a concurrent sessions

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a concurrent sessions
SAVE $50
on your 2007 Annual
Conference 3- or 5-day
registration fee when
you register by
October 12, 2007.
DECEMBER 1–5, 2007 H DALLAS, TEXAS
S
L CONFEREN
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| D
Imagine
AN
… their dreams, their future, and your legacy!
H
AL
T
Join us December 1-5, 2007, at NSDC's 39th Annual
9
LA
3 Conference in Dallas, at the Hilton Anatole, and imagine the impact
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GA
IM
CY
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your professional learning will have not only on the dreams and the futures of
our students but also on your legacy as an educator. NSDC honors learning where
everyone is encouraged to share knowledge—where the presenters are participants and the
participants are active learners.
Imagine a power-packed conference. Sessions have been designed specifically with you in
mind! Whether you are a first-time conference participant, a new staff developer, an expert who wants to
deepen your understanding of a topic, or a former attendee who knows what NSDC professional learning
communities have to offer, the 2007 annual conference is for you. Some of the nation's most highly regarded
speakers—Simon Bailey, Parker Palmer, Jennifer James, James Gilmore, and Sonia Nieto—will deliver provocative
keynote messages. Our Texas scholars will challenge you to think and question your craft, and our in-depth, extended sessions are sure to expand your knowledge.
Imagine an outstanding setting. Dallas—a place where artist Santiago Calatrava's skylines dare you to fly. Singer
Erykah Badu describes Dallas as the unfinished song in all of us. According to Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban,
Dallas is inhabited by “folks who dream big and dare even bigger.” And Bishop T.D. Jakes of the Potters House believes
it is a city where everyone is embraced and propelled to their highest potential. Can you imagine?
Imagine the after-learning activities. Get in touch with history: Experience the Wild West by visiting the Stockyards
in Fort Worth. Tour the Sixth Floor Museum dedicated to President John F. Kennedy. See dinosaurs at the Science
Place, a hands-on science museum that includes a planetarium and an IMAX Theater. Celebrate the holidays from a
horse-drawn carriage on the Highland Park Christmas Lights Tour. Do your once-in-a-lifetime shopping at the Dallas
Galleria. Whatever your interest, Dallas has it waiting for you.
Imagine your legacy at this conference. Year after year, NSDC's Annual Conference is considered the “must
attend” conference for the serious educator. What sets it apart is its unique culture: shared meals and celebrations, the warm welcoming of newcomers, thought-provoking sessions. This is the place where important friendships are made or renewed, where legacies are created, and where learning for all educators
is the focus.
Join us at NSDC's 39th Annual Conference. The Texas Host Committee has worked hard
to provide you with a world-class learning experience, and we invite you to Imagine ...
their dreams ... their future … and your legacy. We look forward to seeing “y'all”
in Dallas, and we invite you to live large and think big.
TH
EI
O
Y
R
E.
DR
R
EAM
TU
U
F
S. THEIR
U
R
Mark Diaz – Conference Chair
Texas Host Committee
“This was one of the best conferences I have ever
attended. The presentations were of the highest
quality with useful information.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
2
DEAR
2007 NSDC
COLLEAGUES
BOARD OF
TRUSTEES
to invite you to the 2007 Annual
suburban, and rural communities.
EN
of educators serving students in urban,
ER
President-Elect
KA R
Staff Development Council is pleased
DY
Center for
Creative
Leadership
Conference at the Anatole
This publication organizes an
you. While in Dallas, you will engage
NSDC's purpose—
with leading-edge keynote presenters,
every educator engages
in effective professional
learning every day so every student
distinguished scholars, and more than
S
M
ER
Southwest
Laboratory
Education
Development
Austin, TX
500 presenters who will lead more than
250 concurrent sessions. You will also
achieves—requires that you and thou-
be able to visit with more than 100
sands of other educators like you devel-
exhibitors offering valuable resources
op a clear vision of what such learning
to assist you in your important work.
Past President
L L IAM SO
The achievement of
M
WI
outstanding learning experience for
ON
KS
S YDNEE D
IC
Hilton Hotel in Dallas.
Greensboro, NC
Granite School
District
Salt Lake City, UT
will look like in your setting and become
Conference is a highlight of their
no matter their role, when they believe
professional year because of what they
that all students and teachers can learn
learn, the dedicated educators they
and perform at high levels, when they
meet, and the sustaining relationships
possess a deep understanding of
they build. We are confident that you will
effective professional development
come away from this event energized
practice, and when they consistently
and eager to demonstrate your new
and persistently act on these beliefs
knowledge and skills in your work and
and understandings. This conference
share what you've learned with your
will help you develop that clarity,
colleagues and stakeholders. On behalf
understanding, and skill.
of the Board of Trustees, we look
DL
GOO OE-JOH
cators can make a profound difference,
ON
NS
Seattle Public
Schools
Seattle, WA
IA
For many educators, NSDC's Annual
ON
AS
M
skillful advocates for it. Individual edu-
CHARLES
Public Schools
Mountain Brook, AL
JAME S
RO
forward to seeing you in Dallas.
Mountain Brook
SIN
US
Generative Human
Systems
Coon Rapids, MN
The conference theme, Imagine: Their
Dreams, Their Future, Your Legacy
Sincerely,
captures NSDC's focus and commitment to preparing educators for our
investment in the future: our students.
Sue McAdamis
In Dallas, you will join educators
NSDC President
throughout North America and around
Rockwood School District
the world in an exciting experience. The
Eureka, MO
SUE S
H
A
SUE M C
AD
meet represent a vibrant combination
MA
R
M
IS
The Board of Trustees of the National
O
RS
WE
Education
Consultant
Cincinnati, OH
teachers, principals, district administrators, school board members, university
professors, and intermediate and state
education agency personnel you will
3
TA B L E O F
TEXAS HOST COMMITTEE
CONTENTS
Host Committee
Chair Letter . . . . . . . . . . .2
NSDC President Letter . .3
NSDC Board of Trustees .3
Texas Host Committee . .4
Conference Planning
Committee . . . . . . . . . . .4
About NSDC . . . . . . . . . .5
Conference Overview . . .6
Keynote Speakers . . . . . .8
Texas Scholars . . . . . . . .10
Sponsors and
Exhibitors . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Conference Features . . .14
Preconference
Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Concurrent Sessions . . .34
Registration
Information . . . . . . . . .102
Conference
Registration Form . . . .103
Session Registration . .104
Hotel Information . . . .105
NSDC Membership
Options . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Topic Index . . . . . . . . . .106
Audience Index . . . . . .107
Back Row (from left)
Angelica Gaytan • Dallas ISD, Edward Chevallier • Carrollton/Farmers Branch ISD,
Terri Patterson • Waco ISD, Mark Diaz, Conference Chair • Manor ISD,
Jolene Yoakum • Houston ISD
Middle Row (from left)
Kathy Kee • Shady Shores, TX, Betty Burks • San Antonio ISD, Janet Swan • Keller ISD,
Gloria Sullivan • Austin ISD, Karen Nix • Mesquite ISD, Karen Anderson • Mesquite, TX
Front Row (from left)
Jeanette Ball • Southwest ISD, Evelyn Wagner Wright • Houston ISD, Lisa Casto • Allen ISD,
Charle Scott • Texas Staff Development Council, Luis Flores • Fort Worth ISD
Presenter Index . . . . . .108
Affiliate Contacts . . . . .110
CONFERENCE PLANNING COMMITTEE
Cathy Berlinger-Gustafson • Facilitator • Crystal Lake, IL
Fredrick Brown • Hoboken, NJ
Ingrid Carney • Boston Public Schools • Boston, MA
Mark Diaz • Manor ISD • Manor, TX
Sonia Caus Gleason • Boston, MA
Chris Guinther • Missouris NEA • Jefferson City, MO
Karen Kearney • WestEd • San Francisco, CA
Fred McCoy • Kutztown University • Kutztown, PA
4
D A L L A S 2 0 0 7 | ABOUT NSDC
A Network of Like-Minded Professionals
Improving the quality of teaching
through transformed professional
learning is the most powerful way
we can impact student learning.
NSDC PURPOSE
Every educator engages
in effective professional
learning every day so
every student achieves.
Together we can make it happen.
The National Staff Development
Council (NSDC) is the largest
non-profit membership association
committed to ensuring high levels
of learning and performance for all
students and staff members. The
NSDC community of educational
leaders is committed to professional
learning that is sustained, jobembedded, practical, and tied
directly to student achievement.
NSDC offers district staff, principals, and teacher leaders the
connections, tools, and resources
they need to infuse professional
learning with meaning and purpose
and embed it in the school day.
You can depend on NSDC for
solutions, cutting-edge strategies,
success stories, and more. Fieldtested standards, resources, and
tools are available to support your
work. Interact with and learn from
your peers through newsletters
focused on specific job roles and
responsibilities, at internationally
recognized annual conferences,
at institutes and academies, and
through online communities created
to support you in your work.
EXECUTIVE OFFICE
BUSINESS OFFICE
Stephanie Hirsh
Executive Director
[email protected]
Leslie Miller
Director of Business Services
[email protected]
Cathy Owens
Director of Learning
[email protected]
Christy Colclasure
Member Services Manager
[email protected]
Carrie Freundlich
Conference Manager
[email protected]
Niki Taylor
Affiliate and Products Manager
[email protected]
Elaine Gilbert
Presentations Manager
[email protected]
Renee Taylor
Assistant Director of Business
Services/Exhibits and Sponsors
[email protected]
Joel Reynolds
Executive Assistant
to Stephanie Hirsh,
Secretary to the Board
of Trustees
[email protected]
Stephanie Wagers
Conference Registration and
IT Solutions Manager
[email protected]
STRATEGIC INITIATIVES
CONSULTANTS
Cathy Berlinger-Gustafson
Conference Planning
[email protected]
Sue Francis
Custom-Designed Services
[email protected]
Dale Hair
Affiliate Coach
[email protected]
René Islas
Federal Policies
[email protected]
Marsha Spring
Marketing
[email protected]
Joellen Killion
Deputy Executive Director
[email protected]
Deanna Sanchez
Program Manager
[email protected]
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE
Joan Richardson
Director of Communications
[email protected]
Tracy Crow
JSD and Web Editor
[email protected]
Dennis Sparks
Emeritus Executive Director
[email protected]
Hayes Mizell
Distinguished Senior Fellow
[email protected]
5
D A L L A S 2 0 0 7 | CONFERENCE OVERVIEW
FRIDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
November 30, 2007
December 3, 2007
December 4, 2007
8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Academy Class of 2008 and
Class of 2009 Sessions
7 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Registration
7 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Registration
7 a.m. - 7:30 a.m.
Breakfast
7 a.m. - 7:30 a.m.
Breakfast
7:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
General Session 1
Keynote Address: Simon Bailey
7:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
General Session 3
Keynote Address: Jennifer James
5 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Registration
5 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Welcoming Reception
8:30 a.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Exhibits
S AT U R D AY
December 1, 2007
9 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions (A & C)
7 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Registration
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions (B & D)
8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Preconference and
Academy Sessions
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Roundtable 1
12 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Lunch
SUNDAY
December 2, 2007
12:45 p.m. - 2 p.m.
General Session 2
Keynote Address: Parker Palmer
7 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Registration
2:15 p.m .- 5:15 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions (E)
8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Preconference Sessions
2:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Session E03 Affiliate
Leaders Session
1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Exhibits Preview
3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Exhibits Grand Opening
4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Exhibitor Roundtable Sessions
5 p.m. - 6 p.m.
Academy Reception and
Academy Graduation
2:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions (F)
(A & B continued)
2:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Roundtable 2
4:45 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Exhibit Hall Reception
6 p.m. - 6:45 p.m.
First-Time Conference Goers
Orientation
6 p.m. - 7 p.m.
State and Provincial
Affiliate Receptions
6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Member Reception
8 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Exhibits
9 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions (G & I)
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions (H & J)
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Roundtable 3
12:30 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Lunch
1:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
General Session 4
Keynote Address: James Gilmore
2:45 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions (K)
2:45 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions (L)
(G & H continued)
2:45 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Roundtable 4 –
Job-Alike Conversations
5:15 p.m. - 6 p.m.
NSDC Business Meeting
WEDNESDAY
December 5, 2007
7 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Registration
7:45 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions (M)
9:45 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Brunch
General sessions provide an opportunity
to network with colleagues, participate in
NSDC celebrations, and hear stimulating
keynote speakers. Plan to attend all of them!
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
General Session 5
Keynote Address: Sonia Nieto
12 p.m. - 3 p.m.
Post Conference Sessions (P)
3 p.m.
Conference Adjourns
6
N S D C S TA N D A R D S
This year’s conference strands address NSDC’s Standards.
C O N T E X T S TA N D A R D S
I
LEARNING COMMUNITIES: Staff development that improves the learning of all students
organizes adults into learning communities whose goals are aligned with those of the school
and district.
II
LEADERSHIP: Staff development that improves the learning of all students requires skillful
school and district leaders who guide continuous instructional improvement.
III RESOURCES: Staff development that improves the learning of all students requires resources
to support adult learning and collaboration.
P R O C E S S S TA N D A R D S
IV DATA-DRIVEN: Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses disaggregated
student data to determine adult learning priorities, monitor progress, and help sustain
continuous improvement.
V
EVALUATION: Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses multiple
sources of information to guide improvement and demonstrate its impact.
VI RESEARCH-BASED: Staff development that improves the learning of all students prepares
educators to apply research to decision making.
VII DESIGN: Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses learning strategies
appropriate to the intended goal.
VIII LEARNING: Staff development that improves the learning of all students applies knowledge
about human learning and change.
IX COLLABORATION: Staff development that improves the learning of all
students provides educators with the knowledge and skills to collaborate.
C O N T E N T S TA N D A R D S
X
EQUITY: Staff development that improves the learning of all
students prepares educators to understand and appreciate all
students, create safe, orderly and supportive learning environments, and hold high expectations for their academic achievement.
XI QUALITY TEACHING: Staff development that improves the
learning of all students deepens educators’ content knowledge,
provides them with research-based instructional strategies to
assist students in meeting rigorous academic standards, and
prepares them to use various types of classroom assessments
appropriately.
XII FAMILY INVOLVEMENT: Staff development that improves the
learning of all students provides educators with knowledge and skills
to involve families and other stakeholders appropriately.
This symbol indicates an
Advanced Level Session
7
M
L
Simon Bailey is an internationallyknown speaker, author, and consultant. He teaches people how to find
their passion and release their
brilliance. He is the founder of the
Imagination Institute, an organization
dedicated to building the world's
most valuable resource – its people.
Bailey's counsel helps organizations
drive productivity and increase
employee retention. He has spoken
in South Africa, Singapore, Canada,
Brazil, and France.
In addition to his latest book,
Release Your Brilliance, he also has
authored Simon Says Dream: Live a
Passionate Life. Bailey also played an
integral role in the Disney Institute
book, Be Our Guest: Perfecting the Art
of Customer Service. His expertise in
leadership, sales, and customer
service led to senior roles with Hyatt
Hotels, the Orlando Convention and
Visitors Bureau, and the Walt Disney
Co. He graduated from Life Christian
University and earned a master's
degree from Faith Christian University.
He is also a graduate of the Rollins
College Executive Management
Program. Bailey serves on the boards
of numerous organizations, including
the Greater Orlando Leadership
Foundation, the Orlando Marine
Institute, and Florida Men of Integrity.
“I learned so much,
not only from the
presenters, but from
the other attendees.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
ES
JENNIF E
R
PA
RELEASING BRILLIANCE THROUGH
THE POWER OF THE IMAGINATION
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
M
PARKE R
SIMO N
KEYNOTE
MONDAY
MORNING
8
ER
JA
EY
BA
IL
KEYNOTE
TUESDAY
MORNING
KEYNOTE
MONDAY
AFTERNOON
THE COURAGE TO TEACH: STAFF
DEVELOPMENT THAT SUSTAINS
THE EDUCATOR'S HEART
Parker Palmer is a senior advisor to
the Fetzer Institute and founder of the
Center for Courage & Renewal, serving
teachers and education leaders nationwide. He previously served as senior
associate of the American Association
for Higher Education. He is known for
his work in education, spirituality, and
social change in institutions including
schools, community organizations,
higher education, and business corporations. His books include The Promise
of Paradox, The Company of Strangers,
To Know As We Are Known, The Active
Life, The Courage To Teach, and Let Your
Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of
Vocation. His writing has earned
numerous awards and citations and
has been translated into several
languages. His work has been cited in
The New York Times and The Chronicle
of Higher Education and on National
Public Radio. He travels extensively as
a speaker, facilitator, and retreat leader.
A Chicago native, Palmer is a
graduate of Carleton College and the
University of California at Berkeley,
where he received his doctorate in
sociology. He also holds nine honorary
doctorates and two distinguished
achievement awards. His own teaching
has been primarily in universities and
adult study programs (including Beloit
College, Georgetown University, and
Pendle Hill, a Quaker living-learning
community). In 1998, the Leadership
Project, a national survey of 10,000
educators, named him one of the 30
most influential senior leaders in higher education and one of the 10 key
agenda-setters of the past decade.
HOW TO CHANGE:
HOW TO TAKE RISKS
Jennifer James is an urban cultural
anthropologist who was a professor at
the University of Washington Medical
School before developing lectures and
corporate seminars that she presents
worldwide. She is a specialist in the
cultural elements of technological
change and marketing intelligence.
Her unique background (history, psychology, and anthropology) has made
her one of the most sought-after
speakers in the world. She works
extensively with boards and high-level
executive groups on strategic planning
and international problem solving.
James is a researcher, writer, and
commentator. She is the author of
seven books, numerous academic
articles, and has been a newspaper
columnist for The Seattle Times for
18 years. Her most recent book is
Thinking In The Future Tense, and
she is completing a new one, Cultural
Intelligence. James has filmed two
PBS specials titled, “Thinking in the
Future Tense” and “A Workout for
Your Mind.” She was chosen as the
top speaker of the year by the Young
Presidents' Organization. She is the
founder of the Committee for
Children, a nonprofit organization
that has developed curriculums
for the protection of children and
alternatives to violence. These
curriculums are taught in every
state and 37 countries.
O
TS
M
N
BRUC E
IA
SON
KEYNOTE
TUESDAY
AFTERNOON
TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE
EMERGING EXPERIENCE ECONOMY
Refer to the topic, presenter, and
audience indices on page 106–109 to
help with your selection process.
KEYNOTE
WEDNESDAY
BRUNCH
BACKUP
KEYNOTE
LEARNING FROM TEACHERS:
LESSONS FOR MEANINGFUL STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
BELL-TO-BELL AND WALL-TO-WALL
EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES: THE
FIRST TIER OF INTERVENTIONS!
Sonia Nieto is professor emeritus
of Language, Literacy, and Culture in
the School of Education, University
of Massachusetts, Amherst. She has
taught students at all levels and has
worked at the university level preparing teachers and teacher educators.
Her research focuses on multicultural
education and the education of
Latinos, immigrants, and other
students of diverse cultural and
linguistic backgrounds. Her books
include Affirming Diversity: The
Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural
Education, The Light in Their Eyes:
Creating Multicultural Learning
Communities, What Keeps Teachers
Going? and two edited volumes,
Puerto Rican Students in U.S. Schools,
and Why We Teach. She has also
published articles in Educational
Leadership and the Harvard
Educational Review.
Nieto is editor for the Language,
Culture, and Teaching Series from
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
She has served on many local,
regional, national, and international
commissions, panels and advisory
boards that focus on educational
equity for all students. Her many
awards for scholarship, advocacy,
and activism include the 2006
Enrique T. Trueba Lifetime
Achievement Award for Scholarship,
Mentorship, and Service. She has
received two honorary doctorates,
was an Annenberg Institute Senior
Fellow, and was awarded a monthlong residency at the Bellagio Center
in Italy.
Bruce Matsui works with several
districts, including the Hawaii School
District, concentrating on leadership
training and school leadership teams.
He also serves as a member of the
Programs Committee for the Japanese
American National Museum. He is
currently the principal investigator on
a study that is examining the effects
of training for principals and lead
teachers of LEARN schools in the Los
Angeles Unified School District.
Matsui also works with school leaders
of island entities in the Pacific under
the auspices of the Pacific Resources
for Educational Learning. He is especially concerned with breaking cycles
of predictable failure attributed to
poverty, gender, and race.
Matsui's work has concentrated
on the introduction of change in
public schools. He has developed an
action mapping process that serves
as an alternative to traditional
processes associated with strategic
planning. Matsui has spent 25 years
in K-12 public schools. He was most
recently deputy superintendent of the
Pasadena Unified School District.
Before that assignment, he was
director of the Los Angeles County
School Leadership Center. He also
served as a principal for 14 years in
the Montebello (CA) Unified School
District. He received his Ed.D. from
the University of Southern California.
His concentrations were in the areas
of organizational development,
leadership, and curriculum and
instruction.
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
James Gilmore is co-founder of
the Ohio-based Strategic Horizons, a
thinking studio dedicated to helping
enterprises conceive new ways of
adding value to their offerings. He is a
Batten Fellow of the Graduate School
of Business Administration and visiting lecturer at the Darden School at
the University of Virginia. His ideas
have been published in the Harvard
Business Review, Investor's Business
Daily, and The Wall Street Journal.
Gilmore is co-author of The Experience
Economy and co-editor of Markets of
One. His next book, Authenticity: The
New Consumer Sensibility, is soon to
be published.
Gilmore's favorite pedagogical
experience is teaching people to
juggle. He contends that what people
of all ages and backgrounds desire
today are neither goods nor services,
but something very different: namely
experiences that engage them in a
personal and memorable way.
Gilmore will describe the nature of
this emerging “experience economy”
and the principles for engaging learning experiences in all environments.
Gilmore attended the Wharton School
of the University of Pennsylvania.
After a career with Procter & Gamble,
he led CSC Consulting's Process
Innovation practice and later cofounded Strategic Horizons.
UI
A
I
ET
JAMES
GI
LM
E
OR
9
MONDAY
MORNING
LECTURE
YMUND P
A
WHAT DOES RESEARCH, BEST
PRACTICE, AND GOOD HORSE
SENSE TELL US ABOUT EFFECTIVE
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
COMMUNITIES?
TEXAS SCHOLARS
Shirley Hord is scholar emeritus
at the Southwest Educational
Development Laboratory in Austin,
TX, where she directed the Strategies
for Increasing Student Success
Program. She continues to monitor
the Leadership For Change Project
and support applications of the
Concerns-Based Adoption Model.
She designs and coordinates professional development activities related
to educational change, school
improvement, and school leadership.
Her early roles include elementary
school teacher and a member of the
science education faculty at the
University of Texas at Austin, where
she was later appointed co-director
of research at the Research and
Development Center for Teacher
Education. Hord has served as a
Fellow of the National Center for
Effective Schools Research and
Development, and was U.S. representative to the Foundation for the
International School Improvement
Project, helping develop research,
training, and policy initiatives to
support school improvement. In
addition to working with educators
at all levels across the United States,
Mexico, and Canada, Hord consults
in Asia, Europe, Australia, and Africa.
Her current focus is on qualitative
research, comprehensive educational
reform, and the functioning of educational organizations as professional
learning communities. Hord is the
author of numerous articles and
books.
10
ES
RE
F01
MONDAY
AFTERNOON
LECTURE
VA
D01
RE
D
RUBEN OL
I
RD
RA
SHIRL E
Y
H
O
Z
J01
TUESDAY
MORNING
LECTURE
RETHINKING COLLEGE READINESS
IN AN AGE OF GLOBALIZATION:
WHAT EDUCATORS NEED TO DO
TO PRESERVE U.S. LEADERSHIP
EDUCATIONAL REFORM AND
ACCOUNTABILITY: EMERGING
LEADERSHIP ROLES FOR STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
Raymund Paredes is the commissioner of higher education at the
Texas Higher Education Coordinating
Board. Before this role, he was vice
president for programs at the
Hispanic Scholarship Fund and
director of creativity and culture at
the Rockefeller Foundation. Before
joining the Rockefeller Foundation,
Paredes was vice chancellor of academic development at UCLA, where
he was also a professor of English. In
addition, he served as special assistant to the president of the University
of California system and was responsible for outreach efforts intended to
improve access to higher education
for students from educationally
disadvantaged communities.
Paredes currently serves on the
Board of Trustees of Mercy College of
New York and the College Board and
on the Board of Directors of the Texas
Cultural Trust. He was appointed to
the Education Commission of the
States by Texas Governor Rick Perry.
He was recently elected to membership in the Texas Philosophical Society.
He attended the University of Texas at
Austin, receiving a B.A. in English. He
served in the U.S. Army for two years,
including a 14-month tour with the
First Infantry Division in Vietnam. At
the conclusion of his military service,
he returned to the University of Texas
at Austin, where he received his Ph.D.
in American civilization.
Ruben Olivarez is a professor and
executive director of the Cooperative
Superintendency Doctoral Program at
the University of Texas at Austin. He is
also the holder of the L.D. Haskew
Centennial endowed professorial chair
in public school administration in the
Department of Educational
Administration. His professional career
spans a period of 35 years in public
education. He served as a teacher,
principal, and central office administrator in the Fort Worth, Austin, Dallas,
and San Antonio school districts. At
the Texas Education Agency, he served
as executive deputy commissioner for
school accreditation and accountability
and played a major role in the development of the state's Public School
Accountability System, which is now
a national model.
Olivarez has served in several
statewide leadership capacities as
president of the Texas Council of
Urban School Districts, officer of the
Texas School Alliance, member of the
Commissioner’s Advisory Council, and
member of the boards of the Texas
Public Schools Equity Center, and the
Texas Business Education Coalition.
He is also a member of the Advisory
Board of the American College Testing
Board. As superintendent of San
Antonio’s largest urban school district,
Olivarez was credited for successfully
leading the district through several
school restructuring initiatives. He has
been recognized for creating a vision
of excellence, attaining significant
increases in student performance,
and bringing stability to the district
governance.
N
GW
E
SERVANT LEADERSHIP:
EMPOWERING 21ST CENTURY
LEARNERS THROUGH CULTURALLY
RESPONSIVE PEDAGOGY
Texas Scholar lectures are now
offered throughout the conference.
Attend all five!
H
M01
BACK-UP
KEYNOTE
BELL-TO-BELL AND WALL-TO-WALL
EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES: THE
FIRST TIER OF INTERVENTIONS!
Bruce Matsui works with several
districts, including the Hawaii School
District, concentrating on leadership
training and school leadership teams.
He also serves as a member of the
Programs Committee for the Japanese
American National Museum. He is
currently the principal investigator on
a study that is examining the effects
of training for principals and lead
teachers of LEARN schools in the Los
Angeles Unified School District.
Matsui also works with school leaders
of island entities in the Pacific under
the auspices of the Pacific Resources
for Educational Learning. He is especially concerned with breaking cycles
of predictable failure attributed to
poverty, gender and race.
Matsui's work has concentrated
on the introduction of change in
public schools. He has developed an
action mapping process that serves
as an alternative to traditional
processes associated with strategic
planning. Matsui has spent 25 years
in K-12 public schools. He was most
recently deputy superintendent of the
Pasadena Unified School District.
Before that assignment, he was
director of the Los Angeles County
School Leadership Center. He also
served as a principal for 14 years in
the Montebello (CA) Unified School
District. He received his Ed.D. from
the University of Southern California.
His concentrations were in the areas
of organizational development,
leadership, and curriculum and
instruction.
H
I
RS
MEET NSDC’s NEW EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
Newly appointed to the role of
executive director, NSDC’s own
Stephanie Hirsh, is a scholar in her
own right. Prior to her recent appointment, she served as deputy executive
director for 18 years. She has published books and articles on topics of
educational leadership, professional
development, and school improvement. She speaks on these topics
internationally and advises federal
and state policymakers on many
issues related to education policy.
She believes that improving the
quality of teaching and leadership in
schools lies at the core of improving
student learning and this is why she is
so committed to advancing the NSDC
purpose, “Every educator engages in
effective professional learning every day
so every student achieves.”
Hirsh began her educational
career teaching Texas history in the
Richardson Independent School
District (RISD) just north of Dallas.
She has been a staff development
advisory committee member, school
district administrator, and a school
board member. Hirsh gave her first
NSDC conference presentation in
1985 on new teacher induction. While
she will not be presenting at any one
specific session, she will be available
to speak with conference participants
at the welcome reception, the firsttimers orientation, the member reception, affiliate receptions, the NSDC
business meetings and everywhere in
between. Don’t miss your opportunity
to engage in one-on-one dialogue
with NSDC’s new leader.
TEXAS SCHOLARS
Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson is an
assistant professor of educational
administration and human resource
development at Texas A&M
University. She teaches classes in
instructional leadership, epistemologies, special populations, analysis of
teaching behavior, curriculum development, and multicultural education.
She spent seven years at the
University of Texas at Austin in the
Department of Special Education.
Webb-Johnson has served as an
educator for 32 years and has been
teaching teachers for the past 17 years.
Webb-Johnson's research interests
include culturally responsive leadership, pedagogy, and teacher development; the disproportionate representation of African-American learners in
special education; the empowerment
of families in the school context; and
culturally responsive and effective
classroom management designed to
improve educational outcomes. She
conducts workshops for school
boards, administrators and other
school-based staff, diagnosticians,
and community organizations.
I
S TEPHAN IE
TUESDAY
MORNING
SPECIAL
GUEST
LECTURE
11:00 a.m.
M
J02
AT
SU
BRUCE
LYN WEBB-JO
HN
DO
N
SO
11
DALLAS 2007 | SPONSORS & EXHIBITORS
SPONSORS (as of June 1, 2007)
EXHIBITORS (as of June 1, 2007)
P L AT I N U M
ABA Educational Art
New Teacher Center @ UCSC
School
Improvement
Network
Solution Tree
Alchemy Systems
Ontario Principal’s Council
Allyn & Bacon/Merrill
Professional
Pacific Learning
PBS TeacherLine
Begin with the Brain
Performance Learning Systems
Benchmark Education
The Bob Pike Group
GOLD
Borenson and Associates, Inc.
The College Board
Microsoft Partners
in Learning
Character Counts!
Corwin Press
CRS Incorporated
Education Illustrated
S I LV E R
eduphoria!
Performance
Learning Systems
Everything She Wants
BRONZE
Exemplars
Compass Learning
New Teacher Center
at UCSC
Voyager Expanded Learning
Walsh, Anderson, Brown,
Schulze, & Aldridge, P.C.
Eye On Education
S TA R
eMBEDDED LEARNING
Wavelength
E
eMBEDDED LEARNING
N
RE
C E F E AT U R
E
12
NEW C
ON
Renaissance Learning
Rigby•Saxon•Steck•Vaughn
Rosetta Stone
SAIL for Education
Scarf King
School Improvement Network
SEDL
Shell Educational Publishing
Shurley Instructional Materials,
Inc.
The Gallup Organization
Software Solutions Pro Developers of Simply Powerful
Software
The Great Books Foundation
Solution Tree
Harcourt School Publishers
TeachFirst, Inc.
IDE Corp.
TheTeachersCorner.com
IRIS Media, Inc.
True North Logic
Just ASK Publications and
Professional Development
University Alliance
Ventures for Excellence
Kagan Publishing and
Professional Development
Marilyn Burns Education
Associates
F
Exhibitor
Roundtable Sessions
Sunday 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Reserve time in your schedule
to take advantage of this
special opportunity to visit
with exhibitors in a sessionstyle setting.
The Pin Man - PositivePins.com
The Math Learning Center
My Learning Plan
National Humanities Center
National Institute for
Community Innovations
Wavelength
WestEd
Whaley Gradebook Co., Inc
Wiley
13
D A L L A S 2 0 0 7 | C O N F E R E N C E F E AT U R E S
REGISTRATION AND FEES
Individuals may register for
preconference, regular conference,
and post-conference programs.
Conference fees are set for:
• One-day preconference program
or one day of the regular conference program.
• A two-day preconference program.
• A three-day regular conference
program.
• A full five-day registration package
that includes both preconference
days and the three-day program
through Wednesday noon.
• A one-day Wednesday only registration that entitles participants
to select morning and postconference sessions. (All other
attendees must pay an additional
$25.00 for the post-conference.)
• Post conference can be added to a
three-day or five-day registration.
Special pointers are indicated throughout
the 2007 Conference Program. Please read
through all the recommendations before
you finalize your conference plans.
MEALS AND RECEPTIONS
Individuals who register for a
preconference program are invited
to the Friday reception and will
receive a morning break and lunch.
Individuals who register for the
three-day regular conference
program may attend the Sunday
reception, Exhibit Hall and Affiliate
receptions on Monday evening,
breakfast and lunch on Monday and
Tuesday, and brunch on Wednesday.
Conference meals are purposely
selected to support a variety of
dietary needs and preferences.
14
FIRST-TIMER ORIENTATION
First-time conference goers will
want to attend a special session at 6
p.m. Sunday with Executive Director
Stephanie Hirsh, President Sue
McAdamis, and Host Committee
Chair Mark Diaz. They will share
exciting information on NSDC
goals, member benefits, and tips
on how to get the most from the
conference. They will then escort
first-timers to the NSDC member
reception.
GENERAL SESSIONS AND
KEYNOTE PRESENTERS
General sessions begin after breakfast on Monday and Tuesday, lunch
on Monday and Tuesday, and
brunch on Wednesday. General
sessions feature NSDC leaders,
special guests, and student performances. Keynote speakers address
the audience at the conclusion of
each general session. NSDC allows
approximately 45 minutes for meal
service. Meals will not be served
once the general session has begun.
NSDC has a long-held tradition in
which participants eat meals together in the spirit of camaraderie and
networking. We encourage you to
come to each general session and
sit with different people each time.
TEXAS SCHOLARS
Texas Scholar Lectures feature
selected local leaders in the field
of professional development, school
improvement, Texas education, and
other areas of interest. One hour
lectures are scheduled throughout
the conference so that attendees
have the option of attending all of
them.
EXPERT TRACK
Check one box on the Session
Registration page and you will be
scheduled for all Keynote Q and A
sessions, Texas Scholar Lectures,
and the Back-up Keynote. This
advanced track is recommended for
attendees who prefer lecture-style
learning.
BEGINNER STAFF DEVELOPER
LEARNING COMMUNITY
Register for Session A01 to participate in NSDC's Beginner Staff
Developer's Learning Community.
Session A01 participants meet
together all day Monday and
Tuesday. Special facilitation by
select national leaders will provide
a unique learning experience for the
beginners in this session.
ROUNDTABLES
NSDC has selected 100 programs to
feature in roundtable presentation
formats. By selecting a roundtable
program, conference attendees may
choose two 45-minute presentations
to attend and also gather informational material from other roundtable presenters. The roundtable
option provides access to several
programs in a short time period.
POST-CONFERENCE SESSIONS
NSDC is offering specially selected
three-hour sessions after the final
general session on Wednesday.
This is available to attendees who
register for the Wednesday one-day
regular conference and also to those
three-day or five-day registrants who
choose the Wednesday post-conference for an additional $25.
15
100
S AT U R D AY P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S
December 1, 2007 – 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
PC101 USING DATA AT 54TH STREET SCHOOL IN LOS ANGELES
How do you change the culture in a school where there is tension? What changes have to be made for schools
to be truly collaborative? Looking at and analyzing data is a first step, but improving instruction is essential.
How do you help students who are below level in reading? Engage in participant-centered activities to find the
answers to these questions and more.
Participants will be able to:
• Implement instructional change to help students reading below grade level.
• Apply key strategies of the Using Data Project.
• Articulate a plan for addressing challenges in their system and schools.
Aminata Umoja, Decatur, GA, [email protected]
Aminata Umoja has been an educator for more than 25 years. She has taught for both the Los Angeles Unified School
District and the Atlanta Public Schools. Umoja became a model teacher leader facilitator for the Atlanta Systemic Initiative.
She was responsible for professional development in the areas of science, mathematics, and technology. Today, she conducts professional development sessions on equity, professional learning communities, kit-based inquiry science, reading
and writing in science and mathematics, school culture, and effective pedagogy.
PC102 NSDC'S STANDARDS FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT: CHALLENGING OUR PRACTICE
Eighteen national associations and organizations collaborated with NSDC to develop and validate a revised set
of standards to guide the planning, implementation, and evaluation of staff development. These organizations
agreed that the standards are essential to accomplish the goals of increased student achievement. Participants
will learn about the research supporting the standards and discuss how to use them to strengthen schools and
student learning. Participants are required to purchase a copy of NSDC's Standards for Staff Development Revised
(NSDC, 2001) for $12. Books will be distributed at the session.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the purpose and rationale for the NSDC standards.
• Identify organizational supports and challenges related to implementation of the standards.
• Utilize the self-assessment instrument to guide the planning and improvement of comprehensive staff
development programs.
Patricia Roy, Chandler, AZ, [email protected]
Pat Roy is founding director of the Delaware Professional Development Center, which focuses on school improvement and
effective professional development for student achievement. She has authored many articles and chapters on cooperative
learning, effective professional development, and school improvement. Most recently, she wrote a training manual for
NSDC's Standards and earlier co-authored, with Shirley Hord, Moving the NSDC Standards into Practice: Innovation
Configurations. Roy writes a monthly column on standards for two NSDC newsletters, The Learning Principal and The
Learning System.
PC103 STARTING WHERE IT STARTS - THE CLASSROOM: THE LIGHTHOUSE PROJECT
Learn about a school reform design that starts in the classroom with the support of leaders. This design is
based on several key assumptions: Only a teacher in the classroom can assure that all students can learn, all
students can learn only when the teacher has the capacity to teach all students, and the actions of leaders must
be focused on supporting and improving what takes place inside the walls of a classroom.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the processes and results from work at three high schools, one middle school, and two
elementary schools.
• Reclaim the professional niche related to the efficacy of research-driven practices.
• Explain the design features of the work with schools in the Lighthouse Project.
• Apply design features and templates from work with schools.
Bruce Matsui, Claremont University, Claremont, CA, [email protected]
Bruce Matsui is professor and executive director of the Institute at Indian Hill at Claremont Graduate University. He works
with several districts on leadership development. He has developed a process he calls “action mapping” that can serve as
an alternative to traditional processes associated with strategic planning. Matsui has spent 25 years in K-12 public
schools. He was most recently the deputy superintendent of the Pasadena Unified School District. Prior to that he was
director of the Los Angeles County School Leadership Center. In addition, Matsui served as a principal for 14 years in the
16
Montebello Unified School District.
100
P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S S AT U R D AY
8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. – December 1, 2007
PC104
PRACTICAL TOOLS FOR CHANGING THE CONVERSATIONS IN SCHOOLS
As educators, we have an imperative to develop prepared, productive citizens for a global society. What does
this mean and how do we do it? What conversations do we need to have, and how do we structure them so
they are engaging and meaningful? Learn to balance discussions about unfunded mandates, standardized test
scores, and what is not working with conversations about 21st century capabilities, promising practices, and
possibilities that push our thinking and require courage.
Participants will be able to:
• Apply practical strategies for shifting the conversation in schools and school districts.
• Engage in authentic conversations and select appropriate tools for application in their own settings.
• Facilitate ambitious conversations characterized by systems' focus, a forward-looking attitude, respect,
and a focus on possibility rather than despair.
• Foster people’s ability to think critically.
Nancy Aronson, Malvern, PA, [email protected]
Nancy Aronson is an independent consultant and partner in Arsht/Aronson. Her work uses collaborative methods to assist
organizations and communities facing complex issues. She is co-developer of the System Coherence Framework for
Change Leadership and contributing author to Future Search in School District Change: Community, Connection, and Results
and the Handbook of Large Group Methods.
Chris Kingsbery, Bryn Mawr, PA, [email protected]
Chris Kingsbery has worked in education for 25 years. Her experience spans the K-16 spectrum, working with both
students and colleagues. Kingsbery has worked in public, private, and charter schools. She is certified in Future Search,
Appreciative Inquiry, and Open Space Technology strategies. She also works as a capacity coach in a public technical
high school, as a product implementation coach in a charter elementary school, and as a literacy mentor in a statewide
high school coaching initiative. Kingsbery is also an adjunct professor at Rosemont College and Lehigh University, where
she works with aspiring school leaders.
PC105
STRATEGIES AND TOOLS FOR LEADING ADAPTIVE, COMPLEX CHANGE
Are you prepared to launch an in-depth improvement initiative in your school, district, or organization? Explore
a range of change models that inform the work of educators who are leading systemic improvement efforts.
Examine predictable stages associated with deliberate, comprehensive change. Deepen your understanding of
how the tension between desired future and current reality can fuel creative momentum. Practice and leave with
a set of practical tools and strategies for proceeding along a path of highly effective transformative change
leadership.
Participants will be able to:
• Explain Robert Fritz’s theory of structural tension.
• Describe various change models.
• Examine stages in large-scale improvement processes.
• Utilize tools and strategies for understanding, planning, facilitating, managing, and sustaining
transformational change.
Cindy Tucker, Fresno Unified School District, Fresno, CA, [email protected]
Cindy Tucker has been an educator for 35 years. Currently she is an associate superintendent for the Fresno Unified School
District. Her primary focus is improving student achievement with special attention to English language learners and
special education students. Previously, Tucker was director of curriculum and professional learning for Elk Grove Unified
School District, statewide director of program development and field support for WestEd, director and regional director of
Sonoma County Office of Education and a classroom teacher, vice principal, and principal.
“I like the preconference because it provides an opportunity
to delve more deeply into an area of interest.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
17
100
S AT U R D AY P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S
December 1, 2007 – 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
PC106 PROMOTE QUALITY TEACHING AND STUDENT LEARNING
THROUGH EQUITABLE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
Discover what students need to know, what teachers need to know and do, and what administrative leaders
need to know and do to create equitable learning environments for all. Consider how organizational leaders
embrace a candid look at structures and practices that impede or promote equitable learning. Examine how
principals focus at the classroom level to assess the quality of teaching and at the student level to assess the
quality of the experiences, relationships, and perceptions that impede or promote equitable learning for all.
Participants will be able to:
• Discuss the research that addresses the practices and importance of equitable learning environments.
• Utilize protocols at an organizational, instructional, and student level to identify strengths and weaknesses
of learning environments.
• Apply strategies that enable educators to gain perspectives and structure learning and actions that impact
the learning of others.
• Develop action steps for creating learning environments with enhanced learning for all students, teachers,
and school leaders.
Deborah Childs-Bowen, Samford University, Decatur, GA, [email protected]
Deborah Childs-Bowen is the director of the Institute for Teaching and Student Achievement in the School of Education at
Samford University in Birmingham, AL. Her areas of specialization include school organizational design, curriculum and
program implementation, evaluation, and professional development for teachers and administrators. Childs-Bowen has
been involved in long-term school improvement projects nationwide and has been a leader in pushing professional learning experiences and research that advance teaching quality, particularly in urban settings. She is an active member of
Marzano's cadre of professional developers. Childs-Bowen is a former academy mentor, conference presenter, member of
the NSDC board of trustees, and president of the National Staff Development Council.
PC107 BLENDED COACHING: SKILLS AND STRATEGIES TO SUPPORT PRINCIPAL DEVELOPMENT
Two insights have converged in today’s education discourse: School improvement cannot occur without effective site leadership, and coaching is an essential element in the professional development of school leaders.
Learn about the New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz's design for school leadership
coaching and induction. Become familiar with the school leadership-coaching model called Blended Coaching.
Review the key components of a comprehensive principal induction model.
Participants will be able to:
• Discuss principal development in relation to adult learning and leadership coaching.
• Describe and use the components of the Blended Coaching model for leadership professional development.
• Apply many of the components of a principal induction program, including coaching, curriculum, and
formative assessment.
Participants are required to purchase a copy of Blended Coaching: Skills and Strategies to Support Principal
Development (Corwin Press, 2005) for $20.
Gary Bloom, New Teacher Center, UCSC, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected] ucsc.edu
Gary Bloom is associate director of the New Teacher Center at University of California, Santa Cruz. Gary has 23 years of K-12
experience, having served as a bilingual teacher, principal, and superintendent. Bloom has consulted and presented
throughout the United States and in Latin America. He supports a number of school districts and states through coaching-based leadership induction programs and principal development. He is lead author of Blended Coaching: Skills and
Strategies for Principal Development, and is editor of The Peer Assistance and Review Reader.
PC108 INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP INSIDE A SYSTEM OF TWO-WAY ACCOUNTABILITY
Driven by Superintendent Melody Johnson’s belief that principals must function as instructional leaders if
student achievement is to improve, the Fort Worth Independent School District and the Institute for Learning
have collaborated for three years. The district's two-way accountability structure engages each principal in a
series of Institute-led learning situations drawn from the Institute's instructional leadership curriculum. Learn
how these work sessions help principals get smarter about teaching and learning. Consider the premise of the
18
100
P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S S AT U R D AY
8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. – December 1, 2007
PC108
two-way accountability structure that if the district requires principals to act in certain ways, then the district
must provide the principals with the resources and support they need to act that way.
(continued)
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the broad dimensions of the Instructional Leadership Curriculum.
• Engage as learners in modules drawn from the curriculum.
• Unpack the characteristics of powerful professional development for practicing principals.
• Critique the two-way accountability system as it is designed and enacted within the Fort Worth ISD.
• Engage in interactive planning to implement similar work in their own work situations.
Melody Johnson, Fort Worth Independent School District, Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Melody Johnson is superintendent of the Fort Worth Independent School District. Previously she served as superintendent
of schools in Providence, RI, senior director at the Texas Education Agency, and in various positions in school districts
across Texas, which is where she began her strong record of success in closing the achievement gap and improving
achievement scores for underprivileged students. Johnson applies the lessons learned from her work with the Institute for
Learning in her staff development with Fort Worth principals.
Judy Johnston, Institute for Learning, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, [email protected]
Judy Johnston specializes in professional development and school leadership. She founded and has served as the only director of the Schenley High School Teacher Center in Pittsburgh. This teacher center is regarded as the vanguard of the
teacher professionalism movement and has been recognized as an Exemplary Staff Development Program by the
American Association of School Administrators and the National Staff Development Council. Johnston was principal
of Taylor Allderdice High School in Pittsburgh, a recipient of the 1996 Blue Ribbon for Excellence Award from the U.S.
Department of Education. In August 1996, she joined the Institute for Learning at the Learning Research and Development
Center, University of Pittsburgh.
PC109
GETTING RESULTS FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS – USING BREAKING RANKS II
TO IMPROVE YOUR SCHOOL
Help ensure your success as a high school leader by improving student performance through the strategies,
recommendations, and tools in Breaking Ranks II: Strategies for Leading High School Reform. Consider a variety
of factors that contribute to effective change and how these factors impact successful initiatives. Learn to use
Breaking Ranks II tools and resources to identify entry points for Breaking Ranks II implementation. Engage in
meaningful conversation about approaches principals and leadership teams have taken to implement high
school reform initiatives to improve student learning. Participants are required to purchase a copy of Breaking
Ranks II: Strategies for Leading High School Reform (NASSP, 2004) for $15. Books will be distributed at the session.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the three core areas and seven cornerstone strategies in Breaking Ranks II and apply them to
improve student performance in your school.
• Utilize strategies and tools provided in Breaking Ranks II to determine entry points for a school community
to successfully begin school improvement initiatives.
• Use targeted professional development as a tool for improved student performance.
• Apply relationship-building strategies that serve as the basis for networking and support essential to
beginning Breaking Ranks II initiatives.
Judith Richardson, National Association for Secondary School Principals, Reston, VA, [email protected]
Judith Richardson is associate director for school improvement for the National Association of Secondary School Principals.
Previously Richardson was an urban secondary principal in the District of Columbia Public Schools, where she also served
as a central office administrator, high school principal, principal mentor, assistant principal, program director, mathematics chairperson, and teacher. She guided school improvement monitoring instruction, targeted staff development, used
disaggregated standardized test data in program design, and initiated business and university partnerships. Currently,
Richardson works with principals and school leaders to demonstrate how standards and curriculum, skills inventories, school
and community statistics, student assessments, and employment data can support and drive successful school change
based on recommendations from Breaking Ranks II and Breaking Ranks in the Middle.
Tom Evans, Randallstown High School, Randallstown, MD, [email protected]
Tom Evans has spent the majority of his 39 years in education as a secondary principal. Currently, he is principal at
Randallstown High School in Randallstown, MD. Previously, Evans served for two years as director of schools in the Kansas
City, Missouri School District. Additionally, Evans is a trainer in the Assessment Center Project for the National Association of
Secondary School Principals as well as Breaking Ranks II and Breaking Ranks in the Middle.
19
200
S U N D AY P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S
December 2, 2007 – 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
PC201 ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS:
PATHWAYS TO ACADEMIC LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Over the last decade, more and more English language learners with diverse languages, cultures, and educational experiences have walked through school doors. Standards have continued to anchor teaching and
learning, and the introduction of English language proficiency standards has been accompanied by increased
accountability for this group of students. Learn about PreK-12 English Language Proficiency Standards (2006),
a publication of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages which is a response to the language
demands second language learners face every day in their classrooms.
Participants will be able to:
• Differentiate academic language proficiency from academic achievement.
• Describe the principles and rationale for the development of the standards.
• Discuss the national English language proficiency standards and their components.
• Begin the implementation process for the standards.
• Facilitate collaboration strategies for teachers working with English language learners.
Margo Gottlieb, Northfield,IL, [email protected]
Margo Gottlieb is a specialist in the design of assessment systems for English language learners, evaluation of language
]education programs, and development of English language proficiency standards. She began her career as a teacher and
is currently director of assessment and evaluation for the Illinois Resource Center and lead developer for the World-Class
Instructional Design and Assessment Consortium. Gottlieb serves on numerous expert panels and consults with the federal government, states, national organizations, publishers, and schools districts. Her latest books include Assessment and
Accountability in Language Education Programs: A Guide for Teachers and Administrators (2007), with Diep Nguyen, and
Assessing English Language Learners: Bridges From Language Proficiency to Academic Achievement (2006).
