Kneeler brochure.indd - St. Columba`s Episcopal Church

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Kneeler brochure.indd - St. Columba`s Episcopal Church
Our sincere thanks to the
St. Columba
Needlepoint Stitchers
Susan Absher
Laura Anthony
Mary Claire Bond
Sally Boulter
Barbara Brincefield
Nancy Bryson
Cynthia Cathcart
Adrienne Clamp
Anne Clippinger
Sally Comiskey
Florri DeCell
Meg Spencer Dixon
Kathryn Donald
Terry Dowd
Debbie DuSault
Brian Flanagan
Marilynn Flood
Kathleen Gallagher
Beth Harrison
Linda Haslach
Betsy Hawkings
Gavin Hills
Alison Horan
Janet Ishimoto
Penny Jones
Sheila Lindveit
Ellen MacNeil
Lisa McAuliffe
Selby McPhee
Ann Peel
Shirley Putnam
Julia Robertson
Mary Sue Robson
Joan Rosenbaum
Jennifer Swift
Charles Taylor
Julie White
MJ Wiseman
Almighty God, we thank you that you have put it into the hearts of
The Dedication of the
Needlepoint Kneelers
your people to make offerings for your service, and have been pleased to
June 8, 2014
accept their gifts. Bless these kneelers we pray as they add to the beauty of
worship and reflect the design of your love as we dedicate them to you our
God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.
The best way to see the entire collection of our
needlepoint kneelers is to come to church!
deep in faith = fish
rich in worship = triquestra
open in spirit = dove
active in service = heart
More information about the Needlepoint Kneeler Project,
a complete history and a church layout of all the original
designs is available on our webpage at:
tinyurl.com/StCsNeedlepoints
4201 Albemarle Street NW n Washington, DC 20016 n 202-363-4119 n Columba.org
If the needlepoint
kneelers could talk
they would have such
a story to tell ...
They traveled far and
wide, by car, train and
airplane. They were
silent witness to
happy times and
as well as sorrow:
family vacations,
college visits and
sporting events, as
well as grave illnesses
and family tragedy.
They were stitched in
sunny rooms by picture
windows, in darkened
rooms in front of
televisions and even in
prison cells.
Our sincere thanks to the
St. Columba
Needlepoint Stitchers
Susan Absher
Laura Anthony
Mary Claire Bond
Sally Boulter
Barbara Brincefield
Nancy Bryson
Cynthia Cathcart
Adrienne Clamp
Anne Clippinger
Sally Comiskey
Florri DeCell
Meg Spencer Dixon
Kathryn Donald
Terry Dowd
Debbie DuSault
Brian Flanagan
Marilynn Flood
Kathleen Gallagher
Beth Harrison
Linda Haslach
Betsy Hawkings
Gavin Hills
Alison Horan
Janet Ishimoto
Penny Jones
Sheila Lindveit
Ellen MacNeil
Lisa McAuliffe
Selby McPhee
Ann Peel
Shirley Putnam
Julia Robertson
Mary Sue Robson
Joan Rosenbaum
Jennifer Swift
Charles Taylor
Julie White
MJ Wiseman
The dedication of the needlepoint kneelers in the Church
Nave at St. Columba’s celebrates the completion of 106
colorful and sturdy needlepoint cushions and the handiwork of 38 dedicated stitchers working more than a
decade, jointly coordinated by Sally Comiskey and
Debbie DuSault.
The needlepoint kneeler project began in 2001 when
Madeline Peeler shared the idea with some friends. A
committee soon formed comprised of Ann Peel, Sally
Comiskey, Kathryn Donald (the wife of the Rev. Jim
Donald, our rector) and Debbie DuSault. The National
Cathedral stitchers were especially helpful with the
management aspects of such a large project and how to
generate design ideas, but could not provide us with any
specific designs since the needlepoints of the Cathedral
are copyrighted and could not be shared. We also found
Almighty God, we thank you that you have put it into the hearts of
The Dedication of the
Needlepoint Kneelers
your people to make offerings for your service, and have been pleased to
June 8, 2014
accept their gifts. Bless these kneelers we pray as they add to the beauty of
worship and reflect the design of your love as we dedicate them to you our
God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.
The best way to see the entire collection of our
needlepoint kneelers is to come to church!
deep in faith = fish
rich in worship = triquestra
open in spirit = dove
active in service = heart
More information about the Needlepoint Kneeler Project,
a complete history and a church layout of all the original
designs is available on our webpage at:
tinyurl.com/StCsNeedlepoints
4201 Albemarle Street NW n Washington, DC 20016 n 202-363-4119 n Columba.org
If the needlepoint
kneelers could talk
they would have such
a story to tell ...
They traveled far and
wide, by car, train and
airplane. They were
silent witness to
happy times and
as well as sorrow:
family vacations,
college visits and
sporting events, as
well as grave illnesses
and family tragedy.
They were stitched in
sunny rooms by picture
windows, in darkened
rooms in front of
televisions and even in
prison cells.
