Bulletin of Information

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Bulletin of Information
Bulletin of
Information
2011–2012
Bulletin of Information
Table of Contents
05 General Information
07 Miriam College Mission-Vision
Higher Education Unit Mission-Vision
57 Student Services
and Facilities
59 First Year Development Program
08 History
60 Guidance Program
09 Miriam College Institutional
Core Values
10 Key Result Areas
The Campus Ministry Office
for Spiritual Development
61 Facilities
11 Consortium of Women’s Colleges
12 International Partnerships
and Linkages
14 Advocacy Centers
16 Special Centers
19 Admission and
Registration Policies
21 Admission Policies
23 Admission Procedures
for Local Applicants
24 Admission Procedures
for Foreign Applicants
26 Language Requirement
Scholarship and Financial Aid
28 Student Registration
35 Academic Policies
37 Classification of Students
38 Student Load
Student Assessment
69 Student Programs
and Activities
71 Student Council
Miriam College COMELEC
72 Co-Curricular Organizations
74 Extra-Curricular Organizations
76 Student Publications
79 Undergraduate Programs
81 College of Arts and Sciences
149 College of Business, Entrepreneurship,
and Accounting
199 College of Education
217 College of International, Humanitarian,
and Development Studies
245 Academic Areas
265 College Directory
39 Class Attendance
265 Board of Trustees
41 Examinations
266 President’s Council
Grading and Reporting
44 Students’ Evaluation of the Learning
Situation (SELS)
Tutorial Classes
45 Summer Classes
46 Maximum Residence
The Standards Deciding Body
Retention and Discontinuance of Study
50 General Requirements for Graduation
52 General Policies
53 Tuition and Other School Fees
267 Advocacy Centers
Special Centers
268 Deans, Associate Deans,
and Administrators
269 Faculty
Table of Contents
General
Information
Table of Contents
The Miriam College
Institutional Vision-Mission
Vision Statement
Miriam College is a premier Filipino Catholic institution of learning that forms leaders in
service who combine competence with caring, are rooted in Filipino culture and Asian
tradition, and yet are citizens of the world.
Miriam College, by integrating the work of education with the life of faith, develops
persons, particularly girls and young women to build the Filipino nation and to be co-creators
of God’s kingdom on earth.
Miriam College is committed to excellent academic programs infused with Christian
values enhanced by modern technology and enriched by national and international linkages.
Finally, Miriam College commits itself to creating and living within our school community
the very changes we seek to realize in society.
Mission Statement
Miriam College, in partnership with families and the community provides quality and
relevant Christian education that prepares students to become effective leaders, lifelong
learners, and productive citizens.
It offers excellent programs at the basic, tertiary, post graduate and adult education levels
through learner-centered, value-integrating, research-based and innovative approaches.
Higher Education Unit
Vision-Mission
Vision Statement
The College Unit of Miriam College is a leading institution of higher learning for women.
It offers excellent and values-oriented academic programs that prepare young people for
productive and relevant careers that serve the needs and aspirations of the Filipino people
and the global environment.
It develops persons who are professionally and socially responsive Christians engaged
in shaping a just and humane society in the context of a changing global environment.
Mission Statement
Miriam College (College Unit), guided by a progressive leadership and supported by a
competent and self-directed staff, is committed to the development of effective women leaders,
who are active agents in social change and in the building and shaping of the Filipino nation
and the world.
It provides tertiary level education that integrates theory and social practice through
values‑oriented, student-centered, and technology-infused approaches.
As a community, we aim:
• To work together as a team to enhance our efficacy as persons and professionals towards
quality programs and services to promote ideals of truth, justice, peace and the integrity
of creation.
• To uphold the value of peace, democracy and human rights in educating our students
to become responsible and proactive citizens of the country.
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Table of Contents
History
Our History
The story of Miriam College dates back to 1926 when the Archbishop of
Manila, then Reverend Michael O’ Doherty, requested the Sisters of the
Maryknoll Congregation in New York to initiate a teacher-training program
for women in the Philippines. In an old remodeled Augustinian Convent in
Malabon, Rizal, the Malabon Normal School was established. The school
transferred sites several times until finally in 1952, with its name officially
changed to Maryknoll College, it laid down its permanent roots in Diliman
(or Loyola Heights), Quezon City.
A long period of stability and growth followed. Maryknoll College
expanded its programs from training teachers to the formation of women
leaders, thus a liberal arts college was developed. The school grew in student
population, in programs, services and reputation, justifiably achieving
recognition as a school where academic excellence, communication skills,
competence, individuality and social responsibility were developed
in its students.
Its graduates have distinguished themselves in various professions.
Several have been cabinet secretaries, legislators, accomplished businesswomen,
entrepreneurs, educators and leaders of government and non-governmental
organizations. To date, nineteen alumnae have been selected as
“The Outstanding Women in the Nation’s Service” (TOWNS) awardees.
After Vatican II, the Maryknoll congregation began to evaluate its work,
not only in the Philippines but worldwide, in the light of their original
apostolate as a missionary order. In the 60’s, the Maryknoll congregation
saw the readiness of the Filipino laity to continue the educational mission
they had started. In 1977, the ownership and management of the school were
turned over to lay administrators. In accordance with the agreement, the
name Maryknoll was to be changed to pave the way for the promotion of the
school’s unique identity, distinct although not disconnected from the identity
of the Maryknoll sisters. In 1989, after a series of consultations, Maryknoll
College was re-named Miriam College.
To meet the challenges of the times, Miriam College has expanded its
course offerings and set up four major centers for curriculum development,
research and community outreach – the Environmental Studies Institute,
the Center for Peace Education, the Women and Gender Institute and the
Institutional Network for Social Action.
Miriam College is committed to the values of truth, justice, peace
and the integrity of creation.
Truth
We believe in the power of knowledge and the liberating force of truth.
We commit ourselves to the systematic and scientific search for truth and to
fairness and openness in its pursuit. We reject all forms of deceit, falseness
and dishonesty. We strive for the highest quality of intellectual and academic
output at the same time that we recognize and value the wisdom of the heart.
Miriam College
Institutional
Core Values
Justice
We believe that all human beings should be equally blessed to be responsible
for and to enjoy the fruits of knowledge-generation and social progress. We
commit ourselves to a society where power and opportunity are equally
shared and where the “naked are clothed and the hungry are fed.” We reject
discrimination of any kind against any individual or any group. We strive
for and support a diverse and interdependent human community in which
people’s rights, welfare and empowerment are centrally valued.
Peace
We believe that God has called us to be peace-builders. We also believe
that peace means the absence of violence as well as the presence of values,
attitudes, behavior and ways of life based on non-violence and respect for the
fundamental rights and freedom of every person. We reject violence of every
form and in every social interaction and all institutions. We are committed to
work for creative and constructive ways of solving conflict and to foster caring
and loving relationships among all human beings and between humans and
the rest of creation.
Integrity of Creation
We believe that God has called us to be stewards of all creation and that the
well-being and happiness of future generations rest upon sustainable and
equitable systems and processes of production and consumption. We reject
destruction of the environment and waste of natural resources. We commit
ourselves to care for the earth and to practice a lifestyle that sustains the
health of the planet on which all life depends.
College Name
“Miriam” is the Aramaic name with which Mary, our Blessed Mother and the
school’s patron, was called in her lifetime. “Miriam” is also a fitting reminder
and tribute to Sr. Miriam Thomas Thornton, M.M., who devoted 50 years of
service to Maryknoll College.
Fr. Bernardo Perez, OSB, once reflected that the name “affirms in word
what has long been established in fact: namely, that an excellent leading
Catholic School founded and administered by religious continues to be an
excellent leading Catholic School administered by lay persons.”
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Table of Contents
Key Result Areas
Miriam College fulfills its vision and mission through achievements in
four key areas – 4 P’s
Program
Miriam College will continue to focus on maintaining high academic
standards in all levels and areas, and developing innovative, relevant and
student-centered programs that address multiple intelligences and are
supported by solid research.
People
To ensure the successful delivery of the school’s various programs and
services, Miriam College will focus on achieving a high performing
organization by developing and recruiting competent, caring, efficient and
effective administrators, faculty, and staff
For our students, we want to provide a transformative experience, bringing
them to a higher level of intellectual, physical, spiritual, emotional and
cultural growth from admission to graduation, while providing them with the
necessary skills and competencies needed by the industry. Emphasis is placed
on the crucial role of our parents and alumni as partners in the development
of the institution.
Processes & System
Miriam College will focus on instituting effective and efficient policies,
processes and systems aligned with the needs of the organization,
its students, employees and partners.
It will intensify collaboration among academic units, advocacy and special
centers and offices and establish open lines of communication within and
between the institution and its relevant publics.
Physical Plant and Resources
Rationale
The Consortium of Women’s Colleges (CWC) is a collaboration and
cooperation of three women’s colleges in Metro Manila, namely: Assumption
College, Makati; Miriam College, Quezon City; and St. Scholastica’s
College, Manila; whose main thrust is to achieve more efficiently common
educational goals and objectives. Noted for their respective distinct charisma,
vision‑mission, and academic programs in the country, the CWC puts
premium on the principle of interconnectedness for the maximization of
resources, both human and material, as against duplication of efforts and
competitiveness in the field of education.
The Consortium of
Women’s Colleges
Vision-Mission
The CWC envisions a community of Catholic educational institutions
united by a commitment to excellence through the dynamic integration
of knowledge, culture and faith.
The CWC forms women leaders who are confident and steadfast in their
Christian values, joyful and compassionate in their leadership and dedicated
and competent in their service.
The CWC commits to the renewal of women’s education through
innovative collaboration, synergetic lay-religious partnership and courageous
advocacy for the empowerment of women and the transformation of society.
Consortium Program
Cross-Enrollment
In a consortium agreement, a student may enroll and take a subject in another
school if said subject is either not offered in her home school or in conflict
with her schedule for the semester. This unique arrangement provides both
the school and students an efficient way of addressing common problems
such as back subjects, which generally lead to the delay in the completion of
academic requirements for graduation.
Miriam College will work to ensure that Miriam College is an exemplar
of a Green Lifestyle, while maintaining an environment that is conducive
to teaching, learning and research.
Procedure for Cross-enrollment:
To meet the enrollment goals, it will continue to innovate and introduce
new recruitment strategies to attract more students at all levels. The strategic
management of our resources for sustained operations and growth continues
to be a priority.
2. Fill out the form in triplicate.
1. Secure three (3) copies of the Consortium Cross-Enrollment Authorization
Form from the Registrar’s Office of the Home School.
3. Present the accomplished Consortium Cross-Enrollment Authorization
Form to the Department Chairperson for endorsement and the Registrar
and College Dean for approval.
4. Bring the three (3) copies of the approved Consortium Cross-Enrollment
Authorization Form to the Registrar and Academic Dean/College Dean
of the Host School for acceptance.
5. Pay accounts (Host School’s rate) at the Host School.
6. Submit the approved Consortium Cross-Enrollment Authorization Form
to the Registrar’s Office of the Host School to secure Registration Form/
Class Cards (whichever is applicable).
7. Submit Blue Form to the Registrar’s Office of the Home School.
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International
Partnerships and
Linkages
Networks (Miriam College as an Institutional Member)
• Association of Christian Universities and Colleges in Asia
• Association of Southeast and East Asian Catholic Colleges and Universities
• International Association of University Presidents
• International Federation of Catholic Universities
• Network of Asian Women’s Universities and Colleges
• Thabyay Education Network
• United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia
3. Internship Programs
Miriam College welcomes office-based, field, and academic research
interns. Through its various offices, advocacy centers, and external partner
organizations, this three to six-month program is directed at providing
hands-on experience and training in various fields. Currently, the internships
are financially supported by the applicants and/or external grants they are
able to secure. As host, MC-IPPO coordinates with the base institution
of the applicants.
4. Study Tours and Short-Term Programs
• Dominican University of California, United States of America
Study tours and short-term programs are designed to suit the specific needs
of a group of participants seeking alternative learning opportunities.
The programs are designed to encourage learning outside of the formal
classroom approach and expose participants to the various cultures,
social institutions, languages, and everyday practices of a given country
or community.
• Ehwa Women’s University, Korea
5. Conferences/Trainings/Seminars/Workshops
• Georgian Court University, United States of America
Given the Miriam College thrust built on developing lifelong learners,
MC‑IPPO encourages students, professional staff, and faculty to join
international conferences, training activities, seminars, and the like.
Potential participants need to express their willingness to join these activities
by fulfilling the requirements and initiating the application process, while
MC‑IPPO can facilitate and provide support, such as (but not limited to):
directing participants to individuals or organizations that offer financial aid
within and outside of MC, and/or advisement on the application procedures.
• University Mobility in Asia and the Pacific
Partner Universities (with Signed Agreements)
• Catholic University of Korea
• Kobe College, Japan
• Ming Chuan University, Taiwan
• Pukyong National University, Korea
• Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia
• Seisen University, Japan
• Soegijapranata Catholic University, Indonesia
• Solbridge International School of Business , Korea
6. Special Projects
• Srinakharinwirot University, Thailand
MC-IPPO provides the institution with support in the undertaking of various
international events initiated by its different units, academic departments,
centers and offices. Some recent projects include the Action Research Training
with Southeast Asian Scholars and Advocates, Gender and Macroeconomics
Intensive Training Program, and the International Conference of Learning
& Teaching, all of which were held and hosted by Miriam College.
• University of Delaware, United States of America
• University of Hildesheim, Germany
• University of Slamet Riyadi, Indonesia
• Whitireia Polytechnic, New Zealand
Programs of International Partnerships
and Program Office (IPPO)
1. Scholarships
Miriam College collaborates with a number of local and international
scholarship organizations to provide women and men quality formal
education and relevant life-long learning opportunities. Academic
scholarships are given to deserving students, professional staff, and
faculty, who exhibit outstanding performance in their chosen academic
field. Scholarship applicants are also evaluated based on their adherence
to Miriam College core values.
2. Academic Exchanges
For the inbound track, the academic exchange program allows international
students and faculty to experience studying in Miriam College and in the
Philippines for a semester or a year, taking subjects and earning grades from
their respective academic units.
For the outbound track, this program opens opportunities for MC students
to spend a semester or a year in any of the partner schools of Miriam College
overseas. The grades earned from the subjects taken abroad will be sent back
to Miriam College for credit.
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Advocacy Centers
Center for Peace Education
The Center for Peace education (CPE) institutionalizes and strengthens
the peace education thrust of Miriam College through faculty training,
curriculum development, and student development programs. The center also
helps promote the culture of peace in the larger society by sharing the school’s
charisma, knowledge and experience with other groups and educational
institutions through its workshops. CPE is active in many local and global
peace networks doing education and advocacy.
Environmental Studies Institute
The Environmental Studies Institute (ESI) is a center for excellence for
environmental studies and education that envisions the development of
citizens and leaders respectful of the sacredness of creation and who will
work for an ecologically sound empowerment, equitable economic growth,
and people employment as pillars of sustainable development. It consolidates
the academic, outreach and research environmental programs of the
institution.
ESI offers programs with a strong values-education component the
institute’s research projects provide knowledge and situations in the field,
while its training and outreach programs, done in partnership with various
organizations, seek to mobilize citizen’s involvement in environmental
protection. ESI also serves as a resource center for information and
networking.
Institutional Network for Social Action
The Institutional Network for Social Action (INSA), as the school’s center
for volunteerism and social development, develops among members of the
community the value of service and solidarity with the poor. In its partner
urban poor communities, INSA helps build the capabilities of local leaders,
including the youth, towards community development. INSA also managers
the school’s volunteer service groups: the Miriam Volunteer Mission for
alumni, and the Gurong Lingkod for teachers.
Lifelong Education and Development Center
The Miriam College Lifelong Education and Development (LEAD) Center,
makes the school’s accumulated wealth of knowledge and experience
available to lifelong learners in the Philippines and in the Asian region.
Through flagship programs aimed at personal and professional growth,
leadership and citizenship, the LEAD Center aims to contribute to economic
growth, human development, social justice and democracy.
2. Forms of Engagement
a. Advocacy and Action Research b. Resources and Knowledge Management c. Training and Capacity Building d. Networking
Linggap Bulilit
Linggap Bulilit, which means “to care for little children,” is Miriam College’s
educational outreach for the poor children in barangay day care centers.
The goal of the program is to help prepare these children for the “big school,”
that is, to equip them with the skills, knowledge and values that are necessary
to survive the demands and challenges of elementary school and beyond.
To reach this goal, Linggap Bulilit trains community-based teachers and
volunteers, most of whom have no formal training in education, specifically
in early childhood education. This is why at the heart of Linggap Bulilit
is teacher‑training intended to help them perform the enormous task of
educating young hearts and minds.
As an innovation, Miriam College is introducing Linggap Bulilit on
Wheels. The central concept is to bring a mobile library to day care and
pre-school children. Linggap Bulilit on Wheels aims to cultivate the love for
reading among young children. Through this project, Miriam College experts
and volunteers will conduct storytelling sessions and other fun activities in
barangay day care centers and public pre-schools.
Women and Gender Institute
The Women and Gender Institute (WAGI) promotes women’s human rights
and gender equality within and outside Miriam College. It heads the school’s
Gender Main streaming Committee, which leads all activities on women
workshops, runs tow regular summer courses on International Women’s
Human Rights and Gender-Fair education, and convenes the Annual Young
Women’s Leadership Conference. It plays a dynamic role in several local and
foreign women’s networks and is also a research hub, publishing numerous
works on gender analysis and women’s studies.
Outside the school, WAGI works with others in achieving women’s
empowerment and gender-fair relations within institutional environments
that respect democracy, human rights, accountable governance, and peoplecentered development.
Inside the campus, it strengthens the school’s social equality values
through the mainstreaming of gender issues and concerns in both academic
and non-academic programs and activities.
1. Program Themes
a. Citizenship, Leadership and Democracy
b. Institutional Advocacies
c. Peace, Security, Interfaith Dialogue
d. Environment and Sustainable Development
e. Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment
f. Social Justice and Freedoms
g. Life Cycle Challenges and Opportunities
h. Personal and Professional Growth and Development
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Special Centers
Ballet Center
Growth and Upgrading Resource Office
For over 20 years, Miriam Ballet has been training classical performing artists.
Through its outreach programs, they are able to spread the world of ballet
and promote Christian values to the under privileged through dance. Its
graduates have been accepted into prestigious ballet companies such as the
UP Filipiniana, Ballet Philippines and the Philippine Ballet Theater.
The Growth, Upgrading and Resource Office (G.U.R.O.) is a teacher training
center offering professional development programs to the Miriam College
faculty and to external groups and individuals.
The following Technique Classes are offered:
• Classical Ballet
• Baby Ballet
• Children’s Ballet
• Adult Ballet
• Partnering Class/Pax de deux
We bring the resources of Miriam College to the service of public
and private schools as well as local government and low-income
partner communities as part of the institution’s response to the needs
of Philippine education.
Our programs are needs-based, well-organized, research-based, and
culture-responsive. Our office is capable of designing, implementing, and
evaluating teacher training programs in the core learning areas as well as
specialized topics, for teachers at different levels, on-site and off-site, and
using different delivery systems to suit different learning styles.
• Teachers’ Training Workshops
• Boys Class, Variation Class
Integrated Lifestyle and Wellness Center
• Pointe Class
To address the total wellbeing of its employees, Miriam College established
the Integrated Lifestyle and Wellness (ILAW) Center in 2006. The center,
which is allied with the school’s Human Resources Division, provides
programs and services that aim to educate, promote, and provide holistic
health among the school’s employees.
• Modern Jazz and Contemporary Dance
Center for Applied Music
In 1954, then Maryknoll President Miriam Thomas Thornton granted Ms.
Gregoria Cayco permission to teach piano at the school which was then still
located along Pennsylvania St. (now Leon Guinto) in Manila.
Through the years, it has expanded in scope and size from an initial
offering of piano lessons to that which includes a variety of other musical
instruments and voice instruction. Thus was born the Miriam College Center
for Applied Music.
Today, the Center for Applied Music continually strives to be innovative
in its programs by constantly updating and upgrading its facilities, services
and course offerings that reflect the changing musical needs and persuasions
of our esteemed students. We are the only academic institution in the
Philippines affiliated with the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music,
a London–based leading authority on musical assessment which our selected
students take every year to certify their international standing.
An integrated approach is espoused in ILAW Center, which encompasses
the physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual wellness of the individual.
In Filipino, ILAW means light - a source of energy that can transform or create
power and wellness, hence the center’s name.
The ILAW Center was made open to the public since July, 2007. Its services
include individual counseling, psychological assessment, group therapy,
therapeutic massage, manicure, pedicure, vidoeke, and seminar-workshops
on various topics, such as enjoying mid-life, anger management, caring for
aging loved ones, creative solo parenting and talks on fatherhood, among
others. The Center also houses a gym for cardiovascular conditioning and
a massage clinic, which are open five days a week. Weekly cardiovascular
activities such as Yoga, Zumba, Aerobics, and Ballroom Dancing, among
others are also offered.
Our Programs
Language Learning Center
Students who complete a year of study perform in a culminating activity at
the end of each school year, held at the La Porte Hall of the Center for Applied
Music. A concert venue that accommodates a seating capacity of 200 persons,
the hall is acoustically sound thereby complementing the 2 full concert grand
pianos housed in the theater.
“Building Bridges Through Languages”
• Piano
The Language Learning Center is a special center of Miriam College under
the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. It provides quality
instructional services to male and female, local and international students,
teachers, and other professionals to learn English and other foreign languages
to develop or enhance their proficiency in their communication skills.
• Voice
• Strings
• Winds
• Theory
• Ensemble Classes
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Table of Contents
Admission
and Registration
Policies
Table of Contents
Admission
Policies
Guidelines for Incoming First Year College Students
The following students are qualified to apply as an incoming first year
college student:
1. Fourth year high school graduating students
2. High school graduates not enrolled in a four-year course in any college
or university
3. PEPT-NFE-ALS Certified students
Guidelines on Transfer Students
Transferees may be admitted to Miriam College if they meet the following
requirements:
1. Have satisfactory academic performance.
2. Have favorable recommendations from their previous school prior
to application to Miriam College.
3. Have not been classified as incoming junior or senior upon evaluation by
the Registrar to qualify for at least five (5) semesters residence at Miriam
College prior to graduation.
4. Meet the required admission score which is the aggregate of their grade
average from their previous school and their entrance test score.
5. In the case of applicants who were enrolled in several schools prior
to application at Miriam College, they must possess above average
academic records and have favorable recommendations from all
the schools attended.
6. Obtain favorable interview ratings from the Admissions Officer.
The admission procedure for transfer students is the same as those of
incoming first year students.
The guidelines for crediting subjects of transferees are as follows:
a. Submit the latest Transcript of Records (duly signed by the Registrar
of the previous school) to the Admissions Office.
b. Only General Education subjects can be credited.
c. Syllabus of the subject to be credited should be presented.
d. Subject content and description should be similar and number of units
should be the same as in Miriam College.
e. Grade should not be lower than 87% or its equivalent.
f. A validating exam, oral or written, may be given when necessary.
g. Units earned five (5) years ago will not be credited unless transferee
is pursuing a second degree.
h. Contemporary Moral Issues (T-103) and NSTP 1.1 will have to be taken
in Miriam College.
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Table of Contents
Admission
Policies
Guidelines on Foreign Applicants/Students
1. Extension of Stay as a Foreign Student
In the event the principal loses his status under any of the admission
categories listed above, the student shall apply for the change/conversion
of her admission status to that of a student.
Request for the extension of stay as a foreign student in Miriam College
is subject to the submission of the following requirements:
Former Filipinos who acquired foreign citizenship are required to get
a Special Study Permit from the BI, or can apply for an immigrant visa.
a. Duly accomplished application form
b. Two pieces 2 × 2 in. pictures
c. Photocopy of the photo, date and stamp of the latest arrival pages of
the passport of the student or Certificate of Identity (CI) for those from
Hong Kong; and the passport itself; for first extendees. For the second
and succeeding extensions, the stamp of visa arrival on the passport
is no longer required.
d. Transcript of records, properly sealed for first extension
e. Grades of the previous semester.
f. Photocopy of ACR, CRTS and 9(F) visa stamps on the passport
for first extension.
g. Explanation in case the student took less than the required normal
load per semester (15 units for undergraduate students and 12 units
for graduate students) with Registrar’s confirmation.
h. Explanation in case of failures, incomplete, dropped or withdrawals
of two or more subjects equivalent to six or more units with
Registrar’s confirmation.
For online application: Log on to http://sdms.mc.edu.ph
For walk-in:
1. Secure and fill out the college application slip with two (2) pieces recent
2 × 2 in. picture (with white background) at the Admissions Office.
For Transferees: Please submit copy of grades and must undergo
interview with the Admissions Officer.
2. Pay the NON-REFUNDABLE application fee at the Cashier’s Office.
3. Go back to the Admissions Office and present the official receipt to claim
the examination permit, and application kit (which includes application
form, secondary school record form and recommendation forms.
4. Submit the completed forms (application kit) on the specified deadline.
5. Take the entrance test on the scheduled date. Bring your High School
ID card.
Miriam College submits these documents to the Bureau of Immigration for
approval under a cover letter written on the school’s official letterhead, signed
by the Registrar, and stamped with the school’s official dry seal.
6. Check the list of successful applicants that will be posted on the
Admissions Office Bulletin Board or on the Miriam College website at
www.mc.edu.ph two to three weeks after taking the exam. The applicant
will also be notified thru SMS.
2. Foreigners Exempted from Securing Student’s Visa
and Special Study Permit
7. If applicant is accepted, pay the non-refundable confirmation fee
and submit other requirements:
The following students are exempted from securing Student’s Visa or Special
Study Permit: the principals, spouses and unmarried dependent children
below 21 years old of the following:
a. Original NSO copy of Birth Certificate
b. Baptismal Certificate (photocopy)
a. Immigrants (permanent foreign residents)
c. Medical certificate from Miriam College’s Doctor
b. Aliens with valid working permits under either Sections 9(D) or 9(G)
or 47(A)(2) of the Philippine Immigration Law of 1940, as amended
d. Original fourth year card (F138), if an incoming first year student or
honorable dismissal, if a transferee student.
c. Personnel of foreign diplomatic and consular missions residing
in the Philippines
d. Personnel of duly accredited international organizations residing
in the Philippines such as, but not limited to the Asian Development
Bank, International Rice Research Institute, and specialized agencies
of the United Nations.
e. Aliens who have valid Special Investor’s Resident Visa (SIRV)
f. Aliens who have valid Special Retiree’s Resident Visa (SRRV)
g. Foreign students coming to the Philippines with 47(A)(2) visas issued
pursuant to existing laws, e.g. PD 2021
Students should present passport and other necessary documents
to prove exemption.
Admission
Procedures for
Local Applicants
8. Enroll on the scheduled date and attend the First Year Students’
Orientation.
Deaf students who passed the Miriam College Admissions criteria can
enroll in the course of their choice and follow the enrollment procedure with
the regular students. Those who do not must go through the Associate in
Computer Technology program before enrolling in the regular 4/5 – year
degree course of their choice.
Admission Requirements for BS Accountancy
A student should have an entrance examination score of at least 75 in both
English and Mathematics in the MC Entrance Test to be accepted in the
BSA program.
Notes: Children already enrolled before their marriage and/or before
reaching the age of 21 shall be allowed to finish their studies without
the need to secure student visa or special study permit as long as their
principals remain in the country.
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Admission
Procedures for
Foreign Applicants
The admission of foreign students to Philippine colleges and universities
is guided by Executive Order 285 (dated September 4, 2000). The student
applies in writing and secures pertinent application forms from the
Admissions Office.
Foreign student who studied or are currently studying
in the Philippines:
Foreign applicant who studied or currently studying abroad:
Foreign applicants are required to submit the following:
1. Two (2) original copies of Transcript of Records duly authenticated by the
Philippine Foreign Service Establishment located at the student’s country
of origin or legal residence
2. Notarized Affidavit of Support including bank statement
1. Submit plain photocopy of the applicant’s passport showing applicant’s
bio-page, admission stamp and authorized stay.
2. Secure and fill out the college application slip with two (2) pieces recent
2 × 2 in. picture (with white background) at the Admissions Office.
a. For Transferees: Please submit copy of grades and must undergo
interview with the
b. Admissions Officer.
3. Pay the NON-REFUNDABLE application fee of one hundred dollars
(U$100) or its equivalent in Philippine peso at the Cashier’s Office.
4. Go back to the Admissions Office and present the official receipt to claim
the examination permit, and application kit (which includes application
form, secondary school record form and recommendation forms.
5. Submit the completed forms (application kit) on the specified deadline.
6. Take the entrance test on the scheduled date. Bring your High School
ID card.
7. Check the list of successful applicants that will be posted on the
Admissions Office Bulletin Board or on the Miriam College website
at www.mc.edu.ph two to three weeks after taking the exam.
The applicant will also be notified thru SMS.
8. If applicant is accepted, pay the non-refundable confirmation fee
and submit other requirements:
a. Original NSO copy of Birth Certificate
b. Baptismal Certificate (photocopy)
c. Medical certificate from Miriam College’s Doctor
d. Original fourth year card (F138), if an incoming first year student
or honorable dismissal, if a transferee student.
9. Enroll on the scheduled date and attend the First Year
Students’ Orientation.
Deaf students who passed the Miriam College Admissions criteria can
enroll in the course of their choice and follow the enrollment procedure
with the regular students. Those who do not must go through the Associate
in Computer Technology program before enrolling in the regular 4/5-year
degree course of their choice.
24 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
3. Submit plain photocopy of the applicant’s passport showing applicant’s
bio-page, admission stamp and authorized stay.
4. Secure and fill out the college application slip with two (2) pieces recent
2 × 2 in. picture (with white background) at the Admissions Office.
For Transferees: Please submit copy of grades and must undergo
interview with the Admissions Officer.
5. Pay the NON-REFUNDABLE application fee of one hundred dollars
(U$100) or its equivalent in Philippine peso at the Cashier’s Office.
6. Go back to the Admissions Office and present the official receipt to claim
the examination permit, and application kit (which includes application
form, secondary school record form and recommendation forms.
7. Submit the completed forms (application kit) on the specified deadline.
8. Take the entrance test on the scheduled date. Bring your High School
ID card.
9. Check the list of successful applicants that will be posted on the
Admissions Office Bulletin Board or on the Miriam College website at
www.mc.edu.ph two to three weeks after taking the exam. The applicant
will also be notified thru SMS.
10.Enroll on the scheduled date and attend the First Year
Students’ Orientation.
Deaf students who passed the Miriam College Admissions criteria can
enroll in the course of their choice and follow the enrollment procedure
with the regular students. Those who do not must go through the Associate
in Computer Technology program before enrolling in the regular 4/5–year
degree course of their choice.
Note: Any foreign student who seeks admission to any Philippine
university or college must present an appropriate Student’s Visa
issued by the Philippine Foreign Service Post in the foreign student’s
country of origin or legal residence. The Special Study Permit issued
by the Philippine Bureau of Immigration is required of foreign students
who enroll in a special course of less than one (1) year.
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Table of Contents
Language
Requirement
Upon acceptance to Miriam College, students who scored 66 and below in
English in the entrance examination are required to take English Plus with
the Language Learning Center and for those who scored 67–70 in English are
required to take Intensive English (E-100).
Financial Aid
Furthermore, non-native speakers of Filipino are required to take
Conversational Filipino (FIL-100 A) and basic Reading and Writing in Filipino
(FIL-100 B) with the Language Learning Center.
1. Grants-in-Aid
The college provides three types of financial aid to students who show need
for assistance in defraying their education expenses.
Tuition and/or general fees grants are given on a yearly basis to students who
meet the following criteria:
A descriptive term mark of P (Passing) or F (Failed) is given to students
at the end of their pre-academic English and Filipino subjects.
a. Demonstrate financial need
A certificate of completion is issued to students upon passing the
pre‑academic English and Filipino subjects. This certification will be
presented to the Registrar when the student enrolls for her regular
English and/or Filipino subjects in the first year curriculum.
c. Very good evaluation and/or substantial contribution
to the Miriam community
b. Admission score/CQPA of at least 3.50
d. Exemplar Behavior
e. The student is expected to complete the specified service hours
in the assigned office in the college, if applicable.
2. Self-Help
Scholarship and
Financial Aid
Miriam College offers a number of scholarship grants to deserving students.
Honor Scholarships
This type of scholarship is awarded on a yearly basis to:
This help offers a limited number of remunerative work opportunities on a
semestral basis to the responsible students to assist them in defraying part
of their college expenses in an emergency situation. The following are the
criteria for acceptance:
a. Demonstrate financial need
b. Admission score/CQPA of at least 3.50
1. First year students who graduated valedictorians
(graduating class with at least 100 students)
2. Upper-class students who are among the top three of their class
and whose CQPA is at least 4.30
3. Top three (3) examinees in the Miriam College Admissions Test (MirCAT)
The honor scholar enjoys a 100% discount on tuition fee.
Athletic/Varsity Scholarships
The college also offers a number of athletic or varsity scholarships. Placers in
athletic auditions for varsity players are granted exemption from the payment
of two (2) units of Physical Education classes for first year and sophomore
students, and two-unit discount for students in the higher years with no PE
classes. Privileges include food allowance during games, varsity uniforms,
transportation to and from the venues of inter-scholastic meets, and insurance
coverage of worth Php 305,000.00 per athlete. The Associate Dean for Student
Affairs and PE Chairperson will coordinate on this matter.
c. Very goof evaluation and/or substantial contribution
to the Miriam community
d. Exemplar Behavior
e. The student is expected to complete the specified service hours
in the assigned office in the college, if applicable.
3. Sister Miriam Thomas Scholarship
This program is designed to broaden the clientele base of the institution
through the extension of scholarships to deserving students who need
assistance in defraying educational expenses. Except for an admission score
of 4.0, the same criteria as the Grant-in-Aid and Self-Help students apply.
4. Banks, Companies, Foundation, and Individuals
They offer scholarships on a yearly basis to deserving students who meet
the same criteria as the Grant-in-Aid and Self-Help.
Note: Grantees of financial aid are expected to render certain hours of
service each semester to the college. The service is structured so as to
extend assistance to the college staff particularly during the critical
periods of registration, examinations, graduations, and others. It is
directly under the supervision of the Office of Associate Dean for
Student Affairs.
Release of Financial Aid application forms is every second to third week of
March and is available at the HEU Admissions Office.
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Student
Registration
Rules of Registration
(2008 Manual of Regulations for Private Schools, section 84)
The enrolment of student/s in every private school shall be held during the
registration days indicated on the approved calendar. It shall be conducted
in accordance with pertinent procedures of the institution and is subject
to the following rules:
1. The enrolment or registration is for the entire term, i.e., semester, trimester.
2. A student may enroll after the lapse of the registration period specified
in the school calendar and be admitted in accordance with the reasonable
rules of the institution for late enrolment but which in no case shall
exceed two (2) weeks after the opening of classes. Thereafter, no further
enrolment shall be allowed.
Enrolment Procedures
There are two ways by which students can enroll in Miriam College.
These include (1) internet enrolment which may be done at home or outside
the campus, and (2) on-site campus enrolment.
1. Internet enrolment
To avoid long queues within the campus on regular enrolment days,
Miriam College recommends internet enrolment and payment, during
the enrolment period. Irregular students should undergo advising by
the Department Chairperson before they can register. In case the student
needs to enroll in English Plus, then she needs to register for English Plus
before paying the fees.
Payment of tuition and other fees can be done using the following
payment options:
3. After enrolment, the transfer of a student to another institution is
discouraged, especially when the student is expected to graduate during
the academic year.
• Payment to Miriam College Cashier
4. A student may transfer to another institution during the school term,
provided the consent of both institutions concerned is obtained.
• Online Payment
5. No student shall be accepted for enrolment unless s/he presents
the proper school credentials on or before the enrolment period
for the school term.
6. A student is deemed officially enrolled after s/he has submitted her/his
appropriate admission or transfer credentials, made an initial payment of
his/her tuition and other fees to the institution, and was allowed to attend
classes by the institution.
7. For purposes of enrolment, the name and other personal data or
circumstances of each student as indicated in her/his birth certificate
or alien certificate of registration, where applicable, shall prevail.
Policies and Guidelines
Students who have been cleared of all entry, property, and financial
accountabilities are the only ones allowed to enroll for the succeeding semester.
• Credit Cards
• Over-the-Counter Bank Payment
Student gets a new ID card (for new students), or validation sticker
(for old students).
2. On-Site Campus Enrolment
Enrolment is also conducted on-line inside the campus on specific dates
provided by the Registrar’s Office. While students are required to register
personally, the Registrar on a case-to-case basis allows registration by
proxy. Irregular students should undergo advising by the Department
Chairperson before they can register. The steps are as follows:
a. Student gets a number from the guard at the College entrance.
b. Student proceeds to the registration facilitators at the MMJ foyer to get
the pre-numbered enrollment slip. Old students should present their ID
and a printout of their online student clearance; new students should
present their acceptance letter.
In case a student does not have a printout of her online student
clearance, she is asked to go to the Internet Center to have it printed.
Requirements for New Students
c. Student waits at the designated area until her number is called.
As a pre-enrolment requirement, new students are required to request
for access to online registration in the MC Enrollment System.
d. Once her number is called, student proceeds to the Internet Center
and accomplishes the following:
• Logs on to the MC Enrollment System using her/his user ID
and password
• Verifies the subjects/schedules assigned
• Clicks payment scheme (semestral, quarterly, or monthly)
• Clicks “accept” to print the registration/assessment form
• Gets the registration/assessment form from the registration
facilitator and proceeds to the Cashier’s Office and lines up for
payment
In case the student needs to enroll in English Plus, then she needs to
register for English Plus before paying the fees.
• Student gets a new ID card (for new students), or validation sticker
(for old students).
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Table of Contents
Note: No credit is given to any subject not listed in the Registrar’s
copy of the validated registration form, even if such a subject may have
been attended and a grade is earned. At the same time, once a subject
appears in the Registrar’s copy, a student is enrolled in the subject,
whether or not she actually attends classes. Because of these serious
implications, any incorrect entry in the registration form should be
brought to the attention of the Registration Facilitators immediately
before it is printed.
Student
Registration
Payment Options
1. Pay to Miriam College Cashier
Cash or check payment is accepted at the Miriam College Cashier from
Monday to Friday, 7:30 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Please note that postdated checks
are not accepted.
2. Credit Cards
For your payment convenience, Miriam College has established
partnerships with the following:
• Citibank Card – Straight or Paylite
• BPI Express Credit – Straight or Paylite
• Diners Card – Straight
• Metrobank – Straight or Paylite
• BDO – Straight
3. Over-the-Counter Bank Payment
The Bank of the Philippine Islands accepts over-the-counter payment.
The following are the details:
Account Name:
Miriam College Foundation, Inc.
Bank Name:
Bank of the Philippine Islands
Branch:
Katipunan, Quezon City
Current Account No.:
3081-1112-42
Note: A clear, enlarged copy of the validated deposit slip should be
presented to the Cashier for issuance of the official receipt.
The Registration Form with the official receipt (OR) serves as proof
of official enrollment.
4. Online Payment – Bancnet
a. Visit www.bancnetonline.com and go to the Bancnet Online link
b. Select the depository bank
c. Click the I Agree button found in the Terms and Conditions page
l. Details of the transaction will appear on the screen.
Once verified as correct, click OK
m.Print the screen that shows the payment details. This serves as your
transaction record and proof of payment. You may also select the
Transaction Log and print the last ten transactions made using your
ATM card
Note: The printed proof of payment should be presented to the
Cashier’s Office for the issuance of an official receipt.
The Registration Form with the official receipt (OR) serves as proof
of official enrollment.
Changes in the Registration
After the enrolment period, official changes may be made on the student’s
current registration assessment form (RAF) within certain deadlines by
securing a form from the Registrar’s Office for any of the following:
• Request to add/drop a course
• Request to change section of the same course
• Request to change from audit to credit, or vice-versa
Students who have paid the current registration fees are the only ones
allowed to make changes in their registration assessment form. Approval
of these requests is done by the respective Department Chair, College Dean,
and the Registrar. A minimal service fee is charged for such changes.
A revision in the current enrolled courses within the first week of the
semester does not affect the student’s academic record. After this period,
another form is accomplished if a student officially drops a subject. A grade
of “W” (Withdrawn) is indicated in her copy of grades for the semester
(including the Transcript of Records), provided the withdrawal is done
within the deadline stipulated. Students who fail to withdraw a course
are considered officially enrolled and are therefore covered by all provisions
applicable to enrolled students. Thus, a student who unofficially drops or stops
attending her classes will receive an “FA” (Failure due to Absences) mark.
Request for Overload
1. Only graduating students may be allowed an overload or additional
subject load up to a maximum of six academic units in excess of the
normal load prescribed in the curriculum.
2. Upon the endorsement of the Department Chair, approval of the College
Dean, and noted by the Registrar, a graduating student may be allowed
a maximum of nine (9) additional academic load on a case-to-case basis.
d. Choose Payment to start the transaction
e. Using the drop down menu, select Miriam College
as the biller/institution
f. Key-in the bank reference number
g. Key-in the ATM card number and member number (if required)
h. Select the preferred Account Type (Savings or Checking)
i. Key-in the amount that you wish to pay
j. Using the mouse, click on the PIN pad on the right side of the screen
to enter the ATM PIN.
k. Click the Submit button.
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Student
Registration
Course/Major Shifting
1. Application for course/major shifting should be completed within
the deadline set by the Registrar’s office.
2. The student should comply with the required CQPA of the intended
course/major.
3. As a general rule, general education subjects are automatically credited.
Major subjects are credited based on the evaluation of the department
chairperson.
4. A student in an associate program may not shift to a regular Bachelor’s
degree. In this case, the student needs to complete the associate program and
undergo the admission process as entry to the regular Bachelor’s degree.
5. A student may change programs for a maximum of two (2) times
for the duration of her stay at Miriam College.
6. An application for shifting, if and when approved, is effective
the succeeding semester.
7. However, with regard to foreign students, the Bureau of Immigration (BI)
requires that change of programs be referred to it for proper action.
Cross Enrollment
Official credit is given to a student enrolled at Miriam College for work
done during the same term in another educational institution only when
such cross-enrollment has been previously approved by the College Dean,
Registrar, and the Department Chair of the subject concerned.
Only general education subjects may be cross-enrolled. All major subjects
must be taken at Miriam College. No student may cross-enroll in more than
one school during the same term.
Request forms to cross-enroll in another school are available at the
Registrar’s Office. During the summer term, only irregular and incoming
seniors are allowed to cross-enroll in any one of the accredited schools for
subjects not offered at Miriam College. To be credited, students must obtain
a grade of at least 80% or its equivalent in all their cross-enrolled subjects.
32 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Table of Contents
Academic
Policies
Table of Contents
Classification
of Students
Regular Student
Regular student is one who carries the load prescribed in the program
curriculum for the particular year level.
Irregular Student
An irregular student is one who does not carry the load prescribed in the
program curriculum for the particular year level. If at least two subjects differ
from the prescribed curriculum, the student will be classified as irregular.
Normally, the following students acquire an irregular status:
1. Transfer students
2. Students who enrolled in Miriam College in the second semester
3. Students under the AB General program
4. Students on probation, and
5. Students readmitted after taking a leave
Audit Student
An audit student is one who merely sits in but will not earn credit for classes
enrolled. They are allowed to take a limited number of units.
Transfer student
A transfer student is one who has not completed or has completed a degree
from another school. The student may be completing an undergraduate
degree or is taking a second degree at Miriam College.
Visiting Student
A visiting student is a foreign student who is taking units for credit, such as
education units, without leading to a degree. Visiting Students who wish to
become regular students should complete the application process. Their load
is limited to less than that of a regular student.
Non-degree student
A non-degree student is one who has completed an undergraduate degree
and intends to take courses for purposes other than seeking another
undergraduate degree. Their load is limited to less than that of the
regular students.
Cross-enrolled Student
A cross-enrolled student is one who is from another school and is allowed
to take units for credit at Miriam College. Such cross-enrolment should
have the approval of the Registrar from the school where the student is
currently enrolled.
Second Degree Returning Student
A second degree returning student is one who graduated from Miriam
College but wants to return for a second degree. Returning students should
apply at the Admissions Office and with the Department concerned.
Foreign Exchange Student
A foreign exchange student is one who studies at Miriam College under an
approved exchange agreement with a partner university or college in another
country. They may take courses for one full semester or for a maximum of
one academic year.
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Table of Contents
Student
Load
The academic year at Miriam College is divided into two semesters of 18
weeks each. A semester hour or unit of credit is given to satisfactory work in
one class hour a week for one semester. A student must carry a minimum of
twelve (12) semester hours of work to be considered a full-time student.
The maximum load for first-year students is 25 units; for upper-class students,
this varies from 15 to 27 units as prescribed by their respective program
curricula. No student may carry a load exceeding what is prescribed in the
curriculum without permission from the Department Chair, College Dean
and the Registrar.
Absences
The maximum number of absences or cuts that may be allowed
are as follows:
1. Three-unit subject held twice a week for 1½ hours each meeting:
Class
Attendance
a. 1st Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of three meetings
b. 2nd Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of five meetings
c. 3rd, 4th and 5th Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of seven meetings
2. Three-unit subject held once a week for 3 hours each meeting:
a. 1st and 2nd Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of two meetings
b. 3rd, 4th and 5th Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of three meetings
Student
Assessment
Students should keep track of their academic records. The record is basically
a checklist of all general and major course requirements for a particular
degree program. This is designed to help the student keep track of her
academic progress and thereby help her assume responsibility for the
completion of all unit requirements for graduation. Every student is expected
to keep the record throughout her entire college stay and to update the
records every semester in consultation with the Department Chair and the
Registrar. This is done by indicating new courses enrolled each registration
time, and by recording grades and units earned at the end of each term.
Seniors report for final evaluation to the Department Chair during the
first semester after which the Department Chair confers with the Registrar
to confirm deficiencies. Graduating students are held responsible for
correcting deficiencies for graduation.
3. Two-unit subject held once a week for 2 hours each meeting:
a. 1st Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of two meetings.
b. 2nd Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of three meetings
c. 3rd, 4th and 5th Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of four meetings
4. Five-unit science with laboratory subject held twice a week for 4 ½ hours
each meeting:
a. 1st Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum of three
meetings in the lecture part and three meetings in the laboratory part.
b. 2nd Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum of five
meetings in the lecture part and five meetings in the laboratory part.
c. 3rd, 4th and 5th Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of seven meetings in the lecture part and seven meetings in the
laboratory part.
5. Five-unit subject (no lab) held once a week for 5 hours and a five-unit
subject (no lab) held 3 times a week distributed into 1 ½ , 1 ½ , and 2 hours:
a. 1st Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of three meetings in the 1 ½ hour session and two meetings
in the two-hour session
b. 2nd Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum of two
meetings in the 5 hour session, five meetings in the 1 ½ hour session,
and three meetings in the 2 hour session.
c. 3rd, 4th and 5th Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of three meetings in the 5 hour session, seven meetings in the 1 ½ hour
session, and four meetings in the 2 hour session.
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Class
Attendance
6. Six-unit subject held twice a week for 3 hours each meeting:
a. 2 Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of five meetings
Midterm and final examinations are given for each semester. Students are
required to obtain clearance on the dates designated by the Registrar’s office
for each examination period.
b. 3rd, 4th and 5th Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of seven meetings.
Special Final Examinations
nd
7. Six-unit subject held once a week for 6 hours each meeting:
a. 2nd Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of two meetings
b. 3rd, 4th and 5th Year students are allowed to be absent for a maximum
of three meetings.
Note: Upper-class students taking up lower year level subjects shall
abide by the policy on absences for their year level. The allowed
number of absences shall include both excused and unexcused
absences. Students absent due to official functions will not be
marked absent.
Examinations
Special Final Examinations may be of two types:
1. Late examinations given only in cases of illness.
2. Early examinations given only to students who have a CQPA of 3.00
and in cases where the instructor approves the request.
Forms for special examinations are available at the College Dean’s Office.
Since early or late examinations are considered special examinations,
they are subject to fees.
Tardiness
A student is considered tardy if she enters a 1 ½ hour class within the first 15
minutes after the second bell, a two-hour class within the first 20 minutes,
a three-hour class within the first 30 minutes, a five-hour class within the
first 45 minutes, etc. After these time allowances, tardiness is considered
an absence.
Three incidents of tardiness are considered as one absence.
Grading system
Grading at Miriam College is a unique numerical system based on the
principle of quality of work done rather than on average percentage points
acquired. The analysis of quality of performance takes into consideration
the following:
1. Mastery of subject matter as evidenced by exams, recitations, etc.
Overcuts
2. Promptness and good quality of assignments
In cases where the student has incurred an overcut, Section 101 of the 2008
Manual of Regulations for Private Higher Education, shall be followed, to wit:
3. Positive attitude towards learning
Section 101. Student Absences. A student who incurs absences of more than
twenty percent (20%) of the prescribed number of class or laboratory periods
during the school year or term shall fail and earn no credit for the course
or subject except in the instances as follows:
5. Clear and effective written or oral expression
1. When the institution adopts a different attendance policy for students
who belong to the upper half of their classes; and
2. When the institution exempts a student for a just and reasonable ground,
provided however that, the student is not excused from keeping up with
lessons, assignments and examinations. A faculty member may exempt
a student who incurs absences beyond the twenty percent (20%) limit,
but with the approval of proper school authority.
Grading
and Reporting
4. Participation in class work
6. Ability to reason and analyze
7. Other criteria that the teacher may choose to emphasize for his/her
specific subject at the start of the semester
The final grade ordinarily consists of one-third (1/3) of examination work
and two thirds (2/3) of class standing.
In the case of first year students, the First Year Coordinator will take charge
of issuing waivers for overcuts when these are justifiable, such as for reasons
of death in the family, extended illness, and the like. The College Dean will
assess and give exemptions to upper-class students.
The above policies on attendance shall be of universal application.
No individual faculty member can lay down an attendance policy different
from the above.
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Table of Contents
Grading
and Reporting
Computation of Quality Points
Grading System
5.0 (99–100)
Outstanding
4.5 (96–98)
Excellent
4.0 (93–95)
Very Good
3.5 (90–92)
Above Average
3.0 (87–89)
Average
2.5 (84–86)
Below Average
2.0 (81–83)
Fair
1.5 (78–80)
Fair
1.0 (75–77)
Poor
Legend
Only grades in courses taken at Miriam College shall be included in the
computation of the cumulative QPA. Except for E-100, M-100, MC 101, MC 102,
and NSTP 2.1, all grades obtained in academic courses are included in the
computation of the semestral and cumulative QPA for as long as such grades
have been obtained at Miriam College, regardless of the course under which
they were obtained and whether they were credited to the current degree
program or not.
The semestral Quality Point Average (QPA) refers to the weighted average
of grades in all academic courses taken in a given semester, whereas the
cumulative QPA refers to the weighted average of grades in all academic
courses from the first semester in which the student was enrolled up to the
last semester.
A grade, except for “F” or “FA”, is at the same time the quality point of
each unit of subject required for graduation. The Quality Point Average (QPA)
whether for the semester or Cumulative Quality Point Average (CQPA) from
first year is computed as follows:
QPA or CQPA =
P – Passed
åU
F – Failed
Where åQP = sum of QP (quality Points) = (Grade per subject X Units per subject)
U = units per subject
NE – Never Entered
Summer grades are included in the computation of the CQPA for the
current school year and not for the succeeding school year.
W – Withdraw from the Course
FA – Failure due to Absences
INC* – Incomplete
*INC grades must be completed on the deadline specified by the
Registrar’s Office or the grade automatically becomes an “F.”
The grading system also introduces descriptive grades for courses
that do not carry quality points.
Descriptive Grades
Ex – Excellent
VG – Very Good
A student who enrolled in summer classes will be re-evaluated for
retention after the summer grades have been inputted into her CQPA.
Reporting of Student’s Performance
After the midterms, the Registrar’s office sends D-warning letters to the
parents of students who obtained low academic performance in the subject/s
(with grades of 2.0 and below) as assessed by their teacher/s.
At the end of each semester, the Registrar’s office sends the students’
Semestral Report, which includes the student’s grades in each of the currently
enrolled subjects, her QPA, and CQPA for the semester. This report may be
withheld if the student has outstanding accountabilities to the College or has
pending cases.
Students who are cleared of entry, property and financial accountabilities
are allowed electronic access of their semestral grades on the schedule set by
the Registrar’s office.
G – Good
Transcript of Records
S – Satisfactory
A transcript of records is sent, on the student’s request, to any college or
business office. Official transcripts imply a transfer of the permanent record to
another college.
FS – Fairly Satisfactory
W – Withdrawn
FA – Failure due to Absences
Any request for change in grades by students/teachers/parents will be
considered by the Standards Deciding Body if submitted within one year
from the end of the semester/term of the grade in question.
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Bulletin of Information
Transcripts are not allowed to be hand carried by students and thus are
unofficial and do not bear the school seal. Ordinarily, seven (7) working days
are required for the issuance of a transcript, except for the peak months of
March to May, where processing takes at least fourteen (14) working days.
All requests for transcripts should be made in writing. No request over the
telephone is honored. Request forms are secured from the Registrar’s Office.
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Students’
Evaluation of the
Learning Situation
(SELS)
The SELS is an instrument by which students evaluate their teachers.
This is administered every semester for all non-permanent and permanent
faculty at least one week after the midterm examinations. This is an important
source of feedback to the College regarding the teaching-learning process.
