The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign To Stop Legal Killing

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The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign To Stop Legal Killing
The
Stanley Tookie Williams
Campaign
To Stop Legal Killing
November to December 2005
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign
To Stop Legal Killing
November to December 2005
The Call
Opposition to the death penalty is the policy of the National Association for the advancement of Colored People,
(NAACP) which all of its local units are bound to. Bruce
Gordon, National President/CEO invited Alice Huffman,
State President of the California NAACP to join him on
a conference call at 10 am on November 8th, 2005 to
discuss saving Stanley Tookie Williams from execution.
Two calls were held with Barbara Becnel, advocate, editor
and friend of Stanley Tookie Williams, Rudy Langlias,
producer of the film Redemption, Stanley’s attorneys and
national staff. These calls triggered one of the most intense
NAACP campaign against the death penalty that has been
witnessed in recent years. The national NAACP, the State
Conference and California local branches joined “The Save
Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign” in full force to stop
state killings.
Why was Stanley Tookie Williams the Catalysts?
Stanley Williams, 51 years old was convicted and sentenced to death for the shotgun slaying of Albert Owens,
who was a clerk at a 7-11 store in Whittier, California and
for three murders 11 days later of Shai – Chen, Yang-Yen,
I Yang and Yu-Chin Lin in Los Angeles, at their family
owned motel. All of the evidence was circumstantial and
had a jury of his peers rendered the decision he may have
been found not guilty of those specific crimes. He was
removed from Los Angeles, tried in a predominately white
venue with an all white jury.
Stanley “Tookie” Williams (born December 29, 1953)
along with Raymond Washington, was the co-founder, of
the Crips, in Compton, a suburb of Los Angeles, California. Initially it was a youth protection organization that
grew into one of the most widely-known and notorious
street gangs. This no doubt, in discussions with the District Attorney and other law enforcements personnel and
the Governor of California, was unofficially the crime for
which he was convicted. In 1981 the state of California
convicted Williams of murdering Albert Owens, ThsiaShai Yang, Yen-I Yang, and Yee Chen Lin during two robberies and sentenced him to death.
Born and raised on the mean streets of south Los
Angeles, when he and his friend, Raymond Washington
co-founded the Crips, he was only 13 years of age. “We
performed mayhem and aggression throughout the city.
We terrorized everybody. We made it living hell. We made
a mistake. We morphed into a monster.” Williams said.
In his books he has written about those days, admitting
that as a Crip and drug addict, he was unapproachable,
unreachable, unteachable, and incorrigible. “I was miseducated on manhood. I thought that manhood constituted
violence, aggression, and womanizing.” He said.
While serving time as an inmate at San Quentin Prison,
in San Francisco, for the last 16 years on death row, Stanley Tookie Williams made a metamorphic change from a
hoodlum and notorious gang leader to a peacemaker and
on to a Pied Piper to young children teaching them the destructive influence of gangs, to themselves and to society.
His nine children’s books and his memoir, Blue Rage, Black
Redemption, were all predicated on persuading youths and
adults to not follow his footsteps. Based on these works he
was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize five times and
four times for the Nobel Prize for literature for his series of
acclaimed books for children.
His execution date was set for December 13, 2005. He
was executed on that date at 12:01 AM.
The Redemption
Since his conviction he denounced his life and role as a
gang leader, and had written from prison about the harmful effects of gang life. However, he maintained his innocence of the four murders.
Williams wrote a series of children’s books popular
around the world for their anti-violence message. He also
helped broker a truce between the Bloods and the Crips.
In 2004, a television movie about his life entitled Redemption: The Stan Tookie Williams Story was released starring
Jamie Foxx as Stanley. (From Wikipedia, free encyclopedia).
The NAACP has a long rich history of fighting legal
lynching of innocent African Americans in this country. In today’s criminal justice system too many African
Americans are on death row and murdered by the state
on bogus circumstantial evidence. Stanley held to the end
that he did not commit those murderers, but that he was
guilty of other infractions with the law as a gang member
and for that he apologized. In his own words from “Tookie’s Corner” he wrote:
“Twenty-five years ago when I created the Crips youth
gang with Raymond Lee Washington in South Central Los Angeles, I never imagined Crips’ membership
would one day spread to much of the rest of the nation
and to cities in South Africa, where Crips copycat
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
gangs have formed. I also didn’t expect the Crips to
end up ruining the lives of so many young people, especially young black men who have hurt other young
black men. Raymond was murdered in 1979. But if he
were here, I believe he would be as troubled as I am by
the Crips legacy.
California local leaders without hesitation agreed to do
whatever they could to Save Stanley Tookie Williams. This
call was the Wednesday before Thanksgiving and a meeting with the National President was scheduled for that
following Saturday morning after his visit to San Quentin
to visit Stanley.
So today I apologize to you all—the children if
America and South Africa—who must cope every day
with dangerous street gangs. I no longer participate in
the so called gangster lifestyle, and I deeply regret that
I ever did.
A work group, called by Rev. Nelson B. Rivers, III, Chief
Operating Officer, with John Johnson Executive Assistant
to the President, John White, Communications Director,
and State President Huffman, discussed what a California
campaign might look like. From that discussion, based
upon 13 days before the scheduled execution, the president developed a Thirteen Day Plan that was taken to the
meeting in Oakland’s Marriott Hotel. The room reserved
for about 40 hosted was packed with over 100 individuals
who had come from across the state, mostly NAACP members, Supervisor, Keith Carson and surprise guest, Tavis
Smiley. Reg Weaver, NEA President, Juan Proana, of Plus
3, and national staff participated by phone. The 13 Day
plan, which was a simple plan was adopted and executed.
A list of attendees is included in Appendix B
As a contribution to the struggle to end child –onchild brutality and black –on-black brutality, I have
written the Tookie Speaks Out Against Gang Violence
children’s book series. My goal is to reach as many
young minds as possible to warn you of the perils of a
gang lifestyle.
I am no longer “dys-educated” (disease educated). I
am no longer part of the problem. Thanks to the Almighty, I am no longer sleepwalking through life.
I pray that one day my apology will be accepted. I also
pray that your suffering, caused by gang violence, will
soon come to an end as more gang members wake up
and stop hurting themselves and others.
I vow to spend the rest of my life working toward
solutions.”
Amani (Peace), Stanley “Tookie” Williams, Surviving Crips
Co-Founder, April 13, 1997
Mr. Williams has won national and international recognition for his work to guide young people toward different
choices than those made by him. He was recognized by
the White House for community service. His anti-gang
work saved many young lives.
Because of the weak circumstantial evidence used to
convict him, his redemption and his ability to effect good
in the gang community, while simultaneously carrying out
national policy to stop capital punishment, the NAACP
developed an intensive campaign to save Stanley Tookie
Williams. It was believed that his positive work from inside prison walls would indeed save future generations of
our children from a life of violence.
The NAACP Campaign
It was clear that Bruce Gordon, National President and
CEO was dedicated to saving Stanley, therefore the State
President immediately scheduled a conference call with
unit Presidents and the State Executive Committee members to share his intent and to inform them that he was
making a special trip to California and to San Quentin to
visit Stanley. California members participating on the call
are listed in Appendix A.
The Plan
Friday, November 25, 2005, Alice Huffman was in route
to the San Francisco Airport to pick up President Bruce
Gordon and his wife Tawana for a visit with Stanley Williams, at San Quentin Prison on death row where he has
lived since 1981. President Huffman left Sacramento at
7:00 am to meet President Gordon at the San Francisco
airport. At 9:40 am, they left the San Francisco Airport
and arrived at San Quentin where President Bruce Gordon
visited privately with Stanley Tookie Williams until 12:30
pm. After a debriefing they returned to San Francisco at
2:00 pm where they prepared for the meeting with local
leaders scheduled for the following morning in Oakland.
Every unit committed to doing whatever events were
already scheduled by the “Save Stanley Tookie Williams
Campaign”. Many units indicated that they would hold
a rally, a prayer vigil or some media event in their locale.
Because the Governor refused to meet with the National
President, it was determined that our case would have to
be made through the media. The National Office and the
State would conduct a media tour to four different locations around the state to generate maximum media. The
four cities selected for the tour were Los Angeles, San
Diego, Sacramento and San Francisco. A private jet was
obtained and the “Tour for Life” was scheduled on December 6, 2005, two days before the Governor was scheduled
to hole a private clemency hearing with Stanley Tookie
Williams’ lawyers and the Los Angeles District Attorney.
ACTION
The “Tour for Life”, December 6, 2005 was the culmination of State and National events. The private jet dignitar-
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
ies were: President Bruce Gordon, Tawana Tibbs, Region I
Board Member Willis Edwards, Alice A. Huffman, Region
I Board Member and California State Conference President, Barbara Becnel, longtime friend, advocate and editor,
John White, National NAACP Communications Director,
Jesse Phinney, Videographer and Valerie Goodloe, Jet photographer. The format for each person when we arrived
was the press was called to order by John White, National
NAACP Director of Communications, he introduced the
State President, Alice Huffman and she introduced the
National President, Bruce Gordon.
•Los Angeles Press Conference
Los Angeles was the kick off of the tour. Approximately 50 media outlets were in attendance. From this
event the NAACP made front page of the Los Angeles
Times. There were comments also made by Los Angeles Branch President, Geri Washington, LA Sentinel
Publisher, Danny Bakewell, National NAACP Board
Member, Willis Edwards, LA City Council Member
Bill Rosendahl, Assembly Member Mervyn Dymally;
Television Show Judge Greg Mathis; Mike Ferrell, Actor, MASH; and Bonnie Williams Taylor, former wife
of Stanley Tookie Williams.
•San Diego Press Conference
The flight into San Diego was uneventful except the
group was late arriving. However, branch members
were able to proceed through presentations from very
high profiled elected officials and citizens to keep all
of the major media there. San Diego was on the list to
generate support from a more conservative area and
the press attended reflected a high level of interest in
Stanley’s case. There were other comments by Douglas Oden, San Diego Branch President; Rob Howard,
Oceanside Branch President; Bishop Joyce McKinney;
Rabbi Rahion; Abdul Hameeb; Kent Peter, Director, Social Ministries, Catholic Diocese; Rabbi Lloyd
Cosky, Executive Director of Inner Faith Community
for Workers Justice; Minister Mohammad, and the Nation of Islam.
•Sacramento Press Conference
The group was able to get back on schedule because
ample time had been built in for the longest flight segment of the tour. They arrived in Sacramento, held a
pres conference on the north capitol steps where Press
covered the President delivering 56,000 petitions from
across the world pleading with the Governor to save
Stanley’s life. There was a brief meeting with deputies in the Governor’s office who assured us that we
would be notified as soon as the Governor made a
decision. Others speaking at the press conference were
Betty Williams, Sacramento Branch President, Aubrey
Stone, President of the Black Chamber of Commerce;
James Shelby, President of the Sacramento Urban
League; Darnell Cooley, First Vice President, California State NAACP.
•San Francisco Press Conference
The San Francisco City Hall was the venue. Comments were made by; Rev. Amos C. Brown, President,
San Francisco Branch, and pastor of Third Baptist
Church, Rabbi Peretz Wolf-prusan, Temple Emanuel
Congregation, Dr. Dorsey Blake, Fellowship Church
of all People; Rev, Arnold Townsend; Rev. Roland
Gordon; Ingleside Presbyterian; Bishop Donald Green;
San Francisco Christian Center; Bishop Franzo King;
St John African Orthodox Church; Elder James Langston, Jr; Jones Memorial United Methodist; Rev. James
McCray. Jr., Hamilton Memorial Church of God In
Christ; Dr. James McCray, Jr., Jones Memorial United
Methodist; Rev. Shod Riddick, Metropolitan Baptist
Church; Rev. Cecil Williams, Glide Memorial Methodist Church; Imman Al-Amin, San Francisco Muslim Community Minister; Christopher Muhammad,
Muhammad’s Mosque #26
President Gordon obtained funds to run two full pages
in the Los Angeles Times and the Sacramento Bee begging
for clemency.
California Local Unit Sponsored Events
•Stockton Branch
Stockton held a very large Prayer Vigil the next
evening that garnered statewide media coverage and
played all weekend. There were prayers offered by
Minister Isaiah Mohammed, Nation of Islam in Los
Angeles, California, Evangelist Jeanette Kimmons, and
Pastor Larry Hawkins was the guest speaker. Barbara
Becnel, who had worked long and tirelessly, in helping Tookie with his books made an impassioned plea
for the governor to spare Stanley Tookie Williams,
to no avail. They had toured the state of California
in order to highlight the massive support to save the
life of Tookie; auguring that he would be more useful
in turning youth from gangs and inform law-abiding
citizens. The governor turned a deaf ear.
•The Stockton Youth Council:
With over 30 youths in attendance viewed the movie
Redemption which depicted the character of Stanley.
They also went to a press conference at City Hall and
had an interview with National Public Radio.
•Rialto / Fontana Branch:
The President and members held a prayer vigil at one
of their member’s homes and another one at Rialto
Blitz on December 12th.
•San Mateo Branch:
Held prayers at the San Mateo Baptist Church, and St.
James AME Church, from 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm led by
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Marie Davis and President Herby Dawkins concurrently.
other officials attended an Oakland rally. They also
conducted a prayer vigil at the north capitol entrance
on December 8th, 2005. Sacramento Branch also
participated in organizing the Northern California
churches asking for support for clemency.
•Sonoma / Santa Rosa County Branch:
On December 12, 2005, members participated in the
San Francisco and Oakland Rallies on Stanley Williams’ clemency.
•Compton Branch
Compton received the voice mail from a cell mate
willing to swear to the fact that Stanley was set up.