PC202 TRANSLATING NSDC’s STAFF DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS INTO ACTION: INNOVATION CONFIGURATIONS
The NSDC standards for staff development drew a line in the sand - stating not all professional development is
effective professional development. Reading about the purpose and rationale that undergird the standards is
only the first step in creating professional development that impacts student learning. Translating those standards into daily practice is essential, and the ICs can help accomplish that goal. Consider what the standards
translated into action look like for teachers, principals, central office personnel, superintendents, school board
members and more. Learn to use the Innovation Configurations to change and improve local professional
development programs. Participants must be familiar with NSDC’s standards and are required to purchase a
copy of Moving NSDC's Staff Development Standards Into Practice: Innovation Configurations, Volume 1 for $24.
Books will be distributed at the session.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the purpose of an Innovation Configuration map.
• Explain the multiple uses of an Innovation Configuration in the development of a comprehensive
standards-based professional development program.
• Use the Innovation Configurations to influence change and improvement of local professional
development programs.
Patricia Roy, Chandler, AZ, [email protected]
Pat Roy is founding director of the Delaware Professional Development Center, which focuses on school improvement and
effective professional development for student achievement. She has authored many articles and chapters on cooperative
learning, effective professional development, and school improvement. Most recently, she wrote a training manual for
NSDC's Standards and earlier co-authored, with Shirley Hord, Moving the NSDC Standards into Practice: Innovation
Configurations. Roy writes a monthly column on standards for two NSDC newsletters, The Learning Principal and The
Learning System.
PC203 USING DATA AS A CATALYST TO DIALOGUE ABOUT RACE, CLASS, AND CULTURE
Engaging with disaggregated student learning data provides a rich opportunity for initiating powerful dialogue
around the issues of race, class, and culture, which allows us to examine tacit assumptions about diverse
students and their potential. Learn how to mine the data that will provide this opportunity by applying a
cultural proficiency lens to data analysis, engaging in data-driven dialogue, and shifting conversations from
blame to collective responsibility.
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P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S S U N D AY
8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. – December 2, 2007
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the cultural proficiency continuum and its application to data analysis.
• Use tools for facilitating dialogue about data, race, class, and culture.
• Apply a process for engaging in data-driven dialogue, surfacing assumptions that underlie data interpretations.
• Implement a structured process for verifying causes of student learning problems using local data
and research.
• Use these tools and concepts as appropriate in their work settings.
PC203
(continued)
Nancy Love, Using Data Project, TERC, Cambridge, MA, [email protected]
Nancy Love is director of the Using Data Project at TERC, in Cambridge, MA, where she works with schools nationwide to
improve teaching and learning through effective and collaborative use of multiple sources of school data. She is author of
Using Data/Getting Results: A Practical Guide to School Improvement in Mathematics and Science and several articles on the
process of data-driven decision-making. Love consults with schools to implement the process of collaborative inquiry,
design effective professional development, and establish high-performing cultures. In 2006, Love was the recipient of
NSDC's Susan Loucks-Horsely Award.
Brenda Campbell Jones, CampbellJones & Associates, Ellicott City, MD, [email protected]
Brenda Campbell Jones is president of Campbell Jones & Associates. She has served as an area superintendent of a large
urban school district, executive director of one of Azusa Pacific University's regional campuses, and executive director of
the California Leadership Academy. She provides staff development and technical assistance to school districts throughout
the United States. Through the lens of cultural proficiency, she coaches and facilitates the change process in school districts that are making systemic changes for academic achievement. Campbell Jones has served students as a teacher, an
elementary principal, and as an award-winning middle school principal.
Franklin Jones, CampbellJones & Associates, Ellicott City, MO, [email protected]
Franklin Campbell Jones is vice president of Campbell Jones & Associates. As a facilitator of organization learning and
cultural diversity, he has addressed audiences in Thailand, China, Guam, Costa Rica, and Canada. Additionally, he works
directly with schools and districts throughout the United States to help them meet the academic and social needs of all
students. Previously Campbell Jones served as a high school social science and reading teacher, school administrator,
district office director, state director for the California School Leadership Academy, and university professor. He is co-author
of The Culturally Proficient School: An Implementation Guide for School.
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY: SEE IT, HEAR IT, AND EXPERIENCE IT
Interested in seeing an example of the NSDC standard, Learning Communities, in action? Study a school
that, for the past 10 years, has been diligently building communities within its classrooms and school while
orchestrating tremendous faculty and parent involvement. Discover the J. Erik Jonsson Community School, a
low-income, urban, laboratory, PreK-5 community school in Dallas and hear from the principal and teachers
how they develop faculty collaboration and involvement from purposeful learning teams. See how Jonsson
has developed unique relationships with the nearby colleges and universities to provide a real laboratory for
innovation and practice.
Note: In addition to the Sunday session, participants will visit Jonsson Community School Monday morning,
departing the conference headquarters on a charter bus and returning to the conference at 11:30 a.m.
PC204
Participants will be able to:
• Discuss the unique principles that guide the continuous improvement of the Jonsson Community School.
• Describe brain-based instruction that evolves from teachers' deep commitment to powerful teaching and
strong relationships.
• Apply insights from materials shared about the purposeful way the school leadership developed faculty
learning teams, curriculum, and student intervention strategies.
• Tour the school and experience a true community of learners among educators, students, parents, and
teachers.
Mike Murphy, Salesmanship Club Youth and Family Centers, Dallas, TX, [email protected]
Mike Murphy is director of education and professional learning for the Salesmanship Club Youth and Family Centers in
Dallas with responsibility for the J. Erik Jonsson Community School and the Institute for Excellence in Urban Education.
Murphy's earlier experiences include director of product research and development for Westmark Systems and executive
director of the Principal Assessment and Action Center for the Dallas Independent School District. In addition, he has
served as a teacher, principal, assistant superintendent for curriculum, planning, and research, and interim superintendent.
Murphy was executive lecturer for the University of North Texas and taught graduate-level courses in instructional leadership and
effective curriculum and instruction. He served as director of programs for the National Staff Development Council between 1999-2003.
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S U N D AY P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S
December 2, 2007 – 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
PC205 CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP BY ELIMINATING THE INSTRUCTIONAL GAP
Over the past 10 years, education reformers have focused on developing and refining high-quality academic
standards, aligning standards-based assessments, and implementing core curricula. In spite of hard work by
committed educators, progress toward closing the achievement gap has been disappointingly slow. A primary
reason for the gap in achievement between students of color, students from low-income families and their more
affluent peers, is the instructional gap. It is the gap between what students must learn to attain proficiency and
what they are actually taught on a day-to-day basis. Become acquainted with the Standards-in-Practice Gap
Analysis process and how it closes the instructional gap by ensuring that teachers' assignments are aligned with
standards and assessments.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the information gap and identify strategies to close the instructional gap.
• Discuss how the six steps provide a framework for professional dialogue through which participants
uncover the information gap and develop targeted instructional intervention.
• Analyze classroom assignments against standards and assessments.
• Use the Standards-in-Practice gap analysis process.
Stephanie G. Robinson, Education Trust, Washington, DC, [email protected]
Stephanie Robinson, senior adviser at the Education Trust, has worked with communities for more than 30 years to ensure
that all students reach high standards. Previously, she was a teacher, administrator, and deputy superintendent, and the
education director for the National Urban League. While at the Urban League she designed and implemented the
National Education Initiative. Today, Robinson provides technical assistance to school districts implementing standardsbased reform.
Shana Kennedy, Education Trust, Washington, DC, [email protected]
Shana Kennedy is a senior associate at the Education Trust, where she works with teachers on the implementation of
Standards in Practice. Her publications include Primary Progress, Secondary Challenge: A State-By-State Look At Student
Achievement Patterns and An Analysis of Florida's Voluntary Pre-K Program. Prior to joining the Education Trust, Kennedy
was an early childhood educator and an organizer of professional development.
PC206 THE SKILLFUL PRINCIPAL
It is one thing to know the practices and structures of a successful school (e.g., a common vision of good
teaching, use of data to focus on student results) and another to mobilize staff commitment and capacity to
make them operate well. Principals need the skills, interpersonal and technical, to build robust communication
and decision-making environments. These need to be supplemented by political skills so that the pace and
scope of improvement efforts are appropriate but continuous. Review the knowledge and skills of successful
principals and the learning experiences that have been crafted over the past two decades by many principals’
institutes across the country.
Participants will be able to:
• Explain why school leaders need courage, knowledge, and skill to handle the disruption and challenge
of large-scale improvement efforts.
• Apply strategies to assist principals to develop emotional intelligence and knowledge for handling
communication and managing change.
• Practice formats and exercises for developing these and other related skills.
• Form a map for the comprehensive development of principals' knowledge and skills.
Jonathon Saphier, Research for Better Teaching, Acton, MA, [email protected]
Jon Saphier is the founder and president of Research for Better Teaching Inc., an educational consulting organization in
Acton, MA that is dedicated to the professional development of teaching and leadership. He is also the founder and chairman emeritus of Teachers 21. In 2001, Saphier became a member of the core faculty of the certification program for aspiring urban principals sponsored by New Leaders for New Schools (NLNS) and provided a course and site visits for the
NLNS resident principals on observing and supervising teaching. He provides the same services annually to the
Philadelphia Leadership Academy. He is the author of The Skillful Teacher, now in its sixth edition.
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P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S S U N D AY
8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. – December 2, 2007
PC207
GATHERING EVIDENCE ON THE EFFECTS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
In this age of accountability, professional development leaders must show that what they do makes a difference.
Stakeholders at all levels want to know if investments in professional development truly result in improvement
in the practices of educators and, ultimately, in the performance of students. Explore factors that contribute to
the effectiveness of professional development and the various levels of professional development evaluation.
Consider the use and appropriate application of these levels, along with procedures for establishing reliable
indicators of success during professional development planning.
Participants will be able to:
• Identify procedures for applying change research findings to professional development design and
implementation.
• Gather quantitative and qualitative evidence on effects of professional development.
• Present evidence to key stakeholders in meaningful ways.
Thomas Guskey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, [email protected]
Tom Guskey, professor of educational policy studies and evaluation at the University of Kentucky, is well known for his work
in professional development and educational change. Previously, he served as director of research and development for the
Chicago Public Schools, director of the Center for the Improvement of Teaching and Learning, and faculty member of
University of Chicago's renowned Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistical Analysis (MESA) Program. At the University of
Kentucky, Guskey served as special assistant to the chancellor, department chair, faculty council president, and director of
the Office of Educational Research and Development. He has served as consultant to educators and educational organizations throughout the United States as well as in Africa, Asia, Australia, and Europe. Guskey is a several-time author of NSDC's
Book of the Year Award and Article of the Year.
PC208
WORKING FROM THE INSIDE OUT FOR TRANSFORMATIONAL EQUITY
Learn how the Boulder Valley School District staff openly discusses equity issues in a positive way that
impacts student achievement. Examine the conversations that serve as the foundation for facing issues of
racism, classism, language, other “isms” and inequities that are part of the daily routine within many public
school systems. Learn about the role of BVSD equity leaders and trainers who facilitate ongoing professional
explorations of vital equity issues from understanding the “isms” to school improvement and
teacher inquiry.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe why BVSD has been recognized for its commitment to equity.
• Learn to implement a similarly effective model for addressing these issues.
• Describe equity structures impacting policies, procedures, practices, and people.
• Discuss the benefits to a district that talks about issues of equity and diversity at the individual
and institutional levels.
• Learn how to replicate this model in another setting.
Pam Duran, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO, [email protected]
Pam Duran is director of the Institutional Equity and Multicultural Education Department for the Boulder Valley Public
Schools in Colorado. She received a master's in early childhood special education with endorsements in ESL, elementary
education, and early childhood education. Duran has been an educator for 33 years, and for the last 10 she has focused
on addressing issues of equity and diversity and their relationships to student achievement. Her work in the field of equity has been acknowledged in National Staff Development Council newsletters and JSD.
Catalina Martis, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO, [email protected]
Catalina Martis has been a teacher in Boulder Valley Public Schools for the last 17 years. She has taught first grade, second
grade, fifth grade, Title I, and ESL. During this time she has served in several teacher leadership roles. She helped develop a
teacher assistance program that provided mentoring to new teachers. Recently, she coordinated services for six Title I
schools. Catalina also provides staff development in cultural proficiency, racism, and poverty through the district's equity
department.
Judy Skupa, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO, [email protected]
Judy Skupa is assistant superintendent for learning services in the Boulder Valley School District. She holds a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from the University of Texas at Austin. Over the past 25 years, Skupa has been a classroom teacher,
reading specialist, central office administrator, and college instructor.
Sandy Ripplinger, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO, [email protected]
Sandy Ripplinger is the director of elementary school leadership in the Boulder Valley School District. Before moving into
her current central office position, Ripplinger served as a teacher and a principal at the elementary and K-8 levels for 17
years.
Lisa Cech, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO, [email protected]
Lisa Cech is the coordinator for Safe and Drug Free Schools in Boulder Valley School District. She is a former teacher, counselor, and coach. Additionally, she has been on the district's equity cohort leadership team for five years, training teachers
and administrators on cultural competence.
Alejandra Sotiros, Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO, [email protected]
Alejandra Sotiros is assistant principal at Boulder High School for the Boulder Valley Public Schools in Colorado. She has
worked 18 years at the elementary level as a bilingual teacher and a literacy and language support services coordinator. She
has also been a consultant for local, statewide, and national organizations in the areas of second language learners and literacy.
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S U N D AY P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S
December 2, 2007 – 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
PC209 CREATING RESILIENT IMPROVEMENT CULTURES: PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER LEADERSHIP PRACTICES
Focus on three domains that provide the foundation for effective principal and teacher leadership for learning:
professional community, organizational learning, and trust. Examine alternative strategies for increasing a
school's capacity in each of these areas. Consider the assumption that all adult members of the school must be
part of a culture that focuses on student learning. Engage with brief articles, case materials from real schools,
and a variety of tools to stimulate diagnosis and reflective practice.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the research base for leadership practices that advance professional learning in schools.
• Discuss what works (and what does not work) for fostering learning cultures.
• Identify specific principal leadership practices that promote teacher learning and teacher leadership focused
on instructional improvement.
• Define teacher leadership practices that engage colleagues in productive collaborative learning to improve
student achievement.
• Tailor a practical theory of change for creating learning cultures in at least one setting.
Karen Seashore Louis, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected]
Karen Seashore Louis is a professor in the Department of Educational Policy and Administration in the University of
Minnesota's College of Education and Human Development. Her research interests include organizational theory, schools
as workplaces, and leadership with a focus on school improvement and reform. She also teaches and advises in all areas
of educational policy and administration. She has devoted almost 30 years of research and consulting efforts to the areas
of policy and leadership development in urban secondary schools. Her most recent article is “A culture framework for education: Defining quality values for U.S. high schools”. Journal of School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 12 (2): 183-212.
with R. G. Schroeder (Journal of School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 12, 2001).
Jennifer York-Barr, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected]
Jennifer York-Barr, is a professor of educa tional policy and administration at the University of Minnesota. Her work focuses
on developing collaborative instructional teams, continuous professional learning, teacher leadership, and inclusive education. She has authored more than 135 publications in these areas and has made more than 100 presentations. York-Barr is
also co-author of Reflective Practice to Improve Schools. She holds two distinguished teach ing awards and is a graduate of
the NSDC Academy.
PC210 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING STRATEGIES THAT ENGAGE THE ADULT BRAIN
Cross your arms. Look down and see which one is on top. Now reverse the positions of your arms. How does
that feel? Awkward? Unnatural? Impossible? Those are some of the same adjectives used by teachers when
other people are trying to change their behaviors. Adult learning theory tells us that teachers do not learn only
by listening to a presenter any more than students learn when the teacher is doing all the talking. Attend this
session and learn not only how to give an unforgettable presentation, but also how to ensure that adults have
the desire to continue practicing what you taught long after the workshop is over.
Participants will be able to:
• Apply six principles of adult learning theory in their professional development activities.
• Incorporate 20 brain-compatible strategies (i.e., music, storytelling, role play) when delivering presentations
to adult audiences.
• Create a brain-compatible workshop or course.
• Develop a plan for professional learning by asking relevant questions.
• Use follow-up strategies that result in sustained adult behavior change.
Marcia Tate, Conyers, GA, [email protected]
Marcia Tate is an educational consultant who has presented at numerous state, national, and international conferences.
Previously, she was executive director of professional development for the DeKalb County School System in Decatur, Ga.
During her 30-year career with the district, she served as a classroom teacher, reading specialist, language arts coordinator, and staff development director. She is the author of Worksheets Don't Grow Dendrites: 20 Instructional Strategies that
Engage the Brain, “Sit and Get” Won't Grow Dendrites: 20 Professional Learning Strategies That Engage the Adult Brain, and
Reading and Language Arts Worksheets Don't Grow Dendrites: 20 Literacy Strategies That Engage the Brain.
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P R E C O N F E R E N C E S E S S I O N S S U N D AY
8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. – December 2, 2007
PC211
MAKING MEETINGS WORK
Are you attending more meetings and getting less done? Want to get something done rather than hosting
another unproductive meeting? If you answer yes, plan to attend this session. Gain practical, user-friendly
tools to support authentic collaborative processes and to improve the quality of meetings, decisions, and
problem solving. Consider common challenges and successful strategies to address them. Participants are
required to purchase a copy of Making Meetings Work (Corwin Press, 2006) for $22. Books will be distributed at the
session.
Participants will be able to:
• Use a variety of tools that will ensure productive and efficient meetings.
• Identify ways to organize the work of a team from start to finish.
• Facilitate shared decision-making and problem-solving opportunities.
• Apply several new strategies that will ensure effective and productive meetings that accomplish goals
and achieve results.
Ann Delehant, Delehant and Associates, Pittsford, NY, [email protected]
Ann Delehant has been a training and development professional for more than 20 years. She has worked as an external
consultant for national consulting firms and professional associations at the university level, and at both the school and
central office levels in several school districts. Delehant has experience as a facilitator, staff developer, teacher, guidance
counselor, government relations specialist, curriculum developer, and university instructor. She was director of staff development for the City School District in Rochester, NY for more than six years. In that position, she was responsible for major
staff development initiatives for administrators, teachers, support staff members, and school-based management teams.
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S A T U R D A Y – S U N D A Y TWO-DAY PRECONFERENCE
December 1 & 2, 2007 – 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
PC301 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY: WHAT REALLY IS IT?
If grade level or subject area teams meet weekly, does that qualify them as professional learning communities?
If the school staff engages in collaborative work, does that characterize it as a PLC? Across the nation, there
are varied definitions of PLCs. A PLC's intentional and purposeful efforts work in a variety of diverse settings,
despite the complex needs of students and challenges of urban, rural, and suburban settings. Learn how to
realize the promise of desired staff and student results by employing the outcomes of research studies and
exemplary practices that have grounded the PLC concept. Ensure the key idea of professionals, learning,
together in community is not lost in translation.
Participants will be able to:
• Discuss the importance of principals’ and teachers’ continuous learning and the relationship between
school professionals’ learning and students‘ successful learning.
• Identify staff and student benefits that result from PLCs that adhere to the five research-based components
of PLC.
• Describe organizational arrangements of school teams and other subgroups that enable them to meet the
agreed-upon goals of the school.
• Specify the process or steps that engage the PLC in its core work.
• Apply strategies and tools to create and maintain effectively functioning PLCs.
Shirley Hord, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Shirley Hord is scholar emeritus at the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory in Austin, TX. She has authored
articles and books on school-based professional development, school change and improvement, and professional learning
communities. Her most recent publications are Learning Together, Leading Together: Changing Schools Through Professional
Learning Communities and The Role of Leaders in Creating and Sustaining Professional Learning Communities. She monitors
and supports the Leadership for Change Networks and the Concerns-Based Adoption Model constituencies, and designs
and delivers professional development that nurtures school leadership. Her research, development, and training efforts
have taken her across the United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe, Asia, Australia, and Africa. Hord is a recipient of NSDC's
Susan Loucks-Horsley Award, NSDC's Distinguished Service Award, and NSDC's Mentor of the Year Award.
Kristine Kiefer Hipp, Cardinal Stritch University, Milwaukee, WI, [email protected]
Kristine Kiefer Hipp, is an associate professor in leadership studies at Cardinal Stritch University in Milwaukee, WI. She
consults widely to help facilitate long-term, organizational change in schools and districts. Her research, teaching, and
service focus on leadership, the development of cultures reflective of professional learning communities, collective efficacy,
and personal transformation. She is co-author of Reculturing Schools as Professional Learning Communities, and is currently
writing the second edition.
Martha Wheeler-Fair, Frances Starms Centers, Milwaukee, IL, [email protected]
Martha Wheeler-Fair is the principal of the Frances Starms Centers, a Pre-K through 8 Grade Elementary Program in
Milwaukee Public Schools. She is also an Ad Hoc Instructor in the Early Childhood Department at the University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Wheeler-Fair has been an educator for over 33 years and a Principal for 20 of those years. Her work
has included: teacher at the elementary and junior high school levels, diagnostic teacher, supervisor for special education,
assistant principal of an urban high school and a suburban middle school.
Olivia Elizondo Zepeda, Gadsden Elementary School District No. 32, San Luis, AZ. [email protected]
Olivia Zepeda is associate superintendent for Gadsden School District in Gadsden, AZ. She has experience as an elementary teacher, college and university instructor, and is an adviser in bachelors and masters programs. Her administrative
experiences include director of professional development, director of curriculum and instruction, instructional steward,
elementary school principal, and assistant superintendent. She is a member of the NSDC Academy XVII program and
completed two years of professional development with Shirley Hord in the Facilitating the Change Process Institute.
PC302 LEADING A TRANSFORMATIVE JOURNEY TO EQUITY: DEVELOPING CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE SCHOOLS
Research on school reform and raising student achievement reveals educators must bring an additive view of
diversity to their practice. Learn how to guide educators through a transformative process that increases their
understanding of culturally responsive school reform, and the roles and responsibilities of team members.
Consider additional strategies for combating underachievement, creating a trusting and safe environment,
developing an equity lens, and promoting culturally responsive pedagogy.
Participants will be able to:
• Access a research-based network to support efforts at improvement.
• Discuss systematic practices that contribute to the underachievement of some students.
• Identify the knowledge and skills needed by leadership teams to implement culturally responsive
school reform.
• Use strategies that help educators develop an equity lens.
• Apply strategies that promote the use of culturally responsive pedagogy.
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TWO-DAY PRECONFERENCE S A T U R D A Y – S U N D A Y
8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. – December 1 & 2, 2007
PC302
Pat Guerra, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, [email protected]
Patricia Guerra is an assistant professor in the Education and Community Leadership Program at Texas State University-San
Marcos, where she teaches graduate courses in culturally responsive leadership and school improvement. She also works
with educators to develop culturally responsive classrooms and schools. Her research interests include culturally responsive schooling and leadership, educational equity, and diversity training. In addition to having worked at the University of
Texas-Pan Am, Guerra was the co-director of the Leadership for Equity and Access Project at the University of Texas at
Austin and worked as a research associate at the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory.
(continued)
Sarah Nelson, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, [email protected]
Sarah Nelson is an assistant professor in the Education and Community Leadership Program at Texas State University-San
Marcos. She is a former Texas public school teacher, instructional specialist, and campus administrator. She earned her
Ph.D. in public school executive leadership from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests center on policies
and practices related to the development of culturally competent school leaders and teachers and issues of educational
equity. Nelson applies her research to the field by training teachers, school leaders, and higher education faculty in the
development of culturally responsive classrooms and schools.
PC303
LEADING FOR RESULTS: TRANSFORMING TEACHING, LEARNING, AND RELATIONSHIPS IN SCHOOLS
The most important changes in organizations begin with significant changes in leaders’ beliefs, the depth of
their understanding of critical issues, their speech, and their actions. These changes radiate outward to deeply
and permanently alter the culture, processes, and outcomes of an organization. Explore ways district leaders,
principals, and teacher leaders can change themselves to address three major barriers to improvement (lack
of clarity, resignation, and dependency). Learn to promote transformations in professional learning, teaching,
student learning, and relationships within schools. All participants are required to purchase a copy of Leading
for Results: Transforming Teaching, Learning, and Relationships in Schools, 2nd Edition (Corwin Press, 2006) for $25.
Books will be distributed at the session.
Participants will be able to:
• Develop clarity regarding their assumptions, intentions, requests, and “next actions” related to key areas
of work.
• Apply several “results skills” that increase interpersonal influence.
• Identify ways in which other skills addressed in Leading for Results: Transforming Teaching, Learning, and
Relationships in Schools, 2nd Edition can be use in their settings.
Dennis Sparks, Ann Arbor, MI, [email protected]
Dennis Sparks served as executive director of the 12,000-member National Staff Development Council for 23 years. Sparks
has also been a teacher, counselor, co-director of an alternative high school, and director of a federally funded teacher
center. His articles and columns have appeared in a wide variety of publications including JSD, the School Administrator,
Education Week, Educational Leadership, and Phi Delta Kappan. His newest book, Leading for Results: Transforming
Teaching, Learning and Relationships in Schools, Second Edition, was published in 2006 by Corwin Press. Sparks became
executive director emeritus of NSDC in 2007.
PC304
EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING
Teacher leaders are assuming new roles in many schools and school systems to support teachers in the classroom. Some of these teacher leaders are in full-time positions such as instructional coach, literacy coach, or
staff development leader, while others are assuming these roles on top of their regular duties. Explore the roles
teacher leaders take, from data coaches to mentors to catalysts for change. Participants will learn and practice
ways to contract with teachers and principals, facilitate data conversations, and work with teachers as part of
any change initiative.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the focus and benefits associated with 10 roles for coaches.
• Utilize a continuum of coaching “stances” to align teacher need with appropriate support.
• Apply components of effective contracting conversations.
• Diagnose teachers responses to change and design effective interventions.
• Facilitate data conversations.
• Analyze ways evaluation, supervision, and coaching are different.
Cindy Harrison, Instructional Improvement Group, Broomfield, CO, [email protected]
Cindy Harrison has worked in education for more than 30 years as a teacher, district staff development director, and middle
school principal. Currently she works with schools in the areas of instructional coaching, organizational change initiatives,
professional learning communities, staff development, leadership teams, and facilitation. She co-authored the book Taking
the Lead: New Roles for Teachers and School Based Coaches with Joellen Killion.
Barbara J. Dessa, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Charlotte, NC, [email protected]
Barbara Dessa is a middle school literacy coach at J.T. Williams Middle School, which participates in the Governor's
Initiative for Increasing Literacy in North Carolina Middle Schools. She has more than 20 years' experience in a variety of
positions from preschool to adult basic education programs. She is a National Board Certified Media Specialist with an
advanced degree in reading.
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S A T U R D A Y – S U N D A Y TWO-DAY PRECONFERENCE
December 1 & 2, 2007 – 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
PC305 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT: BUILDING 21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS
Microsoft’s Partners in Learning initiative has called on premier learning scientist John Bransford and his associates at the University of Washington Life Science Center and Little Planet Learning to create a program that
focuses the conversation in schools on instructional leadership practices. Engage in an interactive simulation
that begins as high school principal Jim Forrester contemplates the advice of former high school students when
they return to speak to the student body. Consider the similarity of challenges faced in other schools. Tap the
expertise of the session leaders and other participants as the group works through issues addressed by the four
modules: Dimensions of Change, New Visions, Some Educational Possibilities, and Leadership. All participants
will leave with the CD to replicate the process with a school faculty or other appropriate learning team. Please
bring a laptop and headphones.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the applications of how people learn using the simulation.
• Describe benefits of applying the model to high schools in the midst of reform.
• Lead the simulation with a school faculty.
• Prepare school leaders or other staff developers to use the modules with specific groups.
• Capitalize on the expertise of colleagues to strengthen current change efforts.
Toby Herrera, Albuquerque Public Schools. Albuquerque, NM, [email protected]
Toby Herrera is director of the Albuquerque Public Schools' Student, School and Community Service Center. Previously, he
was professional development coordinator with the New Mexico Coalition of School Administrators, an administrative
umbrella organization for the state of New Mexico. During his 31 years as an educator, Herrera was a math teacher, tennis
and cross-country coach, activities director, high school assistant principal, and high school principal.
Kathy Klock Persing, Redmond, OR, [email protected]
Kathy Klock Pershing is a consultant involved with a variety of education change programs. Currently she consults in
Microsoft Partners in Learning and serves as commissioner for the National Commission on Teaching and America's
Future. She spent six years with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, and was responsible for the foundation's
original professional development programs. Previously, Pershing was executive director of curriculum, instruction, and
assessment for the Snohomish (WA) School District.
PC306 POWERFUL LEARNING, POWERFUL TEACHING
Explore ways to enhance instructional intelligence by teachers. Experience a number of integrated instructional
and assessment strategies that provide variety, meaning, and motivation to learning experiences. Researchvalidated approaches that impact student motivation and learning will be examined. Learn what is necessary to
make strategic decisions that will align desired standards/student learning outcomes with quality instructional
and assessment practices.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the dimensions of instructional intelligence.
• Link research findings that impact student achievement to target specific outcomes.
• Facilitate a range of integrated instructional/assessment strategies and staff development processes that
engage educators in developing their instructional intelligence.
• Use student data to guide, critically assess, and differentiate instructional approaches.
• Apply the workshop strategies to personal contexts.
Carol Rolheiser, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada,
[email protected]
Carol Rolheiser is associate dean for teacher education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University
of Toronto. Carol has been a teacher, district consultant, and school administrator. Her work with a wide range of educational organizations worldwide has focused on instructional and assessment innovation, teacher development, school
improvement, leadership, teacher education redesign, system reform, and managing educational change. She is a recent
recipient of the University of Toronto's President's Teaching Award for her career commitment to excellence in teaching,
research in teaching, and the integration of teaching and research.
28
Gayle Gregory, Burlington, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Gayle Gregory consults internationally with teachers, administrators, and staff developers. She has been a teacher in elementary, middle and secondary schools, for community colleges, and at universities. Gregory has had extensive district
experience as a curriculum consultant and staff development coordinator and was principal and course director at York
University for the Faculty of Education. Her areas of expertise include brain-compatible learning, block scheduling, emotional intelligence, instructional and assessment practices, differentiated instructional strategies, managing change, and
building professional learning communities.
300
TWO-DAY PRECONFERENCE S A T U R D A Y – S U N D A Y
8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. – December 1 & 2, 2007
CONTINUOUS SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: STRUCTURES, TOOLS, AND PROCESSES
The Charles A. Dana Center has designed a school improvement process around four key structures: professional learning and collaboration, attaining the guaranteed and viable curriculum, systemic change, and monitoring and feedback. Districts and schools that have implemented the model and the structures with fidelity
have reported an increase in collaboration around student learning, better use of data to inform teaching and
leadership practices, and increased attention to coherence, consistency, and collaboration. Examine actions
that can lead to institutionalization of these structures and processes.
PC307
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the four key research-based structures necessary to foster school improvement.
• Determine the extent to which the key structures exist in their schools and districts.
• Facilitate structured processes and professional development protocols that promote professional learning
and collaborative work among teachers and leaders.
• Develop a set of initial actions that lead to institutionalization of key school improvement structures.
David Hill, Charles A. Dana Center, Austin, TX, [email protected]
David Hill is deputy director of the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin. His expertise is in facilitating systems improvement in districts and schools. Previously, Hill managed the operations of the Dana Center's Texas
Statewide Systemic Initiative in Mathematics and Science. He has experience at all levels of public education, including
leadership as an area superintendent. He has experience in strategic and long-range planning and program design and
implementation. Hill received his B.S. in education, M.A. in geography, and Ph.D. in educational administration from the
University of Texas at Austin.
Bergeron Harris, Charles A. Dana Center, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Bergeron Harris is program director for the Division of District Services at the Charles A. Dana Center. Harris provides
leadership support for districts engaged in the Partnership for High Achievement and other math and science initiatives.
He has served in various positions including teacher, principal, and secondary education director. He received the
University Council of Educational Administration's national award for his contributions to the development of aspiring
school leaders. Harris has a B.A. in English education from Dillard University in New Orleans, a M.S. in educational administration from Texas State University, and a Ph.D. in educational administration from Baylor University.
Laurie Mathis, Charles A. Dana Center, Austin, TX, [email protected],utexas.edu
Laurie Mathis serves as program director for professional development at the Charles A. Dana Center, where she leads initiatives in mathematics education and instructional leadership. Prior to her work at the Dana Center, Mathis worked as a
district-level and campus-level administrator. As a mathematics curriculum supervisor in a large district, she directed a
large scale National Science Foundation mathematics initiative. Mathis holds a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the
University of Texas at Austin, a M.S. in Eudcation from Trinity University, and B.S. from St. Cloud State University.
Sam Zigrossi, Charles A. Dana Center, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Sam Zigrossi serves as a program director at the Charles A. Dana Center. He is involved in business development and
provides direct client services to leaders in education. Before joining the Dana Center, Zigrossi had a 29-year career with
IBM in human resources and product education. He taught mathematics and physics for five years before joining IBM.
Zigrossi holds a B.S. in mathematics education, an M.S. in education administration from the University of Utah, and an
M.B.A. in management from Golden Gate University.
“This conference has become an annual travel request for
me because of the high standard maintained in recruiting
appropriate and relevant breakout sessions that are useful
and informative.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
29
300
S A T U R D A Y – S U N D A Y TWO-DAY PRECONFERENCE
December 1 & 2, 2007 – 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
PC308 A STAFF DEVELOPER’S GUIDE TO THE BRAIN
Brain research is constantly providing new revelations about how the brain works and how we all learn. There is
a solid foundation on which to base educational and staff development decisions. While many current educational practices fit well with the research, others run counter and pose significant challenges to those who work
in schools. Review the most educationally significant research developments and explore the implications of
these findings for education leaders.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the necessary mental model shift from educating for Industrial Age to educating for the
Information Age.
• Describe the effects of meaning and emotion on learning.
• Lead a discussion on the implications of the research on drugs, sleep, and other environmental factors
on brain development and learning.
• Discuss new research on mirror neurons and adolescent brain development and its applications for
teaching and learning.
• Plan for how new information from the neurosciences can provide direction for staff developers and
educators in making decisions about pedagogy and curriculum.
Pat Wolfe, Napa Valley, CA, [email protected]
Pat Wolfe is a former K-12 teacher, county office administrator, and adjunct university professor. As an educational consultant
over the past 12 years, she has conducted workshops for thousands of administrators, teachers, boards of education, and
parents throughout the United States and internationally. Her major area of expertise is the application of brain research
to educational practice. She is the author of Brain Matters: Translating the Research to Classroom Practice.
PC309 FACILITATIVE SKILLS FOR GROUP EFFECTIVENESS
Facilitation is key to supporting student learning. Increase your effectiveness as a facilitator. Learn ways to hold
conversations together - in small or large groups, in dialogue or discussion. Discover four support structures
that improve meeting success. Extend personal skills for managing group energy, focus, and information flow.
Apply new understanding to increase effectiveness when collaborating for purposes of studying student work,
dialoguing about data, planning or decision making.
Participants will be able to:
• Apply flexibility, confidence, and authenticity as a facilitator.
• Use new structures that promote success in decision-making meetings.
• Access new ways to developmentally enhance group productivity.
• Use conversation structures that increase understanding and shared meaning among group members.
• Convert negative energy into positive energy.
Carolyn McKanders, Belleville, MI, [email protected]
Carolyn McKanders is an educational consultant specializing in individual, group, and organizational development. Her passion is promoting quality human relationships through communication, collaboration, and leadership skills development.
McKanders has 28 years of experience in the Detroit Public Schools as a teacher, counselor, and staff development specialist. She consults, presents, and facilitates nationally and for Michigan Middle Start, an initiative that focuses on developmentally appropriate curriculum and instruction for young adolescents. Her expertise includes providing polarity management training that helps organizations identify and manage competing tensions inherent in social systems.
PC310 LEADING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING
Develop a deeper understanding of keys to assessment quality. Gain strategies and resources needed to
provide effective professional development in classroom assessment for learning. Join an advanced experience
designed for those somewhat knowledgeable about classroom assessment and who have ongoing professional
development responsibilities. Participants will complete a pre-seminar assignment to become familiar with key
ideas in advance. Participants are required to purchase copies of Classroom Assessment for Student Learning:
Doing it Right – Using it Well and Learning Team Facilitator Handbook: A Resource for Collaborative Study of
Classroom Assessment for Student Learning for $59. Books will be distributed at the session.
30
300
TWO-DAY PRECONFERENCE S A T U R D A Y – S U N D A Y
8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. – December 1 & 2, 2007
PC310
Participants will be able to:
• Explain the keys to assessment quality.
• Develop educator understanding of specific assessment for learning strategies.
• Facilitate one or more learning team activities.
• Plan, structure, and lead classroom assessment for learning introductory presentations.
(continued)
Rick Stiggins, Educational Testing Service, Portland, OR, [email protected]
Rick Stiggins is founder and director of the ETS Assessment Training Institute in Portland, OR. He has been deeply involved
in educational assessment issues for more than 25 years. Stiggins has led performance and classroom assessment programs, directed large-scale test development, and trained educators in thousands of schools to use assessment more
effectively. Stiggins has also been director of test development at the American College Testing Program in Iowa City, IA,
and senior program director at the Northwest Regional Educational Lab in Portland. His book, Student-Involved Assessment for
Learning (2004), now in use in university programs across the country, emphasizes the role of quality assessment in maximizing
student motivation and achievement. He is co-author of Assessment FOR Learning: An Action Guide for School Leaders (2005), Classroom
Assessment for Student Learning: Doing It Right -Using It Well (2004), and A Repair Kit for Grading: 15 Fixes for Broken Grades (2006).
Jan Chappuis, Educational Testing Service, Portland, OR, [email protected]
Jan Chappuis is a former district curriculum and assessment specialist. She has more than a decade of experience in providing K-12 staff training in student-focused classroom assessment and has given hundreds of workshops on integrating
content standards into classroom assessment and instruction. Her background as an elementary and secondary teacher,
combined with her assessment and staff development expertise, enables Chappuis to provide teachers and instructional
leaders with practical strategies for motivating students and engaging them in their own academic success. She is a co-author
of Assessment FOR Learning: An Action Guide for School Leaders (2005), Classroom Assessment for Student Learning: Doing It Right -Using It
Well (2004), and Understanding School Assessment-A Parent and Community Guide to Helping Students Learn (2002).
PC311
ADVANCED FACILITATION FOR GROUP EFFECTIVENESS
Groups work at various levels of complexity - coordination, cooperation, and then collaboration, which is the
highest level. With collaboration, the goal is to achieve results that participants would be incapable of accomplishing working alone. Learn developmentally appropriate ways to help groups improve their capacity to get
work done, do the right work, manage change and adaptivity, and develop interdependence. This advanced
session, for persons with facilitation fluency, will extend knowledge of group dynamics, facilitation, and group
development. Learn what distinguishes expert facilitators from novices and how they apply their skills in
novel and creative ways. Participants are required to purchase a copy of Adaptive Schools: A Sourcebook for
Collaborative Groups by Robert Garmston and Bruce Wellman for $42. Books will be distributed at the session.
Participants will be able to:
• Use “expert” lenses to improve group dynamics.
• Apply new strategies for polarity management, planning, and problem solving.
• Implement principles and tools for group intervention.
• Integrate verbal and nonverbal language and work confidently in difficult situations.
• Refine facilitator language.
• Apply tips and tools for teaching/expanding group member capabilities, knowledge, skills, and effectiveness.
Robert Garmston, El Dorado Hills, CA, [email protected]
Robert Garmston is devoted to developing the capabilities and potential within each person and group. He is director of
Facilitation Associates, an educational consulting firm specializing in leadership, learning, and organizational development
for schools throughout North America and in Africa, Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe, South America, and the Middle East.
He has written books and articles dealing with educational leadership, learning, coaching, and staff development.
Garmston has also served as a teacher, principal, superintendent, and curriculum director. Garmston is a recipient of
NSDC's Contribution to Staff Development Award.
Jane Ellison, The Center for Cognitive Coaching, Englewood, CO, [email protected]
Jane Ellison is co-director of the Center for Cognitive Coaching, an organization whose mission is to expand the influence of
cognitive coaching by building capacity in systems. She provides training and consultation in the areas of cognitive coaching, adaptive schools, change and transition, quality professional and organizational development, curriculum development, effective instruction, supervision, and facilitation. Ellison was a teacher at the elementary and graduate school
levels, a principal, and a director of elementary education.
31
300
S A T U R D A Y – S U N D A Y TWO-DAY PRECONFERENCE
December 1 & 2, 2007 – 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
PC312 A COURAGE TO TEACH INTRODUCTORY RETREAT: RECONNECTING WHO YOU ARE WITH WHAT YOU DO
These are challenging times to teach, lead school improvement efforts, and bring passion and commitment to
our chosen work day after day. And we know that good teaching and effective leadership flow from the identity
and integrity of the individual. Learn retreat experiences developed by Parker Palmer to help educators renew
and sustain their own vocational commitment and personal integrity. Through large group, small group, and
solitary settings, individuals explore the intersections of personal selves and professional lives, make use of
personal stories, reflect on education practice, and consider insights from poets, storytellers, and various
wisdom traditions.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe a Courage to Teach Introductory Retreat experience.
• Reflect on the value of slowing down and listening deeply to themselves and others about significant
questions of vocation and self examination.
• Discuss the benefits of an approach proven effective at creating a safe and trustworthy space for reflection
and dialogue.
• Make connections with other professionals in education.
• Establish clarity about vexing personal and professional issues.
Terry Chadsey, Center for Courage & Renewal, Bainbridge Island, WA, [email protected]
Terry Chadsey is program director for the Center for Courage & Renewal. He has worked in public education as a teacher
and administrator for more than 30 years, teaching grades K through 8 in Chicago, Australia, and Washington. For the last
10 years he has provided professional and organizational development support to districts and schools, principals and
teachers. He is a lead trainer for Positive Discipline and is a Courage to Teach/Courage to Lead facilitator.
Debbie Dewitt, Carolina Forest Elementary, Myrtle Beach, SC, [email protected]
Debbie Dewitt is a kindergarten and mentor teacher at Carolina Forest Elementary School in Myrtle Beach, SC A former
early childhood professor of the University of South Carolina and Coastal Carolina University, she has served as the Horry
County chair of the First Steps State Initiative. She has written and presented various articles on diversity in the public
school classroom. Dewitt is a founding facilitator for the Center for Courage & Renewal and has led Courage to Teach
retreats for educators in South Carolina.
Marcy Jackson, Center for Courage & Renewal, Bainbridge Island, WA, [email protected]
Marcy Jackson is co-director of the Center for Courage & Renewal (CCR), an educational non-profit that renews, sustains,
and encourages educators and other professionals. Jackson has primary responsibility for CCR courses and programs,
including the Courage & Renewal Facilitator Preparation Program. She has been facilitating Courage to Teach/Courage to
Lead and Circle of Trust retreats since 1996. She has worked extensively with individuals, groups, and families as a child and
family therapist and has led retreats in health care, educational and retreat centers, community mental health, and tribal settings.
PC313 WHAT IS OPEN SPACE TECHNOLOGY?
Explore issues related to change, professional development, and conscious leadership. The Open Space meeting process, developed by Harrison Owen, is used with large and small groups and as a whole-system intervention process for facilitating change and reflection. Learn how the process helps others see the benefits of team
problem solving. Examine the stages that teams experience on the path toward becoming high functioning.
Gather interventions and activities to strengthen the process of team development. Apply four powerful professional development interventions, in addition to Harrison Owen's Open Space Structure, to promote systems
learning.
Participants will be able to:
• Apply a series of experiential, hands-on change protocols.
• Explain the foundations and apply the structures of Open Space.
• Use this protocol as a tool to engage people in profession learning communities.
• Identify specific, key issues related to the practical application of leadership, change, and professional
development.
• Consider the benefits of and apply as appropriate four key intervention protocols that build trust, foster
open dialogue, promote effective change, and unlock the potential of people working in real collaboration.
Rob Bocchino, Heart of Change; Change of Heart Associates, Hoboken, NJ, [email protected]
Rob Bocchino is founder and director of Heart of Change; Change of Heart Associates, a team of consultants and change
agents serving educational, business, and governmental systems. He facilitates Future Search and change conferences for
individuals and organizations and has helped businesses, school districts, and government systems establish self-directed
and collaborative work teams through focused, state-of-the-art training, and restructuring. A specialist in human learning
and development, Bocchino has worked with educators as well as business administrators in the United States, Europe,
and Japan. He is currently working with the The College Board to launch its new Leadership Institute for Principals.
32
Consider these
book talk sessions
as you plan
your schedule.
Leading for Results, Second Edition, by Dennis Sparks
D20 Leading for Results Book Talk
presented by Dennis Sparks
A Whole New Mind, by Daniel Pink
F07 NSDC Book Club: A Whole New Mind
Book
Talks
presented by Jan Radford, Claudia Wheatley, Kevin Sue Bailey, and Cate Hart
Sustainable Leadership, by Andy Hargreaves and Dean Fink
J08 Book Talk – Sustainable Leadership
presented by William Sommers and Skip Olsen
The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, by Patrick Lencioni
L08 NSDC Book Club: The Five Dysfunctions of a Team
presented by Cathy Berlinger-Gustafson and Cindy Harrison
Learning by Doing,
by Richard DuFour, Rebecca DuFour, Robert Eaker, and Tom Many
M03 NSDC Book Club: Learning by Doing
presented by Tom Many and Jeanne Spiller
See individual session descriptions for more details.
You’ll be like a kid
in a candy store!
Handpick Your Presenters
and Topics from NSDC’s
Custom Assortment
Individually Tailored Workshops, Programs, and Services
All Aligned with NSDC’s Standards for Staff Development.
TRAINING NSDC will provide you with an outstanding learning experience
on a topic relevant to the needs of your staff.
PLANNING NSDC will help you create the blueprint for ensuring the
achievement of your organization’s goals.
AUDITING An NSDC audit team will assess the quality and impact of
professional development in your school, system, or organization.
COACHING NSDC will arrange on-site or telephone-based coaching services
for your leaders.
EVALUATING NSDC will conduct an evaluation of a selected program or
initiative.
CONSULTING NSDC will help strengthen your staff development efforts
and effectiveness with expert advice and/or facilitation.
YOU’LL RECEIVE…
n
n
A skilled consultant to provide one-on-one assistance in the selection of
objectives, program design, and presenters; and
Complimentary NSDC resources: newsletters, standards brochures, and product
catalogs for all participants.
NATIONAL STAFF DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
For more information, contact Sue Francis at 972-943-0381;
or [email protected]
33
SET
A
5-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 9 A.M.–12 P.M. CONTINUES AT 2:15 P.M. – 4:15 P.M.
A01
A03
SPECIAL SESSION 9:00 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. Monday
and continues 9:00 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. Tuesday
USING TECHNOLOGY WITH CLASSROOM
INSTRUCTION THAT WORKS
TIPS, TOOLS, AND TECHNIQUES FOR
THE BEGINNING STAFF DEVELOPER
Learn which technology tools support the nine
categories of instructional strategies from
“Classroom Instruction that Works.” Consider how
various strategies help answer the four planning
questions for instruction. Gain hands-on experience
with software and web resources that can be applied
in the school and classroom immediately.
Our current professional culture indicates that
everyone is a staff developer. From the classroom
teacher to the principal, from the campus coach to
the secretary, or from the central office to the crossing guard, everyone is a leader in professional learning. During this highly interactive, two-day staff
development 101 session, participants will examine
the attributes of results-driven professional learning
while practicing tips and tools for engaging the adult
learner. Special attention will be given to standardsbased practice, models of effective staff development,
and characteristics of adult learners.
Participants are required to purchase a copy of
NSDC’s Standards for Staff Development Revised and
Presentations That Teach and Transform by Robert
Garmston and Bruce Wellman (ASCD, 1992). The $10
fee will be collected and the books distributed onsite.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Debbie Estes, The Estes Group,
Sherman, TX, [email protected]_group.com
Nancy Gray, Texas Staff Development Council,
Mesquite TX, [email protected]
Lynne Norwood, Texas Staff Development Council,
Odessa TX, [email protected]
Linsae Snider, Frenship ISD,
Wolforth TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
A02
A MODEL FOR PLANNING DIFFERENTIATED
INSTRUCTION
Give your faculty a concrete model for differentiating
content instruction. Try out a powerful approach to
planning differentiated instruction and see how it
enables teachers to challenge all students. Discuss
the myths, challenges, and rewards of differentiating
instruction. Walk away with your own example of a
differentiated lesson, assessment, and/or set of
standards.
Charlotte Lum-Ku, Summit Preparatory Charter High School,
Redwood City, CA, [email protected]
Todd Dickson, Summit Preparatory Charter High School,
Redwood City, CA, [email protected]
Kelly Garcia, Summit Preparatory Charter High School,
Redwood City, CA, [email protected]
Megan Taylor, Stanford University, Stanford, CA,
[email protected]
Howard Pitler, McREL, Denver, CO, [email protected]
Kim Malenoski, McREL, Denver, CO, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, XI
A04
DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP TO SUPPORT
EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Learn to enhance student achievement and high
school completion rates using five action research
grant funded projects: Assessment for Learning,
Differentiated Instruction, Literacy Instruction,
Interagency Collaboration, and Learning with
Technologies. Discover how a distributed leadership
team of school-based and central staff collaboratively
plan, deliver, and provide follow-up support for highquality, job-embedded professional development.
Find out how responsive leadership results in
shared ownership and accountability for improved
achievement.
Corrie Ziegler, Edmonton Public Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Louise Osland, Edmonton Public Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
A05
FIERCE CONVERSATIONS, TRANSFORM THE
CONVERSATIONS CENTRAL TO YOUR SUCCESS
Understand transformational ideas and models that
will shift the basic understanding of conversations
and the power they hold for leadership, achieving
results, and building relationships. Learn how to
possess the skill and the will, tackle and resolve and
organization’s toughest challenges, and develop an
open, direct, respectful culture. Experience a robust
conversations model that turns high-stakes meetings
into internal think tanks that enable individuals and
teams to make the best possible decisions, gets
everyone on board, and unleashes true collaboration.
