View in Full Screen Mode

Comments

Transcription

View in Full Screen Mode
LOCAL NEWS: Dickinson Board of Governors appoints CEO, Page 6
Afternoon t-storms
PLAYER OF
THE NIGHT
High of
81˚
Cole Peterson was
named NYCBL Player of
the Night on Saturday..
SEE PAGE 7
Monday
August 1, 2016
SECOND IN
THE STATE
Pirates lose
The Minor softball team
am
ended their run as thee
second place team inn
the state.
SEE PAGE 7
St. Marys, Pennsylvania
50¢ Vol. 106
Drafting of
'Home Rule'
charter slated
in Highland
Township
By Ted Lutz
Staff Writer
JAMES CITY – A proposed "Home Rule" charter will be drafted for
Highland Township.
The township's volunteer Government Study
Commission agreed Sunday to draft "Home Rule"
regulations to replace the
current state code that
guides the township government.
The decision came
after a 95-minute public
hearing at the township
building in James City.
The
seven-member
commission is hoping to
complete work on the
"Home Rule" charter in
time for the document to
go before township voters
at the Nov. 8 general election.
A majority of township voters must approve
the
proposed
"Home
Rule" charter before it
takes effect.
John "JP" Guras,
chairman of the commission, made a motion
Sunday to move ahead
with plans to draft a
The Pirates lost to the
Brewers 4-2 on Sunday as
Milwaukee swept the series.
SEE PAGE 7
smdailypress.com
No. 146
19 cases listed for August jury selection
By Richie Lecker
Staff Writer
RIDGWAY – Online court
documents show that 19 cases
are currently scheduled for call
of the list and jury selection for
August within the Elk County
Court of Common Pleas.
Call of the list represents the
last date that a defendant may
ask the court to consider a negotiated plea from the Elk County
District Attorney’s Office.
For August, call of the list
for each of the defendants will
occur today during the monthly
return day.
A defendant can enter a
guilty plea after their call of the
list appearance has passed, but
the sentence will be purely up to
the discretion of the court.
If no plea is entered in their
case, each defendant will proceed to jury selection on Aug. 8.
The following individuals
are listed for call of the list and
jury selection.
Damian Tristan Annis of St.
Marys is facing a misdemeanor
charge of theft by unlawful taking – movable property. Bail was
set at $5,000 monetary.
Jamie Ray Baird of Ridgway
is facing four misdemeanor driving under the influence (DUI)
charges. This is listed as his
first DUI offense. Bail was set
at $2,500 unsecured.
Karissa Alexandria Burt
of Kane is facing three felony
aggravated assault charges, a
misdemeanor recklessly endangering another person charge,
three misdemeanor simple assault charges, two misdemeanor
disorderly conduct – engage in
fighting charges, two summary
offenses of harassment – subject
other to physical contact and a
summary offense of criminal
Photo by Amy Cherry
$10-9 Holes
With Cart
$18-18 Holes
With Cart
So. Michael Rd.
St. Marys
834-7888
CALL
ST. MARYS - 781-6065
RIDGWAY - 776-6125
NEW LISTING - 1109 S. MICHAEL RD
$179,900
Tasting in the Wilds, a wine, beer, food and art festival celebrating the tastes of the PA Wilds, took place Saturday at the
Ridgway Firemen’s Carnival Grounds. The annual event is the largest fundraiser for the Ridgway Heritage Council and
featured an array of wineries and breweries offering tastings of their products. Live bands, various food vendors and a
homemade wine and beer contest were also part of the event which ran from 12:30-6:30 p.m. Among the art vendors at
this year’s Tasting in the Wilds event were KP McClard Photography owned by Kathleen Prosperi-McClard of Kane shown
on the left, and Cheryl Oknefski, owner of Peaces of Me in Ridgway, shown on the right.
Search here www.anderson-kime.com
for your new home!
JOHNSONBURG – The following individuals are among
those that have recently had cases presented before Magisterial
District Judge James L. Martin
in District Court 59-2-02.
Angeline Garnet Milliard of
Ridgway was waived for court
on a felony charge of retail theft
- take merchandise and a summary offense of public drunkenness
and similar misconduct. Bail was
set at $10,000 monetary. Unable
to post bail, Milliard was confined
in the Elk County Prison.
Jesse Adam Day of Kersey
had a summary offense of harassment - course of conduct with no
legitimate purpose moved to nontraffic court.
Anthony Stephen Papa of
Ridgway was waived for court
on a felony charge of criminal
trespass - enter a structure, and
misdemeanor charges of defiant
trespass, terroristic threats with
intent to terrorize another and
harassment - subject other to
physical contact. Bail was set at
See Cases, Page 3
Women Who Care grant applications available
Women Who Care (WWC), a
project of the Elk County Community Foundation, announced that
their grant applications are now
available with a deadline for submission by Aug 15.
WWC is a women’s giving
circle, it its seventh year, and this
year will be granting $24,000. Last
year awards brought their overall
total since inception to $103,000.
The 2015 awards went to the
Boys and Girls Club, Community
Nurses, Inc., Guardian Angels,
Johnsonburg Borough, and the
City of St. Marys Memorial Park.
Women Who Care has a membership of slightly over 200 women
from Elk County.
The purpose of the Women
Who Care organization is to
strengthen the local communities
by engaging and educating women in philanthropy and issues that
are important to families. The
membership dues and fundraising
effort for this year grants will be
distributed to various local charitable organizations through a
grant application process. Eightyfive percent of the funds collected
will be awarded each year.
The granting dollars available for this granting cycle will be
$24,000.
Eligible awards will be limited to nonprofit organizations with
current 501(c) 3 status, schools or
municipalities who serve the residents of Elk County.
Requests must not duplicate
the work of other local organizations, and must reflect sustainability and/or other ongoing support. Awards will be given up to
$5,000.
Top grant applications will
be presented to the full members
See Applications, Page 2
Photo submitted
Shown is St. Marys Playland after the renovations that one of the grants from last
year funded.
Rainy weather did not dampen Saturday's park events
By Becky Polaski
Staff Writer
NEW LISTING - 735 CENTER ST
$115,000
See Jury, Page 2
Various cases
presented
before Martin
Annual Tasting in the Wilds
See Rule, Page 6
Wednesday
Special
mischief – damage to property.
Bail was set at $10,000 unsecured.
Jeremiah Edward Bucher of
St. Marys is facing three felony
arson charges, a felony charge
or false, fraudulent, or incomplete insurance claim, a felony
charge of criminal mischief, and
a misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct. Bail was set at
$30,000 unsecured.
Joseph Alan Davis of St.
Marys is facing a misdemeanor
The thought of programs at
area parks typically brings to
mind outdoor events that require
dry weather. However, occasionally staffs at the local parks do
schedule indoor events as well.
Coincidentally, both Memorial
Park and Benzinger Park both
had such events on their schedules for Saturday, and it ended up
providing area youth with the opportunity to still get out and have
a good time despite the rainy
weather.
Memorial Park staff hosted a
NBA2k16 video game tournament
in the park's scout house, and it
was attended by roughly 10 individuals. Two video game consoles
were set up on opposite sides of
the building so that players could
compete against each other without interruption. Those who were
not actively playing at the time
gathered around to watch, and
park staff indicated that many of
the games had been close.
Across town at Benzinger
Park, staff members held a ping
pong tournament during the afternoon. Seven players turned out
for the event, which was held in
the park pavilion. Two ping pong
tables were set up to allow games
to take place concurrently.
See Park, Page 2
Photo by Becky Polaski
Participants are shown competing in the ping pong tournament at Benzinger Park
on Saturday afternoon.
2
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
www.smdailypress.com
3-Day Forecast for St. Marys
TODAY
The Nation
TONIGHT
TUESDAY
81°
84°
57°
59°
An afternoon t-storm in spots
Precipitation
A thunderstorm in spots early
Partly sunny
Regional Weather Today
Erie
81/65
High ................................................ 75°
Low ................................................ 65°
Normal high ................................... 79°
Normal low .................................... 58°
Record high ....................... 90° in 1988
Record low ........................ 45° in 1968
Jamestown
76/59
Saturday ...................................... 0.24"
Month to date .............................. 1.93"
Year to date ............................... 19.27"
Normal year to date ................... 25.57"
Warren
80/60
Kane
79/57
Corry
79/62
Precipitation
Meadville
80/61
Cleveland
83/65
Sunrise today .......................
Sunset tonight ......................
Moonrise today ....................
Moonset today .....................
6:09 a.m.
8:31 p.m.
4:54 a.m.
7:32 p.m.
Youngstown
81/59
Full
Canton
84/62
Last
City
Hi
Albuquerque 89
Asheville
83
Atlanta
90
Atlantic CIty 84
Baltimore
88
Billings
89
Birmingham
92
Boise
96
Boston
75
Burlington, VT 73
Charleston, SC 92
Charlotte
90
Chicago
84
Cincinnati
87
Dallas
98
Denver
94
Des Moines
86
Helena
90
Honolulu
88
Houston
94
Indianapolis
86
Jacksonville
93
Kansas City
93
Las Vegas
105
Los Angeles
82
Lo
67
65
72
73
69
60
74
65
67
62
76
69
68
66
78
61
75
55
75
76
69
72
75
86
67
Aug 10
Aug 18
Aug 24
Indiana
82/63
Pittsburgh
82/63
State College
82/63
Today
Hi
84
84
81
88
84
76
77
81
84
87
83
85
Lo
65
62
63
69
61
62
55
64
62
66
65
66
W
t
pc
pc
t
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
s
s
Today
W
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
City
Coudersport
Detroit
DuBois
Franklin
Fredonia
Grove City
Harrisburg
Ithaca
Jamestown
Johnstown
Lancaster
Lewisburg
Hi
79
85
81
79
81
81
83
79
76
78
83
85
Lo
59
66
61
59
60
60
70
60
59
63
66
65
W
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
Tue.
Hi
82
87
84
82
84
85
86
79
79
80
82
85
Lo
58
71
61
59
63
60
66
59
61
62
62
62
Today
W
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
City
Hi
Memphis
93
Miami
91
Milwaukee
81
Minneapolis
85
Nashville
92
New Orleans 91
New York
80
Norfolk
90
North Platte
95
Oklahoma City 96
Orlando
95
Phoenix
102
Providence
80
Raleigh
90
Rapid City
91
Reno
98
Sacramento
93
St. Louis
90
Salt Lake City 99
San Francisco 72
Seattle
80
Tampa
92
Topeka
96
Tucson
91
Wichita
99
Lo
76
80
68
73
73
79
69
74
65
72
76
84
65
71
58
64
59
77
75
55
58
78
75
75
75
Tue.