They devoted significant energy in assisting in the delivery of the person who made a sworn affidavit. They
also held a press conference with the individual attempting to speak to the Governor through the media
to hear his evidence. To no avail.
•Long Beach Branch:
The branch sent a college student to attend a Town
Hall press conference. All reports received on their
website were disseminated to members and urged
them to participate in all activities aimed at saving
Williams’ life. Some of the members wrote to the Governor requesting him to grant clemency. They started
a program on the death penalty which will take place
in February 2006.
•Pasadena Youth Council
Under the leadership of Chad Hunter, the local college
campus held a “Talk IN” on the Stanley Tookie Williams case.
•San Jose Branch:
On December 4, 2005, the branch conducted a prayer
vigil at the local Baptist church. On December 7, 2005
they held a press conference on the Stanley Williams’
clemency issue.
•Eureka Branch:
Gina Clayton held similar session with her Chapter
members and students at USC.
Unit Participation in Other Activities
Visited their County Supervisor and made a request
for a letter to be drafted to be sent to the Governor
requesting clemency. A prayer vigil was held at Humboldt College.
•East Contra Costa Branch:
The branch sent letters to several churches requesting
prayers for clemency for Stanley Tookie Williams.
•Altadena Branch:
Altadena Branch conducted prayer services for clemency for Mr. Williams. The branch members joined
our National and State Presidents in Los Angeles and
San Diego at the press conferences requesting the
Governor to grant clemency.
•Beverly Hills / Hollywood Branch:
The branch sent representatives to attend the press
conference at city hall on December 6, 2005. They had
an interview with KABC Radio and one with a newspaper. Willis Edwards, National Board Member who
is the branch Vice President attended all press conferences addressed by the National and State Presidents.
They held a prayer vigil at the AME church for clemency for Stanley Tookie Williams.
•Carson / Torrance Branch:
The branch made telephone calls to people requesting
them to pray that the Governor would grant clemency
to Stanley.
•Sacramento Branch:
In the month of November 2005, the branch president
sent a letter to the Governor requesting clemency for
Stanley Tookie Williams. The branch president and
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
• Marin held a vigil between 4:30pm and 6:30 pm, at
the San Rafael Plaza, in San Rafael, CA
• The Freemont branch held a demonstration beginning at 7:15 am, on the steps of Mission San Jose, in
Freemont, CA
• Woodland held a press conference at the Yolo
County Courthouse, from noon to 1:00 pm at the Yolo
County Courthouse, in Woodland, CA
• San Jose held a vigil in front of City Hall, from noon
till 2:00 pm in San Jose, CA, sponsored by the Black
Student Union of San Jose City College.
• Berkeley held the Screening Of Redemption at 7:00
pm at the Black Repertory Theater in Berkeley, CA. 18
year olds and under were admitted free. Sponsored by
the Campaign to End the Death Penalty, Education
Not Incarceration, Ella Bake Center--- Books Not Bars,
Green Party of Alameda County, International Socialist Organization, Malcolm X Grassroots Movement,
and Solidarity Bay Area.
• San Diego held a Community Forum at Springfield College from 6:00 pm till 9:00 pm, entitled “The
Death Penalty, The Movement: Continuing the Struggle for Justice”, N San Diego, CA. This was a discussion aimed at organizing against the death penalty and
in particular defense of Stanley Tookie Williams.
• St Mathias Parish held an Ecumenical Service beginning at 7:00 pm in Redwood City, CA.
• Palo Alto held a candlelight Vigil in support of Williams’ life on the eve of his scheduled execution at the
corner of El Camino and Embarcadero Streets in Palo
Alto, CA.
nocent men wrongfully imprisoned for decades and then
released after DNA evidence proved their innocence. The
film focuses on the gripping story of seven men and their
emotional journey back into society and the efforts to
rebuild their lives.
• Oceanside held a candlelight vigil at Mission San
Luis Rey, from 9:00 pm till 10:30 pm, in Oceanside,
CA.
December 13, 2005, Larry King interviewed President
Bruce Gordon. It was a favorable interview for the nation
to hear the case, but it happened on execution day when
Stanley’s fate was sealed.
• Chico held a silent candlelight prayer vigil at 7:00
pm in Children’s park, downtown Chico, CA.
• San Jose met at Mission Church at 4:00 pm, where
they went to Santa Clara University and marched to
the Cathedral on Market Street, in San Jose, CA.
All were just too little too late!
Conclusion
Too little too late!
Gordon Bradbury Von Ellerman, a cell mate of the gentleman who turned state evidence against Stanley Tookie
Williams, was ready to swear to the fact that he witnessed
the law enforcement work with his cell mate to frame
Stanley. It was alluded to but not announced at the vigil
because the claim was being investigated for authenticity
and veracity. The phone message to Compton, taped and
transcribed is attached along with his sworn affidavit.
January 13, 2006, Theatrical Release of Award winning
Documentary After Innocence premiered in Los Angeles &
Sacramento; A documentary about the innocence tells the
dramatic and compelling story of the exonerated – in-
A final press conference was called to express our disappointment in the Governor’s decision to not grant clemency. And, the final note for some members of the unit
was to attend the execution at San Quentin, for President
Gordon it was a telephone message into the funeral services of Stanley Tookie Williams.
Did we win or lose? We lost Stanley, but we gained
creditability with groups across America who felt isolated
and estranged from organizations like the NAACP. We are
more invigorated to defeat the death penalty and the state
NAACP just supported legislation this week for a moratorium on the capital punishment in California. We believe
an opening now exists for the NAACP to lead a program
to eliminate gang violence in America. The National
NAACP and the California NAACP are in the process of
formulating a pilot project towards that end.
Index
Description
Appendix A
California Members Participating in the Conference Call, November 23, 2005................6
Appendix B
Attendees at the Saturday, November 26, 2005 Meeting..............................................7
Appendix C
NAACP Death Penalty Policy......................................................................................9
Appendix D
NAACP Letters to the Governor................................................................................. 10
Appendix E
Clemency Response................................................................................................. 14
Appendix F
Cell Mate’s Affidavit.................................................................................................30
Appendix G
Governor’s Denial.................................................................................................... 36
Appendix H
The 13 Day Plan...................................................................................................... 42
Appendix I
News Paper Ads.....................................................................................................44
Appendix J
News Releases........................................................................................................46
Page No.
Where Do We Go From Here?......................................................................................................... 59
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix A
California Members Participating in the Conference Call, November 23, 2005
Alice A. Huffman . . . . . . President, California NAACP
Darnell Cooley. . . . . . . . . 1st Vice President, California
NAACP
Gwen Moore. . . . . . . . . . 2nd Vice President, California
NAACP
Debra Carter-Kelly . . . . . 3rd Vice President, California
NAACP
Freddye Davis . . . . . . . . . Asst. Secretary, California
NAACP, Hayward Branch
President
Delois Edwards . . . . . . . . Section Director, North,
California NAACP
Dan Daniels . . . . . . . . . . Section Director, Coastal,
California NAACP
Kelly Nelum . . . . . . . . . . Section Director, Central,
California NAACP
Frank Jackson . . . . . . . . . Section Director, West,
California NAACP
Rob Howard. . . . . . . . . . Section Director, SouthEast,
California NAACP, Oceanside
Branch President
Sandra Thomas . . . . . . . . Section Director, SouthWest,
California NAACP
Chad Hunter . . . . . . . . . . President, Youth & College,
California NAACP
Willis Edwards. . . . . . . . . Region I National Board Member
Marie Davis. . . . . . . . . . . Reparations Chair
Luther Slack . . . . . . . . . . Armed Services Chair, Madera
Branch President
Claresa Slack. . . . . . . . . . Youth Works Chair
Willie Douglas. . . . . . . . . Religious Chair
Ida M. Johnson. . . . . . . . . Education Chair
LaJuana Bivens. . . . . . . . . Membership Chair
Bobby Bivens. . . . . . . . . . Economic Development Chair,
Stockton Branch President
Cynthia Summers. . . . . . Housing Chair
Carolyn Veal-Hunter
Legal Redress Chair
Catherine Henry . . . . . . . Industry Chair
Pat Washington . . . . . . . . WIN Chair
Olivia Verrett . . . . . . . . . Community Coordinator
Chair, Carson/Torrance Branch
President
Ron Hasson. . . . . . . . . . Image Awards Chair, Beverly
Hills/Hollywood Branch
President
Tony Alexander . . . . . . . . Labor Chair
Rick Callender. . . . . . . . . Executive Committee Member,
California NAACP, San Jose
Branch President
Karl Hoffower. . . . . . . . . Executive Committee Member,
California NAACP
Nate White. . . . . . . . . . . Executive Committee Member,
California NAACP
Carol Alleye. . . . . . . . . . . Salinas Branch President
Dr. Amos Brown. . . . . . . Region I National Board
Member, San Francisco Branch
President
Herby Dawkins . . . . . . . . San Mateo Branch President
Deborah Hill . . . . . . . . . . Santa Cruz Branch President
Ben Terry. . . . . . . . . . . . . Santa Rosa/Sonoma Branch
President
Walter Walthall . . . . . . . . Butte County Branch President
A.V. Powell . . . . . . . . . . . Eureka Branch President
April Harris. . . . . . . . . . . Lake County Branch President
Betty Williams. . . . . . . . . Sacramento Branch President
Tommie Philips . . . . . . . . Tri-City Branch President
Rose Tyson . . . . . . . . . . . Vallejo Branch President
George Holland . . . . . . . . Oakland Branch President
Roger Henry. . . . . . . . . . East Contra Costa County
Branch President
Loraine Watts. . . . . . . . . Lake Elisnore Branch President
Donald Craig. . . . . . . . . . Orange County Branch
President
Ellen Turner . . . . . . . . . . Rialto/Fontana Branch President
Woddie Rucker-Hughes Riverside Branch President
Walter Jarmen . . . . . . . . . San Bernardino Branch
President
Douglas Oden . . . . . . . . . San Diego Branch President
Ronnie Jones . . . . . . . . . . San Gabriel Branch President
Lillian Walker . . . . . . . . . Victor Valley Branch President
Shirley Miles-Harris. . . . . Bakersfield Branch President
Ed Bailey . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fresno Branch President
Eddie Edwards. . . . . . . . . Indian Wells Valley Branch
President
Willie McDaniels. . . . . . . Modesto Branch President
Michelle Allison . . . . . . . Merced Branch President
Fredrick Shaw. . . . . . . . . Compton Branch President
Regina Tennelle. . . . . . . Inglewood/South Bay Branch
President
Geraldine Washington Los Angeles Branch President
Joe Brown. . . . . . . . . . . . Pasadena branch President
Darrell Goode . . . . . . . . . Santa Monica Branch President
Gina Clayton. . . . . . . . . . Region I National Board Member
Sheron Wright. . . . . . . . . Staff, California NAACP
Debra Henry . . . . . . . . . . Staff, A. C. Public Affairs
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix B
Attendees at the Saturday, November 26, 2005 Meeting
Bruce Gordon. . . . . . . . .
Tawana Tibbs . . . . . . . . .
Alice A. Huffman . . . . . .
Darnell Cooley. . . . . . . . .
Gwen Moore. . . . . . . . . .
Debra Carter-Kelly . . . . .
Freddye Davis . . . . . . . . .
Delois Edwards . . . . . . . .
Dan Daniels . . . . . . . . . .
Kelly Nelum . . . . . . . . . .
Frank Jackson . . . . . . . . .
Rob Howard. . . . . . . . . .
Sandra Thomas . . . . . . . .
Willis Edwards. . . . . . . . .
Chad Hunter . . . . . . . . . .
Marie Davis. . . . . . . . . . .
Luther Slack . . . . . . . . . .
Claresa Slack. . . . . . . . . .
Ida M. Johnson. . . . . . . . .
Willie Douglas. . . . . . . . .
Cynthia Summers. . . . . .
Catherine Henry . . . . . . .
Tony Alexander . . . . . . . .
Glenna Brambill . . . . . . .
Karl Hoffower. . . . . . . . .
Gerald Martin . . . . . . . . .
Mel Mason . . . . . . . . . . .
Carol Alleye. . . . . . . . . . .
Deborah Hill . . . . . . . . . .
President, National NAACP
National NAACP
President, California NAACP
1st Vice President, California
NAACP
2nd Vice President, California
NAACP
3rd Vice President, California
NAACP
Asst. Secretary, California
NAACP
Section Director, California
NAACP
Section Director, California
NAACP
Section Director, California
NAACP
Section Director, California
NAACP
Section Director, California
NAACP
Section Director, California
NAACP
Region I National Board Member
President, Youth & College,
California NAACP
Reparations Chair, California
NAACP
Armed Services Chair, Madera
Branch President
Youth Works Chair, California
NAACP
Education Chair, California
NAACP
Religious Chair, California
NAACP
Housing Chair, California
NAACP
Industry Chair, California
NAACP
Labor Chair, California NAACP
Member at Large, California
NAACP
Member at Large, California
NAACP
El Cerrito Branch President
Monterey Peninsula Branch
President
Salinas Branch President
Santa Cruz Branch President
Ben Terry. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Walter Walthall . . . . . . . .
Thurdell Wickliff . . . . . .
April Harris. . . . . . . . . . .
Betty Williams. . . . . . . . .
Tommie Philips . . . . . . . .
Rose Tyson . . . . . . . . . . .
George Holland . . . . . . . .
Roger Henry. . . . . . . . . .
Loraine Watts. . . . . . . . .
Donald Craig. . . . . . . . . .
Shirley Miles-Harris. . . . .
Ed Bailey . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eddie Edwards. . . . . . . . .
Willie McDaniels. . . . . . .