The dedication of the needlepoint kneelers in the Church
Nave at St. Columba’s celebrates the completion of 106
colorful and sturdy needlepoint cushions and the handiwork of 38 dedicated stitchers working more than a
decade, jointly coordinated by Sally Comiskey and
Debbie DuSault.
The needlepoint kneeler project began in 2001 when
Madeline Peeler shared the idea with some friends. A
committee soon formed comprised of Ann Peel, Sally
Comiskey, Kathryn Donald (the wife of the Rev. Jim
Donald, our rector) and Debbie DuSault. The National
Cathedral stitchers were especially helpful with the
management aspects of such a large project and how to
generate design ideas, but could not provide us with any
specific designs since the needlepoints of the Cathedral
are copyrighted and could not be shared. We also found
that ecclesiastical needlepoint could
involve hiring, at considerable expense,
one of the few designers in the field,
so we chose to create our own.
In fall 2001, the group approached
Jim Donald to discuss the proposal.
He was very supportive and suggested
that we gauge what the interest in
the parish might be. As a result, over
60 people indicated their willingness
in needlepointing a kneeler, so we
proceeded with research and design.
Our committee next met with Nancy
Lukoskie, a professional needlepoint
designer, finisher and conservator,
who has worked for years on many
church projects including the National
Cathedral. Nancy is nationally known
for her work in ecclesiastical needlepoint. She recommended using the
highest quality canvas materials and
yarns in order to ensure the beauty
and longevity of the cushions. She
personally “finished” all the St.
Columba needlepoint canvases and
has been a valued friend and adviser
throughout the project.
In 2002 we began meeting weekly
to develop design ideas, and looked
into architectural and design motifs
that are a part of St. Columba’s
unique culture. While we each had
a role in creating the designs, the
overwhelming majority were the
work and inspiration of Kathryn
Donald who soon emerged as the
most talented artist among us. She
was uniquely able to adapt our ideas
to the constraints of the long and
narrow kneeler and we embraced
both her designs and spirit.
Each row of pews would have one
design, with thematic development
running from the front to back of the
church. The designs chosen came
from a variety of sources: stories from
the Bible (e.g., Creation, Fish and
Birds, Noah’s Ark, Apple Tree and
Christmas); the church’s architectural
motifs (e.g., Oak Leaves and Thistles
from the parclose and a Celtic design
from St. Columba’s robe depicted in
the stained-glass window); symbolic
floral and religious designs (e.g.,
Morning Glories, Lilies, Pomegranates
and Wheat and Grapes); symbols
of the resurrection; (e.g., Christmas
Rose; Lenten Rose and Easter Lilies)
and, as a tribute to our patron saint,
a three-part story of a pair of cranes.
With the assistance of a single
$10,000 seed money grant from the
St. Columba Fund, the group was
soon able to have the first 24 canvases
painted and prepared. We recruited
our first stitchers from the list of St.
Columbans who had initially volunteered and conducted workshops
to pass along techniques learned
from the experts. Each prospective
stitcher then successfully stitched a
“test sampler” which was independently evaluated by Nancy Lukoskie.
By April 2005 the first needlepoint
kneeler cushion was finished and
installed; an original Celtic design on
a brilliant red background adapted
from the stole in St. Columba’s
stained glass window.
The committee soon realized this
was going to be an expensive project
and looked for ways to reduce the
cost of painting the canvases. Debbie
DuSault, who had extensive needlepoint stitching experience, volunteered, taught herself the craft and
then completed painting the remaining
82 canvases on her kitchen counter
over the next several years.
As the initial seed funds were
depleted, the committee set up
displays on Sunday mornings in the
Common to apprise the parish of our
progress and sell note cards with
pictures of the completed kneelers.
The entire project has now been
funded (with the exception of our
initial $10,000 grant) by the sale of
note cards, donations and/or sponsorships of individual cushions. To
date approximately 38 of the 106
kneelers have been fully sponsored
with a donation of $1,000 each.
In the course of the kneeler project
38 needlepointers, both men and
women, volunteered to stitch 106
canvases and every canvas is a testament to their skill, their dedication
and their love for St. Columba’s. Most
stitchers were St. Columbans, while
a few were friends or relatives of St.
Columbans. Some stitchers began a
canvas and for various reasons had
to pass it along to another.
One such stitcher, when he realized
he would not be able to complete
his canvas, discovered a group of
British prison inmates advertising
their needlepointing services and
arranged to have it finished by
one of the group. This inmate was
clearly a very experienced needlepointer and he did an excellent
job. Although many of our stitchers
stopped at one canvas or part of
one canvas, several stitchers totally
embraced the project and went on
to complete several canvases, some
completing nine, ten or even more.
While the needlepoint kneeler
project was a work of great joy for
everyone involved, we suffered one
very tragic loss. Madeline Peeler,
who started and guided the project
through its early difficult days and
beyond, succumbed to cancer in
December 2009. Madeline not only
originated the idea of the needlepoint kneeler cushions, but also
led us through the research and
planning and wrote the proposals
that resulted in the initial grant from
the St. Columba Fund. Madeline was
our business manager, treasurer,
fundraiser, cheerleader and final
arbiter of taste and beauty. The
outpouring of love for Madeline and
the resulting support for this project
that was so important to her, made a
significant contribution to the funding of this project. Since Madeline’s
death Debbie DuSault and Sally
Comiskey have continued to lead
the needlepoint kneeler project and
know that she would be pleased to
see it finally completed.
that ecclesiastical needlepoint could
involve hiring, at considerable expense,
one of the few designers in the field,
so we chose to create our own.