W
t
pc
pc
pc
t
t
t
pc
pc
s
t
c
r
pc
pc
s
s
pc
t
pc
pc
t
s
t
s
Hi
93
90
84
87
91
92
80
87
91
98
94
97
77
90
90
97
94
96
101
70
72
92
97
88
100
City
London
Mansfield
Meadville
Morgantown
New Castle
Niagara Falls
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Punxsutawney
Rochester
Scranton
Smethport
Hi
84
82
80
83
84
84
86
82
82
79
81
78
Lo
60
60
61
65
59
65
71
63
62
63
66
57
Tue.
W
s
pc
pc
pc
pc
s
t
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
Hi
85
83
85
86
88
87
82
86
85
83
81
81
Lo
59
57
63
62
60
66
69
63
62
62
63
56
Today
W
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
Detroit
85/66
Minneapolis
85/73
Lo
77
79
71
67
74
79
68
73
64
72
76
80
62
70
66
60
58
78
77
54
58
78
73
73
75
W
t
t
r
t
t
t
pc
pc
s
s
t
pc
pc
pc
pc
s
s
t
pc
pc
pc
t
s
t
pc
City
Hi
State College 82
Syracuse
78
Toronto
83
Washington, DC 91
Wellsboro
81
Wheeling
84
Williamsport 85
Wilkes-Barre 83
Youngstown
81
Lo
63
62
63
74
60
65
65
67
59
W
pc
r
s
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
Tue.
Hi
83
79
85
88
82
87
85
83
85
Lo
61
64
64
72
59
66
61
63
61
W
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain,
sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
New York
80/69
Chicago
84/68
Denver
94/61
San Francisco
72/55
Lo
61
60
64
66
63
62
56
65
65
70
68
70
Today
W
t
pc
t
pc
pc
pc
t
s
pc
pc
t
pc
r
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
s
pc
r
t
s
pc
pc
Seattle
80/58
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures
are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.
Tue.
Hi
82
84
84
87
88
76
80
85
87
87
87
88
Lo
67
63
72
71
66
66
74
56
65
63
74
69
72
70
79
64
75
58
76
76
73
73
75
86
65
Billings
89/60
Regional Forecast
City
Allentown
Altoona
Ashtabula
Baltimore
Beaver Falls
Binghamton
Bradford
Buffalo
Canton
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbus
Hi
88
85
93
80
87
96
93
95
76
78
93
91
86
87
100
91
93
97
88
95
86
94
95
107
80
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are
highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.
Altoona
84/62
Aug 2
Tue.
W
t
t
t
t
t
s
t
s
r
r
t
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
s
sh
pc
pc
t
pc
pc
pc
National Outlook
DuBois
81/61
New Castle
84/59
Moon Phases
Coudersport
79/59
St. Marys
81/59
Ridgway
81/60
Oil City
81/61
Sun and Moon
First
87°
63°
Partly sunny
Statistics for Saturday
Temperature
New
Today
WEDNESDAY
Washington
91/74
Kansas City
93/75
Los Angeles
82/67
Atlanta
90/72
El Paso
96/73
Fronts
Houston
94/76
Miami
91/80
Cold
Precipitation
Warm
Showers
Stationary
-10s
-0s
0s
10s
20s
T-storms
30s
40s
Rain
50s
Flurries
60s
70s
Snow
80s
90s
Ice
100s 110s
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016
Jury
Continued from Page 1
charge of simple assault
and a summary offense
of harassment – subject
other to physical contact.
His bail was set at $3,000
unsecured.
Jamie Lee Desantis
of Ridgway is facing felony charges of burglary
– not adapted for overnight
accommodation
– no person present and
criminal trespass – break
into structure. Misdemeanor charges of other
reason access devise is
unauthorized by issuer,
theft by unlawful taking
– movable property, and
receiving stolen property
are also pending. Bail
was set at $5,000 monetary.
Howard Locke Detterline of St. Marys is
facing felony charges of
conspiracy – theft by unlawful taking – movable
property and receiving
stolen property. Bail was
set at $10,000 monetary.
William Charles Dilley of St. Marys is facing
felony charges of bur-
glary – overnight accommodation with no person
present, theft by unlawful taking – movable
property and receiving
stolen property. Bail was
set at $5,000 unsecured.
Brian Lee Duttry of
DuBois is facing a felony
charge of possession of
firearm prohibited. Bail
was set at 10 percent of
$20,000 monetary.
Gina Marie Hayes of
St. Marys is facing felony charges of burglary
– overnight accommodation – person present and
criminal trespass – enter
structure. Misdemeanor
charges of theft by unlawful taking – movable
property and receiving
stolen property are also
pending. Bail was set at
$5,000 unsecured.
Daniel S. Hushon
of Bradford is facing a
misdemeanor charge of
aggravated assault by
vehicle.
Misdemeanor
charges of recklessly
endangering
another
person and summary of-
Applications
Continued from Page 1
SEALCOATING
THE DRIVEWAY COMPANY
Dalton Sheasley Scott Pine
Operating Manager
Owner
Hot Tar Crack Filling
Line Painting
814-389-2373
814-772-8706
FREE ESTIMATES
Continued from Page 1
Š
6/LJKWQHU5G
3RUW&OLQWRQ2+
2QO\PLQXWHVZHVWRI&HGDU3RLQW
em
en
ATTENTION
t
Daily Press Customers
Our paper is temporarily being printed
in an alternate location the week of
August 1st through August 6th.
PLEASE EXPECT A DELAYED
DELIVERY DURING THIS TIME.
Thank you for your patience
and continued support of your
local newspaper.
orc
would like to host another
video game tournament.
Information on upcoming park programs can
be found online at www.
smrecreation.com.
Enf
While Benzinger Park
staff said they did not have
any additional ping pong
tournaments planned for
this summer, Memorial
Park staff indicated they
robbery – threat immediate serious injury, and a
misdemeanor charge of
conspiracy – theft by unlawful taking – movable
property. Bail was set at
$25,000 unsecured.
Dustin Lee Stark is
facing felony charges of
conspiracy – theft by unlawful taking – movable
property, and theft by unlawful taking – movable
property. Bail was set at
$5,000 monetary. In lieu
of bail, Stark is confined
in the Elk County Prison.
Not all of these cases
will make it through to
jury selection. Each defendant has the right to
make a guilty plea during their call of the list
appearance, and each defendant can ask the court
for a continuance of their
appearance, which some
may have already done.
Law
Park
Bail was set at $1,000
unsecured.
In a second case
against Robison, she
is facing seven misdemeanor charges of theft
by deception – false impression and seven misdemeanor charges of bad
checks. Bail in this case
was set at $5,000 unsecured.
Shane
Christopher
Vogt of St. Marys is
facing a misdemeanor
charge of simple assault
and a summary offense
of harassment – subject
other to physical contact.
His bail was set at $3,500
unsecured.
James John Renwick
of St. Marys is facing a
felony charge of conspiracy – burglary – overnight
accommodation with a
person present, a felony
charge of conspiracy –
r
no
Ho
tions can be directed to
Paula Fritz Eddy of the Elk
County Community Foundation at 814-834-2125
or by email at [email protected], and the application can be found on the
Foundation's website at
www.elkcountyfoundation.
com.
len property and possession of firearm prohibited. His bail was revoked
and he remains incarcerated in the State Correctional Institute at Forest.
Laura Ashley Ann
Poglianich of Byrnedale
is facing a felony charge
of manufacture, delivery
or possession with intent
to manufacture or deliver, a misdemeanor charge
of intent to possess a controlled substance by a
person not regulated and
a misdemeanor charge of
use or possession of drug
paraphernalia. Summary
offenses of careless driving, trespass by motor
vehicle, vehicle registration suspended and
fraudulent use/removal
of registration plate are
also pending. Bail was
set at $5,000 monetary.
Brucetta Maxine Robison of Emporium is
facing four misdemeanor
charges of theft by deception – false impression
and four misdemeanor
charges of bad checks.
d to
Prou
at its annual meeting on
Oct. 5. At that time, each
Women Who Care member
will have the opportunity
to vote for the project(s) to
be funded. A short presentation by the agency will be
required at that meeting.
Inquiries/questions
and requests for applica-
fenses of driving at safe
speed and reckless driving are also pending. Bail
was set at $5,000.
David John Krise of
St. Marys is facing two
felony charges of theft by
unlawful taking – movable property, two felony
charges of receiving stolen property, two misdemeanor charges of unauthorized use of a motor
vehicle, a misdemeanor
charge of access device
issued to another who
did not authorize use,
a misdemeanor charge
of possess access device
knowing it is counterfeit,
a misdemeanor charge of
forgery – unauthorized
account in writing and
theft by unlawful taking – movable property.
A summary offense of
driving while operating
privilege is suspended or
revoked is also pending.
Bail was set at $10,000
monetary.
Chad Richard McConahy is facing felony
charges of receiving sto-
3/16
Some animals exhibited in pens
"GSJDBO4BGBSJ8JMEMJGF1BSL
$3.00 Off
Adult Ticket (7 years+)
$2.00 Off
Children’s Ticket (4-6 years)
$55.95 Carload
(Up to 6 people)
[email protected][email protected]@[email protected]?KQLKJ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
[email protected]?KQLKJŠ*=UJKP>[email protected]?KI>EJ=PEKJSEPD=JUKPDANKBBAN
Burke’s Home Center supports our
local law enforcement officers.
Burke’s
Home Center
1077 Million Dollar Highway, St. Marys, PA • 814-781-1519
STORE HOURS Monday - Friday 7am-7pm;
Saturday 8am-4pm; Sunday 9am-2pm
3
www.smdailypress.com
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
Longtime Ag Progress Days manager retiring after 'a good run'
UNIVERSITY PARK
– During the 25 years Bob
Oberheim has been managing Ag Progress Days
for Penn State's College of
Agricultural Sciences, the
show has … well, made a
lot of progress. And he's
proud of that.