Michelle Allison . . . . . . .
Cynthia Philips . . . . . . . .
Ashley Willis. . . . . . . . . .
Laura Byrd . . . . . . . . . . .
Rev. Al Covington . . . . . .
Marque Richardson. . . . .
Rene Lopez . . . . . . . . . . .
Dr. Caesar Churchwell
Hubert Bennett, Jr. . . . . .
Kevin Kelly . . . . . . . . . . .
David West . . . . . . . . . . .
Frank Brown . . . . . . . . . .
Sean Dugar. . . . . . . . . . .
Ray Carlisle . . . . . . . . . . .
Sandra Anderson. . . . . . .
Donald Cooper. . . . . . . . .
Gay Cobb. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lori Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Roshon Green. . . . . . . . .
Velma Sykes . . . . . . . . . .
Willie Jeffery . . . . . . . . . .
Al Brown. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rev. Ronnie Murray, Jr.
Rev. Harry Hodge. . . . . .
Cameron Brown . . . . . . .
Bernard Nelson . . . . . . . .
Zephanii Smith . . . . . . . .
Semaj Thompson. . . . . . .
Santa Rosa Branch President
Butte County Branch President
Berkeley Branch President
Lake County Branch President
Sacramento Branch President
Tri-City Branch President
Vallejo Branch President
Oakland Branch President
East Contra Costa County
Branch President
Lake Elsinore Branch President
Orange County Branch
President
Bakersfield Branch President
Fresno Branch President
Indian Wells Valley Branch
President
Modesto Branch President
Merced Branch President
Tri-City Branch Member
Stockton Branch Member
Sacramento Branch Member
Oakland Branch Member
Los Angeles Branch Member
Sacramento Branch Member
San Francisco Branch Member
Oakland Branch Member
Oakland Branch Member
San Francisco Branch Member
Berkeley Branch Member
Berkeley Youth & College
Member
Altadena Branch Member
Altadena Branch Member
Oakland Branch Member
Oakland Branch Member
Berkeley Branch Member
Sacramento Branch Member
Sacramento Branch Member
Oakland Branch Member
Stockton Branch Member
Stockton Branch Member
Stockton Branch Member
Stockton Youth & College
Member
Oakland Branch Member
Stockton Youth & College
Member
Stockton Youth & College
Member
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix B
Attendees at the Saturday, November 26, 2005 Meeting (Continued)
Amaka Okechukwu. . . . . University Southern California
Member
Gina Clayton. . . . . . . . . . Region I National Board
Member, President, University
Southern California College
Chapter
Catherine Balbas . . . . . . . Madera Branch Member
Elce Murphy, Jr.. . . . . . . . Madera Branch Member
Michael Jordan. . . . . . . . . San Francisco Branch Member
Errol Bullen. . . . . . . . . . . San Francisco Branch Member
Danyell Middleton. . . . . . Altadena Youth & College
Member
Leova Rainey. . . . . . . . . . NAACP Member
Mondaire Jones . . . . . . . . Stanford College Chapter
Jacqueline Johnson. . . . . Orange County Branch Member
Ann Byrd. . . . . . . . . . . . . Santa Rosa / Sonoma Branch
Member, ACLU
Deborah Wright . . . . . . . Hayward Branch Member
Al Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayward Branch Member
Maudine Pembleton. . . . . Hayward Branch Member
Calvin Pembleton . . . . . . Hayward Branch Member
Rev. John Thomas . . . . . . Hayward Branch Member
Chris Daniels . . . . . . . . . San Francisco Branch member
Alphonso Galloway . . . . . Oakland Branch Member
Jasmyne Cannick . . . . . . Reporter
Chauncey Bailey. . . . . . . Reporter, Oakland Post
Jonathan Stack. . . . . . . . . Gabriel Films
Akida Bailey . . . . . . . . . . Gabriel Films
Mark Stroman . . . . . . . . . Entertainment Marketing
Partners
Segretta
Woodard-Baisden. . . . . . Business Professional Women
Stefanie Faucher . . . . . . . Program Director, Death Penalty
Focus
Lance Lindsey . . . . . . . . . Executive Director, Death
Penalty Focus
Oliver Unaka. . . . . . . . . . President/CEO Elite PR Firm
Sandra Andrews. . . . . . . Congresswoman Barbara Lee’s
Office
Keith Carson . . . . . . . . . . Alameda County Supervisor
Barbara Becnel. . . . . . . . . Save Stanley Tookie Williams
Committee
Kathleen Sullivan . . . . . . Save Stanley Tookie Williams
Committee
Rudy Langlis . . . . . . . . . . Film Producer, Director,
“Redemption”
Vic Bulluck. . . . . . . . . . . NAACP Hollywood Bureau
John Wellstone. . . . . . . . . Democratic Club
George Wellstone . . . . . . Democratic Club
Laniece Jones . . . . . . . . . BWOPA
Alona Clifton. . . . . . . . . . Peralta Community College
Trustee
Tavis Smiley . . . . . . . . . . Media Commentator
Sheron Wright. . . . . . . . . Staff, California NAACP
Debra Henry . . . . . . . . . . Staff, A. C. Public Affairs
National NAACP Staff & Guests (via Phone)
Rev. Nelson Rivers III COO
John Johnson . . . . . . . . . Executive Asst. to the President
John White. . . . . . . . . . . Communication Director
Reg Weaver . . . . . . . . . . . National Education Association
Juan Proano . . . . . . . . . . Plus Three LP
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix C
NAACP Death Penalty Policy
Reaffirming Opposition to the Death Penalty
Adopted
WHEREAS, the NAACP adopted a resolution in 2001 re-affirming our opposition to the death penalty due to its racially
disparate application; and
WHEREAS, the NAACP has re-affirmed its 1975 resolution opposing the death penalty on the grounds that it constitutes cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution; and
WHEREAS, many people, including Mumia Abu-Jamal, are incarcerated on death row and face possible execution; and
WHEREAS, more than 320 people on death row have been exonerated; and
WHEREAS, though African Americans make up only 12.4% of the U.S. population, we make up 38% of all the Americans that were sentenced to death and later freed after being found innocent; and
WHEREAS, African Americans make up 35% of those found innocent after being executed; and
WHEREAS, African Americans make up over 80% of those awaiting execution on federal death row; and
WHEREAS, 145 people have been exonerated based on DNA evidence; and
WHEREAS, there is no possible way of restoring the life of an innocent person killed by the death penalty; and
WHEREAS, the implementation of the death penalty raises concerns regarding biased identification, police and prosecutorial misconduct, judicial apathy in protecting the rights of the accused, faulty evidence, inadequate defense representation, coerced confessions, and fabricated testimony.
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the NAACP reiterates its strong opposition to the death penalty; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the NAACP call on its units throughout the United States, and the world, to support
the international call for Mumia Abu-Jamal to be released from death row; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the NAACP reiterate its support of the international movement for a new and fair
trial for Mumia Abu­ Jamal; and
BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that the NAACP renew its call for new nationwide studies on racial discrimination, the
adequacy of counsel, access to modern research technology such as DNA analysis, the sentencing of children and women
to the death penalty and that the NAACP reiterate its call for a national moratorium on all executions.
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix D
NAACP Letters to the Governor - Bruce Gordon
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE
4805 MT. HOPE DRIVE
•
BALTIMORE, MD 21215-3297
BRUCE S. GORDON
President & Chief Executive Officer
•
(410) 580-5777
JULIAN BOND
Chairman, Board of Directors
November 29, 2005
The Honorable Arnold Schwarzenegger
Governor of California, State Capitol Building
Sacramento, California 95814
Dear Governor Schwarzenegger:
The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People requests you to grant clemency to Stanley “Tookie” Williams.
For nearly one hundred years, the NAACP has fought to eliminate race prejudice and discrimination. This organization has
historically recognized that prejudice, race discrimination, and the inability to obtain adequate counsel have resulted in the disparate
application of the death penalty to African Americans.
Studies continue to show that race plays a major role in determining whether a defendant will receive the death penalty. According to a noted study by David Baldus, blacks receive the death penalty at a 38% higher rate than all other races. Also, studies consistently show that those who kill whites face a greater chance of receiving the death penalty than those who kill blacks.
In 2002, the NAACP called on President George W. Bush, governors and state legislatures to adopt a moratorium on the death
penalty until, among other things, procedures could be adopted to remedy these racial disparities. As result of the many issues that
have been raised regarding racial disparities and the unfair administration of the death penalty, legislation has been introduced in a
number of states to impose moratoriums or abolish the death penalty altogether.
Stanley Williams’ trial was not immune to these disparities. Not only were African American citizens stripped from Stanley
Williams’ jury pool, but he was likened to a Bengal Tiger during closing arguments. These practices offend notions of judicial
fairness.
The NAACP does not ask that you re-examine Stanley Williams’ innocence or guilt, nor do we ask you to evaluate the appropriateness of his sentence. Rather, we ask that you show mercy toward a human being who has, in spite of his circumstances, become a
strong voice against gangs, violence and drugs.
Stanley Williams has renounced gang affiliation and has publicly apologized for his role in gang violence. He has become an
accomplished author, activist, and mentor and has received five Nobel Peace Prize nominations, four Nobel Prize for Literature
nominations, and the 2005 Presidential Call Service Award for his volunteer work to save youth. Few hold these accomplishments to
their credit.
Most importantly, Stanley Williams has vowed to spend the rest of his life working toward solutions to abolish gang violence.
The NAACP has historically recognized the importance of the incarcerated and the significant impact they can have on the lives
of others. For over thirty years, it has worked to establish 45 prison branches around the United States to help the incarcerated develop
their voice, so they can someday realize their potential and pour back into the community, at large. Stanley Williams has done just
that.
America must invest its efforts into persevering Stanley Williams’ voice and the potential he has to impact and save our youth,
instead of devoting its energy into the myth that executions decrease crime.
If Stanley Williams is executed, his death will have a chilling effect on the momentum he has created around the negative impact
of gangs and gang violence. If he is executed, we will never know what future impact Stanley Williams might have had on society.
The NAACP respectfully requests that you exercise the mercy only you have been entrusted with the authority to bestow and
grant Stanley “Tookie” Williams clemency.
If you do not grant clemency, we ask that you issue a moratorium on the death penalty until the California Commission on the
Fair Administration of Justice has made its recommendations to you and the Legislature, pursuant to Senate Resolution No. 44.
Very Truly Yours,
Bruce S. Gordon
10
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix D
NAACP Letters to the Governor - Alice Huffman
C ALIFORNIA S TATE C ONFERENCE OF THE N ATIONAL
A SSOCIATION FOR THE A DVANCEMENT OF C OLORED P EOPLE
1315 I Street, Suite 200 • Sacramento, CA 95814 • (916) 498-1898 • Fax (916) 498-1895
Alice A. Huffman
President
Honorable Arnold Schwarzenegger
Governor
Office of the Governor
State Capitol Building
Sacramento, CA 95814
Dear Governor Schwarzenegger:
The California State Conference of the NAACP writes to urge you to grant clemency to Mr. Stanley Tookie Williams. Mr. Williams is scheduled to be executed
December 13, 2005, at the San Quentin State Prison.
Stanly Williams was accused of murdering four people. He has always maintained his innocence and there are many facts to back up his claim. His trial was
based on circumstantial evidence and the testimony of several witnesses, all of
whom were facing a range of felony charges. This letter is a plead to get you to
spare the life of a man that has transformed and turned his life around.
As a result, Mr. Williams has done good deeds in society. He has written 9
internationally acclaimed books that educate young people to avoid gangs, crime
and incarceration. Also, he works to end gang violence through his peace protocol and Internet Project for Street Peace, a peer mentoring project.
Through his continued crusade, Mr. Williams has saved the lives of over 150,000
youth and has been recognized by the President of the United States, for his
volunteer work to help youth. Just as the 9th Circuit Court recommended that
clemency should be granted by the Governor due to his “laudable” accomplishments, we too feel that he should be given another chance at life and the opportunity to keep doing good deeds and making a difference.
We respectfully request your highest consideration for granting clemency to Mr.
Stanly Tookie Williams.
Sincerely,
Alice A. Huffman
President
AAH/srw
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
11
Appendix D
NAACP Letters to the Governor - Rev. Julius C. Hope
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE
4805 MT. HOPE DRIVE
•
BALTIMORE, MD 21215-3297
BRUCE S. GORDON
President & Chief Executive Officer
•
(410) 580-5777
JULIAN BOND
Chairman, Board of Directors
December 2, 2005
Honorable Arnold Schwarzenegger
Governor, State of California
State Capitol Building
Sacramento, CA 95814
Dear Governor,
We the faith based community, urge you to grant clemency to Stanley “Tookie” Williams whose execution has been
scheduled by the State of California on December 13, 2005.
A primary and important tenet of every belief system is founded on the ability of human beings to change. While the
NAACP has adopted resolutions opposing the use and disparate application of the death penalty, this specific matter goes
to the heart of every individual’s ability to change.
Historically, it is not difficult to demonstrate that individuals who have been incarcerated for any period of time for a
crime, especially several months or years, continues to grow and develop. Often times we have noted that they are a very
different person than the one who was convicted. For those who believe that the State killing of Stanley Williams today
would in anyway be fulfilling justice would mean the forever denying of forgiveness, or the recognition of human beings
to grow, learn and change.
While we are keenly aware of the adverse effects of crime in today’s society, we also understand that the price cannot
be paid or satisfied by the death of someone who has made contributions to reach out to those habitually forgotten
individuals, whom society does not pay attention or invest in until they are caught up in an ugly vicious cycle of survival.
Sadly, as has been documented, more dollars are spent to incarcerate rather than invested to educate and provide opportunities.