As such, students are required to accomplish the SELS, which can be
completed online, guided by the following procedures:
1. Log on to http://sels.mc.edu.ph
2. On the main page, click on the Students link
General Policies
1. Miriam College students may take summer classes only in Miriam
College. If the subject is not offered in Miriam College, the students may
take it from the member schools of the Consortium of Women’s Colleges,
Ateneo de Manila University, University of the Philippines, De La Salle
University and University of Sto. Tomas, upon the recommendation of the
Department Chair of the subject and the approval of the College Dean
and the Registrar.
5. Click on the Log In button to submit the entered credentials
2. The Commission on Higher Education (CHED) requires that no student
may take courses in more than one school during the summer without
prior authorization from the CHED. It also stipulates that a student may
take a maximum load of nine (9) units, or not more than one laboratory
and one lecture course.
6. If this is the student’s first time to use the system, s/he will be prompted
to change her/his password to a new one for security reasons
3. The school reserves the right to dissolve a summer class if it has less than
the minimum number of students for a regular class.
7. Fill out all the required fields and click on the Submit button
4. No student may enroll in an advanced subject without the approval
of the Registrar.
3. On the Student’s Login Page, enter the student ID number and the user ID
4. If it is the student’s first time to use the system, her/his default password
is her/his Student ID
8. Her/his enrolled subjects to be evaluated will be displayed. Click on the
Evaluate button for a subject and teacher to start the evaluation process
9. Completely fill out the evaluation form honestly and objectively
10.To submit the form, click on the Submit button. This process is repeated
until the student has completed the evaluation of all her teachers’ subjects.
11. Log out when the evaluation for all the enrolled subjects or teachers
is completed.
Summer
Classes
Enrollment Requirements for Summer Classes
For students from other schools, a cross-enrollment permit from the home
institution is required. For Miriam College students, attendance in summer
classes is limited only to the following:
1. First Year students who took E-100 and E-101/M-100 and M-101
and who need to take E-102/M-102 to be able to enroll in the next
English/Mathematics course the following school year
2. B.S. Psychology students who would like to enroll in S-107 Lec/Lab
Tutorial
Classes
Policies
1. A maximum of nine units may be enrolled on a tutorial basis.
2. All tutorial classes should be held inside the Miriam College campus.
3. The number of meetings should be determined by the following factors:
a. Nature of the subject—Skills subjects have more meetings
than non‑skills subjects
b. Work plan prepared by the teacher—The teacher should submit
the work plan to the Department Chair
3. B.S. Biology students who need to enroll in S-113, S-125, H-105 or E-110
4. BSA students who need to enroll in H-105, H-104
5. Students who will enroll in NSTP 2.1
6. Students who will take Practicum
7. Irregular students whose appeals have been approved by the Registrar
8. Students who received failing marks (copy of grades should be presented
to prove that the subject was failed).
c. Nature of course requirements­— Course requirements are subject
to the approval of the Department Chair
4. Only graduating students who have remaining subjects not offered
in the semester they wish to enroll in or whose remaining subjects
may not be cross-enrolled, are allowed to enroll in tutorial classes.
5. Other students, who for valid reasons cannot attend regular classes,
may be allowed to enroll on a tutorial basis upon the endorsement
of the Department Chair and the approval of the College Dean.
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Maximum
Residence
A student must complete the requirements of her course within six years or
a residence of twelve semesters for a four-year Bachelor’s degree, seven years
or fourteen semesters for a five-year Bachelor’s degree and three years or six
semesters for an Associate degree. Students who finished an Associate degree
and are pursuing a Bachelor’s degree must also complete the requirements for
both courses in six or seven years. A semester wherein a student withdraws
after the second week of classes is counted toward her residence.
Retention Guidelines
1. An incoming sophomore who does not obtain the minimum retention
CQPA shall be retained on probation and deloaded by 6 units if the CQPA
is from 2.10–2.14 and by 3 units if the CQPA is from 2.15–2.19.
2. An incoming junior who does not obtain the minimum retention CQPA
shall be retained on probation and deloaded by 6 units if the CQPA is from
2.20–2.24 and by 3 units if the CQPA is from 2.25–2.29.
3. An incoming senior who does not obtain the minimum retention
CQPA of 2.40 but whose CQPA is not lower than 2.20 and has only 48
or less remaining units shall be retained. She will be allowed to enroll
a maximum of 12 units per semester until such time that she obtains a
minimum CQPA of 2.40. Only then is the student allowed to enroll the full
load prescribed by her curriculum.
Academic Standards, Policies and Procedures
of Certain Programs
Bachelor of Science in Accountancy
The Standards
Deciding Body
The Standards Deciding Body (SDB) is a decision-making body in Miriam
College that acts on cases pertaining to academic policies and standards.
It is tasked to deliberate and decide on the following cases/appeals:
1. Review of grade
1. Qualifying Grade
a. A BSA student must obtain a term mark of at least 3.0 in all Accounting,
Business Law and Taxation subjects before she will be allowed to enroll
in higher Accounting, Business Law and Taxation subjects.
3. Graduation deliberations (with Department Chairpersons)
b. A student who gets a term mark lower than 3.0 in Accounting, Business
Law or Taxation subjects is allowed to re-enroll the subjects only once.
However, 5th year students will be allowed to re-enroll until they
obtain the required grade.
4. End-of-the-semester deliberation of students who will be dismissed
or placed on probation
c. A student who gets a term mark of “F” in Accounting, Business Law
or Taxation will automatically be disqualified from the BSA program.
2. Change of grade
d. A student must obtain a term mark of at least 2.5 in all English subjects
and 2.0 in Economics, Finance and Math subjects before she will be
allowed to enroll in higher English, Economics, Finance, and Math
subjects. A student who gets a term mark lower than 2.5 in English
or lower than 2.0 in Economics, Finance and Math subjects must retake
the same until she obtains the required grade.
2. Qualifying Examination
Retention and
Discontinuance
of Study
Retention Policies
1. The minimum over-all CQPA for retention in Miriam College
for four‑year, five-year, and two-year courses are:
2.20
2.30
2.40
for incoming Sophomores
for incoming Juniors
for incoming Seniors
A student must take a Qualifying Examination after obtaining the required
term mark in BSA-101 (Fundamentals of Accounting 1) and BSA-102
(Fundamentals of Accounting 2). The student must pass the said examination
before she will be allowed to enroll in the BSA-103 (Financial Accounting 1).
A student is given two (2) chances to pass the Qualifying Examinations;
otherwise, she will automatically be disqualified from the BSA program.
3. CQPA and Major CQPA Requirement
2. Exempted from such requirements are the Deaf students taking up
Associate in Computer Technology or Associate in Culinary Arts.
A student (from 1st year to 3rd year) is required to maintain a CQPA of at least
3.0 in all subjects and a major CQPA at least 3.0. Failure to meet the same will
mean disqualification from the BSA program.
3. A student who fails to obtain the minimum retention CQPA may be
retained on a probationary status. A student who is placed on probation
must obtain the minimum retention CQPA for the next year level after
the period of deloading, or else will be accordingly dismissed.
A student (from 4th year to 5th year) is required to maintain a CQPA of at
least 3.0 in all subjects and a major CQPA at least 3.0. Failure to meet the same
shall merit a careful assessment by the BSA Department Chairperson of the
student’s capacity to continue with the program.
4. No second probation is allowed.
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Retention and
Discontinuance
of Study
Bachelor of Arts Major in Communication
Dismissed Students
The Department of Communication complies with the CHED Memorandum
Order No. 10, series of 2010, “Policies and Standards for Bachelor of Arts in
Communication Program,” Section 18 of the CMO which states that: Students
admitted into the BA in Communication program must maintain a grade
weighted average of at least 2.5 in all major subjects each semester.
Students who have been dismissed from Miriam College because they did not
meet the retention requirements may apply for readmission provided they
satisfy the following requirements:
Bachelor of Arts Major in Psychology
All psychology majors must get a major CQPA (cumulative quality point
average) of 2.4 and above during their second year and onwards [and/or
after finishing the following courses in order to be retained in the Psychology
program: Personality, Statistics for Psychology, Development Psychology,
and Experimental Psychology].
Bachelor of Science Major in Psychology
All psychology majors must get a major CQPA (cumulative quality point
average) of 2.4 and above during their second year and onwards [and/or
after finishing the following courses in order to be retained in the Psychology
program: Personality, Statistics for Psychology, Development Psychology,
and Experimental Psychology].
Students are required to take five-unit courses in biological and
physical sciences.
Bachelor of Arts in International Studies
The program follows the institutional CQPA retention for admission and
retention. The program requires six units of Foreign Language, six units
of Group Thesis, and three units of Summer Practicum or International
Exchange Program.
1. Enrolled and obtained satisfactory academic performance in another
school after Miriam College.
2. With favorable recommendation from their previous school.
3. Obtain favorable interview ratings from the Admissions Officer.
4. Have not been classified as incoming junior or senior upon evaluation by
the Registrar to qualify for at least five (5) semesters residence at Miriam
College prior to graduation.
5. Students who have been out of school for one year or more before applying
for readmission should retake and pass the entrance examination and
meet the required admission score.
6. A dismissed student can be readmitted only once.
Transfer Credentials
Transfer credentials are requested upon a student’s withdrawal from the
College. Any student who has secured her Transfer Credentials may be
allowed to re-enroll, if she meets the criteria for admission of transferees.
Request forms for Transfer Credentials may be obtained from the Registrar’s
Office. Transfer Credentials are issued upon request any time.
Leave of Absence
A request to take a leave of absence from the College may be filed
by students who:
• have a minimum overall CQPA required for retention for each year level:
for Sophomores, 2.20; for Juniors, 2.30; and for Seniors, 2.40
• have good academic standing in the current semester, and
• intend to resume their studies at Miriam College after the date of the
effectivity of the leave, which should not be more than one calendar year
at a time.
Application forms for leave of absence are available at the Registrar’s Office.
Students are requested to attach a letter of request before forms are given.
Readmission
Readmission is open to students who have voluntarily withdrawn from
Miriam but did not file a Leave of Absence and would like to resume their
studies in the school. Such students must meet the required retention CQPA
for their year level at the time of their withdrawal.
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General
Requirements
for Graduation
Minimum Requirements
A Miriam College Degree is awarded to a student who meets all the following
minimum requirements:
1. Filed an application for graduation on the deadline set by the Registrar’s
office every semester.
2. Residence of at least five (5) semesters and completion of at least 90 units
at Miriam College
3. Completion of the specified requirements in the curriculum in which
the student is enrolled,
4. Minimum CQPA of 2.40 at the end of the last semester at Miriam College
Application forms for graduation can be secured from the College Dean and
Registrar offices.
Honors and Awards
1. Dean’s List
A Quality Point Average of 4.30 with no marks below 2.5 for the semester
is the scholastic requirement for the Dean’s List of honor students. Students
must carry a current load of at least 12 units to be eligible for the Dean’s List.
The list is announced the following semester at the Students’ Assembly where
certificates are given to each student in the list.
2. Honors at Graduation
b. Area Award
The Area Award is given to students who earn the highest major CQPA
of at least 4.30 in the Area with no grade below 3.0 in the major subjects
and below 1.0 in all other subjects. However, a student is disqualified
for an Area Award if she earned more than 12 units of her graduation
requirements from other schools or if she finished her degree program
for more than the prescribed number of years.
c. Meritorious Academic Performance Award
This award is granted to student/s of associate courses who earn
the highest major CQPA of at least 4.30 with no grade below 3.0
in major subjects.
d. Mother Mary Joseph Award
This award is given by the College to graduates who are outstanding
from the point of view of Scholastic Achievement, Leadership,
Responsibility and Christian Social Consciousness, and thus have
learned to personalize the College objectives. It is expected that this
will be lived out in different individuals in different manners, and this
is recognized at graduation by means of citations. Upon graduation,
one Mother Mary Joseph awardee is chosen to deliver the Message
to the Graduates.
e. Non-Scholastic Honor
A Loyalty Acknowledgment is given to graduates who have been
continuously enrolled in Miriam College since the first grade.
a. Scholastic Honors
Latin Honors are awarded to students who obtain the following
CQPA at graduation:
Summa Cum Laude
Magna Cum Laude
Cum Laude
4.8500–5.0000
4.6000–4.8499
4.3000–4.5999
The minimum grade requirement in all subjects for the three
Latin Honors is as follows:
Summa Cum Laude
Magna Cum Laude
Cum Laude
Minimum of 3.5
Minimum of 3.0
Minimum of 2.5
For either or both of the following conditions, however, a student
is disqualified for Latin Honors:
if she earned more than 12 units of her graduation requirements from
other schools;
if she finished her course for more than the prescribed number of years.
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Table of Contents
General
Policies
Attire
Tuition and Other School Fees
Students of Miriam College are encouraged at all times to follow those
standards of attire consonant with the dignity of Christian women.
All students must wear the prescribed uniform (material, pattern, length)
in coming to school. For physical education classes, a special uniform
is prescribed. The PE uniform may not be worn in other classes.
Information on tuition, basic and miscellaneous fees for the school year may
be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs at telephone number: 580-5400
local 1147 or via e-mail at [email protected]
Dismissal
Payment may be made by cash, check, Citibank credit card, or by postal
money order made payable to Miriam College and not to “Cash”, or to
individuals in the institution. Out-of-town checks should be drawn against
banks in the Metro-Manila area, if possible. Personal checks are not accepted
for the period of March 1-31, so parents and students are encouraged to settle
accounts before March 1 (if they choose to pay in check). Otherwise, they have
to pay in cash or certified checks. It is understood that parents or guardians
are responsible for the payment of tuition and other expenses of the student.
Students may leave the campus anytime, except when an official activity
is scheduled in which their presence is required. They are enjoined to use
their vacant periods wisely and pursue activities that enrich their college
experience.
Campus Visitors
Social visiting on campus is discouraged. Only persons on official business
who are cleared by the college offices will be permitted entry into the
College Campus.
Student Discipline
At all times, on or off-campus, all Miriam College students are expected to
behave in such a way as to earn greater respect for themselves and for the
College as an educational institution. The College Discipline Committee,
under the Associate Dean for Student Affairs, handles and investigates all
reported major violations.
Emergency Measures
In case of emergency situations, HEU administrators shall implement
the following guidelines:
1. Students and personnel shall be asked to evaluate the building through
the nearest safe exit routes in going to the designated evacuation sites.
An evacuation guide will assist them to evacuate in a quiet and orderly
manner. Emergency floor plans are posted inside the classrooms
and offices.
Mode of Payment
Central Bank Requirement for Foreign Students
Under existing Central Bank regulations, foreign students are required
to meet their school expenses such as tuition fees, matriculation fees,
laboratory fees, books and other fees. These can be paid out of the proceeds
of inward remittances of acceptable foreign currencies that they can exchange
in pesos at any commercial bank or authorized foreign exchange dealers
of the Central Bank. Correspondingly, foreign students are required to submit
evidence of sale of foreign exchange in such amount as necessary to cover
payment of school fees and books as a condition for their enrollment.
Refunds
% of Tuition,
Basic Fees and
Regular Semester
Misc. Fees Refunded
Summer Session
75% of tuition
and fees
If the student transfers or
withdraws within the 1st
week of classes whether
these were attended or not
2. In case students and personnel are stranded on campus during
an emergency situation, arrangements with cafeteria will be made
so that food is available.
If the student transfers
or withdraws within the
first and second day of
classes whether these
were attended or not
50% of tuition
and fees
From 3rd to 8th day
of classes
3. The nurse and emergency team members will be asked to stay during
the emergency period.
After the 1st week to 2nd
week of classes, whether
attended or not
None
After the 2nd week of
classes, whether attended
or not
From 9th to 16th day
of classes
4. During an accident or any emergency situation that needs further
evaluation, the patient will be brought to the nearest accredited hospital
or clinic. Parents or guardians will be notified.
Tuition and Other
School Fees
All Miriam College students are covered by an accident insurance
with Prudential Guarantee and Assurance, Inc.
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Tuition and Other
School Fees
Miriam College refunds payments according to CHED regulations.
1. For dropping all courses, refund is made of tuition and general fees
as follows, assuming that corresponding payments have been made.
The computation is made as of the time of request and is based on
the semestral amount payable.
2. For dropping a subject involving a fee, e.g., science lab, computer lab,
refund will depend on the reasons advanced by the student. Full refund
of fees is made for any course or subject which has been discontinued or
a similar administrative act through no fault of the student. In general,
the following applies:
54 | Miriam College % of Fee Refunded
Regular Semester
Summer Session
75%
Within the 1st week of
classes, whether attended
or not
Within the 1st day
of classes
50%
After the 1st week to 2nd
week of classes, whether
attended or not
Within 1st week of classes
None
After the 2nd week of
classes, whether attended
or not
After 1st week of classes
Bulletin of Information
Table of Contents
Student Services
and Facilities
Table of Contents
First Year
Development
Program
The First Year Development Program (FDP) is a support program that aims
at helping the First Year students imbibe positive attitudes towards studying
in Miriam College.
The program emphasizes an understanding of the school vision-mission
and its core values and how these values can be applied in their school and
personal lives. At the same time, FDP aims to orient the First Year students
on policies which would facilitate their adjustment to Miriam’s academic
and non-academic culture.
To be able to fulfill its objectives, the First Year Development Program
implements a one-unit subject every semester: Miriam College Culture,
Identity and Social Responsibility 1 (MC-101) in the first semester and
Miriam College Culture, Identity and Social Responsibility 2 (MC-102)
in the second semester.
MC-101 consists of a series of orientations on the history, vision‑mission,
values and policies of Miriam College to introduce a Miriam identity to the
students. It also consists of modules that will help students’ adjustment to
college life by enhancing confidence, discipline and social skills.
MC-102 consists of modules prepared and collaborated on by Miriam
College’s advocacy centers that aim to make the students realize that school
life is not only for personal gains but for the development of society. First Year
students are equipped with knowledge and skills to become future women
leaders in service.
The First Year Development Program is headed by the First Year
Coordinator (FC) who is assisted by MC Advisers in the implementation
of MC-101 and MC-102. The FC closely coordinates with the chairpersons,
Guidance office, Student Affairs office and parents for the First Year students’
growth and development.
Attendance and active participation in all MC-101 and MC-102 classes
are required.
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Guidance
Program
At the core of the Guidance Program of Miriam College is the concern to
facilitate and measure each student’s response to the objectives of the College.
The objectives and activities of such a program are thus carefully planned to
provide each student with means to develop and to integrate in the context of
her own needs and resources, all skills with which to respond fully to her role
as a woman in her country.
• Individual Counseling for students who wish to work out personal
concerns more thoroughly. To foster familiarity, an assigned guidance
counselor stays with a batch of students until they graduate.
• The Research and Testing Program aims at administering psychological
tests to individuals or groups to help them understand themselves,
their interests, values, aptitudes, personality traits, potential career,
and job preference.
• Interpretation of guidance tests for all students who have taken the test
individually or by small groups.
• Peer Counseling for students who are open to sharing and discussing
their problems with their peers as facilitated by the year level counselor.
• Career Counseling for all students to explore possible choices for a major,
reinforces vocational decisions, and develop career plans after college.
• Placement information on employment opportunities in various
professional fields. Career seminars and lectures are also given to assist
students in seeking worthwhile jobs in their fields of interest. Annual job
fairs are held to invite prospective employers to the school.
• Counseling Special Groups such as deaf, student parents, foreign students
and scholars to assist them in their adjustment to the difficulties in college.
• Enrichment Talks/Symposia for more in-depth information on issues
of interest to students.
The Campus
Ministry Office
for Spiritual
Development
The Campus Ministry Office envisions the formation and development
of committed Christians. Its mission is to create a faith-filled community,
provide evangelization and formation activities, and, celebrate the faith in
various liturgical gatherings.
Services Offered
The Audio-Visual Office
The Audio-Visual Office operates under the administration of the Library
Media Center Supervisor. Its office is located at the Third Floor of the Sister
Miriam Thomas Hall (SMT Hall)
Facilities
A Satellite Desk can be found at the Second Floor of the Paz Adriano (PA)
Hall. This extension serves the equipment and technical needs of the HEU
classrooms located at the Paz Adriano Hall, Mother Mary Joseph (MMJ)
and the Caritas Hall.
1. Resources
The AV Office maintains and provides an extensive collection
of audio‑visual materials, equipment, and facilities for students,
faculty members, and administrators.
Video Recordings on DVDs and other electronic media may be availed
and used for various class activities.
Activity
Audio-Visual Materials
Viewing symbols/
Illustrations that
represent objects
or events
Overhead Projectors,
Overhead Transparencies,
Multimedia Computers,
Maps, Globes, Molecular
Plasma TVs, DVD Players
Model
with USB port
Watching an event,
object, person or
situation though
some medium
Videos, Motion Picture,
and Documentaries on
DVDs, VCDs and VHS
Actual participation or Music, Songs and Sound
observation of an event Effects on CDs
Related Equipment
DVD Players, Plasma
TV, Sound System,
White Boards
Stage/Platforms, DLP
Projectors, Motorized
Screens, Sound System,
Wireless Mics, DVD
Players
• Retreats and recollections
• Celebration of the Sacraments
»» Holy Eucharist (includes daily and special Masses)
»» Confessions
»» Confirmation (once in every 3 years)
• Formation of Student Volunteers
• Prayer Services & Faith Sharing
• Spiritual Accompaniment
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Facilities
2. Audio-Visual Facilities
Library
The AV Office has four (4) Audio-Visual Rooms or AVRs, four (4) Lecture
Rooms, four (4) Viewing Rooms, a Preview Booth, and a Taping Booth.
In its efforts to provide equal opportunities for everyone, maximize the use
of limited facilities and conserve energy, priority on the use of these facilities
will be given to those who will be utilizing Performances, Simulations,
Electronic Media Viewing and Visual Presentations in their activities.
The primary objective of the HEU Library is to make its services contribute
as effectively as possible to the instructional programs of the various colleges.
It provides students and faculty reference materials and research resources
to supplement classroom activities and encourages students to use various
library resources independently as a means to acquire knowledge.
The following are the various facilities with their available fixtures
and equipment.
Activity
Audio-Visual Facility/
Venue
Available Fixtures/
Equipment
Viewing symbols/
Illustrations that
represent objects
or events
Desktop Computer,
Audio-Visual Rooms (4)
Plasma TVs, Sound
located at PA Hall, 2nd Floor
System, White Boards
Watching an event,
object person or
situation though
some medium
Viewing Rooms (4)
located at SMT Hall,
2nd Floor
The Library is located at the SMT Hall and is administered and staffed by
professional librarians and support personnel. They work with the faculty
in curriculum planning and development and in selecting and evaluating
materials to support the instructional program. They provide the necessary
references and bibliographic services to enable the students and faculty
members to take full advantage of the library’s resources.
1. Library Resources
DVD Players, Plasma
TV, Sound System,
White Boards
a. Print Publications
The HEU Library offers a wide range of resources like books on various
disciplines, periodicals like journals and magazines (print and online);
Online databases; and microfiche collection.
Aside from the general book collections (local and foreign), there are
some books that are classified as Special Collections. These are under
various categories:
• Environmental Studies
• Peace and Global Education
Lecture Rooms (4)
Actual participation or
located at SMT Hall,
observation of an event rd
3 Floor
Stage/Platforms, DLP
Projectors, Motorized
Screens, Sound System,
Wireless Mics, DVD
Players
• Women and Gender Issues
• Social Works and Migration Studies
• Theses and feasibility studies
• Rizaliana collection or books about Dr. Jose Rizal and his works.
• Asian Development Bank Publications
3. Service Hours
• Asian Media Information and Communication Centre
The AV Office maintains the following schedules to be able to serve in the
most efficient and effective manner. These schedules are subject to limitations
under the school’s Academic Calendar.
• Filipiniana Collections
• Access to internet is allowed for academic researching for two hours,
free of charge
Regular Term
Monday
2. Electronic Resources:
8:00 AM–12:00 PM, 1:00 PM–5:00 PM
*The AV Office closes from 12:00 NN–1:00 PM during Mondays.
• ONLINE Public Access Catalog or OPAC or visit
http://www.mc.edu.ph/library/
Tuesday to Friday 7:30 AM–7:30 PM
• CD-ROMs
Saturday
• Academic Search Premiere Online Database
8:00 AM–6:00 PM
Summer and Semestral Break
Monday to Friday 8:00 AM–12:00 PM, 1:00 PM–5:00 PM
*The AV Office closes daily from 12:00 NN–1:00 PM.
During suspension of classes, as declared by the government authorities
or the school administration, the office may revert to an 8:00 AM–12:00 PM
and 1:00 PM–5:00 PM office schedule.
• Psychology and Behavioral Science Online Database
• SocINDEX Online Database
• Environment Complete Online Database
• Business Source Elite Online Database
• Academic Research Search Portal
• Index to Periodical Literature Search Portal
• Consortium of Women’s Colleges Online Electronic Theses
and Dissertations
• HEU-LMC Web Site
• AV Online Reservation of Venues
• Transactions Monitoring System
62 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
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Table of Contents
Facilities
Library Services
Calendar of regular activities
1. Library Orientation – At the beginning of every school year, the library
gives orientation to first and second year students in coordination with
the English department’s faculty members.
2. Referral Services
During semestral breaks and special events, PDO may set special schedules
at the center.
3. Interlibrary use of CEAP and CWC Libraries – Students of member schools
like Miriam College are allowed to use the Consortium of Women’s
Colleges (CWC) and Catholic Educational Association of the Philippines
(CEAP) libraries, free of charge, subject to its library rules and regulations.
IRC is closed to students during school breaks and holidays. This will give
way to regular ICT maintenance and repair services that may be planned
during the period. Notices of special shutdowns are made depending on the
network providers’ schedule of maintenance work during the year.
4. Library Hours
Mondays and Saturdays
8:00 AM–5:00 PM
Tuesdays to Fridays
7:00 AM–6:00 PM
5. Recreational Reading Nooks – corners are set up to promote readership
among Miriam College students
6. Faculty Reading Room
IRC Facilities and Services
The IRC has the following facilities available:
• 46 Personal Computers
(Free to all enrolled students for the semester)
• 46 Lockers and Keys for Internet Users
(Free to all enrolled students for the semester)
• 12-hour Internet Service
(Free to all enrolled students for the semester, two hours per use
at any one time to give way for the use of other enrolled students)
7. Discussion Rooms
8. Locker services
Internet Research Center (IRC)
The Internet Research Center (IRC) is managed by the Planning and
Development Office (PDO) with the technical assistance of the Information
and Communications Technology Office (ICTO).
IRC staffs are assigned by PDO to handle the 12-hour operations. They are
assisted by a team of students from the Entrepreneurship department of the
College of Business, Entrepreneurship and Accountancy (CBEA) as part of
their on-the-job training program.
PDO provides the overall direction and management of all staff
and general operations of the center. ICTO, on the other hand, provides
technical support and services through outsourced ICT vendors in the
regular maintenance and repair of all equipment and peripherals in the
center. Student Managers of the Entrepreneurship department handle
the daily operations.
Main Objectives of IRC
IRC aims to enhance MC’s academic programs through the use of modern
technology. It also makes internet resources and services available in support
of MC’s mission to provide superior levels of education and instructional
services to its students.
• Other services:
»» Colored Laser Printing
»» Black and White Laser Printing
»» DVD/CD Burning
»» Fax Transmission Service
»» Image Scanning
Administration Policies
1. Student Access
a. Only students enrolled for the current semester will be given access
to the IRC.
b. Access to the IRC by those not enrolled in the college will require
a special permit from PDO.
c. Students who will be using the IRC are required to surrender their
school ID before using the facility.
d. Students will be given user names and passwords to access the system
and network.
e. Passwords may not be shared with others. Non-compliance to this
policy will be subject to the appropriate disciplinary action.
2. Internet Use
Business Hours
Tuesday to Friday
7:30 AM–6:30 PM
Saturday and Monday
8:00 AM–5:00 PM
Only one student per computer unit will be allowed for a maximum of two
hours per use. After two hours, students will be required to log out or request
for an extension from the coordinator subject to availability of computer units.
Location and Contact Numbers
3. Food and Drinks
IRC is located at the Ground Floor of MMJ Building at Miriam College.
For inquiries and requests for services, you may contact the following
numbers and address:
Food and drinks of any form are not allowed in the IRC. Students will
be asked to leave the area if found to be eating, drinking, or chewing gum.
Non‑compliance to this policy will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action.
Trunkline:
e-mail:
64 | Miriam College IRC follows MC’s Institutional Calendar. The center is open 12 hours a day,
Tuesdays through Fridays and nine hours on Saturdays and Mondays.
The center is closed on all school and national holidays.
Bulletin of Information
+632 580-5400 loc. 1098
[email protected]
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| 65
Table of Contents
Facilities
4. Lockers
Special Services
Lockers will be available to students to lodge their bags, books, and other
personal belongings. Bags are not allowed inside the IRC.
The following services are under the supervision of the Administrative
Services Coordinator and are offered to all Miriam College students.
Students are provided the lock and key for the lockers. Keys shall be
returned to the coordinator after they are through with the use of IRC.
Students who fail to return the keys will be held responsible for replacing
the lost key.
1. Health Service
5. Using Internet Services
(Printing, Scanning, and CD/DVD Burning, others)
The college maintains a well-equipped medical and dental clinic as part of its
health program. During the school year, all students are required to undergo
a physical examination conducted by the College Clinic staff. Should medical
and dental treatment be required as a result of this examination, the student’s
parents are notified and referral is made to the student’s family physician.
Students who wish to avail of other services should proceed to the service
area and request for assistance from the IRC coordinators.
A nurse is available during school hours. She keeps a medical and dental
record of each student.
Printing, scanning, CD/DVD burning, fax and telephone services will be
charged the appropriate fees.
2. Food Service
6. Monitoring and Documentation of Students and Guests
IRC staff will be monitoring all tasks and activities of users and guests.
She will call the attention of students and guests who are noisy, causing
disruption, or are not abiding by the policies, rules, and procedures of the IRC.
Guests will be required to have a separate permit from PDO for the use
of the IRC and seek endorsement from the unit/office they come from.
Guest access should be approved by PDO and likewise subject to the
availability of computers at the IRC. Since the IRC is primarily designed for
student use, PDO reserves the right to disapprove guest access, if necessary.
All incidents requiring the attention of PDO will be reported immediately
to the office for appropriate action.
Food Service for the college is available at the Cafeteria, which is maintained
by a concessionaire. Snacks, hot meals and beverages are available daily from
7:30 AM–5:00 PM.
3. Telephone Service
Public telephones are available for students’ use on campus. All students
are expected to use these prudently. Students may not use office telephones.
4. Locker Room
The Locker Room has 886 lockers and 12 shower rooms that are available
for the students. A minimal fee is charged for the use of the lockers.
5. Parking
Adequate parking space is provided for students and other campus visitors.
Proper traffic and parking regulations are expected to be followed by everyone.
6. Bookstore
Books, compilations, handouts, school supplies and other miscellaneous items
may be purchased at the College Bookstore.
66 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
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Table of Contents
Student Programs
and Activities
Table of Contents
Student
Councils
The Sanggunian ng mga Mag-aaral ng Miriam exercises supervision over the
year councils, co-curricular organizations, and extra-curricular organizations
and coordinates the various activities initiated by them. The officers of the
Sanggunian also represent the students in the decision-making bodies of the
Higher Education Unit and in inter-school affairs.
Each year level has its own set of officers who initiate activates and projects
for the batch. The year council officers coordinate with the members of their
batch through the class and major representatives.
• First Year Council
• Sophomore Council
• Junior Council
• Senior Council
Miriam College
COMELEC
Miriam College Commission on Election (MC COMELEC) is a non‑partisan
body that plans, coordinates, conducts and supervises all electoral
proceedings for all student organizations. Its moderator, who is appointed
by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs acts as adviser and legal counsel.
The Commission shall have the exclusive charge of the enforcement and
administration of all laws relative to conduct or elections for the purpose of
ensuring free, orderly and honest elections.
The Commission shall also serves as the Electoral Board and shall arbitrate
and decide on any election issue or protest before or during the elections
and after the electoral count.
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Table of Contents
Co-Curricular
Organizations
The co-curricular clubs/organizations primarily serve as an extension of
particular fields of educational interests. Their activities are designed to
improve and enrich the academic experiences of the students.
Biological Society
The Biological Society serves as a venue for sharing of ideas, opinions
and knowledge among Biology enthusiasts in the authentic quest of
understanding new developments and trends in the Biological sciences.
It seeks to expand the individual competence of students in their specialized
fields through activities such as collaborations, lecture series, science
competition, workshops, symposia and field trips.
Child Development and Education Circle
The Child Development and Education Circle strives to encourage
and cultivate social consciousness among Child Development and
Education students so that they may serve as effective agents of change
and development in society.
Cillo Society
The Cillo Society provides a venue for discussion of relevant and
pressing historical and contemporary issues and events, critical thinking,
inquisitiveness and open-mindedness through various activities and
programs that promote history. The Society aims to foster historical
consciousness and nationalism among Miriam College students and other
members of the Miriam community.
Communication Society
The Communication Society enhances the knowledge gained by
Communication students through activities related to theater arts, journalism,
advertising, etc.
Humanities Club
The Humanities Club fosters knowledge and awareness of art
and its holistic aspect specially the beauty, significance, and uniqueness
of Filipino art.
International Studies Society
The International Studies Society assists students in applying their acquired
theoretical knowledge to relevant issues within their community by providing
them with the best possible opportunities.
Inter-School Business Association
The Inter-School Business Association conducts various activities wherein
Business Administration students can use the business principles learned in
class. The members are exposed to the different realities of business practices.
Junior Financial Executives
The Junior Financial Executives provides a venue for students enrolled in
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, major in Finance, to network
with professional financial organizations.
Junior Philippine Institute of Accountancy
The Junior Philippine Institute of Accountancy serves as a medium of
expression for ideals and aspirations which promote and protect the welfare
and interest of accounting students.
Junior Philippine Internet Commerce Society
The Junior Philippine Internet Commerce Society provides a venue
for professional networking for Business Administration students.
72 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Le Club Francais
The Le Club Francais develops students’ awareness of the European countries’
culture, tradition and present status in the world with an emphasis on France.
League of Tourism Students of the Philippines
The League of Tourism Students of the Philippines aims to develop its
members to become professionals in the field of leisure and tourism and
to foster an environment that will stimulate academic, professional, creative,
and spiritual growth to encourage active involvement of the members inside
and outside of Miriam College.
Miriam College Computer Research & On-Line Support
The Miriam College Computer Research & On-Line Support promotes the
latest in computer technology and enhances computer skills and knowledge
through workshops and seminars.
Miriam Environmental Planning Organization
The Miriam Environmental Planning Organization serves as a venue for
the sharing of ideas among planning enthusiasts in the genuine pursuit
of knowledge.
Miriam Junior Marketing Association
The Miriam Junior Marketing Association seeks to provide the students
and the other sectors of Miriam College and Community, with research
on marketing developments, and seeks linkages with local and international
business organizations improve the school’s image as well as seeks possible
job placements of Miriam College students.
National Service Reserve Corps
The National Service Reserve Corps gears towards widening social awareness
and promoting involvement of the youth in Nation building. It aims to
produce socially responsive and competent youth for literacy and civic welfare
activities, especially in times of calamities and social needs.
Pangkat Pinoy
The Pangkat Pinoy aims to improve and develop student interest and
potentials in the promotion and concern for the enrichment of the Filipino
language. It also enhances the academic capabilities of students in the Filipino
course offerings.
Philosophy Society
The Philosophy Society develops the students’ interest in philosophical ideas
and promotes academic excellence in philosophy subjects.
Society of Junior Entrepreneurs
The Society of Junior Entrepreneurs aims to develop the entrepreneurial
abilities of its members, develop their entrepreneurial perspective in a fast
changing economic, political, technological and social environment.
Aeon
The Aeon aspires to provide a venue for self-expression in an atmosphere of
trust, openness and respect. It aims to nurture a positive self-concept inherent
in assertive individuals, develops/enhances their communication skills,
and promotes leadership skills and the core values of the institution.
Psychology Guild
The Psychology Guild conducts programs to supplement and reinforce various
aims of the psychology course in terms of theory and social commitment.
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Table of Contents
Extra-Curricular
Organizations
Extra-curricular organizations are not affiliated with any of the College
Departments. They are primarily organized to cater to the different interests
of the students such as in the fields of theatre, performing arts, gender, peace
and spirituality.
Association Internationale Des Estudiantes en Sciences
Economiques et Commercials
The Association Internationale Des Estudiantes en Sciences Economiques et
Commercials bridges the gap between the business, academic and student
communities, as well as develop managers of tomorrow through participation
in various programs which provide practical experiences in management.
CFC–Youth for Christ
The CFC–Youth for Christ aims to provide a healthy Christian support
environment for its members by instilling Christian values and principles
in preparation for the challenges they will face in the workplace and life
in general.
Company of One
The Company of One provides a venue for the creative expression of students
using dance as a medium.
Foreign Students Club
The Foreign Students Club adheres to the promotion of cultural understanding
and respect, integrity and responsibility, equality among members and to
the affiliations of the organization’s members and to further equip and train
women leaders in service in support to the Miriam College thrust.
MC Babaing Aktibong Indibidwal
The MC Babaing Aktibong Indibidwal is Miriam College Youth
Organization for Women Advocacy who strive for and support a diverse
and interdependent human community in which people’s rights, welfare
and empowerment are centrally valued.
MC Glee Club
The MC Glee Club is committed to the highest standards of choral music.
The club is a venue for artistic expression that strives to reach as many sectors
of the school community and society in the light of the College ideals.
Mga Mag-aaral para kay Maria
The Mga Mag-aaral para kay Maria aims to promote awareness and education
on women’s rights and issues so that its members can actively participate in
activities that will liberate women from any form of abuse, exploitation and
discrimination.
Pax Christi
The Pax Christi aims to heighten the consciousness and awareness of students
about peace issues/concerns such as non-violent resolution and total human
development.
Pinay
The Pinay aims to promote nationalism through theatre arts. The objective of
every theatrical production is to impart to the audience the personal as well as
national implications of the current national issues and events.
Talitha Cumi
The Talitha Cumi aims to assist Financial Aid grantees in the various aspects
of growth and development.
Teatro Kolehiyo ng Miriam
The Teatro Kolehiyo ng Miriam develops the physical, mental and effective
skills of each member in order to acquire effective communication tools for
personal and social purposes.
Miriam College Debate Society
The Miriam College Debate Society aims to provide an avenue for students
to exercise their freedom of speech in a healthy and intellectual environment,
honing their communication skills.
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural
Organization Youth Club
The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Youth
Club seeks to promote understanding, cooperation and peace and to train its
members in civics and democracy.
MS Junior People Management Association
The MS Junior People Management Association (MC-JPMAP) is a national
youth organization that commits itself to develop and empower its members
to enable them to grow from the academic to professional level as future
managers of the society.
MC Liturgical Choir
The MC Liturgical Choir (MCLC) allows the development of the students’
creativity in songs in liturgical celebrations and special occasions.
MC Peer Organization for Perceptive Learning
and Enrichment
The MC Peer Organization for Perceptive Learning and Enrichment (MC
PEOPLE) promotes harmonious and helping relationships within the
community and assists the Guidance Center in its services and programs.
74 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
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| 75
Table of Contents
Student
Publications
Cognizant of their constitutional rights to free expression, students are
encouraged to voice their ideas, beliefs and opinions through publication,
guided accordingly by the principle of responsible journalism.
Chi Rho Newsletter
Chi Rho Newsletter is the official student publication that disseminates news
about the activities and concerns of the students in relation to the community
and to the larger Philippine society. It is accompanied by a Literary Magazine
before the end of the school year. The Editorial Board recommends its
moderator who is appointed by the Committee on Student Publications (CSP).
Chi Rho Annual
Chi Rho Annual is the yearbook of each graduating class. Its moderator
is recommended by the Editorial Board and subsequently appointed by
the Committee on Student Publications (CSP).
Gazeta de Pilosopiya
Gazeta de Pilosopiya is the official publication of the Philosophy society
aimed at enhancing the students’ capacity for reflective and critical thinking.
It is a venue for students to write their philosophical insights concerning
issues on human existence and interest.
Issues
Issues is the official publication of the International Studies Society aimed
at developing and honing the creative and analytical skills and talents of
the International Studies students. It also serves as a vehicle for information
dissemination of national and global issues to develop a learned and vibrant
academic community.
Psych Gist
Psych Gist is the official newsletter of the Psychology Guild.
76 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Table of Contents
Undergraduate Programs
1. College of Arts and Sciences
2. College of Business, Entrepreneurship, and Accounting
3. College of Education
4. College of International, Humanitarian, and Development Studies
Table of Contents
College of Arts and Sciences
The College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) provides liberal arts and sciences
undergraduate education to women, specialized programs to the deaf,
and post graduate programs to adult women and men. CAS’ holistic education
is rooted in the core values of truth, justice, peace, and integrity of creation,
and is distinctive for its service-orientation, personalized mentoring in a
caring environment, linkage of formal education with outreach through
the various advocacy centers on campus, and the lifelong education
perspective. CAS graduates are articulate, empowered women leaders in
service, gender‑sensitive men, and competent deaf people who are productive
members of society and of the global community, and committed
to societal transformation.
Undergraduate Programs
1. Associate in Computer Technology
2. Bachelor of Applied Arts in Theater
3. Bachelor of Applied Arts in Visual Design
4. Bachelor of Arts major in Communication
5. Bachelor of Arts in Psychology
6. Bachelor of Science in Biology
7. Bachelor of Science in Environmental Planning and Management
8. Bachelor of Science in Psychology
Associate in
Computer
Technology
In an effort to help deaf students who are talented and motivated to realize
their full potential within a supportive and accepting hearing environment,
Miriam College offers a tertiary level education program in Computer
Technology for such students.
Major subjects: 36 units
CT-100, CT-101, CT-102, CT-103, CT-104, CT-105, CT-106, CT-107, CT-108,
CT-109, CT-110, CT-111
General education units: 61 units
Total number of units: 97 units
Associate in
Computer
Technology
(for the deaf)
Pre-Associate
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-100
Intensive English
M-100
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-101
Communication Skills 1
3
Essential Mathematics
3
M-101
College Algebra
3
CT-100
Computer Fundamentals and
Program Logic Formulation
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
CT-103
Desktop Publishing
and Web Graphics
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
Total
Units
15
Units
Total
15
www.mc.edu.ph
| 83
Associate in
Computer
Technology
(for regular students)
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
Major subjects: 36 units
CT-100, CT-101, CT-102, CT-103, CT-104, CT-105, CT-106, CT-107, CT-108,
CT-109, CT-110, CT-111
General education units: 64 units
Total number of units: 100 units
First Year
First Semester
Second Semester
First Year
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-104
Business English
T-101
M-102
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
Elementary Statistics
3
Multimedia Processes
and Animation
3
CT-104
Units
CT-102
Web Page Design, Hosting
and Development
3
CT-105
Programming Language 1
3
CT-101
Microsoft Office Programs
3
H-101.1
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
(with Rizal)
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
Total
17
Total
17
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-100/E-101
Intensive English/
Communication Skills 1
M-100
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-101/E-102
Communication Skills 1/
Speech Communication
3
Essential Mathematics
3
M-101
College Algebra
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
CT-100
Computer Fundamentals and
Program Logic Formulation
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
CT-101
Microsoft Office Programs
3
CT-103
Desktop Publishing
and Web Graphics
3
CT-102
Web Page Design, Hosting
and Development
3
CT-104
Multimedia Processes
and Animation
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
CT-105
Programming Language 1
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP I
3
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
PSY-101
General Psychology
CT-106
Subject Title
3
CT-107
Programming Language 3
3
Programming Language 2
3
CT-110
IT Project Management
and Artificial Intelligence
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
CT-111
Systems Analysis
and Design
3
S-105/S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
CT-108
Advanced Database
Management System
3
–
–
–
Statistical Package
and Research
3
Total
84 | Miriam College Units
18
Bulletin of Information
Units
Units
Second Semester
Subject Code
CT-109
Second Semester
–
–
Total
Units
–
Total
24
Total
24
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
12
www.mc.edu.ph
| 85
CT-103
Second Year
Subject Code
Subject Title
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
This course deals with the technical and theoretical aspects
of producing a variety of professional quality outputs and
electronic media products in computerized publication and
presentations with designs and graphics integration from
the internet.
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
CT-104
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-104
Business English
H-105
Second Semester
Units
3
FIL-101.1
Units
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
S-105/S-106
Biological Sciences/
Physical Sciences
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
human Person
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
CT-107
Programming Language 3
3
CT-106
Programming Language 2
3
CT-110
IT Project Management and
Artificial Intelligence
3
CT-108
Advanced Database
Management System
3
CT-111
Systems Analysis and Design
3
CT-109
Statistical Package
and Research
3
–
–
–
Total
26
Course
Descriptions
CT-100
Total
23
Computer Fundamentals and Program Logic
Formulation (3 units)
The course deals with the main techniques in programming used to represent
program logic: Flowcharting and Pseudo code. The students will learn how
to solve problems by means of flowcharts and pseudo codes using variables,
logical and relational operators, conditional and iteration constructs arrays
and subroutines.
CT-101
Microsoft Office Programs (3 units)
The course deals with the fundamentals of computer systems, data processing
concepts, development of computing device leading to the networking
principles, basic web page development, E-mail and internet applications, up
to the complexity of using different window-based application programs and
the latest version of MS office programs such as Word, Excel and Power Point.
CT-102
Web Page Design, Hosting and Development (3 units)
This course deals with the technical aspects of creating a web page using
the latest computer software tools for web page design.
86 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Desktop Publishing and Web Graphics
(3 units)
Multimedia Processes and Animation
(3 units)
This course presents the basic principles of simulation
of movement created by displaying a series of pictures,
or frames to form the illusion of continuous motion.
Both sound and/or motion video animation on computers
are covered as the chief ingredients of multimedia
presentations. With the use of Flash, this software application
enables the student to create animations that will be
displayed on screen, starting with independent pictures and
graphics to form the illusion of continuous motion or what is
known as animation.
CT-105
Programming Language 1 (3 units)
CT-109
Statistical Package and Research (3 units)
This course deals with the use of the SPSS (Statistical
Packages for Social Science) in summarizing and analyzing
data organizations. Basic concepts and methods of both
descriptive and inferential statistics will be tackled together
with the skills in design, analysis, and interpretation.
CT-110
IT Project Management
and Artificial Intelligence (3 units)
This course includes the steps necessary to design
and complete ICT related projects from conception
to implementation. It will include the project planning
software life cycle. The student will also learn concepts
and principles of Artificial Intelligence as utilized in
the organization for specific application.
CT-111
Systems Analysis and Design (3 units)
This course deals with technical and theoretical aspects
of developing a computer-based information system.
Emphasis is on the strategies and alternatives dealing
with evolving information systems.
This course covers the fundamental concepts, methodology,
and applications of the current Object-Oriented programming
language in the design and implementation, syntax and
translation, language definition structures, elementary and
structured data types, abstraction mechanisms, sequence
and data control and run time considerations.
CT-106
Programming Language 2 (3 units)
This course covers the programming techniques using
the current Web development software. Students design
procedures and write computer instructions to solve
business problems, learn procedural and object-oriented
programming, develop graphical user interfaces for the
Web and work with events and objects. CT-107
Programming Language 3 (3 units)
This course is a continuation of Web-based Programming 1.
It covers the programming techniques in developing
graphical user interfaces for the Web and work with events
and objects in accessing a database for web site functionality
using the current Web development software for website
functionality. CT-108
Advanced Database Management
System 1 (3 units)
This course covers the different architecture of the relational,
hierarchical and network models. Includes the introduction
to data structure, file organizations and relation of file
management to database management application, data
modeling, design of databases, analysis of data and
the different management issues of security, integrity,
concurrency control and recovery.
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| 87
Bachelor of Applied
Arts in Theater
The Bachelor of Applied Arts in Theater seeks to create a niche for Miriam
College as a training ground for skilled performance artists by providing a
professional environment in the field of the arts with a pool of well-trained
and seasoned talents.
Summer
The course aims to hone the aesthetic and artistic skills of student-artists
by laying a sound foundation in the fundamentals of art and drama on
stage. Emphasis will be put on the history of performing arts as well as the
theories of theater, dance, music, acting, directing, improvisation, movement,
dramaturgy, production design, stage and production management and
the major phases of stage production. Through actual performances,
student‑artists will also be given ample opportunities to collaborate and
exhibit their ideas as well as to understand and experience the rudiments
and major phases of stage production.
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
Major subjects: 66 units
ARTH-101, ARTH-102, ARTH-103, ARTH-104, ARTH-105, ARTH-106,
ARTH-107, ARTH-108, ARTH-109, ARTH-110, ARTH-111, ARTH-112,
ARTH-113, ARTH-114, ARTH-115, ARTH-116, ARTH-117, ARTH-118,
ARTH-119, ARTH-120, ARTH-121, ARTH-122
Second Year
First Semester
Electives: 12 units
ARTH-123, ARTH-124, ARTH-125, ARTH-126
General education subjects: 85 units
Total number of units: 163 units
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-104
Business English
FIL-101.1
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
S-105
Physical Sciences
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo
sa Pananaliksik
3
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
ARTH-103
Introduction to Music
3
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
ARTH-101
Introduction to Theater Arts
3
ARTH-104
Introduction to Visual Arts
3
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
ARTH-102
Introduction to Dance/
Movement
3
ARTH-105
History of Theater
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
HU-102
Art and Design
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP I
3
Total
88 | Miriam College Units
18
Bulletin of Information
Total
Units
Total
23
Total
23
18
www.mc.edu.ph
| 89
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
E-105
Fourth Year
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
Literatures of the Philippines
3
ARTH-109
FL-101
Foreign Language 1
3
ARTH-106
Voice for the Theater
ARTH-107
First Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
H-104
Rizal
Voice 2
3
E-106
ARTH-110
Acting 1
3
3
ARTH-111
Directing 1
Movement 1
3
ARTH-112
ARTH-108
Introduction to Design
for the Theater
3
–
Elective 1
3
Total
21
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
ARTH-114
Internship (Job Training)
3
Total
3
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
3
ARTH-119
Improvisation 2
3
ARTH-115
Acting 2
3
ARTH-120
Production Methods
3
3
ARTH-116
Directing 2
3
ARTH-121
Playwriting
3
Improvisation 1
3
ARTH-117
Movement 2
3
ARTH-122
Recital Thesis 2
3
ARTH-113
Script Analysis
3
ARTH-118
Recital Thesis 1
3
–
Elective 4
3
–
Elective 2
3
–
Elective 3
3
–
–
–
Total
21
Total
Course
Descriptions
Units
21
Units
Total
18
ARTH-101 Introduction to Theater Arts (3 units)
The course begins with theories on basic practices in performance.
The students will be introduced to different theater spaces in various
traditions. An appreciation of the different performances in the media
will also be explored. This course is designed to help students develop
an appreciation of the art form by understanding the relationship of theater
to society and diverse cultures. Students become familiar with components
of stage art including play-writing, acting, directing, and design through
practical experiences and viewing of live productions and films. Students will
be prepared for greater enjoyment of theater by developing a more critical eye
for the many facets of the art form.
ARTH-102 Introduction to Dance/Movement (3 units)
This course provides an overview of the concept of movement in space
in the specific field of dance. It intends to introduce students to the
interdisciplinary study of movement and dance through the framework
of the performing arts. It will look into the various theories surrounding
the beginnings and evolution of this art field and familiarize students with
the various genre of dance in modern times.
ARTH-103 Introduction to Music (3 units)
This course will examine some basic questions about how music is
constructed technically as well as how musical practices can shape the
students’ understanding of themselves and the dynamics of the music culture.
The course will survey a wide range of musical examples, Western and
Non‑western, ancient and contemporary, often drawing on musical contexts
that are new to the students and at other times using examples from musical
forms common in contemporary mass media.
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ARTH-104 Introduction to Visual Arts (3 units)
ARTH-109 Voice 2 (3 units)
ARTH-115 Acting 2 (3 units)
ARTH-121 Play Writing (3 units)
This course provides an understanding of the methods
of identifying, interpreting, and evaluating ideas in the
creative arts. Areas covered include art’s functions,
the visual elements and principles of design, the styles of art,
and the art object.
Prerequisite: ARTH-106 (Voice for the Theater)
Prerequisite: ARTH-110 (Acting 1)
Students will be given exercises to increase breath capacity
and to improve vocal quality and diction through an
exploration of the International Phonetic Alphabet. They will
be introduced to one foreign accent and one English dialect
and will explore the basics of Voice and voice over Acting.
This course will include a brief survey of theater concepts
and terminology. The students will develop acting skills and
techniques including oral communication, improvisation
and stage movement. The students will participate in brief
dramatic presentations for their scene studies.
The two courses (ARTH-110 and ARTH-115) provide an
in depth exploration for the student-actors to develop a
character through sensitivity to the meaning, the language,
the music and the style of the text by deepening their
emotional expression, listening, focusing, centering and
grounding. The course also instills the artist to acquire
professional work ethics and artistic discipline. It also
transforms nerves, anxieties and stage fright into positive
creative energy by accessing entry into the unconscious and
expanding the actors’ imagination. Most importantly, the
course examines an experience of the communal and spiritual
aspects of the actor’s art.
This course introduces writing for the theater focusing on
story structure and development, thematic contents, character
and stage elements and transition elements. Critiquing and
analysis through workshop of each others’ works will be
explored throughout the semester; and in the end, students
are required to submit a one-act play.
ARTH-111 Directing 1 (3 units)
ARTH-116 Directing 2 (3 units)
The course explores theory and practice of the beginning
principles of theater directing, including script selection
and analysis, research, rehearsal structure and techniques,
production organization, incorporation of design and
technology elements, communication skills and leadership.