In 1992, when the
Bellefonte, Centre County, native began as show
manager upon the retirement of former longtime
manager Joe Harrington,
Ag Progress Days had 285
exhibitors. By comparison, the 2016 show will
have about 500. Representatives of most of the
big agricultural equipment makers now have a
presence at the show, and
many demonstrate their
machines.
And when Oberheim
started overseeing the
show, all exhibitors were
under tents. Now, many
exhibits are in buildings.
"Looking back at 25 years,
what I've been so pleased
with is the increase and
improvement in the facilities --we have added
seven new buildings," he
said.
"I guess my pride
and joy are the two large
buildings, the Ag Choice
and the Everett Cash
Mutual buildings. On the
first day I took over managing the show, one of my
goals was to eliminate the
big exhibit tents and build
permanent buildings, and
we did. Structures like the
Equine Building and the
Joe Harrington Conservation Building -- which
went up just a few years
ago -- have added a lot to
the show. "
It is understandable
for Oberheim to reflect on
his tenure as Ag Progress
Days manager for the College of Agricultural Sciences -- because the 2016
show, Aug. 16-18, will be
the last one he oversees.
He is retiring from the
University after 39 years,
on Sept. 30.
From
his
catbird
seat viewing agriculture,
Oberheim, who also has
managed the college's
Horticulture Farm for
29 years, has seen a lot.
Most notable is the development of bigger, better,
more capable and more
sophisticated
farming
equipment. Like most ev-
erything else, agriculture
has been greatly affected
by the computer age.
"I have seen the technology boom with GPS
on planters, tractors and
sprayers, and hands-free
tractor driving. And the
size of the equipment has
increased dramatically,"
he said. "We now have
90-foot sprayers, 12-row
planters and huge, selfpropelled harvesters. I
have watched with great
interest the computerization of agriculture -- how
it has evolved over the
last three decades."
At first, he was pessimistic about how that
same technology boom
would affect his show.
Many outdoor trade and
consumer shows -- indeed
all kinds of shows indoor
and outdoor -- are struggling to stay profitable
and survive. But Ag Progress Days has managed to
hold its own through the
years, despite the emergence of the internet and
online shopping, browsing
and searching.
Oberheim credits the
show’s ongoing success to
its unique make-up, first
in highlighting the College
of Agricultural Sciences'
research, technology and
extension programs while
remaining dedicated to
serving agricultural producers. "I think the true
producer looks at Ag Progress Days as a vacation
to do something with the
family that is enjoyable
because the show has
something for everyone.
And they can shop for
and buy equipment -- because of that I think we've
stayed strong," he said.
"The other thing I attribute the success of the
show to is that we have
stayed true to our audience. You won't see pots
and pans, paintings, and
crafts. Because of that, the
producer is more apt to
attend, and he is pleased
with what he sees when
he comes. And I think the
commercial exhibitors are
thrilled with the quality of
the ag audience. The audience we have is about 60
percent related to agriculture."
But it is true that show
attendance has declined
by 10,000 to 15,000 people
in the last 25 years or so,
a result of the shrinking
agricultural sector in the
state. "There are probably
half as many farms today
as when I started," he
said. "Show attendance on
average has been 40,000
to 42,000 people the last
few years, and when I
took over in 1992, we had
55,000 to 60,000 people."
Oberheim has also
served as secretary of the
Farm Show Commission
for 21 years. In that role
he has coordinated and
overseen the College of
Agricultural Sciences' involvement in the Pennsylvania Farm Show. That's
a big job because Penn
State's contribution to the
annual, sprawling agricultural extravaganza in
Harrisburg is huge. Oberheim has been responsible
for managing travel, lodging and appearances for
hundreds of faculty and
staff at the Farm Show -a role he described as the
"behind the scenes support person."
Through it all, Oberheim, who graduated from
Delaware Valley College
with a bachelor's degree in
agronomy and who earned
a master's degree in
agronomy while working
at Penn State, believes he
has had a charmed career
with the University. From
his first job as a research
technologist in the agronomy department in 1979
to putting the finishing
touches on this year's version of Ag Progress Days,
he has enjoyed it all.
He noted that Ag Progress Days is a little like
Christmas in August for
him -- the gradual buildup to the event while paying attention to a to-do
list, and Monday night
before the show is like
Christmas Eve. "When I
get there Tuesday morning early for the show, it's
like opening presents -everything is all clean and
polished and exhibitors
are there waiting for customers. The energy level
is high, and I like to just
sit back and watch it all
unfold," he said.
"That's where my rewards came. I have been
so blessed because I have
not come to work a single
day in 39 years without
enjoying it. I've had a good
run."
Skydiver becomes first person to jump and land without chute
LOS ANGELES (AP)
— A 42-year-old skydiver
with more than 18,000
jumps made history Saturday when he became
the first person to leap
without a parachute and
land in a net instead.
After a two-minute
freefall, Luke Aikins
landed dead center in the
100-by-100-foot net at
the Big Sky movie ranch
on the outskirts of Simi
Valley.
As cheers erupted, Aikins quickly climbed out,
walked over and hugged
his wife, Monica, who had
been watching from the
ground with their 4-yearold son, Logan, and other
family members.
"I'm almost levitat-
ing, it's incredible," the
jubilant skydiver said,
raising his hands over
his head as his wife held
their son, who dozed in
her arms.
The stunt, broadcast
live on the Fox network
for the TV special "Stride
Gum Presents Heaven
Sent," nearly didn't come
off as planned when Aikins revealed just before
climbing into his plane
that the Screen Actors
Guild had ordered him to
wear a parachute to ensure his safety.
Aikins didn't say
what prompted the original restriction, and representatives for the show
and the Screen Actors
Guild did not immediate-
ly respond to phone and
email messages.
Aikins said he considered pulling out at that
point because having
the parachute canister
on his back would make
his landing in the net far
more dangerous. If he
had to wear it he said he
wouldn't bother to pull
the ripcord anyway.
"I'm going all the way
to the net, no question
about it," he said from
the plane. "I'll just have
to deal with the consequences when I land of
wearing the parachute on
my back and what it's going to do to my body."
A few minutes before the jump one of the
show's hosts said the re-
quirement had been lifted. Aikins left the plane
without the chute.
He jumped with three
other skydivers, each
wearing parachutes. One
had a camera, another
trailed smoke so people
on the ground could follow his descent and the
third took an oxygen canister he handed off after
they got to an altitude
where it was no longer
needed.
Then
the
others
opened their parachutes
and left him on his own.
Aikins admitted before the jump he was nervous and his mother said
she was one family member who wouldn't watch.
When his friend Chris
Talley came up with the
idea two years ago, Aikins acknowledged he
turned it down cold.
"I kind of laugh and I
say, 'Ok, that's great. I'll
help you find somebody to
do it,'" he told The Associated Press as he trained
for the jump last week.
A couple of weeks after Talley made his proposal Aikins called back
and said he would do it.
He'd been the backup
jumper in 2012 when
Felix Baumgartner became the first skydiver to
break the speed of sound
during a jump from 24
miles above Earth.
The 42-year-old daredevil made his first tandem jump when he was
12, following with his
first solo leap four years
later. He's been racking
them up at several hundred a year ever since.
His father and grandfather were skydivers,
and his wife has made
2,000 jumps. His family
owns Skydive Kapowsin
near Tacoma, Washington.
Aikins is also a safety
and training adviser for
the United States Parachute Association and
is certified to teach both
students and skydiving
instructors. His business Para Tactics provides skydiving training
to Navy Seals and other
members of elite fighting
forces.
waived. Bail was set at
$50,000 unsecured.
Dennis J. Massa Jr.
of Clarendon had a summary offense of bad checks
moved to non-traffic court.
Desiree Lee Peters of
St. Marys was waived for
court on a misdemeanor
count of corruption of minors. A felony charge of
manufacture, delivery or
possession with intent to
manufacture or deliver
was withdrawn. Bail was
set at $2,500 unsecured.
Michael John Beck
of Ridgway was waived
for court on three misdemeanor charges of use or
possession of drug paraphernalia. Bail was set at
$2,500 unsecured.
Joshua Michael Smith
was waived for court on
a misdemeanor charge
of retail theft - take merchandise. Bail was set at
$5,000.
Breanna Rae Park
of Ridgway was held for
court on a felony charge
of manufacture, delivery
or possession with intent
to manufacture or deliver,
and three felony charges
of criminal use of a communication facility. She
was also held for court on
misdemeanor charges of
intent to possess a con-
trolled substance by a
person not regulated and
use or possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bail was
set at $25,000 monetary,
and in lieu of bail, Park
was confined in the Elk
County Prison.
Sean Kendall Peterson of Wilcox was waived
for court on three misdemeanor driving under the
influence (DUI) charges.
He was also waived for
court on two summary offenses of operating unsafe
equipment. Bail was set at
$2,500 unsecured. This is
listed as his first DUI offense.
Earl Arthur Condon
of Ridgway was waived
for court on three misdemeanor DUI charges and
a summary offense of period for requiring lighted
lamps. Bail was set at
$2,500 unsecured. This is
listed as his first DUI offense.
Amy Susan Feldbauer of Johnsonburg was
waived for court on four
misdemeanor DUI charg-
es and a summary offense
of careless driving. Bail
was set at $2,500 unsecured. This is listed as her
first DUI offense.
For those individuals
either waived or held for
court, a formal arraignment will now be scheduled before President
Judge Richard A. Masson
in the Elk County Court of
Common Pleas.
This appearance is
commonly waived for
those defendants with attorneys.
For those that had
their cases moved to nontraffic court, Martin proceeded over the cases to
reach a verdict.
Cases
Continued from Page 1
Thursday, August 4 & Friday, August 5, 2016
Fresh Baked Breads
Large Raisin, White, Rye ....................................... $3.50/loaf
Small Raisin, White, Rye ....................................... $2.50/loaf
Cinnamon Rolls .................................................. $6.00/dozen
Specials For August 2016
Pick up in the Social Hall
Hamburg-Vegetable Soup ...............................$4.50/quart
Thurs., Aug. 4th
Ham Salad Sandwich ........................................ $3.00/each
from
4:00-6:00 PM
Chicken Salad Sandwich .................................. $3.00/each
and
Bow-tie Salad with Cucumbers ......................$3.00/quart
Assorted Fruit Turnovers (four) ........................$3.50/pkg
Fri., Aug. 5th
Blueberry Bread .................................................$4.00/large from 10:00-3:00 PM
Blueberry Bread ................................................$2.00/small
or
Thank You For Your Support!