We are not requesting, nor seeking to send a message that criminal actions or behavior will be tolerated, nevertheless it
is important to send a message to those who have been not only incarcerated, but also find themselves to have made poor
decisions in the past that forgiveness involves changing your behavior and improving of your character.
Stanley Williams, through his writings and efforts has made great strides to demonstrate positive change. He has
openly expressed remorse for his actions and asked for forgiveness. His attempts have even merited national recognition,
including being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize five times and nominated for the Nobel Price in Literature four
times, for seeking to deter young people from youth violence and gangs.
It is our prayer that God would grant you insight and wisdom in this matter. Hatred and anger will not move us
forward as a society; forgiveness allows us to let go of the past and advance. You are standing in a defining moment in
history. You are in a position to save a changed and productive life, becoming the first Governor from the State of California, to exercise the power of clemency in over three decades.
Mr. Williams will spend the remainder of his natural life in prison. Daily he will be able to relive, reflect, regret, and
continue to redeem himself to society. The granting of clemency in this matter will reach far beyond San Quentin, into the
community sending a positive message to the youth across this nation that if you fall down you can get up and there are
people willing to give them a second opportunity to do the right thing.
12
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix D
NAACP Letters to the Governor - Rev. Julius C. Hope (Continued)
Governor Schwarzenegger
Page (2)
December 2, 2005
The British philosopher Edmond Burke states and I quote “While good folks keep silent evil triumphs.” Your silence
will allow evil to continue and it would not serve the community or society if evil prevails and this man, this soul, this
human being is put to death on Tuesday, December 13, 2005.
Therefore, Governor Schwarzenegger, let God use you in times like these that try men’s souls, and grant clemency to
Stanley Tookie Williams.
Thank you for your positive consideration in this matter.
Respectfully and Humbly Submitted,
Rev. Julius C. Hope
Director, Religious Affairs Department – NAACP *
JCH:rgf/sj
Governor Schwarzenegger
Page (3)
December 2, 2005
*Nationally Recognized Faith Organizations in support of this request, and additional signers.
Dr. Major L. Jemison, President
Progressive National Baptist Convention, Inc.
Bishop George W. C. Walker, Senior Bishop
African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church
Reverend Stephen J. Thurston, President
The National Baptist Convention of America, Inc.
Bishop Floyd E. Perry, Board Member
Church of God In Christ
Dr. Melvin von Wade, President
National Missionary Baptist Convention of America
The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan
The Nation of Islam
Senior Bishop Marshall Gilmore
Christian Methodist Episcopal Church
Rabbi David N. Saperstein, Vice Chairman
Religious Action Committee of Reform Judaism
Director and Council
Bishop Philip Robert Cousin, Senior Bishop
African Methodist Episcopal Church
Fourth Episcopal District
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
13
Appendix E
Clemency Response (1 of 16)
November 21, 2005
REPLY PETITION
FOR
EXECUTIVE CLEMENCY
On behalf of
STANLEY TOOKIE WILLIAMS
Respectfully Submitted To The Honorable Arnold Schwarzenegger
Governor Of The State Of California
Ƈ
Ƈ
Ƈ
[Clemency] is a part of the Constitutional scheme. When granted it is the
determination of the ultimate authority that the public welfare will be better served
by inflicting less than what the judgment fixed.
Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes (1927)
14
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix E
Clemency Response (2 of 16)
Preface To Reply
The petition seeking clemency on behalf of Stanley Tookie Williams
was delivered to the Governor’s Office on November 8, 2005. In the following
week, the police and a prison official engaged in conduct which can only be
characterized as dishonorable and contrary to everything that justice in this country
represents.
On Tuesday, November 15, 2005, a representative from the Fontana
Police Department told print and television media that a warrant had been issued
for one Lafayette Jones, a known sex offender, for raping a 13 year old child. The
police identified Mr. Jones as the son of Stanley Tookie Williams.
This was a lie. The media attention which followed on television, in
print, and on the internet has parroted this lie -- showing pictures of Stanley Tookie
Williams and focusing on the relationship to Stanley Tookie Williams. The effect
of the story and the imagery was to falsely link Stanley Tookie Williams to an
alleged rapist in the mind of the public at exactly the time his clemency petition is
pending.
With minimal effort we have determined that Lafayette Jones is the 36
year old son of a 59 year old man named Stanley Williams, not 52 year old Stanley
Tookie Williams whose clemency request is pending.
The attached declaration of Janice Anderson, Lafayette Jones’ mother,
exposes this false but broadly publicized police accusation:
I, Janice Anderson, hereby declare under penalty of
perjury:
The man known in the news media as Lafayette Jones
who is a fugitive from a rape charge is not the son of
Stanley Tookie Williams. I am Jones’ mother. (Ex. 1)
Also attached is the declaration of our investigator, Raymond Stevens,
who spoke with Mrs. Anderson. Mrs. Anderson informed Mr. Stevens that she had
contacted the Fontana Police immediately after hearing the false report that her
son’s father was Stanley Tookie Williams. She was told by a police sergeant that
“it did not matter.” The sergeant excused the lie as a purported police tactic.
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
15
Appendix E
Clemency Response (3 of 16)
Mrs. Andersen further informed Mr. Stevens that she and her husband
“are very concerned about these false reports not only because of the damage it is
doing to Stanley Tookie Williams but also to their son Lafayette Jones.” They are
“both very upset that the police and the news media were continuing to report
falsely that Lafayette Jones was the son of Stanley Tookie Williams even after they
had both been informed by her and other relatives that this was not true.” (Ex. 2)
This was followed two days later, on Thursday, November 17, 2005,
by statements from Vernell Crittendon, the spokesperson for San Quentin State
Prison, that he suspected “Stanley Williams of orchestrating gangland crimes from
his cell.” This inflammatory allegation, which was indiscriminately repeated in the
print and television media, and on the internet, is false and is flatly contradicted by
official San Quentin documents to which Mr. Crittenden certainly has complete
access.
An official San Quentin Institutional Classification Committee (ICC)
Summary dated August 5, 2004, reported upon an interview of Stanley Williams
and a review of his conduct as a prisoner at San Quentin. Among other things, it
states:
Lt. G. Fuller stated that during his assignment in East
Block he has not observed Williams in any gang
involvement. ICC commended Williams on his positive
program over the last ten years. Williams thanked ICC
for their respectful treatment.
The ICC Summary also notes that Stanley Williams’ last disciplinary
infraction was on July 6, 1993. (Ex. 3)
This San Quentin report is supported by statements from the Los
Angeles Police Department whose spokeswomen, April Harding, recently stated
there is no evidence of any illegal gang activity on Stanley Williams’ part. (Ex. 4)
Daniel Vasquez, warden at San Quentin from 1983 to 1993, was
recently quoted as saying, in reference to Crittendon’s statements, that he had
never seen such an inflammatory statement in a news release from the prison, and
that it was “like they’re trying to drum up business for death row.” (Ex. 4)
This type of conduct from law enforcement is incompatible with
justice. To the contrary, it is official misconduct.
-ii-
16
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix E
Clemency Response (4 of 16)
The Honorable Arnold Schwarzenegger
Governor of California
State Capitol Building
Sacramento, California 95814
Dear Governor Schwarzenegger:
The choice is life or death.
The decision falls entirely upon you as Governor. Its consequences
are irreversible. Stanley Williams will die by lethal injection, or he will live to
pursue his work of helping others.
The landscape of this petition is clear. California has the death
penalty, although the administration of justice and the manner in which the death
penalty is being applied are currently the subject of review by a non-partisan
commission.1 The constitutional power of the chief executive to grant clemency
and commute a death sentence to life in prison is clear. The petitioner, Stanley
Williams, has been convicted of four murders which he denies. The truth of his
personal redemption, and his unceasing and successful efforts to reach our youth,
is beyond challenge. It is within this landscape that your decision, and the message
it sends, must rest.
The easier course would be to follow the practice of your predecessor
and avoid personal responsibility by resolutely deferring to the result of the judicial
process. We do not see you as that kind of man or Governor. We read of your life
and of your decision to enter the arena of public service as motivated by a desire to
improve the lives of Californians. We see a man with the courage to speak his own
mind and to follow his own heart. You could not otherwise have forged the life
you have led.
We understand that your obligation as Governor is to decide what is in
the best interest of the people of the State you govern. We have detailed our view 1
This petition seeks clemency, not delay. Yet there is an obligation to note that the
Legislature, as early as January 2006, will vote on Assembly Bill 1121 which would
immediately suspend all executions pending the report of the California Commission
on the Fair Administration of Justice which is due no later than December 31, 2007.
It would be ironic and tragic if Stanley Williams became the last human being in
history to die by execution in the State of California.
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
17
Appendix E
Clemency Response (5 of 16)
- allowing Stanley Williams to live and continue his work will, as a matter of
continuing positive impact and example, serve the greater interest. It will also tell
those to whom Stanley Williams speaks that California and its Governor know
their plight, have heard their voices, and care for their future.
As a school teacher in Oakland, California who is
concerned about youth violence and involvement in
gangs, Stanley Tookie Williams’ life should be spared.
Tookie, as he is known, has been doing exceptional work
with anti-gang and anti-violence. . . . If you are
concerned about the youth in our society who are living
in impoverished conditions and are more vulnerable to
gang-violence and affiliation, you would grant Tookie
clemency and continue his work as a peacemaker and a
peacekeeper.
Gina M. Hill
Street Academy, Oakland
The Response of the District Attorney
The response of the District Attorney was as expected. It recounts
Stanley Williams’ conviction and life only until 1993, the last time he was cited for
an infraction in prison. It ignores but does not challenge Stanley Williams’
redemption, and the impact of his message.
The response seeks death and rejects mercy. It dismisses
rehabilitation. Yet, it cannot deny the principal basis of our petition -- that, for
more than a decade, a redeemed Stanley Williams has sent a message of hope and
purpose to those who live in the most difficult of circumstances.
The District Attorney writes:
In the petition in support of Williams’ request for
clemency, the claim is made that Stanley Williams is
today a different man. Even if that were the case, the
jury’s determination . . . should be carried out.
(Response at 48-9) (emphasis added)
The District Attorney thus urges you to follow the easier course -- that
the court system has ordered death and that ends the matter. This is not true or else
-2-
18
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix E
Clemency Response (6 of 16)
the constitutional power of clemency would not exist. Clemency is relevant only
after the courts have denied legal relief. Clemency does not reverse the judicial
process. It is concerned with factors beyond the purview of the courts. Just days
ago, Chief Justice Ronald George of the California Supreme Court publicly stated
during a radio interview:
Clemency exists more or less for the Governor to
exercise authority given him or her under the
Constitution to provide mercy. . . .
[Clemency] is, in a way, an extra-legal -- in the sense of
outside the strictly legal process -- function that the
Governor has, and that is quite separate and apart from
petitions . . . that are being filed in our Court that involve
legal questions.
The District Attorney’s position is inconsistent with a justice system
which overtly favors and encourages rehabilitation of the imprisoned, and at the
least should encourage efforts to teach the benefits of lawfulness. It would be
more consistent with the true goals of law enforcement and of society to
acknowledge the value of Stanley Williams’ personal redemption and, more
importantly, the value of his message to the youth of this State and this great
Nation.
The District Attorney ignores the needs of our disadvantaged youth
and the enduring truth of what you wrote as a private citizen on August 16, 2000 in
the Los Angeles Times:
At a time of unsurpassed prosperity, one out of five
American children lives in poverty. This isn’t a
Republican or Democratic issue; it’s an American issue.
What can we do for the kids who look into the future and
see only gangs, drugs, and violence? When we tell them
to just say “no”, we have to give them something to say
“yes” to. . . .
The American dream? In the inner cities, children don’t
even dare to dream. The message: Don’t bother. You’ll
never make it. You’re a loser.
-3-
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
19
Appendix E
Clemency Response (7 of 16)
How many [inner city children] learn the discipline and
determination, the motivation? How many hear the
simple messages of self worth that would let them even
glimpse their own daring?
Instead, they’re told that they’re trapped. . . .
We can help these children bridge the gaps created by
hardship and hopelessness. We can help them get the
drive, focus, attention, skills and pride that lead to hope.
We can get all our kids up to the same starting line.
That’s what programs like the Inner-City Games offer.
And the kids are hungry for it. (Ex. 5)
This is the message the District Attorney should be endorsing. It is
the message the District Attorney should be sending. Law enforcement which
focuses only on punishment breeds anger. It sends a message of discrimination. It
is incomplete. Ultimately, it is a system which is destined to fail.
The District Attorney questions Stanley Williams’ personal
redemption because Stanley Williams protests his innocence. For reasons of their
own, public prosecutors historically and consistently have encouraged
“cooperation” and “confession” in exchange for penal rewards. This cannot mean
that a refusal to make a false confession should be penalized. That Stanley
Williams refuses to make a false confession, knowing it could benefit him penally,
shows the strength of his character. It is not arrogance.
The District Attorney also claims the absence of personal redemption
because Stanley Williams will not compromise his personal convictions by
submitting to “debriefing.” The District Attorney demands that Stanley Williams
prove his personal redemption by assuming the role of “informant” which, in a free
society, only the police and prosecutor treat as an act of honor.
The District Attorney also points to Stanley Williams’ history of
prison infractions. (Response at 39-40) The list ends in 1993, some twelve years
ago. The District Attorney thereby supports our point of personal change and
redemption. Stanley Williams entered San Quentin one man. Since 1993, he has
become another. (See attached letter of Dr. L. Thomas Kucharski, Ex. 6)
-4-
20
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix E
Clemency Response (8 of 16)
The Trial
The District Attorney’s insistence on confession, which would
validate an otherwise suspect trial, implicates guilt or innocence, a question we
have not stressed in this petition for clemency. But, the District Attorney’s
argument necessarily takes us to that issue.