It also includes practical application, staging scenes with
student-actors.
Prerequisite: ARTH-111 (Directing 1)
ARTH-105 History of the Theater (3 units)
This course is a study of the evolution of theater from
primitive origins through Greek and Roman traditions,
the medieval worlds of England and Japan, The Renaissance
through Romanticism, examining Elizabeth and Jacobean
drama, Restoration and Neo-Classical traditions, as well as
the 17th and 19th century Italian, German, French, Spanish,
and early American Theater. A study of the evolution of
theater from the development of Realism in the late 19th
century through the Theater of the Absurd in the 1960s
examining Naturalism, Idealism, Symbolism, Expressionism,
Surrealism and postmodernism. Emphasis is on the play in
performance reflecting the changing physical theater, as well
as the social, political, and artistic currents of each period.
ARTH-106 Voice for the Theater (3 units)
Prerequisite: ARTH-103 (Introduction to Music)
This course allows students to experience and understand
the basic tools of communication, voice, and diction.
Class exercises include relaxation, alignment, breathing,
phonation, resonation, articulation, vocal range, and
inflection. Students will develop a knowledge and sense
of their own voice and speech expressing who they are and
what they feel. Students will demonstrate mastery of the
International Phonetic Alphabet through testing and a final
memorized performance.
ARTH-107 Movement 1 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ARTH-102 (Introduction to Dance/Movement)
This course emphasizes the principles and practical demands
of dance within the musical theater. Primarily jazz-dance
based movement, with ballet basics included. Integrates an
extensive dance warm-up into movement vocabulary and
works on various combinations. Includes techniques for
exercise, audition requirements, various performance styles,
and choreographic projects.
ARTH-108 Introduction to Design for the Theater
(3 units)
In this course, students are introduced to the fundamentals
of production design for stage including the application
of costume, scenery, lighting and props and their importance.
Students are introduced to the impact scene, light, costume
elements and props have in a complete production
or performance.
92 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
ARTH-110 Acting 1 (3 units)
ARTH-112 Improvisation 1 (3 units)
This course examines concepts such as a weighted and
grounded approach to movement, harnessing the body’s
momentum and force, varying approaches to contact
and partnering, emphasis on intent and focus, technical
prowess, and compositional choices through improvisation
will be included. It also enhances the creative process and
encourages expressiveness in the most communicative
manner possible. While breaking down boundaries of
disciplinary classification, a merging of movement, text,
visuals, and music will be stressed.
ARTH-113 Script Analysis (3 units)
This course develops the students’ skills to identify relevant
structure, plot and themes in script and text work. In addition,
students learn the basic themes, structure and concepts that
influence production design, performance and other facets
of production for the stage. Research, critical thinking and
analysis of script and text to develop design concepts for
production design. The course also develops students’ skills
to understand the structure, history and overall themes of
published/produced work.
ARTH-114 Internship (Job Training) (3 units)
Prerequisite: All major subjects from 1st–3rd year
Internships are conducted during the summer after the third
year level for a minimum of 300 hours of work at theaters,
dance companies, orchestras and other professional artistic
institutions. These companies or organizations must be
screened and approved by the department. A detailed report
of the work experience gained and accomplishments made
shall be submitted to the adviser with confirmation from the
supervising individual from the organization.
This course focuses in the expansion of the development
of directorial skills and techniques with emphasis on
various theories and styles of directing. Many of the major
directors from the past and present will be studied and their
respective methods put into actual usage by the class as a
stimulus to the student.
ARTH-117 Movement 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ARTH-107 (Movement 1)
This course integrates an extensive dance warm-up into
movement vocabulary and builds on principles learned in
Dance Theater I. The final includes choreography and/or
public performance. Designed for intermediate to advanced
level dance students.
ARTH-118 Recital Thesis 1 (3 units)
ARTH-122 Recital Thesis 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ARTH-118 (Recital Thesis 1)
ELECTIVES:
ARTH-123 Costume and Make-Up (3 units)
In this course, the student will understand the basic
techniques of stage costume and makeup and develop
a basic understanding through hands-on training with
a variety of materials.
ARTH-124 Set Design and Scenography (3 units)
The class will examine the advantages, problems and
practices for designing scenery for the thrust, proscenium
and arena stages. The student will practice the fundamental
aspects of drafting for the stage as well as the study of the use
of advanced stagecraft techniques.
ARTH-125 Sound and Music Design
For the Theater (3 units)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the
art and practice of sound design for the theatre. The course
will include a study of sound equipment and control, script
analysis, design methodologies, basic acoustics, and the
processing and completion of sound effects.
In this course, student-artists are required to produce at the
end of their course a full-production focusing on acting,
directing, play writing or management thesis. They will
undergo production from conception of the play script to
visual production of their choice.
ARTH-119 Improvisation 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ARTH-112 (Improvisation 1)
This course emphasizes helping the beginning actor and
non-theater student create believable characters using
subtext through concentration, imagination and observation
in non-scripted scenes. Exercises provide a foundation for
using subtext, playing in the moment, and creating truthful
relationships in scripted and non-scripted scenes, and the use
of the body and voice as communicative agents.
ARTH-120 Production Methods (3 units)
Production Management and Administration is a
survey course designed to familiarize students with the
organizational procedures of the theater production process.
Major areas of study include stage management and
production management.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 93
Bachelor of Applied
Arts in Visual
Design
The Bachelor of Applied Arts in Visual Design provides students with
aesthetic skills in visual communication integrating theory and practice,
technical expertise and career skills necessary to realize their artistic visions
in the context of a productive career.
The course emphasizes practical application and access to the current
technology in the digital space. It combines traditional design elements
with awareness of digital possibilities.
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-104
Business English
HU-102, ARTV-101, ARTV-102, ARTV-103, ARTV-104, ARTV-105, ARTV-106,
ARTV-107, ARTV-108, ARTV-109, ARTV-110, ARTV-111, ARTV-112, ARTV-113,
ARTV-114, ARTV-115, ARTV-116, ARTV-117, ARTV-118, ARTV-119, ARTV-120,
ARTV-121, ARTV-122
FIL-101.1
Electives: 12 units
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
S-105
Physical Sciences
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo
sa Pananaliksik
3
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
ARTV-103
Drawing 2
3
ARTV-101
Drawing 1
3
ARTV-104
Visual Design 2
3
ARTV-102
Visual Design 1
3
ARTV-105
Color Theory
3
Major subjects: 69 units
Units
General education subjects: 85 units
Total number of units: 166 units
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
HU-102
Art and Design
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP I
3
Total
Units
18
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
94 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Units
Total
Units
18
Total
23
Total
23
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
E-105
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
Literatures of the Philippines
3
ARTV-109
Advanced Photography
3
FL-101
Foreign Language 1
3
ARTV-107
Life Drawing 2
3
ARTV-106
Life Drawing 1
3
ARTV-110
Computer Graphics
3
ARTV-108
Introduction to Photography
3
ARTV-112
Web Publishing
3
ARTV-111
Digital Image Making
3
ARTV-113
Portfolio and Process
3
–
Elective 1
3
–
Elective 2
3
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
21
www.mc.edu.ph
| 95
Course
Descriptions
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
ARTV-114
Job Training
3
Total
3
HU-102
Art and Design (3 units)
This course provides an introduction to studio art. This involves an
introduction in the basics of visual communication, including drawing,
painting and sculpture. The basic approach embraces learning by doing
and allows students an opportunity for individual expression and
experimentation in the art process. Part of the artistic experience involves
visit to museum, gallery and artist’s studio. Focus of the course is on Filipino
contemporary art. This is a sequel to HU-101 or its equivalent.
ARTV-101 Drawing 1 (3 units)
This course begins with surveys of traditional art implements
such as colored pencil, charcoal, pen and ink, watercolor and acrylic paints.
The act of drawing promotes creative possibilities. Drawing exercises
include composition, positive/negative space, figure-ground relationship,
and multiple points of view. Subjects for drawing are assigned by themes
to establish certain concepts and skills.
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
H-104
Rizal
E-106
ARTV-102 Visual Design 1 (3 units)
Second Semester
Subject Title
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
3
ARTV-118
History of Contemporary Art
(1945–present)
3
ARTV-115
Typography
3
ARTV-119
Package Design
3
ARTV-116
Animation
3
ARTV-120
Women in Art
3
ARTV-117
History of Graphic Design
3
ARTV-122
Senior Exhibition 2
3
ARTV-119
Package Design
3
–
Elective 4
3
ARTV-121
Senior Exhibition 1
3
–
–
–
This course goes into three-dimensional design such as sculpture
in the round. Students use a variety of materials, processes, and techniques
to explore volume, mass, gravity, tension, compression, light, color,
and structure.
–
Elective 3
3
–
–
–
ARTV-105 Color Theory (3 units)
24
Total
Units
This course enhances theories, and practices in two-dimensional design in
the visual arts. Basic relationships between color and compositional practices
such as space, unity, emphasis, balance, rhythm, and proportion are explored.
An appreciation of harmony in design is promoted.
Subject Code
Total
Units
Prerequisite: ARTV-101 (Drawing 1)
ARTV-103 Drawing 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ARTV-101 (Drawing 1)
18
This course allows students to refine technique learned in Drawing 1 through
rigorous observational practices in the application of light, shade, tone, value,
texture, mass and volume that leads to an identifiable illustration style.
ARTV-104 Visual Design 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ARTV-102 (Visual Design 1)
The principles and theories on colors are related to design. Color in both
traditional and contemporary medium are rendered for color effects for prints
and electronic production methods. The psychological and cultural aspects
of color as they impact the viewer are included in the design process. Testing
of color combinations in practical applications like signage and corporate
emblems is involved.
ARTV-106 Life Drawing 1 (3 units)
This course focuses on the human anatomy. Figure drawing is reflected in
the studies of skeletal structures and muscle masses. Perspectives include
foreshortening, accurate proportion, lighting, and composition.
ARTV-107 Life Drawing 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ARTV-106 Life (Drawing 1)
Expressive forms (gesture, quick sketch, long poses, foreshortening and
composition) in drawing the human figure are introduced. Students situate
the human figures against planes, masses, shapes, action, proportion, rhythm
and various backgrounds.
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ARTV-108 Introduction to Photography (3 units)
ARTV-116 Animation (3 units)
Technical, conceptual and visual issues are explored in
traditional and digital photography. Photo sessions involving
professional photographers are scheduled with on-the-spot
location shoots for photographic skills to be applied.
This course focuses on the basic principles of movement
which form the foundation of both 2-D and 3-D animation.
Students analyze motions of people and objects to constitute
animation. The goal is to establish a clear understanding of
motion dynamics and the associated practices and principles
of animation.
ARTV-109 Advanced Photography (3 units)
Prerequisite: ARTV-108 (Introduction to Photography)
This is a specialized photography involving product shoots
with lighting techniques. This caters to advertising needs,
signage and product catalogues and brochures.
ARTV-110 Computer Graphics (3 units)
This is a basic course on the techniques of producing
audio‑visual materials for use in various media like print,
film, television, theater and others. Alternative media forms
like comics, streamers, posters, flyers and brochures
are also introduced.
ARTV-111 Digital Image Making (3 units)
The computer is introduced as an image-making tool across
all art and design disciplines. Software such as Adobe
Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator are applied to printing
and type presentations. The course enhances student’s ability
to address visual, compositional, and technical problems on
available computer platforms.
ARTV-112 Web Publishing (3 units)
This course deals with the technical and theoretical aspects
of producing artistically effective electronic media in digital
publication and presentations that include web designs for
Internet use.
ARTV-113 Portfolio and Process (3 units)
This is a course that assists students in refining and
assembling a body of artworks in preparation for the job
interview process. Guides in selecting a portfolio and
effectively reworking and improving it through critiquing
by mentors and peers form part of the course.
ARTV-114 Internship (Job Training) (3 units)
Prerequisite: All major subjects from 1st–3rd year
ARTV-117 History of Graphic Design (3 units)
This course provides an exploration of visual communication
issues and applications involving design methodology,
problem-solving, and relationship of visual form to
meaning. It explores the evolution of twentieth-century
design styles and theories from the modernist era through
Post‑modernism.
ARTV-118 History of Contemporary Art
(1945–Present) (3 units)
This course examines the art scene after World War II.
It surveys Asian contemporary art and its quest for a dialogue
between meaning in media and the social, economic, political
and cultural context of the time.
ARTV-119 Package Design (3 units)
This is an approach in managing and undertaking applied
concepts in packaging of products. It includes generating
and processing new concepts, designs and innovations using
market research approaches. It helps concretize ideas on how
to develop products for people’s use and engage design in
promoting both economy and marketability.
ARTV-120 Women in Art (3 units)
This course examines the visual representation of women
in art. It emphasizes the examination of the construction of
gender utilizing various theoretical models of analysis.
It also explores the impact of women artists in the perception
of women in art.
ARTV-121 & 122 Senior Exhibition
(with Laboratory) (3 units each)
This is a juried exhibition during the senior year.
Bachelor of
Arts Major in
Communication
The Bachelor of Arts Major in Communication program aims to develop
in students a comprehensive understanding of the nature, basic theories,
and applications of communication.
The curriculum is designed to train students in the design and production
of multi-media products. Knowledge and skills are imparted to students in a
variety of channels such as print, radio, television, online, theater, and film.
Relevant experiences are also provided on the dynamics of interpersonal
and group communications, public relations, advertising, marketing, and
information and communication technology (ICT).
In addition, students are prepared for their entry into the practical world
of development communication where they are expected to contribute
meaningfully to community building and social understanding through
participative and collaborative undertakings.
The degree program aims to develop students to become effective
communicators and practitioners of Miriam College’s core values. Graduates
are expected to be technically competent and ready for the demands of the
field, where their skills in communication management, consensus building,
multi-media presentations, and multi-cultural and community organization
can be put to good use.
Deparmental Academic Standard and Policy
The Department of Communication complies with the CHED Memorandum
Order No. 10, series of 2010, “Policies and Standards for Bachelor of Arts in
Communication Program,” Section 18 of the CMO which states that: Students
admitted into the BA in Communication program must maintain a grade
weighted average of at least 2.5 in all major subjects each semester.
Major subjects: 66 units
COM-101, COM-102, COM-103, COM-104, COM-105, COM-106, COM-107,
COM-108, COM-109, COM-110, COM-111, COM-112, COM-113, COM-114,
COM-115, COM-116, COM-117, COM-118, COM-119, COM-120,
COM-121, COM-122
Major electives: 12 units
COM-123, COM-124, COM-125, COM-126, COM-127, COM-128,
COM-129, COM-130, COM-131, COM-132, COM-133, COM-134, COM-135
Electives may also be taken from the other degree programs.
General education subjects: 97 units
Total number of units: 175 units
Internships are conducted in summer for a minimum of 300
hours of work at design, advertising or media firms approved
by the Department. This training provides a practical arena
for students to test their skills and to pick up additional
knowledge for career planning.
ARTV-115 Typography (3 units)
This course addresses all aspects of typography including
design, composition, legibility, hierarchy, and text/image
relationships. It also provides a fundamental understanding
and appreciation for visual language.
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| 99
First Year
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
E-104
Business English
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
P-101
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
MC-102
T-101
Biblical Foundation of
Christian Faith
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
Total
Units
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Critical Thinking
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
3
S-105/
S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
S-105/
S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
COM-102
Gender and Communication
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
COM-103
Theories of Communication
3
COM-104
Effective Presentation and
Multimedia Techniques
3
1
COM-101
Introduction to Communication
3
COM-107/
COM-106
3
COM-107/
COM-106
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
Introduction to ICT with
Desktop Publishing and
Graphics/Theater Arts:
Theory and Appreciation
3
2
Introduction to ICT with
Desktop Publishing and
Graphics/Theater Arts:
Theory and Appreciation
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
COM-105
Communication and Society
3
21
Total
Units
Second Semester
21
Total
Units
23
Total
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
E-106
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
COM-108
Marketing Principles and
Practice
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
COM-109
Fundamentals of Journalism
3
COM-114
Public Relations:
Principles and Practice
3
COM-110/
COM-111
TV Production/
Radio Production
3
COM-110/
COM-111
TV Production/
Radio Production
3
COM-112
Advertising Principles
and Practice
3
COM-118
Research Writing 1
3
COM-113
Introduction to Communication
Research
3
–
Elective 2
3
–
Elective 1
3
–
–
–
Total
Bulletin of Information
23
Third Year
Summer
100 | Miriam College Units
Units
24
Units
Total
21
www.mc.edu.ph
| 101
Bachelor of
Arts Major in
Communication
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
COM-115
Job Training
3
Total
3
with minor in
Digital Production
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
FL-101
Foreign Language 1
H-104
First Year
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
FL-102
Foreign Language 2
3
E-101
Communication Skills 1
Rizal
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
M-101
COM-117
Film Theory and Practice
3
COM-120
Media Laws and Ethics
3
COM-119
Research Writing 2
3
COM-121
Communication for
Development
COM-116
Communication Management
and Entrepreneurship
3
COM-122
–
Elective 3
3
–
Total
Units
First Semester
18
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
Audio-visual Communication
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
Elective 4
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation of
Christian Faith
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
COM-101
Introduction to Communication
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
Total
Units
Second Semester
18
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
21
Summer
102 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 103
Second Year
Summer
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-104
Business English
P-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Critical Thinking
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
S-105/
S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
S-105/
S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
COM-102
Gender and Communication
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
COM-103
Theories of Communication
3
COM-104
Effective Presentation and
Multimedia Techniques
3
COM-107/
COM-106
Introduction to ICT with
Desktop Publishing and
Graphics/Theater Arts:
Theory and Appreciation
3
COM-107/
COM-106
Introduction to ICT with
Desktop Publishing and
Graphics/Theater Arts:
Theory and Appreciation
3
Individual/Dual Sports
2
Communication and Society
3
PE-103
Total
Units
COM-105
23
Total
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
FIL-103.1
Subject Title
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
E-106
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
COM-108
Marketing Principles and
Practice
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
COM-109
Fundamentals of Journalism
3
COM-114
Public Relations:
Principles and Practice
3
COM-110/
COM-111
TV Production/
Radio Production
3
COM-110/
COM-111
TV Production/
Radio Production
3
COM-112
Advertising Principles
and Practice
3
COM-118
Research Writing 1
3
COM-113
Introduction to Communication
Research
3
COM-133
Digital Sound Production
3
COM-132
Digital Imaging
3
–
–
–
104 | Miriam College 24
Bulletin of Information
COM-115
Job Training
3
Total
3
Fourth Year
Subject Code
Subject Title
FL-101
Foreign Language 1
H-104
Total
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
FL-102
Foreign Language 2
3
Rizal
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
COM-117
Film Theory and Practice
3
COM-120
Media Laws and Ethics
3
COM-119
Research Writing 2
3
COM-121
Communication for
Development
3
COM-116
Communication Management
and Entrepreneurship
3
COM-122
Audio-visual Communication
3
COM-134
Digital Film-making
3
COM-135
Web Design
3
Second Semester
Units
Units
Units
Units
23
Subject Code
Total
Subject Title
First Semester
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Units
Total
18
Total
18
21
www.mc.edu.ph
| 105
Course
Descriptions
COM-101
Introduction to Communication (3 units)
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the basic
processes of interpersonal, group, and mass communication
(e.g., print, broadcast, and other specialized media). The importance and
role of communication in present day Philippine situation, as well as the
communication trends and systems in other countries, are discussed.
The utilization of mass media in the development process is also emphasized
in this course.
COM-102
Gender and Communication (3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
This course provides the students with a critical examination of the state of
Philippine media, specifically its discourses on women and men. The course
helps students to critically analyze the root cause of gender inequalities,
the persistence of concepts and ideas that perpetuate such inequalities, and
the interrelationships of sex-role stereotyping and its translation into social
institutions, like media.
COM-103
Theories of Communication (3 units)
Marketing Principles
and Practice (3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
and COM-103 (Theories of Communication)
This course is meant to provide students with a working
knowledge of marketing, and how particular communication
tools are used in personal selling, merchandising,
advertising, public relations, publicity, and sales promotion.
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts,
principles, and practices of public relations and its
applications to education, government, business and industry,
and other institutions. Practical applications to cases drawn
from the context of Philippine public relations are discussed.
The course also includes the application of communication
theories to public relations, and the orientation on the role of
public relations person as a change-agent.
COM-109
Fundamentals of Journalism (3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
and COM-103 (Theories of Communication)
This course focuses on the principles and practices of
journalism, which involves a discussion of the functions of
the newspaper: the sequence of news, news gathering and
reporting, publication, editorial policies and standards,
etc. The emphasis of the course is on Philippine journalism
applied to print, online, and broadcast media.
COM-110
This course introduces the student to the multi-disciplinary nature of the
theories of communication and their applications in interpersonal, group,
organizational, intercultural and mass communication situations.
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
and COM-103 (Theories of Communication)
This course is a study of speech proficiency and effective oral communication
methods that would improve the student’s presentation skills with special
emphasis on the use of various appropriate media in situations and contexts,
such as education, government, business and industry, and civil society.
It teaches the student how to use high-touch and high-tech tools in an
enabling environment.
COM-105
Communication and Society (3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
This course is a study of the principles of communication and society.
The focus is on the discussion of communication as it affects society
and how society shapes communication.
COM-106
Theater Arts: Theory and Appreciation (3 units)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of the art of drama on stage, with
emphasis on acting, directing, and production design. It aims to develop in
the student an appreciation of the performing self and the universality of
human experience, through the student’s actual participation in the major
phases of stage production.
COM-107
Introduction to Information
and Communication Technology
with Desktop Publishing and Graphics (3 units)
This course specializes in advertising that provides instruction in the use
of certain computer software for making text and graphics. The students are
expected to create, edit and animate text and graphics for publication and
presentation, using the latest computer equipment.
Bulletin of Information
COM-114 Public Relations: Principles and Practice
(3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
and COM-103 (Theories of Communication)
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
COM-104 Effective Presentation and
Multi-media Techniques (3 units)
106 | Miriam College COM-108
Television Production (3 units)
This course is concerned with the understanding of the
nature of television as a medium of communication, and its
production techniques and processes. Students are given
the chance to study various program types and to produce
these programs.
COM-111
Radio Production (3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
and COM-103 (Theories of Communication)
COM-111 is an integration of the fundamentals of radio
scriptwriting, production procedures, and techniques.
Students are exposed to various radio program-types
and are given the chance to conceptualize, plan, and
produce these programs.
COM-112
Advertising Principles
and Practice (3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
and COM-103 (Theories of Communication)
This course is a detailed study of the theory and practice of
advertising. The preparation and implementation of concepts
to media discourse are comprehensively discussed and taught
in this course. Students are given the opportunity to prepare
workable advertising programs.
COM-113
Introduction to Communication Research
(3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-101 (Introduction to Communication)
and COM-103 (Theories of Communication)
This course orients students on the principles and practical
applications of various research methods in the major areas
of communication, with special reference to Philippine
communication problems.
COM-115
Job Training (3 units)
Prerequisite: All major subjects from 1st–3rd year
must be completed
This course is a summer training program that requires
a minimum of 200 hours of work in different areas of
communication, such as advertising, public relations,
communication research, radio, television, film, theatre,
journalism, and others. It enables the students to learn and
apply communication theories and principles in actual
supervised fieldwork.
COM-116
Communication Management and
Entrepreneurship (3 units)
This course deals with organizational principles and practices
related to the management of communication functions. The
emphasis is on the management of human, financial, material,
and information resources.
This course will also allow the students to manage media
enterprises, such as production and publishing houses,
design studios, and other entrepreneurial fields.
COM-117
Film Theory and Practice (3 units)
This is an introductory course on film, in which film theories
and film history are studied. The students are introduced to
the language and grammar of film and are given the chance
to apply the acquired knowledge through a final production
output. Given the existing facilities of the school, the course
provides hands-on training, where editing and directing
techniques are taken up.
COM-118/COM-119 Research Writing 1 and 2
(3 units each)
Prerequisite COM-118: COM-103 (Theories of Communication),
COM-113 (Introduction to
Communication Research)
Prerequisite COM-119: COM-118 (Research Writing 1)
These courses allow the students to work on an original
study that deals with specific problems in communication,
while properly guided by a research coordinator and adviser.
A research paper is to be presented, defended, and passed
before a panel of experts, prior to and as a requirement
for graduation.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 107
COM-120
Media Laws and Ethics (3 units)
This course strengthens the sense of moral obligation and
responsibility of students as aspiring media practitioners.
It provides essential information about how media laws are
made and applied to the professional world. This subject
aims to guide students in discerning what is ethical, what
is legal, and what is moral in the practice of their profession,
especially in journalism, broadcasting, advertising, public
relations, and corporate communication.
COM-121
Communication for Development (3 units)
This course is an interdisciplinary course which seeks
to examine the phenomenon of communication for
development; the theories, concepts, approaches, and
methodologies utilized by various agencies involved in the
process of development and promotion of change, through
communication. It seeks to study the basic communication
policies and strategies related to the modernization
and national development of Third World countries.
The production of a community’s Communication for
Development Plan is a requirement of the course.
COM-122
Audio-Visual Communication (3 units)
This course is an introductory course on the basic techniques
of producing audio-visual materials necessary for the use in
various media, like print, film , television, theater and others.
The production of alternative media forms, like comics,
streamers, posters, flyers, and brochures are also given emphasis.
Electives
COM-123
Principles of Copywriting (3 units)
This course is a detailed study of the creative process and
strategies of advertising, leading towards the preparation
of print copy, radio commercial scripts, storyboards for
television commercials, and multi-media campaigns. Students
are taught to produce correct, effective and interesting
creative materials for advertising, specifically within the
Philippine context.
COM-124 Play Writing (3 units)
This course is a study on the rudiments of play writing.
Conception of ideas and story-structure are emphasized.
At the end of the semester, a dramatic reading of the one-act
plays will be performed in class.
COM-125
Writing for Film (3 units)
This course is a study on screenwriting for films of various
lengths (shorts and features), genres (such as melodrama,
comedy, and horror) and forms (such as documentary and
experimental). Students are guided step-by-step in turning
their original ideas into screenplays. Style, story- structure,
characterization, dramatization, dialogue, and other areas
of practical screenwriting are emphasized.
108 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
COM-126
Writing for Television (3 units)
This course is a study of the rudiments of writing for all
aspects of a television production show (news, drama,
comedy, variety and documentary). The objective of the
course is to come up with scripts meant for television,
from conceptualization to production.
COM-127
Writing for Radio (3 units)
This course is a study of the rudiments of writing for
radio. The scripts will encompass all the aspects of radio
production, from conceptualization to actual production.
The scripts will cover all types of radio programs
(talk show, music, drama, documentary, etc.)
COM-128
Seminar on Audio and Video
Post-Production (3 units)
This course is a study on the art of post-production.
The language and meaning of editing for audio and video
will be discussed. Students will be exposed to the different
audio and video editing styles and techniques of different
editors. Students will also be challenged to produce their own
video projects using non-linear audio and video editing.
COM-129
Aesthetics and Visual
Communication (3 units)
This course is a study on visual literacy, symbol development,
and evolution of meaning in symbols. The students will
be guided through the different levels of interpretation of
imagery and pictures. The students will apply these different
theories of visual literacy in creating and developing effective
and aesthetically viable communication and design.
COM-130
Foundations of Events Communication
and Management (3 units)
This course will highlight the synergy in creative
conceptualization and execution of events communication
and management with other tools of marketing
communication such as advertising, public relations, among
others. The course will cover the foundation principles
and concepts of mounting and communicating an event
from the planning stage to the post-evaluation stage.
Having an event communication plan as its final requirement,
the student will go through the rudiments of events
communication and management.
COM-131
Music in Media (5 units)
This course focuses on basic music writing methods and
application of MIDI (Music Instrument Digital Interface)
technology. It will provide the students with an opportunity
to create their own music through the use of computers,
music software, and other hardware. The course will
highlight the different concepts and processes of musical
innovation and invention.
Minor in Digital Media Production
(12 units)
COM-132
Digital Imaging (3 units)
(Introductory subject, required to complete DMP)
This course is a detailed study of the concepts and techniques
applicable to digital imaging, more specifically in the areas
of photography and illustration. In order to expose students
to the digital imaging workflow, students are to shoot photos
using a Digital SLR Cameras and edit them using Adobe
Photoshop software package. Illustration will be done using
Adobe Illustrator. Course outputs are designed to simulate
actual work for the fields of Graphic Print Production,
Advertising, Public Relations, Internet, Film and Television,
and Fine Arts.
COM-133
Digital Sound Production (3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-132 (Digital Imaging)
This course is a complete study of Digital Sound in theory
and practice. It will expose students to the fundamentals
of sound engineering, re-coding, and production utilizing
multi‑track digital studio workstations. By using Pro-Tools
and other applicable audio software and hardware, students
will produce various sound projects that will cater to the
needs of music producers, advertisers, public relations
practitioners, internet content creator and the broadcast
media companies.
COM-134
Digital Filmmaking (3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-132 (Digital Imaging) and
COM-133 (Digital Sound Production)
This course is a technical study of Digital Filmmaking.
Students are to be exposed to the independent work flow
of, and technologies available for filmmaking. Students are
to plan, shoot and edit their films on 24-P digital video and
Apple Final Cut or Adobe Premiere equipped workstations.
COM-135
Web Design (3 units)
Prerequisite: COM-132 Digital Imaging,
COM-133 Digital Sound Production,
COM-134 Digital Filmmaking
This course is a comprehensive study of the theories and
techniques for Web Design. Students are to Design websites
featuring advanced interface design and multimedia
integration using Macromedia Dreamweaver or Adobe
Go Live, with special emphasis given on establishing a
solid foundation on HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)
coding. Projects will be suited for the process of information
dissemination and e-commerce applications.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 109
Bachelor of Arts
in Psychology
The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology program provides a thorough
understanding of the basic scientific principles in understanding human
behavior and thinking processes. It aims to turn out graduates who will
join the country’s pool of experts in human behavior and productivity
enhancement, researchers in the behavioral sciences, and a potent labor
supply that can assist in bringing about economic development, good
governance, and national development.
A Miriam Psychology student is given a further edge. Alongside
intensive major area studies, a student takes up electives in human resource
management, Sikolohiyang Filipino, Environmental Psychology, Positive
Psychology, Family Psychology, Forensic Psychology and education,
plus subjects in philosophy and communications that will make them more
competitive in the mainstream of business and industry, the academe,
government and private sector, or in applied medical arts. A BA Psychology
student can also choose to minor in Special Education with the College of
Education.
A Graduate of the BA program is prepared for the licensure exam in
psychometrics. She is also ready to pursue graduate studies in Developmental
Psychology at the Miriam College Graduate School or advance studies in
psychology in other graduate schools of any college or university to qualify
in more specialized professions in psychology.
Academic Standards, Policies, and Procedures
All psychology majors must get a MAJOR CQPA (cumulative quality point
average) of 2.4 and above during their second year and onwards.
Major subjects: 36 units
PY-101.1, PY-102.1, PY-102.2, PY-103, PY-104, PY-105, PY-106, PY-109.1,
PY-109.2, PY-110, PY-111
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
PY-101.1
Personality
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PY-102.1/
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
–
–
–
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
24
Required Psychology electives: 18 units
PY-121, PY-122, PY-123, PY-124, PY-125, PY-126
Major electives to minor in Special Education: 19 units
CD-104, CD-104F.1, CD-113, CDS-101, CDS-102, CDS-103, CDS-104.1
Other major electives: 12 units
PY-116, PY-117, PY-118, PY-119, PY-120, PY-127, PY-128
General education subjects: 88 units
Total number of units: 154 units
Elective open to Non-Psychology majors:
For minor in Human Resources Management (Open to Business Courses)
PY-101.1
PY-103
PY-109.1
PY-121
PY-122
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
Personality 3 units
Social Psychology 3 units
Psychological Assessment 3 units
Psychological Elective: Industrial Psychology 3 units
Psychological Elective: Group Dynamics 3 units
Elective for minor in Psychology
PY-101.1
PY-103
PY-104
PY-106
110 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Personality 3 units
Social Psychology 3 units
Development Psychology 3 units
Abnormal Psychology 3 units
www.mc.edu.ph
| 111
Second Year
Summer
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
P-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Critical Thinking
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
S-105/
S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
S-105/
S-106
Biological Sciences/
Physical Sciences
3
PY-102.2
Psychological Statistics
5
PY-105
Experimental Psychology
5
PY-104
Development Psychology
3
PY-121
Industrial Psychology
3
Total
Units
19
Total
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
PY-124
Practicum
3
Total
3
19
Third Year
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
PY-103
Social Psychology
PY-106
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
Abnormal Psychology
3
E-106
PY-109.1
Psychological Assessment
(lecture)
3
PY-109.2
Psychological Assessment
(lab)
PY-122
–
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
H-105
PY-110
Research in Psychology 1
3
2
PY-123
Filipino Psychology
3
Group Dynamics
3
–
Elective 2
3
Elective 1
3
–
–
–
Units
112 | Miriam College 17
Bulletin of Information
Total
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
H-104
Rizal
3
PY-111
Research in Psychology 2
3
PY-126
Current Issues in Psychology
3
PY-125
Physiological Psychology
3
–
Elective 4
3
–
Elective 3
3
–
–
–
Total
Total
Units
Units
18
Units
Total
15
15
www.mc.edu.ph
| 113
Bachelor of Science
in Psychology
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology program incorporates more subjects in
the physical and biological sciences to prepare students who wish to pursue
medical and paramedical courses upon graduation.
Bachelor of Science
in Psychology
A Miriam Psychology student is given a further edge. Alongside
intensive major area studies, a student takes up electives in human resource
management, Sikolohiyang Filipino, sociology, anthropology, and education,
plus subjects in philosophy and communications that will make her more
competitive in the mainstream of business and industry, the academe,
government and private sector, or in applied medical arts.
Medicine track
The curriculum for this program also gives the student opportunities
for personal growth and the development of her potentials through faculty
mentoring in her area of interest in research. Because the approach is
multi‑disciplinary, each student is also made to acquire positive traits and
attitudes in the workplace, and the nurturing of resourcefulness, creativity,
and innovation in the context of clinical, business, or organizational goals.
First Year
A Graduate of both AB and BS Psychology programs is ready to pursue
graduate studies in Developmental Psychology at the Miriam College or
advance studies in psychology in other graduate schools of any college
or university to qualify in more specialized professions in psychology.
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
PY-101.1, PY-102.2, PY-103, PY-104, PY-105, PY-106, PY-109.1, PY-109.2,
PY-110, PY-111, PY-121, PY-122, PY-123, PY-124, PY-125, PY-126
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
Science subjects: 20 units
S-101 LEC/LAB, S-102 LEC/LAB, S-103 LEC/LAB, S-108 LEC/LAB
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
PY-101.1
Personality
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PY-102.1/
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
–
–
–
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
Academic standards, Policies, and Procedures
For the BS Psychological program
1. Students are required to take five-unit courses in biological
and physical sciences.
2. All psychology majors must get a MAJOR CQPA (cumulative quality
point average) of 2.4 and above during their second year onwards.
Major subjects: 51 units
Other major electives for Medicine track: 16 units
S-107 Lec/lab, S-109 Lec/lab, S-110, M-103
Other major electives for Non-medicine track: 12 units
PY-116, PY-117, PY-118, PY-119, PY-120, PY-127, CD-104/CD-104F.1
General education subjects: 82 units
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Total number of units: 172 (medicine track), 168 units (non-medicine track)
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
24
Summer
114 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 115
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
P-101
PE-103
Third Year
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
Critical Thinking
3
PE-104
Individual/Dual Sports
2
T-102.1
First Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
PY-103
Social Psychology
Team Sports
2
PY-106
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
S-101 Lab
General Chemistry – Laboratory
2
PY-121
Industrial Psychology
3
S-101 Lec
General Chemistry – Lecture
3
PY-105
Experimental Psychology
5
PY-104
Development Psychology
3
S-103 Lab
General Zoology – Laboratory
2
PY-102.2
Psychological Statistics
5
S-103 Lec
General Zoology – Lecture
3
Total
21
Total
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
Abnormal Psychology
3
E-106
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
PY-109.1
Psychological Assessment
(lecture)
3
PY-110
Research in Psychology 1
3
PY-109.2
Psychological Assessment
(lab)
2
PY-123
Filipino Psychology
3
PY-122
Group Dynamics
3
H-104
Rizal
3
S-108 Lab
Physics – Laboratory
2
S-109 Lab
Organic Chemistry – Laboratory
2
S-108 Lec
Physics – Lecture
3
S-109 Lec
Organic Chemistry – Lecture
3
Summer
Units
19
Total
20
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
S-107 Lab
Comparative Vertebrate
Anatomy – Laboratory
2
S-107 Lec
Comparative Vertebrate
Anatomy – Lecture
3
Total
5
Bulletin of Information
Units
21
Total
116 | Miriam College Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
PY-124
Practicum
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 117
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
P-102
Bachelor of Science
in Psychology
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
PY-125
Physiological Psychology
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
PY-111
Research in Psychology 2
3
PY-126
Current Issues in Psychology
3
S-102 Lec
General Botany – Lecture
3
M-103
Trigonometry
3
S-102 Lab
General Botany – Laboratory
2
–
–
–
S-110
Biochemistry
3
–
–
–
Non-medicine track
First Year
First Semester
Total
20
Total
15
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
PY-101.1
Personality
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PY-102.1/
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
–
–
–
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
24
Summer
118 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 119
Second Year
Summer
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
P-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Critical Thinking
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
S-101 Lab
General Chemistry – Laboratory
2
PY-121
Industrial Psychology
3
S-101 Lec
General Chemistry – Lecture
3
PY-105
Experimental Psychology
5
PY-104
Development Psychology
3
S-103 Lab
General Zoology – Laboratory
2
PY-102.2
Psychological Statistics
5
S-103 Lec
General Zoology – Lecture
3
Total
Units
21
Total
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
PY-124
Practicum
3
Total
3
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
P-102
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
PY-125
Physiological Psychology
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
PY-111
Research in Psychology 2
3
PY-126
Current Issues in Psychology
3
S-102 Lec
General Botany – Lecture
3
–
Non-medicine track
Elective 4
3
S-102 Lab
General Botany – Laboratory
2
–
–
–
–
Non-medicine track
Elective 3
3
–
–
–
21
Units
Units
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
PY-103
Social Psychology
PY-106
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
Abnormal Psychology
3
E-106
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
PY-109.1
Psychological Assessment
(lecture)
3
PY-110
Research in Psychology 1
3
PY-109.2
Psychological Assessment
(lab)
2
PY-123
Filipino Psychology
3
PY-122
Group Dynamics
3
H-104
Rizal
3
S-108 Lab
Physics – Laboratory
2
–
Non-medicine track
Elective 2
3
S-108 Lec
Physics – Lecture
3
–
–
–
–
Non-medicine track
Elective 1
3
–
–
–
Total
120 | Miriam College Units
22
Bulletin of Information
Total
Units
Total
20
Total
15
18
www.mc.edu.ph
| 121
Course
Descriptions
PSY-101
General Psychology (3 units)
This course gives a study of the basic principles underlying human behavior,
cognition and affect. It aims to provide the student with a general overview
of the field of psychology and focuses on the different perspectives in
analyzing human development, namely: biological, behavior, cognitive,
humanistic, psychoanalytic and sociocultural with emphasis on the scientific
approach to understanding human behavior and mental processes. It is hoped
that in the end the course will facilitate personal awareness and development
in the student.
PY-101.1
Personality (3 units)
Prerequisites: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the various theories of
personality representing the different schools of thought. The emphasis will
be on grasping the basic principles, tools and research methods in observing
understanding and predicting human behavior.
PY-102.2
Psychological Statistics (5 units)
Prerequisites: PY-101.1 (Personality),
M-102/PY-102.1 (Elementary Statistics)
This is a course on the basic concepts and methods of descriptive and
inferential statistics and their use in the design, analysis and interpretation
of Psychological studies.
PY-103
Social Psychology (3 units)
Prerequisites: PSY-101 (General Psychology),
PY-105 (Experimental Psychology)
This course provides a systematic introduction to the field of social
psychology, which studies how other people and social situations influence
the thoughts, feelings and actions of a person. The focus will be on both the
historical development and current research and application of the topics
covered in the course. Special emphasis will be placed on applying social
psychological principles to everyday Filipino life.
PY-104
Development Psychology (3 units)
Prerequisites: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
This course employs a multidisciplinary approach in the study of
developmental changes across the life span of an individual. It likewise
examines the various factors that contribute to those changes in each stage
of the life cycle and how these changes affect human behavior.
PY-105
Experimental Psychology (5 units)
Prerequisites: PY-102.2 (Psychological Statistics),
E-103 (Fundamentals of Research)
This course aims to introduce the students to the theoretical and
methodological bases of scientific research in general, and the psychological
experiment in particular. Students will be trained in designing, conducting,
analyzing and evaluating experiments as well as in reporting the results
through the experiment report.
PY-106
Abnormal Psychology (3 units)
Prerequisite: PY-101.1 (Personality)
This course covers the different major categories of abnormal behavior,
focusing on the three key concerns of diagnosis, causation and therapy.
Current issues, existing research and the clinical aspects are also examined
as each type of disorder is studied.
122 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
PY-109.1
Psychological Assessment – Lecture
(3 units)
Prerequisite: PY-102.2 (Psychological Statistics)
This course is the lecture component of a five-unit course
on psychological assessment. In this course, students will
be exposed to the principles of test/ scale construction.
Emphasis will be on the practical and theoretical issues in
developing a reliable and valid psychological instrument.
PY-109.2
Psychological Assessment – Lab (2 units)
Prerequisite: PY-102.2 (Psychological Statistics)
The course is designed to orient the students with basic
principles, techniques and practices in psychological
assessment as well as introduce them to various testing
materials being used in academic, industrial and clinical
fields. The course will also function as a training ground for
test administration, scoring and test interpretation utilizing
behavioral science knowledge and skills.
PY-110
Research in Psychology 1 (3 units)
Prerequisite:
PY-102.2 (Psychological Statistics),
PY-105 (Experimental Psychology),
PY-109.1 (Psychological Assessment-lec),
PY-109.2 (Psychological Assessment-lab)
This course is a study of the scientific methods of social
and psychological investigation, focusing on the techniques
of problem identification, hypothesis formulation, and
the construction of a research design and data- gathering
instruments. The preparation of a research proposal is
integral to the course.
PY-111
Research in Psychology 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: PY-110 (Research in Psychology 1)
This course is a continuation of PY-110 (Research in
Psychology 1). Students are required to implement a research
project conceptualized and designed during the preceding
semester. Focus of the course is on the gathering, analysis,
and interpretation of data. A required output is a write-up
of the thesis that is orally defended before a panel.
Sikolohiyang Pilipino (3 units)
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
Ang kursong ito ay isang pag-aaral tungkol sa kaganapan,
perspektibo at direksyon ng Sikolohiya pati na rin
ang paggamit ng mga katutubong pamamaraan ng
pananaliksik. Ang ilang mahahalagang sangkap ng kultura
ay tatalakayin din.
PY-118
Family Psychology (3 units)
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to the study
of family behavior and its psychological, social and cultural
dimensions in contemporary Philippine setting. Emphasis
is on the dynamics of family relations, interpersonal
relationships, love and marriage.
PY-119
Introduction to Forensic Psychology
(3 units)
Prerequisite
PY-103 (Social Psychology),
PY-104 (Development Psychology),
PY-105 (Experimental Psychology),
PY-106 (Abnormal Psychology),
PY-109.1 (Psychological Assessment-lec),
PY-109.2 (Psychological Assessment-lab)
This course introduces how psychology is applied in a
forensic setting, specifically its application to legal processes
and issues, including an understanding of the psychological
aspects of criminal behavior.
PY-120
Basic Psychotherapeutic Interventions
(3 units)
Prerequisite: PY-101.1 (Personality)
This course gives an overview on the study and practice of
the principles of counseling psychology and psychotherapy.
It also focuses on the theoretical approaches, an
understanding of the therapeutic process, application of
the skills and techniques to different situation in therapy
and an awareness of the different issues that may affect the
psychotherapeutic process.
PY-121
Electives
PY-116
PY-117
Industrial Psychology (3 units)
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
Human Resource Management (3 units)
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
This course aims to familiarize students with various aspects
of Human Resource Management, including its functions
and responsibilities as well as the role that HR plays in
contributing to the success of the organization. The course
also identifies the current challenges that HR faces as a result
of the fast paced technological changes and globalization
as well as increasing organizational competitiveness. It
also examines employees and organizations at the micro
and macro levels, to enable the students to have a wider
perspective of the HR system.
This course is designed to introduce the students to the
growing field of industrial Psychology: its development,
and the application of principles governing the different
facets of human resources. It describes work organizations,
the workers and their distinct and common goals. This
course also aims to explain the interplay between these
primary components. Special emphasis is given to both the
science and the practice of the discipline, relating these to the
Philippine setting.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 123
PY-122
Group Dynamics (3 units)
PY-127
Environment Psychology (3 units)
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
This is an introductory course on the dynamics of small
group interaction and how the individual as well as the group
grows as a result of the interaction. This course also provides
experience directed at improving the students’ understanding
of group processes and builds their sensitivity to group
behavior. It aims to develop students’ facilitation skills and
leadership style.
The world faces an ecological crisis, a crisis brought about
by maladaptive human behavior. This course introduces
some of the most pressing environmental issues, with special
emphasis on the context and state of the environment.
The course will provide an overview of the theoretical and
practice tools of psychology that can be applied to understand
the causes of the environment problems, and to formulate
potential solutions. This course will underscore reciprocal
relationship of human beings with the natural world, with
the specific objective of promoting sustainability. It is hoped
that at the end of the course, you will acquire the knowledge
and skills to become effective agents and communicators of
change for the environment.
PY-123
Filipino Psychology (3 units)
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
This course is a study of the development perspective,
and directions of Filipino psychology with emphasis on
contemporary views/issues and indigenous methods and
application of research. Interrelated aspects of Philippine
culture such as Filipino personality, Filipino family, dominant
and popular culture and socioeconomics and political
structure are examined.
PY-124
Practicum (3 units)
Prerequisite:
PY-106 (Abnormal Psychology),
PY-109.1 (Psychological Assessment-lec),
PY-109.2 (Psychological Assessment-lab),
PY-121 (Psychology Elective 1: Industrial Psychology),
PY-122 (Psychology Elective 2: Group Dynamic)
This is a course designed to provide the students the
opportunity to be engaged in a task that would put to use the
knowledge and skills learned in the major courses as well as
the chance to specialize in any particular area of her choice.
A system of evaluation and follow-up integral to the course.
PY-125 Physiological Psychology (3 units)
PY-128
Positive Psychology (3 units)
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
This course introduces the students to a study about
the positive, the adaptive, the creative, and the emotionally
fulfilling characteristics of optimally functioning human
individuals, groups, and institutions, based on the character
strengths and virtues identified in positive psychology.
The core values of Miriam College, namely, truth, peace,
justice, and integrity of creation will also be discussed.
Specifically, it looks at positive emotions or the positive
subjective states of a person (e.g., joy, love, vitality) as well
as the positive individual traits (e.g., courage, wisdom,
justice). On the group or societal level, this course focuses
on the study of the development, creation, and maintenance
of positive institutions such as the advancement of civic
virtues, the formation of healthy families, the study of healthy
occupational environments, and positive communities.
Bachelor of Science
in Biology
The Bachelor of Science in Biology program is designed as, but not limited
to, a pre-medicine course but also opens doors to a wide range of work
opportunities as a professional Biologist/Microbiologist.
The strength of the program lies on the comprehensive selection and
sequences of non-biology tool courses, biology core courses and biology
electives which bring in trends and new developments in biology. The
inclusion of analytical chemistry serves as a tool to strengthen students’
knowledge and skills to perform quality analytical work for the bio-sciences.
The four-unit course in special problems fosters research capability and
integrity of scientific inquiry through public viewing and critiquing of
students’ research outputs.
The program has two tracks: the pre-medicine track which prepares
students who plan to pursue a degree in medicine and the micro-biological
research track which equips students to undertake quality research
and development work, bio-science and industrial-related activities.
The microbiological track qualifies students to take the licensure examination
for Registered Microbiologist given by the Philippine Academy for Microbiology.
Major subjects: 107 units
Core Biology subjects: 48 units
S-104 LEC/LAB, S-111 LEC/LAB, S-113 LEC/LAB, S-115 LEC/LAB; S-117 LEC/
LAB, S-118 LEC/LAB, S-122 LEC/LAB, S-124, S-125, S-126 LEC/LAB,
S-127 LEC/LAB; S-131, S-132 LEC/LAB, S-133 LEC/LAB, S-134 LEC/LAB
Biology electives: 24 units
S-119 LEC/LAB, S-123 LEC/LAB, S-128 LEC/LAB, S-129 LEC/LAB, S-130 LEC/
LAB, S-135 LEC/LAB, S-136 LEC/LAB, S-137 LEC/LAB, S-138 LEC/LAB, S-139
LEC/LAB, S-140 LEC/LAB, S-141 LEC/LAB, S-142 LEC/LAB, S-143 LEC/LAB,
S-144 LEC/LAB
Non-Biology Tool subjects: 35 units
S-101 LEC/LAB, S-109 LEC/LAB, S-112 LEC/LAB, S-114, S-116 LEC/LAB,
S-120 LEC/LAB, S-121 LEC/LAB, M-103, M-109
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
General education subjects: 82 units
This is an introductory regarding the biological basis of
behavior. This course will focus on the relationship between
the brain and human behavior, encompassing sensation,
perception, emotion, and higher cognitive processes
including language and memory.
Free electives: 6 units
PY-126
Total number of units: 195 units
Current Issues in Psychology (3 units)
Prerequisite: PSY-101 (General Psychology)
This is an advanced seminar course that will tackle current
issues and research in a particular sub-area of psychology
such as women and psychology, positive psychology,
children in difficult circumstance, peace psychology,
psycho‑spirituality, the psychology of labor relations, the
psychology of crime and violence, etc. The course may focus
on only one or on a number of current issues within the
semester. The course will also tackle the PAP Code of Ethics
for Psychologists.
124 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 125
Second Year
First Year
First Semester
First Semester
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
CT-112
Advanced Computer Biology
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
P-101
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
3
M-103
Trigonometry
General Chemistry – Lecture
3
MC-102
S-101 Lab
General chemistry – Laboratory
2
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
PE-101
–
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Critical Thinking
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
M-109
Calculus with Analytic
Geometry
3
S-114
Statistics for Biology
3
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
S-109 Lec
Organic Chemistry – Lecture
3
S-112 Lec
Analytical Chemistry – Lecture
3
1
S-104 Lec
General Biology – Lecture
3
S-109 Lab
Organic Chemistry – Laboratory
2
S-112 Lab
Analytical Chemistry –
Laboratory
2
Physical Fitness
2
S-104 Lab
General Biology – Laboratory
2
S-111 Lec
General Biology 2 – Lecture
3
S-115 Lec
General Microbiology – Lecture
3
–
–
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
S-111 Lab
General Biology 2 – Laboratory
2
S-115 Lab
General Microbiology –
Laboratory
2
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
College Algebra
3
NSTP 1.1
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
S-101 Lec
Total
Units
20
Total
Units
Total
23
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
Total
126 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Units
24
Units
Total
22
Summer
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
3
S-113 Lab
Fundamentals of Ecology –
Laboratory
2
3
S-113 Lec
Fundamentals of Ecology –
Lecture
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
Total
7
www.mc.edu.ph
| 127
Fourth Year
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
First Semester
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
S-126 Lec
Plant Physiology – Lecture
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
S-126 Lab
Rizal
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
E-106
3
H-104
Units
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
S-124
Seminar (Special Topics)
1
SEC-116 Lec
General Physics 1 – Lecture
3
S-120 Lec
General Physics 2 – Lecture
3
SEC-116 Lab
General Physics 1 – Laboratory
2
S-120 Lab
General Physics 2 – Laboratory
1
S-117 Lec
Elementary Genetics – Lecture
3
S-121 Lec
Biochemistry – Lecture
3
S-117 Lab
Elementary Genetics –
Laboratory
2
S-121 Lab
Biochemistry – Laboratory
2
S-118 Lec
Plant Morphoanatomy – Lecture
3
S-122 Lec
Animal Morphoanatomy –
Lecture
2
S-118 Lab
Plant Morphoanatomy –
Laboratory
2
S-122 Lab
Animal Morphoanatomy –
Laboratory
1
Biology Elective 1 – Lecture
2
Biology Elective 2 – Lecture
2
Biology Elective 1 – Laboratory
Total
1
25
Biology Elective 2 – Laboratory
Total
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
2
S-133 Lec
Animal Physiology – Lecture
2
Plant Physiology – Laboratory
1
S-133 Lab
Animal Physiology – Laboratory
1
S-127 Lec
Cell and Molecular Biology –
Lecture
2
S-134 Lec
Development Biology – Lecture
2
S-127 Lab
Cell and Molecular Biology –
Laboratory
1
S-134 Lab
Development Biology –
Laboratory
1
S-131
Special Problems in Biology 2
2
–
Biology Elective 6 – Lecture
2
S-132 Lec
Systematic Biology – Lecture
2
–
Biology Elective 6 – Laboratory
1
S-132 Lab
Systematic Biology –
Laboratory
1
–
Biology Elective 7 – Lecture
2
–
Biology Elective 3 – Lecture
2
–
Biology Elective 7 – Laboratory
1
–
Biology Elective 3 – Laboratory
1
–
Biology Elective 8 – Lecture
2
–
Biology Elective 4 – Lecture
2
–
Biology Elective 8 – Laboratory
1
–
Biology Elective 4 – Laboratory
1
–
Free Elective 1
3
–
Biology Elective 5 – Lecture
2
–
Free Elective 2
3
–
Biology Elective 5 – Laboratory
1
–
–
–
1
25
Total
20
Total
21
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
S-125
Special Problems in Biology 1
2
E-110
Technical Writing
3
Total
5
128 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Units
www.mc.edu.ph
| 129
Course
Descriptions
S-101 LEC General Chemistry – Lecture (3 units)
S-112 LEC Analytical Chemistry – Lecture (2 units)
S-115 LEC General Microbiology (Lecture) (3 units)
This course deals with basic chemistry concepts that include atomic structure
and quantum mechanics, periodic table of elements, chemical bonds and
intermolecular forces of attraction and kinetic molecular theory of gases.