Please Use Rear
Until Sold Out!
Benefits: The Building Fund
Handicap Entrance
Please order ahead so you do not miss out on your favorite bread, cinnamon rolls or
specials of the month. We don’t want you to be disappointed. Orders will be accepted
until 11:00 AM on Thursday. Please call 834-7861, #1 or 834-3698.
We are proud to be
the supplier of blood
to Penn Highlands
Elk.
Penn Highlands Elk
Tuesday, August 2 • 11:00-4:00
This drive is open to the community.
WALK-INS WELCOME
www.fourhearts.org
THINKING GOLFING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake! THINKING DINING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake! THINKING GOLFING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake! THINKING DINING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake!
Sacred Heart Social Committee
First Friday Bread Sale
SHARE LIFE. DONATE BLOOD.
THINKING GOLFING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake! THINKING DINING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake!
su do ku
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formaƩed as a
9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3
boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers
1 through 9 must Įll each row, column
and box. Each number can appear only
once in each row, column and box.
You can Įgure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the
numeric clues already provided in the
boxes. The more numbers you name,
the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
THINKING GOLFING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake! THINKING DINING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake!
THINKING GOLFING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake! THINKING DINING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake! THINKING GOLFING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake! THINKING DINING? Think Lakeview Lodge Treasure Lake!
$10,000 unsecured.
Michael Lee Troidl of
Johnsonburg was waived
for court on misdemeanor
charges of make repairs/
sell/etc. offensive weapons
and recklessly endangering another person. Bail
was set at $10,000 unsecured.
Tabitha Lynn Young of
Ridgway was waived for
court on felony charges of
conspiracy - manufacture,
delivery or possession with
intent to manufacture or
deliver, manufacture and
deliver, or possession with
intent to manufacture
or deliver. Misdemeanor
charges of intent to possess a controlled substance
by a person not regulated
and use or possession of
drug paraphernalia were
also waived. Bail was set
at $50,000 unsecured.
Kimberly Ann Parry
of Marienville was waived
for court on felony charges
of criminal use of a communication facility and
manufacture, delivery or
possession with intent to
manufacture or deliver.
Misdemeanor charges of
intent to possess a controlled substance by a
person not regulated and
use or possession of drug
paraphernalia were also
4-
w w w. s m d a i l y p r e s s . c o m
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
O PINION
Letters &
Guest Commentary
We Can't Bomb Our
Way To Better Schools
"A nation that continues year after year to
spend more money on
military defense than on
programs of social uplift
is approaching spiritual
death." – Dr. King
From the left and the
right, policy proposals
are flying fast and furious. It is an election year,
after all. But one topic is
completely off the agenda
from both sides of the
party line: decreasing
military spending.
Today's political candidates are universally
unwilling to discuss the
military budget, overseas aggression, nuclear
weapons, militarism, or
imperialism - except to
recommend more of it.
The problem is, we can't
bomb our way into better
schools.
Year after year, we continue to pour our tax dollars into the war budget at
the expense of other social
programs. And, even as
we overfund the military
contractors, we also fail to
care for our veterans and
renege on our recruitment
promises of education and
jobs for the youth. Neither
of the two major-party
presidential candidates
will discuss ending the
endless war, bringing our
troops home, or investing in improving the
infrastructure, education,
and opportunities here at
home.
Those who study the
rise and fall of empires
know that the obsession
with military expansion, and the pouring of
a nation's resources into
militarism at the expense
of other programs leads to
collapse. The fall of many
powerful empires throughout human history has
been preceded by such a
cycle. Regardless of one's
views on whether or not
the United States should
be pursuing the goal of
imperialism, the obvious
truth is that we are, in
fact, a heavily militarized
empire, with five colonial
territories, and nearly 700
military bases in countries
around the world.
We're operating on
increasingly shaky
ground. As we head into
the elections, where are
the candidates who will
frankly acknowledge this
danger? Who will commit
to investing in our youth,
our communities, and our
people? Will we continue
to obsessively and aggressively try to demonstrate
our greatness through
military might or will we
find ways to humbly and
compassionately strive for
basic goodness - not even
greatness - in the way we
treat one another here at
home?
We may be modern
people with smartphones,
airplanes, and entrenched
beliefs in our political divisions, but at the end of the
day, human values haven't
changed much. We're still
hoping and longing for the
same things. We all want
our kids to be healthy.
We want our schools to be
engaging and empowering. We want our communities to be safe. We
want to have enough. We
don't want to be hungry or
homeless. We don't want
bombs dropping on our
heads. We want meaningful opportunities for our
young people (and ourselves). We want a world
for our great, great-grandchildren.
The question is: how
do we get those things?
Although the policies,
platforms, and proposals
abound, one thing is clear:
continuing to overfund the
military at the expense of
programs of social uplift is
not going to improve the
situation of the average
American. As Dr. King
adroitly pointed out so
many years ago, we are
approaching spiritual
death by continuing on
this path. At the end of
our endless wars, what
are we defending? As we
gut our schools, incarcerate our populace, over-police our poor communities,
let roads and infrastructure crumble, what
exactly are we sending our
sons and daughters overseas to protect? We cannot
bomb our way into better
schools. Instead, we must
beat the swords of our
bombers into plowshares,
study war no more, and
rebuild the spiritual,
moral, and cultural integrity of our nation.
–
Author/activist Rivera Sun is the author of
"The Dandelion Insurrection" and other books, and
the programs coordinator
for Campaign Nonviolence.
Letters to the Editor
The Daily Press welcomes letters to the editor. Letters can be sent by mail to The Daily Press, 245 Brusselles St., St. Marys, Pa. 15857.
Letters can be no longer than 500 words. We reserve the right to edit letters. All letters must include
a name, daytime phone number and must be signed.
Make your opinion known. Call us at 814–781–1596.
The Daily Press
(144920)
245 Brusselles St., St. Marys, Pa. 15857
Website: www.smdailypress.com
Publisher: Harlan J. Beagley
E-mail: [email protected]
Cell: 509-770-6598
Office: 814-781-1596
Managing Editor: Joseph Bell
E-mail: [email protected]
Phone: 814-781-1596
Fax: 814-834-7473
E-mail: [email protected]
Published every morning except Sunday, New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas.
Single copy price 50 cents.
By carrier or mail in county: 1 month $12.50, 3 months $36.75, 6
months $70.00, 1 year $134.75.
By motor route delivery: 1 month $12.50, 3 months $37.00, 6
months $73.00, 1 year $139.00,
Out of county mail delivery: 1 month $16.00.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Press, 245
Brusselles St., St. Marys, Pa. 15857. Complete information on advertising and advertising rates furnished at The Daily Press business office.
Advertisers must notify the management immediately when errors
appear. The publisher reserves the right to reject, edit or cancel any
advertising at any time without liability. Publisher’s liability for
error is limited to the amount paid for advertising.
Periodicals postage paid at St. Marys, Pa.
Guest Commentary
What We Wear: Another Way to 'Vote'
For more than two
decades, more and more
Americans have become
aware of the exploitation
and violence associated
with much of the globalized garment industry
producing more than 95
percent of our clothes. A
series of media exposures,
including the 1996 revelation that TV host Kathy
Lee Gifford had endorsed
a clothing line produced
by Honduran children
in sweatshop conditions,
spurred a growing consciousness of labor abuses
in many countries.
These exposures highlighted the persistent use
of child labor, the absence
of living wages that could
sustain a decent livelihood for millions of workers, and the prevalence
of unsafe working conditions. The latter issue was
thrust dramatically into
public awareness by the
collapse in April, 2013 of
Rana Plaza, an eight-story commercial building in
Dhaka, Bangladesh that
housed a number of garment companies supplying brands like Children's
Place, Benetton, Cato
Fashions, and the parent
company of Calvin Klein
and Tommy Hilfiger. The
collapse of the building,
which many workers had
warned was unsafe, killed
1,139 workers and injured
2,500 more.
Although many of
the major brands made
public commitments to
rectify such abuses, they
continue to shed direct
responsibility by contracting with local suppliers
and subcontractors in different countries. They can
easily move from country
to country, supplier to
supplier, to keep prices
competitive while exerting downward pressure on
workers' wages and working conditions.
This dynamic, too, has
gained media attention
along with the abuses
themselves. TV satirist
John Oliver focused on
it last year in a segment
of his show, "Last Week
Tonight," while filmmaker
Andrew Morgan devoted
an entire documentary,
The True Cost, to exposing the system and its
detrimental effects on
millions of people. Both
Oliver and Morgan
unveiled visual evidence
of profound inequity, yet
exploitation and deprivation persist while fashion industry executives
have become some of the
wealthiest people on the
planet (e.g. Stefan Persson of H&M worth $28
billion; Amancio Ortega of
Zara worth $57 billion).
Global Citizen
Many consumers who
become aware of these
problems are left with
uncertainty as to a responsible course of action.
Some have begun to look
to fair trade certification
as an answer, seeking out
businesses that promise adherence to ethical
labor and environmental
standards. Yet considering
the vast preponderance of
garments manufactured
by major brands, a number of critics argue that
for the 40 million gar-
ment workers worldwide,
a more comprehensive,
sector-wide approach is
needed.
One possible beginning
step for individuals is a
basic one: moving beyond
the identity of "ethical
consumer" to embrace the
broader, more responsive
identity of global citizen.
The former is still closely
identified with the products we choose, the latter
with an awareness of the
social relations defined
by a globalized capitalist economy. As a more
encompassing term,
citizenship entails a responsibility for continuing
self-education no matter
what one's stage of life
may be.
From this perspective,
it may well be worth one's
while to visit the websites
of organizations like the
Clean Clothes Campaign
and the Asia Floor Wage
Alliance. These umbrella
organizations represent
broad coalitions of trade
unions and human rights
organizations, and their
response to the issues is
political. They engage in
advocacy, lobbying, and
public education to support garment workers'
rights (including freedom
of association and union
representation) across the
national boundaries that
transnational corporations so easily traverse.