The District Attorney refuses to address the words of the Court of
Appeals for the Ninth Circuit that the case against Stanley Williams was weak,
and:
. . . comprised of circumstantial evidence and the
testimony of witnesses with less-than-clean backgrounds
and incentives to lie in order to obtain leniency from the
state in either charging or sentencing.” Williams v.
Woodford, (9th Cir. 2004) 384 F.3d 567, 624.
Instead the District Attorney devotes his response to a materially
distorted review of the trial record.
The Witnesses
The District Attorney lists a series of trial witnesses, some of whom
the District Attorney states were not accomplices and did not receive penal benefits
for their testimony. This purports to contradict our position, and that of the Ninth
Circuit, that the case against Stanley Williams “rested on the testimony of claimed
accomplices and admitted informants . . . all of whom received either freedom or
vastly reduced sentences for their testimony.”
The District Attorney is wrong. None of witnesses pointed to by the
District Attorney as being “simply a citizen” implicated Stanley Williams in the
crimes in any way, and the case simply did not rest upon their testimony:
(i) Layduane Douglas testified that Stanley Williams bought a shotgun
from Western Surplus. It was not disputed that Stanley Williams legally owned a
shotgun.
(ii) Johnny Garcia, worked at a Stop-N-Go, and testified that four
black men drove to the Stop-N-Go and acted suspiciously the night of the 7-Eleven
murder. Garcia did not identify Stanley Williams as being one of those men.
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Appendix E
Clemency Response (9 of 16)
(iii) Armando Dominguez drove past the 7-Eleven the night of the
murder and noticed a station wagon in the parking lot and two men in the store.
Dominguez did not identify Stanley Williams as being one of those men.
(iv) Dale Coates also drove past the 7-Eleven, noticing two cars and
several men. Coates did not identify any of these men as being Stanley Williams.
The witnesses who did implicate Stanley Williams were George
Oglesby, Samuel Coleman, Alfred Coward, James Garrett and Ester Garrett. None
of these witnesses were “simply citizens.” 2
George Oglesby was one of the most notorious jailhouse informants in
Los Angeles. In 1988, the infamous Los Angeles jailhouse informant scandal was
touched off when a protégé of Oglesby went on national television to demonstrate
how easily criminals inside the jail could obtain confidential information with
which to fabricate confessions. A watchdog grand jury found that the District
Attorney had “failed to fulfill the ethical responsibilities required of a public
prosecutor by its deliberate and informed declination to curtail the misuse of jail
house informant testimony.” (Report of the 1989-90 Los Angeles County Grand
Jury, “Investigation of the Involvement of Jail House Informants in the Criminal
Justice System in Los Angeles County,” at 6)
Samuel Coleman, interestingly not mentioned by the District
Attorney, was beaten by police and suffered two broken ribs before losing
consciousness. Thereafter, while still in police custody, the District Attorney
offered him immunity for his testimony. (Ex. 7)
Alfred Coward, an alleged accomplice, received complete immunity
for his claimed role in capital murder. Coward had a lengthy criminal history for
armed robbery, including a robbery right in front of the Brookhaven motel. The
trial prosecutor admitted in a memorandum to his superiors that “corroboration”
for Coward’s testimony was “thin.” Subsequent to Stanley Williams’ trial, Coward
was convicted of federal conspiracy and given only probation. He was thereafter
arrested for drug dealing, burglary, and receiving stolen property, yet each time the
District Attorney declined to file charges. In 1990, he pled guilty to burglary and
despite the probation officer’s pleas that he be sent to prison, the District Attorney
2
The facts presented here regarding the witnesses Oglesby, Coleman, Coward, and
the Garretts, as well as the gun evidence, are detailed in the Discovery Motion and
five volumes of exhibits filed by Verna Wefald, Esq. with the California Supreme
Court and served upon the District Attorney’s office on November 9, 2005.
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Clemency Response (10 of 16)
agreed to probation. Presently, Coward is in a Canadian prison for killing a man
during a robbery.
James Garrett, an admitted armed robber, was being interrogated for
the murder of his crime partner when he implicated Stanley Williams in the
Brookhaven motel murder. Garrett informed the police that Stanley Williams had
told him, for no apparent reason, that he had committed the motel murders.
Stanley Williams was not a suspect in these murders before this. Garrett then
pulled Williams’ legally registered shotgun out from under his own bed and
handed it to police.
Garrett was suspected but never prosecuted for the murder of his
crime partner. A Los Angeles police officer testified that Garrett was not
prosecuted because he had an alibi. This was a lie. The officer who testified was
present at the autopsy of Garrett’s crime partner and knew the body had
decomposed to the point where the date of death, much less the time of death,
could not be determined. When the date of death is unknown, an alibi, which must
be date and time specific, is impossible.
By the time Garrett accused Stanley Williams, Garrett had been
arrested for armed robbery and assault with a deadly weapon four times. He was
facing charges stemming from the planning of numerous armed robberies,
including the robbery of two stores of firearms and ammunition at gunpoint. After
testifying against Stanley Williams, Garrett received probation on these charges
due to a “long talk” the judge had with Stanley Williams’ prosecutor.
Shortly after Stanley Williams’ trial, Garrett robbed a bank at
gunpoint. In 1983, Garrett shot his bookie in the chest. In the following years, he
continued with a stream of armed crimes, consistently getting extraordinarily
favorable treatment from the prosecution.
Ester Garrett, James Garret’s wife, was facing multiple felony
prosecutions as her husband’s co-defendant at the time she testified against Stanley
Williams. The District Attorney gave her money for living expenses. When this
money ran out she perjured herself to get welfare. She freely admitted in open
court that it did not bother her to commit perjury.
The continuing favors given to the Garretts and Coward were in
keeping with a training memorandum used by the Los Angeles District Attorney’s
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Appendix E
Clemency Response (11 of 16)
office stating that informants need to be kept happy long after they had left the
witness stand:
If you alienate the informant you run the risk of his
recanting the testimony you agreed to use. . . . so, nurse
the witness. This does not mean you have to cave in. . . .
but the witness should be confident you will be there to
take care of the important requests. (Ex. 8)
In 2004, the Center on Wrongful Convictions at the Northwestern
University School of Law published a study on informant testimony. It concluded:
The experience shows pretty much what you would
expect -- that when the criminal justice system offers
witnesses incentives to lie, they will. (Ex. 9)
If private defense counsel were to give money for testimony, they
would face indictment. Law enforcement offers a much more valuable asset for
testimony, freedom.
The Physical Evidence
The District Attorney claims that the case rested on “strong physical
evidence.” This is grossly inaccurate. The only physical evidence against Stanley
Williams was the testimony of a gun expert, a sheriff’s deputy, who testified that a
shell found at the Brookhaven motel matched test shells from the shotgun owned
by Stanley Williams. What the District Attorney does not say is:
(1) The shotgun was given to the police by James Garrett, who had it
under his bed.
(2) The type of shell found at the motel was only sold by two stores
in Los Angeles in the year prior to the murder. Garrett had robbed one of these
stores during that year of more than 100 firearms and an unknown quantity of
ammunition, a fact of which the police were aware.
(3) The prosecution’s expert ran an initial series of tests and found
them “inconclusive.” (“At that time my opinion was inconclusive.” Trial
Transcript at 1537.) He was asked by the prosecutor to try again, and only then
opined that 2 of 18 test shells had similar markings to the shell found at the motel.
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Clemency Response (12 of 16)
(4) The prosecution’s gun examiner made no effort to compare
ejector and extractor marks on the crime scene shell with the test shells, did not
identify the markings on the shells by class, sub-class and individual
characteristics, did not take photomicrographs of the shells as has been best
practice since the 1920’s, and did not have a second examiner verify his findings.
(See Declaration of David Lamagna, attached as Ex. 10)
This was the only physical evidence against Stanley Williams.
Purported Statements
The District Attorney asserts that Stanley Williams, during an
interview with two police deputies, stated that five shots were fired at the motel
and this was, in essence, an admission of knowledge and participation. However,
Stanley Williams’ interview with the deputies was tape recorded, and this
purported admission is not on the tape. Had this alleged statement really been
viewed as an admission, the prosecutor would surely have used it at the trial -- he
did not. (Response at 37-38)
The District Attorney’s reliance on Tony Sims is also highly
questionable. The District Attorney quotes from an interview at the time of Sims’
arrest, at which time the police were able to advise Sims of the story they had
obtained from Garrett and the immunized Coward. Sims, of course, had only to
repeat this “story” to help himself. Sims was never called as a witness against
Stanley Williams at trial -- where he would have been free of the pressure and
influence of the police interrogation room, would have been sworn to tell the truth
in open court, and would have faced cross-examination.
The Impact of Race
The District Attorney does not contest that the prosecutor was twice
sanctioned by the California Supreme Court for racial bias. Nor that Stanley
Williams was compared to a Bengal tiger. Rather, the District Attorney argues that
the prosecutor left one African-American on Stanley Williams’ jury and that this
cleanses any taint. The District Attorney is wrong on all counts.
The juror, William McLurkin, was born in the Philippines, as was his
mother. The trial record demonstrates that none of the lawyers -- and particularly
the prosecutor -- thought Mr. McLurkin was black. During jury selection, three
jurors were asked whether the fact that they were black would influence them. The
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Appendix E
Clemency Response (13 of 16)
prosecutor struck each of these jurors. Neither Mr. McLurkin nor any of the other
79 potential jurors were asked these questions. The only inference is that none of
the lawyers thought Mr. McLurkin was black. Mr. McLurkin looked Filipino. The
District Attorney has supplied Mr. McLurkin’s death certificate, which does not
have a picture, as an exhibit. What the District Attorney fails to supply is Mr.
McLurkin’s driver’s license, which does have his photograph.3 (Ex. 11)
*
*
*
The basis of this petition is not innocence. Innocence demands
exoneration. But we can and do assert, as did the Ninth Circuit, that for all the
reasons stated above, the case against Stanley Williams was “comprised of
circumstantial evidence and the testimony of witnesses with less-than-clean
backgrounds and incentives to lie.”
*
*
*
The basis of this petition is the personal redemption of Stanley
Williams and the positive impact of the message he sends. Thousands of students,
teachers and parents have written to say that Stanley Williams and his message are
of value -- that Stanley Williams and his message lift them up, teach them, and
give them hope. They ask, on the most human level, that Stanley Williams be
allowed to continue with his work. A student from South Central writes:
[Stanley Williams] made me think and now I know if he
can change his life around then I have the power and
confidence to change my own life around. He gave me a
lot of confidence. I just hope you find it in your heart to
save him and everyone he saved.
Conclusion
The District Attorney insists the death penalty imposed in the courts
must be enforced, that rehabilitation is meaningless, that punishment is the only
3
It is not the legal standard, either in California or under the Constitution, that the
prosecution may deliberately strike all black jurors but one on account of race. The
standard is exactly the opposite. As stated by Judge Rawlinson, a former career
prosecutor: “[t]he striking of even a single juror based on race violates the
Constitution.” Williams v. Woodford, (9th Cir. 2004) 396 F.3d 1059, 1061.
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Appendix E
Clemency Response (14 of 16)
goal of justice in this State, and that no person sentenced to death can ever be
granted clemency.
In the process, the District Attorney ignores the needs of California’s
youth and the sense of hope and future that Stanley Williams brings to so many
who are disadvantaged.
We hold firm in the certainty that this is wrong, that the future of this
State and Nation rests with our youth, that their potential must be tapped if we are
to succeed and that Stanley Williams’ message is crucial to this goal and should
not be extinguished by his death.
In the end, we ask what makes sense. We ask what is practical reality.
Giving Stanley Williams life is the right decision because it does the most good. It
respects his message and increases its already substantial impact by telling those to
whom he speaks that this State and its Governor agree and care about them and
about the possibilities for a better life.
I waited patiently for the Lord,
and he inclined unto me, and heard my cry.
He brought me up also out of a horrible pit,
out of the miry clay, and set my feet upon a rock,
and established my goings,
And he hath put a new song in my mouth.
Psalm 40
The State of California should not execute this man.
*
*
*
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Appendix E
Clemency Response (15 of 16)
We again most respectfully repeat our request for a personal meeting
with you, and encourage you to arrange a personal meeting with Stanley Williams.
Respectfully submitted,
_____________________
Peter Fleming Jr.
Counsel for Stanley Williams
Peter Fleming Jr.
Jonathan Harris
Lothlórien Redmond
Julie Withers
CURTIS, MALLET-PREVOST,
COLT & MOSLE LLP
101 Park Ave.
New York, NY 10178
212-696-6000
Jan L. Handzlik
Sandra Smith Thayer
HOWREY LLP
550 South Hope Street
Suite 1100
Los Angeles, CA 90071
213-892-1800
Verna Wefald
Counsel of Record
65 North Raymond Ave., Suite 320
Pasadena, CA 91103
626-577-2658
Stephen F. Rohde
ROHDE & VICTOROFF
1880 Century Park East, Suite 411
Los Angeles, CA 90067
310-277-1482
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Appendix E
Clemency Response (16 of 16)
INDEX OF ATTACHMENTS TO
REPLY PETITION FOR EXECUTIVE CLEMENCY
Volume R-I . . . . . . . . 1.
Declaration of Janice Anderson,
Mother of Lafayette Jones
2.
Declaration of Raymond Stevens
3.
San Quentin ICC Summary Report
4.
Sample of News Articles Quoting April Harding and
Daniel Vasquez
5.
