9. Primer principio de la termodinámica. Procesos.

Comments

Transcription

9. Primer principio de la termodinámica. Procesos.
ENCUESTA ???
1. Desde el móvil,
2. Cinco minutos
3. Profesor (eu)
4. Uta Naether
5. César Magen
+2
+2
-1
-1
-1
-1
+2
-1
-1
Gas Ideal
El número de moléculas/átomos es grande.
En promedio, la separación entre moléculas es grande
Las moléculas se mueven aleatoriamente
Las leyes de Newton pueden aplicarse al movimiento de
las moléculas del gas.
Las colisiones de las moléculas entre ellas y con las
paredes del contenedor son perfectamente elásticas.
Las moléculas que componen el gas son idénticas e
indistinguibles.
PV  nRT
n: es el número de moles de gas
N
n
NA
Numero total
de moleculas
Numero de Avogadro: el numero de
atomos, moleculas, etc, en un mol de
una substancia: NA=6.02 x 1023/mol.
R: Constante de los Gases: R = 8.31 J/mol · K
Presión y Temperatura
Presión: Es el resultado macroscópico de las colisiones de las
moleculas sobre las paredes del recipiente
Pero también:
p
F
t
F
P
A
Variación del momento lineal
de las moléculas (y por 3ª Ley
de Newton, del recipiente)
Momentum: momentum given by each collision
times the number of collisions in time dt
Only molecules moving toward the surface hit
the surface. Assuming the surface is normal to
the x axis, half the molecules of speed vx move
toward the surface.
Only those close enough to the surface hit it
in time dt, those within the distance vxdt
The number of collisions hitting an area A in
time dt is
1 N 
 A  vx  dt
2 V 
Average density
The momentum given by each collision to
the surface
2mvx
Pressure:
Force:
F
P
A
dp
F
dt
Momentum in time dt:
1 N 
dp  2mv x  
 Av x dt
2 V 
Force:
Pressure:
dp
1 N 
F
 2mvx  
 A v x


dt
2 V
F N 2
P   mv x
A V
Not all molecules have the same v x  average v2x
N 2
P  mv x
V
2
vx

1 2 1 2 2 2
= v  v x  v y  vz
3
3
2
vx

1 2 1 2
= v  vrms
3
3
vrms is the root-mean-square speed
2
vrms  v 
2
vx
2
+ vy
3
2
+ vz
Pressure:
1 N 2 2 N 1 2 
P
mv 
mv




3V
3 V 2
Average Translational Kinetic Energy:
1 2 1 2
K  mv  mvrms
2
2
Pressure:
From
2 N
P   K
3 V
2
PV   N  K
3
Temperature:
and
PV  nRT
3 nRT 3
K 
  k BT
2 N
2
R
23
Boltzmann constant: k B 
 1.38  10
J/K
NA
1
2
PV


N

mv
From
rms
3
and
N
PV  nRT 
RT
NA
vrms
3RT

M
Avogadro’s number
N  nN A
Molar mass
M  mN A
Pressure  Density x Kinetic Energy
Temperature  Kinetic Energy
Internal Energy
For monatomic gas: the internal energy = sum
of the kinetic energy of all molecules:
Eint
3
3
 N  K  nN A  k BT  nRT
2
2
Eint
3
 nRT  T
2
Considera una masa m de gas ideal. Compare las curvas de p-constante, V-constante y un
proceso isotermico en diagramas (a) p-V, (b) p-T , y (c) V-T. (d) Cómo dependen estas curvas
de la masa del gas?
p
p
isobárico
isobárico
isothermal V
isothermal
isocórico
isotermico
isocórico
V
T
T
d) Masa del gas es proporcional al numero de moles:  ∝ 
Constant temperature
Constant volume
Constant pressure
pV  nRT  n
p nR