Susan Scott, Fierce, Inc., Bellevue, WA, [email protected]
Standard(s): XI
Standard(s): II, IX
34
SET
A
A06
A08
PROFESSIONAL COACHING FOR LEADERS
WORKSHEETS DON'T GROW DENDRITES:
20 STRATEGIES THAT WORK!
This is a three-tiered certification program intended
to increase student achievement by building leadership capacity at the individual, team, and systems
levels. Learn to use five research-based leadership
lenses to inform the coaching process and practice
five key coaching skills applicable to everyday leadership practice. Examine various applications within
schools and districts and determine applicability to
your own site.
Nancy Stanford-Blair, Cardinal Stritch University,
Milwaukee, WI, [email protected]
Nancy Marsho, Cardinal Stritch Univeristy,
Milwaukee, WI, [email protected]
T.C. Motzkus, West Bend Public Schools,
West Bend, WI, [email protected]
Donna Recht, Cardinal Stritch University,
Milwaukee, WI, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
A07
ENERGIZING THE CLASSROOM AND STAFF
DEVELOPMENT WITH COLLABORATIVE INQUIRY
Debra Gerdes, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy,
Aurora, IL, [email protected]
Michael Lejcar, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy,
Aurora, IL, [email protected]
Katie Reynolds, Round Lake Area Schools District 116,
Round Lake, IL, [email protected]
Marcia Tate, Developing Minds Inc.,
Conyers, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, XI
A09
ACHIEVING EQUITY: USING COURAGEOUS
CONVERSATION TO INCREASE STUDENT
ACHIEVEMENT
Schools achieve equity by raising the achievement
of all students, while narrowing the gaps between the
highest and lowest performing student groups, and
eliminating the racial predictability and disproportionality of these groups. To build this equity, teams of
district and site-level educators must enter into a
“Courageous Conversation” about the impact of race
on leadership, learning, teaching, and family engagement. The “Equity Framework” guides schools and
school systems through this process.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Create an environment that nurtures engagement
and growth among both staff and students. Learn to
use problem-based learning (PBL) strategies to promote a culture of collaborative inquiry. Experience
the stages of the PBL process and view video clips of
the process in action. Gain the insights and skills to
implement this process in staff development, staff
meetings, and classrooms. Relate the benefits of
collaborative inquiry to your own school’s learning
environment.
It stands to reason that if students don’t learn the
way we teach them, then we must teach them the way
they learn! Experience 20 instructional strategies that
maximize memory and minimize forgetting. Increase
learning for both students and adults when strategies
like drawing, metaphor, music, and storytelling are
used to teach curriculum objectives and meet national standards. Ensure that people retain key concepts,
not just for tests, but for life!
Glenn Singleton, Pacific Educational
Group, San Francisco, CA,
[email protected]
Curtis Linton, School Improvement
Network, Sandy, UT,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, X
Standard(s): IX, XI
“If I could attend only
one professional meeting
a year… this would be it!
It is always an outstanding experience.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
35
SET
B
4-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 10 A.M.–12 P.M. CONTINUES AT 2:15 P.M. – 4:15 P.M.
B01
B04
EXPERIENCING THE STANDARDS
AN ACTION RESEARCH DESIGN
FOR CREATING EQUITABLE CLASSROOMS
Experience the processes and practices that form
the basis of the National Staff Development Council’s
Standards for Staff Development. Interactive technology and a standards-based scoring rubric will assure
that presentation activities and processing protocols
will address identified individual needs. Learn new
strategies for promoting deeper understanding and
application of the standard.
Suzy Cutbirth, Missouri State University/Missouri Department
of Elementary and Secondary Education, Springfield, MO,
[email protected]
Marsha Lay, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO,
[email protected]
Standard(s): IV, IX
Cathy Caro-Bruce, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction,
Madison, WI, [email protected]
Mary Klehr, Madison Metropolitan School District,
Madison, WI, [email protected]
B02
Standard(s): I, X
ALL SYSTEMS IN PLACE:
K-12 CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT
B05
Review how systems theory can be applied to
districtwide reform efforts. Gain an understanding
of different structures, including vertical teaming and
communication facilitation, used in a school reform
effort centered on curriculum alignment. Apply criteria to your own curriculum alignment examination.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Learn how action research is an effective
professional development model that impacts
instructional practice and student learning. Consider
how action research can address equity and race in
your schools. Experience the process of question
development, classroom-based data collection and
analysis, and writing about research findings.
Through examples, stories, and interacting with your
colleagues, learn how you can bring action research
to your district.
Tammy Weatherly, Jefferson County Public Schools,
Golden, CO, [email protected]
Rosemary Smith, Jefferson County Public Schools,
Lakewood, CO, [email protected]
Priscilla Straughn, Jefferson County Public Schools,
Golden, CO, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
UNANTICIPATED BENEFIT
OF COACHING REFORM
While many school districts have instituted
instructional coaching programs, few have seen
these programs as a school reform model which
requires careful planning, execution, and assessment.
High-quality, authentic coaching programs change
school culture and teacher learning. Learn to use
rubrics and other tools for assessing the quality and
progress of coaching programs. Create a plan for a
coaching program that is engaging, professional,
rigorous, and effective in influencing school culture.
B03
Kathy Bocchino, Heart of Change Associates,
Hoboken, NJ, [email protected]
MODELS OF ESOL INSTRUCTION
Standard(s): I, II
How do we determine the best way to meet the
challenge of serving an increasingly diverse student
population, while continuing to meet annual targets
on standardized test performance? Learn about a
professional development experience in a large
urban/suburban public school district helping school
teams make informed decisions regarding instruction
for English language learners. Consider research and
student data that contribute to informed decision
regarding English language instructional delivery.
B06
Galit Zolkower, Montgomery County Public Schools,
Germantown, MD, [email protected]
Sandra Duval, Montgomery County Public Schools,
Germantown, MD, [email protected]
Kelly Reider, Montgomery County Public Schools,
Germantown, MD, [email protected]
TAKING A CANDID, HONEST, AND INTIMATE
LOOK AT EQUITABLE LEARNING
What do students need to know, what do teachers
need to know, and what do administrative leaders
need to know to create equitable learning opportunities for all? Answering this question requires a
“candid look” at practices that impede or promote
learning, an “honest look” at what we really know
about the teaching experiences being provided, and
an “intimate look” at the student as an individual
first and then how our own perceptions relate to
equitable learning.
Deborah Childs-Bowen, Samford University,
Decatur, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VI
Standard(s): X, XI
36
SET
B
B07
USING DATA AND RESEARCH TO VERIFY
CAUSES OF ACHIEVEMENT GAPS
Once collaborative teams identify achievement
gaps, how do they take effective actions? An often
overlooked part of data anaylsis is using research
and data about practice to verify hunches about
what's causing the problem. Participants will use
the Verify Causes Tree as a tool for digging underneath student learning data to identify causes for
gaps and to test resulting hypotheses.
“I enjoyed the conference
and found it professionally
valuable.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
Nancy Love, TERC, Cambridge, MA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI
37
SET
C
3-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 9 A.M.–12 P.M.
C01
C05
MONDAY MORNING LECTURE OPTION
PLCS: A DISTRICT'S JOURNEY
This will allow you to attend the following sessions:
C02: Questions and Answers with Simon Bailey
9 a.m.–10 a.m., and
D01: Distinguished Lecture: Shirley Hord
10 a.m.–11 a.m.
Please see the individual session listings for program
descriptions.
Listen as the Blue Valley School District identifies
critical steps in its systemwide reform and shares
how it implements PLCs. Assess your own district’s
PLC quotient and identify next steps. Explore the
development of student support systems (interventions) and research-based leadership practices that
support PLCs. Question presenters as they share
successes and challenges they encountered. Leave
with tools, next steps and self-confidence to
continue your journey.
C02
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WITH
KEYNOTE SPEAKER SIMON BAILEY
Keynote speaker Simon Bailey will address your
questions in this special session following his
keynote address Monday morning. The
session will conclude after one hour.
Simon Bailey, Nashville, TN,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II
C03
CREATING 21ST CENTURY LEARNING TEAMS
FOR TEACHERS AND STUDENTS
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
For today’s students to acquire the skills to be
competitive in a global economy, the learning
environment within schools must emulate the
behavior of the outside world. However, a learning
environment which is conducive for students to
acquire 21st century skills must not only exist for
the student, but also for educators responsible for
preparing them. Join us as we hear from nationallyrecognized learning teams on the strategies they
have taken to accomplish this.
Brian Bratonia, Microsoft, Redmond, WA, [email protected]
Kathy Klock-Persing, Microsoft US Partners in Learning National
Advisory Council, Redmond, OR, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
C04
USING VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL THINKING
TO TRANSFORM PLANNING
Learn how to spark creativity in the planning process
when things are pushed in a new direction and new
paradigms are sought. At the same time, learn to
design an innovation which can be a constructive
force for improved student learning and enhanced
leadership and teaching practice. Explore answers by
participating in interactive strategies that use vertical
and horizontal thinking to help you scaffold along a
continuum from background knowledge to informed
decisionmaking.
Marti Richardson, Knoxville, TN, [email protected]
Standard(s): II
38
Dennis King, Blue Valley School District,
Overland Park, KS, [email protected]
Walter Carter, Blue Valley School District,
Overland Park, KS, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
C06
INSTRUCTIONAL TALK-THROUGHS: AN
INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO LEARNING
Instructional talk-throughs address the need for staff
to have deep, meaningful conversations surrounding
effective teacher practices, curricular content, student
engagement, and the development and sharing of
resources in order to improve student achievement.
Hear how six diverse K-9 Edmonton Public Schools,
varied in size, socioeconomic status, racial make-up
and achievement, utilize talk-throughs to collaboratively improve the teaching-learning relationship.
Linda Inglis, Edmonton Public Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Dorothy Cronk, Edmonton Public Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Mary Michailides, Edmonton Public Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Dean Michailides, Edmonton Public Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Nancy Petersen, Edmonton Public Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
David Morris, Edmonton Public Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
Register for the Expert Track and attend
all keynote Q&A’s, Texas Scholar lectures,
and the back-up keynote.
SET
C
C07
C10
CREATING CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE
EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS
MINDFULLY RESOLVING CONFLICTS:
FACILITATION FOR DIVERSITY ISSUES
In this academy, we will examine aspects of culturally
responsive systems. Upon completion, participants
will be able to identify key elements of an educational
system and how to leverage change that leads to
culturally responsive outcomes.
How do we begin a conversation with people who
are culturally different? What if they get angry or hurt?
Explore how to develop authentic and meaningful
relationships, even in conflict. This experiential
diversity facilitation workshop teaches leadership
and community-building skills and addresses issues
including racism and cultural diversity.
Shelley Zion, National Center for Culturally
Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt), Denver, CO,
[email protected]
Suzanne Arnold, NCCRESt, Denver, CO,
[email protected]
Lee Mun Wah, StirFry Seminars & Consulting,
Berkeley, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, X
Standard(s): II, X
C08
FACILITATIVE LEADERSHIP AS A VEHICLE
FOR BUILDING PLCs
Karen Owen, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Lidia Gazdyszyn, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Jonett Miniel, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
SUPPORTING TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS
OF ALL GENERATIONS
Have you noticed newer teachers and administrators
feel, look, and act differently than novices you
remember? Do you hear of communication challenges between older and younger colleagues? Who
are the four generations in schools and what are their
strengths and needs? What structures and protocols
will help all generations do their jobs well and grow
into effective leaders? Receive resources on this
increasingly important topic.
Jennifer Abrams, Palo Alto Unified School District,
Palo Alto, CA, jen[email protected]
Burton Cohen, Palo Alto Unified School District,
Palo Alto, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
Standard(s): I, II
C12
C09
DISTRICTWIDE LEARNING FOR
AND FROM FULL-TIME MENTORS
GOING FROM “GOOD TO GREAT” THROUGH
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND
INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING
Identify steps to set up a professional development
plan for teachers, coaches, and administrators
including the process, research, and funding required
for success. Learn and apply instructional coaching
skills while role-playing with colleagues in a stress
free setting. Apply Lesson Design components and
embedded engagement strategies.
Sue Segura, Lyon County School District,
Silver Springs, NV, [email protected]
Denise Benson, Lyon County School District,
Silver Springs, NV, [email protected]
Teresa McCallum, Lyon County School District,
Silver Springs, NV, [email protected]
Mike Paul, Lyon County School District,
Silver Springs, NV, [email protected]
Jim Berryman-Shaffer, Lyon County School District,
Silver Springs, NV, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Facilitative leadership is a tool for developing collegial
relationships, encouraging reflective practice, and
rethinking leadership to restructure schools in support of increased student achievement. Experience
working collaboratively with peers to build relationships that matter; develop a set of skills for engaging
others in meaningful conversations; use protocols to
look at student, teacher, and administrator work; and
to provide feedback.
C11
Imagine a full-time mentoring model whereby
mentors develop instructional and leadership skills,
principals gain insight on support for new teachers,
and district-based administrators share new perspectives on teaching and learning. Learn how the
Durham Public Schools Full-time Mentor Program
has helped establish a true PLC for new teachers as
well as their mentors.
Fred Williams, Durham Public Schools,
Durham, NC, [email protected]
Alvera Lesane, Durham Public Schools,
Durham, NC, [email protected]
Michel Williams, Holt Elementary/Easley Elementary/Durham
Public Schools, Durham, NC, [email protected]
Emmett Tilley, Githens Middle School/Durham Public Schools,
Durham, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
39
SET
C
3-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 9 A.M.–12 P.M.
C13
C16
WHAT DO PLCs DO?
CONTINUOUS SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT:
STRUCTURES, TOOLS, AND PROCESSES
Everyone wants to establish teams to focus on
learning and use the best of what we know about
PLCs. What do we do when we have time to meet?
We look at student work to make decisions about
instruction. We develop common assessments to
answer the question, “How will we know if students
have mastered the concepts?” We develop rubrics to
answer the question, “What is good enough?” Come
discuss values and conditions necessary to build a
collaborative culture.
Ann Delehant, Delehant and Associates,
Pittsford, NY, [email protected]
Jody Hoch, Rush Henrietta School District,
Canandaigua, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
C14
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
FOCUS ON INSTRUCTION: PURPOSE,
ENGAGEMENT, RIGOR, AND RESULTS
Get engaged in this model for continuous school
improvement and examine the tools developed to
support its implementation. The model is based on
The Charles A. Dana Center's research and field work
experiences and the resulting tools are organized
around four key structures: professional learning and
collaboration, attaining the guaranteed and viable
curriculum, systemic change, and monitoring and
feedback. All levels of the system, district, campus,
and classroom, are incorporated into the model.
Bergeron Harris, University of Texas Charles A. Dana Center,
Austin, TX, [email protected]
David Hill, University of Texas at Austin Charles A. Dana Center,
Austin, TX, [email protected]
Laurie Mathis, University of Texas at Austin Charles A. Dana
Center, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Sam Zigrossi, University of Texas at Austin Charles A. Dana Center,
Austin, TX, [email protected]l.utexas.edu
Standard(s): IX, XI
Consider the difference between a good lesson and
a great lesson and explore what instruction that
improves student achievement really looks like. Learn
how one district identifies the components of quality
instruction (purpose, engagement, rigor, and results)
through the use of video clips, rubrics, reflective
conversations, and learning walks.
C17
Bev Henderson, Kennewick School District,
Kennewick, WA, [email protected]
Ardis Sparks, Kennewick School District,
Kennewick, WA, [email protected]
Sharon Fuller, Connecticut State Department of Education,
Hartford, CT, [email protected]
Tony Rigazio-DiGilio, Central Connecticut State University,
New Britain, CT, [email protected]
Christine Sullivan, Connecticut State Department of Education,
Hartford, CT, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
TEACHER LEADERS AND SCHOOL CULTURE
School improvement is impossible without teacher
leadership. This workshop presents a training design
that promotes the use of action research to intervene
and monitor changes in classroom practice and
school culture.
C15
Standard(s): II, VII
A COACHING AND MENTORING MODEL
FOR URBAN SCHOOL LEADERS
C18
Learn how to plan, fund, and implement a comprehensive training program to greatly enhance the
preparation process for school leaders in high need
urban settings. Increase your awareness of the value
of coaching and mentoring when developing successful school leaders and explore how to incorporate
these practices into your own leadership program.
Steven Pomerantz, School Board of Broward County,
Davie, FL, [email protected]
Sherry Rose, School Board of Broward County,
Davie, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
ALABAMA READING INITIATIVE PROJECT
FOR ADOLESCENT LITERACY
Learn about this research-based, adolescent literacy
pilot project fostering collaboration between state
and local education agencies to promote quality
teaching. The content centers around building partnerships, determining the essential components of
school reform, and demonstrating effective teaching
and instruction methods. Apply principles from this
model to your district and/or school setting.
Reeda Betts, Alabama Department of Education,
Highland Home, AL, [email protected]
Tedi Gordon, Alabama Reading Initiative,
Madison, AL, [email protected]
Mike Merold, Alabama Reading Initiative,
Daphne, AL, [email protected]
Denise Perkins, Alabama Reading Initiative,
Helena, AL, [email protected]
Standard(s): IX, XI
40
SET
C
C19
C22
PRINCIPALS WHO LEARN:
A SYSTEMS THINKING APPROACH
CREATING A HIGH-PERFORMANCE
LEADERSHIP CULTURE
Enhance professional conversations by practicing
strategies which improve listening, increase understanding, and include all voices. Use systems thinking tools to analyze issues and surface underlying
assumptions. Increase leadership capacity through
team learning, collaboration and modeling the
importance of ongoing learning.
Anyone can tell when a culture is not working well;
just ask a school teacher laboring under ineffective
leadership. The problem is that not many people
know how to create a culture for high performance
and it is certainly not part of our current leadership
system. Learn about a systems-based approach to
building a high-performance culture. Practice using
it in an experiential exercise and begin creating your
culture for high performance.
Beverly Nance, St. Louis Principals Academy,
St. Louis, MO, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
C20
TRANSFORMING SCHOOLS THROUGH
PLANNING AND PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
Hear how powerful, site-based action plans increased
leadership, aligned school resources to support
goals, and transformed school and district plans for
professional learning. Learn how Stafford County
Public Schools emphasizes broad-based stakeholder
ownership by linking school data with research and
standards to create a culture of continuous
improvement.
Standard(s): II, VIII
C21
ALIGNING THE WORK OF ADULTS
WITH STUDENT LEARNING
Imagine a school system wherein every aspect aligns
with student learning. Hear how this district, from
the school board to the classroom, transforms itself.
See how its commitment to developing leadership
capacity results in sustained professional development and a fervent adherence to its purpose: High
Expectations, High Achievement for All. No Excuses.
Use this session to reflect on the beliefs that guide
your district’s work.
Jeff Ronneberg, Spring Lake Park Schools,
Minneapolis, MN, [email protected]
Jerelyne Nemanich, Spring Lake Park Schools,
Spring Lake Park, MN, [email protected]
Ellen Delaney, Spring Lake Park Schools,
Spring Lake Park, MN, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
Standard(s): II, IX
C23
INTEGRATING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT,
TECHNOLOGY, AND CURRICULUM
How does a district translate the vision of multiple
delivery platforms into powerful learning experiences
that meet the learner's comfort and readiness level?
Learn to create an integrated environment between
curriculum standards, technology, and staff development. Analyze various platforms such as face-to-face,
on-line, hybrid, and self-study to gauge appropriateness. Understand the importance of the learner’s
comfort and readiness level of the delivery tools and
explore options for follow-up.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Patricia Wiedel, Stafford County Public Schools,
Stafford, VA, [email protected]
Andrea Bengier, Stafford County Public Schools,
Stafford, VA, [email protected]
Wendy Payne, Stafford County Public Schools,
Stafford, VA, [email protected]
Catherine Walker, Stafford County Public Schools,
Stafford, VA, [email protected]
Robert Ginnett, Impact Leadership Development Group,
Colorado Springs, CO, [email protected]
Greg Wilborn, Colorado Springs School District 11,
Colorado Springs, CO, [email protected]
Sandy Whitlow, Amarillo Independent School District,
Amarillo, TX, [email protected]
Devia Cearlock, Amarillo Independent School District,
Amarillo, TX, [email protected]
Dirk Funk, Amarillo Independent School District,
Amarillo, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, VII
C24
MENTORING NEW TEACHERS
FOR EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING
Need help fostering a PLC within schools and school
systems? Examine aspects of research-based best
practices for developing a new induction program or
improving an existing one. Learn how to develop
quality teaching and build leadership capacity to
improve student achievement.
Mitchie Neel, Blount County Board of Education,
Oneonta, AL, [email protected]
Stoney Beavers, Blount County Board of Education,
Oneonta, AL, [email protected]
Donna Martin, Blount County Board of Education,
Oneonta, AL, [email protected]
Standard(s): XI
41
SET
C
3-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 9 A.M.–12 P.M.
C25
C28
COACHING BEYOND COMPETENCE
THE LEADER’S ROLE IN DEVELOPING
STRATEGIC READERS
Coaching Beyond Competence is designed for
experienced teachers already engaged in reflective
practice and/or PLCs at their schools who are ready
for a deeper approach to growth. Practice giving
descriptive feedback and scoring lessons to increase
intellectual quality in the classroom.
Dana Carmichael, Dynamic Learner Consulting,
St. Paul, MN, [email protected]
Michael Boucher, Minneapolis Pubic Schools,
Minneapolis, MN, [email protected]
Tiffany Moore, Minneapolis Public Schools,
Minneapolis, MN, [email protected]
Grace Rouseau, Minneapolis Public Schools,
Minneapolis, MN, [email protected]
Susan Presler, Omaha, NE, [email protected]
Rachel Billmeyer, Rachel and Associates,
Omaha, NE, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
Standard(s): I, XI
C29
C26
LEADERSHIP LEGACY THROUGH TEACHER
EMPOWERMENT AND INSTRUCTIONAL
EXCELLENCE
EQUITABLE CLASSROOM PRACTICES THAT WORK
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Do you have a literacy school improvement goal?
Examine the critical role of the leader in developing
strategic readers in all content areas. Explore key
components of a strategic reader, discuss ways to
support teachers as they implement reading strategies, and analyze types of data-collection processes
to verify goal implementation.
Implementing research-based equitable classroom
practices is one approach to closing the achievement
gap. Examine a proven model of school-based professional development that engages participants in an
exploration of equitable practices and the design of a
classroom or schoolwide implementation plan. Hear
how one school has embraced the model, incorporating training, coaching, peer visits, and analysis of
classroom data.
Judy Duffield, Montgomery County Public Schools,
Cabin John, MD, [email protected]
Shira Hill, Montgomery County Public Schools,
Germantown, MD, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, X
C27
DEVELOPING PRINCIPALS AS EFFECTIVE LEADERS
According to Dennis Sparks, “High levels of learning
for all students… requires principals who are consensus builders, strong instructional leaders, and skillful
in forming and sustaining a PLC.” Learn about a professional development process for principals and
assistant principals to develop these competencies.
Hear the rationale and design of the program, the
experiences of participants in the process, and the
results of a three-year research study.
Jay Hillman, Horseheads Middle School/Horseheads School
District, Horseheads, NY, [email protected]
Kay Psencik, Accelerated Learning System,
Cypress, TX, [email protected]
Joe Rumsey, Prattsburgh School District,
Prattsburgh, NY, [email protected]
Maggie Thurber, Elmira City School District,
Elmira, NY, [email protected]
Katherine Funk, Twin Tiers Coalition for Learning,
Corning, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
42
Engage participants in both quantitative and
qualitative research focused on NSDC's standards
for leadership and quality teaching and their impact
on student learning. Observe a teacher leadership
model using the School Improvement Planning
process, job-embedded staff development
opportunities, and the use of best practice research
as a part of classroom instructional design.
Gail Worrell, Zion-Benton Township High School
District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected]
Jasey Kolarik, Zion-Benton Township High School
District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected]
Sandra Ogren, Zion-Benton Township High School
District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected]
Michelle Paulsen, Zion-Benton Township High School
District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected]
Lorie Blickhan, Zion-Benton Township High School
District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected]
Daniel Woods, Zion-Benton Township High School
District #126, Zion, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
C30
DIFFERENTIATING PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Hear how the Monroe Township School District
created a program to meet the needs of its 525
certificated staff, 207 of whom are non-tenured.
The program is built upon the adult learning theories
and allows teachers to participate in ongoing learning
teams focused on classroom instruction and student
achievement. Examine distributed leadership strategies used to develop teacher leadership capacity.
Christopher Tienken, Monroe Township Board of Education,
‘Spring Lake Heights, NJ, [email protected]
Stephanie Goldberg, Monroe Township Board of Education,
Manalapan, NJ, [email protected]
Lew Stonaker, Monroe Township Board of Education,
Robbinsville, NJ, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
SET
C
C31
C34
INCREASING MOTIVATION AND ENGAGEMENT
IN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
BIG 21 NETWORK
Learn research-supported principles to unleash the
power of intrinsic motivation and increase the depth
of learning. Add to your teaching practical tools for
engaging the motivated and the unmotivated. See
our comprehensive instructional framework and how
aligned processes yield broad implementation across
the staff and major gains in student achievement.
Spence Rogers, Peak Learning Systems,
Evergreen, CO, [email protected]
Beth Buchanan, Galena City School District,
Galena, AK, [email protected]
Chris Reitan, Galena City School District,
Galena, AK, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
C32
SHAPING THE FUTURE OF PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING IN CANADA
Joanne Quinn, University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Audrey Hobbs, BC education Leadership Council,
North Vancouver, BC, Canada, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
C33
STATE EDUCATION AGENCY NETWORK
Join the oldest NSDC network, a group of supportive
colleagues from state and provincial agencies across
North America. This session is limited to individuals
who work in staff development at the state level.
Current issues, activities, and materials will be shared
during the meeting.
Eileen Aviss-Spedding, New Jersey Department of Education,
Trenton, NJ, [email protected]
Lea Arnau, Gwinnett County Public Schools,
Suwanee, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
C35
PLC: SEE IT, HEAR IT, EXPERIENCE IT!
Participants in Preconference session 204 will
conduct a site-visit to the Jonsson Community
School, a low-income, urban, laboratory, Pre K-5
school in Dallas, where powerful brain-based
instruction combines with the simultaneous
building of relationships to ensure soaring student
performance and amazing family commitment.
This concurrent session is for participants in
Preconference session 204 only. Transportation
will be provided to and from the school, and
details of the visit will be communicated directly
to registered participants. Participants will return
in time for the general session at noon.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
What’s happening in Canada to move educational
change forward? Join Canadian colleagues to take
stock of what is working effectively, what needs
improvement, and the strategies it will take to shape
the future. Come prepared to share your best practices in professional learning, identify ways to build
support, and develop strategies which influence
policy.
Representatives from the largest school districts
in the U.S. will meet to discuss the major issues
facing their departments and to establish an agenda
for dialogue and action during the year. This session
is limited to Big 21-designated school districts that
received invitations.
Mike Murphy, Salesmanship Club Youth and Family Center,
Richardson, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XII
C36
BUILDING LEARNING COMMUNITIES
THROUGH LEADERSHIP
Leadership skill development is an absolute necessity
if schools are to create the type of learning communities that engage all staff to do whatever is necessary
to improve student performance. This session
provides the training and skills school leaders need in
order to guide continuous instructional improvement.
Michael Routa, Ashland University, Elyria, OH,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
Standard(s): I, IX
Refer to the topic, presenter, and audience
indices on page 106–109 to help with your
selection process.
43
SET
D
2-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 10 A.M.–12 P.M.
D01
D03
TEXAS SCHOLAR LECTURE 10 a.m.–11 a.m.
WHAT DO RESEARCH, BEST PRACTICE, AND
GOOD HORSE SENSE TELL US ABOUT
EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
COMMUNITIES?
IMPROVING INTERVENTION
FOR STRUGGLING READERS
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Though it is not very extensive, there is a
research base that informs us about the results
for school staffs, and outcomes for students, when
the staff is organized and works as a professional
learning community (PLC). Many questionable activities reported by schools undertaking the implementation of PLC seem to be traveling across the nation
more rapidly than the true concept. Are these activities valid and reliable indicators of authentic professional learning communities? We will identify six
issues that relate to many PLC efforts in schools and
districts, and “worry” about whether ad hoc or easyto-implement practices associated with these issues
work to produce desired outcomes for the staffs and
students involved. What has been learned through
research about why and how to conduct a PLC so that
it supports students’ learning? In Texas, we believe
there is some value in deferring to “good horse
sense”. Thus, a nod to this source about the when
and the where of PLCs is also in order.
Shirley Hord, SEDL, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I
D02
STUDYING THE IMPACT OF INSTRUCTIONAL
COACHING
Many educators are choosing instructional coaching
as a powerful way to enable professional learning. But
what does research say about this approach? During
the 2006-07 academic school year, researchers at the
University of Kansas conducted a rigorous study of
instructional coaching, monitoring the impact coaching had on 36 teachers and the students they taught
in six different middle schools. Come learn about
that study.
Jim Knight, Kansas University Center for Research on Learning,
Lawrence, KS, [email protected]
Stacy Cohen, Kansas University Center for Research on Learning,
Lawrence, KS, [email protected]
Tricia McKale, Kansas University Center for Research on Learning,
Lawrence, KS, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, XI
Learn how a publishing company and a school
district partnered to establish a learning community
to provide effective, job-embedded professional
development to teachers for the purpose of
improving intervention instruction for students who
struggle. Share the successes and challenges of
implementing a customized model of Response to
Intervention (RtI) and hear how the RtI process can
limit the amount of academic failure any student
experiences.
Donna Neel, Voyager Expanded Learning,
Dallas, TX, [email protected]
Karen Nelson, Voyager Expanded Learning,
Dallas, TX, [email protected]
Khristie Goodwin, Oxford City Schools,
Oxford, AL, [email protected]
Jeff Goodwin, Oxford City Schools,
Oxford, AL, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
D04
UNDERSTANDING LEARNING AND
BUILDING A COMMUNITY OF LEADERS
Helping parents and students learn about learning
can be a challenge. Using presentations, activities,
and case studies, this session will provide ways to
involve parents in the education process, engage
parents and students in learning more about
learning, and develop a stronger alliance between
all to support success in school and at home.
Anne Taite Austin, Forsyth Country Day School,
Lewisville, NC, [email protected]
Kimberly Helixon, Sam Houston High School/Arlington
Independent School District, Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XII
D05
THE BRAIN AND ADDICTION
Although the brain has the capacity to sculpt itself
based on environmental influences, it does not
always distinguish between positive and negative
influences and can become sculpted to “require”
alcohol and other recreational drugs. Gain insight
on the biological underpinnings of addiction and
understand not only what addiction is but why some
people become addicted to damaging drugs while
others do not.
Pat Wolfe, Mind Matters, Inc., Napa, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI
44
SET
D
D06
D08
ACCELERATING ELEMENTARY LITERACY GROWTH
DATA-DRIVEN STAFF DEVELOPMENT
FOCUSED ON STUDENTS
Learn about one school’s collaborative team
approach to preventing reading failure and
improving literacy outcomes for students by using
data-driven assessment, differentiated instruction and
intervention. The multi-year implementation model
incorporates Response to Intervention (RtI) elements
and highlights administrative considerations. Reflect
upon professional development characteristics that
result in student growth and begin an action plan.
Nancy Aronson, West Chester Area School District,
Ephrata, PA, [email protected]
Susan Cobb, West Chester Area School District,
Kennett Square, PA, [email protected]
Lisa Lucas, West Chester Area School District,
West Chester, PA, [email protected]
Gayle Summers, West Chester Area School District,
Downingtown, PA, [email protected]
Beverly Holcomb, West Chester Area School District,
West Chester, PA, [email protected]
Nina Ansel, West Chester Area School District,
West Chester, PA, [email protected]
Andrea Clemens, West Chester Area School District,
West Chester, PA, [email protected]
Deborah Burston, West Chester Area School District,
Wilmington, DE, [email protected]
Helen Conahan-Dettrey, Institute for Teaching and Learning,
Downingtown, PA, [email protected]
D07
MEASURING AND REPORTING YOUR DISTRICT’S
INVESTMENT IN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Hear this panel’s strategies for finding and using
appropriate data to determine and report on your
K-12 staff development investments. Focusing on
how best to leverage professional development management systems to support the use of evaluation
models like those of Thomas Guskey, NSDC, and
others, examine real world experiences with using
multiple data sources and practical research design
to inform daily practice.
Dan Cookson, TrueNorthLogic,
Sandy, UT, [email protected]
Kirk Vandersall, Arroyo Research Services,
Los Angeles, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, V
“This event was highly
motivating and filled with
much learning for me.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
Rebecca Blink, Chilton School District,
Appleton, WI, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IV
D09
DEVELOPING SUCCESSFUL LITERACY COACHES
TO BUILD INSTRUCTIONAL CAPACITY
Research has shown the importance of teacher
quality on student achievement and the efficacy of
coaching on teacher improvement, but effective staff
development for coaches to learn the craft of coaching is crucial for this to occur. Learn innovative
strategies to deepen the content knowledge and
skills of district coaches to ensure their role as
instructional leaders. Experience how coaches
participating in The Chicago Coaching Project
improved their practice.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Standard(s): I, IV
See how staff development can be driven more by
what the students need than by what teachers think
they need. Learn how student achievement data is
used to drive staff development planning and discuss
how your staff development plans fit into the DDIS
(Data-Driven Instructional System) Model providing
a framework for school districts to focus their energy
on student learning.
Pat Federman, Children's Literacy Initiative,
Philadelphia, PA, [email protected]
Jessie Blohm-Hamlet, Chicago Public Schools,
Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Kimberly Brassfield, Children's Literacy Initiative,
Philadelphia, PA, [email protected]
Karen Carradine, Chicago Public Schools,
Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
D10
RELATIONSHIPS: THE FOUNDATION FOR
POSITIVE SCHOOL CULTURE AND LEARNING
Successful schools with a positive culture are built on
a strong foundation of relationships. Examine the key
elements of what makes a positive school culture and
the implications for student success. Understand the
impact of relationships on learning for all stakeholders in the school community through an interactive
exploration of proven research-based tools and
resources.
Heather Peterson, Hampton City School,
Hampton, VA, [email protected]
Beth Welch, Hampton City School, Hampton, VA,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, III
45
SET
D
2-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 10 A.M.–12 P.M.
D11
D13
TRAINING EDUCATORS TO FOSTER PARENT
ENGAGEMENT IN SCHOOLS
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR PROVIDERS
OF ONLINE TEACHER TRAINING
Engaging parents in their children’s education is
critical for student success. Examine this partnership
between a university and a state department of
education to offer three graduate courses onsite in
a school system. See how all course projects and
activities are designed to address the needs of the
community. Learn the components of this model and
how it may be adapted to fit your school system.
What types of professional development do online
teacher trainers require? FOR-PD provides training to
facilitators of Florida's first large-scale online professional development project focused on engagement
with content and interaction within the online environment. Hear about the design, including a review
of resources and decisions on learning interactions.
Participate in simulations of this professional development and examine key elements of its impact.
Karen Eskow, Towson University,
Towson, MD, [email protected]
Susan Bartels, Towson University/Howard County Public School
System, Towson, MD, [email protected]
Standard(s): XII
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
D12
Candace Whitehead, Florida Online Reading Professional
Development at UCF, Orlando, FL, [email protected]
Lourdes Smith, Florida Online Reading Professional
Development at UCF, Orlando, FL, [email protected]
Vicky Zygouris-Coe, University of Central Florida,
Orlando, FL, [email protected]
INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERS AS
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPERS
Standard(s): VIII, XI
Focusing the work of instructional leaders on
student learning and using this information to design
professional development activities is essential if
school reform efforts are to be successful. Learn how
instructional leaders have been supported in collecting a variety of student and teacher learning data to
construct job-embedded professional development
activities consistent with schoolwide improvement
plans.
ADULT LEARNING FROM STAFF ROOM
TO CLASSROOM
Kathy Binkowski, Plainville Community Schools,
Plainville, CT, [email protected]
Linda Van Wagonen, Plainville Community Schools,
Plainville, CT, [email protected]
David Telesca, Plainville Community Schools,
Plainville, CT, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IV
D14
High-performing districts must work with adult
learners onsite to implement instructional initiatives.
Systemic, sustained, collegial, and job-embedded
professional development with practice, feedback,
and coaching, brings a 95% possibility of immediate,
authentic, and active transfer of learning from the
staff room to the classroom. Explore characteristics
of adult learners and how change occurs in schools.
Robin Fogarty, Robin Fogarty and Associates,
Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Abygayil Joesph, Chicago Public Schools,
Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Brian Pete, Robin Fogarty and Associates,
Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, VIII
“This was my fourth conference and I am always
impressed by the quality of speakers, the attention to
detail and organization, the friendliness of everyone,
and the great learning and sharing that goes on
during the conference.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
46
SET
D
D15
D18
INTERVENTION FOR UNDERACHIEVING
CHILDREN
CHARACTERplus IMPROVES DISCIPLINE
AND ACHIEVEMENT
Teaching underachieving children of poverty presents
a daunting challenge for educators, schools, and districts, but with appropriate school and classroom
intervention, dramatic achievement gains will occur.
Learn about compelling research, program and policy
recommendations, and effective classroom strategies.
K-12 high-achieving schools with significant populations of low SES students will be featured.
Effective school change involves the total
community–administrators, teachers, parents,
community members, and students. Examine an
integrated process based on organizational
development principles, collaborative structures,
and data-based decisionmaking for developing
healthy schools. Learn how your school can improve
the environment, decrease discipline problems, and
improve achievement.
William Parrett, Boise State University Center
for School Improvement and Policy Studies,
Boise, ID, [email protected]
Robert Barr, BSU Center for School Improvement
and Policy Studies, Boise, ID, [email protected]
Kathleen Budge, Boise State University,
Boise, ID, [email protected]
Teri Wagner, Lapwai School District,
Lapwai, ID, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VI
Jeanne Foster, Cooperating School Districts/CHARACTERplus,
Wood River, IL, [email protected]
Sally Caldwell, International Learning Services,
Orange Beach, AL, [email protected]
Jon Marshall, Marshall Consulting,
Rapid City, SD, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, IX
D19
THE GIFT OF COACHING
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
VIA COLLEGIAL INTERACTION
To be a powerful and effective coach requires skill
which is best developed by experiencing coaching
first hand. Observe coaching skills and language
while experiencing its benefits. Members of Coaching
for Results, Inc. are providing the gift of a one-on-one
coaching session with a professional coach. Give
yourself 60-120 minutes to explore your confidential
goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities….a goal
made clear, a plan evolved, multiple solutions for a
tough situation.
Get introduced to a taxonomy for collegiality, which
is central to developing a PLC. Explore ways to use
the taxonomy to effectively assess collegiality in your
schools. Learn to use the taxonomy as a tool to
educate teachers about collegiality and how to
nurture it in working groups.
P. Mark Taylor, University of Tennessee,
Knoxville, TN, [email protected]
Pamela Angelle, University of Tennessee,
Knoxville, TN, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
D17
FACILITATING ANGRY OR DIFFICULT
GROUPS OF PEOPLE
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
D16
Kathryn Kee, Coaching School Results, Inc.,
Shady Shores, TX, [email protected]
Janet Bliss-Mello, Coaching School Results,
Plano, TX, [email protected]
Riva Korashan, UFT Teacher Center,
New York, NY, [email protected]
Alice Owen, Irving Independent School District,
Irving, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
Learn how to use coaching skills in helping groups
work through concerns and issues. Strategies to be
developed include reflecting skills, ideas to make the
change more easily understood, techniques for
assessing people’s level of concern, facilitator/coach
self-protection, and working with implementation
blockers.
John Eller, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
Falls Church, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
D20
LEADING FOR RESULTS BOOK TALK
Dennis Sparks will talk with you about his latest book,
Leading for Results, Second Edition. Please read this
book before attending the session. The book focuses
on the educational leader’s role in actualizing human
potential and unleashing individual and organizational energy and promoting extraordinary performance.
Dennis Sparks, National Staff Development Council, Emeritus
Executive Director, Ann Arbor, MI, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
47
SET
2-hour roundtable sessions
R1
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 10 A.M.–12 P.M.
CREATING SAFE, ORDERLY,
AND SUPPORTIVE LEARNING
ENVIRONMENTS
Learn proven methods for creating
safe, healthy, learning environment
for all students.
Brian Mendler, Discipline Associates,
Rochester, NY, [email protected]
Panella Anthony, Starpoint Central School
District, Lockport, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, X
ONLINE PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT FOR THE
NEW EDUCATOR
Learn how to develop a differentiated, technology-based professional
development plan for each teacher
in your district.
R O U N D TA B L E S E S S I O N S
Evan Erdberg, Knowledge Delivery Systems,
New York, NY, [email protected]
Meline Fox, Knowledge Delivery Systems,
New York, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, VIII
21ST CENTURY PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: DESIGNING,
IMPLEMENTING, AND
MAINTAINING NEW CURRICULA
Hear one district’s use of technology and learning communities to
transform teaching and learning in
science.
Katharine Olson, Northbrook School District
27, Northbrook, IL, [email protected]
Colleen Feldmiller, Northbrook School District
27, Northbrook, IL, [email protected]
Bonnie Wilkerson, Northbrook School District
27, Northbrook, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, VI
strategic plan.
Syd Dickson, Board of Trustees, Salt Lake
City, UT, [email protected]
Standard(s): II
DON'T BREAK THE ICE,
SHATTER IT!
Create engagement and energy by
enhancing ordinary ice breakers
with technology, including digital
cameras, digital storytelling, and
much more.
Tara Mattingly, Charles County Public
Schools, Indian Head, MD,
[email protected]
Alesha Guechati, William Wade Elementary/
Charles County Public Schools, Waldorf, MD,
[email protected]
Meighan Hungerford, Charles County Public
Schools, LaPlata, MD,
[email protected]
Standard(s): III, VII
MODELING THE IMPORTANCE
OF INSTRUCTIONAL EXCELLENCE
Gain practical strategies for modeling instructional excellence at every
level of a jurisdiction.
Bonnie Chappell, School District No. 57
(Prince George), Prince George, BC, Canada,
[email protected]
Brian Chappell, School District No. 57 (Prince
George), Prince George, BC, Canada, brchappel[email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
EFFECTIVE TOOLS FOR
STRENGTHENING YOUR
TEACHER MENTOR PROGRAM
Examine the critical components
of teacher mentor and induction
programs, regardless of a district’s
financial resources.
WHEN LEARNERS REVOLT:
STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS
Ginger Kave, Loudoun County Public Schools,
DIFFICULT ADULT LEARNERS
Ashburn, VA, [email protected]
Learn how to proactively respond to Chad Green, Loudoun County Public Schools,
difficult adult learners, engage them Ashburn, VA, [email protected]
with interactive strategies, and moti- Standard(s): V, XI
vate them to apply their professional
COLLABORATIVE REVIEW OF
development knowledge in their
EVIDENCE OF STUDENT
daily work.
LEARNING IN THE ARTS
Ava Sweet, Houston Independent School
Reflect on the value of collaborative
District, Houston, TX,
[email protected]
decision making and on the implicaLori Grossman, Houston Independent School tions of examining student work for
District, Houston, TX,
art teaching and learning.
[email protected]
Standard(s:) III, VIII
LEADERSHIP NSDC
Explore NSDC leadership and
service options to assist the Council
in the implementation of the new
48
Cheryll Ostrom, Perpich Center for Arts
Education, Brooklyn Park, MN,
[email protected]
Byron Richard, Perpich Center for Arts
Education, Golden Valley, MN,
[email protected]
Standard(s): V, XI
E.R. FOR STRUGGLING READERS
Gain tools that foster active reading
and exhilarating activities that can
be used immediately.
Rebecca Sheinberg, Houston Independent
School District, Houston, TX,
[email protected]
Tai Shan Jackson, Houston Independent
School District, Houston, TX,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, XII
PRODUCTIVE PARTNERS IN
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Learn about East Central University’s
PK-16 professional development
model and its documented successes linked to improved teacher
content knowledge, increased use
of research-based instructional
practices, and improved student
achievement.
Richard Cooper, East Central University,
Ada, OK, [email protected]
Kevin Lynch, East Central University,
Ada, OK, [email protected]
Lisa Shores, Byng Public School,
Allen, OK, [email protected]
C.J. Vires, East Central University,
Ada, OK, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
LEAVING A COACHING LEGACY:
CAN IT BE DONE IN THREE
YEARS?
Explore essential coaching strategies
and support needed to initiate and
sustain positive change in an elementary and middle school setting.
Valerie Winter, Hayfield Middle School/Fairfax
County Public Schools, Alexandria, VA,
[email protected]
Dotty Lin, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Lorton, VA, [email protected]
Lois Lucas, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Alexandria, VA, [email protected]
Cecilia Vanderhye, Fairfax County Public
Schools, Herndon, VA,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
PROMOTING EMOTIONAL
LITERACY AND SELF-DISCIPLINE
Examine how district and schoollevel administrators create the conditions to support major schoolwide
changes in student behavior and
improve student attendance.
Janice Fulawka, Northern Lights School
Division #69, Lac La Biche, AB, Canada,
[email protected]
Dana Robb, Northern Lights School Division
#69, Edmonton, AB, Canada,
[email protected]
Standard(s): IV, IX
SET
Participants selecting Roundtable 1 will have the opportunity to attend two of the following presentations.
Simply check Roundtable 1 on your Session Selection form and choose any two sessions when you arrive.
COLOR YOUR WORLD WITH
ASSESSMENT DATA TO DRIVE
STUDENT LEARNING
Learn how to utilize color-coded
data results and a common
language to promote collegial learning and increase student learning.
Donna Bates, Wise County School Board,
Wise, VA, [email protected]
Sharon Moore, Wise County Public Schools,
Pound, VA, [email protected]
Kathy Stewart, Wise County Public Schools,
St. Paul, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, VI
BEYOND THE NUMBERS:
USING EQUITY TO PERSONALIZE
AND FOSTER LITERACY
Learn leadership strategies that
successfully integrate literacy and
equity in schools and districts to
increase student achievement.
Nivia Garbalosa, Broward County Public
Schools, Pembroke Pines, FL,
[email protected]
Carla Hart, Broward County Public Schools,
Sunrise, FL, [email protected]
Deedra Hicks, Broward County Public
Schools, Sunrise, FL,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, X
Jennifer Bell, Auburn University,
LaGrange, GA, [email protected]
Glennelle Halpin, Auburn University,
Auburn University, AL, [email protected]
Gerald Halpin, Auburn University,
Auburn University, AL, [email protected]
Standard(s): V
STATE AND LOCAL
COLLABORATION BUILDS
TEACHER CAPACITY AND
STUDENT SUCCESS
Learn how state, district, and school
collaboration close the achievement
gap for African-American students
through job-embedded professional
development.
Susan Frank, Caroline County Board of
Education, Denton, MD,
[email protected]
Robin Daubach, Caroline County Board of
Education, Denton, MD,
[email protected]
Kathy Volk, Maryland State Department of
Education, Baltimore, MD,
[email protected]
Standard(s): VII
Jill Zitnay, Orange Elementary School System,
Oxford, CT, [email protected]
Anne Fleming, Orange Public School System,
Branford, CT, [email protected]
Darla Miner, Orange Elementary School
System, Oxford, CT, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, IX
MENTAL MODELSBLUEPRINTS FOR LEARNING
Acquire strategies that engage
faculty in teaching and learning
mental models to improve instruction and student comprehension.
Constance Abernathy, aha! Process, Inc.,
Carrollton, VA, [email protected]
Jim Littlejohn, aha! Process, Inc.,
Columbia, SC, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
DYNAMIC TOOLS FOR THE
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
CONTINUUM
Preview tools and a planning guide
to consider when selecting and
implementing technical assistance
to meet intended outcomes.
Sharon Harsh, Edvantia, Inc.,
Charleston, WV, [email protected]
Sandra Angius, Edvantia, Inc.,
Charleston, WV, [email protected]
Kimberly Hambrick, Edvantia, Inc.,
Charleston, WV,
[email protected]
Caitlin Howley, Edvantia, Inc.,
Charleston, WV, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, VII
DEVELOPING MOTIVATED
MATHEMATICS STUDENTS
THROUGH THE POWER OF
CHOICE
Discover how to motivate students
through learning strategies, assessment, and self-monitoring behavior
management, so that math students
reach their highest potential.
A FOCUS ON LEARNING
AND LEARNERS
Gain knowledge of how one school
aligned and embedded the professional work of staff around student
learning by utilizing key processes
that supported instruction, assessment analysis, and continuous
improvement planning.
Mike Callahan, Spring Lake Park School
District #16, Fridley, MN,
[email protected]
Amy Bjurlin, Spring Lake Park School District
#16, Fridley, MN, [email protected]
Lorrie Murdy, Spring Lake Park School
District #16, Fridley, MN,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
NSDC ACADEMY PREVIEW
Join Ed Tobia and NSDC Academy
graduates to learn more about
Academy expectations, and benefits.
Ed Tobia, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, VII
NSDC BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FOCUSED CONVERSATION
Join an NSDC Trustee to discuss
how the Council can assist you to
achieve NSDC’s purpose.
Charles Mason, Mountain Brook School
District, Mountain Brook, AL,
[email protected]
Standard(s): III, XI
USING NSDC AUDIT AS AN
EXTERNAL REVIEW TO IDENTIFY
DISTRICT PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT NEEDS
Discover the benefits of using an
NSDC audit team to conduct an
external review as a systematic
assessment of the current professional development programs and
services provided within a district.
Linda Munger, Munger Education Associates,
Urbandale, IA, [email protected]
Standard(s): V
Deborah Ekwo, Houston ISD,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Wanetta Jones-Allen, Houston ISD,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Kim Seals, Houston ISD,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Clara Yates, Houston ISD,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, X
49
R O U N D TA B L E S E S S I O N S
AN EVALUATION TRAINING
Learn how to develop a research
design to evaluate the impact of
professional development on
student learning.
CURRICULUM MAPPING
Learn how to support the development of curriculum maps, skills
assessments, grading criteria, and
standards-based report cards
through collaboration and teaming.
R1
SET
E
3-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 2:15 P.M.–5:15 P.M.