August 16, 2000, Los Angeles Times Opinion Piece:
Let’s Terminate the Gap Between Despair and Hope
6.
Letter from Dr. L. Thomas Kucharski
7.
Declaration of Samuel Coleman
8.
Use of Jail House Informants, by Elliott E. Alhadeff,
Deputy District Attorney
9.
The Snitch System, by The Center for Wrongful
Convictions, Northwestern University School of Law
10. Declaration of Firearms Expert, David J. Lamagna
11. Driver’s License of William McLurkin
12. Exonerations in the United States: 1989 through 2003,
by Samuel R. Gross, et al., The Journal of Criminal
Law and Criminology, Vol. 95, No. 2 (2005)
13. Information Regarding the Clemency Power
14. Schools, Correctional Facilities and Other Institutions
that Requested and Screened Redemption
Volume R-II . . . . . . . 15. Letter from Chad Blakeley
16. Handwritten Signatures on the Clemency Petition for
Stanley Tookie Williams Petition
17. Names from the On-Line Clemency Petition for
Stanley Tookie Williams Petition
Volumes R-III & IV . . . . . Names from the On-Line Clemency Petition for
Stanley Tookie Williams Petition (Continued)
Volume R-V . . . . . . . . . . . Letters and Emails from Supporters
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
29
Appendix F
Cell Mate’s Affidavit (1 of 6)
Thursday, December 8, 2005
On Thursday, December 08, 2005, at around 3:00 PM Michael Turner, of the Compton Branch of the
NAACP called the California State Conference of the NAACP to speak with President Alice Huffman. He
shared with her the following message that had been left on his answering machine:
Answering Machine: Thursday, December 8, 2005 2:21 PM
Gordy:Hi, my name is Gordy. I have information about Tookie and the guy that ratted
him off, George Oglesby. I was his cell mate for over two years in the county jail,
in downtown LA. Uh the only way you can get in touch with me is to go to the
area, to the alley behind a hundred, and 10959 South Broadway, you’ll see a gold
Suburban with white stripes, that’s where I live. I don’t have a phone there, I don’t
have any way for you to get in touch with me, but I can tell you this, when George
Oglesby testified against Tookie he was lying on the stand, I know for a fact cause
I was his cell mate. And it’s a Thursday afternoon now, about two o’clock, I just got
through reading the LA Times and it listed George Oglesby as the uh, the person
that testified against Tookie. Now I know that he lied in court because, like I said,
he was my cell mate for a long time. So if you wanted, uh, someone to testify on
Tookie’s behalf or get an emergency stay, uh give me a call or um come by where I
live. Once again, I live at 10959 South Broadway, I live behind it, I live in the, off
the alley between Broadway and Olive and a 110th Street. It’s a Salmon colored,
stucco building and there’s a yard behind there and that’s where I live. I’d be more
than glad to talk to you guys, I’d be more than glad to give you an affidavit, I even
have some letters, somewhere, in all my files, from George Oglesby, but at the time
I knew as Roger, um, I was in the, um, county jail for over three years before I went
to prison. Oh Yeah, and I’m the only white guy down here in this neighborhood
so it’s not hard to find me. Anyways, come by if you want, I’ll be there anytime,
everybody down here knows where I live and I’d be more than glad to help you out
to save Tookie’s life. Bye.
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Appendix F
Cell Mate’s Affidavit (2 of 6)
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
31
Appendix F
32
Cell Mate’s Affidavit (3 of 6)
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix F
Cell Mate’s Affidavit (4 of 6)
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
33
Appendix F
34
Cell Mate’s Affidavit (5 of 6)
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix F
Cell Mate’s Affidavit (6 of 6)
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
35
Appendix G Governor’s Denial (1 of 6)
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Appendix G Governor’s Denial (2 of 6)
STATEMENT OF DECISION
(corrected version)
Request for Clemency by Stanley Williams
Stanley Williams has been convicted of brutally murdering four people during two
separate armed robberies in February and March 1979. A California jury
sentenced him to death, and he is scheduled for execution on December 13, 2005.
During the early morning hours of February 28, 1979, Williams and three others
went on a robbery spree. Around 4 a.m., they entered a 7-Eleven store where
Albert Owens was working by himself. Here, Williams, armed with his pumpaction shotgun, ordered Owens to a backroom and shot him twice in the back while
he lay face down on the floor. Williams and his accomplices made off with about
$120 from the store’s cash register. After leaving the 7-Eleven store, Williams told
the others that he killed Albert Owens because he did not want any witnesses.
Later that morning, Williams recounted shooting Albert Owens, saying “You
should have heard the way he sounded when I shot him.” Williams then made a
growling noise and laughed for five to six minutes.
On March 11, 1979, less than two weeks later, Williams, again armed with his
shotgun, robbed a family-operated motel and shot and killed three members of the
family: (1) the father, Yen-I Yang, who was shot once in the torso and once in the
arm while he was laying on a sofa; (2) the mother, Tsai-Shai Lin, who was shot
once in the abdomen and once in the back; and (3) the daughter, Yee-Chen Lin,
who was shot once in her face. For these murders, Williams made away with
approximately $100 in cash. Williams also told others about the details of these
murders and referred to the victims as “Buddha-heads.”
Now, his appeals exhausted, Williams seeks mercy in the form of a petition for
clemency. He claims that he deserves clemency because he has undergone a
personal transformation and is redeemed, and because there were problems with
his trial that undermine the fairness of the jury’s verdict.
Williams’ case has been thoroughly reviewed in the 24 years since his convictions
and death sentence. In addition to his direct appeal to the California Supreme
Court, Williams has filed five state habeas corpus petitions, each of which has been
rejected. The federal courts have also reviewed his convictions and death
sentence. Williams filed a federal habeas corpus petition, and the U.S. District
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
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Appendix G Governor’s Denial (3 of 6)
Statement of Decision
Request for Clemency by Stanley Williams
Page 2 of 5
Court denied it. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed this decision.1
Williams was also given a number of post-trial evidentiary hearings, and he and his
lawyers had the opportunity at these hearings to present evidence that was not
heard at trial. The jury’s decision has withstood these challenges.
In all, Williams’ case has been the subject of at least eight substantive judicial
opinions.2 Prior to the filing of the clemency petition, the state court habeas
process was completed on June 21, 1995 when the California Supreme Court
denied Williams’ fourth state habeas corpus petition.3 The federal court habeas
process was completed on October 11, 2005 when the United States Supreme
Court denied Williams’ writ of certiorari.
The claim that Williams received an unfair trial was the subject of this extensive
litigation in the state and federal courts. The courts considered the sufficiency of
his counsel, the strategic nature of counsel’s decisions during the penalty phase of
Williams’ trial, the adequacy and reliability of testimony from informants, whether
Williams was prejudiced by security measures employed during his trial, whether
he was competent to stand trial, whether the prosecutor impermissibly challenged
potential jurors on the basis of race, and whether his jury was improperly
influenced by Williams’ threats made against them. There is no need to rehash or
second guess the myriad findings of the courts over 24 years of litigation.
The possible irregularities in Williams’ trial have been thoroughly and carefully
reviewed by the courts, and there is no reason to disturb the judicial decisions that
uphold the jury’s findings that he is guilty of these four murders and should pay
with his life.
1
Some have suggested that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit has endorsed Mr. Williams request for
clemency. (Williams v. Woodford (2004) 384 F.3d 567, 628.) However, a careful reading of the opinion shows that
Ninth Circuit panel merely noted that Williams’ redemption arguments were properly addressed to the Governor,
not the court, without expressing an opinion on the appropriateness of clemency.
2
People v. Williams (1988) 44 Cal.3d 1127 [direct appeal and state habeas corpus petition]; In re Stanley Williams
(1994) 7 Cal.4th 572 [state habeas corpus petition]; Williams v. Calderon (C.D. Cal. 1998) 41 F.Supp.2d 1043
[federal habeas corpus petitions]; Williams v. Calderon (C.D. Cal. 1998) 48 F.Supp.2d 979 [federal habeas corpus
petition]; Williams v. Calderon (C.D. Cal. 1998) 1998 WL 1039280 [request for discovery for federal habeas corpus
petition]; Williams v. Calderon (C.D. Cal. 1999) 1999 WL 1320903 [motion for relief of judgment on federal habeas
corpus petition]; Williams v. Woodford (9th Cir. 2004) 384 F.3d 567 [affirming denial of federal habeas corpus
petition]; Williams v. Woodford (9th Cir. 2005) 396 F.3d 1059 [denying petition for rehearing en banc, with
dissent].
3
On December 10, 2005, Williams’ counsel filed a fifth habeas corpus petition in the California Supreme Court. On
December 11, 2005, the Court unanimously denied his petition.
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Appendix G Governor’s Denial (4 of 6)
Statement of Decision
Request for Clemency by Stanley Williams
Page 3 of 5
The basis of Williams’ clemency request is not innocence. Rather, the basis of the
request is the “personal redemption Stanley Williams has experienced and the
positive impact of the message he sends.”4 But Williams’ claim of innocence
remains a key factor to evaluating his claim of personal redemption. It is
impossible to separate Williams’ claim of innocence from his claim of redemption.
Cumulatively, the evidence demonstrating Williams is guilty of these murders is
strong and compelling. It includes: (1) eyewitness testimony of Alfred Coward,
who was one of Williams’ accomplices in the 7-Eleven shooting; (2) ballistics
evidence proving that the shotgun casing found at the scene of the motel murders
was fired from Williams’ shotgun; (3) testimony from Samuel Coleman that
Williams confessed that he had robbed and killed some people on Vermont Street
(where the motel was located); (4) testimony from James and Esther Garrett that
Williams admitted to them that he committed both sets of murders; and (5)
testimony from jailhouse informant George Oglesby that Williams confessed to the
motel murders and conspired with Oglesby to escape from county jail. The trial
evidence is bolstered by information from Tony Sims, who has admitted to being
an accomplice in the 7-Eleven murder. Sims did not testify against Williams at
trial, but he was later convicted of murder for his role in Albert Owens’ death.
During his trial and subsequent parole hearings, Sims has repeatedly stated under
oath that Williams was the shooter.
Based on the cumulative weight of the evidence, there is no reason to second guess
the jury’s finding of guilt or raise significant doubts or serious reservations about
Williams’ convictions and death sentence. He murdered Albert Owens and Yen-I
Yang, Yee-Chen Lin and Tsai-Shai Lin in cold blood in two separate incidents that
were just weeks apart.
But Williams claims that he is particularly deserving of clemency because he has
reformed and been redeemed for his violent past. Williams’ claim of redemption
triggers an inquiry into his atonement for all his transgressions. Williams protests
that he has no reason to apologize for these murders because he did not commit
them. But he is guilty and a close look at Williams’ post-arrest and postconviction conduct tells a story that is different from redemption.
After Williams was arrested for these crimes, and while he was awaiting trial, he
conspired to escape from custody by blowing up a jail transportation bus and
4
Williams’ Clemency Reply, p. 10.
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
39
Appendix G Governor’s Denial (5 of 6)
Statement of Decision
Request for Clemency by Stanley Williams
Page 4 of 5
killing the deputies guarding the bus. There are detailed escape plans in Williams’
own handwriting. Williams never executed this plan, but his co-conspirator
implicated Williams in the scheme. The fact that Williams conspired to murder
several others to effectuate his escape from jail while awaiting his murder trial is
consistent with guilt, not innocence. And the timing of the motel murders—less
than two weeks after the murder of Albert Owens—shows a callous disregard for
human life.
Williams has written books that instruct readers to avoid the gang lifestyle and to
stay out of prison.5 In 1996, a Tookie Speaks Out Against Gang Violence
children’s book series was published. In 1998, “Life in Prison” was published. In
2004, Williams published a memoir entitled “Blue Rage, Black Redemption.” He
has also recently (since 1995) tried to preach a message of gang avoidance and
peacemaking, including a protocol for street peace to be used by opposing gangs.
It is hard to assess the effect of such efforts in concrete terms, but the continued
pervasiveness of gang violence leads one to question the efficacy of Williams’
message. Williams co-founded the Crips, a notorious street gang that has
contributed and continues to contribute to predatory and exploitative violence. 6
The dedication of Williams’ book “Life in Prison” casts significant doubt on his
personal redemption. This book was published in 1998, several years after
Williams’ claimed redemptive experience. Specifically, the book is dedicated to
“Nelson Mandela, Angela Davis, Malcolm X, Assata Shakur, Geronimo Ji Jaga
Pratt, Ramona Africa, John Africa, Leonard Peltier, Dhoruba Al-Mujahid, George
Jackson, Mumia Abu-Jamal, and the countless other men, women, and youths who
have to endure the hellish oppression of living behind bars.” The mix of
individuals on this list is curious. Most have violent pasts and some have been
convicted of committing heinous murders, including the killing of law
enforcement.
5
Williams’ perennial nominations for the Nobel Peace Prize and Nobel Prize in Literature from 2001-2005 and the
receipt of the President’s Call to Service Award in 2005 do not have persuasive weight in this clemency request.
6
Breaking the cycle of hopelessness and gang violence is the responsibility of us all, not just the most affected
African-American or inner city communities. It is important to work together with respect, understanding and
patience if we are to one day succeed.
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Appendix G Governor’s Denial (6 of 6)
Statement of Decision
Request for Clemency by Stanley Williams
Page 5 of 5
But the inclusion of George Jackson on this list defies reason and is a significant
indicator that Williams is not reformed and that he still sees violence and
lawlessness as a legitimate means to address societal problems.7
There is also little mention or atonement in his writings and his plea for clemency
of the countless murders committed by the Crips following the lifestyle Williams
once espoused. The senseless killing that has ruined many families, particularly in
African-American communities, in the name of the Crips and gang warfare is a
tragedy of our modern culture. One would expect more explicit and direct
reference to this byproduct of his former lifestyle in Williams’ writings and
apology for this tragedy, but it exists only through innuendo and inference.