The fundamentals of thermodynamics, stoichiometry, and kinetics and
rates of reactions during a chemical change are also included. Special topics
include the composition/structure and properties of bioinorganics and
industrial chemicals.
Prerequisites: S-101 LEC (General Chemistry) and
M-101 (College Algebra)
Prerequisites: S-111 LEC (General Biology 2)
S-101 LAB General Chemistry – Laboratory (2 units)
This is a laboratory course designed to develop basic laboratory skills and
experimental techniques. It includes a series of experiments and exercises that
illustrate and reinforce key concepts covered in general chemistry lecture.
S-104 LEC General Biology 1 – Lecture (3 units)
An introduction to biology course that deals with the basic concepts and
principles of general biology with emphasis on the structure and function
of cells, tissues, and organ systems.
S-104 LAB General Biology 1 – Laboratory (2 units)
This is a laboratory course that gives emphasis on experiments of plants
and animal cells, tissues and organ systems. Microscopic investigation
together with the gross morphology of tissues and organs are also examined.
S-109 LEC Organic Chemistry – Lecture (3 units)
Prerequisite: S-101 LEC (General Chemistry)
A one semester lecture course covering basic concepts in organic chemistry.
Topics include hybridization, isomerism, organic structures, reactions
and mechanisms. The concept that organic structures determine chemical
reactivity and physical properties is given emphasis. It also includes a brief
study of the structure and properties of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins.
S-109 LAB Organic Chemistry – Laboratory (2 units)
Prerequisite: S-101 LAB (General Chemistry)
This is a laboratory course covering experiments on separation and
purification of organic compounds, basic organic chemical reactions, organic
synthesis, and qualitative organic analysis. Experiments dealing with the
properties of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins are also included.
S-112 LAB Analytical Chemistry – Laboratory
(1 unit)
Prerequisites: S-101 LAB (General Chemistry) and
M-101 (College Algebra)
A one semester laboratory course that provides students
with the skills and intelligent choices among the many
possible ways of solving an analytical problem from which
the students will develop the appreciation for the pitfalls and
limitations of a physical measurement in terms of sensitivity
and accuracy. Experiments will include: separation and
qualitative characterization of metal and non-metal ions,
isolation and quantitative measurement of inorganic and
/or organic compounds using Potentiometric methods,
Chromatography, or UV, Visible, Mass Spectrophotometry.
S-113 LEC Fundamentals of Ecology – Lecture
(3 units)
Prerequisites: S-111 LEC (General Biology 2)
This course deals with the study of patterns of interaction
between the physical environment and the biological
communities on earth. Emphasis is also given on current,
environmental issues and concerns.
S-113 LAB Fundamentals of Ecology – Laboratory)
(1 unit)
S-111 LEC General Biology 2 – Lecture (3 units)
Prerequisites: S-111 LAB (General Biology 2)
Prerequisite: S-104 LEC (General Biology 1)
This laboratory course deals with the basic principles and
methodologies pertaining to population and community
structure and interactions. The course will also focus on
the assessment of environmental quality.
This fundamental course is a continuation of General Biology I with
concentration on organ systems particularly the reproductive system.
Developmental biology, taxonomy, genetics, evolution, and ecology are also
discussed. Topics on recent environmental issues and concerns and bioethical
issues are also tackled.
S-111 LAB General Biology 2 – Laboratory (2 units)
Prerequisite: S-104 LAB (General Biology 1)
Laboratory activities deal with the study of reproductive patterns and
development in plants and animals. Laboratory exercises also include
taxonomic identification of different plant and animal species, genetics
and ecology.
130 | Miriam College A one-semester course on chemical and instrumental
methods for the bio-sciences. It begins with an introduction
to the fundamentals of sampling and sample preparation, and
the theoretical framework for the qualitative analysis of metal
and non-metal ions. Principles of selected Analytical Tools for
the Bio-sciences will be discussed to include: Potentiometric
Techniques, Spectrophotometry (UV, VIS, IR, AA, and Mass
Spectrophotometry), Radiochemistry, Chromatography,
Electrophoresis, and Immunochemical Techniques.
Bulletin of Information
S-114
Statistics for Biology (3 units)
Prerequisites: M-101 ( College Algebra) and
M-109 (Trigonometry)
This is a course on appropriate statistical procedures for
experimental research and surveys for the bio-sciences. Tests
such as T-test, F-test, chi-square test and analysis of variance
are covered.
This course provides basic concepts in the study of
the morphology, classification, taxonomy, metabolism,
genetics, and control of the microorganisms that include
archaebacteria, bacteria, cyanobacteria, protozoa, fungi,
algae, and viruses. These studies emphasize the contribution
of microbiology to the basic understanding of fundamental
processes and provide insight into how microbiology impacts
our everyday life.
S-115 LAB General Microbiology – Laboratory
(2 units)
Prerequisite: S-111 LAB (General Biology 2)
This course utilizes a practical approach to study
microorganisms and offers student a comprehensive
knowledge of the fundamentals of microbiology. It includes
classification and identification of microorganisms,
physiology (nutrition and metabolism, growth, viability)
and microbiology of air, water, soil, food, industrial and
medical microbiology. Proper laboratory techniques and
methods in handling microorganisms under aseptic
conditions will be emphasized.
S-116 LEC General Physics 1 – Lecture (3 units)
Prerequisites: M-101 (College Algebra) and M-109 (Trigonometry)
A one-semester course which covers the fundamental
concepts of mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, electricity
and magnetism and special topics on contemporary
applications to the different fields.
S-116 LAB General Physics 1 – Laboratory (1 unit)
Prerequisites: M-101 (College Algebra) and M-109 (Trigonometry)
A one-semester laboratory course designed to reinforce
the fundamental concepts taken in the lecture component
which includes mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids,
electricity, and magnetism.
S-117 LEC/LAB Elementary Genetics
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisites:
S-111 LEC and LAB (General Biology 2)
This course deals with fundamental concepts and techniques
in Genetics. It covers chromosomal basis of heredity,
Mendelian Genetics, modifications of Mendelian Genetics,
linkage and mapping, molecular basis of inheritance, gene
expression, DNA technologies, developmental, quantitative
and population genetics.
The laboratory course deals with analysis of genetic
data, solving problems in Genetics, and familiarization
with some genetic techniques. It covers problems and
exercises on chromosomal basis of heredity, Mendelian
Genetics, modifications of Mendelian Genetics, linkage and
mapping, molecular basis of inheritance, gene expression,
DNA technologies, developmental, quantitative and
population genetics.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 131
S-118 LEC/LAB Plant Morphoanatomy
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisites:
S-111 LEC and LAB (General Biology 2)
Basic course on the form and external features (morphology)
and internal structure (anatomy) of vascular plants taking
representative examples from Phylum Lycophyta (clubmosses,
spike mosses and quilworts), Phylum Pterophyta (ferns,
horsetails and whisk ferns), Phylum Ginkgophyta, (Ginkgo),
Phylum Cycadophyta (cycads), Phylum Gnetophyta (gnetum),
Phylum Coniferophyta (conifers) and Phylum Anthophyta
(flowering plants). Emphasis will be given on angiosperms.
Structure-function relationship will be emphasized.
The origin and development of the various kinds of cells
and tissues of roots, stem and leaves will also be covered.
The laboratory component involves microscopic
examination and characterization of cells and tissues of
the root, stem, leaf, flower, fruit and seeds. The different
stages of development of the plant organs will be traced.
Macroscopic examination and diagnostic features of the
plant organs will be observed.
S-119 LEC/LAB Biology Elective –
Microbial Taxonomy
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-115 (General Microbiology)
This course deals with the morphology, reproduction,
life cycles, taxonomy, and phylogeny of microorganisms.
The laboratory and field exercises deal with the
morphological and genetic bases of classification of bacteria,
protozoa, fungi, and algae.
S-120 LEC General Physics 2 – Lecture (3 units)
Prerequisite: S-116 LEC (General Physics 1)
General Physics II covers the topics on wave motion, sound,
electromagnetic waves, light and its properties, mirrors and
lenses, introduction to the theory on special relativity and
wave-particle duality. Special topics on the applications of
Physics to the different fields can be assigned to the students.
S-120 LAB General Physics 2 – Laboratory (1 unit)
Prerequisite: S-116 LAB (General Physics 1)
General Physics II Lab is designed to reinforce the concepts
of wave, motion, sound, electromagnetic waves, light, mirrors,
and lenses.
S-121 LEC Biochemistry – Lecture (3 units)
Prerequisite: S-109 LEC (Organic Chemistry)
An introductory 3-unit course in Biochemistry for science
major students who want to pursue a profession in medicine,
and other health or allied sciences. Biochemistry is the study
of the chemistry of living species. It deals with “molecular
logic of the living state”- the set of ground rules that govern
the nature, function, and interaction of specific types of
molecules called “biomolecules” found in living organisms to
maintain and perpetuate the living state. Part 1 of the course
gives an introduction to the ionic environment (ionization
, acids, bases, and buffers) of living systems followed
132 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
by the topics on the structure and functions of proteins,
carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids, and catalysis and
enzyme action. Part 2 explores cellular pathways for the
interconversion of different forms of energy, the generation of
ATP and other energy storing molecules, and the workings of
the genetic code.
S-121 LAB Biochemistry – Laboratory (2 units)
Prerequisite: S-109 LAB (Organic Chemistry)
A one semester laboratory course which aims to reinforce
learning of structure-function relationships of biomolecules
of the living system. It includes experiments on the detection,
isolation and characterization of carbohydrates, proteins,
lipids and nucleic acids and their metabolites in biological,
food, and drug samples. Enrichment experiments on
digestion of food enzymes activity and energy production in
living cells are included.
S-122 LEC/LAB Animal Morphoanatomy
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisites:
S-111 LEC and LAB (General Biology 2)
Studies major vertebrate phyla of the animal kingdom with
respect to morphological and taxonomic characteristics,
evolutionary relationships, environmental adaptations and
life cycles of representative types. The laboratory component
requires dissections of various examples of vertebrates.
S-123 LEC/LAB Biology Elective –
Microbial Physiology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
This course will provide a conceptual background in
Microbial Physiology. It will facilitate learning on the many
metabolic reactions a microbial cell carries out to yield the
energy needed for growth and division. The mechanisms of
microbial growth and the methods used to measure it will
also be discussed.
The lab will provide a working knowledge, through
practical application, of concepts dealing with Microbial
Physiology. Students will be guided in performing
experiments on microbial growth, quantification,
characterization and identification, and susceptibility
to different environmental influences.
S-124
Seminar (Special Topics in Biology) (1 unit)
This course is designed to broaden students’ knowledge
of some of the most recent advances in the field of Biology.
Students are required to do library work to keep them
updated with the current literatures in various areas of
Biology for which the summary of their research will be
presented orally. At the end of the semester, they are expected
to write a research proposal of a particular topic of interest.
S-125
Special Problems in Biology 1
(Supervised Lab) (2 units)
Prerequisite: S-124 (Special Topics in Biology)
A course that provides opportunity for the acquisition of
skills, training, and experience in basic and applied research.
Students are expected to conduct a scientific investigation
based on a research proposal under the supervision of a
faculty adviser.
S-126 LEC/LAB Plant Physiology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-118 LEC and LAB (Plant Morphoanatomy)
A study of the chemical, physical, and biological activities
of seed plants. Photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration,
senescence, dormancy, photoperiodism, translocation, and
endogenous rhythms will be studied, including the role of
hormones, auxins, phytochromes, pigment, energy transport
systems, and enzymes, in regulating the physiological
processes of plants. The modern roles of plant physiology
in energy production, industrial resources, and agriculture
productivity are discussed.
S-127 LEC Cell and Molecular Biology – Lecture
(2 units)
Prerequisites: S-111 LEC (General Biology 2)
This course is an introduction to cell and molecular biology
that discusses the structure and function of the different
components of the cell at the molecular level as well as
the fundamental principles on structure and organization
of genes including gene expression and regulation. Cell
communication will also be discussed.
S-127 LAB Cell and Molecular Biology – Laboratory
(1 unit)
Prerequisites: S-111 LAB (General Biology 2)
Cell and Molecular Biology laboratory course provides
hands‑on exercises in microscopy, isolation and
characterization of biomolecules and basic techniques
in molecular biology.
S-128 LEC/LAB Biology Elective – Microbial Genetics
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
This course provides basic concepts in the study of the
microbial genetics. The course will teach students to
understand the processes involved in the genomic level of
organization in microorganisms. Topics will include basics
such as the Central Dogma to more complex topics of Gene
regulation, Genetic engineering and Microbial genomics.
Students’ critical thinking abilities will be used to understand
case studies about the topics.
The lab utilizes a molecular approach to the study of
microorganisms. This course will supplement the conceptual
knowledge of students on microbial genetics by doing
experiments involving molecular processes. It includes basic
molecular procedures and identification of microorganisms
using molecular data and computer applications. Proper
laboratory techniques and the importance of a sterile
working environment in the laboratory will be reinforced
to the students.
S-129 LEC/LAB Biology Elective – Microbial Ecology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit )
Prerequisite:
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
Fundamental principles and methodology in the study of
microbial interactions in natural ecosystems; their association
with plant and animals and their transformation of elements
in soil and aquatic habitats.
The laboratory utilizes a practical approach to study
microorganisms and offers student a comprehensive
knowledge of the fundamentals of microbial ecology. It
includes study of microorganisms from air, water, soil, and
food. Proper laboratory techniques and methods in handling
microorganisms under aseptic conditions will be emphasized.
S-130 LEC/LAB Biology Elective –
Medical Microbiology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
This course is about how the microbial world affects the life
and health of human beings. It will discuss how bacteria,
fungi, parasites and viruses are able to invade the human
body, and cause it to become sick. It will also discuss the
manifestations of infectious diseases, its spread, and how the
human body and society protects itself from such diseases.
The laboratory component of medical microbiology will
demonstrate how the microbial world affects the life and
health of human beings. Students in the course will learn
how to safely handle pathogenic bacteria, how to identify
unknown pathogens and cultivate them, as well as how to
correctly extract samples from patients.
S-131
Special Problem in Biology 2
(Supervised Laboratory) (2 units)
Prerequisite: S-125 (Special Problem in Biology 1)
Students are expected to continue and complete their
laboratory or field work. Final requirement for graduation
includes a publishable scientific paper and a poster paper
presentation on the outcome of the accomplished research for
public viewing and critiquing.
S-132 LEC/LAB Systematic Biology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisites:
S-111 LEC and LAB (General Biology 2)
A study of the principles of taxonomy, nomenclature,
classification, and systematic incorporating the most recent
approaches to derivation and application of hierarchical
classification systems. The one-unit laboratory component
involves exercises on applications of phylogenetics in the
study of character evolution, biogeography, co-evolution and
molecular evolution.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 133
S-133 LEC/LAB Animal Physiology (Lecture – 2 units,
Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-122 LEC and LAB (Animal Morphoanatomy)
This course introduces the concepts of vertebrate physiology,
emphasizing functions, mechanisms, and controls of the
various vertebrate organ systems. The laboratory component
provides students with an introduction to the methods and
procedures in physiological research.
S-134 LEC/LAB Developmental Biology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisites:
S-111 LEC and LAB (General Biology 2)
This course is an introduction into the changes and
progress from a single cell, to a fertilized egg, to a
complex multi‑cellular organism with special emphasis
on mammalian and human development. It will look into
the molecular, cellular and organismic changes during
development. As well as the mechanisms that control
developmental processes. The fields of embryology,
morphology, genetics and evolutionary biology are linked
together to provide an overview of animal development.
S-138 LEC/LAB Biology Elective –
Industrial Microbiology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of fermentation
and enzyme technology. The emphasis is on screening,
strain development, fermentation substrates, elementary
fermentation kinetics, the formation, extraction, properties
and uses of primary metabolites, secondary metabolites, as
well as enzymes and microbial proteins.
S-139 LEC/LAB Biology Elective –
Food Microbiology
(Lecture – 2 unit, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
A study of the interactions between microorganisms and
foods, spoilage problems, microorganisms involved in
spoilage and food-borne diseases and the control of the
growth of these microorganisms on foods. The use of
microorganisms in the food and dairy industry and current
topics in food microbiology will be discussed.
S-135 LEC/LAB Biology Elective –
Biomedical Applications
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
S-140 LEC/LAB Biology Elective –
Introduction to Food Chemistry
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
Prerequisite:
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
This course deals with the study of modern concepts and
current applications in the field of biomedical science. The
laboratory will emphasize the advances of molecular biology
and biotechnology and its relevance in the medical field.
S-136 LEC/LAB Biology Elective –
Parasitology (Lecture – 2 units,
Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
S-109 LEC and LAB (Organic Chemistry)
This course deals with the basic principles and concepts in
Food Chemistry. It shall cover the chemical composition,
properties and transformation of fats, proteins, carbohydrates,
vitamins and minerals during storage and cooking of
food materials. An understanding of such properties and
transformation is vital in the control of food processes to
ensure uniform and quality food products that the consumer
market expects. It also includes a chapter on the functions
and control of the use of food additives.
This course focuses on the study of the morphology,
physiology, taxonomy and life cycles of parasites of medical
importance. The host-parasite interaction is also included.
S-141 LEC/LAB Biology Elective –
Freshwater Biology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
S-137 LEC/LAB Biology Elective – Immunology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
Prerequisite:
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
This course includes an introduction to cellular cooperation
in immune response, allergy, cell surface antigen receptors,
immunochemistry, cancer immunology, fetal and neonatal
immunology, autoimmunity, immune complex and
mechanisms of resistance to infections. A basic training that
deals with the biological and molecular basis of cell mediated
and humoral immunity will be included
S-113 LEC and LAB (Fundamentals of Ecology)
Interactions of physical, chemical, and biological properties of
freshwater ecosystems (i.e. groundwater, wetlands, lakes, and
streams.). The laboratory component will involve laboratory
and field exercises devoted to understanding the interactions
of physical, chemical, and biological properties of freshwater
ecosystems, and instrumentation, measurement, sampling
and analysis.
S-142 LEC/LAB Biology Elective – Marine Biology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
S-144 LEC/LAB Biology Elective – Virology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
Prerequisite:
S-113 LEC and LAB (Fundamentals of Ecology)
This course begins with a brief introduction to the physical,
chemical, and ecological processes that affect the major
features of the ocean. Such topics may include plate tectonics,
ocean circulation, tidal cycles, and shoreline processes.
This provides a general background for understanding
the biology of marine organisms, preparing the way for
discussion on the adaptations of animals and plants to
a saltwater existence, and the different kinds of marine
habitats and the diversity, abundance and distribution of
organisms associated with them, as well as selected examples
of population and community ecology of marine ecosystems
and their productivity. In addition, various aspects of
applied ecology, which may include commercial fisheries,
mariculture, and marine pollution, will be considered.
S-143 LEC/LAB
Biology Elective –
Basic Human Anatomy
and Physiology
(Lecture – 2 units, Laboratory – 1 unit)
Prerequisite:
S-104 LEC and LAB (General Biology 1)
for BS Biology,
S-103 LEC and LAB (General Zoology)
for BS Psychology
S-115 LEC and LAB (General Microbiology)
This course will study viruses that can infect plants, animals
and humans. Emphasis will be on the molecular biology of
host-virus interactions. Topics will include viral replication,
gene expression, symptoms, transmission, and control of
different representative viruses. Current trends on emerging
and re-emerging viral infections and other topics important
to virology will be discussed.
In the laboratory, the course will include the appreciation
and applications of virology. Emphasis will be on the
methodologies, modeling and advances on viral structure,
nomenclature, replication and transmission. Trends on the
epidemiology of viruses and their impacts on public health
will also be described along with emerging and re-emerging
viral infections.
This is an introductory course to human anatomy and
physiology for pre-medical students and those interested in
gaining a deeper knowledge of the human body. The course
will deal with topics on the structure of the human body,
and its relationship to function. This course runs in close
conjunction with the laboratory class. When possible and
appropriate, references to common or unique human diseases
will also be used as a means to further show how both
structure and function affect human health.
The laboratory course will deal with topics on the
structure of the human body, and its relationship to function.
The laboratory activities aim to demonstrate this correlation.
When possible and appropriate, references to common
or unique human diseases will also be used as a means
to further show how both structure and function affect
human health.
The laboratory utilizes a practical approach to study cells
and organs of the immune system, with application on
production and characterization of polyclonal antibodies in
mice. Proper laboratory techniques and methods in handling
microorganisms under aseptic conditions and care and
handling of laboratory mice will be emphasized.
134 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 135
Bachelor of Science
in Environmental
Planning and
Management
With the escalating global environmental problems on resource degradation,
climate change, pollution and urban congestion, which resulted in serious
natural disasters and loss of lives of millions of people, the Environmental
Planning and Management (EPM) course provides the education, training,
and skills needed to help plan and manage a sustainable future for our
communities and country.
The program has two tracks:
1. Corporate Environmental Management—This career track will
equip students with technical knowledge on environmental quality
standards, pollution and waste management, and environmental cost
management, needed in assisting business firms to be compliant with
local and international environmental regulations while maintaining
the productivity and viability of their business operations. The course
also provides knowledge on the requirements and procedures in securing
Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) and in formulating
environmental management systems based on ISO (International
Organization for Standardization) standards.
Bachelor of Science
in Environmental
Planning and
Management
Corporate
Environmental
Management Track
2. Urban Planning and Green Architecture—This career track will equip
students with computer-aided planning and architectural skills on
Geographic Information System (GIS), Auto CAD, and others, backed-up
with knowledge on green architectural aesthetics and design techniques,
needed in developing environment-friendly and sustainable technologies
for site, town, and city planning.
EPM students learn from field experiences in different parts of the country
and from interaction with communities, business entities, government and
advocacy groups. They work and learn as a team and, through these, are able
to hone their leadership skills as well.
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
EPC-101, EPC-102, EPC-103, EPC-104, EPC-105, EPC-106, EPC-107, EPC-108,
S-101 (Lec and lab), S-104 (Lec and lab)
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
Urban Planning and Green Architecture: 36 units
MC-101
1
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
EPU-101, EPU-102, EPU-103, EPU-104, EPU-105, EPU-106, EPU-107, EPU-108,
EPU-109, EPU-110
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
EPM-101
Introduction to Environmental
Planning and Management
3
EPM students closely collaborate with the Environmental Studies Institute
(ESI) of Miriam College on their research and advocacy work where they learn
by blending theory and practice.
Common major subjects: 42 units
EPM-101, EPM-117, EPM-123, EPM-124, EPM-125, EPM-126, EPM-127, EPM-128,
EPM-129, EPM-130, EPM-131, EPM-132, EPM-133, EPM-134
Specialization subjects:
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Units
Corporate Environmental Management: 40 units
Electives: 12 units
Total
General education subjects: 85 units (for Corporate Environmental
Management); 91 units (for Urban Planning and Green Architecture)
Total number of units: 179 units (for Corporate Environmental Planning)
181 units (for Urban Planning and Green Architecture)
136 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
21
Units
Total
21
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 137
Second Year
Summer
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
ECO-100
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
H-104
Rizal
3
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
E-104
Business English
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
Environmental Geography
3
EPM-123
Units
Units
EPM-124
Alternative Theories and
Concepts of Sustainable
Development
3
Fundamentals of Environmental
Science
3
EPM-126
Solid Waste Management
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
EPM-127
Introduction to Geo-hazard
Assessment and the EIA
Process
3
23
Total
23
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
S-101 Lec
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
General Chemistry – Lecture
3
E-106
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
S-101 Lab
General Chemistry – Laboratory
2
S-104 Lec
General Biology 1 – Lecture
3
EPC-101
Energy Security and
Sustainable Development
3
S-104 Lab
General Biology 2 – Laboratory
2
EPM-128
International Environmental
Laws, Multilateral and Bilateral
Agreements
3
EPC-102
Environmental Standards and
Pollution Analysis
5
EPM-129
Environmental Research
Methods
3
EPM-132
Feasibility Study and Project
Management
3
EPM-130
Environmental Cost
Management
3
EPC-107
Special Problem on Corporate
Environmental Management 1
3
EPM-131
Socioeconomic Planning
and Governance
3
–
–
–
Total
138 | Miriam College Units
23
Bulletin of Information
Subject Title
Units
EPM-117
EPM Practicum
3
Total
3
Fourth Year
First Semester
EMP-125
Total
Subject Code
Total
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
EPC-103
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
EPC-104
Practice in Environmental
Impact Assessment
5
Air Pollution and Water
Residual Management
5
EPC-105
ISO Registration and
Environmental Audit
Requirements and Procedure
3
EPM-133
Natural Resources and
Ecosystem Management
3
EPC-106
Production and Operations
Management
3
EPC-108
Special Problem on Corporate
Environmental Management 2
3
EPM-134
Environmental Communication
and Advocacy
3
–
Elective 1
3
–
Elective 3
3
–
Elective 2
3
–
Elective 4
3
Total
Units
20
Units
Total
20
22
www.mc.edu.ph
| 139
Second Year
Bachelor of Science
in Environmental
Planning and
Management
First Semester
Urban Planning and
Green Architecture
Track
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
ECO-100
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
H-104
Rizal
3
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
E-104
Business English
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
EPM-123
Environmental Geography
3
EPM-124
Alternative Theories and
Concepts of Sustainable
Development
3
EMP-125
Fundamentals of Environmental
Science
3
EPM-126
Solid Waste Management
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
EPM-127
Introduction to Geo-hazard
Assessment and the EIA
Process
3
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
PSY-101
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
EPM-101
Total
Units
21
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
140 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Units
Units
Total
23
Total
23
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
S-105
Physical Sciences
2
EPU-101
General Psychology
3
Introduction to Environmental
Planning and Management
3
Total
Units
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
Cartography
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
EPU-102
Urban and Regional Planning
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
EPM-128
International Environmental
Laws, Multilateral and Bilateral
Agreements
3
EPU-103
Computer Aided Design (CAD)
Technique
4
EPM-129
Environmental Research
Methods
3
EPU-104
Geographic Information System
4
EPM-130
Environmental Cost
Management
3
EPU-109
Special Problem on Urban
Planning and Green
Architecture 1
3
EPM-131
Socioeconomic Planning
and Governance
3
EPM-132
Feasibility Study and Project
Management
3
21
Total
Units
23
Units
Total
23
www.mc.edu.ph
| 141
Course
Descriptions
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
EPM-117
EPM Practicum
3
Total
3
EPM-101
Introduction to Environmental Planning
and Management (3 units)
The course introduces the environmental planning and management
program and its importance in addressing present local and global
environmental concerns. It defines the two major tracks of the program, the
Corporate Environmental Management track & the Urban Planning & Green
Architecture track, and explains the relevance of these tracks in promoting
sustainable and progressive socioeconomic growth.
This course enables the students to determine the major track they can
pursue and the career opportunities it can offer to them.
EPM-117
EPM Practicum (3 units)
Prerequisites: EPU-103 (Computer Aided design (CAD) Techniques),
EPU-104 (Urban Planning and Green Architecture track),
EPC-102 (Corporate Environmental Management track)
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
EPU-105
Second Semester
Units
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-106
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
Utilities and Infrastructure
Planning
3
EPM-123
Environmental Geography (3 units)
Prerequisite: EPM-101 (Introduction to Environmental Planning
and Management)
Land Use and Settlement
Planning
3
EPU-106
Site Planning
5
EPU-108
Green Architectural Aesthetics
and Design Techniques
5
EPU-110
Special Problem on Urban
Planning and Green
Architecture 2
3
EPU-134
Environmental Communication
and Advocacy
3
EPM-133
Natural Resources and
Ecosystem Management
3
–
Elective 3
3
EPM-124
–
Elective 1
3
–
Elective 4
3
Prerequisite: EPM-101 (Introduction to Environmental Planning
and Management)
–
Elective 2
3
–
–
–
Total
23
EPU-107
Units
This is a practical subject taken by incoming senior EPM students
wherein they spend 240 hours in an environment or planning-related
agency (government, non-government organizations, private industry or
consultancies). It exposes students to the actual work situation and allows
them to learn from practitioners and to contribute to the tasks required in
an environment or planning-related agency or institution.
Total
20
The course provides knowledge and understanding of the dynamics of
geology, meteorology, hydrology, biogeography, and geomorphology, as well
as the ways in which human societies conceptualize the environment.
As differentiated from physical geography, environmental geography covers
the various aspects of the spatial interaction between humans and the
natural world.
Alternative Theories and Concepts
of Sustainable Development (3 units)
The course provides an understanding of the meaning of sustainable
development, conceptually broken into three (3) equally important
components: environmental, economic, and sociopolitical sustainability. It
also presents and explains alternative development concepts, theories and
approaches that developed and developing countries have pursued, and their
experience and lessons learned from them.
The course provides students a better understanding of the reasons
and circumstances behind the present state of the environment, economic
condition, and the sociopolitical system of countries.
EPM-125
Fundamentals of Environmental Science
(3 units)
Prerequisite: EPM-101 (Introduction to Environmental Planning
and Management)
The course provides an overview of the interaction among physical, chemical,
and biological components of the environment. It presents an integrated and
interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental systems. It enables
the students to gain an understanding of the various aspects of environmental
science to include atmospheric science, ecology, environmental chemistry,
geo-sciences, environmental assessment, and environmental microbiology.
142 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 143
EPM-126
Solid Waste Management (3 units)
The course provides knowledge and understanding of the
many facets of solid waste management, its engineering
principles and management issues. It explains solid waste
management (SWM) as a discipline associated with the
control of generation, storage, collection, transfer and
transport, processing and disposal of solid wastes. The
system of management of solid wastes to be discussed is in
accord with the best principles of public health, economics,
engineering, conservation, aesthetics, public attitudes and
other environmental considerations.
Students learn the scope of solid waste management
which includes administrative, financial, legal, planning,
and engineering functions involved in addressing problems
of solid wastes disposal.
EPM-127
Introduction to Geo-hazard Assessment
and the EIA Process (3 units)
Prerequisites:
EPM 101 (Introduction to Environmental
Planning and Management),
EPM-123 (Environmental Geography),
EPM-125 (Fundamentals of Environmental Science)
The course introduces the policies, laws, and procedures
of the Philippine Environmental Impact Statement
System (PEISS), which are being followed in securing
an Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) from
the Department of Environment and Natural Resources
(DENR). It enables the students to learn the processes and
requirements of undertaking geo-hazard and environmental
impact assessment as an effective tool for environmental
planning and management.
EPM-128
International Environmental Laws,
Multilateral and Bilateral Agreements
(3 units)
EPM-129
Environmental Research Methods (3 units)
Prerequisites:
E-103 (Fundamentals of Research),
EPM 101 (Introduction to Environmental
Planning and Management),
EPM 124 (Alternative Theories and Concepts
of Sustainable Development),
EPM-125(Fundamentals of Environmental Science)
The course orients the students on the importance of research
on effective environmental planning and management.
It enables the students to understand and gain knowledge
of developing conceptual and theoretical framework for
environmental research. The students also learn and
apply the different tools and processes in conducting
environmental research.
EPM-130
Environmental Cost Management (3 units)
Prerequisites:
EPM-124 (Alternative Theories and Concepts
of Sustainable Development),
EPM-125 (Fundamentals of
Environmental Science),
EPM-126 (Solid Waste Management)
The course presents the concepts, definitions & application of
cleaner production (CP) and, on the bases of these, students
will understand and learn the techniques and processes of
conducting environmental cost accounting.
As a requirement for cost accounting, students learn how
to identify environmental costs, revenues and savings from
CP investments. Having knowledge of these, students learn
the tools and technique of capital budgeting, e.g. Net Present
Value, Internal Rate of Return, Payback Period, etc, and apply
these in undertaking cost-benefit analysis of CP technologies.
EPM-131 Socioeconomic Planning and Governance
(3 units)
Prerequisites: EPM-124 (Alternative Theories and Concepts
of Sustainable Development),
EPM-125(Fundamentals of Environmental Science)
Prerequisites:
EPM-101 (Introduction to Environmental
Planning and Management),
EPM-124 (Alternative Theories and Concepts of
Sustainable Development)
The course presents and explains the various international
policies and laws on sustainable environmental management.
It also provides a comparative assessment of how these laws
have been applied in the Philippines and in other countries
and how effective they have been in managing and protecting
the environment. The course complements the learning
gained by students on local environmental laws taken from
the other thematic subjects of the environmental planning
and management curriculum.
This course specifically focuses on the local level where
students are required to map out an integrated socioeconomic
plan at the barangay or city/municipal level. It provides
the students an integrated framework for socioeconomic
planning with strong environmental sustainability
consideration. Classroom lectures also include the tools
and quantitative methods for social, economic, and physical
planning at the local level.
144 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
In order for the planning exercise to be well grounded
on actual situations, the students also learn and understand
the present local governance systems for planning and
implementation of socioeconomic programs and projects at
the local level.
EPM-132
Feasibility Study and Project
Management (3 units)
Prerequisites: EPM-129 ( Environmental Research Methods),
EPM-130 (Environmental Cost Management),
EPM-131 (Socioeconomic Planning and Governance)
The course enables the students to learn the methods of
and tools for project conceptualization, identification, and
development. It provides the format and requirements for
preparing project proposals for development assistance.
The methods and procedures for result-based monitoring
and evaluation of programs and projects are also taught
in the course.
EPM-133
Natural Resources and Ecosystem
Management (3 units)
Prerequisites: EPM-124 (Alternative Theories and Concepts
of Sustainable Development),
EPM-125 (Fundamentals of Environmental Science)
The course introduces and explains the importance of the
different natural resources (forest, land, marine, aquatic, etc,)
available to mankind, and how they are integrated with the
overall ecosystem.
The course also provides the scientific knowledge of
natural resource management designed to maintain or
enhance the vigor and productivity of the ecosystem while
producing essential consumption products and other
values to meet human needs and desires. Ecosystem
management considers the limits of socially, biologically and
economically acceptable risks of disrupting or destroying the
ecological balance.
EPM-134
Environmental Communication
and Advocacy (3 units)
Prerequisites:
EPM-124 (Alternative Theories and
Concepts of Sustainable Development),
EPM-133 (Natural Resources and
Ecosystem Management)
The course introduces the fundamentals of the
communication process. It enables the students to learn the
different techniques of environmental communication as
they are applied and made effective in different situations.
The students acquire the skills of communicating and
advocating effective environmental management practices
and sustainable development.
EPU-101
Cartography (3 units)
Prerequisites: EPM-101 (Introduction to Environmental
Planning and Management),
EPM-123 (Environmental Geography)
The course provides the theoretical background on the
science of cartography as well as develops the necessary skills
required for graphic illustrations, Geographic Information
System (GIS), spatial analysis and field techniques. Aided by
the GIS software, the students acquire sufficient knowledge
in map production, analysis and interpretation, which are
needed for geography, site planning, land-use planning, and
environmental planning.
EPU-102
Urban and Regional Planning (3 units)
Prerequisite: EPM 124 (Alternative Theories and Concepts of
Sustainable Development)
The course is concerned with philosophical thought and
critical thinking central in urban and regional planning.
It dwells on planning concepts, theories, models and
analytical methods and the purpose and practice of urban
and regional planning.
Urban and regional planning attempts to address critical
issues such as urban socioeconomic and environmental
problems under conditions of rapid and uneven urbanization,
the overwhelming impacts of urbanization and urban growth
vis-à-vis the city’s capacity to plan for housing, infrastructure
and services within the context of developing countries, slow
growth and poverty in rural areas, and unbalanced urban
and rural development.
The course also reviews various policies, strategies and
approaches that aim to achieve sustainable urban growth
and development as well as spatial strategies to spread
development more evenly over national space using the
Philippine context.
Finally, the course provides the venue for a discussion on
the questions of balanced urban and regional development.
EPU-103
Computed Aided Design (CAD)
Technique (4 units)
The course provides the foundation for the EPM students to
be equipped with computer-based skills and knowledge that
can be applied to environmental planning and management.
Students learn to navigate and maximize the essential
functions and features of Auto CAD for certain practical
applications such as research, documentation, analysis,
planning and presentation.
EPU-104
Geographic Information System (4 units)
The course combines theoretical and practical explanation
of the tools used in the collection, manipulation, analysis
and visualization of data (geographic and non-geographic).
It gives primary importance to geographical information
and the broad overview of its applications to environmental
planning and management. The students are exposed to a
variety of computer-based application systems that will allow
them to gain methodological and technical versatility and
adaptability that are essential to the practice of environmental
planning and management. The course stresses analytical
reasoning that is supported by computer-aided information.
EPU-105
Land Use and Settlement Planning
(3 units)
Prerequisites: EPM-131 (Socioeconomic Planning
and Governance),
EPU-102 (Urban and Regional Planning)
The course provides the students an understanding of
how land uses affect the ecological environment and the
socioeconomic development of a nation. The students learn
the different models of settlement systems, how these
evolved and developed, influence land uses, and affect
land sustainability.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 145
EPU-106
Site Planning (5 units)
Prerequisites: EPU-103 (Computed Aided Design
(CAD) Technique),
EPU-104 (Geographic Information System)
EPU-110
Special Problem on Urban Planning
and Green Architecture 2 (3 units)
EPC-103
Air Pollution and Water Residual
Management (5 units)
Prerequisite: EPU-109 (Special Problem on Urban Planning
and Green Architecture 1)
Prerequisite: EPC-102 (Environmental Standards and
Pollution Analysis)
The course provides the skills and techniques on arranging
land uses and estimating land space requirements for
residential, commercial, industrial and even mix-use type of
development. Students acquire knowledge on the standards
and requirements of government on open space, utilities and
infrastructures, and environmental considerations. Given the
formulated physical plan, students also learn to estimate cost
and project financial profitability of the planned development.
The course involves conducting actual field investigation
and research work guided by the conceptual and analytical
framework developed and approved by a panel of experts
on the field of specialization during the first phase of the
thesis work. At the end of the course, students present and
defend their research and planning works that include their
recommended planning and architectural solutions to urban
and/or environmental problems.
The course introduces the technologies and processes for
mitigating air and water pollution. It also provides knowledge
and understanding of the various compliance requirements
and industry norms for air and water residual management.
The students learn how to plan and implement air and water
residual management programs.
EPU-107
Utilities and Infrastructure Planning
(3 units)
EPC-101
Prerequisites:
EPU-103 (Computed Aided Design
(CAD) Technique),
EPU-104 (Geographic Information System),
EPU-105 (Land Use and Settlement Planning)
Prerequisites: EPM-124 (Alternative Theories and Concepts
of Sustainable Development),
EPM-125 (Fundamentals of Environmental Science)
The course enables the students to learn the methods and
techniques for determining capacity requirements for utilities
and infrastructures, e.g. water, power, sewerage and drainage,
road system, etc. They also learn to undertake preliminary
engineering design of utilities and infrastructures needed for
township development.
EPU-108
Green Architecture Aesthetics
and Design Techniques (5 units)
Prerequisites: EPU-103, (Computed Aided Design
(CAD) Technique),
EPU-106 (Site Planning)
The course enables the students to learn and understand
the philosophy, concepts, principles, and practicality
of green architecture and aesthetics. The students also
learn the techniques for designing green or sustainable
building facilities.
EPU-109
Special Problem on Urban Planning
and Green Architecture 1 (3 units)
Prerequisites:
EPM-129 (Environment Research Methods),
EPM-131 (Socioeconomic Planning
and Governance),
EPU-102 (Urban and Regional Planning)
The course enables students to learn how to conceptualize
and develop planning and design proposals to address
environmental problems, specifically in towns and cities.
The proposal includes the conduct of systematic research
work using tools and techniques on urban planning as well as
concepts and principles of green architecture. The student is
expected to carry out said proposal during the second phase
of the thesis work.
146 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Energy Security and Sustainable
Development (3 units)
This course discusses the current and potential future
energy systems relevant to developing countries, in
general and the Philippines, in particular. It examines the
various conventional energy systems such as fossil and
nuclear‑fuelled energy systems that supply most of the
country’s and also the world’s commercial energy needs,
including the sustainability problems related to their
use. It then investigates renewable energy systems such
as solar thermal energy, solar photovoltaics, bio-energy,
hydroelectricity, wind power, geothermal energy and ocean
thermal energy conversion.
The course explains the physical and technological
principles associated with each energy system and the
economic and environmental impacts of each energy
system. The sustainable energy future is examined based
on the challenges posed by climate change and low carbon
objectives. Policies and technologies which could be adopted
to create more sustainable energy systems in the Philippines
and the world in the twenty-first century are discussed.
EPC-102
Environmental Standards
and Pollution Analysis (5 units)
Prerequisite: S-101 LEC/LAB (General Chemistry Lecture/
Laboratory
The course introduces the students to the various
technologies and methods for water, air and noise pollution
analysis. It enables the students to learn how to collect and
analyze environmental pollution data using analytical
equipment and following environmental standards
of government.
EPC-104
Practice in Environmental Impact
Assessment (5 units)
Prerequisites:
EPM-127 (Introduction to Geo-hazard
Assessment and the EIA Process),
EPC-101 (Energy Security and
Sustainable Development),
EPC-103 (Air Pollution and
Water Residual Management)
The students undergo the actual conduct of environmental
impact assessment (EIA) of an environmentally risky project
in an environmentally critical area following the EIPSS
procedures. On the basis of the EIA, they lean to formulate
an environmental management plan. In conducting an
EIA, students experience how to prepare and package EIA
documents required in applying for an Environmental
Compliance Certificate (ECC) with the DENR.
EPC-105 ISO
Registration and Environmental
Audit Requirements and Procedure
(3 units)
Prerequisites:
EPM-127 (Introduction to Geo-hazard
Assessment and the EIA Process),
EPC-103 (Air Pollution and Water Residual
Management)
The students acquire knowledge of international standards
on product quality and environmental management. They
get oriented on the requirements and procedures for the
registration of business companies with the International
Organization for Standardization (ISO). The students also
learn the principles of and guidelines on environmental audit
for ISO registered firms.
EPC-106
Production and Operations Management
(3 units)
Prerequisites: M-101 (College Algebra),
M-102(Elementary Statistics),
EPM-132 (Feasibility Study and Project Management)
The course introduces the students to operations management
that considers environmental sustainability which will
contribute to the survival and success of a business firm.
Students gain knowledge of effective environmental
business re-engineering and value adding processes that will
strategically allow business firms to emerge successfully in an
environment quality-based competitive position.
The course provides students with a comprehensive view
of the nature and context of operations management, methods
in product design and business processes, selection design of
production facilities and management of the supply chain that
consider environmental integrity as a primordial concern.
EPC-107
Special Problem on Corporate
Environmental Management 1 (3 units)
Prerequisites:
EPM-127 ( Introduction to Geo-hazard Assessment
and the EIA Process),
EPM-129 (Environmental Research Methods),
EPM-130 (Environmental Cost Management)
The course enables students to learn how to conceptualize
and develop research and planning proposals directed to
providing solutions to identified corporate environmental
problems, e.g. waste disposal, energy cost, etc., that impact
on the financial profitability and/or operating expense
requirements of institutions, e.g. business firms, local
government units, etc. The proposal includes the conduct
of systematic research work using tools and techniques
on production and operations management as well as
environmental cost accounting.
The student is expected to carry out said proposal during
the second phase of the thesis work.
EPC-108
Special Problem on Corporate
Environmental Management 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: EPC-107 (Special Problem on Corporate
Environmental Management 1)
The course involves conducting actual field investigation
and research work guided by the conceptual and analytical
framework developed and approved by a panel of experts
on the field of specialization during the first phase of the
thesis work. At the end of the course, students present and
defend their research output and recommended solutions to
corporate environmental problems.
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Table of Contents
College of Business,
Entrepreneurship, and Accountancy
The College of Business, Entrepreneurship and Accountancy (CBEA)
aims to transform students into professional career specialists and decision
makers in the corporate world who are equipped with the right values and
are knowledgeable in the different business principles. The different majors
offered will help prepare them well for a career in their chosen field.
Undergraduate Programs
1. Associate in International Culinary Arts
2. Associate in Culinary Arts for the Deaf
3. Bachelor of Science in Accountancy
4. Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
5. Bachelor of Science in Entrepreneurship
6. Bachelor of Science in Leisure and Tourism Management
Associate in
International
Culinary Arts
and Associate
in Culinary Arts
Food service is a fast-growing industry worldwide. Today, consumers have
higher expectations with regard to food quality standards as new products
and food concepts are made available to them. Consequently, entrepreneurs
are faced with the challenge of satisfying these consumer expectations by
developing new products and concepts that provide unique and innovative
dining experiences to consumers that balance with “bottom-line” issues and
concern for sustainability to recover investments.
It is in this light that the Associate in International Culinary Arts program
and the Associate in Culinary Arts were developed. These programs aim to
provide students with formal education in business and entrepreneurship
complemented with hands-on training in the culinary arts to equip them with
scientific and practical knowledge for the operation of viable and sustainable
business ventures in the food service industry.
Academic Standards, Policies,
and Procedures of the Program:
Except for the Associate in Culinary Arts for the Deaf, all students
are required to pass the admission test and comply with the CPQA
retention policy.
Associate in International Culinary Arts
Major subjects: 45 units
MG-101, ET-101, M-104, ETC-101, ETC-102, ETC-103, ETC-104, ETC-105, ETC-109,
ETC-110, ETC-111, ETC-112, ETC-107/ETC-108
General education subjects: 49 units
Total number of units: 94 units
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Intensive English
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
M-105
Mathematics of Investments
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
H-105
Philippine Constitution
and Government
3
ETC-102
Culinary 1
3
ETC-103
Kitchen Math
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization
3
ETC-101
Foundations of Culinary Arts
3
ETC-104
Culinary 2
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
21
www.mc.edu.ph
| 151
Associate in
Culinary Arts
(Deaf Students)
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
ETC-105
Culinary 3
3
Total
6
Second Year
Subject Title
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
FIL-101.1
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Title
3
ETC-109.1
Catering Management
3
E-100
Intensive English
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
ETC-112
Culinary 5
3
NSTP-1.1
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
ETC-110
Culinary 4
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
ETC-111.1
Beverage Management
3
E-104
ET-101
Entrepreneurship Principles
and Practices
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
20
Subject Title
ETC-108
International Internship
Total
152 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Total number of units: 94 units
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-101
Communication Skills 1
3
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
M-100
Essential Mathematics
3
M-101
College Algebra
3
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 1
1
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 2
1
Business English
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
–
–
–
Total
Units
Total
Units
12
Units
Total
12
17
Summer
Subject Code
General Education subjects: 49 units
First Semester
Subject Code
Total
Units
MG-101, ET-101, M-104, ETC-101, ETC-102, ETC-103, ETC-104,
ETC-105, ETC-109, ETC-110, ETC-111, ETC-112, ETC-107/ETC-108
Pre-Associate
First Semester
Subject Code
Major subjects: 45 units
Summer
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
5
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
5
ETC-105
Culinary 3
3
Total
6
www.mc.edu.ph
| 153
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
T-101
Bachelor of Science
in Accountancy
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-104
Business Communication
3
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
ETC-104
Culinary 2
3
ETC-101
Foundations of Culinary
3
M-105
Mathematical Investments
3
ETC-102
Culinary 1
3
ETC-103
Kitchen Mathematics
3
ET-101
Entrepreneurship Principles
and Practices
3
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization
3
Individual/Dual Sports
2
Team Sports
2
PE-103
Total
Units
PE-104
17
Total
Units
17
Subject Code
Subject Title
ETC-107
Local Internship
5
Total
5
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
ETC-110
1. Qualifying Grade
a. A BSA student must obtain a term mark of at least 3.0 in all Accounting,
Business Law and Taxation subjects before she will be allowed to enroll
in higher Accounting, Business Law and Taxation subjects.
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
Culinary 4
3
ETC-109.1
Catering Management
3
ETC-111.1
Beverage Management
3
ETC-112
Culinary 5
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
H-105
Philippines Government
with Constitution
3
Total
A highlight of the program is an on-the-job-training program where
students are immersed in the business work environment. Students benefit
from this activity through insights gained on real-life work standards and
current practices in the Philippine setting, while applying the theories learned
in school. The program also includes 18 units of integrated accounting courses
taken on the last semester of the student as preparatory to the CPA review
for the licensure examination.
A student should have an entrance examination score of at least 75
in both English and Mathematics in the MC Entrance Test to be accepted
in the BSA program.
First Semester
H-101
The students’ competencies are developed in the following aspects:
organizational development, problem solving, objective and analytical
thinking, business and corporate communications and information
technology (IT), responsible decision-making, self-motivating techniques,
and professionalism.
Admissions Requirements
Units
Second Year
Subject Title
Intensive training is provided to enable students to become competitive
and responsive to the requirements of our increasingly globalized economy.
Alongside intensive major courses, students benefit from a comprehensive
curriculum designed to produce well-rounded and responsible professionals
who are multi-disciplinary and conversant in concepts in business, sciences,
and other related fields. The graduates are not only competent accountants,
but also business advisors who uphold the ethics and the principles of
transparency and accountability.
Academic Standards, Policies, and Procedures for
the BS Accountancy Program:
Summer
Subject Code
The Bachelor of Science in Accountancy program principally aims to prepare
students for a career in the field of accountancy and finance and for the
Licensure Examination for the Certified Public Accountants (CPA).
Units
12
Total
Units
b. A student who gets a term mark lower than 3.0 in Accounting, Business
Law or Taxation subjects is allowed to re-enroll the subjects only once.
However, 5th year students will be allowed to re-enroll until they
obtain the required grade.
c. A student who gets a term mark of “F” in Accounting, Business Law or
Taxation will automatically be disqualified from the BSA program.
d. A student must obtain a term mark of at least 2.5 in all English subjects
and 2.0 in Economics, Finance and Math subjects before she will be
allowed to enroll in higher English, Economics, Finance, and Math
subjects. A student who gets a term mark lower than 2.5 in English or
lower than 2.0 in Economics, Finance and Math subjects must retake the
same until she obtains the required grade.
2. Qualifying Examination
12
A student must take a Qualifying Examination after obtaining the required
term mark in BSA 101 (Fundamentals of Accounting 1) and BSA 102
(Fundamentals of Accounting 2). The student must pass the said examination
before she will be allowed to enroll in the BSA 103 (Financial Accounting 1).
A student is given two (2) chances to pass the Qualifying Examinations;
otherwise, she will automatically be disqualified from the BSA program.
154 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 155
3. CQPA and Major CQPA Requirement
A student (from 1st year to 3rd year) is required to maintain a CQPA of at least
3.0 in all subjects and a major CQPA at least 3.0. Failure to meet the same will
mean disqualification from the BSA program.
A student (from 4th year to 5th year) is required to maintain a CQPA of at
least 3.0 in all subjects and a major CQPA at least 3.0. Failure to meet the same
shall merit a careful assessment by the BSA Department Chairperson of the
student’s capacity to continue with the program.