E01
E05
MONDAY AFTERNOON LECTURE OPTION
CULTURALLY PROFICIENT COACHING
IN DIVERSE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS
This will allow you to attend the following sessions:
E02: Questions and Answers with Parker Palmer
2:15 p.m.–3:15 p.m. and
F01: Texas Scholar Lecture by Raymond Paredes
Please see the individual sessions listings for
program descriptions.
E02
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WITH
KEYNOTE SPEAKER PARKER PALMER
Keynote speaker Parker Palmer will address
your questions in this special session following his keynote address Monday afternoon.
This session will conclude after one hour.
Culturally Proficient Coaching is an essential skill
for educators who serve students in diverse environments and who may make assumptions that block
a student's thinking and learning. These tools help
bring these assumptions to the surface. This coaching will help educators become more conscious of
assessing cultural norms and identity, develop
flexibility while managing the dynamics of diversity,
and improve coaching skills that value diversity.
Delores Lindsey, California State University San Marcos,
Escondido, CA, [email protected]
Randall Lindsey, California Lutheran University,
Escondido, CA, [email protected]
Ricahard Martinez, The Artful Alliance,
Upland, CA, [email protected]
Keith Myatt, Artful Alliance, Upland, CA, [email protected]
Parker Palmer, Madison, WI, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, X
Standard(s): I, II
E03
NSDC AFFILIATE LEADERS MEETING
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Hear from your national leaders. Gather new
strategies for aligning your work with NSDC’s new
strategic plan This session is limited to designated
NSDC affiliate leaders.
Dale Hair, Kennesaw, GA, [email protected]
Karen Anderson, Coaching School Results,
Mesquite, TX, [email protected]
E06
EMPOWERED MENTORS IMPACT
NEW TEACHER SUCCESS
Explore a quality professional development model
proven to make a critical difference in novice and
veteran teacher effectiveness. The Four C's:
Commitment, Community, Conversation, and
Collaboration of this successful district mentoring
program immerse mentors in researched principles
and practices for supporting beginning teachers.
Standard(s): IV
E04
BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING AND CLASSROOM PRACTICE
Learn how one district accomplished real school
change by involving leaders at all levels in assessing
students and school data, designing and delivering
professional development, and creating collaborative
processes to translate training content and strategies
into classroom practice. Explore how this district
provides support, monitors learning, and adheres to
a relentless pursuit of excellence that puts students
first.
Pam Robbins, Mt. Crawford, VA, [email protected]
Jeff White, Fort Osage R-1 School District,
Independence, MO, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
Kim Tunnell, Tyler Independent School District,
Tyler, TX, [email protected]
Charlotte Tharp, Ben Wheeler, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, XI
E07
COOL TOOLS FOR SCHOOLS
Hold on to the reins, pardner. The World Wide
Web is about to change again! Join us as we explain,
investigate, and consider the latest simple tools that
are revolutionizing the Web for educators: wikis,
flickr, furl, del.icio.us, blogs and the invisible web.
You’ll go home with new knowledge and information
that you can share with colleagues and that will make
your job easier. Be on the cutting edge!
Walter Olsen, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected]
Danny Martinez, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory,
Austin, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
50
SET
E
E08
E11
A STRENGTHS APPROACH TO STUDENTS
AND EDUCATORS
INTEGRATING MATHEMATICS CONTENT,
PEDAGOGY, AND EQUITY
Schools can attend to the unique needs of students
and educators through a positive approach of building on strengths. Learn how one school district helps
educators and students identify and use their unique
talents in the classroom. Examine your assumptions
about strength and weakness approaches to improving performance, and take away Teach With Your
Strengths to complete your own strengths profile.
How can we assist inner city teachers in helping
diverse students succeed in mathematics? Learn
about a districtwide staff development model that
deepens mathematics content knowledge and
increases the pedagogical strategies for elementary,
middle, and high school teachers enabling them to
reflect on their role in creating environments where
diverse students can achieve success.
Richard Valenta, Birdville Independent School District,
Haltom City, TX, [email protected]
Gary Gordon, The Gallup Organization,
Overland Park, KS, [email protected]
Leeann Michalak, Birdville Independent School District,
Haltom City, TX, [email protected]
Karen Mayfield-Ingram, EQUALS, University of California Berkeley,
Berkeley, CA, [email protected]
Ann Barker, Center for Research Evaluation
and Assessment/Lawrence Hall of Science,
Berkeley, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
Standard(s): VII, VIII
E12
E09
USING PROFESSIONAL MENTOR STANDARDS
TO ADVANCE MENTOR PRACTICE
Wendy Baron, New Teacher Center at University of California
Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected]
Ronni Mann, New Teacher Center at University of California
Santa Cruz, Bayside, NY, [email protected]
Sharon Nelson, New Teacher Center at University of California
Santa Cruz, Waunakee, WI, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IV
E10
EXPLICIT DATA ANALYSIS TO IMPACT
TEACHING AND LEARNING
Are you drowning in a sea of data? Join us to hear
about processes and structures used to increase the
ability of staff to use data effectively. Gain tools to
guide collegial discussion; build staff capacity to utilize data efficiently, encourage stakeholders to own
data; and monitor and modify instruction within
departments, teams, and classrooms.
Sheila Berlinger, Montgomery County Public Schools,
N. Potomac, MD, [email protected]
Sharon Fogler, Montgomery County Public Schools,
Germantown, MD, [email protected]
Successful workshops rely on basic principles that
apply to all presentations. The goal is to engage the
audience and give beneficial information that can be
immediately implemented. Explore connections
between strategies that can be applicable to the
different areas of presentation: content, process,
and context.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Assessments of mentor practice can help induction
program leaders plan strategic, meaningful, ongoing
professional development for mentors. The New
Teacher Center has designed standards and a continuum to help mentors celebrate success and identify
areas for growth. Learn to use this data to create
powerful learning communities and promote teacher
leadership.
BEYOND THE SIT-AND-GET: CREATIVE RESOURCES
TO ENHANCE PRESENTATIONS
Isai Gutierrez, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Rebecca Sheinberg, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, IX
E13
CO-TEACHING: BUILDING PROFESSIONAL
PARTNERSHIPS
Academic coaches and trainers will learn how
to guide teachers as they transition into roles as
co-teachers in inclusive settings. Providing effective
teaching strategies and non-evaluative feedback in
a coaching situation will make this transition more
successful for teachers and students.
Claudia Parker, South Georgia GLRS,
Lenox, GA, [email protected]
Corine Alt, South Georgia GLRS,
Lenox, GA, [email protected]
Helen Bennett, South Georgia GLRS,
Jennings, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, IX
Standard(s): IV, IX
51
SET
E
3-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 2:15 P.M.–5:15 P.M.
E14
E17
GOTTA MOVE, GOTTA SHARE:
CREATING AN INTERACTIVE CLASSROOM
LAUGHING MATTERS FOR BUILDING
JOYFUL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
Get moving, sharing, and reflecting as this facilitator
models tools, techniques, and strategies to help shift
students from passive mode to active participants in
their own learning. Learn how to shift the work from
teacher to student. Take home proven strategies you
can use immediately to create the ultimate interactive
classroom.
A culture of distrust, low morale, and resistance
to change often blocks teamwork and causes many
to feel a loss of balance in their lives. Focus on the
positive effects of laughter and good humor in your
own life, in the lives and learning of students, and in
your school as a learning community. Rediscover the
joy in education and have some fun!
Ron Nash, Virginia Beach City Public Schools,
Virginia Beach, VA, [email protected]
Susan Stephenson, Top Notch Team Associates,
Brampton, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
Standard(s): I, XI
E15
E18
STUDENTS ARE STAKEHOLDERS, TOO!
THE ARTFUL USE OF INFRASTRUCTURE
Increase your awareness of the value and power to
be derived from engaging authentic student voice in
school improvement and classroom learning. Hear
real-world experiences and results from a composite
school story that will inspire and inform. Compare
eight levels of student participation to school and
classroom practices.
Organizations are discovering they need to learn not
just different ways of doing things, but very different
ways of thinking about their work. This requires
redefinition of leadership. This session stimulates
that thinking. It explores the artful use of infrastructure (roles, rituals, and routines) and addresses how
to align staff, establish continuous learning, and
empower teachers to assume leadership roles.
Edie Holcomb, Kenosha Unified School District No. 1,
Kenosha, WI, [email protected]
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Standard(s): II, XI
E16
NO EXCUSES UNIVERSITY: COLLEGE READINESS
FOR ALL ELEMENTARY STUDENTS
From the moment poor, at-risk students enter the
doors of a school they have been burdened with
poverty, second language challenges, and socially
stunted development. Learn about schools that have
fostered cultures of universal achievement and developed exceptional systems that can be implemented
at any school creating high levels of success for all.
Excuses? Never again!
Damen Lopez, Poway Unified School District,
Ramona, CA, [email protected]
Jeff King, Poway Unified School District,
San Diego, CA, [email protected]
Steve Biancaniello, Freedom Secondary Institute Charter School,
Monroeville, PA, [email protected]
RoseMary Mautino, Duquesne University,
Pittsburgh, PA, [email protected]
Ronald Sofo, Freedom Area School Dstrict,
Monroeville, PA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IV
E19
MORE SWIMMING, LESS SINKING:
NEW TEACHER INDUCTION THAT WORKS
State educators recently wrote our state's first set of
induction program standards as well as descriptions
of what mentors of new teachers should know and
be able to do. Now we are implementing these
standards in nine districts across the state and
encouraging others to adopt them in their own
contexts. Learn what we did and how it could work
in your district.
Standard(s): I, X
Mindy Meyer, Center for Strengthening the Teaching Profession,
College Place, WA, [email protected]
Barb Moses, Toppenish School District, Toppenish, WA,
[email protected]
Jan Rust, Spokane Public Schools, Spokane, WA,
[email protected]
Standard(s): VII, XI
52
SET
E
E20
ENGAGE THE DISENGAGED: MINIMIZE
RESISTANCE AND MAXIMIZE LEARNING
Keeping everyone motivated and engaged is critical
to professional development. Learn how to involve
every participant-even the challenging ones-through
the use of varied strategies. Find out how these
strategies match up with a range of participant types
and practice when to use which strategy to create an
environment that supports all learners.
Diane Alsager, Great Source Education Group,
Cedar Rapids, IA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
E21
THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX:
ASSESSMENT FOR TEACHING
Real shifts in student learning involve a transformation in teacher thinking that comes from examining
practice and learning from students. Examine the
results from action research projects at three very
different schools from the Rainbow District School
Board. Examine the processes and structures that
shaped their inquiry and the content and outcomes
of their work.
S TA N D A R D S
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
LEARNING COMMUNITIES
LEADERSHIP
RESOURCES
DATA-DRIVEN
EVALUATION
RESEARCH-BASED
DESIGN
LEARNING
COLLABORATION
EQUITY
QUALITY TEACHING
XII
FAMILY INVOLVEMENT
ADVANCED
This symbol indicates an
Advanced Level Session
Sharon Speir, Rainbow District School Board,
Sudbury, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, VI
53
SET
F
2-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 2:15 P.M.–4:15 P.M.
F01
F04
TEXAS SCHOLAR LECTURE 3:15 p.m.-4:15 p.m.
RETHINKING COLLEGE READINESS IN AN AGE OF
GLOBALIZATION: WHAT EDUCATORS NEED
TO DO TO PRESERVE U. S. LEADERSHIP.
WALKING AND TALKING: OUR WAY
TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
The demands to make college students
college-ready have changed dramatically over
the past 20 years. New college-readiness standards need to be more rigorous than ever before.
University and K-12 education systems must work
together to improve teaching and learning. There is a
need for vertical teams and course redesign to meet
the demand of college-readiness strategies in Texas.
Raymund Paredes, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board,
Austin, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): X
Dana Robb, Northern Lights School Division,
Lac La Biche, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Jim Clevette, Northern Lights School Division,
Lac La Biche, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Janice Fulawka, Northern Lights School Division,
Lac La Biche, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Blair Norton, Northern Lights School Division,
Lac La Biche, AB, Canada, [email protected]
F02
Standard(s): II, IV
THE QUINTESSENTIAL GUIDE TO
PARENT-TEACHER CONNECTIONS
F05
This guide (Guia de Excelencia Para Conexion Entre
Padres y Maestros) provides knowledge and skills
to increase parental involvement and enhance collaboration with educators for student's success. Learn
strategies to guide parents and teachers in successful
conferencing.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
A Northern Lights School Division project through
Alberta Initiative for School Improvement has helped
to change the way school administration completes
their job. Learn how administrators in the Lac La
Biche region use technology to gather and disaggregate data to enhance staff development through
walk-throughs and reflective inquiry.
Maritza Garcia, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): IX, XII
F03
ONLINE LEARNING FOR MATHEMATICS
TEACHERS VIA E-WORKSHOPS
NCTM will provide information concerning professional development opportunities for mathematics
teachers, in the form of e-workshops. View design
and delivery methods of e-workshops, along with
clips illustrating various portions of the online and
audio experiences. Also, learn of the connectedness
of the e-workshop activities and problems to mathematics research.
Amanda Ross, NCTM, Reston, VA, [email protected]
Monique Lynch, NCTM, Reston, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): IX, XI
METLIFE’S STUDY ON TEACHER LEADERSHIP
IN HIGH SCHOOLS
Understand the conditions that foster teacher
leadership at the high school level. Based on findings
from this MetLife's national study, learn about the
best practices of a diverse set of schools dedicated
to making education a collaborative endeavor
through policies and practices that support teacher
leadership.
Naomi Housman, Institute for Educational Leadership,
Washington, DC, [email protected]
Erica Litke, East Side Community High School/New York Public
Schools, Washington, DC, [email protected]
Sarah Manes, Institute for Educational Leadership,
Washington, DC, [email protected]
Standard(s): II
F06
ITEM ANALYSIS –> COLLABORATIVE DECISION
MAKING –> IMPROVED INSTRUCTION
Schools are rich with data. Come explore a process
of examining testing data to determine focused areas
of concern. Learn how the item-analysis process and
graphic-organizer tools assist with teacher reflection
and improved instruction.
Michelle Kennedy, West Clermont Local Schools,
Batavia, OH, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, IX
Register for a roundtable session
and select two programs to attend.
54
SET
F
F07
F10
NSDC BOOK CLUB: A WHOLE NEW MIND
THE PRINCIPAL AS LITERACY LEADER
Those attending this structured conversation
should read A Whole New Mind by Daniel Pink.
Come prepared to discuss why right-trainers will rule
the future. Daniel Pink sees the future belonging to a
different kind of person with a different kind of mind.
Let’s talk about the six fundamental abilities that are
essential for professional success and personal
fulfillment.
Examine one district’s concentrated, focused
three-year literacy learning plan for elementary
administrators. The plan includes book studies,
research-based strategies, and writing assignments
all aimed at improving academic rigor. See how a
learning community may be structured to result in
skillful school leaders who continuously guide
instructional improvement.
Jan Radford, Michigan City Area Schools,
Michigan City, IN, [email protected]
Claudia Wheatley, Solution Tree, Corydon, IN, [email protected]
Kevin Sue Bailey, Indiana University,
Floyds Knobs, IN, [email protected]
Cate Hart, Center for Lifelong Learning/Indiana University,
Bloomington, IN, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
F08
HOW SCHOOLS MAKE ONLINE PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT A SUCCESS
Margaret Chmiel, Public Broadcasting Services,
Arlington, VA, [email protected]
Marcia Foster, PBS TeacherLine, Arlington, VA, [email protected]
Craig Nicholls, Hezel Associates, Syracuse, NY, [email protected]
Elizabeth Wolzak, PBS TeacherLine,
Arlington, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
F11
MEETING THE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
CHALLENGES OF A LARGE SCHOOL SYSTEM
The alignment of professional learning opportunities
and resources did not exist for a large metro school
system that faced many challenges. The transition
from objective-based classrooms to standards-based
classrooms could not occur without proper training
and resources. Learn how one school system developed an instructional framework to align all professional learning efforts.
Catherine White, Fulton County School System,
East Point, GA, [email protected]
Montreal Gore, Fulton County Schools,
East Point, GA, [email protected]
Kathleen Yarbrough, Fulton County Schools,
East Point, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, VII
Standard(s): III, VI
F12
F09
KEEPING IT REAL: A CASE-BASED
MENTORSHIP PROGRAM
NEW TEACHER COACHING: HOW DOES IT HELP?
Learn how to start up and successfully implement a
new teacher professional coaching program. See how
our district did it. Coaches will be present to help
with any practical questions and concerns.
Loraine Morazzano, Grand Prairie Independent School District,
Grand Prairie, TX, [email protected]
Ellen Alexander, Grand Prairie Independent School District, Grand
Prairie, TX, [email protected]
Vanessa Diggs, Grand Prairie Independent School District, Grand
Prairie, TX, [email protected]
Pam Sanders, Grand Prairie Independent School District, Grand
Prairie, TX, [email protected]
Pat Roetzel, Grand Prairie Independent School District, Grand
Prairie, TX, [email protected]
Deedie Jones, Grand Prairie Independent School District, Grand
Prairie, TX, [email protected]
Becky Waller, Grand Prairie Independent School District, Grand
Prairie, TX, [email protected]
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Through a grant from the U.S. Department of
Education, PBS TeacherLine designed an interactive
Web portal to facilitate job-embedded staff development for math teachers. Hear research-based feature
stories of schools that successfully integrate online
tools to improve professional development. Learn
how these web tools apply to your school.
Margaret-Mary Sulentic Dowell, Louisiana State University,
Baton Rouge, LA, [email protected]
Case studies provide a meaningful bridge connecting
education theory to professional practice. By focusing
on cases mirroring real problems, teachers are actively involved in problem solving. Join us and learn how
a successful mentor program for beginning teachers
utilizes case-based methods to provide just-in-time
learning opportunities.
Mercedes Cordero, CaseNEX, Miami, FL, [email protected]
Vickie Beagle, School District of Santa Rosa County, Milton, FL,
[email protected]
Standard(s): VII, XI
Standard(s): VIII, IX
55
SET
F
2-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 2:15 P.M.–4:15 P.M.
F13
F16
MOTIVATING STAFF TO EFFECT CHANGE
POWERPOINT THAT POPS!
How do you motivate? How do you get school
district personnel or school staff to change? How
do you guide discussions and lead meetings in a way
that promotes constructive, passionate conversations
that build commitment instead of compliance? Learn
how to create trust, embrace conflict, and build a
committed staff who will hold each other accountable
for results.
Explore the research that shows the science behind
PowerPoint overload and what can be done to
address it. Learn to use PowerPoint to tell a story,
be more visual, and keep it simple. Practice making
PowerPoint presentations that help participants
retain and transfer information.
Albert Castillo, Los Angeles Unified School District,
Hacienda Heights, CA, [email protected]
Jesus Angulo, Los Angeles Unified School District,
Commerce, CA, [email protected]
Pat Moretta, Los Angeles Unified School District,
Commerce, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, IX
F14
LEADING OUT LOUD BY TALKING THE WALK
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
We all know the importance of “walking the talk”
to demonstrate our authenticity as leaders. However,
we often neglect to “talk the walk,” which means
verbalizing our core values in an intentional way to
those we lead. Learn how to develop your leadership
capacity by “talking the walk.” Develop your own
action plans for “leading out loud” in staff meetings,
newsletters, parent conferences, and individual
conversations.
Linda Searby, University of Alabama at Birmingham,
Birmingham, AL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VI
F15
OUR JOURNEY TO BECOMING A PLC
Share in our journey to becoming a PLC dedicated
to increasing student achievement. Hear how we
include professional dialogue in the instructional
day, send staff to learning environments, and review
educational journals. Find out how we used datadriven instruction to determine areas where we
needed professional development.
Linda Nance, San Antonio Independent School District,
San Antonio, TX, [email protected]
Caroline Elizondo, San Antonio Independent School District,
San Antonio, TX, [email protected]
Adela Morado, San Antonio Independent School District,
San Antonio, TX, [email protected]
Jody Westbrook-Youngblood, San Antonio Independent School
District, San Antonio, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I
56
Keith Young, Phoenix, AZ, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
F17
MEETING THE CHALLENGE OF DEVELOPING
ADOLESCENT LITERACY
Hear how two principals from large urban schools
and a widely published researcher are using teacher
collaboration and research-based literacy strategies
to achieve results for all students. Come with
questions and leave with a blueprint for implementing schoolwide professional development focused
on adolescent literacy.
Sandi Everlove, TeachFirst, Seattle, WA, [email protected]
Thomas Beatty, Richmond Public Schools,
Richmond, VA, [email protected]
Richard Carranza, Clark County School District,
Las Vegas, NV,
Douglas Fisher, San Diego State University,
San Diego, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
F18
ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS SUCCESS
THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS
Imagine serving a student population where 97% of
the students are Hispanic, 40% of these students are
considered ELL, and 85% come from low-socioeconomic backgrounds. Learn how South Texas border
high schools have utilized partnerships and reform
initiatives to implement instructional programs and
strategies to help ELL students succeed in secondary
schools.
Cynthia Saldivar, University of Texas - Pan American,
Edinburg, TX, [email protected]
Emily Calderon, University of Texas - Pan American,
Edinburg, TX, [email protected]
Fernando Valle, University of Texas - Pan American,
Edinburg, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): IX, X
SET
F
F19
F22
BIG IDEAS FOR SMALL DISTRICTS
ON EVEN SMALLER BUDGETS
IMPROVING ACHIEVEMENT FOR STUDENTS
WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
Learn how the Nine Mile Falls central office
administrators, principals, teachers, parents,
students, and the community are collaborating about
powerful teaching and learning. Simulate real-life
experiences from the work of our small school
district. It is possible to provide time and support
in leadership development that will positively impact
student achievement.
The Ontario Council of Directors of Education has
completed year two of a large-scale, system change
process designed to build capacity in effective
instruction for students with special education needs
at the school, district, and system levels. Results
demonstrate improved student achievement and
enhanced capacity for educators at all levels. Learn
about the components of the project design, the
lessons learned, the research base, and the impact
of the project on staff and student learning.
Debbie Lahue, Nine Mile Falls School District,
Nine Mile Falls, WA, [email protected]
Michael Green, Nine Mile Falls School District,
Nine Mile Falls, WA, [email protected]
Mark St. Clair, Nine Mile Falls School District,
Nine Mile Falls, WA, [email protected]
Linda St. Clair, Nine Mile Falls School District,
Nine Mile Falls, WA, [email protected]
Michelle Forge, Ontario Council of Directors of Education,
Meaford, ON, Canada, [email protected]
John Fauteux, Ontario Council of Directors of Education,
Burlington, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IV
Standard(s): II, IX
F20
F23
OUR JOURNEY IN BECOMING
A MODEL SCHOOL FOR LITERACY
Take a mathematical journey with one student
named Sarah to identify why she is getting the right
answers for the wrong reasons. Examine these easyto-use diagnostic tasks designed to elicit Sarah’s
prior understandings, partial conceptions, and misconceptions. Explore Sarah’s phase of development
that links to explicit instruction. Help correct her
misconceptions and move her to the next phase.
Learn how to examine student literacy data and how
to base teaching and learning on student outcomes.
Consider how scheduling and management of
resources and people can provide time for professional development and student success. Review
how coaching makes a difference with new and
experienced teachers.
Julie Broz, Edith Cowan University Resources for Learning Steps
Professional Development, Beverly, MA, [email protected]
Courtney Nelson, Wilsonville School District,
Portland, OR, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
F21
CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP
THROUGH EARLY COLLEGE
Early College High School is a collaboration between
the Dallas ISD and El Centro College. A program for
grades 9-12 located on a college campus prepares
nontraditional students for college success. Dualcredit classes accelerate high school graduation and
completion of an Associates degree in a total of five
years. Placing high school students on a college
campus while they complete high school, transitions
them into college classes in a familiar and supportive
environment.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
FROM MISCONCEPTIONS TO MILESTONES
Ruth Harvin, Waco Independent School District,
Waco, TX, [email protected]
Charlotte Carter, Waco Independent School District,
Waco, TX, [email protected]
Aiyana Henry, Waco Independent School District,
Waco, TX, [email protected]
Sandra Schultheiss, Waco Independent School District,
Waco, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, V
General sessions provide an opportunity
to network with colleagues, participate in
NSDC celebrations, and hear stimulating
keynote speakers. Plan to attend all of them!
Leicha Shaver, Dallas Independent School District,
Dallas, TX, [email protected]
Danny Cayton, Dallas Independent School District,
Dallas, TX, [email protected]
John Yarbrough, Dallas Independent School District,
Dallas, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): IX, X
57
SET
F
2-hour sessions
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 2:15 P.M.–4:15 P.M.
F24
F27
LAB CLASSROOMS PROMOTE PROFESSIONAL
GROWTH AND LITERACY LEARNING
THE DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: LEADING FOR LEARNING
Imagine one lab classroom at each grade level in a
school district where colleagues observe each other’s
practice and then write articles, create videotapes,
and co-teach. Every week, our administrators and
teachers try out new instructional practices. Hear a
panel presentation sharing how we've changed our
district’s professional climate.
Professional learning at the school site is constrained
or facilitated by outside agents and factors that either
support or impede school improvement efforts. One
major source of outside influence is the school’s
district office. Learn how one district redefined the
role of the director of professional development as a
“broker” and translator of knowledge to promote
reform in 42 schools.
Tammy Mulligan, Wayland Public Schools,
Lexington, MA, [email protected]
Gretchen Knox, Wayland Public Schools,
Wayland, MA, [email protected]
Clare Landrigan, Wayland Public Schools,
Wayland, MA, [email protected]
James Lee, Wayland Public Schools,
Wayland, MA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
F25
MAXIMIZE LEARNING WITH BRAIN-FRIENDLY
PRESENTATIONS
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
When adult learning theory principles guide
professional development, learners are more engaged
and they understand material at a deeper level,
acquire skills more easily, and retain the information
provided. Find out what these theories are and how
to build them into your professional development.
Dawn Applegate, Houghton Mifflin Company,
Winter Springs, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, VIII
F26
ACHIEVING EQUITY AND EXCELLENCE
THROUGH STAFF DEVELOPMENT
This school builds on the strengths of their
diverse student population using the College Board’s
SpringBoard program. English and math teachers
are equipped with tools they need to create nurturing
and engaged learning environments, promoting equity and excellence for all. The newfound learning community now embraces the vision that all students can
meet the challenges of post-secondary opportunities.
Judy Nading, Harlingen Consolidated Independent
School District, Harlingen, TX, [email protected]
Delilah Rodriguez, Harlingen South High School,
Harlingen, TX, [email protected]
Nancy Ruiz, Harlingen South High School,
San Benito, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
Rosalba Corrado Del Vecchio, St. John's University,
Bronxville, NY, [email protected]
Sheryl Chasin, Yonkers Public Schools, Yonkers, NY,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, X
F28
INTEGRATING THE ARTS CREATES
A LASTING IMPRESSION
Fine arts effectively integrated into skill-based
literacy lessons increase students’ ability to infer,
predict, compare, recall, and summarize. Learn how
teacher leaders have designed the web-based lessons,
disseminated the model, and coached fellow teachers
to internalize this creative approach to arts
integration.
Laurie Ballering, Project GRAD Houston/Houston Independent
School District, Bellaire, TX, [email protected]
Miriam Medina, Project GRAD Houston/Houston Independent
School District, Bellaire, TX, [email protected]
Jessica Jasper, Project GRAD Houston/Houston Independent
School District, Bellaire, TX, [email protected]
Ann Parker, Project GRAD Houston/Houston Independent School
District, Bellaire, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, XI
F29
MANY PATHS TO ONE GOAL
FOR PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
Learn how a variety of learning designs can be
integrated into a districtwide vision for staff development. Examine how a collaborative model between a
teacher’s union and district administration results in
meaningful growth experiences for all teachers. Hear
about the evolution of the key structures and policies.
Consider implications for other work settings.
Kathleen Ross, Community Consolidated School District #64,
Park Ridge, IL, [email protected]
Franny Keyes, School District #64,
Park Ridge, IL, [email protected]
Fred Klonsky, School District #64,
Park Ridge, IL, [email protected]
Sandra Stringer, School District #64,
Park Ridge, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
58
SET
F
F30
THE HEART AND SOUL OF
STANDARDS-BASED LEARNING
“All the sessions
Formative assessments created by collaborative
teacher teams and correlated to the vocabulary and
concepts of state standards drive instruction and prepare students for summative assessments. Teachers
who develop rigorous assessments linked to standards and then create differentiated lessons to meet
their goals improve student achievement. This interactive session focuses on embedding state standards
in checklists and rubrics to help students self-assess
their work and set individual goals for improving their
academic achievement.
I attended were "right
Eileen Depka, School District of Waukesha,
New Berlin, WI, [email protected]
Kay Burke, Kay Burke and Associates, LLC,
Greensboro, GA, [email protected]
Chris Jaeggi, , Arlington Heights, IL,
[email protected]
on target" with what I
needed this year. I have
already shared information from my sessions
with my colleagues to
incorporate the ideas
Standard(s): IX, XI
into our district’s work!”
F31
THE GIFT OF COACHING
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
To be a powerful and effective coach requires skill
which is best developed by experiencing coaching
first hand. Observe coaching skills and language
while experiencing its benefits. Members of Coaching
for Results, Inc. are providing the gift of a one-on-one
coaching session with a professional coach. Give
yourself 60-120 minutes to explore your confidential
goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities….a goal
made clear, a plan evolved, multiple solutions for a
tough situation.
Karen Anderson, Coaching For Results, Inc.,
Mesquite, TX, [email protected]
Sandee Crowther, Lawrence Public Schools,
Lawrence, KS, [email protected]
Diana Williams, Coaching For Results, Inc.,
Millersport, OH, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
Special pointers are indicated throughout
the 2007 Conference Program. Please read
through all the recommendations before
you finalize your conference plans.
59
SET
2-hour roundtable sessions
R2
MONDAY – DECEMBER 3, 2007 – 2:15 P.M.–4:15 P.M.
MAKING SCHOOLS READY FOR
PRE-K-3 LEARNERS
Learn what it means to be a “Ready
School” and how to access your
school for these characteristics.
Paula Dowker, High/Scope Educational
Research Foundation, Ypsilanti, MI,
[email protected]
Standard(s): IV, V
THE PRINCIPAL’S ROLE IN
PROMOTING STANDARDS-BASED
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Examines teachers’ and principals’
responses from a national study on
professional development practices
within K-12 schools.
Barbara Presler, Arizona Department of
Education, Laveen, AZ, [email protected]
Patti Chance, University of Nevada Las Vegas,
Las Vegas, NV, [email protected]
R O U N D TA B L E S E S S I O N S
Standard(s): II, VI
MOVING THE IMMOVABLE:
UNDERSTANDING THE PHYSICS
OF SCHOOL CHANGE
Learn several strategies for dealing
with resistant staff members and
moving school reform agendas
forward.
Ira Pernick, Robert F. Kennedy Community
High School, Flushing, NY,
[email protected]
David Cohen, Midwood High School,
Brooklyn, NY, [email protected]
Frank McQuail, Robert F. Kennedy
Community High School, Flushing, NY,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
THE BIG PICTURE: SYSTEMS
APPROACH TO PD FOR ALL
DISTRICT STAFF
Learn how to apply a planning
and thought process that goes into
creating a systems approach to
professional development for all
staff in a district that spans 120
miles of islands.
Linda Diaz, Monroe County School District,
Key West, FL, [email protected]
Frances St. James, Monroe County School
District, Key West, FL,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
60
ENHANCING SCHOOL
IMPROVEMENT THROUGH
POSITIVE SCHOOLWIDE
DISCIPLINE
Hear practical examples of how
successful schools are reducing
misbehavior and increasing student
responsibility by teaching responsible behavior and by improving
school climate.
CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT
GAP IN LITERACY: A DISTRICT/
UNION PARTNERSHIP
Discover which job-embedded
professional development has the
most impact on closing the reading
achievement gap in a K-5 Title I
school which outperformed peers
statewide on rigorous performancebased tests.
Mike Booher, Safe and Civil Schools,
Greensboro, NC, [email protected]
Gwen Carter, Lewisville Independent School
District, Lewisville, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IV
Barbara Eckel, Westerly Public Schools,
Stonington, CT, [email protected]
Maureen Logan, Westerly Public Schools,
Westerly, RI, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IV
THE ART OF TEACHING:
BUILDING PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING COMMUNITIES
IN THE ARTS
Learn about a professional development model to improve teaching
and learning in the arts based upon
research-based practices of lesson
study, intervisitation, backwards
curriculum design, and collaborative
examination of student work.
Maria Palma, Region 7 New York City
Department of Education, Staten Island, NY,
[email protected]
Joanna Hefferen, ArtsConnection, New York,
NY, [email protected]
Kristi Pfister, Public School 16K/New York
City Department of Education, Staten Island,
NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
PROTECTING ONLINE LEARNERS
AND STAFF
Learn about emerging technologies,
federal and state guidelines, and
common gaps in technology policies
and procedures.
Christopher Wells, Gwinnett County
Public Schools, Suwanee, GA,
[email protected]
Standard(s): VII, IX
WHERE DATA AND INSTRUCTION
INTERSECT
Learn how the School Review provides a school-wide perspective in
the areas of curriculum, instruction,
and assessment.
Sandra Sherman, Education Service Center
Region VI, Huntsville, TX,
[email protected]
Panette Kelch, Magnolia Independent School
District, Magnolia, TX, [email protected]
Dorothy Yawn, Education Service Center
Region VI, Huntsville, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IV
TEACHER INDUCTION,
LEADERSHIP INDUCTION:
A FORMULA FOR SUCCESS
Gain an understanding of how to
retain the best and the brightest as
a result of the support provided by
systematic professional learning
within an induction program.
Jean Anne Marra, Oconee County School
System, Watkinsville, GA,
[email protected]
Sam Marra, Oconee County School System,
Watkinsville, GA, [email protected]
Kathy Wright, Oconee County School System,
Watkinsville, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
LITERACY AND LEADERSHIP:
A WINNING COMBINATION
Learn a framework and knowledge
needed to be a literacy leader at the
middle and high school levels.
Sharon Faber, Modern Red SchoolHouse,
Cumming, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
STUDENT RETURN ON TEACHER
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Learn how school districts in
Florida and Texas are improving
how they reliably measure the
impact of professional development
on both teacher practice and
student learning.
Todd Bloom, Blueprint Education Group,
Wayzata, MN,
[email protected]
Standard(s): IV, V
SET
Participants selecting Roundtable 2 will have the opportunity to attend two of the following presentations.
Simply check Roundtable 2 on your Session Selection form and choose any two sessions when you arrive.
RECRUITING GREAT PRINCIPALS
FOR URBAN SCHOOLS
Learn about a leadership strategy for
attracting, preparing, and placing a
broader pool of candidates into the
principalship.
Marci Lindemann, School Board of Broward
County, Fort Lauderdale, FL,
[email protected]
Lisa Johnson-Jenkins, School Board of
Broward County, Miramar, FL,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II
STRENGTHENING INDUCTION
THROUGH PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING PARTNERSHIPS
Learn about site-based, jobembedded mentoring, and coaching
programs that increases teacher
retention rates, enhances teachers’
instructional skills, and increases
student achievement.
NSDC NETWORK: PRINCIPALS
AND ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS
Principals are critical to school
improvement so come to share
effective practices with an international network of school-based
administrators.
STANDARDS ASSESSMENT
INVENTORY (SAI) - MUCH MORE
THAN A SURVEY
Analyze simulated SAI data that lead
to identifying NSDC Standards to
implement in your district and
advance school improvement efforts.
Gustava Cooper-Baker, Sanford B. Ladd
Elementary School, Kansas City, MO,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
Steve Preston, SI Consultants Inc.,
Decatur, GA, [email protected]
Sue Francis, National Staff Development
Council, Plano, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, V
NSDC NETWORK: REGIONAL
LABORATORIES, MATH AND
SCIENCE CONSORTIA, AND
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
AGENCIES
Colleagues employed at Regional
Education Laboratories,
Comprehensive Centers, and the
Regional Technology in Education
Consortia are invited to meet to
share resources and plan further
networking opportunities.
D'Ette Cowan, SEDL, Austin, TX,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, III
NSDC NETWORK:
PORTFOLIOS – A NEW VISION
Explore the expanding vision of
portfolio models and refine tools,
structures, and processes used for
performance evaluation.
INTIMATE LEADERSHIP:
CONNECTIONS TO CREATE
Mary Dietz, San Ramon, CA,
LEARNING
[email protected]
Learn how intimate leadership offers Standard(s): V
the tools to increase professional
development effectiveness, enrich
NSDC NETWORK: TECHNOLOGY
relationships, and increase school
AND THE INTERNET
community success.
Join staff developers and others to
Kelly Johnson-Turnbull, Northern Lights
discuss the use of technology as a
School Division #69, Bonnyville, AB,
tool for staff development. Dialogue
Canada, [email protected]
and share ideas for multimedia preJames Trodden, Northern Lights School
sentations, telecommunications,
Division, Bonnyville, AB, Canada,
[email protected]
and other topics related to the
Standard(s): I, II
implications for technology in staff
development. Discuss how staff
CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE
developers can assist educators in
COLLABORATION
moving beyond the classroom walls
to establish a worldwide community
Learn tools and resources to supof lifelong learners.
port the development of high-perBobb Darnell, Achievement Strategies,
forming school cultures.
Suszanne Hawthorne-Clay, Cleveland
Municipal Schools, Hudson, OH,
[email protected]
Tracy Goodwin, Cleveland Municipal Schools,
Uniontown, OH, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
NSDC ACADEMY PREVIEW
Join Ed Tobia and NSDC Academy
graduates to learn more about
Academy expectations, programs,
and benefits.
Ed Tobia, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
USING NSDC AUDIT AS AN
EXTERNAL REVIEW TO IDENTIFY
DISTRICT PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT NEEDS
Discover the benefits of using an
NSDC audit team to conduct an
external review as a systematic
assessment of the current professional development programs and
services provided within a district.
R O U N D TA B L E S E S S I O N S
Antoinette Kellaher, Prince George’s County
Public Schools, Oxon Hill, MD,
[email protected]
Theresa Adkins, Towsen State University,
Oxon Hill, MD, [email protected]
Layne Ferguson, Prince George's County
Public Schools, Lusby, MD, [email protected]
Alisandra Ravenel, Prince George's County
Public Schools, Landover, MD,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
R2
Kay Psencik, Accelerated Learning System,
Cypress, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): V
Register for Roundtable 4 and
continue networking with your
colleagues in a similar position.
Lake Zurich, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, XI
61
SET
G
5-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 9 A.M.–12 P.M. CONTINUES AT 2:45 P.M. – 4:45 P.M.
G01
G04
NSDC FORUM FOR ACADEMY GRADUATES
BUILDING LITERACY PEDAGOGICAL KNOWLEDGE
WITH CONTENT TEACHERS
For further information, see the Academy newsletter
or contact Joellen Killion at [email protected]
Participants must be a current or former Academy
member.
Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council,
Arvada, CO, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
G02
STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT
FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Review the theory and practical tools necessary
to design a comprehensive system which aligns
assessment methods with intended outcomes. Learn
to gather and use evidence of student achievement
to drive instruction. Explore innovative diagnostic,
formative, and summative assessment methods
aimed at engaging students, both informally and
formally, in meaningful activities that both teachers
and students use to improve teaching and learning.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Michael Moody, LEAP Academy,
Encino, CA, [email protected]
Jason Stricker, LEAP Academy,
Encino, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII
G03
PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES
TO CLOSE ACHIEVEMENT GAPS
Learn how to collect and analyze data to assess
the equity of learning in your classroom, school, or
district. Use these data to develop a plan to close
identified achievement gaps. Apply lessons learned
from the Minority Student Achievement Network to
your instructional strategies, school improvement
efforts, and district goals and outcomes. Identify
resources and next steps to make “all students can
learn” a reality, not just a cliché.
Rossi Ray Taylor, Ray Taylor and Associates,
Ann Arbor, MI, [email protected]
Karen Schulte, Eastern Michigan University,
Ann Arbor, MI, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, VI
Hear how the Striving Readers Project has used a
variety of professional development strategies to
build literacy pedagogical knowledge in content area
teachers. Experience the challenges, professional
development, literacy skill, and knowledge development strategies. Establish literacy instruction
priorities and prepare an initial action plan.
Jill Brownlee, San Diego Unified School District,
San Diego, CA, [email protected]
Margaret Joseph, San Diego Unified School District,
San Diego, CA, [email protected]
Rosemary Staley, San Diego Unified School District,
San Diego, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
G05
ENGAGING IN TEAM MEETINGS
THAT IMPROVE TEACHING QUALITY
Learn how professional learning teams engage
faculties in sustained, onsite professional development that improves teaching quality, builds capacity
and collegiality, and increases student achievement.
Gain tools and procedures for establishing and
maintaining professional learning teams. Experience
guided practice in launching teams, setting goals,
guiding successful meetings, sustaining team
momentum, and monitoring team progress.
Anne Jolly, SERVE Center at UNCG, Warrior, AL, [email protected]
Barbara Howard, Scotland County School System,
Laurinburg, NC, [email protected]
Rebecca Rhoden Ogletree, SERVE Center,
Tallahassee, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
G06
HARNESSING THE POWER OF CULTURE
TO TRANSFORM SCHOOLS
Learn how to harness the power of culture to create
a flexible organization that can adapt to the dynamic
and ever-shifting demands of school reform. Discuss
how to use this culture to transmit school vision,
transform staff mindsets, align the physical environment to enrich instruction, and overcome resistance
to change.
Frank Kros, The Children's Guild,
Baltimore, MD, [email protected]
Barbara Finer, The Children's Guild,
Baltimore, MD, [email protected]
Frank Kros, The Children's Guild,
Baltimore, MD, [email protected]
Andrew Ross, The Children's Guild,
Baltimore, MD, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
62
SET
G
G07
G10
WANT CURRICULUM COHERENCY?
TRY A BIG IDEA MODULE!
AHA! INTEGRATED, INTERDISCIPLINARY,
DIFFERENTIATED CURRICULUM
The Big Idea Modules (BIMs) provide K-12 teachers
of science and mathematics with inquiry-based
professional development that addresses curriculum
coherency. By tracing critical K-12 physics-concept
connections, learn how to adapt this approach to
teacher development curriculum-mapping efforts.
Increase the number of teachers using inquiry-based
instructional strategies in their teaching.
Close the achievement gap for students who are
disconnected because of social, emotional, and
economic conditions of poverty or affluence through
a dynamic curriculum of rigor, relevance, and
relationships. Learn to use an integrated, interdisciplinary, thematic approach to intrinsically motivate
reluctant learners to perform their best. This brainbased model uses the most effective academic,
creative, and character education strategies available.
Kathleen Browne, Rider University,
Lawrenceville, NJ, [email protected]
Kim Feltre, Hillsborough Township School District,
Hillsborough, NJ, [email protected]
Debbie Gross, Hillsborough Middle School,
Hillsborough, NJ, [email protected]
Wil van der Veen, Raritan Valley Community College/NJ Astronomy
Center for Education, Somerville, NJ, [email protected]
Charlene Zeiss, Hillsborough Elementary School,
Hillsborough, NJ, [email protected]
Stephen Grabowski, Hillsborough High School,
Hillsborough, NJ, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
G08
DATA-DRIVEN CONSULTING AND COACHING
OF STRUGGLING TEACHERS
Annette Brinkman, Granite School District,
Salt Lake City, UT, [email protected]
Ellen Williams, Brigham Young University,
South Jordan, UT, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
S TA N D A R D S
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
LEARNING COMMUNITIES
LEADERSHIP
RESOURCES
DATA-DRIVEN
EVALUATION
RESEARCH-BASED
DESIGN
LEARNING
COLLABORATION
EQUITY
QUALITY TEACHING
FAMILY INVOLVEMENT
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Many ineffective teachers and new teachers do not
respond to a coaching relationship immediately
because they do not have the knowledge necessary
to correct their own behavior. Learn a framework,
data-collection methods, and strategies for assisting
struggling and/or new teachers. Consider the three
potential stances: consulting, coaching, and
collaborating to apply in your new setting.
Roger Taylor, Curriculum Design for Excellence,
Oak Brook, IL, [email protected]
ADVANCED
Standard(s): IV, XI
G09
LEADING ADULT LEARNERS: PRACTICES
FOR SUSTAINABLE ADULT DEVELOPMENT
This symbol indicates an
Advanced Level Session
Learn to shape culture and implement practices that
support the growth of educators with different developmental orientations. Examine adult-developmental
theory, a new model of learning-oriented leadership,
practices that support adult learning, and developmental principles informing practices. Apply ideas to
cases and develop action plans for implementing
practices.
Eleanor Drago-Severson, Teachers College at Columbia University,
New York, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
63
SET
H
4-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 10 A.M.–12 P.M. CONTINUES AT 2:45 P.M. – 4:45 P.M.
H01
H04
RACE, CLASS, AND CULTURE IN SCHOOL:
BECOMING CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE
COMMUNICATION TOOLS AND PROTOCOLS
TO SUSTAIN PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
Cultural responsivity is a developmental process.
It is the ability to learn from and relate respectfully to
people not of your own and others culture. Consider
ways to adjust your own and your organization’s
behaviors based on what you learn. Cultural responsivity involves exploring and honoring your own culture, while at the same time learning about and honoring other people’s cultures. In this session, we will
begin the journey to becoming culturally responsive.
Learn to strengthen the goal of a high-functioning
PLC to improve student learning by increasing the
capacity of its members to talk in ways that promote
their mutual professional growth. Consider communication tools and protocols that provide processes to
collaboratively examine student learning, share
knowledge, engage in inquiry, support reflection,
and transform practice. Learn how to use these tools
to deepen and expand professional learning and
energize commitment to successful student learning.
Suzanne Arnold, NCCRESt,
Denver, CO, [email protected]enver.edu
Standard(s): VIII, X
H02
SCHOOL-BASED STAFF DEVELOPMENT: COCREATING A DISTRIBUTIVE LEADERSHIP MODEL
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Evaluate the effectiveness of your current model of
staff development. Experience a staff development
approach which distributes leadership across district
and school levels. Experience content and processes
which nurture, develop, and utilize teacher leadership
and teamwork to advance student learning.
Mike Schwei, Northwest Independent School District,
Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Missy Barksdale, Northwest Independent School District,
Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Melonie Christian, Northwest Independent School District,
Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Michael Griffin, Northwest Independent School District,
Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Kristi King, Northwest Independent School District,
Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
H03
REVITALIZING SCHOOLS THROUGH
APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY
Learn how appreciative inquiry (AI) and coaching can
provoke a positive revolution in change. Learn the
principles and practices of AI as they relate to local
school districts. Immerse yourself in the process
through inspirational videos, one-on-one interviews,
and small group activities.
Cynthia Lemmerman, Fostoria City School District,
Fostoria, OH, [email protected]
Megan Tschannen-Moran, College of William and Mary,
Williamsburg, VA, [email protected]
Bob Tschannen-Moran, LifeTrek Coaching International,
Williamsburg, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, IX
64
Laraine Roberts, Springboard Schools,
Pacifica, CA, [email protected]
Carolyn Bainer, Springboard Schools,
Riverside, CA, [email protected]
Gail Wright, Sonoma County Office of Education,
Santa Rosa, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, IX
H05
DEVELOPING TEACHER LEADERS
THROUGH THE ARTS
Experience how learning through the arts develops
teacher leaders through active immersion in drama,
music, and visual arts. Learn to augment the level of
educational excellence for all students. Hear about a
model of embedded professional development that
has successfully integrated an external organization
with schools in three states.
Charlotte Smelser, Texarkana Regional Arts and Humanities
Council, Texarkana, TX, [email protected]
Angela Brunini, St Richard Catholic School,
Jackson, MS, [email protected]
Kay Thomas, Texarkana Regional Arts and Humanities Council's
ArtsSmart Institute for Learning, Texarkana, TX,
[email protected]
Jennifer Unger, Texarkana Regional Arts and Humanities Council's
ArtsSmart Institute for Learning, Texarkana, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
Texas Scholar lectures are now offered
throughout the conference. Attend all five!
SET
H
H06
H08
MUST HAVES FOR NEW LEADERS IN A
CHAMPIONSHIP LEARNING CULTURE
NU-I: A MODEL FOR COLLABORATIVELY
IMPROVING CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION
Learn ways to help new leaders promote a culture of
organizational excellence that results in improved
student achievement, outstanding service to all stakeholders, and enhanced teamwork. Gain deeper understanding about the vulnerability of new leaders, the
importance of building strong relationships, the need
for deliberate planning, and doable strategies to
secure early wins. Learn ten strategies that can be
helpful to new leaders facing initial challenges to
ensure a sustainable, positive work environment.
Receive templates that can be used at the workplace.
Hear about NU-I (Nugae Sapientii, Sweets of
Wisdom) training that uses the principles of effective
teaching and learning, coupled with a supportive,
workable structure of administrator/teacher reflection, to ensure high-quality, high-level learning for
students. NU-I is an observational instrument
designed to assist teacher and observer in discovering
principles of teaching and learning that consistently
provide outstanding results. Learn how to use NU-I
to build trust, collaboration, and unity. Consider how
NU-I helps teachers to become effective, confident,
skilled, and fulfilled.
Wendy Katz, Sarasota County Public Schools,
Sarasota, FL, [email protected]
Missy Cleary, Sarasota County Public Schools,
Sarasota, FL, [email protected]
Scott Lempe, Sarasota County Public Schools,
Sarasota, FL, [email protected]
Ruth Thomas, Sarasota County Public Schools,
Sarasota, FL, [email protected]
Scott Wilson, Sarasota County Public Schools,
Sarasota, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IV
H07
Differentiated instruction isn't just for teachers!
Hear how mentors trained in essential differentiation
strategies can support teacher growth in sustainable
ways that impact student achievement. Learn how to
apply mentor-focused, differentiation strategies and
tools in the areas of pre-assessment, flexible grouping, and tiered instruction in order to facilitate veteran and new teachers’ success with diverse learners.