n
T V
PV  nRT
A sample of an ideal gas is taken through the cyclic process abca shown in the
figure; at point a, T = 200 K. (a) How many moles of gas are in the sample? What
are (b) the temperature of the gas at point b, (c) the temperature of the gas at point
c, and (d) the net heat added to the gas during the cycle?
Eint  Q  W
(a)
p AVA
n
 1.5 mol.
RTA
(b)
pBVB
3
TB 
 1.8  10 K
nR
(c)
pCVC
2
TC 
 6.0  10 K
nR
(d) Cyclic process  ∆Eint = 0
b
7.5
2.5
PV  nRT
a
c
1.0
3.0
Volume (m3)
Q = W = Enclosed Area= 0.5 x 2m2 x 5x103Pa = 5.0 x 103 J
Heat In
• Temperature change is due to heat (Q).
– If an object’s temperature increases it gains heat.
– If an object’s temperature decreases it loses heat.
Heat into a system
T1 ,U1
T2 ,U 2
Q  T
Capacidad calorífica
• The ratio of the change in heat to the change
in temperature is the heat capacity (C).
– Depends on material
– Depends on the mass
– Measured in J/K
Q  CT
Specific Heat
• The ratio of the change in heat to
the change in temperature is the
heat capacity (C).
– Depends on material
– independent of the mass
– Measured in J/kg-K
Q  mcT
Material
Specific heat
Mercury 140 J/kg-K
Copper
390 J/kg-K
Steel
500 J/kg-K
Granite
840 J/kg-K
Aluminum
900 J/kg-K
Wood
1400 J/kg-K
Ice
2100 J/kg-K
Water
4200 J/kg-K
Equilibrium Temperature
• Two systems in thermal contact will adjust to reach
the same temperature - thermal equilibrium
• If they are thermally insulated, all the heat goes
from the hot system to the cold system.
1
2
m1c1T1  m2c2 T2  0
JOULE
PRIMERA LEY
PRIMERA LEY
The First Law of Thermodynamics
First Law of Thermodynamics → Conservation of Energy:
Energy can be changed from one form to another, but it cannot be
created or destroyed. The total amount of energy and matter in the
Universe remains constant, merely changing from one form to
another.
The First Law of Thermodynamics (Conservation) states that energy is always
conserved, it cannot be created or destroyed. In essence, energy can be
converted from one form into another.
The energy balance of a system –as a consequence of FLT- is a powerful tool to
analyze the interchanges of energy between the system and its environment.
We need to define the concept of internal energy of the system, Eint as an
energy stored in the system.
Warning: It is no correct to say that a system has a large amount of heat or a
great amount of work
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookEner1.html
The First Law of Thermodynamics. Application to a particular case:
A gas confined in a cylinder with a movable piston. Internal Energy
Internal Energy for an Ideal Gas.
Only depends on the temperature of the
gas, and not of its volume or pressure
What is the value of the internal energy for
the gas in the cylinder?
Experiment: Free expansion.
For a gas at low density – an ideal gas-, a free
expansion does not change the temperature of the gas.
If heat is added at constant volume, no work
is done, so the heat added equals the
increase of thermal energy
Eint  Qin
Qin  CV T
and
dEint  CV dT  n cV dT
Internal Energy is a state function, i.e. it is not dependent on the process, only it
depends of the initial and final temperature
A gas confined in a cylinder with a movable piston. Heat
Heat transferred to a system
If heat is added at constant pressure
the heat energy transferred will be used
to expand the substance and to increase
the internal energy.
QP  CP T
QP  CP dT
If the substance expands, it does work
on its surroundings.
Applying the First Law of Thermodynamics
If heat is added at constant volume,
no work is done, so the heat added
equals the increase of thermal energy
Qin,V  CV dT  n cV dT
Qin,V  CV T  n cV T
dEint  QP  Won  CP dT  PdV
PdV  (CP  CV ) dT
as d ( PV )  PdV  dP V
and P  const  dP 0
CP  CV  n R
The expansion is usually negligible for solids and liquids, so
for them CP ~ CV.
The First Law of Thermodynamics. Application to a particular case:
A gas confined in a cylinder with a movable piston
Heat transferred to a system. A summary
Heat energy can be added (or lost) to the system. The value of the heat
energy transferred depends of the process.
Typical processes are
- At constant volume
QV  CV T ; QV  CV dT
- At constant pressure
QP  CP T ; QP  CP dT
For the case of ideal gas
CP  CV  n R
From the Kinetic theory,
for monoatomic gases
for biatomic gases
Relationship of Mayer
3
3
J
CV  n R;  cV  R  12.47
2
2
mol K
5
5
J
CV  n R  cV  R  20.79
2
2
mol K
For solids and liquids, as the expansion at constant pressure is usually
negligible CP ~ CV.
Adiabatic: A process in which no heat flows into or out of a system is
called an adiabatic process. Such a process can occur when the system is
extremely well insulated or when the process happens very quickly.
The First Law of Thermodynamics. Application to a particular case:
A gas confined in a cylinder with a movable piston. Work
Work done on the system, Won , is the energy transferred as work to the system.
When this energy is added to the system its value will be positive.
The work done on the gas in an
expansion is
V2
Won gas    P dV
V1
Won gas  Wby gas
P- V diagrams
Constant pressure
V2
Won gas   P dV  P(V1  V2 )
V1
If 5 L of an ideal gas at a pressure of 2 atm is cooled
so that it contracts at constant pressure until its
volume is 3 l, what is the work done on the gas?
[405.2 J]
The First Law of Thermodynamics. P-V diagrams
P- V diagrams
Conecting an initial state and a final state
by three paths
Isothermal
V2
Constant pressure
Constant Volume
Constant Temperature
Won gas   P dV  P(V1  V2 )
V1
V2
Won gas   P dV  0
V1
V2
Won gas   
V1
n RT
V2
dV  n R T ln
V
V1
The First Law of Thermodynamics
A biatomic ideal gas undergoes a cycle starting at
point A (2 atm, 1L). Process from A to B is an
expansion at constant pressure until the volume is 2.5
L, after which is cooled at constant volume until its
pressure is 1 atm. It is then compressed at constant
pressure until the volume is again 1L, after which it is
heated at constant volume until it is back in its original
state. Find (a) the work, heat and change of internal
energy in each process (b) the total work done on the
gas and the total heat added to it during the cycle.
A system consisting of 0.32 mol of a monoatomic ideal gas
occupies a volume of 2.2 L, at a pressure of 2.4 atm.
The system is carried through a cycle consisting:
1. The gas is heated at constant pressure until its volume
is 4.4L.
2. The gas is cooled at constant volume until the pressure
decreased to 1.2 atm
3. The gas undergoes an isothermal compression back to
initial point.
(a) What is the temperature at points A, B and C
(b) Find W, Q and ΔEint for each process and for the entire
cycle
The First Law of Thermodynamics. Processes. P-V Diagrams
Adiabatic Processes. No heat flows into or out of the system
The First Law of Thermodynamics. Processes. P-V Diagrams
Adiabatic Processes. No heat flows into or out of the system
Qin  0
Adiabatic process
then Eint  Won,adiabatic  n cV T
The equation of curve describing the adiabatic
process is
CP
P V  const;  
CV
T V  1  const
T  P1  const