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP-2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
5
Major Subjects: 163 units
BSA-101, BSA-102, BSA-103, BSA-104, BSA-105, BSA-106, BSA-107, BSA-108,
BSA-109, BSA-110, BSA-113, BSA-114, BSA-115, BSA-116, BSA-117, BSA-118,
BSA-119, BSA-120.1, BSA-120.2, BSA-121.1, BSA-121.2, BSA-121.3, BSA-123.4,
BSA-121.5, BSA-122, BSA-123, BSA-124, BSA-125, BSA-127, BSA-128, BSA-129,
BSA-130, BSA-131, BSA-132, BSA-133, BSA-134, BSA-135, MG-101, MG-102,
MG-105, BL-102, BL-103, BL-104, BL-105, TAX-102, TAX-103, ECO-101, ECO-103
Second Year
Elective subjects: HU-102 (3 units)
First Semester
General education subjects: 97 units
Total number of units: 257 units
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Subject Code
Subject Title
M-105
Mathematics of Investment
FIL-102.1
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
3
BSA-134
Conceptual Framework
and Accounting Standards
3
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
S-105
Physical Sciences
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
ECO-101.1
Introduction to Business
Economics with LRT
3
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
BSA-102
Fundamentals of Accounting
6
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
BSA-127
Database Theory
and Applications
3
BL-102
Law on Obligations
and Contracts
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 1
1
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 2
1
–
–
–
BSA-123
Basic Finance
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
NSTP-1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Pilipino
3
BSA-126
Fundamentals of Computer
Software and Application
3
–
–
–
BSA-101
Fundamentals of Accounting 1
6
Total
156 | Miriam College Units
21
Bulletin of Information
Total
Units
27
Total
26
Total
26
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
H-104
Rizal
3
H-105
Philippines Constitution
with Government
3
M-107
Calculus of Business
3
Total
9
www.mc.edu.ph
| 157
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
ECO-101
Macroeconomics
M-106
Summer
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
ECO-103
Microeconomics
3
Business Statistics
3
M-108
Quantitive Techniques in
Business/Operations Research
3
BSA-103
Financial Accounting
and Reporting
6
BL-104
Law on Negotiable Instruments
3
BSA-131
Human Behavior
in an Organization
3
BSA-130
Good Governance and
Social Responsibility
3
BL-103
Law on Business Organizations
3
BSA-107
Cost Accounting
and Cost Management 1
3
Financial Accounting and
Reporting 2 and 3
6
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
E-106
MG-102
Units
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and
Contemporary Literature
3
Marketing Management
3
Total
BSA-135
T-103
24
Total
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
24
E-107
Technical Writing – Business
MG-105
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
HU-102
Arts and Design
3
Productions and Operations
Management
3
TAX-102
Income Taxation
3
BSA-106
Financial Accounting
and Reporting 4
3
BSA-110
Advanced Financial Accounting
and Reporting 2
3
BL-105
Sales, Agency, Labor
and Other Commercial Laws
3
BSA-115
Applied Auditing
6
BSA-108
Cost Accounting
and Cost Management 2
3
BSA-117
Management Accounting 1
3
BSA-109
Advanced Financial Accounting
and Reporting 1
3
BSA-124
Financial Management 1
3
BSA-114
Assurance Principles,
Professional Ethics
and Good Governance
6
BSA-128
Fundamentals of Information
System and System
Development
3
Total
158 | Miriam College Units
24
Bulletin of Information
Total
Subject Title
Units
BSA-122
Practicum
3
Total
3
Fifth Year
First Semester
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
TAX-103
Business and Transfer Taxes
BSA-125
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
Financial Management 2
3
BSA-133
Synthesis
1
BSA-116
Auditing in a CIS Environment
3
BSA-120.1
Integrated Accounting 1
3
BSA-118
Management Accounting 2
3
BSA-120.2
Integrated Accounting 2
3
BSA-119
Management Consultancy
3
BSA-121.1
Integrated Accounting 3
3
BSA-129
Accounting Information System
3
BSA-121.2
Integrated Accounting 4
3
BSA-132
Business Policy and Strategy
3
BSA-121.3
Integrated Accounting 5
2
BSA-113
Accounting for Governmental,
Not-for-Profit Entities and
Specialized Industries
3
BSA-121.4
Integrated Accounting 6
2
–
–
–
BSA-121.5
Integrated Accounting 7
2
Total
Units
24
Units
Total
22
24
www.mc.edu.ph
| 159
Course
Descriptions
MG-101
Principles of Management and Organization (3 units)
This course presents the basics of an operational theory and science of
management. Emphasis is placed on the application of management science
and theory given today’s changing environment. Discussion is focused on the
study of the management functions and organizational behavior. The concept
of business social responsibility is also explained and discussed. Students are
required to do oral and written analyses of cases.
MG-102
Marketing Management (3 units)
This course provides a working knowledge of the various elements of
marketing-consumer behavior, competition, product management, pricing,
channels of distribution, advertising, marketing research and develops
the ability to synthesize these elements into marketing strategies based
on a thorough grasp of the business environment. Social responsibility in
marketing management is discussed. Students are introduced to the case
method in this course.
MG-105
Production and Operations Management (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-108 (Quantitative Techniques in Business/Operations Research)
This course provides an adequate background on the fundamentals of
production planning and control, method analysis, work measurement,
inventory control, plant lay-out and materials handling. It includes the
practical applications of the tools and techniques of production and nonmanufacturing and service functions.
BL-102
Law on Obligations and Contracts (3 units)
This course gives the student an understanding of the legal concepts and
rules governing the law of obligations and contracts and application of these
concepts to practical problems. It involves a discussion of the nature, sources,
kinds, and extinguishments of contracts including defective contracts and
other miscellaneous topics relevant to the course.
BL-103
Law on Business Organizations (3 units)
Prerequisite: BL-102 (Law on Obligations and Contracts)
This course deals with the laws governing the formation of partnerships and
corporations. It includes a discussion on the various types of partnerships
and corporations, profit sharing among partners, dissolution and liquidation
of a partnership, classes of powers and obligations of shareholders, rights and
liabilities of directors, trustees and officers of a corporation. The course also
includes a discussion on the law of associations such as clubs.
BL-104
Law on Negotiable Instruments (3 units)
Prerequisite: BL-102 (Law on Obligations and Contracts)
This course deals with the provisions of the law on negotiable instruments.
It includes discussions on functions and kinds of negotiable instruments;
construction of ambiguous instrument; forgery and its effect; consideration;
accommodation party; manner and consequence of transfer of instruments;
striking out endorsements; requisites of holder in due course; defense of
the parties; discharge of negotiable instruments and the parties secondarily
liable; liabilities of the parties; discharge; effects of alteration; and other kinds
of instruments such as promissory notes and bills of exchange.
160 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
BL-105
Sales, Agency, Labor and
Other Commercial Laws (3 units)
Prerequisite: BL-102 (Law on Obligations and Contracts)
This course deals with the law on sales covering contracts
for the sale of goods, employment contracts and pertinent
provisions of the Labor Code and the law on credit
transactions, relevant laws on commerce and trade, such
as labor and employment laws that govern the rights of
employers and employees in the workplace are also covered.
It also gives an overview of the following relevant commercial
laws: Omnibus Investment Code, Foreign Investments Act,
and Retail Trade Liberalization Law.
TAX-102
Income Taxation (3 units)
Prerequisites: BSA-135 (Financial Accounting & Reporting 2 & 3)
This introductory taxation course is primarily concerned
with income taxation. The objective is to develop a working
knowledge of the basic principles and rules of the income
tax system as these apply to individuals, partnerships
and corporations. It covers an overview of the national
tax system, and the income taxation of employees,
unincorporated and incorporated businesses. It provides
the students with knowledge of the capital gains tax,
final tax on certain passive income, and the year-end tax,
including the minimum corporate income tax, the normal tax,
and the improperly accumulated profits tax of corporations
and withholding taxes. Tax forms are provided for specific
topics discussed.
TAX-103
Business and Transfer Taxes (3 units)
Prerequisite: TAX-102 (Income Taxation)
This course is an intensive study of the business and transfer
tax system, including the estate tax, the gift tax, and transfer
tax. The relationship between these three donatives transfer
taxes, and between the transfer taxes and the income tax, are
emphasized. The policy underpinnings of wealth transfer
taxation, and the reasons for the recent erosion in its political
support, will be explored. The Expanded Value Added tax
and percentage taxes also discussed.
ECO-100.1 Introduction to Business
Economics with LRT (3 units)
This course seeks to provide students with a thorough
understanding of the workings of the economy. It also
aims to give an appreciation of basic economic concepts
that are covered in Microeconomics, Macroeconomics,
and International Economics essential to both business
and non‑business majors. Topics include, among others,
household behavior and consumer choice, firm theory,
income distribution and poverty, and globalization and
international trade.
ECO-101
Macroeconomics (3 units)
Prerequisite: ECO-100.1 (Introduction to Business
Economics with LRT)
This course is concerned with the behavior of the economy
as a whole. Macroeconomics addresses the determination
of the economy’s total output of goods and services
(GDP), the growth of output, the determinants of the price
level and the rate of inflation, the factors that determine
employment (and unemployment), the balance of payments,
and exchange rates. Major topics discussed are the national
economic issues and measure of performance, aggregate
expenditure decisions, unemployment and inflation
and the global environment (i.e., international trade,
role of transnational corporations in the world economy,
protectionism, foreign exchange controls, NAFTA, AFTA,
GATT, WTO).
ECO-103
Microeconomics (3 units)
Prerequisite: ECO-100.1 (Introduction to Business
Economics with LRT)
This course introduces the student to the three pillars of
economic analysis (choice, scarcity, and coordination) and
the mathematical techniques that economists use to represent
these ideas (optimization, equilibrium, and adding-up
constraints). Most of the course is devoted to “price theory”,
elasticity, price regulation and consumer choice, which is the
analysis of the role that prices play in facilitating coordination
in a market economy. The last part of the course deals with
situations where coordination through prices may not result
in desirable outcomes. This includes market structures:
competition and monopoly, and monopolistic competition
and oligopoly.
BSA-101
Fundamentals of Accounting 1 (6 units)
This course provides an introduction to accounting, within
the context of business and business decisions. Students
obtained basic understanding of the principles and concepts
of accounting as well as their applicability and relevance
in the national context and learn how to use various types
of accounting information found in financial statements
and annual reports. This course starts with an introduction
to accounting: definition, functions, scope and objectives,
differences among the different branches of accounting,
classical notion of stewardship, double-entry bookkeeping
accounting systems and the chart of accounts. The next topic
is the accounting cycle-recoding, handling, and summarizing
accounting data, including the preparation and presentation
of financial statements for merchandising and service
companies. Emphasis is placed on understanding the reasons
underlying basic accounting concepts and providing students
with an adequate background on the recording, classification
and summarizing functions of accounting to enable them to
appreciate the uses of accounting data.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 161
BSA-102
Fundamentals of Accounting 2 (6 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-101 (Fundamentals of Accounting 1)
This is a continuation of the first course in accounting. It
deals with transactions, financial statements, and problems
peculiar to the operations of partnerships and corporations
as distinguished from sole proprietorships. It also covers
the preparation of financial statements for internal and
external purposes, accounting information systems, manual
and computerized special journals; understanding the
statement of financial position, statement of comprehensive
income, statement of cash flows and statement of changes
in equity; financial statements of companies in the service,
manufacturing and trading industries; analysis of accounting
information and decision making; and introduction to basic
cost accounting.
BSA-103
Financial Accounting and Reporting 1
(6 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-102 (Fundamentals of Accounting 2)
This course introduces the nature, functions, scope, and
limitations of the broad field of accounting theory. It deals
with the study of the theoretical accounting framework
objectives of financial statements, standard setting process
for accounting practice, national as well as international
accounting standards relating to the preparation and
presentation of financial statements, the conditions under
which they may be appropriately applied, their impact
or effect on the financial statements; and the criticisms
commonly leveled against them. The course covers
the detailed discussion, appreciation, and application
of accounting principles covering the assets, financial
and non‑financial.
BSA-106
Financial Accounting and Reporting 4
(3 units)
Prerequisites: BSA-135 (Financial Accounting & Reporting 2 & 3
This course is the culmination of the Financial Accounting
cluster. It deals with the preparation of a properly classified
statement of financial position, statement of comprehensive
income, statement of changes in equity, and statement of
cash flows, including the required disclosures and notes
to the financial statements. It also covers reconstruction of
accounts from incomplete records, change from cash basis to
accrual basis of accounting, reconstruction of accounts from
incomplete records, correction of errors, accounting changes,
discontinued operations, accounting for changing prices, and
other current related items.
BSA-107
Cost Accounting and Cost Management 1
(3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-102 (Fundamentals of Accounting 2)
This course is designed to orient the students to the
cost accounting and cost management framework of a
business. Topics discussed are: overview of cost accounting;
manufacturing cost accounting cycle; job order cost system;
accounting, planning, and control for materials, labor, and
factory overhead; and environmental cost management.
162 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
BSA-108
Cost Accounting and Cost Management 2
(3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-107 (Cost Accounting & Cost Management 1)
The course is the second part of cost accounting. It deals
on the discussion of cost concepts, manufacturing cost
accounting cycle, planning and control for materials, labor
and overhead under a process cost system, accounting
for joint costs and by-products, activity-based costing,
standard costing and variance analysis, and on various cost
management concepts, and their application by solving
related cost problems and cases.
BSA-109
Advanced Financial Accounting
and Reporting 1 (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-103 (Financial Accounting and Reporting 1)
This course deals with specialized accounting problems likely
to be encountered by accountants. The study of the various
topics in this course is based upon fundamental valuation
accounting and accounting theory as applied to special
income and expense recognition in partnership accounting;
accounting for joint ventures and associated enterprises;
accounting for domestic branches; accounting for installment
sales; accounting for long-term construction contracts;
accounting for franchising and other special issues.
BSA-110
Advanced Financial Accounting
and Reporting 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-109 (Advanced Financial Accounting
& Reporting 1)
This course is a continuation of Advanced Financial
Accounting and Reporting 1. It deals mainly with
consolidation and mergers, parent-subsidiary relationships,
and consolidated statements, including foreign subsidiaries.
The other topics deal with accounting for the effects
of changes in foreign exchange rates and other similar
current issues.
Also discussed are debt restructuring, accounting for
financially distressed corporations, accounting for the
winding up of an enterprise and accounting variations
among countries.
BSA-113
Accounting for Governmental,
Not-for-Profit Entities and Specialized
Industries (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-109 (Advanced Financial Accounting
& Reporting 1)
This course is the last part of the advanced financial
accounting and reporting for government and not-for-profit
organizations such as universities, NGOs and hospitals and
specialized industries like banking, insurance and extractive
industries. A large part of the course covers the PGAs and the
New Government Accounting System (NGAs) prescribed by
the Commission on Audit.
BSA-114
Assurance Principles, Professional
Ethics and Good Governance (6 units)
BSA-116
Auditing in an CIS Environment
(3 units)
Prerequisites: BSA-104/BSA 105 (Financial Accounting
& Reporting 2 & 3)
Prerequisite: BSA-114 (Assurance Principles, Professional Ethics
and Good Governance)
This course is designed to expose students both to the
demand for and the supply of the profession’s flagship
service – financial statement audits – and to the nature of
the value‑added assurance services which decision makers
demand in the information age. It also cover assurance
standards and attestation and auditing standards; public
sector regulation of accounting practice and legal liability;
the framework of financial statements auditing: risk-based
approach as audit methodology; audit evaluation and
planning, including the concept of risk and materiality;
assessing internal controls, and tests of controls including
internal controls in computer‑based business systems;
performance of an audit; evidence collection, analysis, and
substantive tests; reporting: reports on assurance services,
attestation services, and financial statement audits; and
completing the audit including communications with
board of directors and management concerning internal
control weaknesses. Also discussed in detail are the basic
professional values and the Code of Ethics for Professional
Accountants and SEC’s Code of Corporate Governance.
This course complements the course in auditing.
It discusses IT-related risks, security and control mechanisms
and techniques that may be employed to address the
risks, and the impact of computer use on the audit. It also
introduces computer assisted audit techniques and tools.
In this course, students gain an appreciation of the particular
features and understanding of the risks involved in auditing
in a CIS environment, the CIS controls they would expect
to find in this particular area, how auditors use CAATS
(Computer Assisted Audit Techniques) in this area. The
students gain hands-on experience in the use of computers
in performing audits.
BSA-115
Applied Auditing (6 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-114 (Assurance Principles, Professional Ethics
and Good Governance)
This course is a continuation of Assurance Principles,
Professional Ethics and Good Governance, focusing on
financial statements audit. It covers detailed approaches
to problems and situations normally encountered in the
independent examination of cash, receivables, inventories,
investments, prepaid expenses, deferred charges, property,
plant and equipment, intangibles, liabilities, owners’
equity, and revenue and expenses. It deals specifically
with the application of auditing standards, techniques, and
procedures; internal control evaluation; preparation of audit
working papers; introduction of computer application in
auditing; audit adjustments; and audit reports pertaining
to a medium-sized manufacturing or trading concern.
The determination of audit objectives and audit programs,
evaluation of internal control, and determination of
substantive procedures as applied to various accounts are
better appreciated as the transaction cycle approach is
employed in the course.
Audit working papers and audited financial statements are
the natural outputs of this course leading to the preparation
of audit reports.
BSA-117
Management Accounting 1 (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-107 (Cost Accounting and Cost Management 1)
This course is designed to acquaint students with the role
of the accountant in the management team by providing
and assisting in the analysis, interpretation, and forecasting
of business organizations. It covers the discussion of the
foundation of management accounting; its expanding
role, organizational structure, and professional ethics for
management accountants; design of management accounting
systems (e.g. responsibility accounting system), evaluating
the impact of changes in business structure, functions, and
appropriateness of management accounting techniques and
methods, basic interpretation and use of financial statements;
performance measurement for planning and control such
as: marginal, absorption, and opportunity costing; cost
behavior; cost-volume-profit relationship; advanced analysis
and appraisal of financial and related information; business
planning and budgetary systems; standard costing and
variance analysis; quantitative techniques; and methods for
planning and control.
BSA-118
Management Accounting 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-107 (Cost Accounting and Cost Management 1)
This course is the second part of Management Accounting
and deals with the application of techniques and concepts
focusing on segment reporting, profitability analysis, and
decentralization; information for decision-making purposes
(short-term and long-term) and non-financial indicators such
as productivity per employee or per service unit; decision
making affecting short-run operations of the company; capital
budgeting decisions; pricing of goods and services; and
environmental cost accounting.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 163
BSA-119
Management Consultancy (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-117 (Management Accounting 1)
This is an integrative course that covers basic considerations
of management consultancy engagements by CPAs; areas
of management consultancy, professional attributes of
management standards, and ethical considerations. It also
covers project feasibility aspects of project development
cycle, economic aspect, technical aspect, financial aspect
(investment cost, financing, evaluation): information system
(IS) engagement, management/operations audits, and
business process improvement/re-engineering.
BSA 121.2 Integrated Accounting 4 (3 units)
BSA 121.5 Integrated Accounting 7 (2 units)
BSA-124
Prerequisite:
Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: BSA-123 (Basic Finance)
BSA-117 (Management Accounting 1)
BSA-118 (Management Accounting 2)
BSA-119 (Management Consultancy)
BSA-125 (Financial Management 2)
Management Services
BSA-106 (Financial Accounting & Reporting 4),
BSA-110 (Advanced Financial Accounting
& Reporting 2), and
BSA‑113 (Accounting for Governmental,
Not-for-Profit Entities & Specialized Industries)
Theory of Accounts
BSA 120.1 Integrated Accounting 1 (3 units)
This course enhances the students’ knowledge and
proficiency in the concepts, standards, techniques, and
methodology applicable to management services/consultancy
practice by CPAs; management accounting; financial
management–related services; capital budgeting concepts and
techniques; and project feasibility studies.
Prerequisite: BSA-106 (Financial Accounting & Reporting 4)
BSA 121.3 Integrated Accounting 5 (2 units)
This course enhances the student’s conceptual knowledge
of financial accounting for business enterprises and
understanding of the objectives, basic concepts, principles,
and terminology of financial accounting and financial
statements, including related issues and topics. The student
will also gain familiarity of the basic accounting concepts
and practices.
Practical Accounting Problems 1
Prerequisite: BSA-114 (Assurance Principles, Professional Ethics
and Good Governance)
BSA-122
Auditing Theory
Prerequisite: Completion of at least 80% of courses
in the entire curriculum
This course enhances the student’s proficiency in applying
financial accounting techniques and methodology to
problems likely to be encountered in practice.
The problems involve recognition, measurement,
classification and financial statement presentation, disposition
and disclosure of assets, liabilities, equity, income, expenses,
and profit of an entity, preparation of financial statements,
and contemporary accounting issues in accordance
with Philippine Financial Reporting Standards in effect
at the time of offering of the course.
BSA 120.2 Integrated Accounting 2 (3 units)
Prerequisites:
BSA-108 (Cost Accounting & Cost Management 2),
BSA-110 (Accounting & Reporting 2),
BSA‑113 (Accounting for Governmental,
Not-for-Profit Entities & Specialized Industries)
Practical Accounting Problems 2
This course enhances the students’ proficiency in applying
accounting concepts, techniques and methodology to
problems likely to be encountered in practice. Candidates
should know and understand problems involving accounting
of special transactions and their effects and presentation in
the financial statements.
BSA 121.1 Integrated Accounting 3 (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-115 (Applied Auditing)
Auditing Problems
This course enhances the students’ proficiency in applying
audit standards, techniques, and procedures to a typical
independent audit of a medium-sized service, trading or
manufacturing concern. The student should be able to plan
and perform an audit, analyze data for possible errors and
irregularities, formulate adjusting entries, resolve audit
issues, prepare audit working papers and complete the audit
including the preparation of the audit report. In all the areas
included, the candidate shall apply the Philippine Standards
on Auditing (PSA) and other regulatory laws and regulations
in effect at the time of offering of the course.
164 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
This course enhances the student’s conceptual knowledge
and understanding of assurance and related services
performed by professional accounts. The student will have
a better understanding of the nature of assurance and
related services particularly independent audits of financial
statements, the responsibilities of professional accounts;
the audit process; audit objectives, evidence, procedures,
auditing standards, and the elements of the independent
auditors’ report. In all the areas included, the student will
apply the Philippine Standards on Auditing (PSA) and
other regulatory laws and regulations in effect at the time
of offering of the course.
BSA 121.4 Integrated Accounting 6 (2 units)
Prerequisites:
BL-102 (Law on Obligations and Contracts),
BL-103 (Law on Business Organizations),
BL-104 (Law on Negotiable Instruments),
BL-105 (Sales, Agency, Labor and
Other Commercial Laws),
TAX-102 (Income Taxation),
TAX-103 (Business and Transfer Taxes)
Business Law
This course enhances the students’ knowledge of the laws
relating to obligations and contracts, business associations,
and negotiable instruments, particularly as it relate to
accounting and auditing situations. The students should
know and understand the pertinent legal provisions, general
principles, concepts, and underlying philosophy of the law.
Taxation
This course enhances the students of the conceptual
knowledge and proficiency in the practical application of
the basic principles of taxation as they relate to accounting
practice. The emphasis is on the application of the theory and
principles in solving tax problems. The students are expected
to know, understand and be able to apply the laws on income
tax, business taxes (value-added and percentage taxes), estate
tax, donors tax, as well as Revenue Regulations and Court of
Tax Appeals and Supreme Court decisions.
Practicum (3 units)
This course is an applied academic experience conducted
under joint faculty and employer supervision which requires
a minimum of 200 contact hours. This may be in the areas of
accounting, external audit, internal audit, or tax.
Each internship assignment shall meet the following
requirements:
1. Be substantial and practical, including analysis,
evaluation, and application of business accounting,
and auditing concepts
2. Be subject to periodic documentation of progress
and review of both the employer and the Practicum
Coordinator
The course culminates in a final evaluation prepared by
the employer and a final course grade awarded by the
Practicum Coordinator
BSA-123
Basic Finance (3 units)
This course is a study of the functions of business finance. It
covers basic financial principles such as money, banking and
interest rates. Discussed in detail are the nature of money,
financial intermediaries, money creation, central banking,
demand for money, how interest rates are determined and
fiscal policies, interest rate and investment. Also discussed
are basic concepts in international business and the role
of global financing, investing and operating activities and
their impact on business and trade. The main purpose of
the course is to provide students with the basic financial
background necessary to understand the corporate segment
of the economy.
Financial Management 1 (3 units)
This course provides the synthesis of financial policy into
a grand strategy which integrates organizational purpose
and goal. The focus of the course is on current thinking
regarding valuation of the firm, investment decision
processes, financing, and dividend policy, asset management
and financial strategies and portfolio theory. This course
also covers the financial analysis (interpreting and analyzing
financial statements for indications of business performance
and use of computers for financial analysis, assessing
information weaknesses in financial statements), planning,
and concept of risk. It includes the formation and use of
current assets, working capital, and credit policy. Finally, the
course includes the understanding of long term financing
instruments and the capital structure.
BSA-125
Financial Management 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-124 (Financial Management 1)
This course is a continuation of Financial Management 1
and provides a conceptual framework within key financial
decisions and risks relating to corporations are analyzed.
This analysis considers shareholder wealth maximization,
long term financing, capital budgeting, risk management (the
nature of risk, risk concepts, benefits of risk management, risk
management processes, enterprise-wide risk management,
managing operating risk and financial risk, credit risk
models including Base 2) capital acquisition analysis, capital
structure decision, valuation of financial instruments, and the
dividend decision. It also examines the main types of derivate
contracts: forward contracts, futures, swaps and options, and
how these instruments are used in managing and modifying
financial risks.
BSA-126
Fundamentals of Computer Software
and Applications (3 units)
This is a course designed to assure a basic level of computer
applications literacy to include word processing, spreadsheet,
presentation software, database, local area network (LAN),
e-mail, and internet utilization. The main objective is for the
students to understand how information technology aids
business decision making. The students learn to demonstrate
knowledge of computer hardware and software, including
“multimedia” as well as understand the legal, ethical, and
privacy issues relating to the use of hardware and software in
a business environment. BSA-127
Database Theory and Applications
(3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-126 (Computer Software and Applications)
This course is designed to provide the students with
the basic principles and topics of database management
systems. The students learn the theoretical topics and
database design methodologies. Topics include introduction
to database systems, working with data, relational model
and query languages, commercial relational languages,
schema refinement and normal forms, relational data base
management system (RDBMS), indexing and hashing, and
query processing and optimization.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 165
BSA-128
Fundamentals of Information System
and System Development (3 units)
BSA-131
Human Behavior in an Organization
(3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-126 (Fundamentals of Computer Software
and Applications)
Prerequisite: MG-101 (Principles of Management
and Organization)
This course is designed to provide Accountancy students
with an overview of the systems analysis and design
concepts, methodologies, techniques, and tools. The course
starts with a discussion of the general system concepts,
management’s use of information, IT infrastructure and
rules as they pertain to accounting, accountant’s functions
with respect to IT, managing the security of information,
and electronic commerce. It then proceeds to a discussion of
the systems development environment, system development
life cycle, system analysis and design techniques, system
acquisition, development life cycle phases, tasks and practices
and maintaining control over system development processes,
and accounting system design issues.
This course provides a broad introduction to the structure
and functions of organizations and the behavior of people
in them, focusing on public and nonprofit organizations.
The primary purpose of the course is to equip students
with an understanding of organizational concepts and
practical techniques for managing effectively in challenging
environments. Topics discussed include organizational
behavior, rational and natural organizations, open systems
and organizational environment, personal assessment of
managerial skills, leadership, employee empowerment,
motivation, diversity, managing conflict, negotiation,
communication, leadership and working in groups and
teams, managing change, and managing stress.
BSA-129
BSA-132
Accounting Information System
(3 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-128 (Fundamentals of Information System
and Systems Development)
This course examines the design, operation, and control
of accounting information systems. Emphasis is placed on
transaction cycles and business processes, with a focus on
the flow of financial transactions through the accounting
information system. Internal control concepts and their
application to the information systems are also considered.
BSA-130
Good Governance and
Social Responsibility (3 units)
Prerequisites: MG-101 (Principles of Management
and Organization)
and BL-103 (Law on Business Organizations)
This course is designed to inform and stimulate thinking
on issues of ethics and social responsibility encountered
in business. The material covered is intended to prepare
students to recognize and manage ethical and social
responsibility issues as they arise, and to help them formulate
their own standards of integrity and professionalism. The
overall course objectives are to increase awareness of the
ethical dimension of business conduct, to contribute insight
into the professional standards and responsibilities of
students in their future careers; to develop analytical skills
for identifying and resolving ethical and social responsibility
issues in business; and to practice decision making about
ethical and social responsibility issues. (Key topics are: the
nature of corporate governance, the framework of regulations,
role of external and internal audit, the board of directors,
appraising and rewarding directors, reporting of corporate
governance issues and corporate social responsibility and
ethical behavior in the enterprise.)
166 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Business Policy and Strategy (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-105 (Production and Operations Management)
This course provides a broad overview of the basic concepts
in strategic management. Students are exposed to a number
of frameworks and models to better understand and analyze
the macro-environment, the industry environment, and firm
level resources. The end goal is for the students to be able to
think strategically, as opposed to only having a functional
orientation, and to formulate and to implement creative and
innovative strategies that are conducive to the demands of the
firm and the environment in which it resides. Major topics
include: the strategic management process, SWOT analysis,
the firm’s external environment and internal capabilities,
strategic vs. functional levels, business and corporate level
strategies and competitiveness analysis, with focus on vertical
integration, corporate diversification, strategic alliances, and
mergers and acquisitions.
Also discussed are cooperative strategy and corporate
governance, structure and controls, organizations and
technology, special challenges faced by small enterprises,
measuring effectiveness and efficiency for not-for-profit
organizations, and competing in the global economy.
Together with Management Consultancy, this course serves
as an integrative course to be taken in the last term/semester.
BSA-133
Synthesis (1 unit)
Prerequisite: Completion of at least 80% of courses
in the entire curriculum.
This is a one-unit course that provides an integrating
framework and experiences for understanding the roles of
accountants, their functions, and how they fit within the
context of business and the larger environment. Students
will acquire knowledge and develop the skills necessary to
be effective in organizations and to learn general principles
associated with their profession as accountants. A paper
integrating the concepts taught in all courses is required.
The course is designed to cultivate students’ ability to make
strategic decisions logically based on multidimensional
analyses of corporate structure, strategy, finance, and so forth.
BSA-134
Conceptual Framework and
Accounting Standards (3 units)
This course deals with the conceptual framework of
accounting and the nature and development of both
international and national (Philippine) accounting standards.
It includes a discussion. It also includes a discussion of the
accounting standard-setting process followed by members
of accounting standard-setting body, both locally and
internationally.
BSA-135
Financial Accounting and Reporting
2 and 3 (6 units)
Prerequisite: BSA-103 (Financial Accounting and Reporting 1)
This course is a continuation of Financial Accounting and
Reporting 1. It is designed to cover accounting standards
relative to recognition, measurement, valuation, and financial
statement of presentation of liabilities and shareholders’
equity, including disclosure requirements, employee’s
benefits, leases, income taxes, interim and segment reporting,
earning per share and other topics. The related internal
control, ethical issues and management of liabilities and
owner(s)’ equity are also covered.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 167
Bachelor of Science
in Business
Administration
The Department of Business Administration aims to prepare students
for a productive career in business management – whether as members
of large business organizations or as small business entrepreneurs. The
emphasis is on developing the students’ analytical abilities to enable them
to make sound decisions under new and varied conditions. Business, social
and environmental responsibilities are given special thrusts.
Bachelor of Science
in Business
Administration
The Business Administration Department of Miriam College offers
the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration major in 1) Financial
and Investments Management and 2) Marketing Management; with option to minor
in E-Business.
Major in Financial
and Investments
Management
These programs aim to transform students into professional career
specialists and decision-makers in the corporate world of the new millennium
who are steeped in the principles of business as well as in the core values
of Miriam College: truth, peace, justice and integrity of creation.
Students specializing in Financial and Investments Management receive
a type of education that exposes them to current realities in the Philippine
business environment. They are trained, theoretically and hands-on,
in accounting principles, financial systems, and investment management,
which enable them to work as specialists or analysts in corporate finance
and/or in investment and wealth management operations.
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
M-105
Mathematics of Investments
3
M-101
College Algebra
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
NSTP-1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization
3
Common major subjects: 57 units
MC-101
1
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 2
1
MG-101, MG-102, MG-103, MG-104, MG-105, ECO-103, AC-101, AC-102, M-106,
M-108, BA-101, BA-102, BA-103, BA-104, BA-105, BA-106, BA-107, TAX-101, BL-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
Marketing students are made to focus their attention on management
principles and techniques and on the latest trends in market research
that accelerate organizational and product development. Mastery in these
techniques enables the student to be creative in the design of market
indicators and other instruments that aid production and sales.
The E-Business minor program is a cutting-edge program that is
responsive to the new knowledge-based economy. It provides students with a
strong complementary background in business management through the use
of current electronic technology and ways of doing business.
DEPARTMENTAL POLICIES
1. All major subjects must be taken in Miriam College.
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
H-101
Second Semester
2. All major subjects must be taken in sequential order.
Major subjects (Financial and Investments Management): 18 units
Total
BAF-101, BAF-102, BAF-103, BAF-104, BAF-105, BAF-106
Units
21
Units
Total
21
Major subjects (Marketing Management): 18 units
BAM-101, BAM-102, BAM-103 BAM-104, BAM-105, BAM-106
Minor electives (Electronic Business): 12 units
Summer
BAE-106, BAE-109, BAE-110, BAE-111
Electives: 12 units
Subject Code
Subject Title
General education subjects: 77 units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
Total number of units: 178 units
168 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Units
www.mc.edu.ph
| 169
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-104
Business English
ECO-102
Summer
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Macroeconomics with LRT
3
ECO-103
Microeconomics
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
S-105/S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
S-105/S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
M-106
Business Statistics
3
AC-101
Principles of Accounting 1
3
AC-102
Principles of Accounting 2
3
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
BA-101
Business Communications
3
Individual Sports
2
PE-103
Total
Units
BA-102
23
Business of Software
Total
Units
3
23
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-106
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
FIL-103.1
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
M-102
Marketing Management
3
MG-104
Human Resource Management
3
MG-103
Financial Management
3
BA-103
Managerial Accounting
3
MG-105
Production and Operations
Management
3
M-108
Quantitative Techniques in
Business/ Operations Research
3
BA-104
Management Information
System
3
BAF-101
Financial Institutions
3
BAF-102
Investment Management
3
–
Elective 1
3
–
Elective 2
3
Total
170 | Miriam College Units
24
Bulletin of Information
Total
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
BA-107
Practicum
3
Total
3
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
H-104
Rizal
TAX-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
BAF-106
International Finance
3
Business Taxation
3
BAF-105
Personal Financial Planning
3
BA-105
Business Policy with
Corporate Governance
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
BAF-103
Capital and Debt Markets
3
BL-101
Business Law
3
BAF-104
Advanced Finance
3
BA-106
Development of Enterprise
3
–
Elective 3
3
–
Elective 4
3
Total
Units
18
Units
Total
18
24
www.mc.edu.ph
| 171
Second Year
Bachelor of Science
in Business
Administration
First Semester
Major in Marketing
Management
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
Second Semester
Units
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-102
Speech Communication
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-104
Business English
FIL-102.1
College Algebra
3
M-105
Mathematics of Investments
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo
sa Pananaliksik
3
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
S-105
Physical Sciences
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
BA-102
Business Software Application
3
ECO-102
Macroeconomics with LRT
3
AC-102
Principles of Accounting 2
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
M-106
Business Statistics
3
BA-101
Business Communications
3
AC-101
Principles of Accounting 1
3
ECO-103
Microeconomics
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
NSTP-1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
MC-101
MC Culture Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
MC-102
MC Culture Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
Total
21
Total
Units
23
Total
Subject Title
Units
NSTP-2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
E-106
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
BAM-101
Marketing Research
3
MG-104
Human Resource Management
3
MG-105
Production and Operation
Management
3
BA-103
Managerial Accounting
3
MG-103
Financial Management
3
M-108
Quantitative Techniques in
Business/Operations Research
3
BA-104
Management Information
System
3
MG-102
Marketing Management
3
BAM-102
Pricing Strategy
3
–
Elective 1
3
–
Elective 2
3
21
Total
172 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
23
Third Year
Units
Summer
Subject Code
Units
3
M-101
Total
Second Semester
24
Units
Total
24
www.mc.edu.ph
| 173
MG-103
Summer
Financial Management (3 units)
Prerequisites: AC-101 (principles of Accounting 1) and
AC-102(Principles of Accounting 2)
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
BA-107
Practicum
3
Total
3
This course provides the synthesis of financial policy into
a grand strategy which integrates organizational purpose
and goals. The focus of the course is on current thinking
regarding valuation of the firm, investment decision
processes, financing, and dividend policy, asset management
and financial strategies and portfolio theory.
MG-104
Human Resource Management
(3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-101 (Principles of Management
& Organization)
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
H-104
Rizal
TAX-101
Second Semester
Units
Units
This course aims to familiarize the students with the
various aspects of Human Resources Management,
including its functions, responsibilities, and the role
it plays in contributing to the success of the organization.
The course will also identify the current challenges that
HR faces as a result of the fast-paced technological changes
and globalization, as well as increasing organizational
competitiveness. It will try to see employees and
organizations on the micro and macro levels, to enable
the students to have a wider perspective of the HR system.
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
Business Taxation
3
BA-106
Development Enterprise
3
BA-105
Business Policy with
Corporate Governance
3
BAM-105
International Marketing
3
MG-105
BAM-103
Sales Management
3
BL-101
Business Law
3
Prerequisite: M-108 (Quantitative Technologies in Business)
BAM-104
Advertising and Promotions
Management
3
BAM-106
Advanced Marketing Issues
3
–
Elective 3
3
–
Elective 4
3
Total
18
Total
18
Production and Operations Management
(3 units)
Provides an adequate background on the fundamentals of
production planning and control, location analysis, quality
control, inventory control, pert/cpm and six sigma. It includes
the practical applications of the tools and techniques of
production on non-manufacturing and service functions.
M-105
Mathematics of Investments (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
Course
Descriptions
MG-101
Principles of Management and Organization (3 units)
This course presents the basics of an operational theory and science of
management. Emphasis is placed on the application of management science
and theory given today’s changing environment. Discussion is focused on the
study of the management functions and organizational behavior. The concept
of business social responsibility is further explained and discussed in this
subject. Students are required to do oral and written analyses of cases.
MG-102
Marketing Management (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-101 (Principles of Management & Organization)
This course provides a working knowledge of the various elements of
marketing-consumer behavior, competition, product management, pricing,
channels of distribution, advertising and marketing research. It develops
the standard ability to synthesize these elements into marketing strategies
based on a thorough grasp of the business environment. Social responsibility
in marketing management is discussed. Students are introduced to the case
method in this course.
174 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
This course covers the basic mathematical tools and
operations met in investment problems. It deals with theories,
applications and mathematical aspects of interests, present
values, annuities, amortization and perpetuities.
M-106
Business Statistics (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This course provides the student with the fundamental
understanding of the concepts of probability theory and
statistical inference necessary to effectively employ statistical
methods in contemporary business situations. Topics covered
are: probability concepts, probability distributions, sampling
and sampling distributions, statistical estimation, hypothesis
testing, regression, correlation and time series.
M-108
Quantitative Techniques in Business/
Operations Research (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-106 (Business Statistics)
This course seeks to enhance the students’ ability to
perform the quantitative analysis necessary, understand
the usefulness and limitations of the methods recognize
situations where the methods can be applied beneficially,
and be aware of the issues involved when utilizing the
results of the analyses. Coverage is topical and includes
quantitative analysis techniques such as decision making,
linear programming, graphical sensitivity analysis, inventory
and waiting line models. The introduction to concepts
via cases related to operations and strategies is preferred
whenever appropriate.
BL-101
Business Law (3 units)
This course covers the basic concepts of obligations
and contracts which a business person will normally
encounter. Case situations are studied and analyzed
in relation to legal concepts.
TAX-101
Business Taxation (3 units)
This course deals with the internal revenue taxes applied to
business enterprises. It includes Value Added Tax, Percentage
Tax and Documentary Taxes. It will likewise cover the
administrative provisions, basic concepts and practical
provisions of law on individual income and business taxation,
as embodied in the National Internal Revenue Code.
ECO-102
Macroeconomics with LRT (3 units)
This course deals with the economy as a whole
and focuses on the fundamentals of Macroeconomics.
It presents an overview of the economy and discusses its
basic operations that place particular emphasis on the study
of national income, the business cycle, the unemployment
problem, inflation, fiscal and monetary policies,
and international trade.
ECO-103
Microeconomics (3 units)
This course provides the introductory framework of the
business environment through the study of the market
behavior of the consumer and the firm and their interactions
in the market. It discusses the mechanisms by which
resources are allocated, prices determined and income
distributed. It concentrates on the explanation and evaluation
of the operation of the price policy system as it regulates
production, distribution and consumption. Some topics
to be discussed are demand analysis and equilibrium
determination in various types of markets.
AC-101
Principles of Accounting 1 (3 units)
This course introduces the student to the nature, functions,
scope and limitations of the accounting discipline as applied
to service concerns and merchandising enterprises as a single
proprietorship. It provides students with knowledge on
how accounting records, techniques and methodologies are
utilized to present useful accounting information.
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| 175
AC-102
BA-106
Development of Enterprise (3 units)
BAE-111
Prerequisite: AC-101 (Principles of Accounting 1)
Prerequisite:
BA-105 (Business Policy with Corporate Governance)
This course equips the students with the knowledge
of the accounting process, concepts and principles as
applied in formal business organizations, i.e. partnership
and corporation.
This course continues the integration process started in
BA-105. The students will be required to prepare a scholarly
research or a project that will exemplify their learning in their
particular area of desired specialization. This work may take
the form of a business research (for all majors); or a marketing
plan/program for a company or an activity, or an advertising
and/or promotions plan for a company or an activity
(for marketing majors); or a Company Long-Term Financial
Plan, or a Company Report for Investment Purposes, or
a Prospectus for an Initial Public Offering, or a Personal
Financial Plan for an Individual (for finance majors).
In this course, the students will study the use of digital
technology (such as the internet, mobile and other interactive
channels) and processes in the development, distribution, and
promotion of products and services.
BA-101
Principles of Accounting 2 (3 units)
Business Communications (3 units)
This course is designed to improve the oral and writing
abilities of students in order to communicate more
effectively in the business setting as well as train students
in the preparation of both internal and external corporate
communications.
BA-102
Business Software Applications
(3 units)
This course covers computer database principles and
software. Students are expected to design database file
structures, organize and manipulate records from files, utilize
basic database programming techniques for simple business
and accounting transactions.
BA-103
Managerial Accounting (3 units)
Prerequisite: AC-101 (Principles of Accounting 1) and
AC-102 (Principles of Accounting 2)
This course explains the use and interpretation of financial
information and data for use by management in planning
and controlling business activities. It includes analysis,
budgeting, decision-making and the operations control.
BA-104
Management Information Systems
(3 units)
This course covers all the aspects of information
management, such as data gathering, information processing,
dissemination and updating. Information in the corporate
structure is a basic resource that is available to managers.
Thus, recognizing that information is a resource, it follows
that information should be managed in much the same
way as other resources, such as money, material, machines,
and personnel.
BA-105
Business Policy with Corporate
Governance (3 units)
Prerequisites:
MG-101 (Principles of Management & Organization),
MG-102 (Marketing Management),
MG-103, (Financial Management),
MG-104 (Human Resource Management),
MG-105 (Production & Operations Management),
BA-103 (Managerial Accounting)
This course integrates the different concepts learned in
other courses by making the students analyze the problems
of a company from the point of view of top management.
It also introduces the concepts of corporate strategy. Social
responsibility of business is further emphasized and viewed
in terms of corporate objectives and strategies. Cases are used
extensively throughout the semester.
176 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
BA-107
Practicum (3 units)
Prerequisites: Completion of at least 60% of courses
in the entire curriculum
This course enables incoming seniors to acquire
working experience in business with a minimum
of 200 hours of actual work.
BAE-106
E-commerce Issues (3 units)
This course explores the critical, technical, legal, and
ethical issues in doing business through the internet such
as: hypermarkets (auctions and agents), channel conflict,
trust, network security and encryption, invasion of privacy,
intellectual property, abuse and netiquette, and governance
(including taxation).
BAE-108
Internet Marketing (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-102 (Marketing Management)
This course is designed to bridge the gap between the science
of E-Business Marketing and its practice.
BAE-109
Designing Web Graphics (3 units)
This course gives an overview of design strategies, focusing
on effective websites. It includes an introduction to Hypertext
Markup Language (HTML), structure and essential concepts
of page layout, content and design. It emphasizes hands-on
experiences in building a web page with HTML and web page
design tools.
BAE-110
Web Marketing Applications (3 units)
BAF-101
Digital Marketing (3 units)
Financial Institutions (3 units)
This course is designed to develop an understanding of
the financial institutions and financial markets and their
relationship to public and management policies. It helps
the students to be familiarized with the structures, functions
and mechanisms by which the different financial institutions
operate. The subject covers commercial banks, investment
houses, insurance companies, finance companies,
and savings banks.
BAF-102
Investment Management (3 units)
This course deals primarily with the nature of securities
markets and techniques for security and portfolio analysis.
Topics include short-term and long-term investments, the
structures of rates in the financial markets, the problem of
investment timing and selection, the principles of financial
analysis of individual security issues, risk and return
trade‑off, and capital market efficiency.
BAF-103
Capital and Debt Markets (3 units)
This course focuses on Capital Market Theory, its efficiency
and implications. It examines the interrelationships among
equity and fixed income markets. Topic covered include
the different types of market, functions of the financial
intermediaries, investment opportunities in the capital
and debt markets, the cost of money in bond markets,
pricing of stocks and bonds, and other factors that influence
decision‑making.
BAF-104
Advanced Finance (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-103 (Financial Management)
An advanced course in business finance, it covers the more
complex aspects of long term financing and investment
decisions, capital structure, capital budgeting, capital
budgeting under uncertainty, cost of capital, dividend
decisions, bonds and stock valuation, and alternative sources
of long term financing.
Prerequisite: BAE-109 (Designing Web Graphics)
BAF-105
Personal Financial Planning (3 units)
This course gives the students business and marketing
applications of actual campaigns and business revenue
models available on the web. It integrates web design and
web marketing campaigns that can generate measurable
results and data analytics for marketing practitioners.
This course is an introduction to the field of personal financial
planning. It surveys the market for personal financial
planning services (or wealth management); the development
of personal financial planning as an independent financial
services profession; the ethics of the profession and career
opportunities.
It examines the approaches to the client relationship and
utilizes the investment management tools in analyzing and
evaluating a client’s investments goals and objectives in the
light of his/her risk tolerance. Quantitative methods used
in financial planning (analysis of personal balance sheets,
income statements, and cash flow projections); insurance
and estate planning; tax planning, and other similar tools will
be used in arriving at decisions for specific financial choices.
BAF-106
International Finance (3 units)
Prerequisites: MG-103 (Financial Management) and
BAF-102 (Investment Management)
This course focuses on the tools, instruments,
and techniques of international trade finance, including
issues in managing and hedging exchange rate risk, export
credit guarantees, and commodity financing. It will also
examine valuation techniques for foreign investments,
international financial instruments and contracts, and
cross‑border financing decisions.
BAF-107
Public Finance (3 units) – Elective
This course deals with how a government finances
its operations, particularly, sourcing of funds including
the budget process.
BAF-108
Options, Futures and Derivatives
(3 units) – Elective
Prerequisite: MG-103 (Financial Management)
This course is an introduction to the futures and options
marketing, other derivatives, and their use in the world
of finance.
BAF-109
Risk Management (3 units) – Elective
Prerequisite: MG-103 (Financial Management)
This course deals with various risked encountered by a
business enterprise and how these risks may be reduced,
eliminated or mitigated.
BAF-110
Mergers and Acquisitions
(3 units) – Elective
Prerequisite: MG-103 (Financial Management)
This course is an introduction to the mergers
and acquisitions (M & A) process.
BAM-101
Marketing Research (3 units)
Prerequisites: MG-102 (Marketing Management,
M-106 (Business Statistics) and
M-108 (Quantitative Techniques in Business)
This course familiarizes the students with the techniques
used in marketing research. Selected problems in the analysis
of sales records, forecasting, estimating sales potentials,
sampling consumer demand, and determining the factors
which influence demand for specific goods are discussed.
BAM-102
Pricing Strategy (3 units)
This course examines within the marketing framework,
the strategic and tactical aspects of pricing decisions, using
both qualitative (consumer behavior and psychology)
and quantitative (economics, statistics, and financial
forecasting) analyses.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 177
BAM-103
Sales Management (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-102 (Marketing Management)
This course discusses problems and policies in the
management of the sales force of both manufacturing and
commercial enterprises, which emphasizes on sales analysis,
planning and control, sales organization and personal selling.
BAM-104
Bachelor of Science
in Entrepreneurship
Advertising and Promotions
Management (3 units)
The Department offers two degree programs namely, the Bachelor of
Science in Entrepreneurship with option to minor in Culinary Arts, Product
Design and Development, or Fashion Technology and the Bachelor of Science
in Entrepreneurship major in Culinary Arts. It also offers two Associate
programs: Associate in International Culinary Arts and the Associate in
Culinary Arts (a special program for the deaf). These programs are offered
in collaboration with our partner institutions: American Hospitality Academy
– Philippines, Philippine Trade Training Center, and Fashion Institute
of the Philippines.
Prerequisite: MG-102 (Marketing Management)
This course deals with the issues regarding the competition
for the consumers’ attention. Advertising penetrates almost
all aspects of daily life, hence, effective techniques in
acquiring the consumers’ attention is a key requirement.
This subject examines the role and use of advertising and
promotion within the marketing function. This course is an
overview and evaluation of different advertising products,
such as: tri-media (print/radio/television), mail (mass
mailing and directed mailing) and electronic media will be
covered. Public relations, publicity and sales promotion will
also be examined.
BAM-105
The curricula are designed to develop the students’ fullest potentials
through meaningful balance between the theoretical aspects of managing
an enterprise and practical hands-on training by providing various
opportunities for experiential learning in the real world. These include
hands‑on training in the department’s Business Incubation facilities
(Café Entrep, Internet Research Center, and the MC Bookstore Laboratory),
participation in various local and international trade events, as well as real-life
learning through local and international internships.
International Marketing (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-102 (Marketing Management)
This course discusses the problems and policies of
international marketing with emphasis on foreign marketing
analysis and export feasibility, foreign trade promotion,
export-import procedures and requirements, which are all
considered from the Philippine perspective.
BAM-106
Advanced Marketing Issues (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-102 (Marketing Management)
This course is intended to update the knowledge and skills
of students regarding contemporary marketing issues,
approaches, and techniques.
BAM-107
Brand Management (3 units) – Elective
Prerequisite: MG-102 (Marketing Management)
This course deals with the exploration of brands, brand equity
and strategic brand management.
BAM-108
Services Marketing (3 units) – Elective
Prerequisite: MG-102 (Marketing Management)
This course deals with managing the service value chain;
such as developing service concepts and managing the
customer interface.
BAM-109
The Entrepreneurship Department aims to prepare young women to
become competent and well-balanced entrepreneur-leaders in the fields of
Culinary Arts, Product Design and Development, and Fashion Technology;
or a combination of these areas of specialization. Emphasis is on developing
an entrepreneurial mindset in managing small to medium-sized enterprises;
to be innovative, proficient in preparing business plans, adept in identifying
promising business opportunities, gain confidence in making sound business
decisions, and acquire the necessary practical skills in their chosen field.
Bachelor of Science
in Entrepreneurship
with Option to
Minor in Culinary
Arts, Product
Design and
Development or
Fashion Technology
Common major subjects: 73 units
MG-101, MG-102, MG-103, MG-104, MG-105, ECO-102, ECO-103, AC-101,
AC-102, ET-101, ET-102, ET-103, ET-104, ET-105, ET-106, ET-107, ET-108 A/B,
ET-109, ET-110, ET-112, TAX-101, BL-101
Minor electives (Culinary Arts): 12 units
ET-118A, ET-118B, ET-119A, ET-119B
Minor electives (Product Design and Development): 12 units
ET-122A, ET-122B, ET-123A, ET-123B
Minor electives (Fashion Technology): 12 units
ET-120A, ET-120B, ET-121A, ET-121B
General education subjects: 91 units
Total number of units: 176 units
Direct Marketing (3 units) – Elective
Prerequisite: MG-102 (Marketing Management)
This course examines all aspects of direct and database
marketing. Also explore such issues as: relationship
marketing and customer loyalty.
178 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 179
First Year
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
PSY-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
General Psychology
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat tungo
sa Pananaliksik
3
BL-101
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
M-101
College Algebra
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
M-104
NSTP-1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
Total
Units
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
Business Law
3
H-104
Rizal
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
E-104
Business English
3
3
ET-101
Entrepreneurship Principles
and Practice
3
TAX-101
Taxation
3
Business Mathematics
3
ET-102
Enterprise Planning
3
M-106
Business Statistics
3
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization
3
AC-101
Principles of Accounting 1
3
ETC-103
Enterprise Planning 2
3
1
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 2
1
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
H-105
Philippine Government
and Constitution
3
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
PE-103
Individual Sports/Dual Sports
2
AC-102
Principles of Accounting 2
3
–
–
–
PE-104
Team Sports
2
21
Total
Units
Second Semester
21
Total
Units
23
Total
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
MG-103
Financial Management
3
MG-102
Marketing Management
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
MG-104
Human Resource Management
3
ET-104
Costing and Pricing Policy
3
MG-105
Production and Operations
Management
3
M-108
Quantitative Techniques in
Business/Operations Research
3
M-105
Mathematics of Investment
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
E-106
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
3
S-105
Physical Sciences
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
ECO-102
Macroeconomics with LRT
3
ECO-103
Microeconomics
3
–
Elective 1
3
–
Elective 2
3
Total
Bulletin of Information
26
Third Year
Summer
180 | Miriam College Units
Units
24
Units
Total
24
www.mc.edu.ph
| 181
Bachelor of Science
in Entrepreneurship
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
ET-105
Enterprise Development
and Management
Units
3
Major in
Culinary Arts
International Global Business
Summer Program in Delaware,
USA (to be credited in lieu of
ET-105)
Total
Major subjects:104 units
MG-101, MG-102, MG-103, MG-104, MG-105, ECO-103, AC-101, AC-102,
M-105, M-106, M-108, ET-101, ET-102, ET-103, ET-104, ET-106, ET-107, ET-109,
ET-112, TAX-101, BL-101, ETC-101, ETC -102, ETC-103, ETC-104, ETC-105,
ETC-107,ETC-108, ETC-109, ETC-110, ETC-111,ETC-112
General education subjects: 85 units
Total number of units: 189 units
3
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
ET-106
First Year
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
ET-110
Business Policy
Entrepreneurship On-Line 1
3
ET-107
ET-112
Marketing Communication
3
ET-108A
Business Practicum
–
Elective 3
Total
Units
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-101
Communication Skills 1
Entrepreneurship On-Line 2
3
PSY-101
ET-109
Philippine Business
Environment with Ethics
3
5
ET-108B
Business Practicum
3
–
Elective 4
17
Total
Units
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
General Psychology
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat tungo
sa Pananaliksik
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
5
M-101
College Algebra
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
M-104
Business Mathematics
3
17
NSTP-1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 2
1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
21
Summer
182 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
AC-101
Principles of Accounting
3
Total
6
www.mc.edu.ph
| 183
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
S-105
Physical Sciences
Summer
Second Semester
Units
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
H-105
Philippine Constitution
and Government
3
ETC-101
Foundations of Culinary Arts
3
M-106
Business Statistics
3
ETC-102
Culinary 1
3
E-104
Business English
3
ET-101
Entrepreneurship Principles
and Practice
3
ETC-104
Culinary 2
3
ET-102
Enterprise Planning 1
3
ET-103
Enterprise Planning 2
3
AC-102
Principles of Accounting 2
3
ETC-103
Kitchen Math
3
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
PE-103
Individual Sports/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
Total
26
Total
Subject Code
Subject Title
MG-103
Financial Management
T-103
Subject Title
3
MG-102
Marketing Management
3
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
MG-104
Human Resource Management
3
ET-104
Costing and Pricing Policy
3
MG-105
Production and Operations
Management
3
M-108
Quantitative Techniques in
Business/Operations Research
3
ETC-111.1
Beverage Management
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
E-106
World Literature 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
3
Units
Rizal
3
ETC-110
Culinary 4
3
ECO-102
Macroeconomics with LRT
3
ECO-103
Microeconomics
3
ETC-105
Culinary 3
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
24
Bulletin of Information
ETC-107
Local Internship
5
Total
5
Fourth Year
Subject Code
Subject Title
ETC-108
International Internship
5
Total
5
Units
Fifth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
ET-106
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
ET-107
Entrepreneurship On-Line 2
3
Entrepreneurship On-Line 1
3
ET-110
Business Policy
3
ET-112
Marketing Communication
3
ET-109.1
Catering Management
3
ET-109
Philippine Business
Environment with Ethics
3
ETC-112
Culinary 5
3
BL-101
Business Law
3
TAX-101
Business Taxation
3
Units
H-104
184 | Miriam College Units
Units
Units
Second Semester
Subject Code
Total
Subject Title
26
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Total
Total
Course
Descriptions
15
MG-101
Total
15
Principles of Management and Organization
(3 units)
This course presents the basics of an operational theory and science of
management with emphasis on the application of management science and
theory given today’s changing environment. Discussion is focused on the
study of the management functions and organizational behavior. The concept
of business social responsibility is further explained and discussed in this
subject. Students are required to do oral and written analyses of cases.