Standard(s): IV, IX
“Incredibly organized,
well run, collegial, and
professionally (and personally)
stimulating conference.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
Laura Gschwend, New Teacher Center at UCSC,
Soquel, CA, [email protected]
Rain Bogolan, New Teacher Center at UCSC,
Aptos, CA, [email protected]
Anne Watkins, New Teacher Center at UCSC,
Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
65
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
DIFFERENTIATION STRATEGIES TO
ACCELERATE TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS
Brian Pead, Davis School District,
Farmington, UT, [email protected]
Cyndee Miya, Davis School District,
Farmington, UT, [email protected]
SET
I
3-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 9 A.M.–12 P.M.
I01
I05
TUESDAY MORNING LECTURE OPTION
NETWORKING ACROSS AMERICA
FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT
This will allow you to attend the following sessions:
I02:
J01:
J02:
Questions and Answers with Jennifer James
9 a.m.-10 a.m.
Texas Scholar Lecture by Ruben Olivares
10 a.m.-11 a.m. and
Texas Scholar Lecture With Commissioner
Shirley Neeley, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
Please see the individual session listings for program
descriptions.
I02
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
WITH JENNIFER JAMES
Keynote speaker Jennifer James will address your
questions in this special session following her
keynote address on Tuesday morning. This
session will conclude after one hour.
Jennifer James, Jennifer James Inc.,
Seahurst, WA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
I03
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
FOR TEACHER LEADERS
Teacher leaders often have needs that traditional
professional development offerings do not meet. This
session will examine research to help participants
understand what teacher leaders need and want in
their learning, and explain how meeting the needs of
teacher leaders can be a powerful strategy to utilize
their expertise in education reform.
Terese Emry, Center for Strengthening the Teaching Profession
(CSTP), South Prairie, WA, [email protected]
Tom White, Edmonds School District,
Edmonds, WA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
I04
EFFECTIVE STORYTELLING SKILLS ENHANCE
STUDENT LEARNING
Learn strategies to develop your storytelling skills.
Gain clarity about how storytelling enhances the
classroom environment, develops a child’s imagination, and improves literacy skills. Pratice using exercises that identify what happens when someone listens to a story and then develops their personal story.
Understand how folktales are effective tools in teaching literacy skills, in addressing character education
and diversity, and in improving classroom climate.
Jaymie Reeber Kosa, Storytelling Arts, Inc., Kingston, NJ,
[email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
66
Join national colleagues in a pioneering effort to
increase student achievement through an in depth
case study of schools networking together for school
improvement. School leaders share their experiences
with the NSDC 12-under-12 Network of schools. This
is a nationwide network united by common commitment to student performance goals aligned with
NCLB. Explore the change processes that have
extended over three years linking this unique
networking collaboration of data-driven decision
making, leadership, and research-based strategies
that directly impact student achievement.
Leigh Wall, LaPorte Independent School District,
LaPorte, TX, [email protected]
John Ahlemeyer, Hawthorn School District 73,
Vernon Hills, IL, [email protected]
Mike Henninger, Lincoln Public Schools,
Lincoln, NE, [email protected]
George Perry, Perry and Associates,
Danbury, MA, [email protected]
Angie Zabawa, Lincoln Public Schools,
Lincoln, NE, [email protected]
Stephanie Cox, LaPorte Independent School District,
LaPorte, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IV
I06
UNION AND ADMINISTRATION
UNITED FOR LEARNING
Learn how a teachers union (near the home of the
1936 GM sit-down strike) and administration are
working together to change a culture and improve
student learning. Engage in a process that encourages
systems to focus on shared interests rather than
opposing positions. Discover system structures and
processes that increase a district or building’s capacity to support continuous learning and teamwork.
Linda Wainio, Carman-Ainsworth Community Schools,
Flint, MI, [email protected]
Paul Robinson, Carman-Ainsworth Community Schools,
Flint, MI, [email protected]
Dave Swierpel, Carman-Ainsworth Community Schools,
Flint, MI, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, III
I07
THE COLLEGE BOARD LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE
FOR PRINCIPALS
Learn about a leadership development model that
helps practicing principals engage in professional
learning to become transformational leaders.
Examine critical attributes of the approach including
the logic of the design process, use of the leadership
research-base, components of the leadership development program, and the evaluation design for assess-
SET
I
ing impact. Reflect on the benefits of transforming
schools and transformational leaders.
Al Bertani, University of Illinois at Chicago,
Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Rob Bocchino, Heart of Change,
Hoboken, NJ, [email protected]
Marlyn Lawrence, The College Board,
New York, NY, [email protected]
Helen Santiago, The College Board,
New York, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
I08
A DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN INSTRUCTIONAL COACH
Explore the research that supports the reality of a
day-in-the-life of an instructional coach. Gain background knowledge as well as an understanding of the
leadership roles that school-based staff developers,
or coaches, have in the school improvement process.
Leave the session energized and loaded with ideas
for putting coaching, formally or informally, into
practice in schools and systems.
Lea Arnau, Gwinnett County Public Schools,
Grayson, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
I09
POWERFUL PRESENTATION SKILLS
Deborah Estes, Estes Group, Inc., Sherman, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
I10
ALIGNED STAFF DEVELOPMENT AS A
CATALYST FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Identify effective structures for staff development
designed to increase student achievement. Discuss
the importance of alignment of vision and practice
from central office to classrooms. Consider the effect
of professional conversations in learning communities that involve professionals, parents, and students.
Gather tools to enhance similar efforts with schools.
Karen Stahl, Cherry Creek Schools,
Aurora, CO, [email protected]
Jeff Cazier, Cherry Creek Schools,
Aurora, CO, [email protected]
David Gonzales, Cherry Creek Schools,
Aurora, CO, [email protected]
Angie Zehner, Cherry Creek Schools,
Aurora, CO, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
A CONTINUUM OF TEACHER LEARNING
COMMUNITIES, PRESERVICE THROUGH
EXPERT TEACHING
Hear about the Wachovia-funded National
Commission on Teaching and America’s Future and
Georgia State University Induction Project serving
Atlanta-area school districts. Learn how to navigate a
powerful online resource to support new teachers.
Become familiar with critical-friends group protocols
and how they support teacher dialogue. Review a professional growth plan resource and how it supports
teacher reflection and professional growth planning.
Consider the benefits of university and district collaboration for novice teacher support.
Kathleen Fulton, National Commission on Teaching
and America’s Future, Washington, DC, [email protected]
Lin Black, Georgia State University,
Atlanta, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
I12
DATA + COLLABORATION = RESULTS
Reflect on this statement by Mike Schmoker: “The
right kind of continuous, structured teacher collaboration improves the quality of teaching and pays big,
often immediate, dividends in student learning and
professional morale in virtually any setting.” Discuss
benefits of structured teacher collaboration. Learn
and experience strategies and protocols to structure
collaboration and focus dialogue that will result in
shared understandings and measurable instructional
solutions.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Brush up on your presenting skills. Learn how to
make your presentation more lively. Gain new tools
and strategies to help get everyone involved in the
presentation. Help participants make meaning of
content. Review how to apply best practices when
working with adult learners. Plan for lots of fun.
I11
Steven Carney, California Staff Development Council (CSDC) &
Center for Data, Collaboration and Results (CDCR), Lincoln, CA,
[email protected]
Janet Malone, Poway Unified School District, Poway, CA,
[email protected].com
Standard(s): IV, IX
I13
PREPARING LEAD LEARNERS
FOR LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS
Learn why structuring teachers as true teams with
shared student responsibility greatly increases the
opportunity for teacher learning. Compare teaming
models and the benefits of each. Gain strategies to
connect coaching activities to team problem solving,
teacher growth, and student achievement. Examine
roles for administrators and team leaders in
supporting team learning.
Stephen Barkley, Performance Learning Systems,
New Hope, PA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, III
67
SET
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3-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 9 A.M.–12 P.M.
I14
I17
SUSTAINABLE LEADERSHIP
TO IMPACT STUDENT SUCCESS
WHAT DOES FACULTY PARKING
HAVE TO DO WITH PLCs? EVERYTHING!
Consider why Jane Vella wrote: “All human beings
learn when they are engaged in a real-life struggle
with new content,” and “new content can be
presented through learning tasks.” Examine the
principles of adult learning and the design of professional development through the use of learning tasks.
Engage in learning tasks designed to address Michael
Fullan’s eight principles for sustainable leadership.
From parking that discourages visitors, to flaming
staff emails, to meetings where dissent is outlawed these behaviors send messages that can undercut
attempts to establish PLCs. Want to learn how to
change the message and change the behavior?
Examine how trust links to behaviors that hold
schools accountable and see how this seemingly soft
quality is critical to PLCs and staff efficacy. Leave with
strategic, intentional ways of communicating that
really work.
Christine Huley, Granite School District,
Salt Lake City, UT, [email protected]
William Osman, Hamilton County Public Schools,
North Brunswick, NJ, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
I15
Denny Berry, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Falls Church, VA, [email protected]
Meg Carnes, Washington, DC, [email protected]
Ellen Schoetzau, Alexandria, VA, [email protected]
SUSTAINABLE LEARNING COMMUNITIES:
STRATEGIES THAT GET RESULTS
Standard(s): I, IX
Sustainable learning communities need collaboration
methods that get results. This strategy-rich session
provides the tools necessary to nurture and sustain
learning teams. Using research, results-based
strategies, and the work of NSDC, participants will
understand how learning communities grow and
achieve success over time. Learn techniques to train
and sustain momentum for administrators and
teacher leaders. This model will introduce seven
strategies and help participants plan for the ongoing needs of high-achieving learning teams.
INVESTING IN THE PRINCIPAL-COACH
RELATIONSHIP
Gayle Gregory, Burlington, ON, Canada,
[email protected]
Deb Jones, Thompson School District,
Loveland, CO, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
I16
A FRAMEWORK FOR LEADERSHIP
SUCCESSION PLANNING
Explore leadership succession planning for 21st
century learning, examine tools for identifying and
developing aspiring school leaders, and explore
leading and teaching in team-based learning organizations. Leave with tools and resources that provide
a foundation for creating and sustaining leadershipdevelopment programs where the power and position
of the few is replaced by the skillful collaborative
practice of the many.
Steven Bingham, Wake County Public School System,
Raleigh, NC, [email protected]
Camille Miller, Wake County Public School System,
Fuquay-Varina, NC, clmiller
Joe Peel, Wake Education Partnerhip,
Raleigh, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
68
I18
Learn about an instructional-coaching program in a
very diverse school system that emphasizes collaboration and relationship building. Explore the significance of the coach-principal relationship and its
impact on shifting the school community to a highperforming school culture. Discuss the essential
components and complexities of the principal-coach
relationship. Gain tools to develop and strengthen
this relationship to ultimately increase student
achievement.
Stacy Lucas, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Springfield, VA, [email protected]
Amy Beck, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Springfield, VA, [email protected]
Mary McNamee, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Springfield, VA, [email protected]
Kathleen Walts, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Springfield, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
Register for the Expert Track and attend all
keynote Q&A’s, Texas Scholar lectures, and
the back-up keynote.
SET
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I19
I22
STATEWIDE COLLABORATIVE PROFESSIONAL
LEARNING IN SCHOOLS
BUILDING A FRAMEWORK FOR CHANGE
THROUGH DATA
Explore user-friendly tools for collaborative professional learning as designed and implemented by a
team of national experts, state policymakers, district
administrators, and school leaders. Learn the value
of establishing and nurturing collaborative teams in
schools, and hear from practitioners who are instrumental in creating communities of continuous inquiry
and learning.
Learn how to guide instruction and inform professional learning through the effective use of data.
Discover a proven process to engage faculties in
continuous planning. See a model of a data room to
adapt to any school or system. Walk away with a
method for organizing, using, and displaying data
that will transform the work of a school or system.
Carol Albritton, New Jersey Department of Education,
Trenton, NJ, [email protected]
Victoria Duff, New Jersey Department of Education,
Toms River, NJ, [email protected]
Malcolm Adler, Camden City Public Schools,
Camden, NJ, [email protected]
Peggy Stewart, Vernon Township High School,
Glenwood, NJ, [email protected]
Charles Highsmith, Pemberton Township School District,
Pemberton, NJ, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
I20
MAKING SHIFT HAPPEN: DISTRICTWIDE REFORM
Caren Karlage, Cincinnati Public Schools,
Cincinnati, OH, [email protected]
Harrison Collier Jr., Cincinnati Public Schools,
Cincinnati, OH, [email protected]
Kathy Witherup, Mayerson Academy,
Cincinnati, OH, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, XI
I21
CREATING A BREAKTHROUGH CULTURE
OF LEADERSHIP
Reflect on why lasting school change occurs at a
cultural level. Learn how to create long-term change
that empowers teachers and students to become
leaders. Discover the value of trust, uncover the belief
systems that impact communication, and leave with
a clear vision for how to improve school culture.
Bridgit Barainca, Rapport Leadership International,
Sparks, NV, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
Standard(s): I, IV
I23
MENTORING NEW TEACHERS THROUGH
COLLABORATIVE COACHING
Consider how to ensure sustainability of effective
mentoring and new teacher induction models. Learn
about a sustainable mentoring and induction model
by examining four key components -- mentor program design, mentor training, lead mentor training,
and new teacher induction professional learning
strategies. Leave with concrete strategies to implement in other settings.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Hear how real shift happened in our district when
leaders and teachers worked together to focus efforts
on one district initiative. Consider how thinking and
writing using Extended Response protocols impact
teaching practices and student achievement. Learn
how using rubrics to score student work enhances
student responsibility. Apply lessons from the journey
to similar challenges.
Jan Grogan, Muscogee County School District,
Columbus, GA, [email protected]
Janet LaFortune, Muscogee County School District,
Columbus, GA, [email protected]
Carol Ann Wood, Muscogee County School District,
Columbus, GA, [email protected]
Kathy Dunne, Learning Innovations at WestEd,
Somersworth, NH, [email protected]
Susan Villani, Learning Innovations at WestEd,
Woburn, MA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
I24
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY COACHING
FOR 21ST CENTURY TEACHING AND LEARNING
Join a team of highly motivated instructional
technology resource teachers (ITRTs) and learn
about their role as job-embedded coaches. Enrich
your understanding of today's learner and interact
with 21st century technology tools that the ITRTs use
as part of daily practice to support teacher learning
in data-driven decision making, differentiated
instruction, and technology integration in the
K-12 classroom.
Jan Streich, Spotsylvania County Schools,
Fredericksburg, VA, [email protected]
Matthew Malobicky, Spotsylvania County Schools,
Fredericksburg, VA, [email protected]
Cyndi Pixley, Spotsylvania County Schools,
Fredericksburg, VA, [email protected]
Peter Zicari, Spotsylvania County Schools,
Fredericksburg, VA, [email protected]
Wendy Fletcher, Spotsylvania County Schools,
Fredericksburg, VA, [email protected]
Joshua Long, Spotsylvania County Schools,
Fredericksburg, VA,j [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, XI
69
SET
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3-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 9 A.M.–12 P.M.
I25
I27
USING PLCs FOR SCHOOLWIDE ACTION RESEARCH
ROLLING STANDARDS INTO ACTION: PLANNING,
DEPLOYMENT, AND EVALUATION OF HQPD
PLCs in schools with Whole-Faculty Study Groups
engage in cycles of schoolwide action research
focused on student learning needs. PLCs collect data,
plan, implement, and assess interventions, and look
at student work. Working in simulated study group
PLCs, learn about and experience the action research
steps and identify the implications of this PLC work
for principals, staff developers, and central office
staff.
Karl Clauset, National WFSG Center,
Bellingham, WA, [email protected]
Terri Jenkins, National WFSG Center,
Augusta, GA, [email protected]
Emily Weiskopf, National WFSG Center,
Middleburg, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, VI
I26
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
BEFORE YOUR PLC: BREAKING THE ICE
AND CREATING POSITIVE CLIMATES
This session is designed to aid supervisors/instructional leaders with tools to develop effective PLC
(PLCs) in their buildings/districts. Using brain-based
strategies, participants will look at issues of staff
morale, staff buy-in, and other factors that can defeat
a PLC before it begins. Receive a toolbox to take back
to your district to aid in implementing the strategies
learned in this workshop.
Felicia Fowler, Memphis City Schools,
Memphis, TN, [email protected]
Alyssa Villarreal, Memphis City Schools,
Memphis, TN, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
Hear about Ohio’s statewide effort to support the
implementation of standards-based professional
development. Follow a professional development
planning and implementation process driven by the
data, guided by district priorities, and transferred into
an implementation plan. Examine the information,
learn the steps, and practice the process with
sample data.
Cynthia Yoder, Ohio Department of Education,
Columbus, OH, [email protected]
Lorie Owens, Ohio Department of Education,
Columbus, OH, [email protected]
Linda Williams, Upper Arlington City Schools,
Upper Arlington, OH, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, VII
I28
SCHOOLWIDE LITERACY COLLABORATION
ADVANCES STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Learn the programming strategies a school,
challenged by high poverty and second language
demographics, designed and employed to increase
teacher learning, raise student achievement levels on
state assessments, and achieve a best-schools rating.
Examine key elements of this site-based professional
development approach, including collaborative problem solving, data analysis, community involvement,
and designs for family literacy.
Kathleen Keenan, Hodgkins Elementary School/LaGrange School
District 105, Hodgkins, IL, [email protected]
Marcela Ortiz, LaGrange School District 105,
Hodgkins, IL, [email protected]
John Signatur, LaGrange School District 105,
Hodgkins, IL, [email protected]
Sally Trimble, LaGrange School District 105,
Hodgkins, IL, [email protected]
Leesa McHugh, LaGrange School District 105,
Hodgkins, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, VII
I29
LOOSE-TIGHT LEADERSHIP
IN A LEARNING COMMUNITY
Consider why teacher leaders and site administrators
must be able to make structural and cultural changes
to create a PLC. Learn how to use a “loose-tight”
leadership style to support staff in moving from isolation and private practice to collective responsibility
and teamwork. Examine your school through the lens
of the five Cs of a PLC to clarify the strategic focus
areas for teacher leaders and site administration.
Jay Westover, Center for Educational Efficacy,
Riverside, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
70
SET
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I30
I33
EQUATE MATH SUCCESS WITH
ADDITION OF TEACHER LEADERS
PUBLISHED PROFESSIONALS:
A WRITING INITIATIVE FOR EDUCATORS
Consider a professional development program that
supports highly qualified teachers and increases the
likelihood of a strong, sustained implementation of a
standards-based curriculum. Hear about the unique
preparation of teacher leaders for mentoring other
teachers in mathematics. Engage in mathematical
problem solving, view video clips, and join group
discussions.
Develop a plan for beginning a writing initiative.
Writing is a powerful tool for clarifying and deepening
thinking. Educators who have the opportunity to
explore their experiences and commit those stories to
paper for publication while working in a collaborative
setting engage in rich professional development.
Sandi Novak, Burnsville-Eagan-Savage Schools,
Burnsville, MN, [email protected]
Nancy Nutting, , Richfield, MN, [email protected]
Kyla Wahlstrom, University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis, MN, [email protected]
Sue Wygant, Minnesota Department of Education,
Roseville, MN, [email protected]
Suzanne Gilmour, Oswego State University,
Dewitt, NY, [email protected]
Deborah Carey, Auburn Enlarged City School Distict,
Auburn, NY, [email protected]
Rebecca Kaune, Cayuga-Onondaga BOCES,
Auburn, NY, [email protected]
Clark Smith, Jordan Elbridge Central School District,
Jordan, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
Standard(s): VI, XI
I34
I31
BUILDING YOUR PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT TOOLKIT
Beth Breiner, Carbon Lehigh Intermediate Unit #21,
Schnecksville, PA, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, XI
Fill your tackle box of presentation strategies with
powerful, brain-compatible practices. Orchestrate
workshops using instructional practices that are
designed with the brain in mind. Acquire dozens of
teaching strategies to use during your presentations.
Make sure you have a variety of techniques to hook
the participants’ interest and attention and, most
importantly, get key points across.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Experience techniques and technologies that
support differentiation in professional development.
Examine technology tools that should be in every staff
developer’s toolkit. Enhance presentation skills that
engage participants with the learning objectives and
produce the intended results.
TRAINERS, CHANGE YOUR BAIT!
BRAIN-COMPATIBLE DIFFERENTIATED STRATEGIES
Martha Kaufeldt, Begin With the Brain, Scotts Valley, CA,
[email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
I32
FROM GOOD TO GREAT:
A STANDARDS-BASED INITIATIVE
Examine the implications of adopting a change
initiative focused on a standards-based approach
to schools and classrooms. Hear how district staff,
principals, and teacher leaders worked together to
create a system focused on using standards, student
work, proficiency levels, and assessment to impact
achievement. Examine the roles involved, identify
effective change-management practices, use
protocols, and gain effective leadership techniques
when working toward a change initiative.
“I came away reenergized
and enthusiastic about my
job. I received new knowledge I will use immediately.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
Debra Webb, Deer Valley Unified School District,
Phoenix, AZ, [email protected]
Gayle Galligan, Deer Valley Unified School District,
Phoenix, AZ, [email protected]
Cherryl Paul, Deer Valley Unified School District,
Phoenix, AZ, [email protected]
Paul Stanton, Deer Valley Unified School District,
Phoenix, AZ, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
71
SET
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2-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 10 A.M.–12 P.M.
J01
J03
TEXAS SCHOLAR LECTURE 10 a.m.–11 a.m.
EDUCATIONAL REFORM AND ACCOUNTABILITY:
EMERGING LEADERSHIP ROLES FOR STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
NSDC PRESIDENTS’ SEMINAR
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Educational reform initiatives have had an
enormous impact on public education. The
advent of high-stakes testing and performance-based educational accountability, both
at the state and national level, have caused
wide-spread realization that the structure and
organization of the public school and its delivery
system needs to be re-examined. Central to the
success of meeting these expectations is the ongoing
professional training and renewal of all educational
personnel. The essence of the role of the teacher,
and that “the teacher is and has always been the only
program,” need to be recaptured and must serve as
the basis for all planning and decision making
regarding staff development. The traditional leadership roles and responsibilities for staff development
must be consistent with the basic premises that are
advancing the educational reforms. There is a need to
translate our current beliefs about educational equity
and excellence, accountability, and the expected
change process into new leadership roles at the
front line levels of the school system.
Current and former NSDC presidents will meet
to align work and focus for the new NSDC strategic
plan.
Kathryn Kee, Consultant, Shady Shores, TX,
[email protected]
Carlene Murphy, WFSG National Center,
Augusta, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
J04
QUESTIONING TO IMPROVE LEARNING
IN COMMUNITY
Utilizing questioning skills, teachers at Bruce Shulkey
Elementary School have worked with each other and
with their students to improve learning. The results in
achievement scores for all subgroups are dramatic. In
this session, leaders and teachers will reflect on the
supports that led to this sea-change in learning.
Paula Mower, Fort Worth Independent School District,
Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Eunice Davis, Fort Worth Independent School District,
Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Sara Mueller, Fort Worth Independent School District,
Granbury, TX, [email protected]
Barbara Tennison, Fort Worth Independent School District,
Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Ruben Olivarez, University of Texas at Austin,
Austin, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, XI
Standard(s): II
J05
J02
ELECTRIFYING STUDENT LEARNING
THROUGH TECHNOLOGY
TEXAS SCHOLAR LECTURE 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND INSTRUCTIONAL
COACHES – THE TEXAS WAY!
This session will focus on how professional learning
with an instructional focus is impacting student
performance. The use of instructional coaches to
improve student success has proven beneficial.
Texas has made great strides improving the quality
of education through the implementation of more
rigorous curriculum, graduation requirements, and
a tougher statewide assessment test. The newlyappointed commissioner of Texas education shares
strategies to meet educational needs of all students.
Learn about the commissioner’s agenda to continue
to improve education throughout Texas.
Learn how you can dramatically improve students’
literacy, numeracy, and content mastery using technology in the classroom. Explore strategies to teach
essential learning-to-learn skills needed to acquire,
process, and creatively apply content materials. Learn
about an easy-to-use technology integration model
that can provide a framework for differentiation and
bring immediate and continuous improvement in
student performance, especially for average and
low-achievers.
Bobb Darnell, Achievement Strategies,
Lake Zurich, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, XI
Texas Education Agency, Austin, Texas
www.tea.state.tx.us
Standard(s): II
Register for the Expert Track and attend all
keynote Q&A’s, Texas Scholar lectures, and
the back-up keynote.
72
SET
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J06
J09
MANAGING UNSOLVABLE PROBLEMS: POLARITY
MANAGEMENT AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT
TEACHER LEADERS SUPPORTING
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT
The bad news is that schools are full of unsolvable
problems. The good news is that we can stop trying
to solve unsolvable problems and learn how to
manage them as polarities. We will explore how to
distinguish problems from polarities, why it matters
to know the difference, and what practical skills allow
us to manage polarities well. Polarity management
helps leaders work with resistance to change rather
than against it.
Learn from teacher leaders across diverse district
populations who have impacted teacher growth and
student achievement through induction, mentoring,
and standards-based professional development.
Identify needs related to your educational context
and develop your action plan for next steps.
Terry Chadsey, Center for Courage and Renewal,
Seattle, WA, [email protected]
Ed Tobia, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
Sharon Kortman, Arizona State University,
Tempe, AZ, [email protected]
Kelly Stewart, Avondale Elementary School District,
Avondale, AZ, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
J10
SCORING HIGH WITH SLAM DUNK LESSONS
J07
Jane Golding, Yarmouth School Department,
Yarmouth, ME, [email protected]
Katie Milliken, Gorham School Department,
Gorham, ME, [email protected]
Debbie Boyer, Canyon Independent School District,
Canyon, TX, [email protected]
Kim Beth Buchanan, Canyon Independent School District,
Canyon, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
Standard(s): VIII, XI
J08
J11
BOOK TALK – SUSTAINABLE LEADERSHIP
A SMART APPROACH TO IMPROVING STUDENT
LEARNING DISTRICTWIDE
Be prepared to discuss Sustainable Leadership by Andy
Hargreaves and Dean Fink (Jossey-Bass, 2005) and relate
it to the field of current educational practice.
William Sommers, SEDL, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Skip Olsen, Minneapolis, MN, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
“NSDC is my favorite
conference on a professional
and personal basis for many
reasons, I am proud to be a
part of the community.”
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Educators can effect change that improves student
learning. Experience strategies effective leaders
implement to activate the change process using
real life scenarios. Learn skills to build personal
resiliencies and develop supportive collegial relationships. Develop a personal plan to implement when
you return to your school.
Learn to present engaging, hands-on professional
development in a user-friendly format. Slam dunk
lessons help K-12 students score high by promoting
higher-level questioning techniques, focused research
skills, and targeted technology integration within a
fast-break curriculum. Learn how one district is using
Jamie McKenzie's technology-based module to assist
teachers in the creation of engaging and differentiated
online lessons.
YOU CAN EFFECT CHANGE!
Learn how a district is taking a systematic approach
to improve student learning by implementing a coordinated mix of professional development strategies
that engage campus and central office administrators
and teacher leaders in the articulation of a robust
curriculum, monitored and improved through the
use of the SMART Goals process.
Jan O'Neill, QLD (Quality Leadership by Design),
Madison, WI, [email protected]
Judy Joiner, Bryan Independent School District,
Bryan, TX, [email protected]
Linda Madden, Bryan Independent School District,
Bryan, TX, [email protected]
Mary Russ, Bryan Independent School District,
Bryan, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
73
SET
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2-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 10 A.M.–12 P.M.
J12
J15
USING PATHWAYS TO TEACHING
TO SUPPORT PARAPROFESSIONALS
THE AMAZING RACE
They are in classrooms with children every day;
yet focused professional learning opportunities for
paraprofessionals to improve their instructional
knowledge and skills are often neglected. Learn
about Pathways to Teaching, a year-long professional
development project specifically designed to give
paraprofessionals the pedagogical knowledge and
skills that they need to help students achieve.
Riva Korashan, UFT Teacher Center,
New York, NY, [email protected]
Marie Alexander, UFT Teacher Center,
Hopewell Junction, NJ, [email protected]
Kathy Giannou, UFT Teacher Center,
New York, NY, [email protected]
Pamela Humphrey, UFT Teacher Center,
Bronx, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, VIII
J13
PODCASTS FOR PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Acquire the steps necessary to coordinate a web
learning community that uses action research as a
form of staff development. Learn to develop, market,
and utilize podcasts as a coaching resource for
teacher development and how the use of educational
podcasts can improve teaching and learning. See how
blogs, webinars, and podcasts can be valuable
resources.
Understand the English language learner;
demonstrate how to use assessment information
to identify language or academic need; and improve
the program design that is currently in place.
Tonie Garza, EL Saber Enterprises,
Dallas, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, XI
J16
PROVIDING A GUARANTEED
AND VIABLE CURRICULUM
A guaranteed and viable curriculum for all students
is a fundamental step toward providing effective
instruction, establishing a PLC, and reaching NCLB
goals. Participants will receive applicable tools to
assess, develop, and implement essential content
that is based on research for an effective school.
Salle Quackenboss, McREL,
Denver, CO, [email protected]
Sammye Wheeler-Clouse, McREL,
Denver, CO, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, VII
J17
BUILDING MILLENNIAL MINDS: PREPARING
TODAY’S STUDENTS FOR TOMORROW'S WORLD
Standard(s): I, V
A mentally energizing presentation that will
challenge your professional perspectives of teaching
and learning! Contemporary brain research, global
change initiatives, the digital revolution, 21st century
literacies, and constructivist instructional strategies
are melded into essential learning necessary for
student success in the forthcoming millennium. An
action plan to create momentum for initiating 21st
century skills in your educational system is included.
J14
Janet Jones, Educational Consulting Service,
Surprise, AZ, [email protected]
Randall Deich, School Board Broward County,
Davie, FL, [email protected]
Latonya Cooper, School Board Broward County,
Ft. Lauderdale, FL, [email protected]
Tanya Martin, School Board Broward County,
Davie, FL, [email protected]
HELPING TEACHERS IMPROVE
COMPREHENSION INSTRUCTION
See how a group of teachers worked collaboratively
to improve their teaching of comprehension. This
interactive session will bring educators up to date
with research about the teaching of comprehension
and will demonstrate the most effective teaching
practices.
Sheena Hervey, Australian United States Services in Education,
Port Washington, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, XI
Standard(s): II, VIII, XI
J18
WRITING FOR PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS
Writing for professional publications should not
mean producing manuscripts that read like term
papers. Learn how to plan for writing a successful
article. Collect tips on how to edit your own writing
to achieve the informal, conversational style preferred
by most major publications.
Joan Richardson, National Staff Development Council,
Grosse Pointe Park, MI, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII
74
SET
J
J19
HOME LITERACY AS A BRIDGE
FOR PRESCHOOL ENGLISH LEARNERS
ment tool to support a plan for long-term, jobembedded, school-based professional development.
Gain research-based instructional strategies for preschool English learners regarding second language
acquisition and pre-literacy skills. The session emphasizes the strengths that preschool English learners
bring to the classroom and draws upon home literacy
practices to involve families in meaningful ways.
Jack Berckemeyer, National Middle School Association,
Westerville, OH, [email protected]
Linda Hopping, Georgia Middle School Association,
Atlanta, GA, [email protected]
Linda Robinson, Alvin, TX, [email protected]
Rebeca Valdivia, WestEd, San Diego, CA, [email protected]
Nellie Rios-Parra, Lennox School District,
Lennox, CA, [email protected]
Irene Villanueva, WestEd, San Diego, CA, [email protected]
Ann-Marie Wiese, WestEd, Sausalito, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
J20
“STICKY LEARNING” STRATEGIES
TO HELP STUDENTS ACHIEVE
Rich Allen, Education Illustrated LLC,
Howell, MI, [email protected]
Emma Jeter, Christopher Farms Elementary School,
Virginia Beach, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
J21
SETTING THE STAGE FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT
Review National Middle School Association’s School
Improvement Toolkit, a research-based tool that
allows a middle school to evaluate its programs and
practices. Consider processes that combine book
study, an on-line assessment, and the option of an
outside observer to help identify a school’s strengths
and areas for growth. Consider uses for the assess-
J22
DATA IN A DAY: ASSESSING
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEEDS
Learn the processes of engaging all stakeholders
in identifying strengths and gaps in instructional
practices that engage students at a high level of
cognition. This 24-hour, data-driven protocol helps
staff collaborate in designing a framework for relevant
professional development through learning teams.
Student voice plays a powerful role in bringing new
perspectives to the conversations.
Robin Shrode, Impact! Educational Consulting, LLC,
Irving, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, VII
J23
THE GIFT OF COACHING
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Helping students remember the vast quantities of
information they are learning every day is the central
goal of teachers of all grades levels. Learn how to
isolate the key concepts students need to know from
a given area of instruction and subsequently teach it
to them in a way which significantly increases their
ability to hold on to it so they can easily recall and
apply it as needed.
Standard(s): I, IV
To be a powerful and effective coach requires skill
which is best developed by experiencing coaching
first hand. Observe coaching skills and language
while experiencing its benefits. Members of
Coaching for Results, Inc. are providing the gift of
a one-on-one coaching session with a professional
coach. Give yourself 60-120 minutes to explore
your confidential goals and dreams. Imagine the
possibilities: a goal made clear, a plan evolved,
multiple solutions for a tough situation.
Frances Shuster, Coaching For Results, Inc.,
Flower Mound, TX, [email protected]
Vicky Dearing, Coaching For Results, Inc.,
Lewisville, TX, [email protected]
Reba Schumacher, Tyler Independent School District,
Tyler, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
“As a first time attendee, and a first time presenter, I was
uplifted by the consistency of the NSDC message and the
alignment with which I see the work in my current district.
I can’t wait until Dallas!”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
75
SET
2-hour roundtable sessions
R3
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 10:00 A.M.–12:00 P.M.
CULTIVATING DATA SYSTEMS
THAT SUPPORT MATHEMATICAL
LITERACY
Apply new habits to the examination
of mathematics assessment results
and improve teacher and student
knowledge of mathematics.
Gayle Palka, Broome-Tioga BOCES,
Binghamton, NY, [email protected]
Carol Dean, Broome-Tioga BOCES,
Binghamton, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, XI
APPLYING ADULT LEARNING
PRINCIPLES TO PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES
Review principles of adult learning
theory, self-directed learning, selfefficacy, and motivation and their
application to effective professional
development.
R O U N D TA B L E S E S S I O N S
Gail Derrick, Regent University,
Virginia Beach, VA, [email protected]
Natasha Spellman, Regent University,
Elizabeth City, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII
EMERGING TRENDS
OF DISCIPLINE
Help learners acquire new skills that
contribute to character building and
success in school.
Johnstone Wanjala, Sima Community
Based Organization, Kitale, Rift Valley,
Kenya, [email protected]
Joshua Chesoli, Teachers Service
Commission, Kitale, Rift Valley, Kenya,
[email protected]
Benard Masinde, Teachers Service
Commission, Kitale, Rift Valley, Kenya,
[email protected]
Knight Wasilwa, Teachers Service
Commission, Kitale, Rift Valley, Kenya,
[email protected]
Standard(s): VI, VIII
THE KEYSTONE
OF CREATING A LEGACY
Practice using coaching strategies
and consider ways teacher leaders
can support the learning of one
another.
Mie Devers, Fairfax County Public Schools,
Reston, VA, [email protected]
Kevin Simpson, Fairfax County Public
Schools, Vienna, VA,
[email protected]
Timothy Stanley, Fairfax County Public
Schools, Vienna, VA,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
OPENING MINDS THROUGH
THE ARTS (OMA)
Learn how integrating arts with
other core subjects can increase student engagement, enrich the curriculum, and result in increases in
FOSTERING LANGUAGE
student achievement.
DEVELOPMENT IN EARLY
Joan Ashcraft, Tucson Unified School District,
CHILDHOOD STUDENTS
Tucson, AZ, [email protected]
Richard Wamer, Tucson Unified School
Consider and adapt strategies that
District, Tucson, AZ,
will elevate language development
[email protected]
in young students.
Standard(s): VI, XI
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
COMMUNITIES FOR SPECIAL
EDUCATION TEACHERS
Gain practical strategies on how to
make learning communities work
with special educators focused on
early childhood.
Kim Holland, Gwinnett County Public
Schools, Sugar Hill, GA,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
Sandra Frost, UFT Teacher Center,
Brooklyn, NY, [email protected]
Leslie Richmond, UFT Teacher Center,
Brooklyn, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT:
SNAPSHOT TO ALBUM WITH A
LENS ON LEARNING
Gain tips/tools for identifying, training, and empowering teacher leaders to provide ongoing building-level
professional development.
Claudia Shulman, East Penn School District,
Emmaus, PA, [email protected]
Linda De Ivernois, East Penn School District,
Emmaus, PA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, XI
76
ACTIVATE SCHOOL REFORM
WITH THE TRANSFORMING TRIO
Learn how data-driven learning
communities can have a positive
effect on job performance which
impacts student achievement in
even the most challenging of school
environments.
Leontine Butler, Broward County Schools,
Davie, FL,
[email protected]
Marcia Baldanza, Broward County Schools,
Davie, FL,
[email protected]
Katherine Blasik, Broward County Schools,
Davie, FL,
[email protected]
Standard(s): IV, IX
THE INSPIRATIONAL MENTOR:
CREATING A PRINCIPLECENTERED CLASSROOM
Learn positive mentoring techniques
based upon building mutual respect
and trust, modeling appropriate
behaviors, interpreting spoken and
unspoken interactions, and
strengthening organizational and
personal development.
Gary McGuey, McGuey and Associates,
Canandaigua, NY,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
FROM NEOPHYTE TO
PROFESSIONAL: A PRACTICAL
APPROACH
Learn strategies and activities to
help new teachers develop workplace skills and professional expertise, and become effective members
of a school community.
Julia Thompson, , Greenville, NC,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
Register for the roundtable session
and select two programs to attend.
SET
Participants selecting Roundtable 3 will have the opportunity to attend two of the following presentations.
Simply check Roundtable 3 on your Session Selection form and choose any two sessions when you arrive.
REFINING INSTRUCTION FOR
ADOLESCENT LITERACY IN THE
21ST CENTURY
To better meet the needs of their
struggling readers, learn how one
school district is refining literacy
instruction in grades seven to nine
through large-scale professional
development, school-based coaching, professional learning communities, and individual goal setting and
reflection.
Nicole Lafreniere, Edmonton Catholic
Schools, Edmonton, AB, Canada,
[email protected]
Corine Gannon, Edmonton Catholic Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Brenda Willis, Edmonton Catholic Schools,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
WORKING TOGETHER FOR
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT
Learn structures and processes
for organizing the work of school
improvement teams by using tools
that enhance the ability to share
leadership and achieve results.
Mike Galvin, Midcontinent Research for
Education and Learning, Denver, CO,
[email protected]
Danette Parsley, McREL, Denver, CO,
[email protected]
Rodney Shotwell, Rockingham County
Schools, Eden, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
HIGH-QUALITY PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: A “VIRTUAL”
SOLUTION
Learn how online professional
development can enhance professional growth offerings in your
own school district.
ZOOMING IN ON LEARNING
WITH DATA TEAMS
Learn how several middle and high
schools enhanced teacher collaboration, expanded the use of effective
teaching strategies, and increased
student achievement by using data
teams.
LEARNING COMMUNITIES
IN SCHOOLWIDE REFORM
Learn about a comprehensive
and collaborative process of school
change and alternatives to increase
staff ownership and improve
student outcomes.
Lori Van Houten, WestEd, San Francisco, CA,
[email protected]
Noelle Caskey, WestEd, San Francisco, CA,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, IV
USING CRITICAL FRIENDS
GROUPS FOR TEACHER
RETENTION
Learn to use the reflective practice
model, Critical Friends Groups
(CFGs), as a professional development vehicle for teacher support
and retention in an urban school
district.
Jonett Miniel, Houston Independent School
District, Houston, TX,
[email protected]
Lidia Gazdyszyn, Houston Independent
School District, Houston, TX,
[email protected]
Karen Owen, Houston Independent School
District, Houston, TX,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
“This was one of the best conferences
I have attended. It was highly organized,
warm and friendly and used best practices
in professional development.”
THE TEACHING FOR
UNDERSTANDING ACADEMY
Learn how to help teachers collaboratively examine their instruction
through reading, research, peer
observation, and reflection.
Eileen Howley, Farmington Public Schools,
Farmington, CT, [email protected]
Anthony Rigazio-DiGilio, Central Connecticut
State University, New Britain, CT,
[email protected]
Standard(s): IX, XI
BENCHMARKING PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Learn about APQC’s and NSDC’s
Benchmarking Study of Professional
Development, the findings, and how
to participate in future benchmarking studies.
Travis Colton, APQC, Houston, TX,
[email protected]
Standard(s): III, V
STANDARDS ASSESSMENT
INVENTORY (SAI) - MUCH MORE
THAN A SURVEY
Analyze real school SAI data as an
example of how to identify NSDC
Standards to implement in your district and to help schools identify the
best Standards for them to include
in their own improvement plans.
Steve Preston, SI Consultants Inc.,
Decatur, GA, [email protected]
Sue Francis, National Staff Development
Council, Plano, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, V
LEADERSHIP NSDC
Explore NSDC leadership and
service options to assist the Council
in the implementation of the new
strategic plan.
Sue Showers, Board of Trustees,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I
NSDC BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FOCUSED CONVERSATION
Join NSDC Board of Trustees
members to discuss how the
Council can assist you to achieve
NSDC’s purpose.
Karen Dyer, Center for Creative Leadership,
Greensboro, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, XI
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
77
R O U N D TA B L E S E S S I O N S
Angela Peery, Center for Performance
Assessment, Beaufort, SC,
[email protected]
Drema Jackson, Tompkins Middle School,
Savannah, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IV
Elaine Duff, Cumberland County Schools,
Fayetteville, NC, [email protected]
Barry Duff, Cumberland County Schools,
Fayetteville, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
R3
SET
K
3-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 2:45 P.M.–5:45 P.M.
K01
K04
TUESDAY AFTERNOON LECTURE OPTION
MENTORING THE MENTORS THROUGH
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This will allow you to attend the following sessions:
K02: Questions and Answers with James Gilmore
2:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m. and
L01: Texas Scholar Lecture by Gwen Webb-Johnson
3:45 p.m.-4:45 p.m.
K02
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WITH
KEYNOTE SPEAKER JAMES GILMORE
Keynote speaker James Gilmore will address
your questions in this special session following his keynote address on Tuesday afternoon.
This session will conclude after one hour.
James Gilmore, Strategic Horizons LP,
Aurora, OH, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII
K03
WAITING FOR WINGS: THE METAMORPHOSIS
OF SCHOOL-BASED COACHES
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Join one district’s journey toward an effective and
relevant building-based staff development program
for middle and elementary schools. Gain an understanding of how coaches engage teachers as learners
and encourage them to take on leadership roles.
Learn how to change the conversations in your
school from “lounge talk” to “teaching and learning
talk.” Leave with strategies that will empower you
and your colleagues to spread your wings and fly.
Dan Schneider, Hawthorn School District #73,
Vernon Hills, IL, [email protected]
Lisa Cerauli, Hawthorn School District #73,
Vernon Hills, IL, [email protected]
Ann Hofmeier, Hawthorn School District #73,
Vernon Hills, IL, [email protected]
Sheryl Kabak, Hawthorn School District #73,
Vernon Hills, IL, [email protected]
Karen Olker, Hawthorn School District #73,
Vernon Hills, IL, [email protected]
Betsy Sostak, Hawthorn School District #73,
Vernon Hills, IL, [email protected]
Maureen Vinci, Hawthorn School District #73,
Vernon Hills, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
Register for the Expert Track and attend all
keynote Q&A’s, Texas Scholar lectures, and
the back-up keynote.
78
Discuss why mentors, whether new or experienced,
need job-embedded support to address challenges,
grow professionally, and enhance the learning of
beginning teachers and the schools in which they
work. Learn how several Wisconsin districts with
different mentoring models apply various strategies
and structures to support mentors. Consider
implications for your own district setting.
Thomas Howe, Wisconsin New Teacher Project/UCSC,
Madison, WI, [email protected]
Sharon Nelson, Wisconsin New Teacher Project/UCSC,
Waunakee, WI, [email protected]
Nancy Nikolay, Sun Prairie Area School District,
Sun Prairie, WI, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, XI
K05
CREATING EXTRAORDINARY EXPERIENCES
OF LEARNING
Deepen your awareness and design capacity in
creating extraordinary learning events. Break the
traditional paradigm of static, start/stop learning
sessions. Gain clarity in using Before, During, and
After strategies, creating an ongoing, continuous
learning cycle. Lead your colleagues in designing
“After” activities that produce sustainable, predictable
application and transformation. Practice mapping the
learning ecology that moves participants from insight
to practice.
Rob Abernathy, Knowledge Advancers,
Anaheim, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, VIII
K06
BUILDING PLCS THROUGH FAILURE
IS NOT AN OPTION™
“Failure Is Not an Option™ addresses all of the
elements that are absolutely necessary for effective
and enduring educational reform”, writes Michael
Fullan in his foreword of Alan Blankstein’s NSDC
2005 book of the year. Examine how the six principles
guide student achievement in high-performing
schools so all students can achieve and explore how
the principles create a system that gives and
strengthens PLC.
Jan Nobuto, HOPE Foundation,
Mississauga, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Jo Ann Pierce, Duncan Public Schools,
Duncan, OK, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
SET
K
K07
K10
ACTION LEARNING TEAMS TO
IMPROVE TEACHING AND LEARNING
TEACHING AND LEARNING
BEYOND PROFICIENCY
End educator isolation and increase collaboration
by establishing action learning teams that use data
to target student and professional learning goals.
Examine rules, roles, and responsibilities in successful action learning teams and experience the process.
Apply the structure to support the development of
learning communities. Gain a number of valuable
tools and strategies including fast feedback forms,
surveys, and focus groups to support implementation.
Learn to apply data tools to identify the gap between
student proficiency and full mastery. Prepare to examine assumptions about student potential. Using data
and case histories from schools to learn how to set
and benchmark learning goals within a classroom, a
school, or a school district and to work with student
achievement data to maximize student learning.
Margaret Miller, Birdville Independent School District, Fort Worth,
TX, [email protected]
Ellen Bell, Birdville Independent School District, Fort Worth, TX,
[email protected]
Terry Lashley, Tennessee Technological University,
Knoxville, TN, [email protected]
Colleen Goss, Learning Curve Educational Consulting,
Crossville, TN, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, VIII
Standard(s): I, IX
K11
K08
TEACHER LEADERS LEADING MATHEMATICS
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
PEER COACHING FOR TECHNOLOGY
INTEGRATION
Karen Meyer, Puget Sound Center for Teaching, Learning,
and Technology, Bothell, WA, [email protected]
Shelee King-George, Puget Sound Center for Teaching, Learning,
and Technology, Bothell, WA, [email protected]
Standard(s): IX, XI
K09
INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP IN PRACTICE
Reconsider old beliefs and learn new skills proven
to bring about educationally significant change in
teachers and students. Learn specific, immediately
applicable leadership moves that increase staff
resourcefulness and motivation. Discover the four
essential leadership strategies for upgrading teacher
effectiveness. Hear about three landmark breakthroughs in neouroscience and how their application
improves instructional delivery. Strengthen school
culture by applying strategies that renew energy,
encourage optomism, and improve teaching.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
When teachers work collaboratively to design
engaging, rigorous learning experiences, amazing
things happen. Examine how coaches in the Peer
Coaching Program collaborate to design powerful
lessons that integrate technology. Learn about
strategies and resources you can use to establish or
strengthen any peer coaching program. See examples
from coaches in this international staff development
program being implemented in the U.S. and 43
different countries through the Partners in Learning
Program sponsored by Microsoft.
Examine how mathematics teacher leaders learn to
facilitate teacher learning. Consider how leaders
enhance their content-specific facilitation skills by
studying authentic instances of mathematics professional development practice. Learn how one district
uses videocases as part of a comprehensive program
for development of its teacher leaders.
Cathy Carroll, WestEd, Redwood City, CA, [email protected]
Judy Mumme, WestEd, Sheridan, MT, [email protected]
Casilda Pardo, Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
K12
LEADING THE PURPOSE
Learn the difference between leading the purpose and
leading the work and the significant impact it will
have on your school or district. Gain an understanding of how you can connect your school improvement
plan to developing teacher leaders. Learn how to
incorporate feedback loops. Hear how one school has
put these practices into place and achieved success.
Kathy Foster, McKinney Independent School District,
Plano, TX, [email protected]
Wendy Craft, McKinney Independent School District,
McKinney, TX, [email protected]
Alison Smithwick, McKinney Independent School District,
McKinney, TX, [email protected]
Quintero Wajida, San Antonio, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
John LeTellier, Quantum Learning,
Oceanside, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
79
SET
K
3-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 2:45 P.M.–5:45 P.M.
K13
K16
FACILITATION 101: TRICKS OF THE TRADE CULLED
FROM THE TRENCHES
RELIABLE TEACHER EVALUATION:
RESEARCH AND APPLICATION
Delve into the do’s and don’ts of school consulting
by interacting with case studies, by reacting to
challenging scenarios, and by sharing your own war
stories. Learn to use data from various sources
(surveys, the operational curriculum, achievement
scores, etc.) to select and develop the very best staff
development plan possible. Leave with information
on more than 20 facilitation strategies.
Explore the features of research-based teacher
evaluation. Examine seven strategies for improving
reliability of evaluation and practice collecting the
kinds of data that lead to accurate conclusions about
teaching. Learn to conduct teacher evaluations in
ways that result in learning for the teacher and
produce positive changes in teaching practice.
Folwell Dunbar, Collaborative Learning Inc.,
New Orleans, LA, [email protected]
Rush Michael, Collaborative Learning Inc.,
Westmont, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
K14
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
THERE’S NO FUN IN DYSFUNCTION:
OVERCOMING THE FIVE TEAM DYSFUNCTIONS
Based on Patrick Lincioni's book, The Five
Dysfuntions of a Team, this session explores the
dysfuntions all teams must overcome, the positive
results when those pitfalls are avoided, and provides
a model for all teams who wish to focus on results.
Professional learning communities and other educator groups are of little value if the members don't
function effectively.