The Asia Floor Wage Alliance makes a crucial distinction between the legal
minimum wage in many
of the producing countries
and a living wage that
enables workers to sup-
port themselves and their
families with dignity. And
these organizations offer
ways that individuals
can help take a stand in
solidarity with workers,
including (on the Clean
Clothes website) a link
that provides information
on the corporate behavior
of specific labels.
It may be objected that
with so many American
jobs already lost overseas,
our focus should stay
squarely on retaining
and growing jobs here at
home. Yet the garment
industry is itself a prime
example of outsourcing;
it wasn't very long ago
that most of the clothes
purchased in the U.S.
were made by American
workers. The same global
economics affecting the
welfare of workers in
Bangladesh or Cambodia
affect the welfare of workers here.
More than 50 years ago,
Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. wrote from Birmingham, Alabama, "Injustice
anywhere is a threat to
justice everywhere. We
are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality
tied in a single garment of
destiny." If he had written
those words today from
Dhaka or Mumbai, Phnom
Penh or Jakarta, they'd
ring as true now as they
ever did.
–
Andrew Moss is an
emeritus professor at the
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona,
where he taught a course,
“War and Peace in Literature,” for 10 years.
Today in History
Today is Monday, Aug.
1, the 214th day of 2016.
There are 152 days left in
the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Aug. 1, 1966, Charles
Joseph Whitman, 25, an
engineering student at
the University of Texas in
Austin, went on an armed
rampage that killed 14
people, most of whom were
shot by Whitman while he
was perched in the clock
tower of the main campus
building. Whitman, who
had also slain his wife and
mother hours earlier, was
finally gunned down by police.
On this date:
In 1714, Britain's Queen
Anne died at age 49; she
was succeeded by George I.
In 1876, Colorado was
admitted as the 38th state.
In 1907, the U.S. Army
Signal Corps established
an aeronautical division,
the forerunner of the U.S.
Air Force.
In 1913, the Joyce Kilmer poem "Trees" was first
published in "Poetry: A
Magazine of Verse."
In 1936, the Olympics
opened in Berlin with a
ceremony presided over by
Adolf Hitler.
In 1944, an uprising
broke out in Warsaw, Poland, against Nazi occupa-
tion; the revolt lasted two
months before collapsing.
In
1946,
President
Harry S. Truman signed
measures establishing the
Fulbright Program and the
Atomic Energy Commission.
In 1957, the United
States and Canada agreed
to create the North American Air Defense Command
(NORAD).
In 1971, the Concert
for Bangladesh, organized
by George Harrison and
Ravi Shankar, took place
at New York's Madison
Square Garden.
In 1975, a 35-nation
summit in Finland concluded with the signing of
a declaration known as the
Helsinki Accords dealing
with European security,
human rights and EastWest contacts.
In 1981, the rock music
video channel MTV made
its debut.
In 1994, Michael Jackson and Lisa Marie Presley confirmed they'd been
secretly married 11 weeks
earlier. (Presley filed for
divorce from Jackson in
January 1996, citing irreconcilable differences.)
Ten years ago: Mel Gibson issued a statement in
which he denied being a
bigot; he also apologized
to "everyone in the Jewish
community for the vitriolic
and harmful words" he'd
used when he was arrested
for investigation of drunken driving. Fidel Castro
released a statement a day
after ceding power to his
brother Raul in which he
sought to reassure Cubans
that his health was stable
after intestinal surgery.
Five years ago: The U.S.
House of Representatives
passed, 269-161, emergency legislation to avert the
nation's first-ever financial
default; Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords
returned to the House for
the first time since being
shot in January 2011 to
cast a "yes" vote.
One year ago: Japan's
Imperial Household Agency released a digital version of Emperor Hirohito's
radio address on Aug. 15,
1945, announcing his country's surrender in World
War II; the digital recording offered clearer audio,
although Hirohito spoke
in an arcane form of Japanese that many of his countrymen would have found
difficult to comprehend.
British singer and TV host
Cilla Black, 72, died in Estepona (eh-steh-POH'-nah)
in southern Spain.
Today's Birthdays: Singer Ramblin' Jack Elliott is
85. Former Sen. Alfonse
D'Amato, R-N.Y., is 79.
Actor Giancarlo Giannini is 74. Basketball Hall
of Fame coach Roy Williams is 66. Blues singermusician Robert Cray is
63. Singer Michael Penn
is 58. Rock singer Joe Elliott (Def Leppard) is 57.
Rock singer-musician Suzi
Gardner (L7) is 56. Rapper
Chuck D (Public Enemy)
is 56. Actor Jesse Borrego
is 54. Actor Demian Bichir
is 53. Rapper Coolio is 53.
Actor John Carroll Lynch
is 53. Rock singer Adam
Duritz (Counting Crows)
is 52. Movie director Sam
Mendes is 51. Country
singer George Ducas is 50.
Country musician Charlie
Kelley is 48. Actress Jennifer Gareis is 46. Actor
Charles Malik Whitfield is
44. Actress Tempestt Bledsoe is 43. Actor Jason Momoa is 37. Actress Honeysuckle Weeks (TV: "Foyle's
War") is 37. Singer Ashley
Parker Angel is 35. Actress
Taylor Fry is 35. Actor
Elijah Kelley is 30. Actor
James Francis Kelly is 27.
Actress Ella Wahlestedt is
18.
Thought for Today: "The
only fool bigger than the
person who knows it all
is the person who argues
with him." — Stanislaw J.
Lec, Polish writer (19091966).
www.smdailypress.com
Records
5
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
Daily Press
Today's Obituaries
Thomas K. Krug Sr.
Thomas K. Krug Sr.,
59, of 8342 state Route
219, Brockway, died unexpectedly Friday, July 29,
2016 at his residence.
He was born April 16,
1957 in St. Marys, son
of the late Hilary Krug
and Lillian McClintock
Krug, who survives, of St.
Marys. He was a lifelong
resident of the area, residing the past five years
in Brockway, and was a
graduate of St. Marys
Area High School, Class of
1975. He was an employee
of Atlas Pressed Metals in
DuBois.
On Nov. 15, 1975 in
the Queen of the World
Church, he married his
high school sweetheart,
Kathryn A. Wolfe, who
survives.
Tom enjoyed gardening, woodworking, and
building things for his
children and grandchildren, who he adored. He
was a jack-of-all-trades
and never believed in the
word “can’t.”
In addition to his
mother and wife, he is
also survived by a daughter, Angela Breitkreutz
and her husband Daniel
of Murrysville; two sons,
Nicholas C. Krug and his
partner Michael Cutts of
Edgewood, and Thomas
K. Krug Jr. and his wife
Courtney of Brookville;
six grandchildren, Madison Breitkreutz, Sydney
“Peanut”
Breitkreutz,
Grace Breitkreutz, Jack
Krug, Charlie Krug, and
Sam Krug; a sister, Linda
Feronti and her husband
Ed of Johnsonburg; two
brothers, Kenneth Krug
and Mark Krug, both of
St. Marys; and by his
mother-in-law, Sara Wolfe
Facchine of St. Marys.
Perhaps what summarizes this man's life
best can be found in a
note written by his granddaughter:
Dear Pop, I know you
couldn't help leaving us
but I just want you to
know that I miss you.
Margaret C. Occhiuto
I was your Peanut. You
taught me how to play
softball and improve on
basketball, you taught
me how to fix things like
the garage GG broke, I
helped you fix the brakes
on your car, and to do so
many other little things.
From now on I will play
basketball and volleyball
in memory of you. I will
play to make you proud
every time I step on the
court. I will remember
you in every history class
I take and all the history
you told me. It will be
hard, but I'll get through
this, but I will never forget you. I love you Pop.
Please give me a sign that
you are here.
His signs will be all
around us in the lives that
live on in his wife of 40
years, his three beautiful
children and six adoring
grandchildren. Whether
it is on a field, court, outdoors, classroom, or in
the everyday matters, his
memory will live on in all
of us.
A Mass of Christian
Burial for Thomas K.
Krug Sr. will be celebrated Tuesday, Aug. 2 at 10
a.m. in the Queen of the
World Church with the
Rev. Ross Miceli officiating. Burial will be in the
St. Mary’s Cemetery.
Visitation is at the
Lynch-Radkowski Funeral Home on Monday evening from 6-8 p.m.
Online
condolences
may be offered at www.
lynch-radkowski.com.
State Police at Ridgway
Burglary
- theft
worked in bridal boutiques
in New York City where
she rubbed elbows with the
stars. She loved to tell her
stories about her life and
they were enjoyed by all
who heard them.
She is survived by one
sister, Veronica, Mrs. Anthony Ferragine of Johnsonburg; and numerous
nieces and nephews whom
she loved very much.
In addition to her parents and husband, she was
preceded in death by her
brothers, Salvatore and
Bruno “Nibe” Vavala; and
her sisters, Helen Tassone,
Marian Dellaquila, Rose
Damore, Brunina Tripodi,
Josephine DeFiore and
Giovanna “Jane” Francis.
A Mass of Christian
Burial for Margaret C. Occhiuto will be conducted
Thursday, Aug. 4 at 10 a.m.
at Holy Rosary Church,
Johnsonburg. Officiating
will be Rev. David J. Wilson, pastor. Interment will
be in Holy Rosary Cemetery, Johnsonburg.
Friends will be received Wednesday evening,
Aug. 3 from 6-8 p.m. at the
Anthony F. Ferragine Funeral Home, 401 Chestnut
St., Johnsonburg.
Share your condolences at www.ferraginefuneralhome.com.
Diane L. Snyder
Diane L. Snyder, 54, of
1440 Million Dollar Hwy.,
Kersey, died Friday, July
29, 2016 at her home surrounded by her family.
She was born Sept.
15, 1961 in St. Marys, a
daughter of the late Howard and Helen "Phyllis"
Polites Leasgang.
On July 3, 1981 in St.
Marys, she married Robert
Snyder, who survives.
Diane was a lifelong
resident of the area and a
graduate of SMAHS, Class
of 1979. She attended DuBois Cosmetology School.
She enjoyed cross stitching, the outdoors, and gardening. Most of all, she enjoyed spending time with
her family, especially her
beloved grandchildren.
In addition to her
husband, Robert Synder,
she is survived by a son,
Zackery Snyder, at home;
a daughter, Jamie, Mrs.