24
www.mc.edu.ph
| 185
MG-102
Marketing Management (3 units)
ECO-102
Macroeconomics with LRT (3 units)
This course provides a working knowledge of the various
elements of marketing-consumer behavior, competition,
product management, pricing, channels of distribution,
advertising and marketing research. It develops the students
ability to synthesize these elements into marketing strategies
based on a thorough grasp of the business environment.
Social responsibility in marketing management is discussed.
Students are introduced to the case method in this course.
This course deals with the economy as a whole with a
focus on the fundamentals of macroeconomics. It presents
an overview of the economy and its operations. The topics
include national income accounting, consumption and
savings, investment, labor and employment, inflation, fiscal
policy, monetary policy, economic growth and development,
and international trade.
MG-103
This course provides the introductory framework of the
business environment through the study of the market
behavior of the consumer and the firm and their interactions
in the market. It discusses the mechanisms by which
resources are allocated, prices determined and income
distributed. It concentrates on the explanation and evaluation
of the operation of the price policy system as it regulates
production, distribution and consumption. Some topics
to be discussed are demand analysis and equilibrium
determination in various types of markets.
Financial Management (3 units)
This course introduces the finance function in business
through the policies of asset management particularly short,
intermediate and long-term financing. Focus is given to cash
management, receivables and inventory management, and
capital budgeting.
MG-104
Human Resource Management (3 units)
This course aims to familiarize the students with the various
aspects of Human Resources Management, including its
functions, responsibilities and the role it plays in contributing
to the success of the organization. The course will also
identify the current challenges HR faces as a result of the
fast-paced technological changes and globalization as well as
increasing organizational competitiveness. It will try to see
employees and organizations at the micro and macro level,
to enable the students to have a wider perspective of the
HR system.
MG-105
Production and Operations Management
(3 units)
Prerequisite: M-108 (Quantitative Techniques in Business/
Operations Research)
This course provides an adequate background on the
fundamentals of production planning and control, method
analysis, work measurement, inventory control, plant
lay-out and materials handling. It includes the practical
applications of the tools and techniques of production to
non‑manufacturing and service functions.
AC-101
Principles of Accounting 1 (3 units)
This course introduces the student to the nature, functions,
scope and limitations of the accounting discipline as applied
to service concerns and merchandising enterprises as a single
proprietorship. It provides students with knowledge on
how accounting records, techniques and methodologies are
utilized to present useful accounting information.
AC-102
Principles of Accounting 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: AC-101 (Principles of Accounting I)
The primary focus of the course is to equip the students
with the knowledge of the accounting process, concepts and
principles as applied in formal business organizations, i.e.,
partnership and corporation.
186 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
ECO-103
M-104
Microeconomics (3 units)
Business Mathematics (3 units)
This course deals with the business applications of
the fundamental operations of addition, subtraction,
multiplication and division of whole numbers, decimals
and fractions, such as in the preparation of simple bank
reconciliation, income statements, computation of averages,
use of price quotations, ratios and proportions. It also
includes application of the percentage formula in trade, retail
and cash discounting; in simple interest and simple discount
computations; in discounting promissory notes; and in
commission selling and buying.
M-105
Math of Investments (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This course covers the basic mathematical tools and
operations met in investment problems. It deals with theories,
applications and mathematical aspects of interests, present
values, annuities, amortization and perpetuities.
M-108
Quantitative Techniques in Business/
Operations Research (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-106 (Business Statistics)
This course seeks to enhance the student’s ability to
perform the quantitative analysis necessary, understand
the usefulness and limitations of the methods, recognize
situations where the methods can be applied beneficially,
and be aware of the issues involved when utilizing the
results of the analyses. Coverage is topical and includes
quantitative analysis techniques such as matrices, graphic
linear inequalities, linear programming, graphical sensitivity
analysis, inventory and waiting line models. The introduction
to concepts via cases in decision-making related to operations
and strategies is preferred whenever appropriate.
BL-101
Business Law (3 units)
This course covers the basic concepts of obligations and
contracts which an entrepreneur will normally encounter.
Case situations are studied and analyzed in relation to
legal concepts.
This course is designed to familiarize students in the
planning, organization, operation, and management of small
business enterprises with an emphasis placed on current
business problems. The final output is the business plan
for defense.
TAX-101
ET-106
Business Taxation (3 units)
Entrepreneurship On-Line 1 (3 units)
This course deals with the internal revenue taxes applied to
business enterprises. It includes Value Added Tax, Percentage
Tax and Documentary Taxes. It will likewise cover the
administrative provisions, basic concepts and practical
provisions of law on individual income and business taxation,
as embodied in the National Internal Revenue Code.
This course examines the technical, theoretical and practical
aspects of developing a “dot-com” business. More specifically,
this course looks at the changing nature of business and
competition brought about by technological innovations
giving rise to technopreneurs. It also introduces the students
to e-business concepts and practices.
ET-101
ET-107
Entrepreneurship Principles and Practices
(3 units)
Entrepreneurship On-Line 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ET-106 (Entrepreneurship On-Line 1)
This course introduces the fundamentals of entrepreneurship
that deals with the role of entrepreneurship in economic
development. Topics on Filipino entrepreneurial economy,
entrepreneurial motivation, government assistance and
programs for entrepreneurs, development and growth
theories and applications are included.
This course is a continuation of Entrepreneurship On-Line
I. In this course, students are required to transact business
online with a foreign partner school with the end view of
closing a sale. “Dot-com” business strategies are integrated
in the course to give students an overview of how to compete
effectively in a world dominated by information technology.
ET-102
ET-108
Enterprise Planning 1 (3 units)
This course will provide knowledge in identifying business
opportunities and threats, evaluation of the organization’s
capabilities, setting up of objectives, programming and
budgeting. This will give directions on organizing and
initiating a new business operation as well as in making
decisions in the future when the business is to expand or to
diversify. Emphasis is on small and medium scale enterprises.
ET-103
Enterprise Planning 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ET-102 (Enterprise Planning 1)
This course is a continuation of Enterprise Planning 1.
Students are required to do product research and
environmental scanning of identified business opportunities.
Final output is a defense of their mini-business plan and an
exhibit of the prototype of the product or service.
ET-104
Costing and Pricing Policy (3 units)
This course introduces the primary concepts of cost and
pricing with emphasis on the cost of products and services
as well as the structure of job-order cost systems, budgeting,
and special decisions involving relevant costs and pricing.
It covers the basic purposes of cost and price system and
their application in the managerial functions of planning
and controlling.
ET-105
Enterprise Management
and Development (3 units)
Prerequisites:
AC-101 (Principles of Accounting 1),
AC-102 (Principles of Accounting 2),
ET-101 (Entrepreneurship – Principles and Practices),
ET-102(Enterprise Planning 1),
MG-101(Principles of Management and Organization),
MG-102(Marketing Management),
MG-103(Financial Management),
MG-105(Production and Operations Management)
A Business Practicum A/ET-108 B
Business Practicum B (5 units each)
Prerequisites: At least 40% of major subjects
This course, consisting of 2 parts (ET-108 A and ET-108 B)
taken on the first and second semester, exposes the students
to actual business experience by requiring them to set up
a micro-business fully and duly registered with the proper
government agencies. Students are given a sales quota to meet
in their business operation.
ET-109
Philippine Business Environment
with Ethics (3 units)
Prerequisite:
MG 101 (Principles of Management and Organization)
This course covers the internal and external environments
affecting the enterprise with emphasis on the Philippine
setting. Topics include aspects and levels of business
environment, environment constraints, current business
challenges, business ethics, responsibility and compliance
ET-110
Business Policy (3 units)
Prerequisite:
MG 101 (Principles of Management and Organization)
This course is designed to equip students with the necessary
specialized knowledge and skills of a Chief Executive of
a business enterprise. The emphasis is geared towards
policy making. Case analysis is employed to give students
an overview of the various problems encountered by a
Chief Executive.
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| 187
ET-111
Events Management (3 units) – Elective
ET-116
Industrial Design (3 units) – Elective
This course is designed to address the needs of entrepreneurs
and corporate citizens regarding major trends and business
practices in handling and managing events. It covers
techniques for managing trade exhibits, sales promotion
events, staff meetings and corporate events. It also includes
topics on management of event finances with a creative flair
and control mechanisms.
This course aims to present an approach in managing and
undertaking a new product line through applied concepts.
It includes generating and processing new concepts, designs
and innovations through intuitive and logical approaches.
It helps concretize ideas on how to develop products for
people’s use and facilitate the translation of those ideas into
workable designs.
ET-112
Marketing Communications
(3 units) – Elective
ET-117
International Business (3 units) – Elective
Prerequisite:
MG-101 (Principles of Management and Organization)
Prerequisite:
MG-101 (Principles of Management and Organization),
MG-102 (Marketing Management)
This course deals with the principles, concepts and
applications that an entrepreneur can use to connect with
her target market through effective communications,
relationships with diversity, locally and globally. It offers
different alternatives to take when faced with real marketing
communications dilemma. The course integrates critical
examination and application of marketing communications
practices that influence the target market’s buying, having
and being preferences.
ET-113
Family Business Management
(3 units) – Elective
Prerequisite:
MG-101 (Principles of Management and Organization)
This course provides the next generation of family
business owners with the knowledge and skills needed for
the successful management and leadership of the family
enterprise. It covers the intricacies of a start-up business
that will eventually be inherited by the next generation.
Family Business Management, at its core, is a practical
course that presents the management and family practices
that ensure success as well as an honest look at the
advantages and challenges facing family enterprises. With
an emphasis on leadership and positioning for the future,
the course likewise illustrates how the family enterprise can
achieve growth and sustainability.
ET-114
Franchising (3 units) – Elective
This course is designed to familiarize students with terms
associated with business franchises and the classifications of
franchises in the Philippines to enable them to discuss the
advantages and disadvantages of franchising and understand
the legal aspects and requirements of franchising. It also deals
with sourcing capital to finance the franchise and manage
money more effectively.
ET-115
Multi-level Marketing (3 units) – Elective
This course covers the conceptual foundations of Multi-level
(MLM) or Network Marketing, as well as the integral parts
of a free-enterprise system to make it work. It highlights
contrasting points in MLM vs. Pyramid Selling and
conventional Income vs. Network Income. A defense of a
live project in MLM comprises a major part of the course
requirements. Thereby allowing students to experience real
world application of the principles, strategies and psychology
of success for Multi-level Marketing.
188 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
ET-121 A/ET-121 B
Advance Fashion Illustration/
Design with Laboratory 1 & 2 (3 units each)
Prerequisite: ET-120 A/ET-120 B (Basic Fashion Illustration/
Design with Laboratory 1 & 2)
This course is a continuation of the basic fashion illustration/
design course with focus on the execution of the fashion
design concepts in various categories including fashion
marketing, merchandising and trend. As a final output,
students are encouraged to put up a fashion show showcasing
their creations.
This course deals with the problems, policies on global
marketing and finance with emphasis on export and
import activities, procedures and requirements. It likewise
involves a study on the commercial and trade relations of the
Philippines with other countries, as well as on the leading
issues on international trade and finance besetting the
various trade organizations or associations.
ET-122 A/ET-122 B
Basic Product Design and
Development with Laboratory 1 & 2 (5 units each)
ET-118 A/ET-118 B
Basic Food Preparation and
Service with Laboratory 1 & 2 (3 units each)
ET-122 A (5 units) covers training on entrepreneurship,
setting up of export business, costing and pricing
documentation. It includes developing and producing one’s
product and marketing the product. Likewise, training on
product development and improvement, packaging and
labeling are infused.
This is a basic food preparation and services course dealing
purely on developing a professional chef and an overview
of the food industry in general, and food service operation,
in particular. It aims to provide students with hands-on
experience in food preparation through application of basic
principles, procedures and techniques.
ET-119 A/ET-119 B
Advance Food Preparation and
Services (3 units each)
Prerequisite: ET-118 A/ET-118 B (Basic Food Preparation
and Service with Laboratory 1 & 2)
This course is a continuation of the basic food preparation
and services course. It covers advanced Asian and western
cuisines such as Filipino, French (Bordeaux and Alsace),
Vietnamese and Thai. It includes an appreciation of one’s
culture and practices in food services. Awareness of ethical
considerations, in particular, fine dining etiquette based on
one’s culture is also emphasized.
ET-120 A/ET-120 B
Basic Fashion Illustration/
Design with Laboratory 1 & 2 (5 units each)
This course is intended to present an approach in managing
and undertaking new product development through applied
concepts. This will help in generating and processing
new concepts and ideas for product innovation through
intuitive and logical approaches as a medium to a successful
enterprise.
This course is in partnership with the Philippine Trade
Training Center and Product Development and Design
Center of the Philippines. This is a 10-unit subject (5 units
per semester) that will enhance the students’ skills in product
design and export management.
ET-122 B (5 units) is a continuation of the basic product
design and development course. This covers training
on visual merchandising, negotiation with buyers
and participation in trade fairs and exhibits. Final output
is an export product to be included in local and international
trade fairs.
ET-123 A/ET-123 B Advanced Product Design and
Development with Laboratory 1 & 2 (3 units each)
Prerequisite: ET-122 A/ET-122 B (Basic Product Design
and Development with Laboratory 1 & 2)
This course aims to equip students with necessary
training and information on entrepreneurship and
provide the techniques on product development and
visual merchandising to be more competitive in both local
and international markets. Students are given more rigid
experience and actual exposures on entrepreneurship. They
will also be allowed to participate in trade fairs and exhibits
to further motivate them on their chosen career and how to be
successful and competitive worldwide.
ETC-101
Foundations of Culinary Arts (3 units)
This course is an introduction to nutrition as applied to menu
planning and food preparation. It focuses on techniques on
how to select raw ingredients, prepare and cook them in ways
that preserve their nutrients, enhance their flavours and show
them at their best. It also includes a discussion in fire and
safety practices.
ETC-102
Culinary 1 (3 units)
This course presents the principles involved in the
preparation of stocks, soups, and starches. It covers the
different types of soups, starches, and provides students with
hands-on experience in the kitchen laboratory. It also includes
knife skills, butchery and fish mongery.
ETC-103
Kitchen Mathematics (3 units)
This course covers the application of the fundamentals of
mathematics in food preparation, recipe costing, conversion
of measurements and attainment of cost standards. It
particularly emphasizes the importance of maintaining costefficient procedures to maximize resources (cost controls) and
managing the profitability of the business enterprise
ETC-104
Culinary 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: ETC-102 (Culinary 1)
This course aims to provide the students with a better
appreciation of basic ingredients and new materials used
in food preparation. It consists of two parts: Product
Identification I and Product Identification II while Product
ID I discusses the different herbs and spices, vegetables
and fruits. Product ID II discusses the dairy products:
cheese, milk, butter, eggs, and the different types of grains,
starches and flours. It also includes a discussion and actual
preparation of the foods of North America.
ETC-105
Culinary 3 (3 units)
This course introduces the students to restaurant service
particularly banquet service and set-up. It also includes
a discussion and actual preparation of the food from the
following countries: China, India, Singapore, Japan,
and the Philippines.
ETC-106
Intensive Culinary (6 units)
This course is designed to provide students who shift from
other academic programs with a “bridge” course which will
enable them to learn the basic principles of stocks, soups, and
starches; appreciate the basic ingredients and new materials
used in food preparation; as well as identify correctly the
different herbs and spices, vegetables and fruits, dairy
products (cheese, milk, butter, eggs), different types of grains,
starches and flours. It is taken in lieu of ETC-101 and ETC-102.
ETC-107
Local Internship (5 units)
Prerequisite: ETC-101(Foundations of Culinary Arts),
ETC-102(Culinary 1), ETC-104(Culinary 2),
ETC-105(Culinary 3)
This course provides the students with the opportunity
for actual exposure in the real world of cookery through
hands‑on application of knowledge and skills in a local
culinary workplace. Students are required to complete a
minimum of 300 hours of actual work in a local restaurant
in the country.
ETC-108
International Internship (5 units)
Prerequisite: ETC-101(Foundations of Culinary Arts),
ETC-102(Culinary 1), ETC-104(Culinary 2),
ETC-105(Culinary 3), ET-107 (Local Internship)
This course is intended to provide hands-on application
of knowledge and skills in a culinary workplace abroad
(US, New Zealand, Australia, and Singapore); students are
expected to complete a minimum of 400 hours of actual work.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 189
ETC-109.1 Catering Management (3 units)
ETC-111.1 Beverage Management (3 units)
This is designed to equip the students with knowledge
and practical skills in catering and banquet. At the end
of the course, the students are required to apply the different
cooking methods and catering principles in an actual
catering activity.
This course is designed to provide students with the practical
knowledge needed to manage a beverage operation in a
restaurant, hotel or bar. It presents principles and theories
to support and enhance the practical aspects of managing
and controlling operations. It also covers the preparation of
different beverages and drinks.
ETC-110
Culinary 4 (3 units)
This course deals with breakfast and egg cookery. It presents
the different types of eggs, techniques on determining
freshness, as well as techniques for preparing and cooking
eggs. It also presents continental, American, and European
breakfast cooking.
Bachelor of Science
in Leisure
and Tourism
Management
ETC-112
Culinary 5 (3 units)
This course covers a discussion and actual hands-on
preparation of food from the following countries: France,
Germany, Italy and Spain. It presents the distinct differences
in each country’s cuisines – their preparation, cooking
techniques, and presentation
The Leisure and Tourism Management program is designed to prepare
its graduates to become career specialists and decision makers in the leisure
and tourism industries in the Philippines and abroad. It aims to provide
a viable and continuous pool of competent and talented man power trained
and knowledgeable in all aspects of the leisure and tourism industries,
ready to take on management tasks anytime and anywhere in the world.
The local leisure and tourism industry is continuing to experience a boom,
as result of the government’s thrust to actively promote the Philippines as a
tourist destination. Upsurge in the Philippine tourism has come on the back
of a wide range of promotional activities and products, including attractive
travel, vacation, recreation and leisure packages. The private sector on its part
has ramped up its spending and capital outlays for new tourist and leisure
facilities, even in areas that were previously untapped.
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
H-101
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
M-105
Mathematics of Investments
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
LTM-101
Communication Technology
3
M-101
College Algebra
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
AC-103
Accounting Appreciation for
Non-Accountants
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 2
1
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
–
–
–
NSTP-1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
Total
The Leisure and Tourism Management program intends to provide the
essential manpower to aid in the fruition of this rising industry, equipped
with values of ecotourism and preservation of biodiversity.
Major subjects: 91 units
MG-101, LTM-102, LTM-103, LTM-104, E-104, MG-103, LTM-105.1, FL-101,
LTM-107, LTM-126, LTM-109, FL-102, LTM-110, M-106, LTM-111, LTM-112,
LTM-113, LTM-114, FL-103, LTM-127, TAX-101, LTM-115, LTM-116, LTM-122,
FL-104, LTM-119, LTM-117, LTM-118, LTM-124, LTM-128
Second Semester
Units
21
Units
Total
24
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
Elective subjects: 12 units
General education subjects: 77 units
E-101, M-101, HU-101, SO-101, H-101, T-101, MC-101, E-102, M-105, PSY-101,
AC-101, LTM-101, MC-102, ECO-101.1, S-105, S-106, FIL-101.1, P-101, H-105,
P-102, LTM-106, FIL-102.1, T-103, LTM-123, E-105, H-104, T-104
PE/NSTP: 14 units
Total number of units: 194 units
190 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 191
Second Year
First Semester
Summer
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
H-105
Philippine Government with
Constitution
3
S-105/
S-106
Biological Sciences/
Physical Sciences
3
MG-103
Financial Management
3
Subject Title
LTM-114
Practicum
In partnership with the DOT
3
Total
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
ECO-100.1
Introduction to Business
Economics with LRT
3
S-105/
S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
E-104
Business English
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
LTM-102
Introduction to Tourism
and Leisure
3
T-102
Community and Celebration
3
FL-103
Foreign Language 3
LTM-103
Managerial Accounting
for Tourism
3
LTM-105.1
Health and Wellness Tourism
3
H-104
LTM-104
Philippine Arts and
Cultural Tourism
3
LTM-106
Tourism Marketing
3
PE-103
Individual Sports/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
Total
Units
Subject Code
Total
First Semester
Subject Title
3
FL-104
Foreign Language 4
3
Rizal
3
LTM-119
Feasibility Study/
Project Management
3
LTM-127
Strategic Management for
Leisure and Tourism
3
LTM-117
Eco-Tourism and Regional
Planning
3
2
TAX-101
Income Taxation
3
LTM-118
Transportation Management
3
23
LTM-115
Parks and Recreation
Management
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
LTM-116
Sports and Events Tourism
3
LTM-124
Total Quality Management
3
LTM-122
Leisure and Tourism Research
3
LTM-128
Tourism Impact
and Sustainability
3
ELEC-3
Elective 3
3
ELEC-4
Elective 4
3
FL-101
Foreign Language 1
FIL-102.1
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
FL-102
Foreign Language 2
3
Pagbasa at Pagsulat tungo
sa Pananaliksik
3
LTM-110
Tourism Laws and Regulations
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
M-106
Business Statistics
3
LTM-123
Human Behavior
in Organization
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
LTM-107
Tourism Planning
and Development
3
LTM-111
Resort and Hotel Operations
and Management
3
LTM-126
Management Information
System
3
LTM-112
Food and Beverage Service
Management
3
LTM-109
Tour and Travel Agency
Operations and Management
3
LTM-113
International Tourism
and Leisure Markets
3
LTM-120
Current Issues and Challenges
in Tourism 1
3
LTM-121
Current Issues and Challenges
in Tourism 2
3
Total
192 | Miriam College Units
24
Bulletin of Information
Total
Second Semester
Subject Code
Third Year
Subject Title
Fourth Year
First Semester
23
Subject Code
Units
Units
24
Total
Course
Descriptions
Units
24
AC-103
Units
Total
24
Accounting Appreciation for Non-Accountants
(3 units)
This course is an introductory course in accounting for non-accountants
but who nevertheless have to understand accounting in order to make
business decisions
BA-105
Business Policy (3 units)
Prerequisites:
MG-101 (Principles of Management and Organization),
MG-103 (Financial Management),
LTM-102 (Introduction to Tourism and Leisure),
LTM-106 (Tourism Marketing),
LTM-123(Human Behavior in Organizations)
This course integrates the different concepts learned in other courses by
making the students analyze the problems of a company from the point of
view of top management. It also introduces the concepts of corporate strategy.
Social responsibility of business is further emphasized and viewed in terms of
corporate objectives and strategies.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 193
ECO-100.1 Introduction to Economics with LRT
(3 units)
LTM-107
This course seeks to provide students with a thorough
understanding of the workings of the economy. It also
aims to give an appreciation of basic economic concepts
that are covered in Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and
International Economics essential to business majors. Topics
include, household behavior and consumer choice, firm
theory, income distribution and poverty, and globalization
and international trade.
Prerequisites: MG-101 (Principles of Management and Organization)
and LTM-102 (Introduction to Tourism and Leisure)
LTM-101
Communication Technology (3 units)
This course deals with the fundamentals of computer
system, data processing concepts, development of computing
device leading to the networking principles, basic web page
development using MS Word, E-mail and Internet application,
up to the complexity of using different window-based
application programs from the latest version of MS Office
programs such as Word, Excel and Power Point.
LTM-102
Introduction to Tourism and Leisure
(3 units)
This course provides a foundation for the concept of tourism
and leisure management as a system. It is an introductory
study of the various interrelated components of the industry,
such as international and domestic travel and tourism,
destination planning and development, tour and travel
distribution systems, attraction and entertainment systems
and the hospitality industry.
LTM-103
Managerial Accounting for
Tourism Enterprises (3 units)
This is a basic course on managerial accounting (for decisionmaking) which is crafted specifically for the issues pertaining
to the tourism and leisure industry.
LTM-104
Philippine Arts and Cultural Tourism
(3 units)
This course is an exposition to the various art and cultural
wealth of the Philippines, and their value as a tourist
destination for foreign tourists.
LTM-105.1 Health and Wellness Tourism (3 units)
This course discusses the management and operations of
health and spa establishments and resorts and their services,
including the technical and administrative aspects will be the
subject of this course.
LTM-106
Tourism Marketing (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-101 (Principles of Management
and Organization)
This course teaches the basics of marketing as applied
to the tourism and leisure industry.
Tourism Planning and Development
(3 units)
This course is intended to initially develop knowledge of the
advanced principles and practices of tourism for all students
via the coursework. Students will develop
a common understanding of the advanced theories and
concepts of the business of tourism internationally within
the context of its environmental, socio-cultural, and
environmental consequences.
LTM-108
Intrapreneurial Tourism (3 units)
Prerequisites: MG-101 (Principles of Management and Organization)
and LTM-102 (Introduction to Tourism and Leisure)
This course focuses on the skills and knowledge necessary
to recognize opportunities in the field of leisure and tourism
management, and moving beyond the recognition of these
opportunities to identification, selection and implementation
of leisure and tourism-related businesses.
LTM-109
Tour and Travel Agency Operations
and Management (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-101 (Principles of Management
and Organization)
This course discusses the basic and advanced travel and tour
operations and management principles and practices.
LTM-110
Tourism Laws and Regulations (3 units)
This course familiarizes the students with the applicable
tourism laws and regulations.
LTM-111
Resort and Hotel Operations
Management (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-101 (Principles of Management
and Organization)
This course focuses on the technical aspects of resort and
hotel operations and management with particular emphasis
on quality standards, efficiency, and cost controls. Students
are exposed to hands-on training with partner provider, on
any one of these areas: front office operations, house keeping.
LTM-112
Food and Beverage Service Management
(3 units)
This course analyzes the principal operating problems facing
managers in the food and beverage service industry. Students
are exposed to a hands-on training with partner provider, for
exposure on food and beverage program.
LTM-113
International Tourism and Leisure
Markets (3 units)
Prerequisite
LTM-106 (Tourism Marketing)
This course is an introduction to the international scope of
travel, tourism, and leisure markets.
194 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
LTM-114
Practicum (3 units)
Prerequisites: Completed at least 60% of total courses
in the curriculum, including LTM-111 and LTM-112
This course provides actual exposure and hands on
application of knowledge in accredited tourism and leisure
establishments of the Department of Tourism.
LTM-115
Recreation, Parks and Tourism
Management (3 units)
Prerequisites:
LTM-102 (Introduction to Tourism and Leisure)
LTM-104 Philippine Arts and Cultural Tourism)
LTM-105.1 (Health and Wellness Tourism)
LTM-106 (Tourism Marketing)
This course focuses on the study, analysis and practice
of management processes as they are applied to recreation
organizations. Students will acquire professional
management skills that can be applied to a wide variety
of facilities and events for diverse populations around the
world through emphasis in the application of theories,
practices and case studies in specific recreation setting.
LTM-116
Sports and Events Tourism (3 units)
This course focuses on advanced planning and managing
of sports and special events, from ideas and concepts through
the actual event implementation and follow-up.
LTM-117
Eco-Tourism and Regional Planning (3 units)
This course focuses on the sustainable utilization of the
natural environment as a component of tourism development,
including the identification, development, and operation of
eco-tourism products and programs.
LTM-118
Transportation Management (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-101 (Principles of Management
and Organization)
This course focuses on the development of major transportation
systems and their marketing function as an integral part
of the leisure and tourism trade. The different modes of
transportation, including rates and services will be discussed.
LTM-119
Feasibility Study/Project (3 units)
Prerequisites:
LTM-102 (Introduction to Tourism and Leisure)
LTM-106 (Tourism Marketing)
LTM-122 (Leisure and Tourism Research)
AC-103 (Accounting Appreciation
for Non‑Accountants)
This course is designed to familiarize students in the
planning, organization, operation and management of a
business enterprise that is engaged in the leisure and tourism
trade. Emphasis is placed on the current business problems
associated in an in-depth industry study. The final output is a
business plan.
LTM-120
Current Issues and Challenges
in Tourism 1 (3 units) – Elective
This course focuses on the current issues and challenges
confronting the industry, their impact on leisure and tourism,
and how these can be effectively dealt with.
LTM-121
Current Issues and Challenges
in Tourism 2 (3 units) – Elective
This course focuses on the current issues and challenges
confronting the industry, their impact on leisure and tourism,
and how these can be effectively dealt with.
LTM-122
Leisure and Tourism Research (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-106 (Business Statistics)
This course familiarizes the students with the techniques
used in marketing research. Selected problems in the analysis
of sales records, forecasting, estimating sales potentials,
sampling consumer demand, and determining the factors
which influence demand for specific goods are discussed.
LTM-123
Human Behavior in Organization
(3 units)
This course introduces the students to the factors affecting
the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations and
how these impact the organizational structure. The primary
purpose is to equip students with an understanding of how
people behave in organizations and provide insights and
practical techniques for managing effectively in challenging
environments. It includes a discussion of topics such
as individual and group behavior, theories and models
of personality, perception, motivation, job satisfaction,
communication, leadership, conflict and negotiation,
organizational culture and other organizational dynamics.
LTM-124
Total Quality Management (3 units)
This course presents the various TQM frameworks, concepts,
and quality improvement tools necessary implementing
the quality culture that characterizes world-class
organizations of the 21st century. It will revolve around
the core values and the criteria for performance excellence
embodied in TQM models such ISO, Malcolm Baldridge,
Six Sigma and other quality initiatives, and explore key
actions for transforming organizations into world-class
organizations that deliver ever‑improving value to their
customers/clients and constituents.
LTM-125
Basic Finance (3 units)
Prerequisite
M-105 (Mathematics of Investment)
LTM-126
Management Information System (3 units)
Prerequisite: LTM-101 (Communication Technology)
This course provides an overview of the elements of
Management Information Systems in general, tourism and
leisure in particular. This is designed to familiarize students
on hardware, software, communication technology, database
concepts and types of computer configurations currently used
in the tourism and leisure industry.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 195
LTM-127
Strategic Management for Leisure
Prerequisite: LTM-102 (Introduction to Tourism and Leisure)
LTM-106 (Tourism Marketing)
LTM-125 (Basic Finance)
AC-103 (Accounting Appreciation
for Non Accountants)
LTM-123 (Human Behavior in Organization)
This course integrates the different concepts learned in
other courses by making the students analyze the problems
of a company from the point of view of top management.
It also introduces the concepts of corporate strategy.
Social responsibility of business is further emphasized
and viewed in terms of corporate objectives and strategies.
LTM-128
Tourism Impact and Sustainability
Prerequisite: LTM-122 (Leisure and Tourism Research)
This course introduces quantitative and qualitative
approaches to the measurement of tourism impacts
as well as in achieving sustainable development and
growth. Tourism impacts to economic, environmental
and socio‑cultural factors are expounded, as well principles
for sustainable development are discussed.
M-105
Mathematics of Investments (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This course covers the basic mathematical tools and
operations used in investment problems. It deals with
theories, applications and mathematical aspects of present
values, annuities, amortization and perpetuities.
M-106
Business Statistics (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This course provides the student with the fundamental
understanding of the concepts of probability theory and
statistical inference necessary to effectively employ statistical
methods in contemporary business situations. Topics covered
are: probability concepts, probability distributions, sampling
and sampling distributions, statistical estimation, hypothesis
testing, regression, correlation and time series.
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization (3 units)
This course presents the basics of an operation theory and
science of management. Emphasis is placed on the application
of management science and theory given today’s changing
environment. Discussion is focused on the management
functions and organizational behavior. The concept of
business social responsibility is further explained and
discussed in this subject. Students are required to do oral and
written analyses of cases.
196 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
MG-103
Financial Management (3 units)
Prerequisite: AC-103 (Accounting Appreciation
for Non-Accountants)
This course introduces the finance function in business
through the policies of asset management particularly short,
intermediate and long-term financing. Focus is given to cash
management.
MG-104
Human Resource Management (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-101 (Principles of Management
and Organization)
This course aims to familiarize the students with various
aspects of Human Resource Management, including its
functions, responsibilities, and the role it plays in contributing
to the success of the organization. The course will also
identify the current challenges HR faces as a result of the
fast-paced technological changes globalization as well as
organizational competitiveness. It will try to see employees
and organizations in the micro and macro level, to enable the
students to have a wider perspective of the HR system.
TAX-101
Income Taxation (3 units)
This course deals with the internal revenue taxation
applied to business enterprise. It includes Value Added tax,
Percentage Tax and Documentary. It will likewise cover
the administrative provisions, basic concepts and practical
provisions of law on individual income and business taxation,
as embodied in the National Internal Revenue Code.
Table of Contents
College of Education
The College of Education (CEd) is committed to forming dedicated teachers
who are values oriented, life-long learners – women leaders who serve as
engaged agents and advocates for social change who serve the needs and
aspirations of the Filipino people and the global community.
Undergraduate Programs
Bachelor of Science in Child Development and Education
Bachelor of
Science in Child
Development
and Education
The Child Development and Education Department aims to provide a
holistic program for students who wish to pursue a career in early childhood
education, specifically in the formation of preschool and grade school
students. The CDE program offers a broad spectrum of childhood education
courses which provide the necessary knowledge, attitudes and skills in
educating children. Through the major courses, students are able to apply
their understanding of child growth and development, developmentally
appropriate and child-centered approaches to teaching and learning and
knowledge of curriculum content areas.
Field experiences provide students with opportunities to demonstrate their
teaching competencies under guided supervision and to make connections
between theory and practice.
CDE students imbibe the qualities of a child specialist and develop
their artistic capabilities in the form of art, music, theatre and multimedia
productions and other forms that may be considered as the best and most
appropriate channels for values education. They are also prepared to be of
service to in and out-of-school youth, underprivileged children and children
with special needs. They are ultimately expected to play a major role in
society as agents of change and development.
Academic Standards, Policies,
and Procedures of the Program:
1. All major subjects must be taken at Miriam College.
2. General Psychology is a pre-requisite to any of the major subjects.
3. A CQPA of at least 3.0 is required for shifters to be admitted to CDE.
Major subjects: 73 units
CD-101, CD-101F.1, CD-102, CD-103, CD-104, CD-104F.1 , CD-105,
CD-105F.1, CD-106, CD-107, CD-108, CD-109, CD-110.1, CD-111, CD-112,
CD-113, CD-114.1, CD-115, CD-116, CD-116F, CD-117, CD-117F, CD-118,
CD-118F.1, CD-120.1, CD‑121
Electives for Minor in Special Education: 12 units
CDS-101, CDS-102, CDS-103, CDS-104.1
Electives for Minor in Social Work: 12 units
SW-101, SW-102, SW-110, SW-114.1
Other electives open to Non-CDE Majors:
CD-103, CD-104/CD-104F.1, CD-109, CD-113, CDS-101, CDS-102,
CDS-103, CDS-104.1, CD-120.1
Prerequisite CDE subjects for BA Psychology Students
CD-104, CD-104F.1, CD-113
General education subjects: 91 units
Total number of units: 176 units
www.mc.edu.ph
| 201
Second Year
First Year
First Semester
First Semester
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
Elementary Statistics
3
FIL-102.1
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
SO-101
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
PE-101
–
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo
sa Pananaliksik
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
3
S-105/S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
S-105/S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
Introduction to Sociology
3
CD-102
Education Technology 1
3
CD-106
Instructional Materials
3
CD-101
Child Adolescent Development
3
CD-103
Foundations of Education
3
CD-108
Problems and Guidance in
Child Development
3
1
CD-101F.1
Field Study 1
1
CD-104
Principles and Techniques
in Teaching
3
CD-105
Educational Technology 2
3
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
CD-104F.1
Field Study 2
1
CD-105F.1
Field Study 3
1
–
–
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
College Algebra
3
M-102
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
NSTP 1.1
Total
Units
21
Total
Units
Total
22
Units
24
Units
Total
24
Third Year
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
Total
First Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
CD-110.1
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
Methods in Teaching Math,
Science and Social Studies
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
CD-112
Creative Arts, Music, PE,
and Drama
3
CD-114.1
Methods in Teaching Reading,
Writing and Language
3
CD-109
Educational Psychology
3
CD-115
Measurement and Evaluation
3
CD-111
Developmental Reading
3
CD-116
Curriculum Development
3
CD-113
Exceptional Psychology
3
CD-116F
Field Study 4
1
E-106
World Literatures 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
3
CD-107
Education for Peace, Gender
Equality and the Environment
3
–
Elective I
3
P-102
Philosophy of the Human
Person
3
–
–
–
–
Elective II
3
Total
202 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Second Semester
Units
24
Units
Total
25
www.mc.edu.ph
| 203
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
H-104
Rizal
T-104
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
CD-121
Directed Practice Training
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
–
–
CD-117
Moral Development
and Education
3
–
–
–
CD-117F
Field Study 5
1
–
–
–
CD-118
Assessment in Early
Childhood Education
3
–
–
–
CD-118F.1
Field Study 6
1
–
–
–
CD-120.1
Administration and
Supervision of Early Childhood
Education Schools
3
–
–
–
–
Elective 3
3
–
–
–
–
Elective 4
3
–
–
–
Total
Bachelor of
Science in Child
Development
and Education
Second Semester
Units
23
Total
Units
10
Major in Special
Education
–
10
Major CDE subject: 63 units
CD-101, CD-101F.1, CD-102, CD-103, CD-104, CD-104F.1 , CD-105, CD-105F.1,
CD-106, CD-107, CD-108, CD-109, CD-110.1, CD-111, CD-112, CD-113, CD-114.1,
CD-115, CD-116, CD-116F, CD-117, CD-117F, CD-118, CD-118F.1, CD-120.1
Major SPED subjects: 30 units
SPED-101, SPED-102, SPED-103, SPED-104, SPED-105, CDS-101, CDS-102,
CDS-103, CDS-104.1
General education subjects: 91 units
Total number of units: 184 units
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 1
1
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 2
1
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
CD-101
Child Adolescent Development
3
NSTP-1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
CD-101F.1
Field Study 1
1
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Pilipino
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
–
–
–
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
22
Summer
204 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 205
Third Year
Second Year
First Semester
First Semester
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
CD-110.1
S-105/S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
2
PE-104
Team Sports
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
P-101
CD-102
Educational Technology 1
3
CD-103
Foundations of Education
CD-104
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
Methods in Teaching Math,
Science and Social Studies
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
CD-112
Creative Arts, Music, PE,
and Drama
3
CD-114.1
Methods in Teaching Reading,
Writing and Language
3
2
CD-109
Educational Psychology
3
CD-115
Measurement and Evaluation
3
Critical Thinking
3
CD-111
Developmental Reading
3
CD-116
Curriculum Development
3
CD-105
Educational Technology 2
3
CD-113
Exceptional Psychology
3
CD-116F
Field Study 4
1
3
CD-105F.1
Field Study 3
1
E-106
3
CD-107
Education for Peace, Gender
Equality and the Environment
3
Principles and Techniques
of Teaching
3
CD-106
Instructional Materials
3
World Literatures 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
CDS-101
3
P-102
1
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
Field Study 2
Methods and Materials in
Teaching the Exceptional Child 1
–
–
–
CDS-102
Methods and Materials in
Teaching the Exceptional Child 2
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
FIL-103.1
S-105/S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
T-102.1
CD-104F.1
Second Semester
Total
Units
24
CD-108
Problems and Guidance
in Child Development
Total
Units
3
24
Total
Summer
Subject Title
SPED-101
Foundations of SPED
3
SPED-102
Curriculum Programming
in SPED
3
Total
6
Bulletin of Information
24
Units
Total
25
Summer
Subject Code
206 | Miriam College Units
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
SPED-103
Differentiation and
Individualization
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 207
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
H-104
Rizal
T-104
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
SPED-104
Organization and Administration
of Early Intervention Programs
3
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
SPED-105
Directed Practice Teaching
in SPED
6
CD-117
Moral Development
and Education
3
–
–
–
CD-117F
Field Study 5
1
–
–
–
CD-118
Assessment in Early
Childhood Education
3
–
–
–
CD-118F.1
Field Study 6
1
–
–
–
CD-120.1
Administration and
Supervision of Early Childhood
Education Schools
3
–
–
–
CDS-103
Behavioral Management
3
–
–
–
CDS-104.1
Assessment of Children with
Special Needs
3
–
–
–
Total
9
Total
Bachelor of
Science in Child
Development
and Education
Second Semester
Units
Units
Minor in
Social Work
Major subject: 73 units
CD-101, CD-101F.1, CD-102, CD-103, CD-104, CD-104F.1 , CD-105,
CD-105F.1, CD-106, CD-107, CD-108, CD-109, CD-110.1, CD-111, CD-112,
CD-113, CD-114.1, CD-115, CD-116, CD-116F, CD-117, CD-117F, CD-118,
CD-118F.1, CD-120.1, CD-121
Electives for Minor in Social Work: 12 units
SW-101, SW-102, SW-110, SW-114.1
General education subjects: 91 units
Total number of units: 176 units
First Year
First Semester
23
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 1
1
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity
and Social Responsibility 2
1
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
CD-101
Child Adolescent Development
3
NSTP-1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
CD-101F.1
Field Study 1
1
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Pilipino
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
–
–
–
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
22
Summer
208 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 209
Third Year
Second Year
First Semester
First Semester
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
CD-110.1
S-105/S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
2
PE-104
Team Sports
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
P-101
CD-102
Educational Technology 1
3
CD-103
Foundations of Education
CD-104
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
Methods in Teaching Math,
Science and Social Studies
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
CD-112
Creative Arts, Music, PE,
and Drama
3
CD-114.1
Methods in Teaching Reading,
Writing and Language
3
2
CD-109
Educational Psychology
3
CD-115
Measurement and Evaluation
3
Critical Thinking
3
CD-111
Developmental Reading
3
CD-116
Curriculum Development
3
CD-105
Educational Technology 2
3
CD-113
Exceptional Psychology
3
CD-116F
Field Study 4
1
3
CD-105F.1
Field Study 3
1
E-106
3
CD-107
Education for Peace, Gender
Equality and the Environment
3
Principles and Techniques
of Teaching
3
CD-106
Instructional Materials
3
World Literatures 1 and 2:
The Classics and Contemporary
Literature
SW-101
Introduction to Social Work
3
P-102
3
Field Study 2
1
Philosophy of the
Human Person
–
–
–
SW-102
Ethics of Social Work
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
FIL-103.1
S-105/S-106
Physical Sciences/
Biological Sciences
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
T-102.1
CD-104F.1
Second Semester
Total
Units
24
CD-108
Problems and Guidance
in Child Development
Total
Units
Units
3
Units
24
Total
24
Total
25
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
H-104
Rizal
T-104
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
CD-121
Directed Practice Teaching
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
SW-114.1
Social Work Practice
with Communities
3
CD-117
Moral Development
and Education
3
–
–
–
CD-117F
Field Study 5
1
–
–
–
CD-118
Assessment in Early
Childhood Education
3
–
–
–
CD-118F.1
Field Study 6
1
–
–
–
CD-120.1
Administration and
Supervision of Early Childhood
Education Schools
3
–
–
–
SW-110
Child and Youth Studies
3
–
–
–
Total
210 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Second Semester
Units
20
Units
Total
10
13
www.mc.edu.ph
| 211
Course
Descriptions
CD-101
Child Adolescent Development (3 units)
Instructional Materials (3 units)
This course entails a study of educational theories related
to the selection, production, and utilization of instructional
materials. Opportunities are provided for hands-on activities
requiring the proper selection, creation, and effective
employment of instructional materials for specific subjects
from Grade K to six. Creative enhancement of the learning
environment will also be addressed.
CD-101F.1 Field Study 1 (1 unit)
CD-107
This field study course requires students to observe and analyze
the stages of development of children and adolescents in different settings.
CD-102
Educational Technology 1 (3 units)
This course provides the student with the concepts and applications
related to the creation of instructional materials, lesson plan writing,
test preparations, and lecture presentations through the use of computer
applications such as word processing, desktop publishing, spreadsheets
and presentation software.
CD-103
Foundations of Education (3 units)
This course is a comprehensive and critical study of the field of education,
the various philosophical and psychological theories that form the bases for
the development of childhood education programs, and the current trends
and practice that dominate the field. The history and significance of major
educational developments in the Philippines will also be studied.
CD-104
Principles and Techniques in Teaching
(3 units)
This course is an analytical study of the fundamental principles
and components involved in the teaching-learning process.
Various instructional procedures, methods, and strategies in teaching
and in classroom management form the focus of the course.
CD-104F.1 Field Study 2 (1 unit)
This one-unit course is a field analysis of the fundamental principles
and components involved in the teaching-learning process. Students
observe and evaluate how instructional procedures, methods and strategies
in teaching, and classroom management are applied in the classroom
CD-105
Educational Technology 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: CD-102 (Educational Technology I)
This course covers efficient use of on-line information resources to meet
the needs of research, publications, communications and productivity
simulations in real-world educational settings. The student will also learn web
development application and its evaluation in the different components of an
active learning environment.
CD-105F.1 Field Study 3 (1 unit)
Prerequisite: CD-102 (Educational Technology I)
This course provides students with experiential learning by collaborating
with teachers to create instructional materials, lesson plans, internet
resources, and to observe how these materials are utilized in the classroom.
212 | Miriam College CD-106
This course provides the student with a holistic and sequential view
of the development of the child, focusing on current issues and researches.
The course includes a study of the theories of child and adolescent
development, the basic principles underlying a developmental approach,
the characteristics of children and adolescents in the different ages and
stages of their growth, and opportunities for observing and interacting
with children in their natural environment.
Bulletin of Information
Education for Peace, Gender Equality
and the Environment (3 units)
This course seeks to introduce the students to the major
content, skills and value orientations of three transformative
and relevant educational thrusts: peace education, gender‑fair/
non-sexist education and environmental education.
It promotes a holistic understanding of peace and
motivates the participants to contribute to the building
of a culture of peace in the family, community, nation and
world, particularly through education. It also promotes the
understanding of gender equality as an integral component
of a rights-and value-based approach to education for social
change and development. Finally, it seeks to increase the
students’ understanding of environmental principles and
issues as well as their role as stewards of the environment.
CD-108
Problems and Guidance
in Child Development (3 units)
Prerequisite: CD-101 (Child and Adolescent Development)
This course is an introduction to the problems confronting
young children in both home and school settings. It includes
an assessment and analysis of these problems through the
use of non-test methods and techniques (i.e. observation,
interview, sociometry, and anecdotal records). Guidance
concepts, principles and practices help the students acquire
the ability to guide, help and handle children.
CD-109
Educational Psychology (3 units)
This course deals with the knowledge and application
of the theories and principles of educational psychology
in significant teacher-tasks such as lesson planning,
classroom management, and decision-making. Emphasis
is on the understanding of the child and that of the
psychology of learning in order to bring about authentic
learning in the classroom.
CD-110.1
Methods in Teaching Math, Science
and Social Studies (3 units)
This course is designed to provide students with the essential
knowledge and skills to become successful teachers of
mathematics, science, and social studies. Emphasis will
be placed on methods, materials and resources accessible
in the various subject areas. This course also covers the
examination, application and assessment of the different
methods and strategies used in teaching mathematics,
science, and social studies in the preschool and
elementary level.
CD-111
Developmental Reading (3 units)
This course enriches the students’ reading proficiency
through skills in academic and efferent reading in
preparation to understanding the nature and process
of reading, including the factors that affect reading
performance.
CD-112
Creative Arts, Music, PE and Drama
(3 units)
This course provides the students with various approaches
to facilitate children’s creative expression and problem
solving through art, music, physical education, and drama.
Its aims to equip students on ways on how to create
developmentally appropriate activities while maintaining
a classroom environment that permits creative expression
and enhances the creativity and talents of preschool children.
CD-113
Exceptional Psychology (3 units)
This course is an introduction into the world of the
“exceptional” or “special” child. The course gives an overview
of etiology, characteristics and educational services for
children who belong to the category of children with special
needs. It also deals with the basic principles of classroom
management and mainstreaming of these children.
CD-114.1
Methods in Teaching Reading,
Writing and Language (3 units)
This course provides a basic understanding of the nature and
process of reading, with focus on the theories of early literacy,
techniques and materials in teaching beginning reading and
their application using the Four Pronged Approach.
A special component of this course is a supervised
Service Learning Program through which students
apply their knowledge and skills in teaching reading by
rendering volunteer service as teachers in early literacy
classes for indigent children. Processing and reflection of
students on their service learning experience is a significant
aspect of the program
CD-115
Measurement and Evaluation (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-102 (Elementary Statistics)
This course equips the students with knowledge and skills
in constructing different classroom tests and in employing
the essentials of measurement in order
to evaluate children’s achievement.
CD-116
Curriculum Development (3 units)
This course provides students with the theoretical framework
and the different methods and techniques of curriculum
planning and development for preschool and elementary
levels. Through the experiential approach, students will
understand the dynamics of curriculum design as they
create a curriculum for a level and subject of their choice.
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| 213
CD-116F
Field Study 4 (1 unit)
This course covers a field analysis and evaluation of the
different methods and techniques of curriculum planning
and development.
CD-117 Moral Development and Education
(3 units)
This course is a hands-on multi-media exploration of
how a student can transform herself into an effective and
efficient religion teacher. Through journal writing, Biblical
interpretation, analytical research, the student will design
a program based on Filipino culture to nurture her moral
and spiritual development.
CD-117F
Field Study 5 (1 unit)
This course covers a field analysis and evaluation of the
different methods and techniques applied in the teaching
of Christian values, as well as the teacher’s philosophy
and values.
CD-118
Assessment in Early Childhood
Education (3 units)
Prerequisite: CD-103 (Foundations of Education) and
CD-104 (Principles and Techniques of Teaching)
CD-121
Directed Practice Teaching (10 units)
This is a program intended to give prospective teachers
exposure to and first hand experience in all aspects of
teaching in the early childhood and elementary levels of
schooling. The objectives are threefold: to develop in the
student a positive attitude and firm commitment towards the
teaching profession; to allow the student-teacher to practice
the skills and competencies needed for successful teaching;
to evaluate the student’s strengths and weaknesses and guide
her towards self-improvement. This is conducted under the
guidance of a college supervisor and cooperating teacher.
A minimum of ten weeks of actual teaching in a public and
private school setting is required.
CDS-101
Methods and Materials in Teaching
the Exceptional Child 1 (3 units)
Prerequisite: CD-104 (Principles and Techniques of Teaching)
and CD-104F.1 (Field Study 2)
This course is an introduction to the use of research-based
curricula and developmentally appropriate practices,
planning procedures, and teaching methods relevant to
dealing with the gifted, mentally retarded and those children
with learning disabilities.
This course aims to equip the student with sufficient
knowledge and skills in assessing preschool age children.
Important developmental milestones and key issues in
assessment will also be discussed. Emphasis is on the
mastery of the assessment procedure through observations
and actual experience.
CDS-102
CD-118F.1 Field Study 6 (1 unit)
CDS-103
This course covers a field analysis and evaluation of formal
and informal procedures of assessing and promoting
children’s learning and development.
Prerequisite: CD-113 (Exceptional Psychology)
CD-120.1
Administration and Supervision of Early
Childhood Education Schools (3 units)
The training and development of the student’s administrative
and supervisory skills is the goal of the various on and
off-campus activities of the course. Emphasis will be on:
program development, staffing patterns and interpersonal
relations within an organization, and an understanding of
the Philippine educational system, particularly the role of the
Department of Education (DepEd). The course also prepares
the student to set up and operate her own school.