Ginger Tucker, Canyon ISD, Canyon, TX, [email protected]
Leslie Laughter, Canyon ISD, Canyon, TX, [email protected]
Tim Persall, Canyon ISD, Canyon, TX, [email protected]
Justin Richardson, Canyon ISD, Canyon, TX,
[email protected]
Paula Bevan, Educational Testing Service,
DuBois, PA, [email protected]
Standard(s): V, VI
K17
BUILDING CAPACITY TO MEET THE NEED
FOR HIGH-QUALITY TEACHERS
Learn about a capacity-building model that has
helped organizations in more than 35 states meet
the need for high-quality teachers. Hear how
collaboration among agencies in one state added
an effective online learning program. Consider other
uses for online technology in delivering and assessing professional development. Determine how the
model might assist your state or organization meet
its needs for high-quality teachers.
Barbara Treacy, Education Development Center,
Newton, MA, [email protected]
Gwenda Purnell, Mississippi Department of Education,
Jackson, MS, [email protected]
Leinda Peterman, Education Development Center,
Newton, MA, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, XI
Standard(s): I, II
K18
K15
DEVELOPING LEADERS ONLINE:
THE ALABAMA LEADERSHIP ACADEMY
Learn practical strategies for developing and
delivering successful online professional development. Discover methods successfully used by the
Alabama Leadership Academy for developing and
nurturing online learning communities that engage in
sustained, job-embedded professional development.
Review design standards and content elements,
participate in activities that can be adapted to other
content areas, and receive feedback from the
presenters on questions from participants.
John Ross, Edvantia, Pulaski, VA, [email protected]
John Bell, Alabama State Department of Education,
Montgomery, AL, [email protected]
Jackie Walsh, Edvantia, Montgomery, AL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
80
THE COURAGE TO LEAD:
SUSTAINING THE HEARTS OF SCHOOL LEADERS
Building the skills and knowledge of instructional
leadership is critical, but not sufficient, to transforming student achievement. It is also critical to sustain
and renew the heart and courage of school leaders
working to transform schools. Courage to Lead
programs effectively address this need. Experience
the Courage to Lead approach and learn about
national, district, and school level efforts to sustain
school leadership.
Edward Tobia, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Terry Chadsey, Center for Courage and Renewal,
Bainbridge Island, WA, [email protected]
Theresa Kauffman, Hill School of Fort Worth,
Fort Worth, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
SET
K
K19
EFFECTIVELY USING TECHNOLOGY
TO ENSURE AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT
“This conference has
Learn how to use all the features of PowerPoint and
Word including animations, sound, video, and collaboration tools to engage your audience. Plus, you'll
uncover a few Microsoft secrets and tips! Learn how
to reinforce your message through the correct use of
visuals, graphics, sound, and motion. Bring your laptop and try it out, or follow along with the handouts.
become an annual travel
Marcia Tyrrell, Central Bucks School District,
Langhorne, PA, [email protected]
request for me because
of the high standard
maintained in recruiting
Standard(s): VI, VII
appropriate and relevant
breakout sessions that are
S TA N D A R D S
LEARNING COMMUNITIES
LEADERSHIP
RESOURCES
DATA-DRIVEN
EVALUATION
RESEARCH-BASED
DESIGN
LEARNING
COLLABORATION
EQUITY
QUALITY TEACHING
FAMILY INVOLVEMENT
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
useful and informative.”
ADVANCED
This symbol indicates an
Advanced Level Session
81
SET
L
2-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 2:45 P.M.–4:45 P.M.
L01
L04
TEXAS SCHOLAR LECTURE 3:45 p.m.-4:45 p.m.
SERVANT LEADERSHIP: EMPOWERING 21ST
CENTURY LEARNERS THROUGH CULTURALLY
RESPONSIVE PEDAGOGY
CREATING AND CULTIVATING A LEARNING
COMMUNITY THROUGH MATHEMATICS
School leaders are responsible for supporting
teachers who in turn are responsible for
supporting learners to be their best academically. However, the challenge in facilitating this
process through equitable and socially just service
delivery is monumental when administrators and
teachers fail to embrace the integrity and brilliance
found in an ever- changing and diverse society.
Multicultural education, as a process, offers evidencebased research to support paradigm shifts that make
“all” finally mean “all.”
Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson, Texas A & M University,
College Station, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): X
L02
NSDC FORMER AND CURRENT
BOARD MEMBERS: A DIALOGUE
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Past and current NSDC Board Members will
collaborate on agenda items supporting and
promoting the strategic plan of NSDC.
The Knox County study group model was instituted in
grade-level specific math academies for the last three
years. Learn how content knowledge was improved,
powerful lessons shared, and a sense of a true cohort
was formed.
Tanna Nicely, Knox County Schools,
Blaine, TN, [email protected]
Rodney Russell, Knox County Schools,
Knoxville, TN, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
L05
FACULTY SUPPORT TEAMS
FACILITATE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Learn how a cadre of master teachers providing
job-embedded instructional support helps teachers
improve lessons and increase student engagement.
Discover how the Faculty Support Team, a cadre of
master teachers, promotes quality teaching, increases
teacher retention rates, and improves student
achievement. Take helpful ideas found successful
in a large urban school setting.
Kathy Kee, Coaching School Results,
Shady Shores, TX, [email protected]
Carlene Murphy, WFSG National Center,
Augusta, GA, [email protected]
Sharon Hodges, Prince George's County Public Schools,
Oxon Hill, MD, [email protected]
Patricia Smith, Prince George's County Public Schools,
Oxon Hill, MD, [email protected]
Stephanie Tayman, Prince George's County Public Schools,
Oxon Hill, MD, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
Standard(s): I, XI
L03
L06
STRENGTHENING FEDERAL INVESTMENTS
IN EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
POSITIVE IMPACT, POSITIVE RESULTS,
POWERFUL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Review current and future federal investments in
professional development. Learn about NSDC’s
policy advocacy agenda regarding the reauthorization
of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and
next steps for ensuring that all educators experience
effective professional development on a regular basis.
Experience the impact of PLC and shared leadership
that results in increased student achievement.
Examine the impact of a collaborative learning
environment and job-embedded professional development. Learn steps necessary for organizing and
implementing learning teams, teacher cadres, and
collaborative communication. Dialogue and consider
application of key ideas to other settings.
Rene Islas, National Staff Development Council/B&D Consulting
LLC, Washington, DC, [email protected]
Hayes Mizel, National Staff Development Council,
Columbia, SC, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, III
Kelly Taliaferro, Bixby Public Schools, Bixby, OK,
[email protected]
Robin Ross, Bixby Public Schools, Bixby, OK, [email protected]
Suzie Smith, Bixby Public Schools, Bixby, OK, [email protected]
Sandy Thompson, Bixby Public Schools, Bixby, OK,
[email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
Build in reflection time
during your daily schedule.
82
SET
L
L07
L10
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT THAT WORKS:
INSPIRING EXPERTISE
IMPROVE YOUR SCHOOL OR DISTRICT WEB SITE
Consider the benefits of differentiating professional
development plans for all staff. Learn how numerous
opportunities provided to all staff to enhance individual expertise and to meet the needs of all learners
resulted in improved student achievement. By discovering what one district did to ensure this improvement, find ways to modify the process and create a
framework that works in the participants’ work
settings.
Judith DeStefano-Anen, Stafford Township School District,
Manahawkin, NJ, [email protected]
Thomas Dellane, Stafford Township School District, Manahawkin,
NJ, [email protected]
Margaret Hoffman, Stafford Township School District,
Manahawkin, NJ, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, XI
L08
NSDC BOOK CLUB:
THE FIVE DYSFUNCTIONS OF A TEAM
Cathy Berlinger-Gustafson, Crystal Lake, IL, [email protected]
Cindy Harrison, Instructional Improvement Group,
Broomfield, CO, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII
Tracy Crow, National Staff Development Council,
Columbus, OH, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, VIII
L11
MENTORING SUPPORT FOR MULTIPLE ROLES:
A PARTNERSHIP STORY
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro,
with support from state funds and a Wachovia grant,
has established a school/university partnership to
support mentors in the Piedmont Triad region. Learn
how university and school district personnel are
working together to create learning communities
that prepare and support mentors who can function
in a variety of roles and meet diverse needs across
multiple settings.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Those attending this structured conversation should
read The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick
Lencioni. Come prepared to discuss how to build an
effective, cohesive team and how to overcome the
five dysfunctions that Lencioni identifies in his book.
Participants will share their ideas in small group and
large group conversations.
School and district web sites have the potential to
support effective communication and collaboration
among educators and between schools and communities. Learn what makes informational web sites
particularly useful. Look at features on existing sites
and leave with clear strategies for improving your
site. Examine very basic web site elements,
not the latest interactive features.
Betty Epanchin, University of North Carolina at Greensboro,
Greensboro, NC, [email protected]
Christina O'Connor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro,
Greensboro, NC, [email protected]
Rhonda Schuhler, Alamance Burlington School System,
Burlington, NC, [email protected]
Cheryl Greenberg, University of North Carolina at Greensboro,
Greensboro, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, VII, X
L09
DEVELOPING URBAN TEACHER LEADERS AS
DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION EXPERTS
Consider the relationship between the NBPTS Five
Core Propositions, National Teaching Standards, and
diffentiated instruction. Learn strategies for differentiating instruction and establishing challenging learning environments in urban schools. Apply the strategies to the development and support of teacher leaders. Participants will realign current teaching practices to share with teacher leaders and instructional
coaches to facilitate schoolwide implementation.
Ann Cunningham-Morris, ASCD,
Alexandria, VA, [email protected]
Wil Parker, NBPTS, Arlington, VA, [email protected]
L12
DIFFERENTIATING CURRICULUM
FOR ALL LEARNERS
Ensure that all children in every classroom learn.
Empower teachers to accept the challenge by
preparing them to differentiate the curriculum for
all learners in all content areas. Help teachers use a
variety of strategies including implementing flexible
grouping, tailoring instruction to diverse learning
styles, and managing the differentiated classroom.
Plan appropriate staff development for teachers.
Wendy Conklin, Teacher Created Materials,
Round Rock, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, XI
Standard(s): I, X, XI
83
SET
L
2-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 2:45 P.M.–4:45 P.M.
L13
L16
PROBLEM POSING: A TOOL TO BUILD TEACHER
LEADERSHIP IN MATHEMATICS
NSDC’S COACHING ACADEMY
Hear why student mathematics achievement goals
are being achieved sooner than anticipated in Clear
Creek Independent School System. Consider the role
played by teacher leaders in accelerating school and
districtwide reform of mathematics instructional
practices. Explore problem posing as a core strategy
for strengthening students' mathematical reasoning
abilities and developing teacher leaders.
Sue Chapman, Clear Creek Independent School District,
League City, TX, [email protected]
NSDC’s Coaches’ Academy is in its fourth year.
Funded by Wachovia's Teachers and Teaching
Initiative, the Academy is designed to initiate statelevel support of school-based coaches/staff developers within the participating states while modeling
an Academy-like experience for participants. Learn
about the purpose, structure, curriculum, and
results of the Academy.
Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council,
Arvada, CO, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, VII
Standard(s): I, II
L17
L14
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
MOVING FROM WORKSHOPS
TO COLLABORATIVE SCHOOL CULTURES
Learn how school professional learning teams, collaborative coaching, and accountability form a structure
that results in improved instructional practice and
increased student achievement. Review a training
model that gives teachers, in a diverse district of over
130,000 students in northeast Florida, ownership of
their professional learning. Consider lessons learned
and actions that can be applied to other settings.
Dawn Wilson, Duval County Public Schools,
Green Cove Springs, FL, [email protected]
Kay Earhart, Duval County Public Schools,
Jacksonville, FL, [email protected]
Susan Wilkinson, Schultz Center for Teaching and Leadership,
Jacksonville, FL, [email protected]
Patricia Willis, Duval County Public Schools,
Jacksonville, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
L15
BUYING INTO THE DATA:
DEVELOPING A DATA-DRIVEN SCHOOL
Learn how to establish data as the driving force for
instruction through a step-by-step process for analyzing data to modify instruction. Use this information
to take a critical look at how to effectively analyze
data at your school.
Carmen Gregory, Memphis City School,
Memphis, TN, [email protected]
Tamika Carwell, Memphis City Schools,
Memphis, TN, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, IX
AN INQUIRY-BASED APPROACH TO
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND
INSTRUCTION
Learn practical strategies to accelerate and support
all students, but especially low-income and minority
students. Learn how inquiry-based professional development is a necessary foundation for inquiry-based
instructional practices, including Socratic Seminars,
tutorials, and Cornell note-taking. Learn researchdriven strategies based on 27 years of instructional
practice. Create supportive learning environments
that turn students from passive learners into active
classroom contributors and critical thinkers.
Granger Ward, AVID Center, San Diego, CA, [email protected]
Kathy Arno, McKinney Independent School District,
McKinney, TX, [email protected]
Eileen Friou, AVID Center, Edinburg, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
L18
PRESENTATION SKILLS 101:
51 WAYS TO ENGAGE ALL PARTICIPANTS
You have been asked to make a presentation to a
new group, your peers, or your administration. Do
your hands sweat, your pulse race, your confidence
go down, or you feel completely unprepared? Explore
the myths and truths associated with presenting, as
well as learn ways to vary voice, add gestures, engage
the entire audience, and have fun. Attend to improve
basic platform, classroom management, and
presentation skills.
Adrianne Roggenbuck, Professional Development Alliance- ROE,
Joliet, IL, [email protected]
Betsy Allen, The Bob Pike Group,
Fort Myers, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
84
SET
L
L19
TRANSFORMING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
FROM EVENT-BASED TO PROGRAM-DRIVEN
Learn how a large urban professional development
department facilitated a process that led to curriculum, technology, school, and other divisions to
support the cultural shift from events to programs.
Acquire tools for a focused and sustained professional development program. Examine the impact the
Professional Developer’s Program is having on job
performance and student achievement.
Bette Zippin, Broward County Public Schools Human Resource
Development, Davie, FL, [email protected]
Kyna Miller, Broward County Public Schools Human Resource
Development, Davie, FL, [email protected]
Denise Roberts, Broward County Public Schools Human Resource
Development, Davie, FL, [email protected]
Anamarie Root, Broward County Public Schools Human Resource
Development, Davie, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, V
L20
CONTENT AREA LITERACY: AN EFFECTIVE
TRAINING DESIGN FOR NEW TEACHERS
Angela Kennedy, Pasadena Independent School District,
Pasadena, TX, [email protected]
Diana Gomez, Pasadena Independent School District,
Pasadena, TX, [email protected]
Billy Winebrenner, Pasadena Independent School District,
South Houston, TX, [email protected]
Jan Perales, Pasadena Independent School District,
Pasadena, TX, [email protected]
Karen Brown, Pasadena Independent School District,
Pasadena, TX, [email protected]
Kim Aubin, Pasadena Independent School District,
Pasadena, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, XI
L21
WHAT WORKS:
CLASSIFIED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Discuss why in today’s educational climate,
comprehensive, high-quality staff development for
classified staff is critical to ensure high-quality overall
performance of the organization and achievement of
its strategic plan. Take a variety of tools, strategies,
Helen Ryley, St. Vrain Valley School District, Boulder, CO,
[email protected]
Stephanie Boespflug, St. Vrain Valley School District,
Longmont, CO, [email protected]
Sharon Kaiser, St. Vrain Valley School District,
Longmont, CO, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
L22
USING CASE STUDIES TO ENHANCE
SUPPORT OF TEACHER LEADERS
Consider the implications of case studies written
by teacher leaders describing the challenges and
opportunities they face in assuming new roles in
their schools. Clarify opportunities for districts and
schools and the benefits to the individual teachers
using teacher leadership models. Assess the potential
of strategies for addressing the opportunities and
benefits of teacher leadership.
Jeanne Harmon, Center for the Strengthening of the Teaching
Profession (CSTP), Silverdale, WA, [email protected]
Hellwich John, Dieringer School District,
Bonney Lake, WA, [email protected]
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Learn about staff development that effectively helps
new teachers promote literacy development in the
content areas grades 3-12. Review program evaluation
data including survey results, state certification
exam scores, and student state assessment scores.
Experience several strategies from the Literacy
Seminar including dialogue journals, foldables, colorcoded note-taking, and using read-alouds in the
classroom. Leave with ideas you can use immediately.
and ideas to design, implement, evaluate, and
sustain classified professional development to share
with your district. Ensure appropriate professional
growth opportunities for the classified and support
staff who typically represent about half of most
district's personnel.
Standard(s): II, IX
L23
FEE-FOR-SERVICE:
SURVIVING A RESOURCE CULTURE CHANGE
In a time of shrinking budgets and competition for
resources, learn how one large urban professional
development department shifted from district-funded
to fee-for-service, a hybrid of privatized and public
models of delivery of services. Consider the “lessons
learned-lessons applied” and acquire practical strategies to facilitate necessary culture shifts of staff and
customers. Pinpoint services to customer needs and
make essential systemic changes toward an optimized program of professional development.
Sharon Koonce, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Melinda Garrett, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Melissa Noriega, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Cristina Oliveros, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): III
85
SET
L
2-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 2:45 P.M.–4:45 P.M.
L24
L27
THE FRAGILE SEX: DECLINING MALE LITERACY
UNDERSTANDING LEARNING
Review data that suggests boys have more problems
learning to read and are more likely to end up in
special education than girls. Consider their distinctly
different learning styles. Learn about one district’s
intervention approach and methods to incorporate
male literacy strategies into professional development
plans.
Review the cognitive structures necessary for
individuals to learn. Learn why students may know
information one day but not the next or why they
raise their hand for help only to be unable to explain
what help they need. Explore the role of mediation
in developing strong students. Help teachers with
developing learning structures, building mental
models, identifying payoffs for learning, and labeling
and sorting strategies that use patterns.
Sarah Delawder, William S. Hart Union High School District,
Canyon Country, CA, [email protected]
Terry Deloria, William S. Hart Union High School District, Canyon
Country, CA, [email protected]
James Webb, William S. Hart Union High School District, Canyon
Country, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, X
L25
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
SCHOOLS THAT LEARN
Consider why too often traditional structures and
practices discourage learning for all stakeholders
when schools are supposed to be in the business of
learning. Learn to cultivate a learning-focused school.
Consider strategies that tap the resources found
specifically within any school. Experience two schools’
professional learning structures that have produced
transformational results in school culture, faculty
commitment, and student achievement.
Laura Link, Forsyth County Schools,
Cumming, GA, [email protected]
Jeffrey Zoul, Forsyth County Schools,
Cumming, GA, [email protected]
Shelley Rex, aha! Process, Inc.,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Jim Littlejohn, aha! Process Inc.,
Columbia, SC, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
L28
LEARNING FROM LIFE:
NURTURING SCHOOLS TO VITALITY
Take an innovative journey and learn from more than
600 successful secondary schools involved in the
Lessons From Life network. Understand the rationale
for this unique biological model of school leadership.
Reflect on school leadership practices applying this
model. Explore best practices among secondary
schools that aspire to achieve rigor, relevance, and
relationships and more than adequate yearly
progress.
Richard Jones, RDJ Associates, Loudonville, NY, [email protected]
Kathleen Weigel, Palm Beach County Schools,
Delray Beach, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
Standard(s): I, II
L26
NEA KEYS: ASSESSING TEACHING AND LEARNING
CONTEXTS IN SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS
It is well established that school contexts explain
a significant portion of the variance in students’
achievement. Yet there are few substantive efforts
to operationally define high-quality school contexts
and still fewer methodologically rigorous methods
for measuring and enhancing them. The NEA KEYS
initiative which includes a web-based, internet
administered survey provides a systematic way for
schools to look at themselves and identify and
address issues critical to success.
Jacques Nacson, NEA, Washington, DC, [email protected]
Ross Edminster, Berkley Public Schools,
Berkley, MA, [email protected]
Betsy Gooch, Berkley Public Schools,
Berkley, MA, [email protected]
Daniel Nerad, Green Bay Area Public Schools,
Green Bay, WI, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IV
86
L29
DEVELOPING A REFLECTIVE MODEL FOR
EVALUATION FOCUSING ON PROFESSIONAL
GROWTH
Learn how your school district can design and
implement an evaluation model using Charlotte
Danielson's framework, which enhances student
achievement and promotes professional learning for
teachers, other certified personnel, and support staff.
Explore the processes involved in developing a model
aligned to teacher needs and school/district goals.
Helene Spak, Northbrook School District 27,
Northbrook, IL, [email protected]
Theresa Fournier, Northbrook School District 27,
Northbrook, IL, [email protected]
David Kroeze, Northbrook School District 27,
Northbrook, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): V, XI
SET
L
L30
L33
DISAGGREGATING DATA AND COLLABORATIVE
DIALOGUE = RESULTS
BUILDING ON THE COACHING CONNECTION
Hear how PLC combine disaggegating data and
collaborative dialogue to solve school issues.
Help all teachers to use data to make instructional
decisions. Examine how staff development is shifting the focus from teaching to learning. Learn how
use of research-based teaching strategies as well as
student achievement has grown.
Kelly Grimmett, Vinita Public Schools,
Vinita, OK, [email protected]
Carrie Satterfield, Vinita Public Schools,
Vinita, OK, [email protected]
Jason Sauer, Vinita Public Schools,
Vinita, OK, [email protected]
Mary Smith, Vinita Public Schools,
Vinita, OK, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, VIII
L31
STANDARDS...AND DELIVER!
Rochelle Winter, Wavelength Inc., Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Julie Ganey, Wavelength Inc., Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Debbie Lauer, Wavelength Inc., Chicago, IL,
[email protected]
Jim Winter, Wavelength Inc., Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): IX, XI
L32
MAKING PRACTICAL CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
SKILLS VISIBLE FOR TEACHER INDUCTION
Hear how Western Carolina University teacher
candidates are prepared to use a proactive classroom
management approach that contributes to a successful induction year. Learn strategies to assist new and
current teachers to maintain consistency in the classroom. Gain practical approaches that enable teachers
to diffuse classroom conflicts skillfully. Consider
application of the preparation model and strategies
for your organization.
Rick Smith, Conscious Teaching,
Fairfax, CA, [email protected]
Kathy Proctor, Swain County Middle School,
Bryson City, NC, [email protected]
Tyra Webb-Johnson, Rochester City School District,
Rochester, NY, [email protected]
Marie Cianca, Rochester City School District,
Rochester, NY, [email protected]
Michele Hancock, Rochester City School District,
Rochester, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, VIII
L34
IMPROVING MEETINGS TO
BUILD AND ENERGIZE TEAMS
Learn the importance of energized staff meetings
and how to implement activities and techniques to
make meetings collaborative learning opportunities.
Gain strategies for a variety of meeting phases and
ideas for long-term meetings. Acquire knowledge and
skills needed to put what is learned to immediate
use and/or to teach your colleagues.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Watch the award-winning improvisational comedy
ensemble, Wavelength demonstrate improvisations’
place in improving student achievement. View how
improvisation offers an extraordinary form of collaboration and can help create a climate where a community of learners can support each other and flourish.
Following the performance, explore explicit strategies
(including interactive exercises) and resources for the
appropriate use of humor and improvisation in an
educational community.
Role play, reflect, learn, and use effective coaching
strategies. Gain strategies to create high-performing
leadership teams. Discuss experiences that facilitate
the development of successful coaches. Design an
implementation plan. Discover how coaching has
moved from the power of one to the synergy of many.
Sheila Eller, Fairfax County Schools, Lake Elmo, MN,
[email protected]
John Eller, Virginia Polytechic Institute and State University, Falls
Church, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
L35
TRAINING PRE-K–12 GRADE TEACHERS VIA AN
ONLINE LITERACY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Where can pre-K-12 teachers find effective literacy
resources to support their literacy instruction? How
can we assist them in utilizing resources effectively?
Assisting teachers with finding useful and effective
literacy strategies is a goal of many staff developers
around the country. Come learn about how an online,
statewide professional development course is helping
teachers develop their literacy knowledge and is supporting their literacy instruction.
Lourdes Smith, Florida Online Reading Professional
Development, Orlando, FL, [email protected]
Candace Whitehead, Florida Online Reading Professional
Development, Orlando, FL, [email protected]
Vicky Zygouris-Coe, University of Central Florida,
Orlando, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, XI
Standard(s): VII, XI
87
SET
L
2-hour sessions
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 2:45 P.M.–4:45 P.M.
L36
L39
INCLUSION STAFF DEVELOPMENT: ALIGNING
STRENGTHS WITH STANDARDS
TRANSFORMING ADMINISTRATORS
INTO INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERS
Make inclusion a successful reality for educators,
students, and families. Experience guided role
playing, modeling, discussions, research critiques,
and demonstration of effective lesson designs for
inclusion settings. Review instructional and classroom management strategies. Achieve the ultimate
goal of maximum success for all students.
School principals overloaded with “administrivia”
spend too much of their daily work in isolation and
away from classrooms. Learn how to reduce the
administrative tasks of the principal and embed daily
time for him/her to learn and share instructional
leadership skills with fellow leaders. Leave this
session with a clear set of strategies to ratchet up
instructional leadership via collaborative work that
reconnects principals and teachers.
Toby Karten, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional Schools,
Marlboro, NJ, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
L37
PERFORMANCE-BASED TEACHER EVALUATION
AND SUPERVISION
Consider why most teacher evaluation efforts are
disconnected from student work produced in the
classroom and teacher learning needs. Learn how
this performance-based teacher evaluation and
supervision model guides conversations between
teachers and supervisors and promotes teacher
learning in the use of student performance data.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Anthony Rigazio-DiGilio, Central Connecticut State University,
New Britain, CT, [email protected]
James Aseltine, Central Connecticut State University,
New Britain, CT, [email protected]
Judith Farynairz, Central Connecticut State University,
New Britain, CT, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, XI
Timothy Berkey, University of Houston-Victoria,
Sugar Land, TX, [email protected]
Beth Folger, Guilford County Schools,
Greensboro, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
L40
READY FOR ANYTHING:
SUPPORTING NEW TEACHERS FOR SUCCESS
How do we prepare our international cadre of beginning teachers to meet the needs of today's diverse
student population? Learn to implement a year-long,
site-based professional development support model
that builds the competence and confidence needed
by new teachers to impact student achievement.
Lynn Howard, Center for Performance Assessment,
Englewood, CO, [email protected]
Catherine Koontz, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools,
Harrisburg, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
L38
ACTIVE SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHING
Learn dynamic, active professional development and
teaching strategies for social studies. Experience a
variety of strategies to use with teachers. Walk away
with energy and excitement about staff development
possibilities.
Emily Smith, Teacher Created Materials,
Bristow, VA, [email protected]
Marcia Russell, Teacher Created Materials,
Huntington Beach, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, XI
General sessions provide an opportunity
to network with colleagues, participate in
NSDC celebrations, and hear stimulating
keynote speakers. Plan to attend all of them!
L41
THE GIFT OF COACHING
To be a powerful and effective coach requires skill
which is best developed by experiencing coaching
first hand. Observe coaching skills and language
while experiencing its benefits. Members of
Coaching for Results, Inc. are providing the gift of
a one-on-one coaching session with a professional
coach. Give yourself 60-120 minutes to explore your
confidential goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities….a goal made clear, a plan evolved, multiple
solutions for a tough situation.
Marceta Reilly, Coaching For Results, Inc.,
Hoyt, KS, [email protected]
Paula Kellogg, Coaching For Results, Inc.,
Perry, KS, [email protected]
Sue Kidd, Greenbush Educational Service Center,
McLouth, KS, [email protected]
Dayna Richardson, Unified School District 313-Buhler School
District, Hutchinson, KS, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
88
SET
2-hour roundtable sessions
R4
TUESDAY – DECEMBER 4, 2007 – 2:45 P.M.–4:45 P.M.
Participants selecting Roundtable 4 will network with colleagues in similar roles.
This session offers an extended
networking opportunity among
peers in the same roles. Find out
how others with job responsibilities
similar to yours are responding to
challenges and utilizing their local
resources.
Network with colleagues in these roles:
• Superintendents
• School-Based Staff Developers
• Assistant Superintendents
• District Staff Developers
• Central Office Administrators
• University Teachers
• Curriculum Specialists
• Regional/Technical Assistance
Providers
• Principals
• Assistant Principals
• Teacher Leaders
R O U N D TA B L E S E S S I O N S
89
SET
M
2-hour sessions
WEDNESDAY – DECEMBER 5, 2007 – 7:45 A.M.–9:45 A.M.
M01
M04
BACK-UP KEYNOTE ADDRESS 7:45 a.m.-8:45 a.m.
BELL-TO-BELL AND WALL-TO-WALL EDUCATIONAL
PRACTICES: THE FIRST TIER OF INTERVENTIONS!
WHEN PRINCIPALS FOCUS ON STUDENT
LEARNING, SOMETHING MAGIC HAPPENS
Every student in America should receive a
warranty that ensures that every classroom
in America has a professional educator who
has mastered the strategies associated with
making every moment count. The address
takes umbrage at the fact that we are talking
about interventions without ensuring that all teachers
have the capacity to teach all students in every classroom. If we can do that, the need for tier two and
three interventions is diminished significantly. Before
schools begin to develop RtI frameworks they should
work hard to ensure that every teacher in America has
the capacity to use space and time effectively.
Should Bruce Matsui not be called upon during
the conference as a back-up keynote speaker he will
deliver his prepared keynote during the M01 session.
Bruce Matsui, Claremont University,
Claremont, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): X
M02
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
BENCHMARKING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
APQC, with the support of NSDC, conducted a
benchmarking study of professional development in
27 school districts across the country. In this session,
participants will learn how benchmarking helps
organizations improve their practices, how the
professional development benchmarking study was
designed, and what the findings and implications are.
Acquire research-based tools and strategies for
principals that will help them to create supportive,
productive working environments focused on student
learning. Examine how research has converged to
give a clear picture of the characteristics of effective
school leadership. Use the rubrics and tools provided
to guide the use of the most effective school leadership characteristics and behaviors.
Dawn Billings, School Synergy,
Salem, OR, [email protected]
Mardale Dunsworth, School Synergy,
Salem, OR, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, V
M05
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES THAT IMPACT
MINORITY STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Learn instructional strategies that change minority
students' attitudes toward learning and reduces the
achievement gaps with their counterparts. Compare
cases studies of fourth and fifth grades students with
current practices and develop a customized instructional plan for immediate implementation among
minority student populations. Walk away with a repertoire of ideas that build capacity, increase stamina,
and enhance retention of content-area concepts.
M03
Corina Bullock, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Gaylynn Prestwood, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Andetria Green-Hampton, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Denise McAfee, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Ingrid Baker, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
LaTanya Davis, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
NSDC BOOK CLUB: LEARNING BY DOING
Standard(s): X, XI
Joellen Killion, National Staff Development Council,
Arvada, CO, [email protected]
Travis Colton, APQC, Houston, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): III
Those attending this structured conversation should
read Learning by Doing by Richard DuFour, Rebecca
DuFour, Robert Eaker, and Tom Many. Come prepared to discuss the issues and challenges that
schools and districts face when implementing PLC
concepts and learn how to assess your schools place
on the PLC journey. Participants will share their ideas
in small-group and large-group conversations.
Tom Many, Kildeer Countryside School District 96,
Buffalo Grove, IL
Jeanne Spiller, Kildeer Countryside School District 96,
Buffalo Grove, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I
90
Special pointers are indicated throughout
the 2007 Conference Program. Please read
through all the recommendations before
you finalize your conference plans.
SET
M
M06
M09
COACHING SCHOOLS FOR A GLOBAL AGE
USING PLCs TO MAKE SMALLER
COMMUNITIES STRONG
Learn about the Asia Society International Studies
Schools Network (ISSN), its school design, and its
integrated coaching model. Work with ISSN's graduate profile and experience a coaching simulation that
introduces a variety of coaching tools and strategies.
Leave with a model of coaching adaptable for other
settings and new tools and strategies for school
change work.
Judith Conk, Asia Society International Studies Schools Network,
Nanuet, NY, [email protected]
Shari Albright, International Studies Schools Network Asia Society, San Antonio, TX, [email protected]
Melissa Jacobs, Houston Academy of International Studies,
Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX,
[email protected]
Meredith Wedin, International Studies School Network Asia Society, Houston, TX, [email protected]
Hear about the Building Responsive Inclusive
Classrooms for Kids initiative, with smaller learning
communities as the structure to deliver differentiated
instruction and why the creation of PLCs to increase
student achievement is a certain next step. Follow the
blending of both types of learning communities from
teacher selection through full involvement in a large,
successful school district.
Tina Farrell, Clear Creek Independent School District,
League City, TX, [email protected]
Janis Jarvis, Clear Creek Independent School District,
League City, TX, [email protected]
Felicia Andrews, Clear Creek Independent School District,
League City, TX, [email protected]
Kathy Davis, Clear Creek Independent School District,
League City, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
Standard(s): I, II
M10
M07
BUILDING EFFECTIVE TEAMS:
ACADEMICS AND ACTIVITIES
Examine how school improvement occurs when students, staff, and parents have a clear understanding
of current achievement levels, where they need to be,
and what strategies are necessary to get there. Learn
skills of data analysis, research, and collaboration
essential to success and staff development activities
that are at the heart of the work.
Build effective teams by applying interpersonal skills,
knowledge, vision, and management. Enhance these
efforts by creating trust through supervision and
instruction. Learn to apply these skills to all stakeholders including administration, teaching and
non-teaching staff, students, parents, and community.
Gain winning results by effectively leading and
managing the people, processes, and products.
Karen Seiber, Rockwood School District,
Fenton, MO, [email protected]
Rachelle Meyer, Rockwood School District,
Fenton, MO, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
M08
CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP
THROUGH BRAIN-FRIENDLY INSTRUCTION
Consider how staff development that aligns with
how the brain best learns engages more learners
and engages all learners more fully - reducing the
achievement gap. Review empirical data demonstrating reduction of the achievement gap with brainfriendly instructional strategies and then experience
and process a range of strategies including RallyQuiz;
Kinesthetic Symbols; Timed Pair Share; Sage-NScribe; and Listen Right.
Spencer Kagan, Kagan Publishing and Professional Development,
San Clemente, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
TEACHER LEADERS CAN CHANGE YOUR SCHOOL
Mike Grant, Eden Prairie Public Schools,
Eden Prairie, MN, [email protected]
William Sommers, SEDL, Austin, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
M11
IMPROVE INSTRUCTION USING CULTURALLY
RELEVANT TEACHING STRATEGIES
Join a provocative interactive presentation focused
on professional learning developed for teams of
teachers from ten diverse school districts. Hear how
this year-long, ongoing professional development
examines issues of race, class, and culture and their
impact upon classroom instruction. Find out how
these teachers implement culturally relevant teaching
strategies and conduct action research to improve
the academic achievement of their students. Enter
the conversation, share your experiences, and leave
armed with new ideas to continue the work in your
district.
Bonnie Davis, Cooperating School Districts,
St. Louis, MO, [email protected]
Sue Heggarty, Cooperating School Districts,
St. Louis, MO, [email protected]
MaryKim Schreck, Osage Beach, MO, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
91
SET
M
2-hour sessions
WEDNESDAY – DECEMBER 5, 2007 – 7:45 A.M.–9:45 A.M.
M12
M15
TODAY'S BEGINNING TEACHERS,
TOMORROW’S EDUCATIONAL LEADERS
LEADERSHIP FOR LITERACY: RAISING
EXPECTATIONS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR
EXCELLENCE
Revisit the challenges faced by beginning teachers
and the additional challenges of meeting the needs
of students from poverty. Discover how to retain
quality beginning teachers through an innovative,
research-based support system created by professional developers and award-winning classroom teachers.
Examine the impact this program has on improving
classroom management, collaboration, and integration of innovations into instructional practice.
Renee Coward, North Carolina Center for the Advancement of
Teaching, Cullowhee, NC, [email protected]
Steve Hauge, Raleigh, NC, [email protected]
Mary McDuffie, North Carolina Center for the Advancement of
Teaching, Cullowhee, NC, [email protected]
Kay Shapiro, North Carolina Center for the Advancement of
Teaching, Cullowhee, NC, [email protected]
View how high school teachers initiate and implement school and curricular improvements using the
Reading Apprenticeship (RA) instructional framework
and professional development model. Learn how this
framework leads to innovations in daily classroom
practice, promotes student literacy growth, and
builds teachers’ content area reading and learning
expertise. Experience key RA routines.
Diane Waff, Strategic Literacy Initiative/WestEd,
Philadelpia, PA, [email protected]
Nicole Chilla, Wilson High School/DC Public Schools,
Bethesda, MD, n[email protected]
Lisa Grymes, Wilson High School/DC Public Schools,
Washington, DC, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
Standard(s): VI, VIII
M13
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
LEADING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN
SCHOOLS: FOUNDATIONS, FOCUS, AND FUTURE
ACTIONS
Consider why leading school-based professional
development is challenging and complex. Learn
strategies to improve professional learning at a
school level. Review essential professional development concepts and implementation issues. Engage in
collaborative activities designed to improve one’s
ability to lead professional learning.
Robert Scott, New Berlin Public Schools,
Pewaukee, WI, [email protected]
Anne Marie Keskonis, Gwinnett County Public Schools,
Buford, GA, [email protected]
Shelly Sweatt, Burkburnett Independent School District,
Burkburnett, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
M14
CLOSING THE KNOWING-DOING GAP IN SCHOOLS
Consider why too many teachers and leaders attend
professional development sessions only to return to
their schools and do nothing differently. Learn strategies for closing this knowing-doing gap in schools
by building the capacity of teachers and leaders to
understand and implement best practices in the
classroom and throughout the school. Learn how
two schools transformed research into action, from
knowing how to improve student achievement to
actually doing it.
M16
SO, WHAT ARE BEST PRACTICES ANYWAY?
Provide strategies that help students deepen
their understanding of concepts and promote the
application of knowledge and skills. Receive ideas
and tools that can be easily implemented and
address assessment, equity, reflection, feedback,
motivation, communication, and creative thinking.
Learn ways to recognize and support the use of
these strategies in the classroom.
Eileen Depka, School District of Waukesha,
New Berlin, WI, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, VIII
M17
ENHANCING TEACHER INDUCTION EXPERIENCES
THROUGH COLLABORATION AND DATA ANALYSIS
Hear how the ABRAZO New Teacher Induction
Program incorporates a unique blend of tools, data,
and professional development experiences to
enhance quality teaching and learning by beginning
teachers. Create waves of excitement for new teachers
by practicing mentoring conversations, developing
teacher portfolios, and analyzing data to ensure a
support system that it is centered around new
teacher needs.
Jeffrey Zoul, Forsyth County Schools,
Cumming, GA, [email protected]
Laura Link, Forsyth County Schools,
Cumming, GA, [email protected]
Melanie Evans-Smith, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Pearl Black, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Janet Gless, New Teacher Center at University of California Santa
Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, [email protected]
Ava Sweet, Houston Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
Standard(s): III, XI
92
SET
M
M18
M21
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TIME
DURING THE ACADEMIC DAY
CROSSING THE CHASM: STAFF DEVELOPMENT
FOR EMBRACING DATA-DRIVEN INSTRUCTION
Learn why conducting professional development on
a regular basis during the academic day is a powerful
venue for school improvement. Even if you cannot
afford daily team planning time, consider these creative ways to provide time for professional learning.
Explore ideas for arranging bell schedules to support
team learning time in the academic day, procuring
quality activities, and scheduling activities.
Develop new insights into staff development for facilitating true, data-driven instruction. Hear top administrators explain their successful combination of workshops and coaching that are producing higher levels
of implementation and student achievement. Share
experiences at helping educators embrace change
and align instruction to student needs identified by
formative assessments.
Beth Madison, George Middle School,
Portland, OR, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, IX
Bonnie Strykowski, Lorain City Public Schools,
Lorain, OH, [email protected]org
Dee Morgan, Lorain City Public Schools,
Lorain, OH, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, XI
M19
DESIGNING AND IMPLEMENTING CONTINUOUS
IMPROVEMENT PROCESSES FOR STANDARDSBASED INSTRUCTION
M22
Discover how a large, urban district used collaborative practices to design, develop, and implement a
continuous improvement cycle for assessing progress
toward standards-based instruction. Consider the
implications of this model for improving the quality
of classroom instruction, for developing instructional
leaders’ capacity and confidence, and for closing the
student achievement gap. Learn how to apply the
materials, tools, and processes in your own school
district.
How to retain teachers in at-risk urban schools is a
problem faced by many large school districts. The
Northeast Region Urban Teacher Program that was
designed to recruit and retain strong, effective
teachers in identified at-risk urban schools. The
Northeast Region of the Clark County School District
has a unique mentoring program that is getting
results. What do the mentors do that helps new
teachers and experienced teachers new to the Clark
County School District? Hear ideas, share ideas, and
participate in activities that you can take back, adapt,
and incorporate in your mentoring program.
Standard(s): II, XI
Kathy Magee, Northeast Region Urban Teacher Program,
Las Vegas, NV, [email protected]
Jackie Clark, Clark County School District,
Las Vegas, NV, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII
M23
M20
SUCCESSFUL LITERACY COACHING
NATIONAL HUMANITIES CENTER TOOLBOX
LIBRARY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
RESOURCES
Examine the many hats coaches wear. From conducting staff development to analyzing data, the skills and
qualifications required for success are expansive. See
how our partnership has increased literacy coaches’
proficiency. Hear from practicing literacy coaches and
facilitators how learning teams improve teaching.
Examine assessment data and learn how to determine a promising instructional focus to improve
reading scores. Consider applications of this model
to settings with different structures and needs.
Learn to create sustainable, customized, standardsbased, content-rich professional development seminars. Access free primary source materials, historical
documents, literary texts and works of art thematically organized with notes and discussion questions for
teachers of American history and literature. Discover
new resources ready to use in the classroom, tools
to help improve and enhance lesson plans, and a
partner for continuing consultation.
Kathy White, Roanoke Rapids Graded School District,
Roanoke Rapids, NC, [email protected]
Richard Schramm, National Humantities Center,
Research Triangle Park, NC, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, III
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Sherry McCarty, Albuquerque Public Schools,
Albuquerque, NM, [email protected]
Virginia Duran-Ginn, Albuquerque Public Schools,
Albuquerque, NM, [email protected]
Christina Fritz, Albuquerque Public Schools,
Albuquerque, NM, [email protected]
Lynda Idle, Albuquerque Public Schools,
Albuquerque, NM, [email protected]
MENTORING NEW TEACHERS
IN A LARGE, URBAN DISTRICT
Annie Ballance, Pearson Achievement Solutions,
Las Vegas, NV, [email protected]
Carey Regur, Pearson Achievement Solutions,
Huntington Beach, CA, [email protected]
Syria Watson, Chandler Unified School District,
Chandler, AZ, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, XI
93
SET
M
2-hour sessions
WEDNESDAY – DECEMBER 5, 2007 – 7:45 A.M.–9:45 A.M.
M24
M27
THE HABITS OF DEVELOPING CHARACTER
PROMISING PRACTICES THAT
INCREASE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Give your teachers new strategies for holding
students accountable for their learning. See how
teacher collaboration leads to a positive school
climate for faculty, staff, students, and the community. Consider ways to integrate the Seven Habits of
Highly Effective People into the curriculum.
Lauretta Teague, Decatur City Schools, Madison, AL,
[email protected]
Debbie House, Decatur City Schools, Decatur, AL,
[email protected]
Sonya Jackson, Decatur City Schools, Decatur, AL,
[email protected]
Standard(s): II, XII
M25
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
TEACHING TOUGH STUDENTS
WITHOUT LOSING YOUR DIGNITY OR SANITY
Learn effective strategies that maintain high energy
and optimism to increase student motivation. Share
with colleagues methods for preventing and, when
necessary, handling problems while maintaining
dignity and sanity. Consider the attitudes, beliefs, and
understandings necessary for success with challenging students. Gain strategies for working with staff
resistant to considering changes in their practice.
Allen Mendler, Discipline Associates,
Rochester, NY, [email protected]
Richard Curwin, Discipline Associates,
Rochester, NY, Richard.[email protected]
Standard(s): VII, X
M26
AT THE CROSSROADS: ENHANCING YOUR
LEGACY THROUGH MENTORING
Learn the techniques to become a change agent in a
virtual mentoring process. Examine how mentoring
becomes a catalyst for increased student achievement. Learn how to integrate leading edge technology
into the mentoring design to produce a dynamic
learning community. Practice effective blogging and
podcasting communication techniques to enhance
collaboration in a virtual environment.
Mary Brown, Kaplan University,
North Las Vegas, NV, [email protected]
Carol Rubel, Kaplan University, Henderson, NV, [email protected]
Gloria Zucker, Kaplan University,
Henderson, NV, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
Build the capacity of teacher leaders to use student
data to establish school improvement goals and
instruction-focused action plans to address them.
Learn the school improvement stages and gain tools
to help teachers engage in collaborative examination
of student work and achievement, establish improvement goals, participate in professional development,
take decisive actions to increase student achievement, and recognize and celebrate progress.
Carol Burlinski, High School District 214,
Inverness, IL, [email protected]
Susan Carley, High School District 214,
Buffalo Grove, IL, [email protected]
Mark Schaetzlein, High School District 214,
Buffalo Grove, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, VII
M28
WALKING THE TALK: CONSTRUCTIVIST
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR ELEMENTARY
MATHEMATICS
Review why learning principles apply to teachers as
well as students. Learn about a professional development project that uses innovative strategies to help
teachers actively construct the knowledge, attitudes,
and skills they need to radically improve their classroom practice. Experience a rich diagnostic assessment tool, strategies for enhancing professional
development, and a new model of coaching based
on co-inquiry.
Lorelei Gibeau, Edmonton Catholic School District,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, VIII
M29
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT THAT WORKS
Learn about a research-based professional development model program that resulted in improved math,
science, and reading scores at a high school. Hear
about the program framework, the collaborative
district and university partnership, and the impact
upon the school. Learn how the framework meets
program evaluation and research requirements for
federal and state funding.
Donna McCaw, Western Illinois University,
Macomb, IL, [email protected]
LaVerne Logan, Western Illinois University,
Moline, IL, [email protected]
Terri VandeWiele, United Township High School District,
East Moline, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): VI, IX
94
SET
M
M30
M32
PLCs: MOVING BEYOND THE JARGON
STORIES OF SYMBIOSIS: FOUR SCHOOL
DISTRICTS AND A SERVICE CENTER
“We did PLCs already…” Don’t let that happen to
you! Support your teachers in the implementation of
effective learning teams by helping them ask the right
questions. Walk away with dozens of practical tools,
practitioner stories, and an opportunity to share your
success and struggles in implementing learning
teams. Help teachers to make the PLC movement
more than another set of “emperor's clothing.”
Robert Hess, Springfield Public Schools, Lebanon, OR,
[email protected]
Nancy Golden, Springfield Public Schools, Springfield, OR,
[email protected]
Pam Robbins, Mt. Crawford, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
M31
SUSTAIN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
INITIATIVES - INTEGRATE WITH ONLINE
POSSIBILITIES
Kimberly Flack, Arizona School Services through Educational
Technology (ASSET), Tempe, AZ, [email protected]
Diane Puff, Palominas School District #49,
Hereford, AZ, [email protected]
Irma Sandercock, ASSET, Tempe, AZ, [email protected]
Kim Thomas, Madison Elementary School District #38,
Phoenix, AZ, [email protected]
Standard(s): III, VII
Diane Peterson, Region 4 Education Service Center,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Dianne Brazell, Spring Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Vickey Giles, Sheldon Independent School District,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Joan Slater, Tomball Independent School District,
Tomball, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VII
M33
WORKING OUR WAY TO A STRONG
MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM
Hear about Socorro ISD's partnership with Marilyn
Burns Education Associates to build and sustain a
long-term professional development plan that provides teachers with the support they need to better
understand and teach mathematics. Examine the
framework for this leadership initiative, the staff
development that supports it, and the impact of the
work on student learning.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Join two district leaders in discussion regarding the
use of online professional development resources,
tied to the NSDC standards, to sustain site and district initiatives and individualize the work with educators. Brainstorm ways in which you can apply these
strategies to stretch your professional development
dollars while making lasting impact in the classroom
for 21st century learners.
Explore how districts and education service agencies
can pursue mutually beneficial partnerships to
strengthen professional knowledge and, ultimately,
to increase student achievement. Hear the stories
of five educators representing all levels of school
leadership and a diverse spectrum of school districts.
Discover ways to pursue a symbiotic partnership in
your district or agency.
Lu Ann Weynand, Math Solutions Professional Development,
San Antonio, TX, [email protected]
Sandra Garza, Socorro Independent School District,
El Paso, TX, [email protected]
Mary Salas, Socorro Independent School District,
El Paso, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
M34
USING MUSIC TO MOTIVATE LEARNERS
AND ENHANCE CONTENT
Refer to the topic, presenter, and audience
indices on page 106–109 to help with your
selection process.
Learn how to make music an integral component of
staff development sessions. Consider its implications
for creating effective and dynamic learning cultures.
Examine the numerous ways in which music can
influence the successful outcome of a workshop.
Learn how to influence the brain's chemistry to boost
attention, understanding, and recall of key concepts,
as well as create a non-threatening, collaborative
workshop climate.
Duke Kelly, Education Illustrated LLC,
Howell, MI, [email protected]
Cindy Rickert, Virginia Beach City Public Schools,
Virginia Beach, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, VII
95
SET
M
2-hour sessions
WEDNESDAY – DECEMBER 5, 2007 – 7:45 A.M.–9:45 A.M.
M35
M38
CREATIVE COLLABORATION + DYNAMIC
DECISIONS = ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE: THE 2% SOLUTION
Hear about a model for job-embedded professional
development that engendered teacher buy-in and produced significant student gains in writing. Learn to
use a specific tool for analyzing student data and
improving instruction. Consider the complexities and
possibilities of unique collaboration opportunities.
Sonya Abbye Taylor, Pawling Central School District,
Patterson, NY, [email protected]
Linda Heitmann, Dutchess County BOCES,
Poughkeepsie, NY, [email protected]
Catherine Parsons, Dutchess County BOCES,
Poughkeepsie, NY, [email protected]
Develop administrators as instructional leaders
and gain results for students. Experience activities
which help administrators develop PLCs, identify best
practices in classrooms, and alter ineffective instructional practices. Gain insight into how the initiative
improved learning for all students and led to ten of
Indian River’s 13 schools being classified as
“Superior.”