Is Williams’ redemption complete and sincere, or is it just a hollow promise?
Stanley Williams insists he is innocent, and that he will not and should not
apologize or otherwise atone for the murders of the four victims in this case.
Without an apology and atonement for these senseless and brutal killings there can
be no redemption. In this case, the one thing that would be the clearest indication
of complete remorse and full redemption is the one thing Williams will not do.
Clemency decisions are always difficult. But the constitutional power of the
Governor to grant clemency does not stand in isolation. It must be balanced with
the Governor’s constitutional duty to see that the laws are faithfully executed.
Here, Williams is clearly guilty, and the evidence and clemency materials
supporting Williams’ claim of personal redemption are equivocal.
Therefore, based on the totality of circumstances in this case, Williams’ request for
clemency is denied.
DATED: December 12, 2005
___________________________________
ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER
Governor of the State of California
7
George Jackson was a militant activist and prison inmate who founded the violent Black Guerilla Family prison
gang. Jackson was charged with the murder of a San Quentin correctional officer. In 1970, Jackson’s brother
stormed the courtroom with a machine gun, and along with three inmates, took a judge, the prosecutor and three
others hostage in an attempt to leverage his brother’s freedom. Shooting broke out. The prosecutor was paralyzed
from a police bullet, and the judge was killed by a close-range blast to his head when the shotgun taped to his throat
was fired by one of the accomplices. Jackson’s brother was also killed. Then, three days before trial was to begin in
the correctional officer murder case, George Jackson was gunned down in the upper yard at San Quentin Prison in
another foiled escape attempt on a day of unparalleled violence in the prison that left three officers and three inmates
dead in an earlier riot that reports indicate also involved Jackson.
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
41
Appendix H
The 13 Day Plan (1 of 2)
SAVING STANLEY “TOOKIE” WILLIAMS
NAACP 13- DAY PLAN TALKING PAPER
The NAACP opposes the death penalty, especially in a nation where disparities in its application
are well documented. The conviction of Stanley “Tookie” Williams was based on circumstantial
evidence from dubious witnesses presented to a racially biased jury. His execution is scheduled
for December 13, at 12:01 AM at San Quentin Prison.
Mr. Williams has won national and international recognition for his work to guide young people
toward different choices than those he made. He has published positive books. He was recognized by the White House for community service and nominated for the Noble Peace Prize. His
anti-gang work has saved many young lives.
We have no choice but to fight for Stanley “Tookie” Williams’ life.
Mr Williams’ fate lies in the hands of one person, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. He can
place (a moratorium on this case until a Commission completes its work on disparities in sentencing in the California criminal justice system) or grant clemency. Clemency laws were created
for just such a case where an individual has (transformed his or her life) and is contributing to
society.
The Governor has declined to meet with the NAACP. Thus we must use the public airways to get
to him our plea for Stanley Tookie Williams.
The NAACP proposes to join others in this movement over the next 13 days to save Stanley Williams.
THE 13- DAY PROGRAM
Wednesday, November 30, 2005 - Press Runs: National Day of Action
Around November 26 hold press conferences with President Gordon in the major media markets
of California, beginning in San Diego and ending in San Francisco. Standing with him will be
significant leaders of local areas. This will be a one-day event. The focus of the events will simply be a call to the press to advance to the public the case for keeping Stanley Williams alive.
Sunday, December 4, 2005 - Power of Prayer Sunday
Every church in California will be asked to devote a portion of the service to prayer beseeching the Almighty to touch the Governor’s heart so that he can see the good in Stanley Williams
and sense the impact that clemency will have on our community. Pray that he has the courage
to spare his life. This call should be announced at a press conference by a group of ecumenical
clergy.
42
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Appendix H
The 13 Day Plan (1 of 2)
Beginning Wednesday, December - 7th , 2005 and Thursday, December –8th, 2005- Prayer
Vigils
Beginning the 7th of December Prayer Vigils will be held in many different parts of the state, and
in Los Angeles in front of District Attorney, Steve Cooley’s office. They can be large or small.
All should be noticed and promoted to the press. On Thursday, December 8th, a candle light
vigil will be held at the State Capitol. This will happen during the time of the closed door meeting between the Governor and the Attorneys representing Stanley Tookie Williams.
Friday, December 9th , 2005,- Rallies (Celebration)
Rallies should be held around the state with dignitaries from local governments, state and congress along with community organizations and clergy explaining the faults with Capital punishment in California and calling on the Governor to spare Mr. William’s life.
December 12, 2005 a San Quentin Vigil
If all has failed, we shall gather at San Quentin Monday evening and stay with Stanley Williams
until the end.
Alice A. Huffman
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
43
Appendix I
44
News Paper Ads (1 of 2)
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Appendix I
News Paper Ads (2 of 2)
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
45
Appendix J
News Releases
CA NAACP
NEWS
www.canaacp.org
Alice A. Huffman
President and CEO
Darnell Cooley
1st Vice President & Publicity Chair
Monday, December 12, 2005
Alice A. Huffman, President, California NAACP
& National Board Member
The NAACP is Deeply Saddened by the Decision made by the Governor on
not to Grant Clemency to Stanley Tookie Williams
Statement to the Press
We are deeply saddened by the Governor’s decision to not grant clemency to
Stanley Tookie Williams. He has delivered a serious blow to our efforts to
eliminate gangs and create a safer environment. We believed that Stanley Tookie Williams’ life has value above any notion of
an “eye for an eye”, which is the premise of the death penalty. Obviously,
the Governor believes otherwise.
We believe that every child Stanley Tookie Williams is able to draw away
from gang life is invaluable. Obviously, the Governor does not.
We believe that one can reform and become rehabilitated from wherever one
resides. Stanley, for the last 10 years, has made a difference in the lives
of inner city children all over the world. We think that the work that he has done
should have set the stage for him to be granted permission to continue it. Obviously,
the Governor did not see it that way.
1315 I Street, Suite 200
46
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Sacramento, CA 95814
Appendix J
News Releases
Page 2
The National NAACP, the State NAACP, local branches and youth
units, the California State Black Chamber of Commerce, the Urban League, the
ACLU, and the many other groups that are opposed to the death penalty, all calling
for clemency were not heard. It is clear that we have no voice or standing with him.
We regret that the Governor does not understand or care about the injustices
of the criminal justice system and the disparities with which we live,
that erodes our trust in the system. Even after an inmate has come forth at the eleventh hour, to provide evidence that Stanley Williams was framed,
the Governor would not listen.
I regret that the Governor has abandoned the sacred cannon of redemption. He
does not believe that from someone with a bad beginning can become an
instrument for good.
I thank the community, the NAACP and all of our branches for their continued
support of Stanley Tookie Williams. There is one last effort, that the Governor may
reconsider his decision and provide a stay. Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights
organization. Its half-million adult and youth members throughout the
United States including the California NAACP along with its 64 Branches and
more than 30 youth and college chapters are the premier advocates for civil
rights, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring equal opportunity in
the public and privates sectors.
###
Contact: CA-NAACP Office (916) 498-1898
1315 I Street, Suite 200
Sacramento, CA 95814
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
47
Appendix J
News Releases
NAACP NEWS
www.sacnaacp.org
Betty Williams
President Velma Sykes
Publicity/Media Chairperson
For Immediate Release--REVISED
November 30, 2005
NAACP STEPS UP EFFORTS TO SAVE STANLEY TOOKIE WILLIAMS
California Gov. Schwarzenegger is asked to grant clemency to former gang leader
who has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize
The Sacramento Branch NAACP, along with the Nation of Islam will be holding a candlelight
prayer vigil on December 8th on the north steps (L Street side) of the State Capitol in a show of
support for the request by the National President/CEO, Bruce Gordon to spare the life of Stanley
“Tookie” Williams. The Prayer vigil will begin at 3:00 p.m.
President Bruce Gordon, President/CEO, National NAACP, President Alice Huffman, CA State
NAACP and Betty Williams, President of the Sacramento Branch National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), agree that California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger
should spare the life of Stanley Tookie Williams, who is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection on December 13. Mr. Williams, who maintains his innocence, has been nominated five times
for the Nobel Peace Prize and four times for the Nobel Prize for Literature for his series of acclaimed children’s books.
President Gordon spent two and one-half hours at San Quentin prison death house on Saturday
talking with Mr. Williams. He then called a meeting with the California NAACP leaders to discuss
the outcome of the meeting and a strategy to implement a direction for the organization to assist in the life-saving of Mr. Williams. During the meeting with Mr. Williams, Gordon said Williams
committed to working with the NAACP to reach young people who might be influenced to join
gangs. President Gordon said: “There is no doubt in my mind that Stanley Williams merits clemency. The NAACP asks Gov. Schwarzenegger to act with courage and exercise the power of his
office to grant clemency to Stanley Williams.”
The NAACP will lead a multi-city two-week crusade to convince Schwarzenegger that Williams
should live to continue his work in helping young people make positive choices and avoid the
gang life that he once lived. Williams, a co-founder of the Crips gang, has won international and
national recognition for the 10 books he wrote urging youths to stay away from gangs.
(more)
815 I Street
48
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Appendix J
News Releases
Page 2
Williams
Schwarzenegger has agreed to meet Dec. 8 with Williams’ lawyers, Los Angeles County prosecutors and others involved in the case to consider whether to grant clemency. During the
meeting, the NAACP will hold a prayer vigil across the state. The community is invited to join
the NAACP at the State Capitol as we pray for the Governor and encourage him to make the
right decision.
Gordon said: “I am convinced that our community is best served if Stan is alive and contributing to the guidance of our youth. He is a one-of-a-kind human asset who needs to exercise his
unique ability to touch the lives of young people.” President Betty Williams agrees.
The NAACP has long opposed the death penalty and has called for a moratorium on executions until questions about the reliability and fairness of capital punishment have been answered and it is certain that the process does not discriminate. There are documented cases
that show the death penalty has been applied differently depending on the race of the offender
and the victim. The NAACP bases it’s support for clemency on the value of Stan’s life to the communities the
organization represents. We want to save Stan’s life so he can save the lives of others.”
The NAACP supports the Petition for Executive Clemency submitted by William’s legal counsel on November 8, 2005. Included in the petition is a quote from the late Chief Justice William
Rehnquist written in 1998:
“…the heart of executive clemency…is to grant clemency as a matter of grace, thus allowing
the executive to consider a wide range of factors not comprehended by earlier judicial proceedings and sentencing determinations.”
Four Nobel laureates, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu, have called on Schwarzenegger
to grant clemency for Williams. “Through his work, gang truces have been mediated and longstanding wounds have been healed. Lives have been saved,” the laureates said in a letter to the
governor.
“There is no doubt in my mind that Stanley Williams merits clemency,” said Gordon.
Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its halfmillion adult and youth members throughout the United States and the world are the premier
advocates for civil rights in their communities, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring
equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.
###
Contact: Betty Williams or Velma Sykes, Sacramento NAACP Office, 916-447-8629
815 I Street
Sacramento, CA 95814
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
49
Appendix J
News Releases
NAACP NEWS
www.naacp.org
Bruce S. Gordon
President and CEO
Julian Bond
Chairpman, Board of Directors
For Immediate Release
December 6, 2005
What Stanley Tookie Williams Will Do With the Rest of His Life
If granted clemency, Williams will work with the NAACP on programs to reach at-risk youths
Stanley Tookie Williams said in a soon to be published essay titled What I Will Do With the Rest of
My Life that if he wins clemency he will partner with the National Association for the Advancement of
Colored People (NAACP) on programs aimed at persuading at-risk youths to avoid gangs.
Williams said, “In the beginning, redemption was an alien concept to me. However, while in solitary
confinement, during 1988 to 1994, I embarked upon a transitional path toward redemption. I
underwent disciplined years of education, soul searching, edification, spiritual cultivation and battling
my internal demons. Though I was loathed for being the co-founder of the Crips, my redemption
caused me to repudiate my gang leadership role, to repudiate any affiliation with the Crips or other
gangs.”
NAACP President and CEO Bruce S. Gordon visited Williams at the San Quentin Prison for more
than two hours. Gordon said, “Stan gives us a unique opportunity to help save lives by turning around
some of these young people who are inclined to join a street gang. He can speak with credibility
unmatched by most youth workers and counselors. He has agreed to work with the NAACP to create
and implement a violence prevention curriculum for at-risk youths throughout America .”
The NAACP is urging Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to grant clemency for Williams who is
scheduled to die by lethal injection on December 13, 2005 .
Williams said, “Redemption has resurrected me from a mental and spiritual death. It symbolizes the
end of a bad beginning as well as a new start. Being redeemed has enabled me to reunite with God,
reclaim my humanity, find inner peace and discover my raison d’etre – my reason to exist.”
Recently when asked if he is prepared to die, Williams responded, “I’m prepared to live. Though
execution looms like poisonous toxins, God’s gift of redemption revivifies my life. I inhale redemption
and exhale joie de vivre. That’s why I do not fear death. Socrates stated while defending his life before
court judges, ‘A man who is good for anything should not calculate the chance of living or dying. He
should only consider whether in doing anything, he is doing right, or wrong, and acting the part of a
good man, or of bad.’ I opted for good to assist the hopeless.”