A quantity of air is compressed adiabatically
and quasi-statically from an initial pressure of
1 atm and a volume of 4 L at temperature of
20ºC to half its original volume. Find (a) the
final pressure, (b) the final temperature and (c)
the work done on the gas.
cP = 29.19 J/(mol•K); cV = 20.85 J/(mol•K).
M=28.84 g
adiabatic
coefficien t
We can use the ideal gas to rewrite
the work done on the gas in an
adiabatic process in the form
Won gas,adiab 
Pf V f  Pi Vi
 1
The First Law of Thermodynamics. Processes. P-V Diagrams
A polytropic process is a thermodynamic process that obeys the relation:
PVn = C,
where P is pressure, V is volume, n is any real number (the polytropic index), and C is a
constant. This equation can be used to accurately characterize processes of certain systems,
notably the compression or expansion of a gas, but in some cases, possibly liquids and
solids.
For certain indices n, the process will be synonymous with other processes:
if n = 0, then PV0=P=const and it is an isobaric process (constant pressure)
if n = 1, then for an ideal gas PV= const and it is an isothermal process (constant
temperature)
if n = γ = cp/cV, then for an ideal gas it is an adiabatic process (no heat transferred)
if n = ∞ , then it is an isochoric process (constant volume)
The First Law of Thermodynamics.
Cyclic Processes. P-V Diagrams
Two moles of an ideal monoatomic gas have an initial pressure P1 = 2 atm and an initial
volume V1 = 2 L. The gas is taken through the following quasi-static cycle:
A.- It is expanded isothermally until it has a volume V2 = 4 L.
B.- It is then heated at constant volume until it has a pressure P3= 2 atm
C.- It is then cooled at constant pressure until it is back to its initial state.
(a) Show this cycle on a PV diagram. (b) Calculate the head added and the work done by
the gas during each part of the cycle. (c) Find the temperatures T1, T2, T3
Solve the above problem considering the STEP A is an adiabatic
expansion. Determine the efficiency of the both cycles. Determine the
efficiency of a Carnot cycle operating between the temperature extremes
of the both cycles..
The First Law of Thermodynamics.
Cyclic Processes. P-V Diagrams
The First Law of Thermodynamics.
Cyclic Processes. P-V Diagrams
At point D in figure the pressure and temperature of
2 mol of an ideal monoatomic gas are 2 atm and
360 K. The volume of the gas at point B on the PV
diagram is three times that at point D and its
pressure is twice that a point C. Paths AB and DC
represent isothermal processes. The gas is carried
through a complete cycle along the path DABCD.
Determine the total work done by the gas and the
heat supplied to the gas along each portion of the
cycle
The First Law of Thermodynamics.
Cyclic Processes. P-V Diagrams
The First Law of Thermodynamics.
Cyclic Processes. P-V Diagrams
PROCESOS
TERMODINÁMICOS
PV = nRT
   = −
Eint  Qin  Won
dEint  Qin  Won
2
1
 