Sandy Smith, Indian River School District,
Selbyville, DE, [email protected]
Susan Bunting, Indian River School District,
Selbyville, DE, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VI
Standard(s): IV, XI
M39
M36
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
ACADEMY FOR TEACHER LEADERSHIP:
GROWING YOUR OWN
Learn about a teacher leadership academy that
requires a partnership between teachers and administrators. Gain clarity about the essential skills and
leadership competencies necessary for teacher leaders to be most effective in their schools. Examine key
competencies such as consensus building, resolving
conflicts, coaching, facilitation, and presentation
skills. Discuss how this model might be adapted for
your district or school.
Lyn Nevins, Cooperative Educational Services,
Trumbull, CT, [email protected]
Esther Bobowick, Cooperative Educational Services,
Trumbull, CT, [email protected]
Debi Boccanfuso, Darien Public Schools,
Darien, CT, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
M37
WHAT'S ALL THE RUCKUS ABOUT
RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION?
Learn about the legal mandate for early intervention
Response to Intervention (RTI), how RTI links special
education and general education, and its impact on
the future of instruction and assessment. Explore the
different models and components of RTI and what it
will take to support the staff development needs
associated with its implementation. Receive an RTI
professional development matrix for identifying and
managing staff development.
Sheila Fernley, LRP Publications,
Palm Beach Gardens, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, XI
LITERACY LEARNING COMMUNITIES:
AUTHENTIC, EMBEDDED, SUSTAINED
Learn how literacy learning communities (LLC) can
have a direct impact on the entire literacy culture of
a school. Gain tools to use immediately to assess a
school's literacy culture, as well as specific actions
that a LLC may take to deepen its own literacy learning and transfer its knowledge to increase student
learning.
ReLeah Lent, Alford, FL, [email protected]
Connie Cain, University of Central Florida,
Apopka, FL, [email protected]
April Johnson, University of Central Florida,
Monticello, FL, [email protected]
Susan Kelly, University of Central Florida,
Orlando, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II, IX
M40
LENSES ON LEARNING: SUPPORTING
TEACHER DEVELOPMENT AS INSTRUCTORS
OF MATHEMATICS
Consider how standards-based classrooms, with their
emphasis on mathematical thinking and reasoning,
pose new challenges for those who observe in classrooms with the purpose of either assessing or assisting teachers. Dialogue with a principal and a teacher
about how they reshaped the discourse about math
instruction in their school and the impact it has been
having on high-quality instruction.
Adina Laver, Math Science Partnership of Greater Philadelphia,
Plymouth Meeting, PA, [email protected]
Warren Mata, School District of Springfield Township,
Oreland, PA, [email protected]
Debbie McKinney, Victory Schools,
Philadelphia, PA, [email protected]
Lori Pinelli, School District of Springfield Township,
Oreland, PA, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
96
SET
M
M41
M44
LEARNING COMES FIRST WITH EFFECTIVE
LEADERSHIP TEAMS
IMPROVING ACHIEVEMENT WITH PLC
AND DATA-INFORMED INSTRUCTION
Learn how to use collaborative processes and apply
research to transform teacher committees into effective leadership teams that produce results focused on
student learning. Examine how teacher teams have
collaborated to produce standard assessment practices that guide effective teaching. Consider alternatives for empowering teacher leadership teams with
time and knowledge. Participate in activities that
challenge current practices and inspire thinking
towards collective visions.
Hear how educators can measurably improve the
quality of instruction and student learning by creating
district leadership teams and PLC. Explore how setting district and schoolwide goals and targeting
professional development transformed the district
and school culture. Learn strategies and practices to
analyze data, create SMART goals, align resources,
foster teacher collaboration, differentiate instruction,
and guide continuous improvement.
Cindy Newell, Durant Public Schools,
Durant, OK, [email protected]
Nancy Johnson, Durant Public Schools,
Durant, OK, [email protected]
Tanya Lindley, Durant Public Schools,
Durant, OK, [email protected]
Elaine Sawyers, Durant Public Schools,
Durant, OK, [email protected]
Sharon Clarizio, Garfield Public Schools,
Garfield, NJ, [email protected]
Kelly Mokashi, Pearson Achievement Solutions,
Indianapolis, IN, [email protected]achievement.com
Joyce Yuppa, Garfield Public Schools,
Garfield, NJ, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, V
Standard(s): IV, IX
M45
M42
WHY CHANGE? PREPARING STUDENTS
FOR THE FUTURE
SUPPORTING TEACHERS TO PROVIDE POWERFUL
VOCABULARY INSTRUCTION TO ALL STUDENTS
Pamela Spycher, WestEd, Sacramento, CA, [email protected]
Tamaye Ota, WestEd, Sacramento, CA, [email protected]
Standard(s): XI
M43
QUALITIES THAT MAKE GREAT TEACHERS GREAT
Learn 30 qualities that contribute to great teaching.
Help teachers build high-trust classrooms. Apply
these strategies to a teacher induction program or to
help teachers who need to reconnect to their passion
for teaching.
Lonnie Moore, Education for Life,
Tampa, FL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Hear about the English Learners and the Language
Arts (ELLA) professional development project that
provides intensive training and on-going coaching to
K-12 classroom teachers and instructional coaches
in research-based vocabulary instruction. Learn how
ELLA has worked with schools and districts to
implement comprehensive and intensive professional
development that extends and enhances the rigor of
vocabulary instruction for all students.
Consider why understanding the changing world
is essential for preparing students for their future.
Acquire knowledge and skills to help teachers better
prepare all students for the higher learning standards
now required for future learning, work, and citizenship in a knowledge society. Learn seven disciplines
that strengthen instruction and assist school and
district leaders with daily work.
Jill Gildea, Libertyville 70, Lakewood, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, XI
M46
DISTRICT LEADERS ARE MORE EFFECTIVE
WHEN ARMED WITH TECHNOLOGY TOOLS
Learn about the newest technological trends for
both software and hardware and how they impact
education and instruction. Examine technology
including Skype, Moodle, wikis, blogs, flash drives,
GPS, Playaways, streaming video, and online systems
such as workshop management and Discipline Pro.
Consider how leaders are more effective when
using and modeling technology.
Sandra McLeroy, Education Service Center Region 6, Huntsville,
TX, [email protected]
Rachelle Ferguson, Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School
District, Keller, TX, [email protected]
Nancy Hollis, Education Service Center Region 6, Huntsville, TX,
[email protected]
Standard(s): III
97
SET
M
2-hour sessions
WEDNESDAY – DECEMBER 5, 2007 – 7:45 A.M.–9:45 A.M.
M47
M50
TEACHING READING WITH
A NONLINGUISTIC TWIST
CULTURE, CONSENSUS,
COMMUNITY, COMMITMENT
Learn how to use nonlinguistic representations to
reach struggling readers, ADD/ADHD students, and
reluctant readers. Gain strategies to help teachers
address reading performance standards, such as
main idea, vocabulary, context clues. Consider application of these strategies across all other disciplines.
The use of music will be a major component in this
session, which is implemented to reach our students
who learn musically.
Examine research from education that articulates
specific traits of PLC. Review one comprehensive
professional development model designed to support
standard, outcomes, curriculum, and teaching for
understanding. Learn how this approach promotes
a change in school culture, a sense of professional
community, consensus building, and a commitment
to continuous learning at all levels.
Vincent Taylor, Duval County Public Schools,
Jacksonville, FL, [email protected]
Christine Lowden, Arlington Central School District,
Hopewell Junction, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IX
Standard(s): VI, VIII
M48
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
PRINCIPAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES:
COLLABORATING TO DEVELOP LITERACY
LEADERSHIP
Understand the rationale for establishing
administrator learning communities focused on
teaching and learning. Experience the model to
contribute to an understanding of the impact and
potential for this structure. Examine a framework and
process for building a literacy learning community.
Leave with tools necessary to create administrator
learning communities.
Peter Brunn, Developmental Studies Center,
Oakland, CA, [email protected]
Thuy Do, Developmental Studies Center,
Oakland, CA, thuy_d[email protected]
Kevin Harrigan, Newark Unified School District,
Newark, CA, [email protected]
Martha Morgan, Developmental Studies Center,
Chandler, AZ, [email protected]
M51
LET’S FALL INTO THE GAP:
GAINING ACHIEVABLE PROGRESS
What is the achievement gap? What does it mean
for your campus? How can you address it? Will it
ever disappear? Gain real answers, real solutions,
and real options in order to address achievement
gaps in mathematics and science. Hear how the
strategies have impacted results in a large, urban
Texas school system.
Kimberly Caldwell, THIRST Teacher Training, LLC,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Susan Chacko, THIRST Teacher Training, LLC,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Yolonda Kelley-Larry, THIRST Teacher Training, LLC,
Houston, TX, [email protected]
Paula Pierre, Hartman Middle School/Houston Independent
School District, Houston, TX, [email protected]
Standard(s): IV, XI
Standard(s): I, II
M52
M49
BRIDGING THE GAP:
ADOLESCENT MALES AND LITERACY
USING A RESPONSE SYSTEM TO FACILITATE
ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING
Hear about classroom response systems that are
proliferating in K-12 schools. Consider how this new
technology can be used to facilitate best practices
in formative assessment for students and for adult
learners. Practice using a response system, discuss
the applications for classrooms and professional
development, and learn how one state has integrated
them into its new teacher mentoring program.
Gene Kerns, Renaissance Learning, Inc.,
Irving, TX, [email protected]
Dawn Dehel, Milford School District,
Milford, DE, [email protected]
Mary Kotz, Delaware Department of Education,
Dover, DE, [email protected]
Standard(s): VII, VIII
98
Learn how the Boys in Literacy Initiative motivates
males to become life-long readers, no matter their
interests. View and discuss research-based strategies
necessary to the implementation of a reading
program specifically designed to meet the needs of
males. Through the use of student choice, literacy
role models, and real world tie-ins, males have buy in
and feel validated about their reading choices. By providing a safe, nurturing environment just for males,
literacy is becoming more important in the lives of
males who can, can’t, won’t, or don’t like to read.
Jodie Peters, Alexandria City Public Schools,
Clinton, MD, [email protected]
Rob Murphy, Alexandria City Public Schools,
Alexandria, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
SET
M
M53
M56
CHARISMA: CATS AND DOGS
AND THE ART OF RELATIONSHIPS
ACHIEVING EXCELLENCE THROUGH ARTS
INTEGRATION
Explore the art of relationships and the charisma
of leadership through the analogy of cats and dogs
based on the work of Michael Grinder. Understand
the benefits and cautions of each style. Learn to
identify and use style differences. Practice
communication styles that improve team
productivity and staff morale.
Learn how arts integration offers a powerful school
improvement strategy. Hear about Ashley River’s
award-winning curriculum. Review the steps involved
in developing a unit based on arts integration. Gain
specific strategies and tools. Consider potential
benefits for application in your school.
Carolyn Hirst-Loucks, Auburn Enlarged City School District,
Auburn, NY, [email protected]
Kim Loucks, Auburn, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
M54
QUALITY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT:
NOT JUST FOR GENERAL EDUCATION
Examine how professional development for special
education teachers can produce dramatic changes
in expectations for and achievement of students with
special needs. Learn how lesson study, learning
communities, and data analysis can be used to
strengthen instruction by these teachers. Consider
implications for moving from a functional only curriculum to one grounded in grade-level expectations.
Standard(s): X, XI
M55
INTEGRATE INTERNET RESOURCES INTO
CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION WITH FOUR
TEACHER TOOLS
Learn about free, easy-to-use, web-based resources to
share with teachers. Explore how they support educators with curriculum enhancement, professional
organization, and assessment strategies. Investigate
successful technology integration and implementation tools. Brainstorm effective integration and professional development techniques. Design an action
plan for implementing these powerful online
resources into all classroom environments.
Amber Rowland, ALTEC, University of Kansas,
Lawrence, KS, [email protected]
Standard(s): III,XI
Standard(s): VIII, XI
M57
THE GIFT OF COACHING
To be a powerful and effective coach requires skill
which is best developed by experiencing coaching
first hand. Observe coaching skills and language
while experiencing its benefits. Members of
Coaching for Results, Inc. are providing the gift of
a one-on-one coaching session with a professional
coach. Give yourself 60-120 minutes to explore your
confidential goals and dreams. Imagine the possibilities….a goal made clear, a plan evolved, multiple
solutions for a tough situation.
Bob Carter, Coaching For Results, Inc.,
Rowlett, TX, [email protected]
Jane Bidlack, Tyler Independent School District,
Tyler, TX, [email protected]
Edna Harris, Coaching For Results, Inc.,
Round Rock, TX, [email protected]
Janice Shelby, Coaching For Results, Inc.,
Saltillo, TN, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
“I came away reenergized
and enthusiastic about my
job. I received new knowledge
I will use immediately.”
— 2006 CONFERENCE ATTENDEE
99
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Deborah Taub, ILSSA--UK, Burke, VA, [email protected]
Michelle Pierre-Farid, Washington DC Public Schools,
Washington, DC, [email protected]
Mariel Zeller, ILSSA--UK, Lexington, KY, [email protected]
Jayne Ellicott, Ashley River Creative Arts Elementary
School/Charleston County Schools,
Charleston, SC, [email protected]
Judi Beaudrot, Charleston County School District,
Charleston, SC, judi_beaudrot
Jeffery Jordan, Charleston County School District,
Charleston, SC, [email protected]
Cathie Middleton, Charleston County School District,
Charleston, SC, [email protected]
SET
P
3-hour POSTCONFERENCE sessions
WEDNESDAY – DECEMBER 5, 2007 – 12:00 P.M.–3:00 P.M.
P01
P04
GOING DEEPER WITH DATA:
TRANSFORMING LEARNING
STRATEGIES TO ENGAGE THE MIND
OF THE LEARNER
Learn to use data to differentiate instruction.
Through simulation, video, case studies, and small
group discussion, learn how to build strong learning
communities that use a variety of tools to design
precise instruction. The 3D model provides practical
strategies to: display data, disaggregate data, and
design appropriate instruction. Leave with techniques
and resources to implement data-driven instructional
decision making in your school or district.
Review research that indicates involving students
actively in learning increases student achievement.
Examine different instructional tools teachers can
use to mentally engage their students. Learn to use
a variety of strategies and consider benefits and
applications of each strategy use.
Gayle Gregory, Gayle Gregory Consulting Inc.,
Burlington, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Eleanor Adam, Toronto, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Ruth Peden, Halton Board of Education,
Burlington, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Joanne Quinn, University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, IV
P02
POSTCONFERENCE SESSIONS
FOURTEEN WAYS TO FIRE UP, FUEL, AND FOCUS
YOUR LEADERS
Do you want to be easily forgotten or leave a legacy?
Consider how you build buy-in, inspire your team,
and plan your term as principal, administrator, or
staff developer to impact your legacy. Learn the best
strategic planning ideas and jumpstart your planning
with a repeatable process which you can use to make
your coming year.
Betsy Allen, The Bob Pike Group,
Fort Myers Florida 33919, FL, [email protected]
Adrianne Roggenbuck, Professional Development Alliance- ROE,
Oswego, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, VIII
Rachel Billmeyer, Rachel and Associates,
Omaha, NE, [email protected]
Susan Presler, Rachel and Associates,
Omaha, NE, [email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
P05
SCHOOL TEAMS ACHIEVING RESULTS
FOR STUDENTS: A REFORM FRAMEWORK
Examine models that combine intensive professional
development with ongoing coaching and strategic
interventions. Learn how teams of principals and key
teacher leaders attend annual institute sessions to
build their instructional capacity and change leadership skills. Learn how to transfer skills to classrooms
and schools through cycles of application and regular
examination of student work in follow-up sessions
throughout the year.
Dorothy Pandel, Chicago Public Schools,
Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Valerie Davis, Chicago Public Schools,
Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Caridad Garcia, Chicago Public Schools,
Chicago, IL, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, II
P06
MAKING MEETINGS WORK
P03
MANAGING STUDENT BEHAVIOR
IN THE STANDARDS-BASED CLASSROOM
Review a framework for maintaining a safe and
orderly classroom environment where students
feel valued and where learning is the focus. Explore
options for providing differentiated learning
experiences to meet the needs of all students.
Reflect on how communicating, teaching, and
evaluating standards for instruction and behavior
can increase student achievement.
Kay Burke, Kay Burke and Associates,
Greensboro, GA, [email protected]
Patricia Jackson, Cobb County School District,
Kennesaw, GA, [email protected]
Standard(s): X, XI
100
Are you attending more meetings and getting less
done? Are you discouraged about how decisions are
made? Want to improve your efficiency and effectiveness rather than hosting unproductive meetings?
If you are answering yes to any of these questions,
attend this session. Learn to use tools to support the
collaborative process. Be prepared to participate,
practice, and have fun learning together.
Ann Delehant, Delehart and Associates,
Pittsford, NY, [email protected]
Standard(s): II, IX
P07
AFTER THE CONSULTANT LEAVES:
FROM DREAMS TO LEGACIES
Examine four ways that professional learning,
facilitated by a consultant, can evolve into teacherled, high-quality, job-embedded professional learning.
Analyze a school-based systemic approach to creating
structures and processes to foster continuous learning and teamwork. Learn how teacher leadership can
be nurtured and developed so that dreams of desired
classroom practices are reality. Discuss how
professional development can be an efficient tool
to address school priorities, helping staff to work
smarter not harder.
STOP!
Before you go
any further,
Pam Robbins, Mt. Crawford, VA, [email protected]
Standard(s): I, VIII
Do you know how easy
P08
USING BRAIN-FRIENDLY STRATEGIES
IN THE CLASSROOM
Review the latest research on brain-based learning.
Consider how important dendrite growth is in the
educational process as well as for an individual’s
well being. Learn to create experiences that
optimize learning for adults and students.
Deborah Estes, Estes Group, Inc.,
Sherman, TX, [email protected]
it is to register for the
conference online? Our
electronic registration tool
let’s you know immediately
Standard(s): VI,XI
if the session you are
P09
EFFECTIVE STORYTELLING SKILLS FOR
IMPROVING TEACHING AND LEARNING
Learn strategies to develop storytelling skills.
Consider how storytelling enhances the classroom
environment, develops a child's imagination, and
improves literacy skills. Gain confidence in using
storytelling to advance adult and student learning.
Jaymie Reeber Kosa, Storytelling Arts, Inc., Kingston, NJ,
[email protected]
Standard(s): VIII, XI
selecting is available
or full.
So, before you complete
a paper registration, go to
www.nsdc.org, and register
Build in reflection time
during your daily schedule.
online.
101
D A L L A S 2 0 0 7 | R E G I S T R AT I O N I N F O R M AT I O N
REGISTRATION POLICIES
AND PROCEDURES
To register to attend the conference,
please complete the registration
form on the next page. Registration
forms may also be downloaded from
the NSDC web site, www.nsdc.org,
or you can register online with a
credit card.
Fees for Saturday and Sunday
include the Friday Welcoming
Reception, lunch on Saturday and
Sunday, morning break refreshments,
and materials. Fees for the threeday conference include the Sunday
evening reception, breakfast and
lunch on Monday and Tuesday,
and brunch on Wednesday. The
Wednesday one-day fee includes
brunch and the post-conference.
If you are not a current NSDC
member, you must join. “Taste Test”
Trial Memberships do not apply.
THREE WAYS TO REGISTER
Registrations will be accepted via
mail, fax, or online. If you register by
fax or online, do not mail the registration form. If you mail the form, do
not fax or register online. This can
cause duplicate charges. All registrations require payment for processing.
Online registration is encouraged.
REGISTRATION DEADLINE
Registrations must be postmarked
on or before November 15. Call the
NSDC Business Office at (800)
727-7288 after that date to check
on conference availability.
EARLY REGISTRATION DISCOUNT
If your registration is postmarked
on or before October 12, you may
deduct $50 from a 3-day or 5-day
registration.
102
PRESENTER DISCOUNT
All presenters may deduct an
additional $25 from their conference
fees.
GROUP DISCOUNT
A 10% discount on registration fees
for 10 or more persons will be granted to school districts if 10 or more
registrations are completed and are
included in one envelope with a
school district check (no purchase
orders or credit cards) for the total
amount due.
CANCELLATION POLICY
A full refund less a $50 administrative fee will be issued upon written
request received in the NSDC
Business Office by November 9,
2007; one-half refund less a $50
administrative fee by November 21,
2007; no refunds will be issued for
cancellations received after
November 21, 2007. No refunds will
be issued until after the conference.
CONFIRMATION
You will receive registration confirmation via e-mail. Please make sure
we have your current e-mail address.
Please call the NSDC Business
Office (800) 727-7288 if you have
NOT received confirmation within
two weeks of registering. Please
bring your registration confirmation
to the NSDC registration area to
receive a nametag, session tickets,
and additional conference materials.
REGISTRATION FORM
SECTION I - Registration Data must
be filled out completely. Your current
membership number appears on
your address label.
SECTION II - Registration Fees
must accompany registration. No
registrations will be processed
without payment in full.
SECTION III - Form of Payment.
Fees are payable by check,
Visa/MasterCard, or purchase order.
The purchase order must be
enclosed or faxed with the
registration. NSDC will invoice your
school/district on the purchase
order upon receipt. Payment of the
invoice must be received before the
conference.
SESSION SELECTION PROCESS
In order to get the best selection
of preconference and concurrent
sessions, please register early.
Because the number of participants
for each session is limited, it is
important that you indicate your 1st,
2nd, 3rd, and 4th choices for each
time period. Full and cancelled
sessions will be listed on our web
site. Please list a 5th and 6th choice
if you register after October 15.
POST-CONFERENCE
NSDC is offering specially selected
three-hour sessions (12 p.m. –
3 p.m.) after the traditional brunch
and close of the conference at noon
Wednesday. This is available to
participants who register for
Wednesday only one-day regular
conference. Three-day or five-day
registrants may add the Wednesday
post-conference for $25.
EXPERT TRACK
Choose the “Expert” track, and you
will receive tickets for all Keynote
Q&A’s, Texas Scholar lectures, and
the Back-up Keynote.
A SESSION OPTION
Choose the Beginner Staff Developer
Learning Community specially
designed for beginning staff
developers. This session meets
Monday AND Tuesday (see session
description A01 for more details.)
save
D A L L A S 2 0 0 7 | R E G I S T R AT I O N F O R M
50
$
Is this your first NSDC Annual Conference?
Yes
No
I would be willing to host concurrent session(s) that I am attending
and be eligible to win a free conference registration for 2008.
SECTION I - REGISTRATION DATA
NSDC Member No. _________________________________________
Three people can attend using one organizational membership number.
First Name (this will appear on your nametag)
Your membership number appears on your address label.
on a 3-day or 5-day
registration when
you register by
October 12, 2007
Last Name
School District / Organization
The NSDC Annual
Conference will
be held at the
Position
Address / Street (all conference and membership materials will be sent to this address)
Is this address:
Business
Home
Hilton Anatole Hotel
December 1–5, 2007
Dallas, TX
City / State / Province / Zip
Business Telephone
Home Telephone
Fax
E-mail – Make sure we have your current e-mail as your conference confirmation will be e-mailed to you.
Special dietary needs
SECTION II - REGISTRATION FEES
1-Day Preconference (indicate day attending)
(List each fee that applies)
Saturday 12/1 OR
1-Day Regular Conference (indicate day attending)
Mon. 12/3
Sunday 12/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$250
Tues. 12/4 OR
Remember
your conference fees
include coffee breaks
and lunch on preconference days, breakfast
and lunch on Monday
and Tuesday, and
brunch on Wednesday.
Wed. 12/5 . . . . . . . .$185
2-Day Preconference or two 1-Day Preconferences (Saturday 12/1 AND Sunday 12/2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$395
3-Day Regular Conference (Monday 12/3, Tuesday 12/4, Wednesday (a.m.) 12/5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$395
5 Days (2-Day Preconference and Regular Conference) (Saturday 12/1 through Wednesday (a.m.) 12/5) . . . . .$695
Add Wednesday afternoon Post-Conference to a 3-day or 5-day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25
SPECIAL DISCOUNTED MEMBER FEE OR RENEWAL FEE. All nonmembers MUST add the fee for one of the options below. (“Taste Test”
trial memberships do not apply)These are one-year memberships. Go to page 105 in this program for complete membership benefits.
Non-member fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$50
Teachers Teaching Teachers Introductory Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$49
Teacher Leader Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$99
Principal Leader Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$99
System Leader Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$99
Comprehensive Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$129
Organizational Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$179
Add NSDC Book Club to any U.S. Membership (Canada $59, all others $84) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$49
Book Fee for preconference 102, 107, 109, 202, 211, 303, 310, 311 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$
Subtotal
Cancellation Policy
A full refund less a
$50 administration
fee will be issued upon
written request received
in the NSDC Business
Office by Nov. 9, 2007;
one-half refund less a
$50 administration fee
by Nov. 21, 2007; no
refunds will be issued
for cancellations
received after
Nov. 21, 2007.
Questions? Phone.
800-727-7288
Deduct $50 early discount (on 3- or 5-day registrations only) if postmarked before Oct. 12, 2007 –
Presenters deduct an additional $25 –
Return
completed
forms and
fees to:
Presenter Session # _________
TOTAL DUE
SECTION III - FORM OF PAYMENT
Registration fees made
payable to NSDC must
accompany this form.
Invoice issued on
purchase order must
be paid prior to the
conference.
Fees are payable by:
CARD NO.
EXPIRATION DATE
CHECK NO.
DATE
SIGNATURE
THREE-DIGIT SECURITY CODE
MasterCard
Visa
Check
Purchase Order (Purchase
Order must accompany form)
NSDC Conference
Registration
5995 Fairfield Road, #4
Oxford, OH 45056
800-727-7288
Fax 513-523-0638
E-mail:
[email protected]
www.nsdc.org
103
D A L L A S 2 0 0 7 | S E S S I O N R E G I S T R AT I O N F O R M
Name __________________________________________________________
EXPERT TRACK
Check here to register
for all Keynote Speaker
Q & A sessions, Texas
Scholar Lectures, and
Back-up Keynote
address. DO NOT
register for concurrent
sessions if you select
this option.
BEGINNER STAFF
DEVELOPER
LEARNING
COMMUNITY
(See complete description
for session A01)
Check here to register
for sessions specifically
designed for new staff
developers. This choice
covers sessions all day
Monday and Tuesday.
You may select
Wednesday sessions
with this option.
Participants are required
to purchase a copy of
NSDC’s Standards for
Staff Development
Revised and Presentations
That Teach and
Transform by Robert
Garmston and Bruce
Wellman (ASCD, 1992).
The $10 fee will be
collected and the books
distributed onsite.
ROUNDTABLES ONLY
Check here to register
for the four Roundtable
sessions on Monday
and Tuesday. This
choice allows you to
attend eight 45-minute
sessions. You may
select Q & A’s C02 and
I02 and Wednesday
sessions with this
option.
EXHIBITOR
ROUNDTABLE
SESSION
Check here to register
for the Exhibitor
Roundtable session on
Sunday from 4:00 pm 5:00 pm. This choice
allows you to attend
four 15-minute sessions
conducted by selected
exhibitors.
104
PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOP SELECTIONS December 1 and 2
Please indicate three choices (mark 1st, 2nd, and 3rd)
SATURDAY,
SUNDAY,
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY,
December 1, 2007
December 2, 2007
December 1–2, 2007
____ PC101
____ PC102
____ PC103
____ PC104
____ PC105
____ PC106
____ PC107
____ PC201 Gottlieb
____ PC202 Roy (add $24 book fee)
____ PC203 Love, Campbell Jones &
Campbell Jones
____ PC204 Murphy
____ PC205 Robinson & Kennedy
____ PC206 Saphier
____ PC207 Guskey
____ PC208 Duran, Sotiros, Martis,
Skupa, Ripplinger & Cech
____ PC209 Seashore Louis &
York-Barr
____ PC210 Tate
____ PC211 Delehant
(add $22 book fee)
____ PC301 Hord, Zepeda, Keifer
Hipp, & Wheeler-Fair
____ PC302 Guerra & Nelson
____ PC303 Sparks (add $25 book fee)
____ PC304 Harrison & Dessa
____ PC305 Klock Pershing & Herrera
____ PC306 Rolheiser & Gregory
____ PC307 Hill, Harris, Mathis &
Zigrossi
____ PC308 Wolfe
____ PC309 McKanders
____ PC310 Stiggins & Chappuis
(add $59 book fee/2 books)
____ PC311 Garmston & Ellison
(add $42 book fee)
____ PC312 Chadsey, Dewitt & Jackson
____ PC313 Bocchino
Umoja
Roy (add $12 book fee)
Matsui
Kingsbery & Aronson
Tucker
Childs-Bowen
Bloom
(add $20 book fee)
____ PC108 Johnson & Johnston
____ PC109 Richardson & Evans
(add $15 book fee)
CONCURRENT SESSION SELECTIONS December 3, 4, and 5
Please indicate six choices (mark 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th choices). Please make sure you do not
sign up for sessions with conflicting times. It is not necessary to sign up for all time periods.
MONDAY, December 3, 2007
Morning Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top six choices for this time period from Set A, B, C, D, or Roundtable 1.
Remember: Sessions A & B take the entire day and should also be marked in the same order in your afternoon schedule.
1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ____________ 4. ___________ 5. ___________ 6. ___________
Afternoon Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top six choices from Set A, B, E, F, or Roundtable 2. Remember: If you
previously chose sessions from Set A or B, you need to list them in the same order below as they are all-day sessions.
1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ____________ 4. ___________ 5. ___________ 6. ___________
TUESDAY, December 4, 2007
Morning Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top six choices for this time period from Set G, H, I, J, or Roundtable 3.
Remember: Sessions G and H take the entire day and should be marked in the same order in your afternoon schedule.
1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ____________ 4. ___________ 5. ___________ 6. ___________
Afternoon Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top six choices from Set G, H, K, L, or Roundtable 4. Remember: If you
previously chose sessions from Sessions G or H, you need to list them in the same order below as they are all-day sessions.
1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ____________ 4. ___________ 5. ___________ 6. ___________
WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2007
Morning Concurrent Session Choice: Identify your top three choices from Set M.
1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ____________
POST-CONFERENCE, December 5, 2007
Post-Conference (Set P): Identify your top three choices from Set P.
You must add $25 for post-conference unless you have registered for Wednesday only.
1. ___________ 2. ___________ 3. ____________
H O T E L I N F O R M AT I O N
NSDC MEMBERSHIP OPTIONS
Special Conference Prices!
For all online reservations,
go to www.nsdc.org/
connect/events.cfm
Teachers Teaching Teachers Introductory Membership .$49
• Teachers Teaching Teachers eight-page e-newsletter (8X/year)
• All member benefits listed at below.
Teacher Leader Membership
MAKE YOUR HOTEL
RESERVATIONS BEFORE
OCTOBER 31 TO GET
THE SPECIAL GROUP
RATE.
A shuttle
will run
between
all the
hotels.
HILTON ANATOLE – Main Conference
Hotel ($179 single – $199 double)
Make reservations online:
www.nsdc.org/connect/events.cfm
and select the hotel link.
By phone: 214-748-1200
H I LT O N A N
HILTON GARDEN INN DALLAS/
MARKET CENTER ($89 single–double)
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By phone: 214-634-8200
O N GA R D
I LT
H
AS
RE
N A I SS A N CE
DA
RENAISSANCE DALLAS HOTEL
($166 single–double)
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and select the hotel link.
By phone: 214-631-2222
ES
SH E
R AT O N
SU
IT
AR
R I O T T C OU
RT
R
YA
M
Principal Leader Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$99
•
•
•
•
The Learning Principal eight-page print newsletter (8X/year)
Tools for Schools eight-page print newsletter (4X/year)
JSD professional magazine on leadership and learning (4X/year)
All member benefits listed above at below.
System Leader Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$99
•
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•
The Learning System eight-page print newsletter (8X/year)
Tools for Schools eight-page print newsletter (4X/year)
JSD professional magazine on leadership and learning (4X/year)
All member benefits listed above at below.
Comprehensive Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$129
•
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The Learning Principal eight-page print newsletter (8X/year)
The Learning System eight-page print newsletter (8X/year)
Tools for Schools eight-page print newsletter (4X/year)
JSD professional magazine on leadership and learning (4X/year)
All member benefits listed above at below.
Organizational Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$179
N
EN
IN
LL
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$99
Teachers Teaching Teachers eight-page e-newsletter (8X/year)
Tools for Schools eight-page print newsletter (4X/year)
JSD professional magazine on leadership and learning (4X/year)
All member benefits listed above at below.
LE
AT
O
ALL HOTELS WILL
CHARGE ONE NIGHT'S
ROOM AND TAX FOR ALL
CANCELLATIONS MADE
AFTER OCT. 31, 2007.
•
•
•
•
SHERATON SUITES/ MARKET CENTER
($149 single–double)
Make reservations online:
www.nsdc.org/connect/events.cfm
and select the hotel link.
By phone: 214-747-3000
The Learning Principal eight-page print newsletter (8X/year)
The Learning System eight-page print newsletter (8X/year)
Tools for Schools eight-page print newsletter (4X/year)
Teachers Teaching Teachers eight-page e-newsletter (8X/year)
JSD professional magazine on leadership and learning (4X/year)
Opportunity for three people to attend either the Summer
Conference or the Annual Conference at the member rate
• All member benefits listed above below.
•
•
•
•
•
•
BENEFITS FOR ALL NSDC MEMBER CATEGORIES:
• Connect with NSDC e-newsletter (12X/year)
• Access to the online community for your specific job role or
responsibilities
• 20% discount on items in the Bookstore
• Access to members-only section of web site
• Annual Conference Program (1X/year)
• Summer Conference Program (1X/year)
• Member price for Summer Conference, Annual Conference,
institutes, and workshops
NSDC BOOK CLUB
D
COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT, DALLAS
MARKET CENTER ($154 single–double)
Make reservations online:
www.nsdc.org/connect/events.cfm
and select the hotel link.
By phone: 214-653-1166
In cooperation with Corwin Press,
receive a book selected just for
NSDC members four times a year.
(A $100+ value.)
$49
IN THE U.S.
$59 in Canada
$84 All other
Countries
105
D A L L A S 2 0 0 7 | TOPIC INDEX
ADVANCED SESSIONS
B07, C04, C14, C19, C30, D02, D15,
D20, E09, F07, G03, G09, H03, H04,
I14, I25, I34, J08, J16, K05, K18, L08,
L29, M03, M14, M27, M38, M50
Adult Development/Learning
A01, C04, C11, C17, C27, C28, C36, D14, E03,
E07, E09, E20, F07, F14, F15, F25, F28, G09,
H07, I07, I08, I14, I17, I30, J07, J18, K13, L01,
L03, L08, L10, L16, L25, L31, M01, M03, M06,
M12, M26, M40, M49, P01, P04, P08
Assessment/Evaluation of Students
F06, F23, F30, G02, M21, M37, M41, M49,
M54
Brain-Based Learning
A08, C31, C35, D04, D05, E12, E14, E20, F25,
I09, I34, J17, J20, K09, K19, L12, L24, L27,
M08, M34, M56, P08
Case Studies of Successful Schools/Systems
C21, D07, D15, F04, F05, F12, F27, I05, I26,
I32, J11, K13, L17, L23, L24, L28, M17, M30,
M31, M32, M44
Change
C19, C20, F13, F21, G06, H03, H06, I35, J06,
L23, L28, M25, M38, M41, M45
Closing Achievement Gaps
A02, A08, A09, B06, B07, D15, E18, E21, F18,
F21, F26, G03, G10, I15, I25, I28, J05, J15, J16,
L03, L09, L17, M05, M08, M16, M27, M47,
M52
Coaching and School Coaches
A06, B05, C09, D02, D09, D19, E05, E09,
E13, F08, F09, F14, F24, F31, I08, I18, I23, I24,
J13, J23, K03, K08, L14, L33, L42, M06, M10,
M11, M21, M23, M28, M33, M57
Collaboration/Team Building
A05, A07, B01, B03, C06, C10, C13, C19, D14,
D16, D17, D18, E10, E13, E17, F09, F13, F19,
F24, F29, F30, G04, G05, G09, H04, I06, I11,
I12, I13, I16, I18, I19, I21, I28, I32, J03, K04,
K08, K12, K14, L10, L15, L25, L30, L31, L33,
L34, L36, L39, M09, M10, M18, M38, M53,
P06
Curriculum Alignment/Development
F01, G02, H08, J11, J16, J17, L06, M50, M56
Data-Driven Decision Making
B01, B03, B04, C16, D06, D07, D08, D13,
D18, E10, E18, F04, F06, F23, G03, G08, I12,
I15, I22, I25, I27, J22, K10, K16, L05, L15, L30,
M04, M21, M27, M35, M37, M41, M44, M52
Demonstrating Impact of Staff Development
C12, D02, D07, D09, D13, E06, E21, F26, I32,
L14, L20, L41, M31, M33
106
Distributive Leadership
A04, C21, C30, E15, E21, F05, H02, I16, I29,
J08, L30, M04, M36
District Professional Development Planning
C09, C23, C30, I26, I27, J04, J12, K07, L12,
L13, L19, L21, M03, M19, P02
Diversity and Cultural Responsiveness
A09, C07, C10, C26, E05, H01, I35, L01, L11,
M05, M11
Effective Teaching and Instruction
A02, A03, A07, A08, B02, B06, C04, C09,
C14, C18, C24, C25, C26, C29, C31, D02, D04,
D09, D12, D15, E04, E11, E14, E17, E19, F03,
F17, F20, F26, F30, G02, G07, G08, G10,
H05, H07, H08, I09, I20, I31, I34, J04, J05,
J10, J12, J14, J15, J19, J20, K03, K07, K09, K10,
K16, L05, L07, L12, L18, L27, L31, L32, L35,
L36, L37, L38, L41, M05, M08, M14, M16,
M20, M23, M25, M33, M34, M37, M42, M43,
M44, M45, M55, M56, M58, P03, P04, P08,
P09
English Language Learners B03, F02, F18, J15
Ethical, Moral, and Interpersonal Leadership
A09, B04, C07, D17, E11, F21, H01, I10, K11,
K13, L01, L24, M24, P03
Facilitation Skills
C08, C10, D13, K19, L18, M34, P02, P06
Family Involvement D04, D11, F02, J19, M24
Job-Embedded Staff Development
and Team Learning
B05, C06, C17, C20, C25, C29, C30, D03,
D06, D16, E04, E10, E13, E19, F08, F19, F22,
F28, F29, G05, I05, I08, I13, I20, I29, J04, J13,
J14, K04, K15, L05, L06, L09, L29, L34, M29,
M32, M35, M50, P05, P07
Leadership Development
A04, A05, A06, C04, C05, C08, C14, C15, C22,
C28, C32, C36, D08, D19, F13, F14, F16, F27,
F31, I03, I07, I14, I20, I21, I33, J03, J08, J09,
J23, K12, K14, K15, L02, L39, L42, M06, M09,
M13, M14, M38, M40, M43, M48, M57, P02,
Learning Communities
B02, C03, C05, C08, C12, C13, C16, C25, C27,
C33, C34, C35, C36, D03, D16, D17, E16, F06,
F15, F22, F24, G01, G05, G07, G09, H04, I06,
I11, I13, I15, I17, I19, I22, I26, I29, I33, I35, J03,
J07, K05, K06, K07, K14, L04, L11, L16, L25,
L34, M03, M09, M12, M20, M30, M31, M39,
M45, M46, M48, M50, M54, P05
Literacy
C28, D06, F10, F17, F23, F28, G04, I28, J14,
J19, L07, L20, L41, M11, M15, M23, M28, M39,
M40, M42, M47, M52, P09
Mathematics
E11, F03, I30, K11, L04, L13, M51
Mentoring and Induction
C11, C12, C15, C24, E06, E09, E19, F12, H07,
I11, I23, J09, K04, L11, L21, L32, L40, M12,
M17, M24, M43, M58
Models of Staff Development
A03, B04, C13, C27, E08, F11, F12, F22, I07,
I14, I19, I24, I33, J21, K05, K17, L17, L19, L20,
L32, L35, M17, M28, M29, M42, M48
Organization Development
D10, D12, D18, G03, G06, H06, I21, J08, K17,
M04, M19, M53, P06
Partnerships
C18, C34, F18, M29, M32, M35, M36
Presentation Skills
C31, E12, E14, E20, F16, F25, I09, I31, I34,
K05, L18, P09
Principal Recruitment, Support,
and Retention C11, C15, K18
School Culture
A05, A07, C03, D10, E04, E15, E16, F02, F05,
F10, G06, H01, H03, H06, I18, K18, L26, M13,
M14, M53, P03
School Reform/Improvement Processes
A04, B02, B05, C05, C16, C18, C20, E08, E15,
F27, G10, I22, I25, J06, J11, J21, J22, K10, L06,
L15, L19, L26, M07, M18, M19, M30, M51
School-Based Staff Development
C06, C26, D14, E05, E08, E18, F17, F20, G04,
H02, I10, J21, J22, K03, K09, L14, L16, L22,
L38, L39, L40, M07, M13, M15, M18, M27,
M39, M47, P01, P07
Science D05, G07, M51
Staff Development Resources
A01, C23, C33, D10, E03, E07, E12, F11, F29,
K17, L23, L35, M16, M20, M26, M55
Support Staff/Classified J12, L21
Systems Thinking
C07, C19, C21, C22, D08, E16, F11, H02, I16,
I27, J06, J16, J17, K06, L26, L28
Teacher Evaluation C23, K16, L29, L37
Teacher Leadership
A06, C03, C17, C24, C29, D12, D19, E06, E17,
F15, F19, F31, H05, H08, I03, I06, I23, I30,
J09, J23, K08, K11, K12, L13, L22, L29, L42,
M07, M10, M15, M36, M57, P07
Technology Applications
A03, E07, F03, F04, F08, F16, I24, I31, J05,
J10, J13, K15, K19, L10, M26, M46, M49, M55
Urban Issues and Settings
C35, F10, I05, I10, L03, L09, M46, M58
AUDIENCE INDEX
M O N D AY
T U E S D AY
W E D N E S D AY
University Faculty
D11, F05, F10, F21
University Faculty
I07, I11, L32, L36
Teacher Leaders
A02, A07, A09, B01, C03, C06, C10, C13, C14,
C17, C19, C25, C26, C28, D05, D08, D13, D14,
D16, D17, D18, D19, E04, E09, E10, E11, E12,
E14, E15, E16, E17, F02, F03, F05, F08, F09,
F13, F15, F18, F19, F23, F24, F26, F28, F30,
F31
Teacher Leaders
G02, G03, G04, G07, G08, G09, H01, H05,
H06, H07, H08, I03, I06, I13, I20, I22, I23,
I28, I29, I31, J05, J07, J09, J10, J11, J14, J19,
J22, J23, K03, K04, K10, K11, K12, K13, L06,
L09, L12, L13, L15, L22, L24, L25, L26, L27,
L30, L32, L33, L35, L39, L41
Teacher Leaders
M04, M05, M07, M10, M14, M15, M16, M20,
M23, M24, M25, M26, M27, M30, M34, M36,
M41, M42, M44, M47, M49, M50, M52, M53,
M54, M56, M57, P03, P04, P05, P07, P09
Superintendents/Assistant Superintendents
A05, A09, B05, C03, C04, C05, C07, C12, C15,
C16, C18, C20, C21, C22, C24, C27, C32, D02,
D05, D07, D12, D15, D18, E11, E16, E21, F10,
F11, F17, F22, F27
Superintendents/Assistant Superintendents
G06, G07, H02, H03, I06, I07, I09, I14, I16,
I21, I26, J06, J08, J12, J15, J16, J17, J20, J21,
K06, K07, K14, K15, K16, K17, L17, L21, L23,
L26, L28, L29, L30, L37, L39
State/Regional Agency Personnel
C07, D07, D11, E13, F20
State/Regional Agency Personnel
I03, I19, I27, J17, K15, K17
School-Based Staff Developers/Coaches
A02, A05, A06, A07, A08, B01, B03, B04,
C04, C08, C09, C10, C13, C19, C20, C24, C25,
C26, C29, C31, C36, D02, D04, D06, D08,
D09, D10, D14, D19, E05, E07, E08, E09, E10,
E12, E13, E14, E18, E19, E20, E21, F02, F03,
F04, F06, F08, F14, F15, F16, F20, F21, F23,
F24, F25, F27, F28, F30, F31
School-Based Staff Developers/Coaches
G02, G04, G05, G07, G08, G09, H01, H04,
H07, I10, I12, I15, I18, I22, I24, I25, I27, I28,
I29, I31, I33, I34, I35, J04, J05, J10, J11, J13, J14,
J20, J22, J23, K03, K04, K05, K06, K08, K11,
K13, K19, L07, L09, L12, L13, L14, L15, L17,
L18, L19, L20, L22, L25, L27, L31, L33, L35,
L36, L38, L40, L41
School Board Trustees/Policy Makers
C32
School Board Trustees/Policy Makers
H03, I06
Private Consultants
E20, F25
Private Consultants
I34, K13
Principals/Assistant Principals
A02, A03, A04, A05, A06, A07, A08, A09,
B02, B03, B05, C03, C06, C08, C10, C11, C12,
C13, C14, C15, C16, C17, C18, C19, C20, C21,
C22, C23, C27, C28, C29, C30, C31, C36, D04,