Nick Brown of Kersey; two
grandchildren, Ethen and
Emma Brown; and two sisters, Cynthia (Gary) Horn
of Vowinckel and Sandra
Palmer of Kersey.
She was preceded in
death by her parents.
Funeral and committal services for Diane L.
Snyder are private and are
being held at the convenience of the family.
Lynch-Green Funeral
Home, 151 N. Michael St.,
St. Marys, is handling the
arrangements and online
condolences may be made
to the family at www.
lynchgreenfuneralhome.
com.
Greek police arrest 26
anarchists who
interrupted a Mass
Photo submitted
Stilt grass invasive
work begins
The Bureau of Forestry has partnered with
the Bucktail Watershed
to control the leading edge
of the Japanese stilt grass
infestation on the Elk
State Forest.
The bureau is committing their staff time
and equipment, and the
watershed is contributing
the herbicide and private
lands work. They work
well together and will continue their relationship to
manage this and other invasive projects to protect
Wild Places.
The treatment has
begun on the Ridge Road
where the leading edge of
the stilt grass has been
identified.
Treatments
will occur heading south.
Their hope is to stop the
spread of this aggressive
plant. This grass spreads
easily through mowing
and grading which are activities we perform regularly on and along the
roadways. It is evident
this grass is being spread
by recreation too, as it
can be found along the
entrances to trails and on
Margaret C. Occhiuto,
95, of 628 First Ave., Johnsonburg, formerly of New
York, died Sunday morning, July 31, 2016 at Penn
Highlands Elk, St. Marys,
following a brief illness.
She was born June
10, 1921 in Johnsonburg,
daughter of the late Stephen and Mary Grace Scrivo Vavala. She married
Saverio Occhiuto on July
22, 1942 in Holy Rosary
Church, Johnsonburg. He
died July 19, 1982.
Margaret resided in
Johnsonburg since 1983.
She was a 1939 graduate of
Johnsonburg High School
and was a member of Holy
Rosary Church. She was
very active and held multiple offices within the
Rosary Altar Society. She
took up painting later in
life and she became a local
award-winning artist and
she enjoyed seeing her artwork hanging in all of her
families’ homes.
Margaret was predominantly a homemaker, but
led an exciting life where
she worked for the War
Department during WWII,
and followed her husband
from New York to the Virgin Islands working alongside him as he worked as a
world-class meat handler
and butcher. She had also
animals trails.
This grass can be
identified by a distinctive silvery stripe down
the center of the upper
leaf surface. Leaves are
around 3 inches long and
lance-shaped. Tiny flowers appear in late summer
from August to September
with fruits maturing soon
after. By late fall the grass
will die back, leaving dead
orange-tinged plants.
For more information,
please call the District Office at 814-486-3353. You
can visit DCNR online
at www.dcnr.state.pa.us.
Also check out their Facebook at www.facebook.
com/elkstateforest.
ST. MARYS
MONUMENTS
LOCALLY OWNED
& OPERATED
SUSIE & DONNY (FLIP)
BOBENRIETH
148 TIMBERLINE ROAD
834-9848
THESSALONIKI,
Greece (AP) — Greek police arrested 26 anarchists
who burst into the Greek
Orthodox cathedral in the
northern city of Thessaloniki on Sunday and interrupted a Mass, chanting slogans and dropping
flyers.
Metropolitan Anthimos of Thessaloniki, the
city's archbishop who
was officiating at another church, said about
30 people burst into the
cathedral of St. Gregory
Palamas and, aside from
interrupting the Mass,
"destroyed what they
could." He did not elaborate.
The
cathedral
is
named after a 14th-century archbishop of Thessaloniki who is revered
in the Eastern Orthodox
Church.
Police say those arrested included 19 women
and seven men. Seventeen
are Greek.
The anarchists on
Sunday were protesting a
police operation Wednes-
Police Reports
day in the city that evicted anarchists and refugees from three illegally
occupied buildings. One
of the buildings, formerly
an orphanage, is the property of the Greek Orthodox Church and is being
demolished to build a hospice for the terminally ill,
Anthimos said.
Police arrested 74 anarchists in that operation,
64 of them foreigners. The
33 refugees were released.
Before dawn Sunday,
an improvised device exploded outside the offices
of the construction company demolishing the
church's property but did
little damage.
KORB
MONUMENTS
Since 1901
1-800-752-1601
Mary Petrucci
814-781-3063
www.korbmonuments.com
A Family Fire Safety Tip
From The Johnsonburg
Fire Department
Test Your Smoke Alarm Monthly
RIDGWAY TWP. –
The Ridgway-based State
Police report investigating an incident of burglary-theft at a residence
in Ridgway Township. An
unknown actor entered
a building behind a residence belonging to Curt
Gosnell Sr. and stole cash.
The investigation continues.
NBA2K16 Tournament
Photo by Becky Polaski
Participants and park staff are shown gathered around one of
the video game stations during Memorial Park's NBA2k16
tournament on Saturday at the park's scout house.
Debate commission:
Democrats didn't rig
debate schedule
ASHLAND, Ohio (AP)
— The Commission on
Presidential Debates rejected Republican Donald
Trump's claim that Democrats rigged the debate
schedule so that two of the
three debates would occur
during football games.
In a statement released Sunday, the commission said it started
working more than 18
months ago to identify all
religious and federal holidays as well as baseball
and football games and
other major events. The
commission said it was
"impossible" to avoid all
sporting events.
"As a point of reference, in a four-year period, there are four general
election debates (three
presidential and one vice
presidential), and approximately 1,000 NFL
games," the commission
wrote.
On Sept. 26, the night
of the first debate, ESPN
will carry the Monday
night game featuring the
Falcons vs. the Saints. On
Oct. 9, the second debate
will air opposite the Sunday night game featuring
the Giants vs. the Packers
on NBC.
Hillary Clinton vowed
to attend all the matchups, telling reporters in
Ohio on Sunday: "I'm going to be there, that's all I
have to say."
Her campaign, meanwhile, dismissed Trump's
claims, with vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine
saying he's "mystified" by
what he calls Trump's "bizarre" allegations.
"Is Donald Trump
complaining that the
framers of the constitution put the election in the
NFL season?" he asked
during a campaign stop at
a dairy barn in Ohio.
The Democratic ticket
is in the midst of a postconvention swing through
the battleground states of
Ohio and Pennsylvania.
On Friday, Trump
accused Clinton of "trying to rig" the schedule.
"Unacceptable!" he wrote.
In an interview Sunday
on ABC's "This Week,"
Trump said he got a letter
from the NFL calling the
conflict "ridiculous."
NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy tweeted on
Saturday: "While we'd
obviously wish the Debate Commission could
find another night, we did
not send a letter to Mr
Trump."
A Trump aide said
Saturday that the Republican candidate "was made
aware of the conflicting
dates by a source close to
the league." The aide was
not authorized to speak by
name and requested anonymity.
The nonpartisan, independent
presidential
debate commission said it
never consulted with either political party in setting the dates, announced
last September. The group
serves as event sponsor
and sets the participation
criteria, dates, sites and
formats.
The Democratic Party
was criticized during the
primary race for scheduling debates between Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders on Saturday nights
and holiday weekends,
times when viewership
is low. The Sanders campaign suggested that was
an effort to limit the size
of the audience.
Trump told ABC that
Clinton wants to debate
"like she did with Bernie
Sanders, where they were
on Saturday nights when
nobody's home."
6
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
www.smdailypress.com
Dickinson Board of Governors appoints CEO
RIDGWAY – Fran
Roebuck Kuhns, Dickinson Center, Inc. (DCI)
Board Chair is pleased
to announce the appointment of Heidi Thomas as
Dickinson Center’s Chief
Executive Officer.
The DCI Board met
July 21 and unanimously
approved this appointment. Thomas has been
leading Dickinson as interim CEO since August
2015. The board and DCI
administration agree that
Thomas is an excellent
fit for this role, and one
who will successfully lead
the organization through
their pending
affiliation with
Journey
Health System
and
future endeavors.
Heidi
Heidi
has
been
Thomas
with Dickinson Center since June 2004, her
education includes a bachelor’s degree in accounting
from Penn State University, a master’s degree in
business administration
from Clarion University,
and she is a certified pub-
lic accountant.
Thomas is a lifelong
resident of Ridgway and
is married to Andy Thomas with two children,
Carli and Drew. She has
served or currently serves
on various boards including CAPSEA, Community
Education Center, YMCA,
Penn Highlands Elk, and
WRC Senior Services. She
is a graduate of Leadership Elk County, and over
the years has volunteered
as a coach for local youth
sports.
"It is with overwhelming support and great
pride that the board of
directors appoints Heidi
Thomas as the CEO of
Dickinson Center, Inc.,"
Kuhns said. "Heidi has
done an outstanding job
during this year of transition as interim CEO; leading us through a strategic
partnership, expanding
our service lines, enhancing customer service to
new heights, engaging our
skilled and caring staff,
and bringing our mission
and vision to life. She
is dedicated to DCI and
will lead us forward into
the future of behavioral
health, intellectual disabilities, and prevention
services for our consumers
of today and tomorrow."
Since 1958, Dickinson Center, Inc. has been
committed to helping individuals reach their full
potential by providing a
comprehensive spectrum
of behavioral health, intellectual disability, and prevention services. Initially,
DCI opened to provide
outpatient
psychiatric
care to rural northwestern
Pennsylvania, and is now
recognized as a leading
rural behavioral health
provider in Northwestern Pennsylvania, serving Elk, Cameron, Potter,
McKean, Forest, Warren,
Jefferson, and Clearfield
counties.
DCI has been accredited under the Pennsylvania Association of
Nonprofit Organizations’
Standards for Excellence
since 2010. This accreditation is attained by the
most well managed and
responsibly governed nonprofit organizations that
have demonstrated compliance with 55 specific
Standards for Excellence
based on honesty, integrity, fairness, respect,
trust, responsibility, and
accountability.
of Mercersburg drafted
the "community bill of
rights" adopted by Highland and Grant townships.
CELDF also is advising the Highland Government Study Commission on its work toward
a "Home Rule" charter
that includes language
banning injection wells.
Chad Nicholson and
attorney Natalie Long of
CELDF were among 25
at the hearing Sunday.
The commission will
be holding three public
meetings this month to
discuss the "Home Rule"
charter and to seek input
from residents on its content.