In fall 2001, the group approached
Jim Donald to discuss the proposal.
He was very supportive and suggested
that we gauge what the interest in
the parish might be. As a result, over
60 people indicated their willingness
in needlepointing a kneeler, so we
proceeded with research and design.
Our committee next met with Nancy
Lukoskie, a professional needlepoint
designer, finisher and conservator,
who has worked for years on many
church projects including the National
Cathedral. Nancy is nationally known
for her work in ecclesiastical needlepoint. She recommended using the
highest quality canvas materials and
yarns in order to ensure the beauty
and longevity of the cushions. She
personally “finished” all the St.
Columba needlepoint canvases and
has been a valued friend and adviser
throughout the project.
In 2002 we began meeting weekly
to develop design ideas, and looked
into architectural and design motifs
that are a part of St. Columba’s
unique culture. While we each had
a role in creating the designs, the
overwhelming majority were the
work and inspiration of Kathryn
Donald who soon emerged as the
most talented artist among us. She
was uniquely able to adapt our ideas
to the constraints of the long and
narrow kneeler and we embraced
both her designs and spirit.
Each row of pews would have one
design, with thematic development
running from the front to back of the
church. The designs chosen came
from a variety of sources: stories from
the Bible (e.g., Creation, Fish and
Birds, Noah’s Ark, Apple Tree and
Christmas); the church’s architectural
motifs (e.g., Oak Leaves and Thistles
from the parclose and a Celtic design
from St. Columba’s robe depicted in
the stained-glass window); symbolic
floral and religious designs (e.g.,
Morning Glories, Lilies, Pomegranates
and Wheat and Grapes); symbols
of the resurrection; (e.g., Christmas
Rose; Lenten Rose and Easter Lilies)
and, as a tribute to our patron saint,
a three-part story of a pair of cranes.
With the assistance of a single
$10,000 seed money grant from the
St. Columba Fund, the group was
soon able to have the first 24 canvases
painted and prepared. We recruited
our first stitchers from the list of St.
Columbans who had initially volunteered and conducted workshops
to pass along techniques learned
from the experts. Each prospective
stitcher then successfully stitched a
“test sampler” which was independently evaluated by Nancy Lukoskie.
By April 2005 the first needlepoint
kneeler cushion was finished and
installed; an original Celtic design on
a brilliant red background adapted
from the stole in St. Columba’s
stained glass window.
The committee soon realized this
was going to be an expensive project
and looked for ways to reduce the
cost of painting the canvases. Debbie
DuSault, who had extensive needlepoint stitching experience, volunteered, taught herself the craft and
then completed painting the remaining
82 canvases on her kitchen counter
over the next several years.
As the initial seed funds were
depleted, the committee set up
displays on Sunday mornings in the
Common to apprise the parish of our
progress and sell note cards with
pictures of the completed kneelers.
The entire project has now been
funded (with the exception of our
initial $10,000 grant) by the sale of
note cards, donations and/or sponsorships of individual cushions. To
date approximately 38 of the 106
kneelers have been fully sponsored
with a donation of $1,000 each.
In the course of the kneeler project
38 needlepointers, both men and
women, volunteered to stitch 106
canvases and every canvas is a testament to their skill, their dedication
and their love for St. Columba’s. Most
stitchers were St. Columbans, while
a few were friends or relatives of St.
Columbans. Some stitchers began a
canvas and for various reasons had
to pass it along to another.
One such stitcher, when he realized
he would not be able to complete
his canvas, discovered a group of
British prison inmates advertising
their needlepointing services and
arranged to have it finished by
one of the group. This inmate was
clearly a very experienced needlepointer and he did an excellent
job. Although many of our stitchers
stopped at one canvas or part of
one canvas, several stitchers totally
embraced the project and went on
to complete several canvases, some
completing nine, ten or even more.
While the needlepoint kneeler
project was a work of great joy for
everyone involved, we suffered one
very tragic loss. Madeline Peeler,
who started and guided the project
through its early difficult days and
beyond, succumbed to cancer in
December 2009. Madeline not only
originated the idea of the needlepoint kneeler cushions, but also
led us through the research and
planning and wrote the proposals
that resulted in the initial grant from
the St. Columba Fund. Madeline was
our business manager, treasurer,
fundraiser, cheerleader and final
arbiter of taste and beauty. The
outpouring of love for Madeline and
the resulting support for this project
that was so important to her, made a
significant contribution to the funding of this project. Since Madeline’s
death Debbie DuSault and Sally
Comiskey have continued to lead
the needlepoint kneeler project and
know that she would be pleased to
see it finally completed.
n Debbie DuSault
& Sally Comiskey
Contact us at
[email protected]
n Debbie DuSault
& Sally Comiskey
Contact us at
[email protected]