D06, D09, D10, D12, D15, D16, D17, D18,
D19, E04, E05, E06, E07, E08, E11, E15, E16,
E17, E18, E19, E21, F02, F04, F05, F06, F10,
F12, F13, F14, F15, F17, F18, F19, F21, F23,
F26, F31
Principals/Assistant Principals
G02, G03, G05, G06, G08, G09, G10, H01,
H02, H03, H04, H06, H08, I05, I08, I09, I10,
I11, I12, I13, I14, I15, I18, I19, I20, I21, I22, I23,
I24, I25, I28, I29, I30, I32, I33, I35, J04, J06,
J08, J09, J15, J16, J19, J21, J22, J23, K03, K05,
K06, K09, K10, K12, K14, K16, K18, L05, L06,
L09, L14, L22, L24, L25, L26, L27, L28, L29,
L30, L33, L34, L37, L38, L39, L40, L41
District-Level Staff Developers
A03, A04, B01, B02, B03, B04, B05, C05, C06,
C08, C09, C11, C12, C14, C22, C23, C25, C26,
C28, C30, C31, C36, D02, D05, D06, D09,
D10, D11, D13, D14, D15, D16, D17, E05, E06,
E07, E08, E09, E10, E12, E13, E14, E15, E18,
E20, F03, F04, F08, F09, F11, F12, F16, F17,
F18, F22, F24, F25, F26, F28, F29, F30
District-Level Staff Developers
G03, G04, G05, G10, H02, H04, H05, H07,
H08, I03, I05, I08, I09, I10, I13, I14, I15, I16,
I18, I19, I20, I21, I23, I25, I26, I27, I30, I31,
I32, I33, I34, I35, J04, J07, J09, J10, J11, J12, J13,
J14, J19, J20, K04, K05, K07, K08, K09, K11,
K12, K16, K18, K19, L05, L07, L12, L13, L14,
L17, L18, L19, L20, L21, L23, L24, L29, L31,
L32, L34, L35, L36, L38
District Office Personnel
(Directors, consultants for instruction,
technology, curriculum, human resources
and assessment)
A03, A04, A06, A08, B02, B04, C04, C05,
C07, C09, C11, C15, C16, C17, C18, C21, C23,
C24, C27, C29, C30, D04, D07, D08, D12,
E04, E06, E17, E19, F06, F09, F11, F12, F13,
F14, F16, F19, F20, F22, F27, F29
District Office Personnel
(Directors, consultants for instruction,
technology, curriculum, human resources
and assessment)
G06, G10, H05, H06, I05, I07, I08, I11, I12,
I16, I24, I26, I30, I32, J05, J06, J08, J12, J13,
J16, J17, J21, K07, K08, K09, K10, K14, K15,
K17, K18, K19, L05, L06, L07, L18, L19, L20,
L23, L28, L31, L34, L37, L40
Community/Educational Partners
F29
Community/Educational Partners
L15
Superintendents/Assistant Superintendents
M04, M21, M29, M31, M33, M38, M43, M45,
M46, M48, M50, P02, P05, P08
State/Regional Agency Personnel
M32, M43
School-Based Staff Developers/Coaches
M05, M06, M07, M08, M09, M10, M11, M12,
M13, M15, M17, M18, M20, M23, M26, M27,
M28, M32, M35, M36, M37, M39, M40, M42,
M44, M49, M51, M52, M54, M55, M57, P04,
P06, P07
School Board Trustees/Policy Makers
M46
Principals/Assistant Principals
M04, M06, M07, M08, M10, M11, M13, M14,
M16, M18, M19, M21, M24, M25, M27, M29,
M30, M31, M33, M34, M35, M36, M37, M38,
M39, M40, M41, M44, M45, M47, M48, M50,
M51, M52, M54, M56, M57, P01, P02, P03,
P05, P06, P07, P08, P09
District-Level Staff Developers
M05, M08, M09, M11, M12, M15, M17, M19,
M20, M25, M26, M28, M29, M34, M35, M37,
M39, M40, M42, M43, M47, M48, M49, M51,
M53, M55, M56, P01, P02, P03, P04, P08
District Office Personnel
(Directors, consultants for instruction,
technology, curriculum, human resources
and assessment)
M09, M12, M13, M14, M16, M17, M19, M21,
M23, M28, M30, M31, M32, M33, M38, M41,
M45, M46, M53, M55, P01, P06
Community/Educational Partners
M06, M24
Classified/Support Staff
P09
ADVANCED SESSIONS
B07, C04, C14, C19, C30, D02, D15,
D20, E09, F07, G03, G09, H03, H04,
I14, I25, I34, J08, J16, K05, K18, L08,
L29, M03, M14, M27, M38, M50
Classified/Support Staff
L21
107
D A L L A S 2 0 0 7 | PRESENTER INDEX
Abbye Taylor, Sonya . . . . .M35
Abernathy, Constance . . . .RT1
Abernathy, Rob . . . . . . . . .K05
Abrams, Jennifer . . . . . . . .C11
Adam, Eleanor . . . . . . . . .P01
Adkins, Theresa . . . . . . . .RT2
Adler, Malcolm . . . . . . . . . .I19
Ahlemeyer, John . . . . . . . . .I05
Albright, Shari . . . . . . . . .M06
Albritton, Carol . . . . . . . . . .I19
Alexander, Ellen . . . . . . . .F09
Alexander, Marie . . . . . . . .J12
Allen, Betsy . . . . . . . .L18, P02
Allen, Rich . . . . . . . . . . . . .J20
Alsager, Diane . . . . . . . . . .E20
Alt, Corine . . . . . . . . . . . . .E13
Anderson, Karen . . . .E03, F31
Andrews, Felicia . . . . . . .M09
Angelle, Pamela . . . . . . . .D16
Angius, Sandra . . . . . . . . .RT1
Angulo, Jesus . . . . . . . . . . .F13
Ansel, Nina . . . . . . . . . . .D06
Anthony, Panella . . . . . . . .RT1
Applegate, Dawn . . . . . . . .F25
Arnau, Lea . . . . . . . . .C34, I08
Arno, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . .L17
Arnold, Suzanne . . .C07, H01
Aronson, Nancy . . . .104, D06
Aseltine, James . . . . . . . . .L37
Ashcraft, Joan . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Aubin, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .L20
Aviss-Spedding, Eileen . . .C33
Bailey, Kevin Sue . . . . . . . .F07
Bailey, Simon . . . . . . . . . .C02
Bainer, Carolyn . . . . . . . .H04
Baker, Ingrid . . . . . . . . . .M05
Baldanza, Marcia . . . . . . .RT3
Ballance, Annie . . . . . . . .M23
Ballering, Laurie . . . . . . . .F28
Barainca, Bridgit . . . . . . . .I21
Barker, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . .E11
Barkley, Stephen . . . . . . . . .I13
Barksdale, Missy . . . . . . .H02
Baron, Wendy . . . . . . . . . .E09
Barr, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . .D15
Bartels, Susan . . . . . . . . . .D11
Bates, Donna . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Beagle, Vickie . . . . . . . . . .F12
Beatty, Thomas . . . . . . . . .F17
Beaudrot, Judi . . . . . . . . .M56
Beavers, Stoney . . . . . . . .C24
Beck, Amy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I18
Bell, Ellen . . . . . . . . . . . . .K07
Bell, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Bell, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K15
Bengier, Andrea . . . . . . . .C20
Bennett, Helen . . . . . . . . .E13
Benson, Denise . . . . . . . .C09
Berckemeyer, Jack . . . . . . .J21
Berkey, Timothy . . . . . . . . .L39
Berlinger, Sheila . . . . . . . .E10
Berlinger-Gustafson, Cathy . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L08
Berry, Denny . . . . . . . . . . . .I17
Berryman-Shaffer, Jim . . .C09
Bertani, Al . . . . . . . . . . . . .I07
Betts, Reeda . . . . . . . . . . .C18
Bevan, Paula . . . . . . . . . . .K16
Biancaniello, Steve . . . . . .E18
Bidlack, Jane . . . . . . . . . . .M57
Billings, Dawn . . . . . . . . .M04
Billmeyer, Rachel . . .C28, P04
Bingham, Steven . . . . . . . .I16
Binkowski, Kathy . . . . . . .D12
Bjurlin, Amy . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Black, Lin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I11
Black, Pearl . . . . . . . . . . . .M17
Blasik, Katherine . . . . . . . .RT3
Blickhan, Lorie . . . . . . . . .C29
Blink, Rebecca . . . . . . . . .D08
Bliss-Mello, Janet . . . . . . .D19
Blohm-Hamlet, Jessie . . .D09
Bloom, Gary . . . . . . . . . . .107
Bloom, Todd . . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Bobowick, Esther . . . . . . .M36
Boccanfuso, Debi . . . . . .M36
Bocchino, Kathy . . . . . . . .B05
Bocchino, Rob . . . . . .313, I07
Boespflug, Stephanie . . . .L21
Bogolan, Rain . . . . . . . . .H07
Booher, Mike . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Boucher, Michael . . . . . . .C25
Boyer, Debbie . . . . . . . . . . .J10
Brassfield, Kimberly . . . . .D09
108
Bratonia, Brian . . . . . . . . .C03
Brazell, Dianne . . . . . . . .M32
Breiner, Beth . . . . . . . . . . . .I31
Brinkman, Annette . . . . .G08
Brown, Karen . . . . . . . . . .L20
Brown, Mary . . . . . . . . . .M26
Browne, Kathleen . . . . . . .G07
Brownlee, Jill . . . . . . . . . .G04
Broz, Julie . . . . . . . . . . . . .F20
Brunini, Angela . . . . . . . .H05
Brunn, Peter . . . . . . . . . .M48
Buchanan, Beth . . . . . . . . .C31
Buchanan, Kim Beth . . . . .J10
Budge, Kathleen . . . . . . . .D15
Bullock, Corina . . . . . . . .M05
Bunting, Susan . . . . . . . .M38
Burke, Kay . . . . . . . . .F30, P03
Burlinski, Carol . . . . . . . .M27
Burston, Deborah . . . . . .D06
Butler, Leontine . . . . . . . .RT3
Cain, Connie . . . . . . . . . .M39
Calderon, Emily . . . . . . . . .F18
Caldwell, Kimberly . . . . . .M51
Caldwell, Sally . . . . . . . . . .D18
Callahan, Mike . . . . . . . . .RT1
Campbell, Brenda . . . . . . .203
Campbell, Franklin . . . . . .203
Carey, Deborah . . . . . . . . . .I33
Carley, Susan . . . . . . . . . .M27
Carmichael, Dana . . . . . . .C25
Carnes, Meg . . . . . . . . . . . .I17
Carney, Steven . . . . . . . . . .I12
Caro-Bruce, Cathy . . . . . . .B04
Carradine, Karen . . . . . . .D09
Carranza, Richard . . . . . . .F17
Carroll, Cathy . . . . . . . . . . .K11
Carter, Bob . . . . . . . . . . . .M57
Carter, Charlotte . . . . . . . .F23
Carter, Gwen . . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Carter, Walter . . . . . . . . . .C05
Carwell, Tamika . . . . . . . . .L15
Caskey, Noelle . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Castillo, Albert . . . . . . . . . .F13
Cayton, Danny . . . . . . . . . .F21
Cazier, Jeff . . . . . . . . . . . . .I10
Cearlock, Devia . . . . . . . . .C23
Cerauli, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . .K03
Chacko, Susan . . . . . . . . .M51
Chadsey, Terry . .312, J06, K18
Chance, Patti . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Chapman, Sue . . . . . . . . . .L13
Chappell, Bonnie . . . . . . .RT1
Chappell, Brian . . . . . . . . .RT1
Chappius, Jan . . . . . . . . . .310
Chasin, Sheryl . . . . . . . . . .F27
Chesoli, Joshua . . . . . . . . .RT3
Childs-Bowen, Deborah
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106, B06
Chilla, Nicole . . . . . . . . . .M15
Chmiel, Margaret . . . . . . .F08
Christian, Melonie . . . . . .H02
Cianca, Marie . . . . . . . . . .L33
Clarizio, Sharon . . . . . . . .M44
Clark, Jackie . . . . . . . . . . .M22
Clauset, Karl . . . . . . . . . . . .I25
Cleary, Missy . . . . . . . . . .H06
Clemens, Andrea . . . . . . .D06
Clevette, Jim . . . . . . . . . . .F04
Cobb, Susan . . . . . . . . . . .D06
Cohen, Burton . . . . . . . . . .C11
Cohen, David . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Cohen, Stacy . . . . . . . . . .D02
Collier Jr., Harrison . . . . . .I20
Colton, Travis M02, . . . . .RT3
Conahan-Dettrey, Helen .D06
Conk, Judith . . . . . . . . . .M06
Conklin, Wendy . . . . . . . . .L12
Cookson, Dan . . . . . . . . .D07
Cooper, Latonya . . . . . . . . .J13
Cooper, Richard . . . . . . . .RT1
Cooper-Baker, Gustava . . .RT2
Cordero, Mercedes . . . . . .F12
Corrado Del Vecchio, Rosalba
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F27
Cowan, D'Ette . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Coward, Renee . . . . . . . . .M12
Cox, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . .I05
Craft, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . .K12
Cronk, Dorothy . . . . . . . . .C06
Crow, Tracy . . . . . . . . . . . .L10
Crowther, Sandee . . . . . . . .F31
Cunningham-Morris, Ann L09
Curwin, Richard . . . . . . . .M25
Cutbirth, Suzy . . . . . . . . . .B01
Darnell, Bobb . . . . . .RT2, J05
Daubach, Robin . . . . . . . .RT1
Davis, Bonnie . . . . . . . . . .M11
Davis, Eunice . . . . . . . . . . .J04
Davis, Kathy . . . . . . . . . .M09
Davis, LaTanya . . . . . . . . .M05
Davis, Valerie . . . . . . . . . .P05
De Ivernois, Linda . . . . . .RT3
Dean, Carol . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Dearing, Vicky . . . . . . . . . .J23
Dehel, Dawn . . . . . . . . . .M49
Deich, Randall . . . . . . . . . .J13
Delaney, Ellen . . . . . . . . . .C21
Delawder, Sarah . . . . . . . .L24
Delehant, Ann . .211, C13, P06
Dellane, Thomas . . . . . . .L07
Deloria, Terry . . . . . . . . . . .L24
Depka, Eileen . . . . . .F30, M16
Derrick, Gail . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Dessa, Barbara . . . . . . . . .304
DeStefano-Anen, Judith . .L07
Devers, Mie . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Dewitt, Debbie . . . . . . . . . .312
Diaz, Linda . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Dickson, Syd . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Dickson, Todd . . . . . . . . .A02
Dietz, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Diggs, Vanessa . . . . . . . . .F09
Do, Thuy . . . . . . . . . . . . .M48
Dowker, Paula . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Drago-Severson, Eleanor G09
Duff, Barry . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Duff, Elaine . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Duff, Victoria . . . . . . . . . . .I19
Duffield, Judy . . . . . . . . . .C26
Dunbar, Folwell . . . . . . . . .K13
Dunne, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . .I23
Dunsworth, Mardale . . . .M04
Duran, Pam . . . . . . . . . . .208
Duran-Ginn, Virginia . . . .M19
Duval, Sandra . . . . . . . . . .B03
Dyer, Karen . . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Earhart, Kay . . . . . . . . . . . .L14
Eckel, Barbara . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Edminster, Ross . . . . . . . .L26
Ekwo, Deborah . . . . . . . . .RT1
Elizondo, Caroline . . . . . . .F15
Elizondo Zepeda, Olivia . .301
Eller, John . . . . . . . . .D17, L34
Eller, Sheila . . . . . . . . . . . .L34
Ellicott, Jayne . . . . . . . . . .M56
Ellison, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . .311
Emry, Terese . . . . . . . . . . . .I03
Epanchin, Betty . . . . . . . . .L11
Erdberg, Evan . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Eskow, Karen . . . . . . . . . . .D11
Estes, Deborah . . . . .I09, P08
Evans, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Evans-Smith, Melanie . . .M17
Everlove, Sandi . . . . . . . . .F17
Faber, Sharon . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Farrell, Tina . . . . . . . . . . .M09
Farynairz, Judith . . . . . . . .L37
Fauteux, John . . . . . . . . . .F22
Federman, Pat . . . . . . . . .D09
Feldmiller, Colleen . . . . . .RT1
Feltre, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .G07
Ferguson, Layne . . . . . . . .RT2
Ferguson, Rachelle . . . . .M46
Fernley, Sheila . . . . . . . . .M37
Finer, Barbara . . . . . . . . .G06
Fisher, Douglas . . . . . . . . .F17
Flack, Kimberly . . . . . . . . .M31
Fleming, Anne . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Fletcher, Wendy . . . . . . . . .I24
Fogarty, Robin . . . . . . . . . .D14
Fogler, Sharon . . . . . . . . . .E10
Folger, Beth . . . . . . . . . . . .L39
Forge, Michelle . . . . . . . . .F22
Foster, Jeanne . . . . . . . . . .D18
Foster, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . .K12
Foster, Marcia . . . . . . . . . .F08
Fournier, Theresa . . . . . . .L29
Fowler, Felicia . . . . . . . . . .I26
Fox, Meline . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Francis, Sue . . . . . . .RT2, RT3
Frank, Susan . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Friou, Eileen . . . . . . . . . . . .L17
Fritz, Christina . . . . . . . . .M19
Frost, Sandra . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Fulawka, Janice . . . . .RT1, F04
Fuller, Sharon . . . . . . . . . .C17
Fulton, Kathleen . . . . . . . . .I11
Funk, Dirk . . . . . . . . . . . . .C23
Funk, Katherine . . . . . . . . .C27
Galligan, Gayle . . . . . . . . . .I32
Galvin, Mike . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Ganey, Julie . . . . . . . . . . . .L31
Gannon, Corine . . . . . . . .RT3
Garbalosa, Nivia . . . . . . . .RT1
Garcia, Caridad . . . . . . . . .P05
Garcia, Kelly . . . . . . . . . . .A02
Garcia, Maritza . . . . . . . . .F02
Garmston, Robert . . . . . . .311
Garrett, Melinda . . . . . . . .L23
Garza, Sandra . . . . . . . . .M33
Garza, Tonie . . . . . . . . . . . .J15
Gazdyszyn, Lidia . . .C08, RT3
Gerdes, Debra . . . . . . . . .A07
Giannou, Kathy . . . . . . . . .J12
Gibeau, Lorelei . . . . . . . .M28
Gildea, Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . .M45
Giles, Vickey . . . . . . . . . . .M32
Gilmore, James . . . . . . . .K02
Gilmour, Suzanne . . . . . . .I33
Ginnett, Robert . . . . . . . . .C22
Gless, Janet . . . . . . . . . . .M17
Goldberg, Stephanie . . . .C30
Golden, Nancy . . . . . . . . .M30
Golding, Jane . . . . . . . . . . .J07
Gomez, Diana . . . . . . . . . .L20
Gonzales, David . . . . . . . .I10
Gooch, Betsy . . . . . . . . . . .L26
Goodwin, Jeff . . . . . . . . . .D03
Goodwin, Khristie . . . . . .D03
Goodwin, Tracy . . . . . . . . .RT2
Gordon, Gary . . . . . . . . . .E08
Gordon, Tedi . . . . . . . . . . .C18
Gore, Montreal . . . . . . . . .F11
Goss, Colleen . . . . . . . . . .K10
Gottlieb, Margo . . . . . . . . .201
Grabowski, Stephen . . . . .G07
Grant, Mike . . . . . . . . . . .M10
Green, Chad . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Green, Michael . . . . . . . . .F19
Green-Hampton, Andetria . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M05
Greenberg, Cheryl . . . . . . .L11
Gregory, Carmen . . . . . . . .L15
Gregory, Gayle . .306, I15, P01
Griffin, Michael . . . . . . . .H02
Grimmett, Kelly . . . . . . . . .L30
Grogan, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . .I22
Gross, Debbie . . . . . . . . .G07
Grossman, Lori . . . . . . . . .RT1
Grymes, Lisa . . . . . . . . . .M15
Gschwend, Laura . . . . . . .H07
Guechati, Alesha . . . . . . . .RT1
Guerra, Pat . . . . . . . . . . . .302
Guskey, Tom . . . . . . . . . . .207
Gutierrez, Isai . . . . . . . . . .E12
Hair, Dale . . . . . . . . . . . . .E03
Halpin, Gerald . . . . . . . . .RT1
Halpin, Glennelle . . . . . . .RT1
Hambrick, Kimberly . . . . .RT1
Hancock, Michele . . . . . . .L33
Harmon, Jeanne . . . . . . . .L22
Harrigan, Kevin . . . . . . . .M48
Harris, Bergeron . . . .307, C16
Harris, Edna . . . . . . . . . . .M57
Harrison, Cindy . . . .304, L08
Harsh, Sharon . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Hart, Carla . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Hart, Cate . . . . . . . . . . . . .F07
Harvin, Ruth . . . . . . . . . . .F23
Hauge, Steve . . . . . . . . . .M12
Hawthorne-Clay, Suszanne . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Hefferen, Joanna . . . . . . .RT2
Heggarty, Sue . . . . . . . . . .M11
Heitmann, Linda . . . . . . .M35
Helixon, Kimberly . . . . . .D04
Henderson, Bev . . . . . . . .C14
Henninger, Mike . . . . . . . .I05
Henry, Aiyana . . . . . . . . . .F23
Herrera, Toby . . . . . . . . . . .305
Hervey, Sheena . . . . . . . . .J14
Hess, Robert . . . . . . . . . .M30
Hicks, Deedra . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Highsmith, Charles . . . . . .I19
Hill, David . . . . . . . . . . . . .C16
Hill, Shira . . . . . . . . . . . . .C26
Hillman, Jay . . . . . . . . . . .C27
Hipp, Kris . . . . . . . . . . . . .301
Hirst-Loucks, Carolyn . . .M53
Hobbs, Audrey . . . . . . . . .C32
Hoch, Jody . . . . . . . . . . . . .C13
Hodges, Sharon . . . . . . . .L05
Hoffman, Margaret . . . . .L07
Hofmeier, Ann . . . . . . . . .K03
Holcomb, Beverly . . . . . .D06
Holcomb, Edie . . . . . . . . . .E15
Holland, Kim . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Hollis, Nancy . . . . . . . . .M46
Hopping, Linda . . . . . . . . .J21
Hord, Shirley . . . . . . .301, D01
House, Debbie . . . . . . . .M24
Housman, Naomi . . . . . . .F05
Howard, Barbara . . . . . . .G05
Howard, Lynn . . . . . . . . . .L40
Howe, Thomas . . . . . . . . .K04
Howley, Caitlin . . . . . . . . .RT1
Howley, Eileen . . . . . . . . .RT3
Huley, Christine . . . . . . . . .I14
Humphrey, Pamela . . . . . .J12
Hungerford, Meighan . . . .RT1
Idle, Lynda . . . . . . . . . . . .M19
Inglis, Linda . . . . . . . . . . .C06
Islas, Rene . . . . . . . . . . . . .L03
Jackson, Drema . . . . . . . .RT3
Jackson, Marcy . . . . . . . . .312
Jackson, Patricia . . . . . . . .P03
Jackson, Sonya . . . . . . . .M24
Jackson, Tai Shan . . . . . . .RT1
Jacobs, Melissa . . . . . . . .M06
Jaeggi, Chris . . . . . . . . . . .F30
James, Jennifer . . . . . . . . .I02
Jarvis, Janis . . . . . . . . . . .M09
Jasper, Jessica . . . . . . . . . .F28
Jenkins, Terri . . . . . . . . . . . .I25
Jeter, Emma . . . . . . . . . . . .J20
Joesph, Abygayil . . . . . . . .D14
John, Hellwich . . . . . . . . . .L22
Johnson, April . . . . . . . . .M39
Johnson, Melody . . . . . . . .108
Johnson, Nancy . . . . . . . .M41
Johnson-Jenkins, Lisa . . . .RT2
Johnson-Turnbull, Kelly . .RT2
Johnston, Judy . . . . . . . . . .108
Joiner, Judy . . . . . . . . . . . . .J11
Jolly, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . .G05
Jones, Deb . . . . . . . . . . . . .I15
Jones, Deedie . . . . . . . . . .F09
Jones, Janet . . . . . . . . . . . .J17
Jones, Richard . . . . . . . . . .L28
Jones-Allen, Wanetta . . . . .RT1
Jordan, Jeffery . . . . . . . . .M56
Joseph, Margaret . . . . . . .G04
Kabak, Sheryl . . . . . . . . . .K03
Kagan, Spencer . . . . . . . .M08
Kaiser, Sharon . . . . . . . . . .L21
Karlage, Caren . . . . . . . . . .I20
Karten, Toby . . . . . . . . . . .L36
Katz, Wendy . . . . . . . . . . .H06
Kaufeldt, Martha . . . . . . . .I34
Kauffman, Theresa . . . . . .K18
Kaune, Rebecca . . . . . . . . .I33
Kave, Ginger . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Kee, Kathryn . . .D19, J03, L02
Keenan, Kathleen . . . . . . . .I28
Kelch, Panette . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Kellaher, Antoinette . . . . .RT2
Kelley-Larry, Yolonda . . . .M51
Kellogg, Paula . . . . . . . . . .L41
Kelly, Duke . . . . . . . . . . . .M34
Kelly, Susan . . . . . . . . . . .M39
Kennedy, Angela . . . . . . . .L20
Kennedy, Michelle . . . . . .F06
Kennedy-Salchow, .Shana 205
Kerns, Gene . . . . . . . . . . .M49
Keskonis, Anne Marie . . .M13
Keyes, Franny . . . . . . . . . .F29
Kidd, Sue . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L41
Killion, Joellen .G01, L16, M02
King, Dennis . . . . . . . . . . .C05
King, Jeff . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E16
King, Kristi . . . . . . . . . . . .H02
King-George, Shelee . . . . .K08
Kingsberry, Chris . . . . . . . .104
Klehr, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . .B04
Klock Persing, Kathy .305, C03
Klonsky, Fred . . . . . . . . . . .F29
Knight, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . .D02
Knox, Gretchen . . . . . . . . .F24
Kolarik, Jasey . . . . . . . . . .C29
Koonce, Sharon . . . . . . . . .L23
Koontz, Catherine . . . . . . .L40
Korashan, Riva . . . . . .D19, J12
Kortman, Sharon . . . . . . . .J09
Kosa, Jaymie Reeber .I04, P09
Kotz, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . .M49
Kroeze, David . . . . . . . . . .L29
Kros, Frank . . . . . . . . . . . .G06
LaFortune, Janet . . . . . . . .I22
Lafreniere, Nicole . . . . . . .RT3
Lahue, Debbie . . . . . . . . . .F19
Landrigan, Clare . . . . . . . .F24
Lashley, Terry . . . . . . . . . . .K10
Lauer, Debbie . . . . . . . . . . .L31
Laughter, Lesli . . . . . . . . . .K14
Laver, Adina . . . . . . . . . . .M40
Lawrence, Marlyn . . . . . . .I07
Lay, Marsha . . . . . . . . . . . .B01
Lee, James . . . . . . . . . . . . .F24
Lejcar, Michael . . . . . . . . .A07
Lemmerman, Cynthia . . .H03
Lempe, Scott . . . . . . . . . .H06
Lent, ReLeah . . . . . . . . . .M39
Lesane, Alvera . . . . . . . . . .C12
LeTellier, John . . . . . . . . . .K09
Lin, Dotty . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Lindemann, Marci . . . . . .RT2
Lindley, Tanya . . . . . . . . . .M41
Lindsey, Delores . . . . . . . .E05
Lindsey, Randall . . . . . . . .E05
Link, Laura . . . . . . . .L25, M14
Linton, Curtis . . . . . . . . . .A09
Litke, Erica . . . . . . . . . . . . .F05
Littlejohn, Jim . . . . . .RT1, L27
Logan, LaVerne . . . . . . . .M29
Logan, Maureen . . . . . . . .RT2
Long, Joshua . . . . . . . . . . .I24
Lopez, Damen . . . . . . . . . .E16
Loucks, Kim . . . . . . . . . . .M53
Love, Nancy . . . . . . .203, B07
Lowden, Christine . . . . . .M50
Lucas, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . .D06
Lucas, Lois . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Lucas, Stacy . . . . . . . . . . . .I18
Lum-Ku, Charlotte . . . . . .A02
Lynch, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Lynch, Monique . . . . . . . .F03
Madden, Linda . . . . . . . . . .J11
Madison, Beth . . . . . . . . .M18
Magee, Kathy . . . . . . . . . .M22
Malenoski, Kim . . . . . . . . .A03
Malobicky, Matthew . . . . .I24
Malone, Janet . . . . . . . . . . .I12
Manes, Sarah . . . . . . . . . .F05
Mann, Ronni . . . . . . . . . .E09
Many, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . .M03
Marra, Jean Anne . . . . . . .RT2
Marra, Sam . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Marshall, Jon . . . . . . . . . .D18
Marsho, Nancy . . . . . . . . .A06
Martin, Donna . . . . . . . . .C24
Martin, Tanya . . . . . . . . . . .J13
Martinez, Danny . . . . . . . .E07
Martinez, Ricahard . . . . . .E05
Masinde, Benard . . . . . . .RT3
Mason, Charles . . . . . . . . .RT1
Mata, Warren . . . . . . . . .M40
Mathis, Laurie . . . . . . . . . .C16
Matsui, Bruce . . . . . .103, M01
Mattingly, Tara . . . . . . . . .RT1
Mautino, RoseMary . . . . .E18
Mayfield-Ingram, Karen . . .E11
McAfee, Denise . . . . . . . .M05
McCallum, Teresa . . . . . .C09
McCarty, Sherry . . . . . . . .M19
McCaw, Donna . . . . . . . .M29
McDuffie, Mary . . . . . . . .M12
McGuey, Gary . . . . . . . . . .RT3
McHugh, Leesa . . . . . . . . .I28
McKale, Tricia . . . . . . . . . .D02
McKanders, Carolyn . . . . .309
McKinney, Debbie . . . . . .M40
McLeroy, Sandra . . . . . . .M46
McNamee, Mary . . . . . . . . I18
McQuail, Frank . . . . . . . . .RT2
Medina, Miriam . . . . . . . .F28
Mendler, Allen . . . . . . . . .M25
Mendler, Brian . . . . . . . . .RT1
Merold, Mike . . . . . . . . . . .C18
Meyer, Karen . . . . . . . . . . .K08
Meyer, Mindy . . . . . . . . . .E19
Meyer, Rachelle . . . . . . . .M07
Michael, Rush . . . . . . . . . .K13
Michailides, Dean . . . . . .C06
Michailides, Mary . . . . . .C06
Michalak, Leeann . . . . . . .E08
Middleton, Cathie . . . . . .M56
Miller, Camille . . . . . . . . . .I16
Miller, Kyna . . . . . . . . . . . .L19
Miller, Margaret . . . . . . . .K07
Milliken, Katie . . . . . . . . . .J07
Miner, Darla . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Miniel, Jonett . . . . . .C08, RT3
Miya, Cyndee . . . . . . . . . .H08
Mizel, Hayes . . . . . . . . . . .L03
Mokashi, Kelly . . . . . . . . .M44
Moody, Michael . . . . . . . .G02
Moore, Lonnie . . . . . . . . .M43
Moore, Sharon . . . . . . . . .RT1
Moore, Tiffany . . . . . . . . . .C25
Morado, Adela . . . . . . . . . .F15
Morazzano, Loraine . . . . .F09
Moretta, Pat . . . . . . . . . . . .F13
Morgan, Dee . . . . . . . . . .M21
Morgan, Martha . . . . . . .M48
Morris, David . . . . . . . . . .C06
Moses, Barb . . . . . . . . . . .E19
Motzkus, T.C. . . . . . . . . . .A06
Mower, Paula . . . . . . . . . . .J04
Mueller, Sara . . . . . . . . . . .J04
Mulligan, Tammy . . . . . . .F24
Mumme, Judy . . . . . . . . . .K11
Mun Wah, Lee . . . . . . . . . .C10
Murdy, Lorrie . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Murphy, Carlene . . . .J03, L02
Murphy, Michael . . . .204, C35
Murphy, Rob . . . . . . . . . .M52
Myatt, Keith . . . . . . . . . . . .E05
Nacson, Jacques . . . . . . . .L26
Nading, Judy . . . . . . . . . . .F26
Nance, Beverly . . . . . . . . .C19
Nance, Linda . . . . . . . . . . .F15
Nash, Ron . . . . . . . . . . . . .E14
Neel, Donna . . . . . . . . . . .D03
Neel, Mitchie . . . . . . . . . .C24
Nelson, Courtney . . . . . . .F20
Nelson, Karen . . . . . . . . .D03
Nelson, Sarah . . . . . . . . . .302
Nelson, Sharon . . . .E09, K04
Nemanich, Jerelyne . . . . . .C21
Nerad, Daniel . . . . . . . . . .L26
Nevins, Lyn . . . . . . . . . . .M36
Newell, Cindy . . . . . . . . . .M41
Nicely, Tanna . . . . . . . . . .L04
Nicholls, Craig . . . . . . . . .F08
Nikolay, Nancy . . . . . . . . .K04
Nobuto, Jan . . . . . . . . . . .K06
Noriega, Melissa . . . . . . . .L23
Norton, Blair . . . . . . . . . . .F04
Novak, Sandi . . . . . . . . . . .I30
Nutting, Nancy . . . . . . . . .I30
O'Connor, Christina . . . . . .L11
O'Neill, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . .J11
Ogletree, Rebecca Rhoden . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .G05
Ogren, Sandra . . . . . . . . .C29
Olivares, Ruben . . . . . . . . .J01
Oliveros, Cristina . . . . . . .L23
Olker, Karen . . . . . . . . . . .K03
Olsen, Skip . . . . . . . . . . . .J08
Olsen, Walter . . . . . . . . . .E07
Olson, Katharine . . . . . . . .RT1
Ortiz, Marcela . . . . . . . . . .I28
Osland, Louise . . . . . . . . .A04
Osman, William . . . . . . . . .I14
Ostrom, Cheryll . . . . . . . .RT1
Ota, Tamaye . . . . . . . . . .M42
Owen, Alice . . . . . . . . . . .D19
Owen, Karen . . . . . .C08, RT3
Owens, Lorie . . . . . . . . . . .I27
Palka, Gayle . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Palma, Maria . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Palmer, Parker . . . . . . . . .E02
Pandel, Dorothy . . . . . . . .P05
Pardo, Casilda . . . . . . . . . .K11
Paredes, Raymond . . . . . .F01
Parker, Ann . . . . . . . . . . . .F28
Parker, Claudia . . . . . . . . . .E13
Parker, Wil . . . . . . . . . . . . .L09
Parrett, William . . . . . . . . .D15
Parsley, Danette . . . . . . . .RT3
Parsons, Catherine . . . . . .M35
Paul, Cherryl . . . . . . . . . . . .I32
Paul, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . .C09
Paulsen, Michelle . . . . . . .C29
Payne, Wendy . . . . . . . . . .C20
Pead, Brian . . . . . . . . . . .H08
Peden, Ruth . . . . . . . . . . .P01
Peel, Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I16
Peery, Angela . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Perales, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . .L20
Perkins, Denise . . . . . . . . .C18
Pernick, Ira . . . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Perry, George . . . . . . . . . . .I05
Persall, Tim . . . . . . . . . . . .K14
Pete, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . .D14
Peterman, Leinda . . . . . . .K17
Peters, Jodie . . . . . . . . . . .M52
Petersen, Nancy . . . . . . . .C06
Peterson, Diane . . . . . . . .M32
Peterson, Heather . . . . . .D10
Pfister, Kristi . . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Pierce, Jo Ann . . . . . . . . . .K06
Pierre, Paula . . . . . . . . . . .M51
Pierre-Farid, Michelle . . .M54
Pinelli, Lori . . . . . . . . . . .M40
Pitler, Howard . . . . . . . . . .A03
Pixley, Cyndi . . . . . . . . . . . .I24
Pomerantz, Steven . . . . . .C15
Presler, Barbara . . . . . . . .RT2
Presler, Susan . . . . .C28, P04
Preston, Steve . . . . .RT2, RT3
Prestwood, Gaylynn . . . .M05
Proctor, Kathy . . . . . . . . . .L32
Psencik, Kay . . . . . . . . . . .C27
Puff, Diane . . . . . . . . . . . .M31
Purnell, Gwenda . . . . . . . .K17
Quackenboss, Salle . . . . . .J16
Quinn, Joanne . . . . .C32, P01
Radford, Jan . . . . . . . . . . .F07
Ravenel, Alisandra . . . . . .RT2
Ray Taylor, Rossi . . . . . . .G03
Recht, Donna . . . . . . . . . .A06
Regur, Carey . . . . . . . . . . .M23
Reider, Kelly . . . . . . . . . . .B03
Reilly, Marceta . . . . . . . . . .L41
Reitan, Chris . . . . . . . . . . .C31
Rex, Shelley . . . . . . . . . . . .L27
Reynolds, Katie . . . . . . . . .A07
Richard, Byron . . . . . . . . .RT1
Richardson, Dayna . . . . . .L41
Richardson, Joan . . . . . . . .J18
Richardson, Judith . . . . . .109
Richardson, Justin . . . . . .K14
Richardson, Marti . . . . . .C04
Richmond, Leslie . . . . . . .RT3
Rick, Stiggins . . . . . . . . . . .310
Rickert, Cindy . . . . . . . . . .M34
Rigazio-DiGilio, Anthony . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .C17, RT3, L37
Rios-Parra, Nellie . . . . . . . .J19
Robb, Dana . . . . . . . .RT1, F04
Robbins, Pam .E04, M30, P07
Roberts, Denise . . . . . . . . .L19
Roberts, Laraine . . . . . . .H04
Robinson, Linda . . . . . . . . .J21
Robinson, Paul . . . . . . . . .I06
Robinson, Stephanie . . . .205
Rodriguez, Delilah . . . . . .F26
Roetzel, Pat . . . . . . . . . . . .F09
Rogers, Spence . . . . . . . . .C31
Roggenbuck, Adrianne
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L18, P02
Rolheiser, Carol . . . . . . . . .306
Ronneberg, Jeff . . . . . . . . .C21
Root, Anamarie . . . . . . . . .L19
Rose, Sherry . . . . . . . . . . .C15
Ross, Amanda . . . . . . . . . .F03
Ross, Andrew . . . . . . . . . .G06
Ross, John . . . . . . . . . . . . .K15
Ross, Kathleen . . . . . . . . .F29
Ross, Robin . . . . . . . . . . .L06
Rouseau, Grace . . . . . . . . .C25
Routa, Michael . . . . . . . . .C36
Rowland, Amber . . . . . . .M55
Roy, Pat . . . . . . . . . . .102, 202
Rubel, Carol . . . . . . . . . . .M26
Ruiz, Nancy . . . . . . . . . . . .F26
Rumsey, Joe . . . . . . . . . . .C27
Russ, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . .J11
Russell, Marcia . . . . . . . . .L38
Russell, Rodney . . . . . . . .L04
Rust, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E19
Ryley, Helen . . . . . . . . . . . .L21
Salas, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . .M33
Saldivar, Cynthia . . . . . . . .F18
Sandercock, Irma . . . . . . .M31
Sanders, Pam . . . . . . . . . .F09
Santiago, Helen . . . . . . . . .I07
Saphier, Jon . . . . . . . . . . .206
Satterfield, Carrie . . . . . . .L30
Sauer, Jason . . . . . . . . . . .L30
Sawyers, Elaine . . . . . . . .M41
Schaetzlein, Mark . . . . . .M27
Schneider, Dan . . . . . . . . .K03
Schoetzau, Ellen . . . . . . . . .I17
Schramm, Richard . . . . .M20
Schreck, MaryKim . . . . . .M11
Schuhler, Rhonda . . . . . . . .L11
Schulte, Karen . . . . . . . . .G03
Schultheiss, Sandra . . . . .F23
Schumacher, Reba . . . . . . .J23
Schwei, Mike . . . . . . . . . .H02
Scott, Robert . . . . . . . . . .M13
Scott, Susan . . . . . . . . . . .A05
Seals, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Searby, Linda . . . . . . . . . . .F14
Seashore Louis, Karen . . .209
Segura, Sue . . . . . . . . . . .C09
Seiber, Karen . . . . . . . . . .M07
Shapiro, Kay . . . . . . . . . . .M12
Shaver, Leicha . . . . . . . . . .F21
Sheinberg, Rebecca . .RT1, E12
Shelby, Janice . . . . . . . . . .M57
Sherman, Sandra . . . . . . .RT2
Shores, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Shotwell, Rodney . . . . . . .RT3
Showers, Sue . . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Shrode, Robin . . . . . . . . . .J22
Shulman, Claudia . . . . . . .RT3
Shuster, Frances . . . . . . . . .J23
Signatur, John . . . . . . . . . .I28
Simpson, Kevin . . . . . . . . .RT3
Singleton, Glenn . . . . . . .A09
Slater, Joan . . . . . . . . . . . .M32
Smelser, Charlotte . . . . . .H05
Smith, Clark . . . . . . . . . . . .I33
Smith, Emily . . . . . . . . . . .L38
Smith, Lourdes . . . . .D13, L35
Smith, Mary . . . . . . . . . . .L30
Smith, Patricia . . . . . . . . . .L05
Smith, Rick . . . . . . . . . . . .L32
Smith, Rosemary . . . . . . .B02
Smith, Sandy . . . . . . . . . .M38
Smith, Suzie . . . . . . . . . . .L06
Smithwick, Alison . . . . . . .K12
Sofo, Ronald . . . . . . . . . . .E18
Sommers, William . .J08, M10
Sostak, Betsy . . . . . . . . . . .K03
Spak, Helene . . . . . . . . . . .L29
Sparks, Ardis . . . . . . . . . . .C14
Sparks, Dennis . . . . .303, D20
Speir, Sharon . . . . . . . . . . .E21
Spellman, Natasha . . . . . .RT3
Spiller, Jeanne . . . . . . . . .M03
Spycher, Pamela . . . . . . .M42
St. Clair, Linda . . . . . . . . . .F19
St. Clair, Mark . . . . . . . . . .F19
St. James, Frances . . . . . .RT2
Stahl, Karen . . . . . . . . . . . .I10
Staley, Rosemary . . . . . . .G04
Stanford-Blair, Nancy . . . .A06
Stanley, Timothy . . . . . . . .RT3
Stanton, Paul . . . . . . . . . . .I32
Stephenson, Susan . . . . . .E17
Stewart, Kathy . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Stewart, Kelly . . . . . . . . . . .J09
Stewart, Peggy . . . . . . . . . .I19
Stonaker, Lew . . . . . . . . . .C30
Straughn, Priscilla . . . . . .B02
Streich, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . .I24
Stricker, Jason . . . . . . . . .G02
Stringer, Sandra . . . . . . . .F29
Strykowski, Bonnie . . . . .M21
Sulentic Dowell, MargaretMary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F10
Sullivan, Christine . . . . . . .C17
Summers, Gayle . . . . . . .D06
Sweatt, Shelly . . . . . . . . . .M13
Sweet, Ava . . . . . . . .RT1, M17
Swierpel, Dave . . . . . . . . . .I06
Taite Austin, Anne . . . . . .D04
Taliaferro, Kelly . . . . . . . . .L06
Tate, Marcia 210, . . . . . . .A08
Taub, Deborah . . . . . . . . .M54
Taylor, Megan . . . . . . . . . .A02
Taylor, P. Mark . . . . . . . . .D16
Taylor, Roger . . . . . . . . . . .G10
Taylor, Vincent . . . . . . . . .M47
Tayman, Stephanie . . . . . .L05
Teague, Lauretta . . . . . . .M24
Telesca, David . . . . . . . . . .D12
Tennison, Barbara . . . . . . .J04
Tharp, Charlotte . . . . . . . .E06
Thomas, Kay . . . . . . . . . .H05
Thomas, Kim . . . . . . . . . .M31
Thomas, Ruth . . . . . . . . .H06
Thompson, Julia . . . . . . . .RT3
Thompson, Sandy . . . . . .L06
Thurber, Maggie . . . . . . . .C27
Tienken, Christopher . . . .C30
Tilley, Emmett . . . . . . . . . .C12
Tobia, Ed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . .RT1, RT2, RT3, J06, K18
Treacy, Barbara . . . . . . . . .K17
Trimble, Sally . . . . . . . . . . .I28
Trodden, James . . . . . . . .RT2
Tschannen-Moran, Bob . .H03
Tschannen-Moran, Megan . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H03
Tucker, Cindy . . . . . . . . . . .105
Tucker, Ginger . . . . . . . . . .K14
Tunnell, Kim . . . . . . . . . . .E06
Tyrrell, Marcia . . . . . . . . . .K19
Umoja, Aminata . . . . . . . .101
Unger, Jennifer . . . . . . . . .H05
Valdivia, Rebeca . . . . . . . . .J19
Valenta, Richard . . . . . . . .E08
Valle, Fernando . . . . . . . . .F18
van der Veen, Wil . . . . . . .G07
Van Houten, Lori . . . . . . .RT3
Van Wagonen, Linda . . . .D12
Vanderhye, Cecilia . . . . . . .RT1
Vandersall, Kirk . . . . . . . .D07
VandeWiele, Terri . . . . . .M29
Villani, Susan . . . . . . . . . . .I23
Villanueva, Irene . . . . . . . .J19
Villarreal, Alyssa . . . . . . . .I26
Vinci, Maureen . . . . . . . . .K03
Vires, C.J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Volk, Kathy . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Waff, Diane . . . . . . . . . . . .M15
Wagner, Teri . . . . . . . . . . .D15
Wahlstrom, Kyla . . . . . . . . .I30
Wainio, Linda . . . . . . . . . .I06
Wajida, Quintero . . . . . . . .K12
Walker, Catherine . . . . . . .C20
Wall, Leigh . . . . . . . . . . . . .I05
Waller, Becky . . . . . . . . . . .F09
Walsh, Jackie . . . . . . . . . . .K15
Walts, Kathleen . . . . . . . . .I18
Wamer, Richard . . . . . . . .RT3
Wanjala, Johnstone . . . . . .RT3
Ward, Granger . . . . . . . . . .L17
Wasilwa, Knight . . . . . . . .RT3
Watkins, Anne . . . . . . . . .H07
Watson, Syria . . . . . . . . . .M23
Weatherly, Tammy . . . . . .B02
Webb, Debra . . . . . . . . . . .I32
Webb, James . . . . . . . . . . .L24
Webb-Johnson, Gwen . . . .L01
Webb-Johnson, Tyra . . . . .L33
Wedin, Meredith . . . . . . .M06
Weigel, Kathleen . . . . . . . . L28
Weiskopf, Emily . . . . . . . . .I25
Welch, Beth . . . . . . . . . . .D10
Wells, Christopher . . . . . .RT2
Westbrook-Youngblood, Jody
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F15
Westover, Jay . . . . . . . . . . .I29
Weynand, Lu Ann . . . . . . .M33
Wheatley, Claudia . . . . . . .F07
Wheeler-Clouse, Sammye .J16
Wheeler-Fair, Martha . . . . .301
White, Catherine . . . . . . . .F11
White, Jeff . . . . . . . . . . . . .E04
White, Kathy . . . . . . . . . .M20
White, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . .I03
Whitehead, Candace .D13, L35
Whitlow, Sandy . . . . . . . . .C23
Wiedel, Patricia . . . . . . . .C20
Wiese, Ann-Marie . . . . . . .J19
Wilborn, Greg . . . . . . . . . .C22
Wilkerson, Bonnie . . . . . .RT1
Wilkinson, Susan . . . . . . .L14
Williams, Diana . . . . . . . . .F31
Williams, Ellen . . . . . . . . .G08
Williams, Fred . . . . . . . . . .C12
Williams, Linda . . . . . . . . .I27
Williams, Michel . . . . . . . .C12
Willis, Brenda . . . . . . . . . .RT3
Willis, Patricia . . . . . . . . . .L14
Wilson, Dawn . . . . . . . . . .L14
Wilson, Scott . . . . . . . . . .H06
Winebrenner, Billy . . . . . .L20
Winter, Jim . . . . . . . . . . . . .L31
Winter, Rochelle . . . . . . . . .L31
Winter, Valerie . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Witherup, Kathy . . . . . . . . .I20
Wolfe, Pat . . . . . . . . .308, D05
Wolzak, Elizabeth . . . . . . .F08
Wood, Carol Ann . . . . . . . .I22
Woods, Daniel . . . . . . . . .C29
Worrell, Gail . . . . . . . . . . .C29
Wright, Gail . . . . . . . . . . .H04
Wright, Kathy . . . . . . . . . .RT2
Wygant, Sue . . . . . . . . . . . .I30
Yarbrough, John . . . . . . . .F21
Yarbrough, Kathleen . . . . .F11
Yates, Clara . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Yawn, Dorothy . . . . . . . . .RT2
Yoder, Cynthia . . . . . . . . . .I27
Young, Keith . . . . . . . . . . .F16
Yuppa, Joyce . . . . . . . . . .M44
Zabawa, Angie . . . . . . . . . .I05
Zehner, Angie . . . . . . . . . . .I10
Zeiss, Charlene . . . . . . . .G07
Zeller, Mariel . . . . . . . . . .M54
Zicari, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . .I24
Ziegler, Corrie . . . . . . . . . .A04
Zigrossi, Sam . . . . . . . . . .C16
Zion, Shelley . . . . . . . . . . .C07
Zippin, Bette . . . . . . . . . . .L19
Zitnay, Jill . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RT1
Zolkower, Galit . . . . . . . . .B03
Zoul, Jeffrey . . . . . . .L25, M14
Zucker, Gloria . . . . . . . . .M26
Zygouris-Coe, Vicky . .D13, L35
109
D A L L A S 2 0 0 7 | A F F I L I AT E C O N TA C T S
Alabama Staff Development Council
Gloria Jemison
E-mail: [email protected]
Indiana Staff Development Council
Jetta Tarr
E-mail: [email protected]
Alaska Staff Development Council
Patricia Chesbro
E-mail: [email protected]
Iowa Staff Development Council
Linda Munger
E-mail: [email protected]
Staff Development Council of Arizona
Kristin Metler-Armijo
E-mail: [email protected]
Kansas Staff Development Council
Sandee Crowther
E-mail: [email protected]
WHO ARE THE AFFILIATES?
NSDC affiliates provide educators with the
opportunity to advance the mission and
purpose of NSDC at the local, state, and
provincial levels. Affiliate contacts want to
hear from individuals interested in getting
involved with their work. For information on
organizing an affiliate in a state or province,
please e-mail [email protected]
Kentucky Staff Development Council
Vicki Riley
E-mail: [email protected]
Louisiana Staff Development Council
Amy Allen
E-mail: [email protected]
Maryland Council of Staff Developers
Nancy Carey
E-mail: [email protected]
Arkansas Staff Development Council
Marion Woods
E-mail: [email protected]
Michigan Staff Development Council
Sam Lo Presto
E-mail: [email protected]
Staff Development Council
of British Columbia
Audrey Hobbs Johnson
E-mail: [email protected]
Minnesota Staff Development Council
Jenni Norlin-Weaver
E-mail: [email protected]
California Staff Development Council
Steven Carney
E-mail: [email protected]
Colorado Staff Development Council
Mary Ann Grenawalt
E-mail: [email protected]
Connecticut Staff Development Council
Patrice Nelson
E-mail: [email protected]
Florida Association of
Staff Development
Joyce Menz
E-mail: [email protected]
Georgia Staff Development Council
Kathy O'Neill
E-mail: [email protected]
Illinois Staff Development Council
Sallie Penman
E-mail: [email protected]
110
Mississippi Staff Development Council
Karen Burke
E-mail: [email protected]
Missouri Staff Development Council
Marcia Haskin
E-mail: [email protected]
Nebraska Staff Development Council
Karen Hayes
E-mail: [email protected]
New Hampshire Staff Development
Council
Jane Bergeron-Beaulieu
E-mail: [email protected]
New Jersey Staff Development Council
Linda Mayer
E-mail: [email protected]
New Mexico Staff Development Council
Virginia Ginn
E-mail: [email protected]
New York State Staff Development
Council
Christine Lowden
E-mail: [email protected]
North Carolina Staff Development
Council
Debbie Rollins
E-mail: [email protected]
Northern Interior Staff Development
Council
Jon Marshall
E-mail: [email protected]
Staff Development Council of Ohio
Sherri Houghton
E-mail: [email protected]
Staff Development Council of Oklahoma
Patti Cargill
E-mail: [email protected]
Staff Development Council of Ontario
Jacqueline Kemball
E-mail: [email protected]
Oregon Staff Development Council
Dawn Billings
E-mail: [email protected]
Pennsylvania Staff Development Council
Linda DeIvernois
E-mail: [email protected]
South Carolina Staff Development
Council
Marsha M. Johnson
E-mail: [email protected]
Tennessee Staff Development Council
Barry Olhausen
E-mail: [email protected]
Texas Staff Development Council
Charle Scott
E-mail: [email protected]
Utah Staff Development Council
Christine Huley
E-mail:
[email protected]
Virginia Staff Development Council
Rich Hall
E-mail: [email protected]
Wyoming Staff Development Council
Cynthia Nunley
E-mail: [email protected]
Official Travel Agency for the 2007 Annual Conference!
Special group rates offered for 10 or more traveling together
(30 day advance purchase recommended)
For Reservations:
• Call Kay at the NSDC Travel Desk - 800.445.3265
• e-mail your request to [email protected]
Include the following information in your email:
1. Name(s)
2. Departure City
3. Departure Date & Preferred Time
4. Airline Preference
5. Return Date & Preferred Time
STELLAR TRAVEL is located in Bellevue WA, is a travel agency specializing in exceptional personal
care to each traveler. Under the same local ownership for twenty years, the company is recognized
as one of the top travel businesses in the Pacific Northwest. Stellar Travel is a proud member of the
Virtuoso network of travel agencies with expert travel-planning travel consultants that specialize in
connecting travelers to the world's destinations - in the best ways possible. All Virtuoso travel
specialists take the time to get to know you so your travel requirements and expectations really
do become reality.
www.stellartravel.com
National Staff Development Council • Dallas, Texas • December 1–5, 2007
111
SAVE
50
$
on a 3-day or 5-day registration when you register by October 12!
NSDC’s
39th Annual
Conference
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:
Simon Bailey • Parker Palmer
Jennifer James • James Gilmore
Sonia Nieto • Bruce Matsui
TEXAS SCHOLARS:
Shirley Hord • Raymund Paredes
Ruben Olivarez • Gwendolyn Webb-Johnson
Dallas, Texas • Hilton Anatole Hotel
December 1-5, 2007
For more information call:
800-727-7288
National Staff
Development Council
5995 Fairfield Road, #4
Oxford, Ohio 45056
NON-PROFIT
U.S. POSTAGE
P A I D
PERMIT NO. 79
WHEELERSBURG, OH 45694