Meetings will be held
Thursday at the Snowseekers
Snowmobile
Club in Highland, Aug.
18 at the Hi-La Sportsmen's Club in Russell
City and Aug. 30 at the
township building. All
meetings are at 7 p.m.
"We want to hear
from you," Misty Edinger said in encouraging
township residents to attend the upcoming commission meetings.
The commission reportedly must complete
work on a proposed
"Home Rule" charter by
September to give the
Elk County Board of
Elections sufficient time
to place the referendum
on the ballot Nov. 8.
If the commission
can't meet the deadline
in September, it could
continue to work on the
"Home Rule" charter and
place the proposal before
township voters in the
2017 primary election.
Township voters in
April approved a Government Study Commission
for 'Home Rule." Once a
vote is held on the "Home
Rule" proposal, the commission will be abolished.
The commission thus
far has not used any
township funds for its
meetings, flyers and ads.
Private donations and
fundraisers have covered
operating expenses for
the commission, it has
been noted.
Under a "Home Rule"
charter, township residents could circulate
petitions for a voter referendum on certain nonroutine actions taken by
the elected three-member Board of Supervisors.
The
referendums
mostly likely would be
held in conjunction with
the primary election in
the spring or the general
election in November.
Voter approval of a
resident-inspired referendum would "trump the
supervisors," Guras said.
In addition to a
clause against injection wells, the proposed
"Home Rule" charter for
Highland could call for a
public vote on the filling
of vacancies on the Board
of Supervisors.
The state code includes the annual appointment of a "Vacancy
Board" chairman whose
sole function is to break
a tie between the two remaining supervisors in
filling a vacant seat on
the three-member board.
Twice in the past
four years, a Vacancy
Board chairman was not
in place when a vacancy
occurred on the Board of
Supervisors.
Because the two remaining
supervisors
could not agreed on a replacement, the township
in 2013 and again this
year asked Elk County
President Judge Richard
Masson to appoint a new
board member.
In 2013, Masson appointed Jim Wolfe of
Russell City. Earlier this
year, he appointed Glen
Hulings of James City.
Wolfe and Hulings
currently serve on the
Board of Supervisors
along with Mike Detsch
of James City. Detsch is
the board chairman.
Prior to a PowerPoint
presentation
Sunday,
commission
members
outlined their reasons
for wishing to serve on
the government study
panel.
Lloyd Hulings said
a "Home Rule" charter
would "give a voice back
to the people."
"People should take
more concern in local
government,"
Vaughn
said.
Guras
believes
"Home
Rule"
would
"provide protection" for
township residents. He
said the Second Class
Township Code, adopted
by the state in 1933, is
a "one size fits all" set of
rules.
Vaughn
said
the
commission would "tailor" the proposed "Home
Rule" charter to "help
Highland Township" by
giving residents "more of
a voice." He said township residents, by speaking up at the August
meetings, would "have
a say" in the wording in
the proposed charter.
Ridgway
Township
voters in 2013 turned
down the formation of
a "government study
commission" to draft a
"Home Rule" charter.
Rule
Continued from Page 1
"Home Rule" charter.
Commission
members
Matt Vaughn, Misty Edinger, Bill Edinger, Amy
Beers and Lloyd Hulings
agreed with the motion.
Judy Orzetti has
been named to replace
Erin Vassallo as the seventh member of the commission. Orzetti, however, cannot take part
in commission business
until she takes the oath
of office. Vassallo reportedly resigned due to an
employment issue.
Beers, who resides in
Russell City, is the only
commission member who
does not live in James
City.
Several communities
in the state-- including
St. Marys and Warren-are governed by "Home
Rule" charters. "Home
Rule" transfers authority over municipal matters from the state to the
township, which now is
guided by the state 100page Second Class Township Code.
It appears that most
of the code will continue to be followed in the
"Home Rule" charter for
Highland.
However, the proposed new governing tool
is expected to include a
specific clause that bans
injection wells for the
underground
disposal
of waste fluids from gas
well drilling operations.
The township supervisors in 2013 adopted
a "community bill of
rights" that bans injection wells. Seneca Resources is challenging
the validity of this ordinance in federal court in
Erie.
The current Board
of Supervisors has announced that it would
consider repealing the
"community
bills
of
rights" ordinance at its
regular monthly meeting Aug. 10. Such action
could end the basis for
the Seneca lawsuit.
However,
voter-approval of a "Home Rule"
charter with an anti-injection well clause could
precipitate another legal
battle with Seneca.
Grant Township in
Indiana County last year
lost a similar federal
lawsuit filed by Pennsylvania General Energy
(PGE) of Warren. PGE
successfully challenged
Grant's "community bill
of rights" that bans injection wells. Grant has
appealed this court decision to the Third District
Court of Appeals in Philadelphia.
Grant voters last
year also approved a
"Home Rule" charter
that includes a ban on
injection wells.
The Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF)
ROSENHOOVER’S
BLACKTOP
SEALING
3+<6,&$/7+(5$3<‡2&&83$7,21$/7+(5$3<‡63((&+7+(5$3<
Suffering from &21&866,21RU%$/$1&(
',)),&8/7,(6? Recovering from 685*(5< or an
,1-85<? We’ll get you back to healthy.
Our outpatient physical, occupational and speech therapists will
customize a treatment plan for each patient. 2XU2XWSDWLHQW
5HKDELOLWDWLRQ&HQWHUVFRQVLVWHQWO\VFRUHZHOODERYHWKH
QDWLRQDODYHUDJHLQSDWLHQWVDWLVIDFWLRQVXUYH\VIRU
ˆ6IXYVRMRKTVSTIVFSH]JYRGXMSR
ˆ6IHYGMRKTEMR
ˆ)\GIPPIRXGYWXSQIVWIVZMGI
We are the /2&$/(;3(576,1
PHYSICAL THERAPY. That’s why
4IRR,MKLPERHW,IEPXLGEVILEW14
/2&$7,216XLVSYKLSYXSYVVIKMSR
Here are just some of the conditions we treat.
ˆ Musculoskeletal conditions (joint surgeries or pain)
ˆ 2IYVSPSKMGEPGSRHMXMSRWconcussions, stroke or imbalance)
ˆ Cardio-pulmonary conditions (LIEVXWYVKIV]'34(SVHMJ½GYPX
breathing)
ˆ Sports Injuries
PENN HIGHLANDS CLEARFIELD
814-768-2285
&VSSOZMPPI`2I[&IXLPILIQ
'PIEV½IPH
PENN HIGHLANDS DUBOIS
814-375-3372
&VSGO[E]`'YV[IRWZMPPI`(Y&SMW`*SVGI
6I]RSPHWZMPPI
PENN HIGHLANDS ELK
814-788-8490
Pure Rubberized Material
)QTSVMYQ`*S\8S[RWLMT`/ERI`.SLRWSRFYVK
6MHK[E]`7X1EV]W
BRUSHED ON
NOT SPRAYED
Call for Free Estimates
814-512-2600
PENN HIGHLANDS BROOKVILLE
814-849-6878
of Penn Highlands Healthcare
Visit us at www.phhealthcare.org
7
www.smdailypress.com
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
Minor softball finishes second in the state
The St. Marys Minor
League all-star softball
team finished as the runner-up in the state after an
8-3 loss to Tunkhannock
on Sunday afternoon in
the championship game of
the 8-10 Year Old Softball
Pa. State Tournament in
Wellsboro.
St. Marys had entered
the game needing a win to
force a deciding game for
the title. That game would
have been played on Monday.
Tunkhannock
dealt
the St. Marys squad their
only losses of the tournament. The two teams first
met in the final of the winners bracket on Friday,
with Tunkhannock winning that game 5-3.
Dropping into the con-
solation bracket, St. Marys
took on Morrisville on Saturday. That game was the
final of the consolation
bracket, and St. Marys’
2-1 victory gave the team
another shot at Tunkhannock.
The
Tunkhannock
team will advance to the
East Region Little League
8-10 Year Old Softball Invitational
Tournament,
which is being hosted by
Back Mountain Little
League in Dallas, Pa. from
Aug. 7-15.
St. Marys ends their
season having claimed
both the District 10 and
Section 1 titles. Aside from
their losses to Tunkhannock, the team’s only other
defeat this season came at
the hands of Punxsutaw-
ney in the District 10 Tournament.
The team opened play
in the state tournament
on Tuesday with an 11-2
victory over Indiana and
then followed that up with
a 10-0 four-inning victory over Avon Grove on
Wednesday to set up Friday’s first meeting with
Tunkhannock. St. Marys
ended play in the state
tournament with a record
of 3-2.
Members of the St.
Marys team are Sydney
Alexander, Lydia Anderson, Ellie Baron, Izzy
Catalone, Rosa DePrator,
Jianna Gerg, Kara Hanslovan, Lucy Klawuhn, Emily
Mourer, Rylee Nicklas, GiFile Photo by Becky Polaski
anna Surra, Seanna VanAPlayers and coaches for the St. Marys Minor League all-star softball team are shown
lstine, and Gabby Weisner. talking following a game earlier this season at Benzinger Park.
Cole Peterson named
NYCBL Player of the Night
The New York Collegiate Baseball League
(NYCBL) Western Division champion Olean Oilers moved a step closer
to defending their league
title with an 8-6 victory
over the Eastern Division
champion Syracuse Jr.
Chiefs on Saturday night
in Syracuse, and St. Bonaventure shortstop Cole
Peterson paced the Oilers’
offense with a 4-for-5 effort at the plate en route
to being named Player of
the Night.
Peterson
knotted
things up in the top of the
third with an RBI double
after the Jr. Chiefs took a
1-0 lead an inning earlier.
The Johnsonburg native
later contributed to a sixrun top of the sixth with
an
RBI single. Peterson
accounted for four of Olean’s 11 hits. The Oilers’
shortstop was also part of
two double plays turned
by the Olean infield. Pe-
File photo by Becky Polaski
Cole Peterson is shown about to connect with a pitch
during an Oilers’ game earlier this season.
terson also almost made
a play in the hole between
third and short.
Fellow Olean player
Eddie Demurias (Florida) earned Pitcher of the
Night honors after picking up the save during his
one and one third innings
on the mound. Demurias
closed out the win retiring
all four batters he faced.