PV = nRT
Wgas = P V = area under a PV graph
Try calculating the work done by the gas in
this isobaric expansion
P = 1.01 x 105 Pa , Vi = .7 m3, Vf = 1.3 m3
W = P V = (1.01 x 105 N/m2)( .6 m3)= 60600 J
What if the arrow were switched and it was
an isobaric compression?
W = P V = (1.01 x 105 N/m2)(- .6 m3)= - 60600 J
Net work = 0
+W
-W
Name the process A to B
Isobaric expansion
How much work is done?
W= PV=Po (3Vo) = 3PoVo
Name the process B to C
Isochoric loss of pressure
How much work is done?
W= PV=Po 0 = 0
Name the process C to A
Contraction
How much work is done? W= PV=can’t be done because P is changing
W = estimate of area under curve = 4.5 boxes
4.5 boxes (1 box = ½ PoVo) = -2.25 PoV0
Net Work done in cycle = 3PoVo +0 + -2.25 PoVo= + .75 PoVo
Net Work done in cycle = 3PoVo +0 + -2.25 PoVo= + .75 PoVo
Do you see a shortcut?
Get the area of the enclosed triangle
W= ½ bh = ½ 3Vo (½ Po) = ¾ PoVo
So for any closed cycle, the net work done
is the area enclosed .
For an open cycle
(where you don’t return to the P, V, T you started at)
the work done is the sum of the areas under the
curve
A.k.a
isochoric
When a gas expands adiabatically, the work done in the expansion comes
at the expense of the internal energy of the gas causing the temperature
of the gas to drop. The figure below shows P-V diagrams for these two
processes.
U = Won + Q into
Which process
resulted in a
higher
temperature?
Thus the adiabat lies below the isotherm.
In the end, the internal energy of a gas depends only on its
temperature, assuming PVT changes only.
Chemical or phase changes could change PE of molecules, but we
don’t deal with that in this course.
U =  KEint +  PE int = (3/2) nkT
CUANDO EL SISTEMA REGRESA A LOS
P,V
INICIALES
CICLOS TERMODINÁMICOS
CICLOS TERMODINÁMICOS: CUANDO EL
SISTEMA REGRESA A LOS
P
P
P
V
P,V INICIALES
V
V
Como PV = nRT, esto significa que el sistema TAMBIÉN retorna a
la misma T. Entonces U = 0, y la primera ley se reduce a……….
Esto significa que W = - Q y el trabajo se pierde/gana como calor.
El Trabajo es el Area bajo la curva en el ciclo PV.
CICLO DE CARNOT
Este ciclo se compone de cuatros procesos reversibles los cuales son:


Dos procesos isotérmicos
Dos procesos adiabáticos
Estos se dan en un sistema cerrado o como un fluido estacionario (en cilindro-embolo adiabático)
CICLO DE CARNOT
Proceso 1-2, expansión isotérmica reversible: inicialmente la temperatura del gas
y la cabeza del cilindro están en contacto a una temperatura, cuando el gas se
expande lentamente y da como resultado un trabajo.
Como la diferencia de temperaturas del gas y el nunca exceden una cantidan
diferencial de temperatura se le conoce como proceso reversible de calor.
Procesos 2-3, expansión adiabática reversible:
En el estado 2, el deposito que se mantuvo en contacto con la cabeza del cilindro se
elimina y se reemplazan por aislamiento para que el sistema se vuelva adiabático y el
gas continua expandiéndose lentamente realizando un trabajo hasta que la
temperatura disminuye.
Proceso 3-4, compresión isotérmica reversible:
En este estado se retira el aislamiento de la cabeza del cilindro y se pone a
este en contacto con un sumidero a una temperatura constante, despues
se produce una fuerza que empuja al cilindro hacia el interior,
realizando trabajo sobre el gas, a medida que este gas se comprime su
temperatura se incrementa, pero tan pronto como aumente esta el calor
se transfieres desde el gas hasta el sumidero llegando al estado 4.
Proceso 4-1, compresión adiabática reversible:
Cuando se elimina el deposito de baja temperatura se coloca un aislamiento sobre
la cabeza del cilindro comprimiendo al gas de una manera reversible por lo que
vuelve a si estado inicial.
CICLO DE CARNOT
CICLO DE OTTO
Este es un ciclo ideal para maquinas de encendido por chispa, en la mayoría
de las maquinas de encendido por chispa el embolo ejecuta cuatro tiempos
completos ( dos ciclos mecánicos) dentro del cilindro y el cigüeñal da dos
revoluciones por cada ciclo termodinámico por lo que son llamadas
maquinas de combustión interna de cuatro tiempos.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-udN4cZ6HU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaIGmPQYUOs
Las fases de operación de este motor son las siguientes:
 Admisión (1): El pistón baja con la válvula de admisión abierta, aumentando
la cantidad de mezcla (aire + combustible) en la cámara. Esto se modela
como una expansión a presión constante (ya que al estar la válvula abierta
la presión es igual a la exterior). En el diagrama PV aparece como la línea
recta E→A.
 Compresión (2): El pistón sube comprimiendo la mezcla. Dada la velocidad
del proceso se supone que la mezcla no tiene posibilidad de intercambiar
calor con el ambiente, por lo que el proceso es adiabático. Se modela como
la curva adiabática reversible A→B, aunque en realidad no lo es por la
presencia de factores irreversibles como la fricción. Combustión Con el
pistón en su punto más alto, salta la chispa de la bujía. El calor generado
en la combustión calienta bruscamente el aire, que incrementa su
temperatura a volumen prácticamente constante (ya que al pistón no le ha
dado tiempo a bajar). Esto se representa por una isócora B→C. Este paso
es claramente irreversible, pero para el caso de un proceso isócoro en un
gas ideal el balance es el mismo que en uno reversible.


Expansión (3): La alta temperatura del gas empuja al pistón hacia abajo,
realizando trabajo sobre él. De nuevo, por ser un proceso muy rápido se
aproxima por una curva adiabática reversible C→D.
Escape (4) Se abre la válvula de escape y el gas sale al exterior, empujado
por el pistón a una temperatura mayor que la inicial, siendo sustituido por la
misma cantidad de mezcla fría en la siguiente admisión. El sistema es
realmente abierto, pues intercambia masa con el exterior. No obstante,
dado que la cantidad de aire que sale y la que entra es la misma podemos,
para el balance energético, suponer que es el mismo aire, que se ha
enfriado. Este enfriamiento ocurre en dos fases. Cuando el pistón está en
su punto más bajo, el volumen permanece aproximadamente constante y
tenemos la isócora D→A. Cuando el pistón empuja el aire hacia el exterior,
con la válvula abierta, empleamos la isobara A→E, cerrando el ciclo.