(more)
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Appendix J
News Releases
Page 2
For Life Release
Williams has won international and national recognition for the nine books he wrote urging
youths to stay away from gangs. He said in the editorial, “ Consequently, my spirit deeds
are exhibited in my nine children’s books; my memoir, Blue Rage, Black Redemption; my
educational website, www.tookie.com; my Internet Project for Street Peace and my Peace
Protocol. All of my work is predicated on persuading youths and adults to not follow in my
footsteps. Still, my desire is to do more.”
Williams said about his meeting with Gordon, “The partnership with this nation’s oldest civil
rights organization will provide me with the structure and support to carry out my vision of a
gang-free America .”
In conclusion, Williams states, “I know that to whom much is given, much is expected. If
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger grants me clemency, I will accept it as an obligation to
society to spend the rest of my life working to reverse the cycle of youth violence. It is my
desire to help save society from producing more victims. Here and now, I bear witness that
God’s bequest of redemption has replenished me with a mission and revealed that the
impossible is possible.”
The NAACP has called for a moratorium on executions until questions about the reliability
and fairness of capital punishment have been answered and it is certain that the process
does not discriminate. There are documented cases that show the death penalty has been
applied differently depending on the race of the offender and the victim.
Founded in 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is the
nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its half-million adult and youth members
throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their
communities and monitor equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.
CONTACT: NAACP Office of Communications 410.580.5125
4805 Mt. Hope Drive
Baltimore, MD 21215
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
51
Appendix J
News Releases
NAACP NEWS
www.naacp.org
Bruce S. Gordon
President and CEO
Julian Bond
Chairpman, Board of Directors
For Immediate Release December 2, 2005
Contacts: John C. White (410) 580-5127 or (410) 370-8817
[email protected]
Jasmyne Cannick (310) 223-1201 or (323) 839-0216
[email protected]
NAACP Announces Statewide Tour
To Save Stanley Tookie Williams
President Bruce S. Gordon and State President Alice Huffman to Kick Off
Tour in Los Angeles
WHAT:
A four-city California crusade to increase public support for Governor Schwarzenegger to
order clemency for Stanley Tookie Williams so he can continue his work in helping young
people make positive choices and avoid the gang life that he once lived.
WHEN:
Tuesday, December 6th (see schedule below)
WHERE:
Los Angeles, San Diego, Sacramento, and San Francisco (see schedule below)
WHO:
Bruce S. Gordon, NAACP President and CEO, Alice Huffman, California NAACP
President, Hon. Mervyn M. Dymally, Chair of the Legislative Black Caucus, and Council
member Bill Rosendahl, Advocate for Stanley Tookie Williams.
The tour is an effort to build public support for California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to grant clemency
to San Quentin death row inmate Stanley Tookie Williams.
Schwarzenegger has agreed to meet December 8 with Williams’ attorneys, Los Angeles County
prosecutors, and others involved in the case to consider whether to grant clemency but have refused to
meet with the NAACP.
The NAACP supports the Petition for Executive Clemency submitted by Williams’ legal counsel on
November 8, 2005.
Gordon said: “I am convinced that our community is best served if Stan is alive and contributing to the
guidance of our youth. He is a one-of-a-kind human asset who needs to exercise his unique ability to
touch the lives of young people.”
(more)
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Appendix J
News Releases
Page 2
“We’re not winning the war on gangs ourselves and to that end we should not execute a man who
has single handedly been able to make a positive difference in so many youth regarding gang
involvement,” commented Alice Huffman. “Williams could have opted to sit in his cell and wait for his
execution date, but he didn’t. He choose to use his life as an example for all youth and in doing so has
made a significant impact on the way many youth view gangs. We are calling on the Governor to grant
this man clemency and allow him to continue saving lives.”
“Serious concerns have been raised about whether California’s death penalty is applied in fair and
accurate manner,” stated Dymally. “A recent study shows that race is a key factor in who is sentenced
to death in California. We need to put executions on hold while our state commission investigates
these problems. For the state of California to continue to execute prisoners, while an official
governmental body investigates the findings and allegations of error and racism in the criminal justice
system, is unfair.”
“I call on the Governor to grant Mr. Williams clemency not only because I believe capital punishment is
immoral and because we know it is applied disproportionately to people of color, but because I believe
in rehabilitation,” commented Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-Oakland) via a statement. “Through
his work to end gang violence, his books for children and his Internet Project for Street Peace, Mr.
Williams has demonstrated not only that rehabilitation is possible, but the good that can come if
people are given the opportunity to turn their lives around.”
Schedule of Events
LOS ANGELES – 9 a.m. City Hall Press Conference and rally, South Park Lawn - On the 1st
Amendment Steps, 200 North Spring Street (Between Spring and Main facing 1st Street)
SAN DIEGO -- 11:00 Press Conference, City Hall
SACRAMENTO – 2 p.m. present thousands of petitions to the Governor’s office
SAN FRANCISCO – Press Conference and rally with San Francisco clergy
Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its half-million
adult and youth members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for
civil rights in their communities, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring equal opportunity in the
public and private sectors.
###
4805 Mt. Hope Drive
Baltimore, MD 21215
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
53
Appendix J
News Releases
NAACP NEWS
www.naacp.org
Bruce S. Gordon
President and CEO
Julian Bond
Chairpman, Board of Directors
For Immediate Release
November 27, 2005
NAACP Steps Up Efforts to Save Stanley Tookie Williams
California Gov. Schwarzenegger is asked to grant clemency to former gang leader who has
been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize
Bruce S. Gordon, President & CEO, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP), said today that California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger should spare the life of Stanley
Tookie Williams, who is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection on December 13. Williams, who
maintains his innocence, has been nominated five times for the Nobel Peace Prize and four times for
the Nobel Prize for Literature for his series of acclaimed children’s books.
Gordon said: “The NAACP asks Gov. Schwarzenegger to act with courage and exercise the power of
his office to grant clemency to Stanley Williams.”
Gordon said the NAACP will lead a multi-city two-week crusade to convince Schwarzenegger that
Williams should live to continue his work in helping young people make positive choices and avoid
the gang life that he once lived. Williams, a co-founder of the Crips gang, has won international and
national recognition for the 10 books he wrote urging youths to stay away from gangs.
In a series of rallies, prayer vigils and news conferences in California from San Diego to Sacramento,
the NAACP will focus public attention on the Williams case. Schwarzenegger has agreed to meet Dec.
8 with Williams’ lawyers, Los Angeles County prosecutors and others involved in the case to consider
whether to grant clemency. He has refused to meet with the NAACP.
Gordon said: “I am convinced that our community is best served if Stan is alive and contributing to the
guidance of our youth. He is a one-of-a-kind human asset who needs to exercise his unique ability to
touch the lives of young people.”
On Saturday, Gordon met privately with Williams for two-and-a half hours at the San Quentin prison
death house where he has lived since 1981. During the meeting, Gordon said Williams committed to
working with the NAACP to reach young people who might be influenced to join gangs. Gordon, who
became president of the NAACP in August, said reaching out to young people is a key priority in his
administration. “He is our new partner,” he said. “He’s our secret weapon in the fight to help young
African Americans reject gangs. Williams will have a powerful impact not just in Los Angeles, not just in
California, but throughout our nation.”
(more)
4805 Mt. Hope Drive
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Appendix J
News Releases
Page 2
Williams
The NAACP has long opposed the death penalty and has called for a moratorium on executions until
questions about the reliability and fairness of capital punishment have been answered and it is certain
that the process does not discriminate. There are documented cases that show the death penalty has
been applied differently depending on the race of the offender and the victim.
Gordon said that based upon the assessment of the NAACP legal staff; there is sufficient reason to
question Williams’ guilt. “We believe that race impacted the trial that convicted Stan and sentenced
him to death,” said Gordon. “However, at this point, the NAACP bases its support for clemency on the
value of Stan’s life to the communities the organization represents. We want to save Stan’s life so he
can save the lives of others.”
The NAACP supports the Petition for Executive Clemency submitted by Williams’ legal counsel on
November 8, 2005. Included in the petition is a quote from the late Chief Justice William Rehnquist
written in 1998:
“…the heart of executive clemency…is to grant clemency as a matter of grace, thus allowing the
executive to consider a wide range of factors not comprehended by earlier judicial proceedings and
sentencing determinations.”
Four Nobel laureates, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu, have called on Schwarzenegger to
grant clemency for Williams. “Through his work, gang truces have been mediated and long-standing
wounds have been healed. Lives have been saved,” the laureates said in a letter to the governor.
“There is no doubt in my mind that Stanley Williams merits clemency,” said Gordon.
Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its half-million
adult and youth members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for
civil rights in their communities, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring equal opportunity in the
public and private sectors.
CONTACT: NAACP Office of Communications 410.580.5125
4805 Mt. Hope Drive
Baltimore, MD 21215
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
55
Appendix J
News Releases
NAACP NEWS
www.naacp.org
Bruce S. Gordon
President and CEO
Julian Bond
Chairpman, Board of Directors
For Immediate Release
December 2, 2005
NAACP Asks California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger To Grant
Clemency To Stanley Tookie Williams
In impassioned letter to Schwarzenegger President Gordon calls for mercy for Williams
Bruce S. Gordon, President and CEO, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP) has asked California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to grant clemency to Stanley Tookie
Williams because he has “become a strong voice against gangs, violence and drugs.”
Gordon, who plans to hold events in four California cities to encourage the public to support the call for
clemency, said, “If Stanley Williams is executed, his death will have a chilling effect on the momentum
he has created around the negative impact of gangs and gang violence. If he is executed, we will
never know what future impact Stanley Williams might have had on society.”
In his letter to Schwarzenegger on November 29, Gordon said: “Stanley Williams has renounced gang
affiliation and has publicly apologized for his role in gang violence. He has become an accomplished
author, activist, and mentor and has received five Nobel Peace Prize nominations, four Nobel Prize for
Literature nominations, and the 2005 Presidential Call Service Award for his volunteer work to save
youth. Few hold these accomplishments to their credit. Most importantly, Stanley Williams has vowed
to spend the rest of his life working toward solutions to abolish gang violence.”
Moreover, Gordon said: “For nearly one hundred years, the NAACP has fought to eliminate race
prejudice and discrimination. This organization has historically recognized that prejudice, race
discrimination, and the inability to obtain adequate counsel have resulted in the disparate application
of the death penalty to African Americans.”
Gordon said: “Studies continue to show that race plays a major role in determining whether a
defendant will receive the death penalty. According to a noted study by David Baldus, blacks receive
the death penalty at a 38% higher rate than all other races. Also, studies consistently show that those
who kill whites face a greater chance of receiving the death penalty than those who kill blacks.”
In 2002, the NAACP called on President George W. Bush, governors and state legislatures to adopt a
moratorium on the death penalty until, among other things, procedures could be adopted to remedy
(more)
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Appendix J
News Releases
Page 2
these racial disparities. As result of the many issues that have been raised regarding racial disparities
and the unfair administration of the death penalty, legislation has been introduced in a number of
states to impose moratoriums or abolish the death penalty altogether.
“The Stanley Williams’ trial was not immune to these disparities,” said Gordon. “Not only were African
American citizens stripped from Stanley Williams’ jury pool, but he was likened to a Bengal Tiger
during closing arguments. These practices offend notions of judicial fairness.”
Gordon continued: “The NAACP has historically recognized the importance of the incarcerated and
the significant impact they can have on the lives of others. For over thirty years, it has worked to
establish 45 prison branches around the United States to help the incarcerated develop their voice, so
they can someday realize their potential and pour back into the community, at large. Stanley Williams
has done just that.
“America must invest its efforts into persevering Stanley Williams’ voice and the potential he has to
impact and save our youth, instead of devoting its energy into the myth that executions decrease
crime.”
In closing, Gordon said, “The NAACP respectfully requests that you exercise the mercy only you have
been entrusted with, the authority to bestow and grant Stanley Tookie Williams clemency.
“If you do not grant clemency, we ask that you issue a moratorium on the death penalty until the
California Commission on the Fair Administration of Justice has made its recommendations to you and
the Legislature, pursuant to Senate Resolution No. 44. “
Founded in 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is the nation’s
oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its half-million adult and youth members throughout the
United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities and monitor
equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.
4805 Mt. Hope Drive
Baltimore, MD 21215
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
57
Appendix J
58
News Releases
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
Where Do We
Go From Here?
Three strategies are available and will be pursued partly as continued efforts to
implement NAACP policy and partly out of a need that persists in our community.
The First Strategy Is To Ban The Death Penalty.
• The national NAACP must renew its efforts to ban the death penalty nationwide
by sponsoring legislation in every state that does away with capital punishment.
• We must educate the public on this arcane practice to increase public support
for its elimination.
The Second Strategy . . .
• We must pursue a Moratorium as an interim process while states examine the
efficacy and effectiveness of their sentencing for the purpose of eliminating the
disparities.
• We must insist that all death row inmates be given DNA testing before
execution.
• We must work with sentencing projects to discover innocent inmates on
death row.
• We must out rogue cops who set up bogus circumstantial evidence on minorities to lead to wrongful convictions.
The Third Strategy . . .
• Violence prevention is the key, therefore we must engage with the community
to eliminate it by fighting for improved life opportunities in the most depressed
communities.
• We must divert the youth in these communities from turning to gang life as an
alternative lifestyle by providing other positive choices.
• We must continue to work toward the elimination of the root causes of poverty.
The Stanley Tookie Williams Campaign to Stop Legal Killing
59
California State Conference of the NAACP
1315 I Street, Suite 200
Sacramento, California 95814
916/498-1898 Fax 916/498-1895
A Very Special Thank You to:
The writers of this report,
Catherine Henry and Alice A. Huffman
and
The printers of this report
SEIU Local 1000, CSEA
The
Stanley Tookie Williams
Campaign
To Stop Legal Killing
November to December 2005