214 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Methods and Materials in Teaching
the Exceptional Child 2 (3 units)
This course is an introduction to the use of research-based
curricula and developmentally appropriate practices,
planning procedures, and teaching methods relevant to
dealing with children with sensory and physical disabilities
Behavioral Management (3 units)
This course provides a practical guide to students for
applying behavior management techniques both in general
and special education settings. It focuses on the principles
of behavior management and their application in the
educational programs. It will help the student become a
critical thinker, creative planner and effective practitioner.
CDS-104.1 Assessment of Children
with Special Needs (3 units)
SPED-101 Foundations of SPED (3 units)
This is an introductory course designed to provide
an overview of the historical, philosophical, theoretical,
and legal foundations from which current special education
practice is based. The main goal of the course is to develop
an in-depth understanding and appreciation of special
education as it seeks to serve the needs of persons with
disabilities. Local and global issues and trends in early
childhood special education would be discussed as they
impact on the provision of programs and services for learners
with special needs.
SPED-102 Curriculum Programming in SPED
(3 units)
The course provides students with the theoretical
framework of curriculum design and programming
particularly for children with special needs. It would
emphasize individualization of educational content and
strategies geared towards providing a comprehensive and
accurate curriculum that would address the unique needs
of the learner. Adapting the curriculum in the context of the
child’s exceptionality and developmental needs, students
would be trained to construct an Individualized Educational
Plan (I.E.P.) as the cornerstone for collaboration with an
interdisciplinary team and integration of educational goals
and procedures for students with special learning and
behavioral needs.
SPED-104 Organization and Administration
of Early Intervention Programs (3 units)
The course gives an overview of early intervention programs
and services both locally and globally, discussing models
of early intervention from which ‘best practices’ could be
derived. It is rooted on a family-centered philosophy and
revolves around developmentally-appropriate practices,
encouraging collaboration among different members of
an interdisciplinary team. The focus of the course is on
developing the student’s ability to examine present models of
early intervention and their capacity to address current needs,
and on honing the student’s leadership skills.
SPED-105 Directed Practice Teaching in SPED
(6 units)
This 200-hour practicum aims to provide students with
engaging experiences to apply theoretical principles in
special education to pedagogy, as applied to a specific
group of learners with special needs in any of the following
settings: school-based, center-based, hospital-based, or
community‑based settings. At the end of the course,
students should possess the necessary attitudes, skills, and
competencies in conducting a SPED assessment, designing
and implementing an Individualized Educational Plan (I.E.P.),
and effectively teaching children with special needs.
SPED-103 Differentiation and Individualization
(3 units)
This is an integrating course that would cover the different
areas of SPED practice from assessment to program and
curriculum planning, instruction and grading, applying
the concepts of Inclusive Education and the Universal
Design for Learning. The course would examine recent
trends in special education to respond to diversity seen in
the inclusive classroom specifically in the preschool and
early grades. The output of the course would be a student
portfolio covering a specific disability category, which would
include a brief assessment, Individualized Education Plan
(I.E.P.), and a discussion of alternative placement and grading
schemes which would appropriately meet the needs of the
child with exceptionality.
Prerequisite: CD-113 (Exceptional Psychology)
Topics in this course include assessment, identification,
and evaluation of children with suspected disability.
Assessment covers the following areas: cognitive, motor,
speech/language, social, emotional and family environment.
www.mc.edu.ph
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Table of Contents
College of International, Humanitarian,
and Development Studies
The College of International, Humanitarian, and Development Studies
(CIHDS) provides students with inter‑disciplinary knowledge and
specialized skills to understand an ever changing world. It aims to contribute
to the formation of future leaders with a global perspective but who are
grounded in their own cultures and responsive to national and regional
challenges. It has three degree‑granting departments – International Studies,
International Social Work, and Migration Studies, together with an academic
service program, National Service Training Program.
Undergraduate Programs
1. Bachelor of Arts in International Studies
2. Bachelor of Science in Social Work
Bachelor of Arts
in International
Studies
The Bachelor of Arts major in International Studies (IS) is a comprehensive
inter-disciplinary program that provides students with the global
perspectives, theories and tools to understand historical and contemporary
political, economic, social and cultural changes affecting the country, Asian
region and the world.
It is designed to hone the students’ knowledge and skills in negotiating
through the complex of national, regional and global processes and issues
with a strong base in critical international relations (interplay of states and
markets) and diplomacy. It leads to professional careers in diplomatic and
consular affairs as well as employment in government, inter-governmental
and international development agencies. Moreover, it allows students to
pursue further studies in law, economics, international development and
public policy.
Two specialized tracks comprise the degree.
1. The International Politics (ISI) track combined with a Minor in Peace
Studies is focused on the analysis of the shifting power dynamic and
geopolitics of the international community as well as of the global and
regional institutions and mechanisms arising from these. The track
primarily concerns issues of peace and human security, war and conflict
as well as inter-dependence among state and non-state actors, combined
with skills building in peace education, conflict resolution and mediation.
2. The Development Studies (ISD) track combined with a Minor in Gender
Studies is focused on the analysis of and responses to (1) persistent , social
and economic problems in developing countries and (2) emerging global
issues, as well as of the global and regional institutions and mechanisms
arising from these. . The track primarily concerns issues of poverty,
human well-being, development planning, management and finance
and has a special focus on gender analysis and integration in poverty
responses and development processes.
Academic standards, Policies, and Procedures of the program:
1. The program follows the institutional CQPA retention for admission
and retention.
2. The program requires six units of Foreign Language.
3. The program requires six units of Group Thesis.
4. The program requires three units of Summer Practicum or
International Exchange Program.
Major subjects: 48 units
IS-101, IS-102, IS-103, IS-104, IS-105, IS-106, IS-107, IS-108.1, IS-109.1, IS-110,
IS-111, IS-112, IS-113, IS-114, H-102, H-103
Track and minor subjects: 27 units
International Politics Track: ISI-101, ISI-102, ISI-103, ISI-104, ISI-105
Minor in Peace Studies: ISP-101, ISP-102, ISP-103, ISP-104
Development Studies Track: ISD-101, ISD-102, ISD-103, ISD-104, ISD-105
Minor in Gender Studies: ISG-101, ISG-102, ISG-103, ISG-104
General education subjects: 100 units
Total number of units: 175 units
www.mc.edu.ph
| 219
Second Year
Bachelor of Arts
in International
Studies
First Semester
International
Politics Track with
minor in Peace
Studies
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
ECO-100
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
S-105
Physical Sciences
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
H-103
Western Civilization
3
H-102
Asian Civilization
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
IS-103
Social and Political Thought
3
IS-101
Philippine Nationalism and
Culture: Constructions and
Assertions
3
IS-104
Theories of Development
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
IS-106
Gender and Society
3
First Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
Second Semester
Units
3
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-102
Speech Communication
Units
M-101
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
IS-107
Political Geography
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
H-104
Rizal
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
21
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
220 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Units
Total
Units
Units
3
Total
Total
Second Semester
23
Total
23
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
FL-101
Foreign Language 1
E-106
2
21
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
World Literature 1 & 2:
The Classics & Contemporary
Literature
3
FL-102
Foreign Language 2
3
IS-102
Introduction to
Political Analysis
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
IS-105
Introduction to Peace Studies
3
IS-108.1
Philippine Foreign Policies
and Relations
3
ISI-102
Theories of International
Cooperation and Integration
3
IS-114
Public International Law
3
IS-111
International Economics
and The Global Economy
3
IS-112
Research Methods 1
3
ISP-101
Global and Local Peace Issues
3
ISP-102
Theory and Practice of
Non-violence
3
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
21
www.mc.edu.ph
| 221
Bachelor of Arts
in International
Studies
Development
Studies Track with
minor in Gender
Studies
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
P-102
First Year
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
CT-101.1
Advance Microsoft Office
Programs
3
E-101
Communication Skills 1
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
M-101
IS-113
Research Methods 2
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
ISI-101
Seminar Course in International
and Regional Organizations
3
IS-109.1
International Relations
and Diplomatic Practices
3
IS-103
Comparative Foreign Policy
of Selected States
3
ISI-104
International Peace
and Security
3
ISP-103
Conflict Prevention
and Transformation
3
ISI-105
Seminar Course in Global
Governance and Civil Society
3
–
–
–
ISP-104
International Humanitarian
Issues
3
Total
Units
First Semester
18
Total
Units
21
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
3
College Algebra
3
M-102
Elementary Statistics
3
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
T-101
Biblical Foundation
of Christian Faith
3
IS-107
Political Geography
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
H-104
Rizal
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
Total
Units
21
Units
Total
21
Summer
222 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 223
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
ECO-100
Summer
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa Akademikong
Filipino
3
S-105
Physical Sciences
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
PE-104
Team Sports
2
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
H-102
Asian Civilization
3
H-103
Western Civilization
3
IS-103
Social & Political Thought
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
IS-104
Theories of Development
3
Philippine Nationalism and
Culture: Constructions and
Assertions
3
IS-101
Total
Units
IS-106
23
Gender and Society
Total
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
FL-101
Foreign Language 1
T-103
23
Subject Title
3
FL-102
Foreign Language 2
3
Contemporary Moral Issues
3
E-106
World Literature 1 & 2:
The Classics & Contemporary
Literature
3
IS-102
Introduction to
Political Analysis
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
IS-105
Introduction to Peace Studies
3
IS-108.1
Philippine Foreign Policies
and Relations
3
ISD-101
Issues and Challenges
in Developing Nations
3
IS-114
Public International Law
3
IS-111
International Economics
and The Global Economy
3
IS-112
Research Methods 1
3
ISG-101
Gender Analysis
in Development
3
ISG-102
Gender, Language,
and Education
3
224 | Miriam College Units
21
Bulletin of Information
IS-110
Practicum/International
Exchange Program
3
Total
3
Total
Units
Fourth Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
P-102
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
CT-101.1
Advance Microsoft Office
Programs
3
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
3
IS-113
Research Methods 2
3
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
ISD-102
Governance, Development,
and Civil Society
3
IS-109.1
International Relations
and Diplomatic Practices
3
ISD-103
Development Planning
and Analysis
3
ISD-104
Management of Development
Organizations
3
ISG-103
Gender, Law, and Politics:
Women’s Leadership and
Human Rights
3
ISG-104
Colloquium: Contemporary
Issues in Gender &
Development
3
–
–
–
ISD-105
Aid Development and Finance
3
Second Semester
Subject Code
Total
Subject Title
3
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Units
Total
Units
18
Units
Total
21
21
www.mc.edu.ph
| 225
Course
Descriptions
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics with LRT (3 units)
IS-106
Gender and Society (3 units)
IS-112
Research Methods 1 (3 units)
This course seeks to provide students with a thorough understanding of
the workings of the economy. It also aims to give an appreciation of basic
economic concepts that are covered in Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and
International Economics essential to non-business majors. Topics include,
among others, household behavior and consumer choice, firm theory, income
distribution and poverty, globalization and international trade.
This course introduces students to basic concepts and
theories for critically examining the social construction of
gender systems and how these interact with other social
factors (e.g. class, ethnicity, culture) in shaping people’s lives
and structuring power relations between social groups of
women and men.
Focused on constructing research problems in International
Studies, this course equips students with knowledge and
skills in social science inquiry, centered on the relevance
of research (process, methods and organization) in order
for students to write undergraduate thesis proposals and
defend these before a panel.
H-102
IS-107
IS-113
Asian Civilization (3 units)
Utilizing a historical and comparative perspective, this course introduces the
students to the knowledge systems and cultural, philosophical, & political
traditions of Asian civilizations (Chinese, Indian and Islamic).
H-103
Western Civilization (3 units)
This course equips students with historical and analytical tools to critically
understand the influence of Western thinking & society on the present world
order, with emphasis on the roots of modern-day politics and governance.
H-105
Philippine Constitution and Government (3 units)
A study of the development, organization and operation of the Philippine
political system, including its foreign affairs, and the Constitution.
IS-101
Philippine Nationalism and Culture:
Constructions and Assertions (3 units)
Prerequisite: IS-107 (Political Geography)
This course looks at the Filipino nation as a complex and dynamic cultural
community arising from various assertions of Filipino identities and
competing constructions of a national society that are constantly re-negotiated
along the lines of class, ethnicity, national identity, particularly in the context
of globalization.
IS-102
Introduction to Political Analysis (3 units)
Prerequisite: IS-103 (Social and Political Thought)
The course deals with a review of various political systems and the study
of contemporary politics & institutions, providing concepts and theories for
studying interest groups, political participation and representation, public
opinion and policy-making, relations between the military and politics, and
challenges to democracy.
IS-103
Social and Political Thought (3 units)
Prerequisite: H-103 (Western Civilization)
This course covers modern and contemporary texts on social and political
thought that elaborate on concepts and theories on governance, justice, liberty,
equality, democracy, political obligation and authority, citizenship and the
good and perfect society.
IS-104
Theories of Development (3 units)
This course surveys competing or complementing development theories and
strategies in development practice, paying attention to how these historically
shape the socioeconomic contours of developing/south countries and their
interactions and political relations with developed/north countries.
IS-105
Political Geography (3 units)
This course introduces students to world geography and
provides a study of the social and spatial aspects of politics
by examining the interactions of people, state and territory/
environs. Students will be initiated to issues related to
national, geopolitical, supranational and global interests,
power and processes, and learn to appreciate the disciplinal
integration of human geography and politics. It serves as the
entry course to all major subjects of the IS curriculum.
IS-108.1
Philippine Foreign Policies and Relations
(3 units)
This course presents a comprehensive view of Philippine
external relations that combines both theoretical and
operational aspects in foreign policy making including an
assessment of the issues and problems that confront the
Philippine state as an international actor.
IS-109.1
Research Methods 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: IS-112 (Research Methods 1)
This course is a continuation of IS-112 where thesis students
are required to do data gathering (library research or
fieldwork), apply their chosen analytical framework, draft
and complete their theses, and present these to a panel.
IS-114
Public International Law (3 units)
This course focuses on the legal obligations, duties,
and relationships among states as sovereigns and
international bodies in the international/global system,
including a survey of the core UN and non UN international
treaties and conventions.
International Relations and Diplomatic
Practices (3 units)
This course orients the students with the basic concepts,
principles and theories in international relations, an
understanding of the evolution of international organizations
and their role in the resolution of global issues toward the
achievement of global peace and security, as well as a survey
of diplomatic and consular practices and how these have
had to respond to possibilities opened up by the global
information and knowledge explosion.
IS-110
Practicum/International Exchange
Program (3 units)
This course is a practical application of their learning from
IS major subjects in internship areas, such as the Model
United Nations Program of the Far West, embassies and
consular offices in Manila, UN agencies, government
offices, international, national and local non-governmental
organizations, and the like.
IS-111
International Economics and
the Global Economy (3 units)
This course inquires into the actors, processes, and issues
in international and global trade and finance, utilizing
international political economy and other conceptual
approaches and critical perspectives in examining economic
globalization processes.
Introduction to Peace Studies (3 units)
This interdisciplinary course serves as an introduction to peace ideas and
movements, the theory and practice of nonviolent action, and alternative
approaches to conflict and change.
226 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 227
Course
Descriptions
International
Politics Track with
minor in Peace
Studies
ISI-101
Seminar Course in International
and Regional Organizations (3 units)
ISI-102
International Humanitarian Issues (3 units)
This course looks at global humanitarian problems and examines such
issues as the promotion and protection of human rights, the provisions and
mechanisms of the implementation of the international humanitarian law.
It also looks at the roles and responsibilities of relevant actors that include
governments, international institutions and voluntary transnational agencies
in promoting human rights, international humanitarian law and peace.
This course builds on the student’s understanding of the dynamics of
international politics by focusing on selected international/regional
organizations and institutions, highlighting their emergence, structure and
processes, and their contribution to a changing international political world,
together with an analysis of current trends such as ‘regionalism’, transnational
social movement and activism, and ‘global civil society.’
Theories of International Cooperation
and Integration (3 units)
This course introduces the student to relevant theoretical frameworks
and analytical tools, focuses on key areas of cooperation in the context
of a globalizing world, and gives particular attention to the role of non-state
actors and norms in influencing international cooperation.
ISI-103
Comparative Foreign Policy of Selected States (3 units)
This course provides the student with the necessary analytical tools in
examining current foreign policy shifts of selected states, building upon basic
concept and theories that explain the dynamics of foreign policy making since
the end of the Cord War and the post-September era.
ISI-104
International Peace and Security (3 units)
A survey course focused on global and transnational issues and concerns
affecting international peace and security and that encourages critical longterm and futures thinking by inquiring into alternatives for sustainable global
peace and security.
ISI-105
Seminar Course in Global Governance
and Civil Society (3 units)
This course introduces the concepts of ‘global civil society’ and ‘global
citizenship’ and the structures and processes that produce new political
subjects and actors in a globalizing world, and their implications to questions
of global governance in particular, of emerging practices of democracy and a
new global ethic.
ISP-101
Global and Local Peace Issues (3 units)
This course looks at peace issues and processes with particular emphasis on
the Philippines. It specifically examines conflicts, their causes and possible
alternatives, as well as, peace-building efforts and what lessons can be derived
from such initiatives.
ISP-102
Theory and Practice of Non Violence (3 units)
This course provides a critical understanding of the historical, philosophical
and religious foundations of non-violence, with emphasis on human efforts
and contemporary experiences in bringing about non-violent social change
and transformation.
ISP-103
Conflict Prevention and Transformation (3 units)
Studies operational and structural strategies to address violent conflicts,
why they occur and what are the responsibilities of states, civil society and
international organizations in promoting a culture of prevention. It introduces
the various theories that deal with the nature and causes of conflicts and
the different modalities of conflict transformation at the interpersonal,
inter‑group and international levels.
228 | Miriam College ISP-104
Bulletin of Information
Course
Descriptions
Development
Studies Track with
minor in Gender
Studies
ISD-101
Issues and Challenges in Developing Nations (3 units)
This course is an application of theories learned in IS-104, Theories
of Development. As such, it deepens the students’ understanding of
the constraints and issues of post‑colonial states (Third World/South
Perspectives) as they grapple with the challenges of globalization.
ISD-102
Governance, Development and Civil Society (3 units)
This course examines the inter-linkages and dynamics among government,
civil society and private sector in the pursuit of development from a combined
framework of politico-economic and institutional analysis.
ISD-103
Development Planning and Analysis (3 units)
This course introduces students to development approaches and
strategies, with special focus on analyzing policies, programs and projects
vis-a-vis the opportunities, resources and constraints faced by developing
countries like the Philippines within global shifts, directions and transitions. ISD-104
Management of Development Organizations (3 units)
This course aims to enhance the student’s preparation for leadership in the
field of development practice through a survey of issues, perspectives and
problematics that have attracted the intense engagement of non-governmental
organizations in contemporary international development and includes an
introduction to techniques and technologies for strategic leadership and
management of development organizations.
ISD-105
Aid Development and Finance (3 units)
This course focuses on the politics in the generation, distribution and
use of resources in development, specifically focusing in finance, food
and volunteerism, in the context of the politico-economic dynamics
of Official Development Assistance (ODA) provision and implementation
in international development cooperation.
ISG-101
Gender Analysis in Development (3 units)
This course familiarizes students with gender analyses for challenging
development approaches and strategies, by introducing various
gender‑related concepts, strategies and tools in development thinking
and practice.
ISG-102
Gender, Language and Education (3 units)
Examines the various forms of sexism in language and the masculinist
orientation of knowledge production that create gender/sexual inequalities,
as well as, focuses on women’s/feminist studies programs as a strategy
for gender equality.
www.mc.edu.ph
| 229
ISG-103
Gender, Law and Politics: Women’s Leadership
and Human Rights (3 units)
This course examines the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination
against Women (CEDAW) and related United Nations documents and
agreements that promote women’s rights as well as, explores more deeply
women’s political leadership as a strategic expression of gender equality.
ISG-104
Colloquium: Contemporary Issues in Gender
and Development (3 units)
This course encourages students to apply gender analyses on contemporary
issues and debates in development and requires students to conceptualize
and implement seminars on their chosen issues as a final activity.
Objectives/Description of the Program:
The BSSW program prepares students for direct (generalist)
practice of social work with individuals, families and
groups and communities with additional competencies in
humanitarian studies or corporate social work. Below are the
competencies that the program intends to cultivate in and
among the students:
1. Knowledge of and skills in the generalist helping
process and planned change process within the
micro‑mezzo‑macro practice continuum for the purposes
of developmental, protective, preventive and/or
therapeutic intervention.
2. An understanding of social work origin, development,
and purposes unique to the Philippine experience.
3. A critical understanding of how global and national
socio‑structural inadequacies, discrimination, oppression,
and socioeconomic and political injustice impact on
human functioning and development.
Bachelor of Science
in Social Work
The Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BSSW) program under the College
of International, Humanitarian and Development Studies (CIHDS) adheres
to producing professionals who are competent, passionate and socially
committed in their chosen field and in diverse work settings. The BSSW
program commits to form students who are globally creative thinkers yet
taking pride in their national heritage, who can bring strong leadership skills
to the job yet attuned to harnessing individual human potentials.
It also prepares students to pass the Licensure Examination for Social Workers
administered by the Professional Regulation Commission.
Capitalizing on Miriam College’s strong base of international programs
and active advocacy on peace, gender, environment and social justice, the
social work program combines in the social work curriculum the concept
of internationalism and multi-disciplinary approaches. This perspective
includes looking at how global issues impact on local communities, people
and individuals. With the knowledge, skills and attitudes students acquire,
they understand better policy implications, work effectively in service
delivery and resource management.
Two growing areas where there is increasing demand for well-trained
social workers are in Humanitarian Studies where they can enter the field
of humanitarian assistance, crisis and disaster risk management, and
Corporate Social Work, where the social worker is able to straddle the
corporate and social development sectors by working in and managing
corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs.
Aside from the regular program, BS Social Work is also open
to working professionals, college undergraduates and individuals seeking
to pursue a degree in social work. It features flexible schedules as well as
blended learning methodologies intended to cater to the unique needs
of adult learners.
Two specialized areas comprise the degree:
4. Knowledge of human behavior and the social
environment, with particular emphasis on the
person‑in‑environment transaction, life span development
and the interaction among biological, psychological,
socio-structural, gender, cultural and spiritual factors
in shaping human development and behavior.
Core subjects: 75 units
Human Behavior and Social Environment:
SW-103, SW-104, SW-105, SW-106.1, SW-109
Social Welfare, Policies and Programs:
SW-106, SW-110, SW-111, SW-112, SW-121, SW-123, SW-124
Social Work Practice:
SW-101, SW-102, SW-107, SW-113, SW-114, SW-115, SW-120
Field Instruction:
SW-108, SW-118, SW-119, SW-122
Specialization subjects: 15 units
Humanitarian Studies:
SWH-116, SWH-117
Corporate Social Work:
SWC-117, MG-101, BSA-130
Electives: EPM-101, ISP-103
General education subjects: 97 units
Total number of units:
Humanitarian Studies Specialization: 181 units
Corporate Social Work Specialization: 181 units
5. Knowledge of social welfare policies, programs,
and services of the locality, country and/or region.
6. Knowledge of, and skills in evidence-based research,
including ethical use of research to address social issues
and the use of research in social work.
7. Sufficient knowledge of related occupations and
professions and ability to work with multidisciplinary/
interdisciplinary/transdisciplinary teams to facilitate
inter-professional collaboration and teamwork.
8. The development of critical self-reflective and ethically
active practitioners:
a. Ability to practice in various contexts, e.g. respect
for diverse ethnic and cultural groups, including those
with special needs
b. Ability to network, mobilize resources, develop
advocacy agendas, and develop partnerships towards
social justice and development agendas
c. Ability to use supervision for personal and
professional growth
d. Application of social work values, ethical principles,
knowledge and skills to address and transform
social inequities
e. Ability to develop integrated social development plans
that address multi-faceted social issues.
1. The Humanitarian Studies specialization will address the need for
well‑trained social workers who can enter the field of humanitarian
assistance, crisis management and disaster preparedness and mitigation.
This allows the students to experience international field placements.
2. The Corporate Social Work specialization will enable the professional
to straddle the corporate and social development sectors.
230 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 231
First Year
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
College Algebra
3
M-102
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
NSTP 1.1
Subject Title
3
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Elementary Statistics
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
S-105
Physical Sciences
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
SW-102
Ethics of Social Work
3
SW-105.1
Social Deviation
and Social Work
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation of
Christian Faith
3
SW-103.1
Filipino Personality
and Social Work
3
SW-106.1
Social Work: Gender
and Society
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
SW-104.1
Philippine Social Realities
and Social Work
3
SW-106.2
Social Welfare Policies,
Programs, and Services
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
SW-107.1
Social Work Practice with
Individuals and Families
3
–
–
–
SW-101
Introduction to Social Work
3
21
Total
Units
Second Semester
Subject Code
Total
Units
First Semester
Total
Total
23
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
Bulletin of Information
23
Units
24
Summer
232 | Miriam College Units
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
SW-108.1
Field Instruction 1
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 233
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
E-106
Fourth Year
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
EPM-101
Introduction to Environmental
Planning and Management
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
World Literature 1 & 2:
The Classics & Contemporary
Literature
3
ECO-100
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
FL-102
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
H-102
Asian Civilization
3
SW-109
Contemporary Family Issues
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
SW-110
Child and Youth Studies
3
SW-114.1
Social Work Practice
with Communities
3
SW-112.1
Social Welfare Agency
Administration
3
SW-111
Social Welfare Financial
Management (Accounting for
Non-Accountants)
3
SW-113.1
Social Work and Disaster
Management
3
SWH-116
Social Work among
Migrant Communities in
Multi‑cultural Settings
3
SW-115.1
Social Work Practice
with Groups
3
SWH-117
Practicing Social Work in
Humanitarian Setting
3
Total
Units
First Semester
24
Total
Units
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
H-104
Rizal
3
Foreign Language 2
3
ISP-103
Conflict Prevention
and Transformation
3
SW-119.1
Field Instruction 3
3
SW-122.1
Field Instruction 4
3
SW-120.2
Social Work Communication
and Documentation
(with Media and Advocacy)
3
SW-123.1
Social Work Research 2
3
SW-121.1
Social Work Research 1
3
SW-124
Social Work and the Law
3
Total
Units
15
Units
Total
15
24
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
SW-118.1
Field Instruction 2
3
FL-101
Foreign Language 1
3
Total
6
234 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Units
www.mc.edu.ph
| 235
Bachelor of Science
in Social Work
Summer
Specialization in
Corporate Social
Work
Subject Code
Subject Title
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 2
3
Total
3
First Year
Second Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
E-101
Communication Skills 1
M-101
Second Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
E-102
Speech Communication
College Algebra
3
M-102
FIL-101.1
Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino
3
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
NSTP 1.1
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
Subject Title
3
E-103
Fundamentals of Research
3
E-105
Literatures of the Philippines
3
Elementary Statistics
3
P-101
Critical Thinking
3
PE-104
Team Sports
2
HU-101
Introduction to Humanities
3
T-102.1
Theology of Mission,
Communion and Service
3
P-102
Philosophy of the
Human Person
3
3
FIL-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
3
S-105
Physical Sciences
3
S-106
Biological Sciences
3
National Service Training
Program – NSTP 1
3
MC-102
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 2
1
SW-102
Ethics of Social Work
3
SW-105.1
Social Deviation
and Social Work
3
PSY-101
General Psychology
3
T-101
Biblical Foundation of
Christian Faith
3
SW-103.1
Filipino Personality
and Social Work
3
MG-101
Principles of Management
and Organization
3
MC-101
MC Culture, Identity,
and Social Responsibility 1
1
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology
3
SW-104.1
Philippine Social Realities
and Social Welfare
3
SW-106.2
Social Welfare Policies,
Programs, and Services
3
PE-101
Physical Fitness
2
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities
2
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports
2
SW-107.1
Social Work Practice with
Individuals and Families
3
–
–
–
SW-101
Introduction to Social Work
3
21
Total
Units
Second Semester
Subject Code
Total
Units
Units
Total
Units
23
Units
Total
23
24
Summer
236 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
SW-108.1
Field Instruction 1
3
Total
3
www.mc.edu.ph
| 237
Third Year
First Semester
Subject Code
Subject Title
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues
E-106
Fourth Year
Second Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
EPM-101
Introduction to Environmental
Planning and Management
World Literature 1 & 2:
The Classics & Contemporary
Literature
3
ECO-100
FIL-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag
3
SW-109
Contemporary Family Issues
SW-110
SW-112.1
First Semester
Units
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
T-104
Theology of Social Justice
and Peace
Introduction to Economics
with LRT
3
BSA-130
H-102
Asian Civilization
3
3
H-105
Philippine Government
with Constitution
3
Child and Youth Studies
3
SW-114.1
Social Work Practice
with Communities
Social Welfare Agency
Administration
3
SW-111
Subject Code
Subject Title
3
H-104
Rizal
3
Good Governance
and Social Responsibility
3
ISP-103
Conflict Prevention
and Transformation
3
SW-119.1
Field Instruction 3
3
SW-122.1
Field Instruction 4
3
SW-120.2
Social Work Communication
and Documentation
(with Media and Advocacy)
3
SW-123.1
Social Work Research 2
3
3
SW-121.1
Social Work Research 1
3
SW-124
Social Work and the Law
3
Social Welfare Financial
Management (Accounting for
Non-Accountants)
3
ISD-105
Aid and Development Finance
3
–
–
–
Total
SW-113.1
Social Work and Disaster
Management
3
SWC-116
Social Work: Human Behavior
in Organization
3
SW-115.1
Social Work Practice
with Groups
3
SWC-117
Practicing Social Work
in a Corporate Setting
3
Total
24
Summer
Subject Code
Subject Title
Units
SW-118.1
Field Instruction 2
3
Total
3
Second Semester
Total
Units
18
Units
Total
15
24
Course
Descriptions
SW-101
Introduction to Social Work (3 units)
This course provides students with an introductory framework to develop
their basic competency as professional social workers with a generalist
perspective. It presents the overview of the social work profession, its
historical and philosophical background, its knowledge base, values,
and ethics.
SW-102
Ethics of Social Work (3 units)
Prerequisite: SW 101(Introduction to Social Work)
This course focuses on specific knowledge about social work values, ethical
principles, and professional conduct and their application. It provides
students with opportunities to develop the professional self as a tool in the
helping relationship and as an agent of change and social transformation.
It explores ethical dilemmas in social work practice, and raises the awareness
and sensitivity of students to issues of diversity and social justice.
SW-103.1
Filipino Personality and Social Work (3 units)
Prerequisite: SW-101(Introduction to Social Work)
This course discusses the different personality theories, concepts in the
context of Filipino and Asian culture. It gives emphasis on Filipino personality
in relation to social work practice.
238 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 239
SW-104.1
Philippine Social Realities
and Social Welfare (3 units)
Prerequisite: SW-101(Introduction to Social Work)
This course discusses how economic, political and social
issues and problems in the context of a globalizing world
impact on the social functioning of individuals, groups,
communities and the larger society. It also tackles theories
and perspectives on social change and development essential
to the practice of social work profession and social welfare.
SW-105.1
Social Deviation and Social Work (3 units)
Prerequisite: SW-103.1 (Filipino Personality and Social Work)
This course discusses the different forms of deviancy
and abnormal behavior and its implications to social
work practice.
SW-106.1
Social Work: Gender and Society (3 units)
SW-110
Child and Youth Studies (3 units)
This course examines the everyday lives of children and
youth from a holistic development focus. It also discusses
selected issues and problems confronting children and
youth from a rights- based perspective and the theoretical
underpinnings and impact of international, national and local
organizations working with children and youth.
SW-111
Social Welfare Financial Management
(Accounting for Non-Accountants)
(3 units)
This course equips students with basic competency in finance
to be able to develop financial management plans for social
development projects.
SW-112.1
Social Welfare Agency Administration
(3 units)
This course focuses on gender relations in society and the
construction of power as it affects relations among different
people. The key consideration is gender awareness, gender
sensitivity, and empowerment of women.
This course provides an overview of management theories
and practices in social welfare administration. It focuses on
social welfare agency systems that include policy formulation,
program development and planning, programming,
organizing and coordination.
SW-106.2
SW-113.1
Social Welfare Policies, Programs
and Services (3 units)
This course discusses definitions of policy, public policy
and‑social welfare policy. It provides an overview of the how
social policies are developed, the cycles of policy‑making
as well as the existing policies that govern the provisions
of social welfare programs and services by different
stakeholders and institutions such as government, local or
international organizations, corporate foundations, faith
based and people’s organizations. It examines welfare
policies and programs at the global and local levels and how
they impact on the social functioning of clientele systems.
Emerging policy concerns focusing on ethical policy ethics
will also be tackled.
SW-107.1
Social Work Practice with Individuals
and Families (3 units)
Prerequisite: SW-101(Introduction to Social Work)
This course focuses on the concepts, theories, principles,
values, skills and techniques in assessment and interventions
in working with individuals and families in different welfare
settings. Included will be a historical overview of social
casework that includes the values and scientific foundation
of casework. It includes looking at problem-solving strategies
such as crisis intervention, task-centered, psychosocial,
family-centered and functional approaches.
SW-109
Contemporary Family Issues (3 units)
This course discusses the issues confronting the
contemporary family, particularly the Filipino family,
including the changing roles of women, men, and children in
the context of globalization and its sociopolitical, economic,
and cultural impacts. Implications on social work theory and
practice will be explored and the roles of social workers will
be given particular attention.
240 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Social Work and Disaster Management
(3 units)
This course equips students with principles and guidelines
for humanitarian protection in complex emergencies.
The course will focus on the practical needs of understanding
procedures for emergency relief operations, logistics,
coordination, and working in multi-disciplinary teams
that include the role of international aid agencies as well
as looking at disaster preparedness and response as early
warning systems. The course will focus on the role of women,
children and the elderly in humanitarian crisis.
SW-114.1
Social Work Practice with Communities
(3 units)
SW-120.2
Social Work Communication
and Documentation
(with Media and Advocacy) (3 units)
This course provides an overview of the role of multi-media in
advocacy and shaping public opinion relevant to social work
practice. The course will include building on verbal and non
verbal communications skills as well as the different forms of
social work writing. It also introduces the students to the use
of networking for advocacy and partnership building.
SW-121.1
Social Work Research 1 (3 units)
This course covers the fundamentals of multi-disciplinary
social research methods and the scientific methods of
social investigation and how these maybe utilized for the
improvement of social work practice by using quantitative
and qualitative techniques.
SW-123.1
Social Work Research 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: SW-121.1 (Social Work Research 1)
This course requires students to carry out an actual social
action research report based on their field experience
that integrates the students’ academic competence, selfawareness and understanding of human behavior and social
environment, social welfare policies and social work practice.
SW-124
Social Work and the Law (3 units)
This course provides students with a basic understanding
of concepts about the law, its principles, and procedures and
the structure of the Philippine legal system. It examines the
content and inter-linkages of international standards, national
policies, and local legislations and how they affect the rights,
well-being and welfare of marginalized populations. Special
emphasis is given on the social work values and skills
required in working with judges, lawyers, paralegals, clients,
and communities.
Prerequisite: SW-101( Introduction to Social Work)
FIELD INSTRUCTION
An introduction course that looks at the history, values
and theories, principles, skills, approaches and trends of
community development in urban and rural communities.
It focuses on the multiple issues affecting rural and urban
communities and the impact of globalization as it applies
social welfare policies, programs and services.
The course is an essential feature of the BSSW Program.
The student is required to spend a minimum of 1,000 hours
of supervised fieldwork practice experience in welfare
institutions and community settings. Under the current
curriculum, students in the Humanitarian specialization
will have the option to do international field placement.
SW-115.1
SW-108.1
Field Instruction 1 (Working with
Individuals and Families) (3 units)
Prerequisites:
SW-101 (Introduction to Social Work),
SW-102 (Ethics of Social Work),
SW-103.1 (Filipino Personality and Social Work),
SW-104.1 (Philippine Social Realities and Social Welfare),
SW-105.1 (Social Deviation and Social Work),
SW-106 (Social Work: Gender and Society), and
SW-107.1 (Social Work Practice with Individuals
and Families)
Social Work Practice with Groups (3 units)
Prerequisite: SW-101( Introduction to Social Work)
This course discusses the theories, principles, methods, skills
and techniques in assessment and intervention in working
with groups.
This course involves placement in an institutional setting,
either agency-based or community based with particular
focus on working with individuals, families and small
groups. Students will render 250 hours as a summer
practicum in a local welfare agency.
SW-118.1
Field Instruction 2
(Working with Groups) (3 units)
Prerequisites: SW-108.1 (Field Instruction 1),
SW-115.1 (Social Work Practice with Groups)
This field placement focus is on enhancing skills of the
student in working with individuals, families and small
groups, either in an agency or in community-setting. Students
will render 250 hours as a summer practicum in a local
welfare agency.
SW-119.1
Field Instruction 3 (Working with
Communities 1) (3 units)
Prerequisites: SW-114.1 (Social Work Practice with Communities),
SW-118.1 (Field Instruction 2)
This field placement will be done in a community-based
setting with particular focus on working with larger
collectivity (60-150 families). This involves application of
community organization processes from entry to community,
integration, conduct of community study, implementation and
evaluation of plan of action. Students will render 250 hours in
a local or international welfare agency.
SW-122.1
Field Instruction 4 (Working with
Communities 2) (3 units)
Prerequisites: SW-114.1 (Social Work Practice with Communities),
SW-118.1 (Field Instruction 2)
This field placement builds upon on the previous placement
education undertaken by the student which primarily
focused on the micro-practice of social work. This is directed
towards linking the micro, mezzo and macro levels of social
work practice with emphasis on students’ involvement in
policy and advocacy, research, planning, implementation
and evaluation of field placement agency policies, programs
and services. Students will render 250 hours in a local or
international welfare agency.
SPECIALIZATION COURSES
Humanitarian Studies
SWH-116
Social Work among Migrant Communities
in Multi-Cultural Settings (3 units)
This course is about the diaspora of Filipinos and other
nations worldwide. The course focuses on various migrant
communities in the developed world and how they
learn about their issues as well as the contributions the
communities make in the receiving countries. The course
will also look at the role of the larger society in receiving
countries and how migration is affecting their own
internal development.
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SWH-117
Practicing Social Work in Humanitarian
Setting (3 units)
This course expands on the core course of Social Work and
Disaster Management. The focus of this course will be to
build the students understanding of the legal discourse
of UN conventions and treaties and its application to
national legislation. This course includes an introduction to
international humanitarian law. It will look at humanitarian
work from the perspective of human security and an
engendered rights perspective. As an introductory course it
will provide the student with an overview of humanitarian
issues and the major international, regional and national
humanitarian and relief organizations which include private,
government, international NGOs, the UN, and other related
international institutions.
Corporate Social Work
SWC-117
Practicing Social Work
in a Corporate Setting (3 units)
This course is designed to introduce the student to
the philosophies and models to the roles and needs of
corporations in social development work. The student will
be able to identify and understand the internal structures
of CSR for employees and operations. The course will look
at the issues that the corporate sector is undertaking and how
they see themselves in these roles. The course will look at the
definitions and specifics of the emerging corporate citizen.
Students will also understand the relationship between
communities, NGOs and SR programs. The course will
include; the role of multi-stakeholders and their influence
in CSR programs and existing models in the Philippines
and internationally for framing CSR programs within the
work place.
BSA-130
Good Governance and
Social Responsibility (3 units)
Prerequisite: MG-101 (Principles of Management
and Organization)
This course is designed to inform and stimulate thinking
on issues of ethics and social responsibility encountered
in business. The material covered is intended to prepare
the students to recognize and manage ethical and social
responsibility issues as they arise and to help them formulate
their own standards of integrity and professionalism. Key
topics are the nature of corporate governance, the framework
for corporate regulations, corporate governance issues and
ethical behavior in enterprise.
242 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
Table of Contents
Academic Areas
1. English
2. Filipino
3. Foreign Language
a. Japanese as a minor program
b. Mandarin as a minor program
c. Spanish as a minor program
4. Humanities
5. Mathematics
6. National Service Training Program (NSTP)
7. Philosophy
8. Physical Education
9. Science
10.Social Science
11. Theology
English
The Department of English offers a variety of courses to ensure adequate
training in and opportunity for understanding and appreciating literature
as a representation of life experiences through various art forms, proficiency
in oral and written communication, expository and creative writing, and
disciplined research. The goal of these curricular offerings is to develop
responsible individuals who are culturally enriched, skilled in and disciplined
by critical and objective thought, capable of mature evaluation of the changing
currents of society, and equipped to contribute to the educational and cultural
development of the nation.
The other objectives of this Department are the following:
1. To develop the ability for analytical reading, critical thinking,
and insightful synthesis of experience;
2. To develop the skills of logical, coherent, and correct expression
for effective communication;
3. To develop the ability to recognize form and pattern in literary works
as a means to interpreting, analyzing, and appreciating the life
experiences they present; and
4. To develop the skills and discipline of scholarly research and
documented writing.
English
Departmental Policies
1. All English core requirements must be taken at Miriam College.
Recognition of transfer credits is at the discretion of the English
Department Chair who decides whether a particular course meets
the requirements of content and achievement standards.
2. English courses must be taken as scheduled in the core patterns and in
proper sequence: E-100/E-100 (for the Deaf), E-101/E-101 (for the Deaf),
E-102, E-103/E-104/E-104 (for the Deaf), E-105, E-106, E-107, and E-110.
3. E-101 is the first English course taken by an incoming first year student.
A student who obtained a score below percentile 71 in the English portion
of the Admissions Test for College and Universities (ACTU) or Qualifying
Examination for Collegiate Studies (ATCU), however, needs to take
E-100 first.
4. E-100 is a 3-unit, non–credit course and its term mark is P (Passing) or F
(Failure). A student is eligible for E-101 after she gets a P in E-100.
5. Deaf students in mainstream classes may opt to take another English
subject in place of E-102.
6. E-103 is taken by students majoring in Child Development Education,
International Studies, Social Work, and Psychology.
7. E-104 is taken by students majoring in Applied Arts, Business
Administration, Communication, Computer Technology,
Entrepreneurship, and Leisure and Tourism Management.
Course
Descriptions
E-100
Intensive English (3 units, non-credit)
The course is a non-credit subject designed to improve the students’ English
language ability to prepare them to get into the mainstream of college
English and later, meet the demands of using English for academic purposes.
It addresses skills geared towards efficient listening for purposeful activities,
active reading for critical thought, and speaking and writing with accuracy
and coherence.
E-100
Intensive English for the Deaf (3 units)
The course is designed to allow deaf students to develop their reading
fluency, expand their vocabulary, improve their grammar, and develop
study skills to become independent and active learners and do effective
work in their courses.
E-101
Communication Skills 1 (3 units)
The course is a study and practice of the principles of effective expository
writing. The course emphasizes the process approach to writing and
underscores the reading-writing connection. It focuses on developing
the students’ writing as well as research skills through the introduction
of the different types of expository writing and other forms of discourse.
E-101
Communication Skills for the Deaf (3 units)
9. E-107 is taken by Accountancy students.
The course is designed to reinforce the reading skills of deaf students towards
writing. The students will focus on understanding the different methods
of exposition, breaking down the parts of a paragraph and essay,
and creating coherent and cohesive compositions that manifest sentence
sense and critical thinking.
10.E-110 is taken by Biology students.
E-102
11. Only deaf students are allowed to enroll in subjects designed for them:
E-100, E-101, and E-104 for the Deaf. A deaf student, however, may enroll
in mainstream classes upon recommendation of his/her teacher and
at the discretion of the English Department Chair.
The course aims to develop the students’ oral communication skills for
effective intrapersonal and interpersonal communication in the academe
and the workplace. It seeks to advance students’ concepts of the oral
communication process as well as techniques on oral performance of
Literature. As a continuation of E-101, it also covers rhetorical organization.
8. Environmental Planning and Management students take both E-103
and E-104.
12.The English Department also offers E-108 and E-109, which are electives
open to all majors.
13. A student should obtain at the end of the term at least the following grades:
a. 2.0 for the Communication Skills subjects: E-101, E-102, E-103, E-104,
E-107, and E-110. Below 2.0 is automatically an F.
b. 1.0 for the Literature subjects: E-105, E-106, E-108, and E-109.
14.In E-100, a Communication Skills subject, the passing grade is also 2.0.
The term mark as indicated in No. 4, however, is a letter grade.
15. In subjects for the deaf, the passing grade is 1.0 and the term mark
is numerical.
16.No student may be given credit for E-103 unless she has satisfactory
completed all the requirements of this course, which includes the entire
research of her chosen topic. Since the “research process” includes meeting
specific deadlines, this paper must be completed and submitted within
the regular time span of the semester in which the course is taken.
E-103
Speech Communication (3 units)
Fundamentals of Research (3 units)
The course is designed to introduce the students to the methods and
mechanics of research and research writing. As a continuation of E-101 and
E-102, it reinforces the necessary discipline and proper attitude writing and
presenting a research paper entails.
E-104
Business English (3 units)
The course aims to train students to adopt formal, appropriate manners in
preparation for practicum; to be familiar with ethics in the workplace; and to
develop writing and verbal communication skills with business-like precision.
The course is designed to help students cope effectively with the English –
related demands of the business environment namely writing business letters,
memos and reports, conducting interviews, and preparing sales presentation,
project proposals, and case analysis
E-104
Business English for the Deaf (3 units)
The course is designed to enable deaf students to develop their business and
social English skills, with focus on improving their reading comprehension,
building their business English vocabulary and grammar, and enhancing
their personal attributes. It prepares them to cope with the demands of the
business environment, such as writing e-mails and business letters, making
effective presentations, and applying for a job.
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E-105
Literatures of the Philippines (3 units)
This course is a study of the literary forms or genres as
exemplified by selected literary texts from various regions
of the Philippines written at different periods in Philippine
literary history.
E-106
World Literature 1 & 2: The Classics
and Contemporary Literature (3 units)
The course is a study of representative works of world
literature, from the classical to the contemporary writings.
It emphasizes the literary, cultural, and human significance
globally reflected in Eastern and Western works.
E-107
Technical Writing in Business (3 units)
The course focuses on the importance of stronger technical
writing and speaking skills, and is designed to enable
future accountants to meet the demands of their job. It trains
students to learn various aspects of contemporary business
writing practices including various on-the-job writing tasks:
accounting and auditing reports, technical reports, project
proposals, and other business documents.
E-108
E-109
Poetry Writing (3 units, elective)
The course introduces students to the writing of poetry
by studying local and international works and movements.
The output for the semester will be a collection or folio
of poems and a class production like a poetry festival, which
may include a poetry reading of students and invited poets
or a poetry contest sponsored by the English Department.
E-110
Filipino
May tatlong kurso ang Departamento ng Filipino: Komunikasyon sa
Akademikong Filipino (Fil-101.1), Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo sa Pananaliksik
(Fil-102.1), at Masining na Pagpapahayag (Fil-103.1). Nililinang ng mga kurso
ang apat na makrong kasanayan sa komunikasyon: pakikinig, pagsasalita,
pagbasa, at pagsulat, samantalang binibigyang halaga ang kritikal na
pag‑iisip at kapasidad sa pagninilay sa mga isyung panlipunan.
Isinusulong ng departamento ang pagpapaunlad sa wikang Filipino
bilang wikang pambansa. Sa pamamagitan ng mga kurso at katuwang
na mga gawain at estratehiyang panturo, nilalayon ng departamento
na maiangat ang mga kasanayan at kaalaman ng mga mag-aaral sa
wika, kaugnay ng mas maigting na kamalayan sa kasaysayan, at maalab
na pagmamalaki at pagmamahal sa sariling bansa.
Technical Writing (3 units)
The course is a preparatory subject that seeks to prepare third
year Biology students to write a special project, the equivalent
of a thesis paper, and defend it on their fourth and final year
in college as a requirement for graduation. It is designed
to provide students with the skills, discipline, and proper
attitude necessary to write and present a thesis proposal,
and to gain an appreciation not only of writing but also of
research in science as a process that serves both academic
and real world purposes.
Departmental Policies
1. Filipino 101.1 is a pre-requisite to Filipino 102.1. Filipino 102.1 is a
pre‑requisite to Filipino 103.1.
2. Students may not take two or three Filipino subjects at the same time
or the same semester except when approved by the Filipino Department
Chair and the Registrar.
3. All Filipino courses must be taken at Miriam College. Cross-registration
and recognition of credits are at the discretion of the Filipino Department
Chair in accordance with the school’s policies and procedures.
Popular Literature and Creative Writing
(3 units, elective)
4. Non-Filipino students are required to take and pass the prerequisite
courses namely Fil-100A (Conversational Filipino) and Fil-B & C (Basic
Reading and Writing in Filipino) at the Language Learning Center for
at least a year before they shall be allowed to enroll in regular Filipino
courses in college.
The course explores cartoon strips, comic books, songs,
romance novelettes, radio plays, chick literature, and other
writings that have achieved mass appeal as they demonstrate
literary qualities. The course engages the students in critical
thinking and writing, and demands a creative output in the end.
Course
Descriptions
Fil-101.1
Komunikasyon sa Akademikong Filipino (3 units)
Sumasaklaw ang kursong ito sa paglinang ng mga kasanayan sa paggamit
ng wikang Filipino tungo sa lalong mataas na komunikasyon at sa kritikal
na pagdidiskurso. Lilinangin ang apat na makrong kasanayan: pakikinig,
pagsasalita, pagbasa at pagsulat sa pamamagitan ng iba’t ibang teksto at
konteksto. Gagamitin ang wika sa pagkilala at pag-unawa sa sarili at sa
pambansang identidad, kultura, at lipunan.
Fil-102.1
Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo sa Pananaliksik (3 units)
Ang kursong ito ay higit na pagpapalawak ng kaalaman at lalo pang
pagpapataas ng antas ng kasanayan sa kritikal na pagbasa at lohikal na
pagsulat tungo sa gawaing pananaliksik ayon sa hinihingi ng iba’t ibang
disiplina. Tampok ang pagdebelop sa kritikal na pag-unawa, pag-oorganisa
at paglalahad ng mga ideya, at mabisang pagpapahayag sa anyong pasulat.
Fil-103.1
Masining na Pagpapahayag (3 units)
Sinasaklaw ng kurso ang mga prinsipyo at proseso ng masining na
pagpapahayag sa Filipino: alinman sa paglalahad, paglalarawan,
pagsasalaysay, at pangangatwiran. Nakatuon ito sa malayang pagtuklas
at pagpapakita ng kakayahan at kahusayan sa pagdidiskursong pasulat at
pasalita tungkol sa mga paksang pangkomunidad, pambansa, at pandaigdig.
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Foreign
Language
The Foreign Language Department aims to provide opportunities to speak,
read, and write some foreign languages intelligently and with enjoyment
to enhance appreciation of the culture of nations where these languages
are used as the media of communication.
FR-104
French for Business (3 units)
Course
Descriptions
France is a well known bastion of liberty, equality, and intellect. The French
language is widely spoken in five continents and in many countries as a
native language, language of instruction, language of government, and lingua
franca of business. It is among the principal languages of diplomacy and of
important international organizations. It is the language of culture that opens
doors to art, music, dance, fashion, cuisine, and cinema.
FR-101
Elementary French (3 units)
This course provides the students with the basic elements of the French
language. Special emphasis is on conversation using a fundamental
vocabulary of about 700 words. Students are trained to recognize and use all
patterns of expression that are frequently encountered in the syntax of talk.
FR-102 Intermediate French (3 units)
Prerequisite: FR-101 (Elementary French)
Comprehension of written text is the main objective of this course. Students
learn to express their ideas in written forms and write short compositions.
Knowledge of French culture and civilization are provided.
FR-103
Conversational French (3 units)
Prerequisite: FR-102 (Intermediate French)
The course emphasizes the use of the French language for active
communication. It helps students develop the ability to understand spoken
French in various contexts (e.g. acquire a French vocabulary sufficient
for reading newspaper and magazine articles, literary, texts and other
non‑technical writings without dependence on a dictionary), and the ability
to express themselves coherently, resourcefully, and with reasonable fluency
and accuracy in both written and spoken French.
Course content can reflect intellectual interests shared by the students
and teachers (the arts, current events, literature, sports, etc.). Materials
include audio and video recordings, films, newspapers, magazines
and French classics.
Intermediate Japanese 1 (3 units)
Prerequisite: JAP-102 (Elementary Japanese 2)
The course intends to prepare students to work and interact
in a multilingual environment such as in multinational
companies, embassies, and outsourcing organizations.
This is the beginning of the minor program and students
who reach this level have a deep interest in the language.
Consequently, it is a must to study kanji, or Chinese
characters. In as much as speaking and listening are given
importance, essay and diary writing begin thus honing
writing skills as well. By the end of this course, the students
can engage in more complex conversation and have acquired
a total of 700 words.
The actual situations provided to students cover a wide
range of business interactions—from the brief and informal,
to the more formal and prolonged exchange. Using the
original situations as models, students are invited to engage
in role-playing exercises and construct dialogues along
similar lines.
French as a minor program
JAP-103
Prerequisite: FR-103 (Conversational French)
Translation of official documents and commercial
correspondence are likewise introduced and students
are invited to write follow-up letters regarding inquiries,
complaints, orders, employment and business applications,
and invitations.
This course, in summary, aims at providing students with
the necessary oral and written skills to deal with commercial
correspondence and business interactions.
Japanese as a minor program
Nihongo is a language of business and of refinement. Japan’s
long-standing ties with the Philippines make competence in
Japanese useful and sought-after. Japanese people have long
been known to be truly nationalistic and this is evident in
their exclusive use of Japanese for business inside and outside
Japan despite learning English since their elementary years.
Those who wish to deal with the Japanese as clients or guests
must learn their language to make strides in any dealings.