Expansión (3): La alta temperatura del gas empuja al pistón hacia abajo,
realizando trabajo sobre él. De nuevo, por ser un proceso muy rápido se
aproxima por una curva adiabática reversible C→D.
Escape (4) Se abre la válvula de escape y el gas sale al exterior, empujado
por el pistón a una temperatura mayor que la inicial, siendo sustituido por la
misma cantidad de mezcla fría en la siguiente admisión. El sistema es
realmente abierto, pues intercambia masa con el exterior. No obstante,
dado que la cantidad de aire que sale y la que entra es la misma podemos,
para el balance energético, suponer que es el mismo aire, que se ha
enfriado. Este enfriamiento ocurre en dos fases. Cuando el pistón está en
su punto más bajo, el volumen permanece aproximadamente constante y
tenemos la isócora D→A. Cuando el pistón empuja el aire hacia el exterior,
con la válvula abierta, empleamos la isobara A→E, cerrando el ciclo.
E-A: admisión a presión constante (renovación de la carga).
A-B: comprensión de los gases es adiabática.
B-C: combustión, aporte de calor a volumen constante. La presión se eleva
rápidamente antes de comenzar el tiempo útil.
C-D: fuerza, expansión adiabática o parte del ciclo que entrega trabajo.
D-A: Escape, cesión del calor residual al ambiente a volumen constante.
A-E: Escape, vaciado de la cámara a presión constante (renovación de la carga).
CICLO DIESEL

Es el ciclo ideal para las maquinas de encendido
por comprensión, (conocidos como motores diesel),
esto se debe a la mezcla de aire y de combustible
que se comprimen hasta tener una temperatura
inferior a la temperatura de auto-encendido del
combustible, y el proceso de combustión se inicia
al encender una bujía.



Admisión E→A El pistón baja con la válvula de admisión
abierta, aumentando la cantidad de aire en la cámara. Esto
se modela como una expansión a presión constante (ya que
al estar la válvula abierta la presión es igual a la exterior).
En el diagrama PV aparece como una recta horizontal.
Compresión A→B El pistón sube comprimiendo el aire.
Dada la velocidad del proceso se supone que el aire no tiene
posibilidad de intercambiar calor con el ambiente, por lo
que el proceso es adiabático. Se modela como la curva
adiabática reversible A→B, aunque en realidad no lo es por
la presencia de factores irreversibles como la fricción.
Combustión B→C Un poco antes de que el pistón llegue a
su punto más alto y continuando hasta un poco después de
que empiece a bajar, el inyector introduce el combustible en
la cámara. Al ser de mayor duración que la combustión en
el ciclo Otto, este paso se modela como una adición de calor
a presión constante. Éste es el único paso en el que el ciclo
Diesel se diferencia del Otto.
CICLO BRAYTON
Se utiliza turbinas de gas donde los procesos tanto de combustión
como de expansión suceden en una maquina rotatoria, consiste en
introducir aire fresco en condiciones ambiente dentro del
compresor dando como resultado que su presión y la temperatura
aumente ese aire sigue hacia la cámara de combustion donde el
combustible se que a combustión constante.
Los gases que entran a la turbina se expanden hasta alcanzar la
presión atmosférica, esto provoca que sean expulsados afuera de
ese ciclo.
El ciclo ideal que el fluido de trabajo experimenta en este ciclo cerrado
es el ciclo Brayton, que esta integrado por cuatro proceso
internamente reversibles:
1-2 compresión adiabática (en un compresor)
2-3 Adición de calor a P=constante
3-4 Expansión adiabática (en una turbina)
4-1 Rechazo de calor a P=constante
FIN

Similar documents