JAP-101
Elementary Japanese 1 (3 units)
JAP-104
Intermediate Japanese 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: JAP-103 (Intermediate Japanese 1)
This course prepares the student to take the Japanese
Language Proficient Exam Level 4 administered by the
Association of International Education, Japan and the Japan
Foundation. Students take several mock tests. This level could
be achieved after studying Japanese for about 150 hours.
Mandarin as a minor program
MAN-101 Elementary Mandarin (3 units)
Spoken Mandarin Chinese is the emphasis of this course.
This course aims to equip students with the proper linguistic
skills to effectively learn Mandarin Chinese in the shortest
possible time. As students progress through this course, they
will develop their listening, comprehension, and speaking
skills through exposure to multimedia and real-life situations.
MAN-102 Intermediate Mandarin (3 units)
Prerequisite: MAN-101 (Elementary Mandarin)
This course introduces the students to Japanese syllabary.
Focus is on learning basic grammar patterns to be able to
speak while giving close attention to pronunciation and
intonation. Although learning the characters is not a priority
in this course, students are introduced to the katakana
or alphabet for foreign words. By the end of the course,
the student should have the ability to engage in simple
conversations with an acquired vocabulary of 300 words.
This course concentrates on writing spoken Chinese in
Chinese characters. Students learn to recognize and write
over 500 words in character form, building upon previous
knowledge of Mandarin Chinese acquired in the form of
Pinyin. Students also familiarize themselves with practical
situations where character knowledge is requisite. Advanced
sentence patterns are also added.
JAP-102
Prerequisite: MAN-102 (Intermediate Mandarin)
Elementary Japanese 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: JAP-101 (Elementary Japanese 1)
With the introduction of the basic Japanese alphabets
Hiragana and Katakana in Japanese 101, this course promotes
mastery of these characters. Use of Japanese is maximized
to improve listening and comprehension skills. By the
end of the course, students should be able to converse in
Japanese, and read and write simple sentences with acquired
vocabulary of 500 words and 100 Kanji characters.
MAN-103 Advanced Mandarin (3 units)
This course deals with the use of Mandarin Chinese
in various situational contexts. Students gain familiarity
with the language patterns found and used in real-life
situations. Students also build upon previous knowledge
of Mandarin Chinese acquired in character form, adding 300
words in character and Pinyin forms to their core vocabulary.
MAN-104 Business Mandarin (3 units)
Prerequisite: MAN-103 (Advanced Mandarin)
This course familiarizes a student on the formal use of
Chinese. A student is taught how to hold meetings, negotiate
and make presentations within the proper cultural context.
Mandarin Chinese in a business setting is the main focus.
At this point the student is already equipped with around
2500 words in her vocabulary and can recognize and write
around 800 characters.
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Spanish as a minor program
SP-102
This minor provides a foundational knowledge of linguistic,
literary and cultural aspects of the study of Spanish. It gives
students an advantage in the ever growing bilingual
global job market. Thus, it leads the student to gain global
perspectives, a deeper understanding of the cultures and
value systems and enhance their general knowledge of world
development.
SP-101
Elementary Spanish (3 units)
An intensive study of Spanish grammar wherein the students
learn the foundations of the language and skills needed
to comprehend and use the language. At the end of the
course, the students are able to express themselves in the
present indicative, present progressive tenses using adjectives
and adverbs.
Intermediate Spanish (3 units)
Prerequisite: SP-101 (Elementary Spanish)
Mathematics
This course is an intensive study of the fundamentals
of Spanish grammar, with special attention given to
pronunciation and oral expression. There is careful
attention to grammar and acquired style through reading
stories, articles and compositions written by the students.
There is emphasis on the oral aspects of the language based
on everyday situations. At the end of the course the students
are able to express themselves in imperfect indicative, future
indicative, present perfect indicative and affirmative tenses.
SP-103
The Department of Mathematics seeks to cultivate an understanding of
the fundamental concepts and processes of Mathematics sufficient for
the students to perform efficiently and effectively in their chosen careers.
In its desire to help students discover their role in society, the Department
specifically aims to develop:
1. The power to think logically, critically, and accurately.
2. An appreciation of mathematics for its cultural and vocational values
in modern living and higher education.
3. A meaningful relationship with the world, and their individual
and social lives.
Advanced Spanish (3 units)
Prerequisite: SP-102 (Intermediate Spanish)
This course is an intensive study of advanced Spanish
grammar through the continuation of skills development
and development and review of Spanish syntax. At the end
of the course the students will be able to express themselves
in negative imperative, conditional indicative and present
subjunctive sentences.
Course
Descriptions
M-100
Essential Mathematics (3 units, non-credit)
This course focuses on the review and mastery of the basic concepts
involving the real number system. Topics included are order relations, order
of operations, divisibility, factors, multiples, and prime factorization of whole
numbers, fractions, and decimals where applicable.
A student is eligible for M-101, the next Mathematics subject, after she gets
a P in M-100.
M-100
Essential Math for the Deaf (3 units)
This course focuses on the review and mastery of the basic concepts
involving the real number system. Topics included are order relations, order
of operations, divisibility, factors, multiples, and prime factorization of whole
numbers, fractions and decimals where applicable.
Humanities
The Humanities Department offers a foundation subject on the arts. It aims
to enhance holistic development and cultural literacy through art creation
and appreciation. It seeks to promote art as a valuable means to appreciate
humanity and to strengthen individual and social development.
A student is eligible for M-101 , the next Mathematics subject, after he/she
gets a P in M-100.
M-101
College Algebra (3 units)
This course deals with the fundamental principles of College Algebra.
Topics include Linear Equations, Inequalities, Quadratic Equations,
Functions, Systems of Linear Equation in two or three variables, Matrices
and Determinants, and Sequences and Series. A review on the operations of
Polynomial, Fractions, and Radicals is also included.
M-102
Elementary Statistics (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
Course
Descriptions
252 | Miriam College HU-101
Introduction to Humanities (3 units)
The course provides a general survey of art and design in their various forms
and structures, the personal and social functions of art, and the roles of artists
in society. It includes the disciplines of Aesthetics, Art Criticism, Art History,
and Art Production in relation to daily life, cultures, and other learning areas.
Bulletin of Information
The course is designed to enable the students to gain the necessary knowledge
and skills in organizing, analyzing, and interpreting quantitative data
obtained from research-based studies and enhanced through computeraided instructions and service-learning activities. Topics include descriptive
statistics, sampling theory, regression, correlation, and inferential statistics.
M-103
Trigonometry (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This course deals with the basic concepts of functions and relations,
including inverse functions, graphs, trigonometric functions, equations, and
applications of these functions. In addition, analytic geometry covers the
rectangular coordinate system, areas of triangles and inclinations of slopes,
and standard equations of lines and the conic sections.
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M-104
Business Mathematics ( 3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
The course deals with the business applications of
the fundamental operations of addition, subtraction,
multiplication, and division of real numbers such as in the
preparation of simple bank reconciliation, income statements,
computation of averages, use of price quotations, aliquot
parts, ratios and proportions. It also includes applications of
the percentage formula in trade, retail and cash discounting;
simple and compound interest computations; discounting
promissory notes, and commission buying and selling.
M-105
Mathematics of Investments (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This course covers the basic mathematical tools and
operations met in investment problems. It deals with theories,
applications and mathematical aspects of interests, present
values, annuities, amortization and perpetuities.
M-106 Business Statistics (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This course provides the student with the fundamental
understanding of the concepts of probability theory and
statistical inference necessary to effectively employ statistical
methods in contemporary business situations. Topics covered
are: probability concepts, probability distributions, sampling
and sampling distributions, statistical estimation, hypothesis
testing, regression, and correlation.
M-107
Calculus for Business (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This course provides the students with an understanding
of calculus as it applies to business, economics, and
accountancy. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives
of polynomials and other algebraic functions, implicit
differentiation, higher‑order derivatives, extrema, logarithmic
and exponential functions, definite and indefinite integrals,
and applications to business and accounting topics.
254 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
M-108
Quantitative Techniques in Business/
Operations Research
Prerequisites: M-102 (Elementary Statistics) or
M-106 (Business Statistics)
This course seeks to enhance the students’ ability to
perform the quantitative analysis necessary, understand
the usefulness and limitations of the methods, recognize
situations where the methods can be applied beneficially,
and be aware of the issues involved when utilizing the results
of the analyses. Coverage is topical and includes quantitative
analysis techniques such as decision making, linear
programming, graphical sensitivity analysis, forecasting
and waiting line models. The introduction to concepts
via cases related to operations and strategies is preferred
whenever appropriate.
M-109
National Service
Training Program
(NSTP)
NSTP is a 6-unit mandated subject for all baccalaureate courses by Republic
Act (RA) 9163 in 2001, otherwise known as NSTP Law. The NSTP law aims
to enhance civic consciousness and patriotism among the youth. It has three
(3) main components; the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC), Literacy
Training Service (LTS), and Civic Welfare Training Service (CWTS).
All CWTS and LTS graduates are members of National Service Reserve
Corps (NSRC) which can be tapped by the local/national government
for literacy and civic welfare activities especially in times of calamities
and disasters.
General Policies
1. No orientation, no exposure
2. No permission letter, no community/institutional exposure
3. Attendance and punctuality in all NSTP assemblies
Calculus with Analytic Geometry
Prerequisite: M-103 (Trigonometry)
The course is designed to equip the students with the
necessary knowledge and skills in the elementary analysis
of various functions and their applications to Biology and the
Life Sciences. Topics include the different types of functions
(algebraic and transcendental), limits, derivatives (first
and second derivatives), continuity and differentiability,
differentiation (explicit and implicit), anti-differentiation
and integration, and introduction to elementary differential
equations, as well as applications to Biology and the
Life Sciences.
Course
Descriptions
NSTP 1.1
National Service Training Program – NSTP 1 (3 units)
NSTP 1.1 provides an initial economic, political, social, and environmental
awareness to the students on the situation of marginalized sectors of society
(e.g. farmers, fisher folk, workers, urban communities, indigenous people,
in and out of school youth, and prisoners) The first part of the course focuses
on classroom discussions, workshops, and group dynamics as a preparation
for the exposure. The heart of the subject is the actual integration/exposure
of the students in the various sectors.
NSTP 2.1
National Service Training Program – NSTP 2 (3 units)
Prerequisite: NSTP 1.1 (National Service Training Program – NSTP 1)
NSTP 2.1 is the plan implementation and continuation of NSTP-1 wherein
the students are given the chance to mobilize resources, plan, and implement
short-term projects in consultation with the partner communities of
Miriam College.
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Philosophy
The Philosophy core curriculum involves a personal and critical inquiry
coordinated along a thematic, historical, and interdisciplinary approach
towards an integral understanding of the human person. The Department
aims to develop reflective critical thinking in the students in order to deepen
their perception of themselves, other people, and the world around them,
and to enable them to explicate and articulate such perception.
Physical
Education
Physical Education aims at an all around wholesome development of human
personality in order to make an individual a good citizen who is able to
make a valuable contribution to the nation’s fitness and sports development
program. Thus, Physical Education moves toward making an individual
physically fit, mentally alert, emotionally balanced, socially well adjusted,
morally true, and spiritually uplifted. Complementing the academic offerings
are the Intramural Program, the Service Program, and the Athletic Program.
The Intramural Program aims to promote wellness, and foster the spirit
of competition and sportsmanship. It allows students who do not compete
in interscholastic, national, or international competitions an opportunity
to be active.
Course
Descriptions
P-101
The Athletic Program is another aspect of Physical Education which
focuses on the recruitment, training, and exposure of student-athletes in
interscholastic competitions. Varsity training enhances their athletic skills,
and values of discipline, camaraderie and fair-play. At present, Miriam
College is a member of the Women’s National Collegiate Athletic Association
(WNCAA) and Women Colleges Sports Association (WCSA), aside from these
prestigious tournaments Miriam College participates in other tournaments
such as Women’s Basketball League (WBL), University Games (UNIGAMES),
and other invitational competitions sponsored by the National Sports
Association (NSA). Varsity teams are handled by competent head coaches
and trainers in the field. Currently, the athletic program has the following
events: badminton, basketball, futsal, pep squad, table tennis, swimming
and volleyball.
Critical Thinking (3 units)
This course deals with the various elements and methods essential in the
development of critical thinking. It hones the students’ reasoning skills and
capacity to question, and presents them a wide range of logical frameworks
with which to effectively analyze and evaluate.
P-102
Philosophy of the Human Person (3 units)
Prerequisite: P-101 (Critical Thinking)
This course stimulates the art of wonder and engages the students in the
activity of reflection on the different facets of being human, the limitations
and forms of transcendence in themes such as embodiment, language,
love, death, freedom, and the absolute. The students are expected to see
the meaning of becoming authentically human.
Course
Descriptions
PE-101 Physical Fitness (2 units)
A prerequisite to any of the other PE courses.
This course covers aerobics, body building, conditioning exercises,
gymnastics, slimnastics, tai-chi, taebo, weight training, and stretching
exercises. Its culminating activity is a cheer dance exhibition.
PE-102
Rhythmic Activities (2 units)
This course covers ballroom dances, ballroom dances, creative dance,
foreign folk dances, interpretative dances, modern dance, jazz, and sayawit.
Its culminating activity is dance kinetics.
PE-103
Individual/Dual Sports (2 units)
This course covers badminton, creative games, martial arts, sepak takraw,
swimming, table tennis, track and field, and tai-chi.
PE-104
Team Sports (2 units)
This course covers basketball, dodge ball, football, handball, orienteering,
Philippine games, soccer, softball, and volleyball.
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Science
The Department of Science seeks to equip the student with the fundamental
knowledge on scientific facts, developments, ideas, and processes sufficient
for performing efficiently in this age of modern science and technology.
In its desire to help the student discover herself and her role in society,
this area specifically aims to develop:
1. The power to think logically, critically, and accurately.
2. An appreciation for the study of life and seeking its truths.
3. A better understanding and use of the environment.
4. A meaningful link between the theories taught inside the classroom
and the world around her.
S-103 LAB General Zoology (Laboratory) (2 units)
S-106
This is an introductory laboratory course dealing with the
study of relationships between structure and function of
different vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Different
organ systems are studied, putting emphasis on features and
problems shared by all animals from the cellular organization
to their relationship with the environment. The laboratory
activities also emphasize the study of the structures of the
organ system using dissection techniques as a primary tool.
This course is offered to B.S. Psychology majors with 6-hour
laboratory work per week.
This course deals with basic concepts and current
developments in cell biology, plant and animal anatomy
and physiology, and ecology. Discussion of relevant biological
and environmental issues/problems will be highlighted in
this course.
S-104 LEC General Biology 1 (Lecture) (3 units)
Course
Descriptions
S-101 LEC General Chemistry (Lecture) (3 units)
This is an introductory course covering basic chemistry concepts that include
atomic structure, electron configuration and periodicity, chemical bonding
and molecular structures, stoichiometry, solids, liquids, gases, and the
Kinetic Molecular Theory colloids and solutions. Introduction to chemical
thermodynamics, kinetics, and equilibrium are also included. In order to
better understand how chemistry concepts work in the real world, the course
is taken simultaneously with its 2-unit laboratory counterpart, S-101 LAB.
S-101 LAB General Chemistry (Laboratory) (2 units)
This is a laboratory course designed to develop basic laboratory skills and
experimental techniques. It includes a series of experiments and exercises
that illustrate and reinforce key concepts covered in general chemistry lecture.
S-102 LEC General Botany (Lecture) (3 units)
This course involves the study of plant life forms and their significance
to humans. Understanding of plant body is achieved through the study
of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems. Biological concepts are discussed
in relation to environmental and societal issues. Offered to BS Psychology
majors, the course aims to provide knowledge on herbal medicine and the
effects of the environment/plants on the psyche of humans. To increase
richness of knowledge on plants, the course is taken simultaneously with
its 2-unit laboratory counterpart, S-102 LAB.
S-102 LAB General Botany (Laboratory) (2 units)
This is an introductory laboratory course dealing with exercises on plant
anatomy, morphology, and physiology. It is offered to BS Psychology majors
with six-hour laboratory work per week.
S-103 LEC General Zoology (Lecture) (3 units)
This course deals with Kingdom Animalia focusing on the animals’ structural
organization, chemical composition, and interactions with the environment.
Various aspects of zoology, ranging from molecular and cellular organization
to genetic control, reproductive mechanisms, responsiveness and evolution,
are examined based on the features and problems shared by all animals.
For a better understanding, the course is taken simultaneously with its 2-unit
laboratory counterpart, S-103 LAB.
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This course focuses on the wealth of life forms on earth,
on their structural organization, chemical composition,
and interactions with their environment. Various aspects of
biology will be examined based on the features and problems
shared by all living things ranging from their molecular and
cellular organization to their genetic control, reproductive
mechanisms, metabolism, responsiveness and evolution.
Similar to other lecture courses, it has a 2-unit laboratory
component, S-104 LAB, which has to be taken simultaneous
with this course.
S-104 LAB
General Biology 1 (Laboratory) (2 units)
This is a laboratory course that focuses on the relationship
between the environment and organisms surrounding it.
Experiments and exercises are presented allowing each
student to actually understand the principles and concepts
in biology. The course also provides students an opportunity
to apply the scientific method of investigation, which
specifically highlights synthesis, and analysis of data.
S-105
Physical Sciences (3 units)
This is designed for students with limited background and/or
aptitude in the Natural Sciences. It focuses on the basic ideas
of modern physics, chemistry of our physical environment,
earth science and astronomy. General topics include special
theory of relativity, nature and application of light, atomic
structure and quantum theory of composition and interaction
of matter, building and shaping earth’s surface, and the
origin and fate of the universe. To allow students to see the
relevant application of acquired knowledge to everyday life,
environmental concerns and issues are discussed where they
occur naturally throughout the course. Such environmental
concerns and issues include air pollution and its associated
phenomena of photochemical and industrial smog, acid rain,
stratospheric ozone depletion, and climate change; water
contamination by toxic chemical and hazardous wastes;
and the natural phenomena of earthquake and tsunami.
Biological Sciences (3 units)
S-107 LEC Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
(Lecture) (3 units)
Prerequisites: S-103 LEC (General Zoology)
This course involves the study of the finer details of vertebrate
bodies. Differences in the vertebrate internal body structures
are discussed. Focus is on the anatomy of mammals. A higher
zoology course for B.S. Psychology students.
S-107 LAB Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
(Laboratory) (2 units)
Prerequisite: S-103 LAB (General Zoology)
This is a higher laboratory course dealing with vertebrate
anatomy. It focuses on the anatomy of sharks and cats.
Skills in discussion and identification of internal/finer body
structure are enhanced.
S-108 LEC Physics (Lecture) (3 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This is a course which covers the fundamental concepts of
mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, electricity, magnetism,
waves and geometric optics. It is taken in tandem
with S-108 LAB.
S-108 LAB Physics (Laboratory) (2 units)
Prerequisite: M-101 (College Algebra)
This is a one-semester laboratory course designed to reinforce
the concepts taken in Physics Lecture which includes the
fundamental principles of mechanics, thermodynamics,
fluids, electricity, magnetism, waves and geometric optics.
S-109 LEC Organic Chemistry (Lecture) (3 units)
Prerequisite: S-101 LEC (General Chemistry)
Taken with S-109 LAB, this is a course covering basic
concepts in organic chemistry. Topics include hybridization,
isomerism, organic structures, reactions and mechanisms.
The concept that organic structures determine chemical
reactivity and physical properties is given emphasis. It also
includes a brief study of the structure and properties of lipids,
carbohydrates, and proteins.
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S-109 LAB Organic Chemistry (Laboratory) (2 units)
Prerequisite: S-101 LAB (General Chemistry)
This is a laboratory course covering experiments on
separation and purification of organic compounds, basic
organic chemical reactions, organic synthesis, and qualitative
organic analysis. Experiments dealing with the properties of
lipids, carbohydrates and proteins are also included.
S-110
Social
Sciences
Biochemistry (3 units)
Prerequisite: S-109 LEC and LAB (Organic Chemistry)
S-110 is an introductory 3-unit course in Biochemistry for
science major students who want to pursue a profession in
medicine, and other health or allied sciences. Biochemistry
is the study of the chemistry of living species. It deals with
the “molecular logic of the living state” – the set of ground
rules that govern the nature, function, and interaction of
specific types of molecules called “biomolecules” found in
living organisms to maintain and perpetuate the living state.
Part 1 of the course includes topics on the structures and
functions of proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids
and basic concepts of catalysis and enzyme action.
Course
Descriptions
The Social Sciences Department seeks to fulfill the vision of Miriam College
to “form leaders in service who are rooted in Filipino culture and Asian
traditions and yet are citizens of the world.” The course offerings of the
Department give students the opportunity to explore and answer significant
questions about the nature of humanity (especially families), society, politics
(especially human rights and governance), history, and other subjects. It has
a special responsibility to develop in the students the capacity of critical
thinking so that students may effectively respond to issues of truth, justice,
peace and the integrity of creation. To this end, it contributes to the General
Education program at the undergraduate level by offering courses in History/
Kasaysayan, Sociology, and Rizal.
H-101
Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas (3 units)
Ito ay isang pag-aaral ng mga pangkabuhayan, panlipunan, pampulitika,
at pangkulturang pag-unlad ng Pilipinas mula pa noong sinaunang panahon
hanggang sa kasalukuyan. Pahahalagahan dito ang mga makahulugang
paksa na paulit-ulit na nagaganap sa kasaysayan, gayundin ang mga
malubhang suliranin ng bayan sa kasalukuyan.
Part 2 explores cellular pathways for the interconversion
of different forms of energy, and the generation of adenosine
triphosphate (ATP) and other energy storing molecules.
This course discusses the economic, social, political, and cultural
developments of the Philippines. It emphasizes the relevant and recurring
issues in Philippine history and studies the serious problems that confront
the country.
Part 3 covers major evolutionary challenges in molecular
reproduction and the adaption of cells and organism to
changing environment.
H-101.1
Introduction to Philippine History with Rizal (3 units)
This course is designed for deaf students. It discusses salient features of the
economic, social, political, and cultural developments of the Philippines from
the pre-colonial period to the Philippine Revolution of 1896. It highlights
the contribution of Jose Rizal to Philippine history and his relevance to
contemporary Philippine society.
H-104
Rizal (3 units)
Prerequisite: H-101 (Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas)
Ito ay isang pag-aaral ng buhay at mga akda/gawa ni Jose P. Rizal at
ang impluwensya at kabuluhan ng mga ito sa kasalukuyang lipunan.
Sa pagpapahalaga sa kakayahang Pilipino, nilalayon nito ang pagsulong
ng makabayang damdamin.
This course is a study of the life and works of Jose P. Rizal and their
influence and relevance in contemporary Philippine society. It aims to
deepen and strengthen the student’s sense of nationalism.
SO-101
Introduction to Sociology (3 units)
This course is primarily intended to provide students with an overview
of sociology as a scientific activity. This course emphasizes the nature, scope,
basic concepts, theoretical formulations and methods of sociology. Focus is
given to analysis of current phenomena in the Philippines today.
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Theology
The Theology department underlines the very nature of Miriam College
as a Catholic tertiary institution. It implements and supports the mission
of promoting integral human formation and holistic education.
The Theology department is primarily concerned that the students become
enlightened and committed Christians who develop, first of all, a deep
relationship with Christ and who strive to live Spirit-led lives imbued with
Gospel values in their families and in their communities.
The Theology program is designed to help students understand as well
as appropriate the Christian message through the reflective, experiential
and contextual approach which includes exposure-immersion and service
to different sectors of the society.
The goal of the Theology department through its course offerings,
which are sequential from first year to the senior year, is to graduate Miriam
students with a mature understanding and personal integration of their
Christian faith lived in the Filipino context.
Course
Descriptions
T-101
Biblical Foundation of Christian Faith (3 units)
One of the major sources of Christian theology is the Bible. This foundational
course focuses on basic theological questions: Who is God? How does God
communicate with us? Who is Jesus of Nazareth?
The students are introduced to the Bible (Jewish and Christian Scriptures)
as the basic text for understanding the structure of Christian faith.
Participation in a one-day Prayer Workshop is a major requirement of the
course. This also serves as the day of recollection for the school year.
T-102.1
Theology of Mission, Communion and Service (3 units)
Prerequisite: T-101 (Biblical Foundation of Christian Faith)
T-102.1 deals with the Christian Community, and how it has constantly
labored to continue Jesus’ mission of proclaiming the Reign of God.
The course traces and explores the forms and dynamics of the community’s
missionary activities throughout the centuries.
T-103
Contemporary Moral Issues (3 units)
Prerequisites: T-101 (Biblical Foundation of Christian Faith) and
T-102.1 (Theology of Mission, Communion
and Service)
This course involves critical reflection on contemporary
issues that confront the Filipino youth; that is, reflection
in the light of Christian faith. Special attention is given to
issues concerning sexuality and gender, relationships and
commitment, marriage and family life. Prior to analysis and
reflection on specific issues, the students are introduced to the
basic concepts, values and principles that are necessary for
discernment and moral decision-making.
This course will equip them with concepts and tools
that will help them understand more and live in this fastchanging world. Thus, a Discernment Recollection is one of
the major requirements of this course. It aims, among other
things, to deepen the students’ understanding of the Miriam
Spirituality as exemplified by Miriam of Nazareth.
T-104
units)
Theology of Social Justice and Peace ( 3
Prerequisites: T-101 (Biblical Foundation of Christian Faith) and
T-102.1 (Theology of Mission, Communion
and Service)
This course attempts to integrate the Catholic Social Teaching
and the Catholic Social Ethics with the Core-Values of Miriam
College e.g. Truth, Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation.
It seeks to explore the contents of major church documents
and provide students with a greater understanding of the
biblical and ecclesiological foundations of working for a just,
humane and peaceful society. It prepares and guides them to
examine and practice the various forms of expressing their
commitment to the Christian Faith, especially as they enter
the world of work.
This course also looks into the Sacraments as celebrations of life’s most
important moments wherein God’s gracious presence is experienced and
avenues for communion to the God who builds community.
It emphasizes the theme of Mission, Communion/Discipleship and
Service to the local communities and the whole Church in the context of the
Miriam core values of Truth, Peace, Justice and Integrity of Creation. Parish
and Community Involvement is an integral part of the course. An exposure
to and involvement in Church organizations and ministries is the
service‑learning project of the course.
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Table of Contents
Miriam College
Board of Trustees
Ms. Lourdes R. Quisumbing, Ph.D.
(Chairperson Emerita)
Founding President
Asia Pacific Network for International
Education and Values Education (APNIEVE)
Ms. Josefina N. Tan
(Chairperson, Board)
President and Director
BDO Private Bank
Ms. Edith I. Alcantara
(Vice-Chairperson, Board)
President
C. Alcantara & Sons
Ms. Rosario O. Lapus, Ph.D.
President
Miriam College
Ms. Emelina S. Almario
President and General Manager
Adarna House, Inc.
Mr. Baltazar N. Endriga
President
Credit Information Corporation
Sr. Margarita E. Jamias, M.M.
Representative
Maryknoll Sisters of St. Dominic
Mr. Roberto M. Laviña
Executive Vice President and
Chief Operating Officer
The Philippine Investment Management
(PHINMA), Inc.
Atty. Christian S. Monsod
Board Member and
Management Consultant
Manila Electric Company
Ms. Carmelita I. Quebengco, Ph.D.
Chancellor Emeritus
De La Salle University
Ms. Maria Lim Ayuyao, Ph.D.
Ms. Ma. Teresa D. Villanueva
(Ex-Officio MMCAA)
President
Foundation for Worldwide People Power, Inc.
Chief Executive Officer
Publicis-Manila
Ms. Corazon S. de la Paz-Bernardo
Atty. Ulpiano P. Sarmiento III
(Corporate Secretary)
Chairperson
National Citizens’ Movement for Free
Elections (NAMFREL)
Senior Partner
The Firm of Ulpiano Sarmiento III
and Marciano Delson
Ms. Nieves R. Confesor
Dean
(Center for Development Management)
Asian Institute of Management
Ambassador
Laura Quiambao del Rosario
Director
(Foreign Service Institute)
Department of Foreign Affairs
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Table of Contents
Miriam College
President’s Council
Advocacy
Centers
Ms. Rosario O. Lapus, Ph.D.
Ms. Ma. Corazon R. Reyes, Ph.D.
Loreta N. Castro, Ed.D.
Ma. Dreena Q. Del Mundo
President
Director, Basic Education
Ms. Glenda E. Fortez, Ph.D.
Ms. Gail Frances Reyes-Galang,
Ph.D.
Executive Director
Center for Peace Education
Program Director
Linggap Bulilit
Donna Paz T. Reyes, Ph.D.
Aurora J. De Dios
Executive Director
Environmental Studies Institute
Executive Director
Women and Gender Institute
Vice-President for Academic Affairs
Ms. Rose Linda O. Bautista
Vice-President for Development
and Resource Management
Principal, Grade School
Mr. Edizon A. Fermin, Ph.D.
Principal, High School
Maria Lourdes Turalde-Jarabe
Mr. Noel C. Racho, Ph.D.
Ms. Trixie Marie J. Sison
Executive Director
Institutional Network for Social Action
Director, Human Resources
Principal, Child Study Center
Ms. Cynthia O. Morales
Mr. Carlo P. Garcia
Director, Administrative Services
Principal, Miriam College Adult Education
Ms. Myrna G. Vidal
Ms. Carolyn C. Ui
Director, Finance
Principal, Southeast Asian Institute
for the Deaf
Ms. Ma. Concepcion Y. Lupisan
Stella Eloisa M. Fong
Planning and Development Coordinator
Lifelong Education and Development Center
Dean, College of Business, Entrepreneurship,
and Accouting
Ms. Rosario Margarita A. Aligada,
Ph.D.
Dean, College of Education
Ms. Lourdes K. Samson, Ph.D.
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Ms. Caridad Sri Tharan, Ph.D.
Dean, College of International,
Humanitarian, and Development Studies
Special
Centers
Shirley Halili-Cruz
Ronaldo A. Motilla, Ph.D.
Artistic Director
Ballet Center
Head
Integrated Lifestyle and Wellness Center
Josefino J. Toledo
Elineth Elizabeth L. Suarez, Ed.D.
Executive Director
Center for Applied Music
Program Officer
Language Learning Center
Ma. Jamelia F. Villanueva
Executive Director
Growth and Upgrading Resource Office
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Table of Contents
Miriam College
Deans
Miriam College Faculty
2011–2012
Lourdes K. Samson, Ph. D.
Caroline De Leon, Ph. D.
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences (CAS)
Dean, College of Education (CEd)
Ma Concepcion Y. Lupisan
Caridad T. Sri Tharan, Ph. D.
Dean, College of Business, Entrepreneurship
and Accountancy (CBEA)
Dean, College of International, Humanitarian
and Development Studies (CIHDS)
A
Ablan, Michel Kristian
Aliman, Agnes Shari
Bachelor of Laws
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Asian Studies
University of the Philippines
Acosta, Ma. Margarita
Alminar-Mutya, Ruby
Doctor of Philosophy
in Child and Family Studies
Miriam College
Doctor in Business Administration
Philippine School of Business Administration
Aguila, Ma. Celia
Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts
Miriam College
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Guidance & Counseling
Ateneo de Manila University
Miriam College
Associate Deans
Alagaran, Jose Rueben
Francis N. Evangelista, Ph.D.
Maria Lourdes L. Chavez
Associate Dean
for Academic Support Services
Associate Dean for Student Affairs
Doctor of Philosophy in Communication,
Cognates in Educational Technology and
Distance Education
University of the Philippines
Alberto, Romille
Miriam College
Administrators
Ma Cynthia A. Alcantara, Ph.D.
Romeo Sebastian
Registrar
Supervisor, Library Media Center
Vivian Q. Arionday
Maricel C. Ui
Coordinator, Administrative Service Officer
Coordinator, Office of the Program for
Learners with Special Needs
Ma Teresita F. Mendoza
Supervisor, Guidance Center
Ma Teresita Rapadas
Coordinator, Campus Ministry Office
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Ma Luisa V. Villano
Admissions Officer
Alpay, Judith
Anasarias, Ernesto
Master of Arts in Community Development
University of the Philippines
Añonuevo, Ma. Luz Rebecca
Doctoral of Philosophy in Literature
De La Salle University, Manila
Apuan, Ma. Victoria
Master of Science in Computer Science
AMA University
Doctor of Philosophy in Philippine Studies
University of the Philippines
Alcantara, Maria Cynthia
Arceo, Teresita
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Educational Psychology
University of the Philippines
Doctor of Education
in Educational Management
Centro Escolar University
Alcazar-Bayaua, Angelina
Arlegue, Celito
Master of Arts in Childhood Education
Miriam College
Master in International Studies
University of the Philippines
Alcid, Mary Lou
Avante, Raquel
Master of Science in Rural Development
Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand
Master of Science in Applied Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Alejandrino, Raul
Azarcon, Tirso
Master of Science in Sociology
Asian Social Institute, Inc
Aligada, Rosario Margarita
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Educational Management
Trinity University of Asia
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Reading Education
University of the Philippines
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Miriam College Faculty
B
2011–2012
Bagaman, Bernard
Biason, Garnet
Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts
Ateneo de Manila University
Master of Science in Applied Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Balolong-Parungao, Marilen
Billanes, Lorna
Master of Science in Microbiology,
Minor in Biochemistry
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in English Studies/
Creative Writing
University of the Philippines
Baltao, Kimberly
Biña, Josefina
Juris Doctor
Ateneo De Manila University
Bachelor of Science in Botany
University of the Philippines
Baluyut, Archivald
Blanca, Antonia
Bachelor of Science in Tourism Management
University of the Philippines
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Special Education
University of the Philippines
Banlaoi, Rommel
Master of Arts in Political Science
University of the Philippines
Baroma, Regina Salve
Masters in Development Economics
University of the Philippines
Barroga, Christina
Bachelor of Laws/Certified Public Accountant
University of the East
Bassig, Angeles
Master of Arts in Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Baybay, Maria Lourdes
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Research and Evaluation
University of the Philippines
Bellen, Jonathan Jeffrey
Bachelor in Physical Education
Polytechnic University of the Philippines
Bengzon, Jaime
Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies
Ateneo de Manila University
Berbano, Alfred Lindon
C
Cabrido, Avelinda
Concepcion, Nancy
Master of Science in Biology
University of Sto. Tomas
Master of Arts in Broadcasting
University of the Philippines
Caligner, Eduardo
Conti, Virgilio
Doctor of Philosophy, Major in Psychology
University of Sto. Tomas
Master in Business Administration
University of the Philippines
Canlas, Elizabeth
Cordova, Joel
Master of Science in Chemistry
University of the Philippines
Master in Business Administration
Philippine School of Business Administration
Capiral, Cedrick Justice
Cornejo, Rodrigo G.
Bachelor of Laws
Far Eastern University
Bachelor of Science
in Business Administration,
Major in Marketing
University of the East
Carandang, Olivia
Bolaños, Jesus Anthony
Bachelor of Arts in Psychology
Ateneo de Manila University
Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts
Miriam College
Cardano, Lyzette
Boquiren, Elaine
Master in Business Administration
University of Sto. Tomas
Doctor in Business Administration
Philippine School of Business Administration
Carvajal, Thaddeus
Buenafe, Jocelyn
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Philippine School of Business Administration
Masters in Biology
De La Salle University
Casimiro, Girlie
Master in Business Administration
Asian Institute of Management
Master of Arts in Development Studies,
Major in Population, Poverty
and Social Development
The Institute of Social Studies
in The Netherlands
Buncio, Aurora
Castillo, Criselda Ana
Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry
Ateneo de Manila University
Burgos, Antonio
Castro, Loreta
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Philippine School of Business Administration
Doctor of Philosophy in Education
University of the Philippines
Buensuceso, Noel
Cornista, Joel
Master of Science in Microbiology
University of the Philippines
Cruel, Joedy Liza
Master in Business Administration
De La Salle University
Cruz, Angela
Master of Arts in Family Psychology
and Education
Miriam College
Cruz, Arnel
Master in Business Administration
Ateneo de Manila University
Graduate School of Business
Cui, Fernando, Jr.
Master of Science in International
Political Economy
London School of Economics
and Political Science
Chua, Mae Ann
Master of Arts in Communication
Ateneo de Manila University
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Philippine School of Business Administration
Bernal, Gracita
Master in Physical Education and Sports
Polytechnic University of the Philippines
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| 271
Miriam College Faculty
D
Dacillo, Jesus
De Vera, Christine
Doctor of Philosophy
in Applied Cosmic Anthropology
Asian Social Institute
Master of Music, Major in Musicology
University of the Philippines
David, Rizalino
Master of Arts in Economics
University of the Philippines
Master of Science
in Human Movement Science
University of the Philippines
Del Castillo, Noel
E
Del Socorro, Jundy
Encarnacion, John Antonio III
Estrera, Rodolfo
Doctor of Philosophy in Education, Major in
Mathematical Education
University of the Philippines
Bachelor of Arts in Communication
Ateneo de Manila University
Endriga, Victor
Doctor of Philosophy in Education
University of the Philippines
Doctor of Philosophy in Fiscal Studies
Lyceum of the Philippines
Master of Science
in Environmental Engineering
Mapua Institute of Technology
Enriquez, Claire
Dela Cruz, Editha
Estarija, Consolacion
Master of Arts in Teaching Chemistry
Marikina Institute of Science & Technology
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Educational Psychology
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Art Education
University of the Philippines
De Castro, Patrick
Dela Cruz, Renato
Master of Arts in History,
Cognate in Geography
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry
Our Lady of the Angels Seminary
Inter‑Congregational Theological Center
Dayrit, Benjamin
Doctor of Education
Far Eastern University
De Borja, Rebecca
De Dios, Aurora
Deocariza, Mariño
Master of Arts in Asian Studies,
Major in East Asia-Japan
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts
in Urban and Regional Planning
University of the Philippines
De Dios, Rolando
Dingcong, Sheila
Master of Arts in Psychology
University of Sto. Tomas
Master of Industrial Relations
University of the Philippines
De Guzman, Josefina
Dinglasan, Anna Kristina
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Childhood Education
Miriam College
Master of Arts in International Studies
Miriam College
De Guzman, Margaret
Master in Business Administration
San Beda College
Master of Science in Microbiology
University of the Philippines
De Jesus, Randolph Joseph
Master of Arts in History
Ateneo de Manila University
De Lara, Marites
Dulalia, Melissa Grace
Dungo, Nanette
Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology
University of the Philippines
Duque, Aida
Master of Arts in Teaching Filipino
Philippine Normal University
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Philippine School of Business Administration
De Leon, Caroline
Durano, Mary Ann Charity
Doctor of Philosophy
in Child & Family Studies
Miriam College
Master of Arts in Theological Studies
Ateneo de Manila University
De Vela, Theresa
DPCE Management
Conservatoire Arts et Metiers
Master of Arts in Women and Development
University of the Philippines
272 | Miriam College 2011–2012
Bulletin of Information
Master of Arts in Psychology
University of the Philippines
F
Evangelista, Francis Julius
Evangelista, Grace
Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology
University of the Philippines
Feliciano, Elgene
Fortez, Sarah Joy
Juris Doctor
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning
University of the Philippines
Flores, Angelica
Fortin, Pacita
Master of Arts in Special Education
Miriam College
Master of Arts in Development Studies,
Major in Women/Gender Development
The Institute of Social Studies
in the Netherlands
Flores, Frederick
Bachelor of Laws
San Sebastian College-Recolletos/
Phil. Law School
Fong, Stella Eloisa
Francisco, Josefa
Master of Arts in International Studies
Miriam College
Master of Arts in Speech Communication
University of the Philippines
Fontanilla, Robert
Bachelor of Arts in Photography
and Multimedia Arts Program
College of St. Benilde
Formoso, Alessandro Rey
Bachelor of Science in Accountancy/
Certified Public Accountant
Miriam College
Durr, Francis Charles
www.mc.edu.ph
| 273
Miriam College Faculty
G
2011–2012
Gadja, Michelle
Gatchalian, Maria Luisa
Master of Arts in Education
Ateneo de Manila University
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Values Education
University of Asia and the Pacific
Gaerlan, Maria Carmen
I
Ibañez, Maria Cristina
Ilagan, Olivia
Master in Strategic
Human Resource Management
Miriam College
Master in Industrial Relations
University of the Philippines
Ibe, Milagros
Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry,
Major in Spirituality and Retreat Directing
Loyola School of Theology of Ateneo de Manila
Doctor of Education,
Major in Religious and Values Education
De La Salle University
Gellynck, Marc
Galace, Jasmin
Gendrano, Ma. Cecilia
Ignacio, Ronald
Doctor of Philosophy
in Educational Psychology
University of the Philippines
Master of Environment and Natural
Resources Management,
Major in Coastal Resources Management
University of the Philippines (Open University)
Bachelor of Laws
Arellano University
Galang, Angelina
Doctor of Medicine
University of Sto. Tomas
Doctor of Philosophy
in Environmental Science
University of the Philippines
Go, Karl
Gamboa, Clint
Guia, Mark Benedict
Master of Arts in Theology
Recoletos Formation Center
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
San Beda College
Garcia, Lynda
Master of Arts Major in Communication
Ateneo de Manila University
Gatchalian, Corazon
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Research and Evaluation
University of the Philippines
Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics
University of the Philippines
Guico, Cynthia
Bachelor of Music in Voice
University of the Philippines
J
Doctor of Philosophy, Major in Math Education
University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
Isidro, Guadalupe
Jadormio, Jennifer Rose
Joves, Ronald
Bachelor of Science in Social Work
Miriam College
Master in National Security Administration
National Defense College
Jarabe, Maria Lourdes
Jurisprudencia, Jerry
Master of Science in Social Work
University of the Philippines
Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology
Ateneo de Manila University
Joaquin, Jethro
Bachelor of Arts in Theater Arts
University of the Philippines
Jocson, Angelito
Master in Business Administration
Philippine School of Business Administration
Josue, Gerardo
Master of Arts in Communication
University of the Philippines
H
Hipe, Jethro Alden
Master of Arts in Management,
Major in Public Management
Master of Science
in Environmental Engineering
University of the Philippines
Ho, Howell
Master of Science in Biology
De La Salle University
274 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 275
Miriam College Faculty
L
Lacsamana, Ronaldo
Leonidas, Jose
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
Mapua Institute of Technology
Master of Science in Sociology
Asian Social Institute
Lansang, Nicolas Jr.
Libatique-Davadilla, Melanie
Master in Business Administration
University of the Philippines
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture
University of the Philippines
Medina, Marishelle
Bachelor of Arts
in Malikhaing Pagsulat sa Filipino
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Teaching English Language
De La Salle University
Mariano, Rachel
Bachelor of Science in Social Work
Miriam College
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Educational Psychology
University of the Philippines
Ligon, Clarissa Carmelita
Maribbay, Jose
Mendoza, Leah Lydia
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Special Education
De La Salle University
Master of Science in Teaching Mathematics
Ateneo de Manila University
Doctor of Philosophy in Human-Social
Information Sciences
Tohoku University, Japan
Llave, Jose Fernando
Master of Social Work
Jane Addams College of Social Work,
University of Illinois, USA
Mendoza, Merlie
Bachelor of Laws
San Beda College
Loanzon, Jeanette Isabelle
Martinez, Sheba
Minguillan, John Mark
Lee-Agramon, Brenda
Doctor of Philosophy in Economics
Philips University of Marburg, Germany
Master of Science in Microbiology
University of the Philippines
Lopez, Antonio
Master of Arts in Religious Studies
– Women and Religion
Institute of Formation and Religious Studies
Master of Arts in Korean Language
and Literature
Chonnam National University, Korea
Marzan-Bartolay, Maria Cecilia
Motilla, Ronaldo
Master of Arts in International Studies
Miriam College
Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology
Ateneo de Manila University
Master of Arts in Theology
Ateneo De Manila University
Lasam, Joel
Master of Arts in Public Administration
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Public Policy
and Administration
Institute of Social Studies, The Hague,
Netherlands
Leonardia, Ma. Lourdes
Martinez, Luz
Doctor in Business Administration
Philippine School of Business Administration
Medrano, Zosima
Bachelor of Science in Psychology
St. Paul College
Master of Arts
in Family Psychology and Education
Miriam College
Lupisan, Ma. Concepcion
Master of Science in Accountancy/
Certified Public Accountant
De La Salle University
Matutino, Anthony
Morillo, Susan
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Philippine School of Business Administration
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Special Education
University of the Philippines
Macalincag, Ma. Liza
Malang, Kristine Margret
Master of Industrial Relations
University of the Philippines
Juris Doctor
Ateneo de Manila University
McRae, Noel D.
Macapagal, Roehl
Mamhot, Alice Mae
Master in Business Administration
Ateneo Graduate School of Business
Master of Arts in Teaching English Language
De La Salle University
Macapagal, Ma. Therese
Manaligod, Ma. Paz
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Educational Administration
University of the Philippines
Doctor of Philosophy
in Child & Family Studies
Miriam College
Macaranas, Alvin
Manalo, Rosario
Master of Arts in Philosophy
University of the Philippines
Bachelor of Laws
University of the Philippines
Magtal, Agnes
Manaloto, Christian
Master in Business Administration
Philippine School of Business Administration
Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry
Ateneo de Manila University
Baccalaureate in Sacred Theology
Loyola School of Theology
Malana, Lorna
Master of Education in Physical Education
Philippine Normal University
276 | Miriam College M
Manansala, Maynard
Lanzona, Raymund
M
2011–2012
Bulletin of Information
Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology
Ateneo de Manila University
N
Natanauan, Nelissa
Nieto, Olivia
Master of Arts in English, Major in Literature
Centro Escolar University
Bachelor of Science in Psychology
Miriam College
Nera, Evelyn
Nogoy, Paterno Jr.
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Values Education and Development
Miriam College
Master in International Management
Master in Business Administration
International Academy of Management
and Economics
Ngo, Jose Jr.
Bachelor of Laws
University of the Philippines
www.mc.edu.ph
| 277
Miriam College Faculty
O
P
2011–2012
Oblena, Lilibeth
Ontiveros, Sr. Edith L. O. S. U.
Master of Arts in Filipino
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Comparative Literature
University of Sto. Tomas
Master of Arts in Christian Spirituality
Creighton University, USA
Ong, Elizabeth
Master of Divinity,
Major in Biblical Studies
Asian Theological Seminary
Master of Arts in Communication Management,
Major in Corporate Communications
Asian Institute of Journalism and
Communications
Ordoñez, Janice Carmina
Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts
Miriam College
R
Rapadas, Ma. Teresita
Reyes, Vilma
Master of Arts in Religious Studies
Maryhill School of Theology
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Teaching in the Early Grades
Roosevelt College Foundation
Raquitico, Kornellie
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Literature
Philippine Normal University
Regodon, Lucilen
Master in Communication Management
Asian Institute of Journalism
and Communication
Reguindin, Janet
Pangilinan, Maria Ellen
Pelias, Mary Francis Therese
Masters in Hotel & Restaurant Management
Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain
Master of Arts in Basic Education
Ateneo de Manila University
Paragas, Eleanor
Peñalosa, Ma. Carmen
Master of Arts in Japanese Language
and Literature
Kyoto University
Master of Arts in Demography
University of the Philippines
Paragas, Rosa
Bachelor of Arts in History
University of the Philippines
Master in Business Administration
Philippine School of Business Administration
Parayno, Phares
Doctor of Education in Energy Management
and Environment Policy
University of Pennsylvania
Parr, Rachel
Master of Arts in Psychology,
Major in Developmental Psychology
University of the Philippines
Pascual, Clarence
Master of Arts in Economics
University of the Philippines
Paulino, Ma. Dinna
Bachelor of Laws
San Beda College
Pimentel, Marita
Pinca, Eric Kobar
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Philippine School of Business Administration
Polestico, Alda Perlita
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Guidance & Counseling
University of the Philippines
Post-Graduate Studies
in Counseling Psychology
Osaka University of Education, Osaka, Japan
Master of Arts in History
University of the Philippines
Resos, Archie
Master of Arts in Asian Studies
University of the Philippines
Reyes, Corazon
Doctor of Education
in Educational Administration
Greenville College
Reyes, Danilo
Rivadelo, Genevieve
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Special Education
University of the Philippines
Robles, Nenita
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Polytechnic University of the Philippines
Rodriguez, Salvacion
Master of Science in Social Work
Asian Social Institute
Rojas, Leopoldo
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in English
Ateneo de Zamboanga University
Romero, Frederick
Master in Business Administration
University of Sto. Tomas
Master in Business Administration,
Major in Finance & Investment
George Washington University
Romualdo, Romualdo
Reyes, Donna Paz
Roque, Aristotle
Doctor of Philosophy
Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology,
Australia
Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts
Miriam College
Reyes, Melanie
Master of Arts in Urban Planning
and Regional Planning
University of the Philippines
Master in Public Administration,
Major in Public Policy
University of the Philippines
Reyes, Mira
Master of Arts in Philosophy
Ateneo de Manila University
Master in Business Administration
Philippine School of Business Administration
Rosel, Minerva
Rutaquio, Armando, Jr.
Master of Arts in Theater Arts
University of the Philippines
Reyes, Norma
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Anthropology/Sociology
University of the Philippines
Reyes, Rachel
Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology
Ateneo de Manila University
278 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 279
Miriam College Faculty
S
2011–2012
Sagmit, Johann Andrew
Sevilla, Aleli
Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology
Ateneo de Manila University
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Sociology and Anthropology
University of the Philippines
Saguinsin, Mary Grace
Master In Development Communication
University of the Philippines
Sajo, Dennis
Master of Arts in Educational Administration
Trinity University of Asia
Salunga, Thucydides
Doctor of Philosophy in Medical Sciences
Gifu University School of Medicine Japan
Samson, Julius
Bachelor of Fine Arts, Major in Painting
University of the Philippines
Samson, Lourdes
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Educational Administration
University of the Philippines
Sanchez, Jennifer
Juris Doctor
Ateneo de Manila University
Santos, Ma. Regina Elvira
Master in Business Administration,
Major in Financial Management/
Certified Public Accountant
National College for Business Administration
Santos, Herbert
Master of Science in Microbiology
University of the Philippines
Santos, Thelma
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Research & Evaluation
University of the Philippines
Seño, Reuel
Master of Arts in Theology
University of Sto. Tomas
Serrana, Milagros
Sibal-Lim, Alice
Master of Arts in Psychology,
Major in Applied Psychology
University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada
T
Tabag, Enrico
Teraña, Edward
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Las Piñas College
Bachelor of Arts,
Major in Communication Arts
University of the East
Tan, Ann Debbie
Timbang, Ferdinand
Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing
De La Salle University
Master of Science in Computational Finance/
Certified Public Accountant
De La Salle University
Tan, Emelita Jane
Sicat, Crizel
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Educational Technology
Roosevelt College
Masters in Education,
Major in Filipino Education
Saint Louis University
Tan, Maria Melinda
Silverio, Ryan
Master of Science in Psychology
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Human Rights
Mahidol University, Thailand
Tang, Allan Paul
Singson, Mariano Jr.
Toledo, Joel
Master of Arts in English Studies,
Major in Poetry
University of the Philippines
Tolibas, Joan Hope
Bachelor of Science in Social Work
Miriam College
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Educational Management
University of Sto. Tomas
Torralba, John
Master in Educational Administration
Ateneo de Manila University
Sinon, Rosario
Tenorio, Arnold
Torreon, Rachelle
Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communication
St. Paul College
Master in Business Administration
University of the Philippines
Master of Arts in Teaching Reading
Philippine Normal University
Soriano, Grace
Teodoro, John Iremil
Torres, Susan
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in English
Ateneo de Davao University
Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing
De La Salle University
Master of Arts in Mathematics
University of the Philippines
Ulili, Rechilda
Ui, Marical
Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts
Ateneo de Manila University
Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration
Maryknoll College Foundation
Uro, Justo Jude
Uy, Jaymelyn Nikkie
Bachelor of Science in Accounting/
Certified Public Accountant
Ateneo de Zamboanga University
Master in International Studies
Miriam College
Master of Arts in Philippine Studies
De La Salle University
Sri Tharan, Caridad
Doctor of Philosophy in Gender Studies
University of Sussex, England
Sta. Maria, Christine
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Philippine Women’s University
Suarez, Elineth
Doctor of Philosophy in Education,
Major in Educational Administration
Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila
Post-Graduate Diploma Course in TESOL
Regional Language Center, Singapore
and DLSU, Manila
U
Master of Science in Biology
University of the Philippines
280 | Miriam College Bulletin of Information
www.mc.edu.ph
| 281
Miriam College Faculty
2011–2012
V
Velasco, Anne Lorraine
Viray, Jan Corazon
Masters in Business Administration
Ateneo Graduate School of Business
Bachelor of Science in Entrepreneurship
Miriam College
Diploma in Culinary Arts
American Hospitality Academy
Vergel de Dios, Victor
Master in Business Administration/
Certified Public Accountant
Philippine School of Business Administration
Villanueva, Ma. Jamelia
Master of Arts in Education,
Major in Educational Administration
University of the Philippines
W
Y
282 | Miriam College Wood, Ma. Rosario
Master of Science in Chemistry
Ohio University
Yap, April
Master of Arts in Mass Communication,
Major in Communication Research
University of the Philippines
Yulo, Paul Richard
Master of Science in Microbiology
University of Santo Tomas
Bulletin of Information
ADMISSIONS OFFICE
HIGHER EDUCATION UNIT
Katipunan Avenue, Loyola Heights,
Quezon City 1108
T: (632) 580.5400 to 29 loc. 240
F: (632) 435.3504
E: [email protected]
www.mc.edu.ph