The righty struck out
the side in the ninth. He
threw 16 pitches – 12 for
strikes.
Newly acquired Melancon settles
in with NL East-leading Nats
SAN
FRANCISCO
(AP) — Mark Melancon
sat patiently as his name
circulated in rumors
leading up to the trade
deadline.
“I’ve been through it
before, so I realize that
until it happens it’s not a
big deal,” Melancon said.
“I just waited until I got
the phone call.”
The call finally came
on Saturday, and he was
no longer the closer for
the Pittsburgh Pirates.
Instead, the All-Star was
joining the NL East-leading Washington Nationals.
By Sunday, Melancon
had joined his new team
for a game in San Francisco.
“A lot of different
emotions going on just
because I’ve been with
the Pirates for a while,”
said Melancon, who was
in his fourth year with
Pittsburgh. “It’s a little
sad to leave those guys,
but at the same time I’m
really excited to be here
on a first-place club.”
Washington sent reliever Felipe Rivero and
pitching prospect Taylor
Hearn to the Pittsburgh
Pirates to acquire Mel-
ancon, who supplants
the struggling Jonathan
Papelbon as Washington’s closer.
Melancon exchanged
text messages with Papelbon on Saturday while
he was between flights.
Papelbon is 2-4 with
a 4.41 ERA and has allowed eight runs and
seven hits in his past
three outings.
“He’s been awesome
about it,” Melancon said.
“It’s a tough situation, so
I understand . Like he
said, ‘we’re here to win a
championship, whatever
it takes.’”
The deal reunites
Melancon with his Team
USA teammate
Max
Scherzer. He also works
out with Anthony Rendon in the offseason.
The
31-year-old
right-hander goes from
the fringe of the wildcard race to a team that’s
building a nice lead in its
division.
“It gives you a nice
little boost, I know that,”
Melancon said. “For me
it was really exciting.
Whirlwind of a day yesterday, but I’m here and
everything’s great.”
Melancon has con-
verted 30 of 33 saves with
a 1.51 ERA this season.
He joins his fifth organization in eight years.
He is making $9.65
million and is eligible
for free agency after the
World Series; as part of
the swap, the Pirates
will pay Washington
$500,000 on Sept. 1.
Melancon broke into
the majors in 2009 with
the Yankees, where he
was considered a possible successor to Mariano
Rivera. He also pitched
for Houston, Boston and
the Yankees.
He credits the famed
Yankees closer with helping him develop the cut
fastball that he considers
his best pitch.
“I got to watch that a
lot from (Rivera),” Melancon said. “Just sit behind
the plate, sit behind him
pitching. Not only did
I notice how important
the cutter and the movement, when to throw it
in and back door and all
that stuff but just his
location and how important that was. With him
only having one pitch it
meant a lot that he hit
his spots, so I picked up
a lot on those subtleties.”
Francouer’s 2-run homer lifts Braves over Phillies
ATLANTA (AP) — Jeff
Francoeur has enjoyed
his second stint with the
Braves, even though they
have the major leagues’
worst record.
The Atlanta native
doesn’t know if he will be
with Atlanta after Monday’s trade deadline, so he’s
savoring every moment
with his hometown team.
“I think that’s what
they signed me to do, and
when you get a spot start
like today, provide a big hit
or some pop,” he said. “It
was nice to be able to do
that today.”
Francoeur hit a tiebreaking two-run homer in
the seventh inning Sunday,
and the Braves beat the
Philadelphia Phillies 2-1.
Francoeur’s
seventh
home run this season came
off Andrew Bailey (3-1),
who has allowed 19 earned
runs in his last 16 2/3 innings.
Mauricio Cabrera (20), the fourth of six Atlanta
pitchers, pitched a one-hit
seventh.
Jimmy Paredes entered as a defensive replacement in the seventh
and homered against Chris
Withrow in the eighth.
Steelers’ tight ends look
to fill in for retired Miller
LATROBE (AP) —
Pittsburgh quarterback
Ben Roethlisberger called
retired tight end Heath
Miller the best teammate
he ever had.
Roethlisberger doesn’t
expect anyone in the current group to imitate the
most-decorated tight end
in franchise history.
“I think the key is
that they don’t need to
try and be Heath Miller,”
said Roethlisberger, who
wore Miller’s No. 83 jersey as a tribute on the
first day of training camp.
“They have to make sure
they don’t get too anxious.
They’re out there trying
to be the best on every
play. Right now, they’re
doing some really good
things. I’m excited to see
what they can do moving
forward.”
Miller retired shortly
after the Steelers’ January playoff loss against
Denver. The team signed
6-foot-6 tight end Ladarius Green, who spent four
seasons in San Diego and
set single-season career
highs in receptions, receiving yards and touchdowns in 2015 behind
All-Pro Antonio Gates.
Green started training
camp with the Steelers
on the physically unable
to perform list, still recovering from surgery on an
injured ankle that ended
his 2015 season.
“With surgery, you
never know what to expect,” said Green, who
added that doctors repaired a tendon and inserted plates into his
ankle. “I’m just trying to
take it day-by-day and get
back as quick as I can.”
Jesse James, the
Steelers’ 2015 fifth-round
pick, is in his second season, but he’s the only tight
end who spent time with
the team in training camp
last year. David Johnson
played the previous two
seasons in San Diego, but
now he’s back with the
Steelers, where he spent
the first four years of his
career. Xavier Grimble
was on the team’s practice
squad in 2015.
James sees Miller’s
retirement as an opportunity for an expanded role.
“It’s huge for me,”
James said. “Last year,
I played in place of him
once or twice. There’s a
lot of snaps open and my
goal is to take up as many
as I can.”
A
slimmed-down
James lost weight during
the offseason. He’s taking
snaps with the first-team
offense early in training
camp and playing with
confidence.
“Last year at this time
I wasn’t stepping into the
huddle with (Roethlisberger) until we got into
the season,” James said.
“From that standpoint it’s huge. The team
knows what they can expect from me and that’s
my goal going through
camp, to make sure I’m on
the same page with Ben
and the offense.”
James appeared in
eight games last season,
making two starts. He
caught eight passes for
56 yards and a touchdown
in his first career game.
That’s when James realized he could make an impact as a tight end in the
NFL.
“I didn’t prove much
going into that game,”
James said. “But I was
able to have a good game
blocking and catching and
score that touchdown. I
feel good about where I’m
at and what I need to do
to prepare for the season.”
Green already has experience playing behind
a franchise tight end in
Gates.
“You can’t replace
those types of guys,”
Green said. “I learned
that lesson awhile ago.
They’re too special. You
just try to do your best.”
Green’s unique combination of size and speed
gives the Steelers a downfield weapon that can create matchup problems for
opposing defenses, which
excites Roethlisberger.
Green can’t wait to
work with the Steelers’
franchise
quarterback,
too. And he knows he
doesn’t have to step in
and imitate Miller.
“(Gates) and Heath
are the same,” Green said.
“They’re two special guys
at this position. I couldn’t
try to be like (Gates) and I
can’t try to be like Heath.”
NOTES: The Steelers
will practice in pads for
the first time at training
camp on Sunday. ... The
team delayed the start
of Saturday’s practice by
an hour because of heavy
rains that passed through
the area. S Shamarko
Thomas missed practice
with an illness.
Lucroy draws ovation as
pinch-hitter, Brewers sweep Pirates
MILWAUKEE (AP) —
From winning a division
title and a playoff series
to making two All-Star
teams, Jonathan Lucroy
has enjoyed plenty of positive moments since debuting with the Milwaukee
Brewers in 2010.
With Lucroy prominently mentioned in trade
speculation, the 32,405
fans at Miller Park potentially provided one last
memory when they gave
him standing ovations before and after he flied out
as a pinch hitter Sunday
in a 4-2 win over Pittsburgh.
“It was pretty cool, a
lot of fun,” said Lucroy,
who turned down a trade
to Cleveland over the
weekend. “I wish I would
have gotten a knock there,
but we won the game, so
that’s all that matters.”
“The
fans
have
been great to me here. I
couldn’t ask for a better
environment to grow up
in if something does happen. If nothing does happen, it’s going to be awkward the rest of the year.
We’ll see what happens.
It’s out of your control at
this point,” he said.
Lucroy nixed that
swap to the AL Centralleading Indians. But
other teams want the
30-year-old catcher before Monday’s deal dead-
line and he has a limited
no-trade clause.
Pirates pitching coach
Ray Searage visited the
mound as Lucroy walked
to the plate in the eighth
inning. With the crowd
chanting his name, Lucroy tipped his helmet to
acknowledge the cheers.
With two on and two
outs, Lucroy flied out. He
left the field to another
standing ovation.
Local & Area Sports Briefs
ST. MARYS SPORTSMEN’S MEET TONIGHT
The August membership meeting of the St. Marys
Sportsmen’s Club will be held tonight at 8 p.m. at the
farm.
Agenda items at this time include the annual Gun
Bash, rifle and pistol range updates; water to the rearing ponds, maintenance items at the lodge and farm,
skeet and trap items and the postcard membership
campaign.
All members are encouraged to attend.
DUTCH FOOTBALL PARENTS
MEETING TUESDAY
There will be a St. Marys Area Dutch football meeting on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in the high school auditorium for all parents of players in grades 7-12.
8
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
www.smdailypress.com
Benzinger Park’s 38th annual Activity Day was a success
Benzinger Park hosted its 38th annual Activity Day on July 28.
Eighty children came out
to participate and spend
a beautiful day at the
park competing against
other children in a variety of activities in their
specific age groups. The
games began around 9
a.m., Don’s Pizza was given out at noon for lunch,
and events concluded this
year around 1:30 p.m.
Plaques and ribbons were
awarded to the winners
and every child was able
to take home a prize. This
was yet another successful and fun-filled Activity
Day at Benzinger Park.
-Editor’s note: A photo
was not received depicting the winners of the 1011 boys age group. In that
age group, first place went
to Liam Brem, Brayden
Asti was the runner-up,
and Nick Hayes finished
third.
Pictured are the participants who took part in this year’s Activity Day at Benzinger Park.
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
In tennis serve, first place went to Dylan Bleggi, while
In the relay race event, first place went to Lucas MurIn football throw, first place went to Keegan Brem,
Andrew Seltzer was the runner-up and Wyatt Brem was ray, while the runner-up was Kaiden Hoy, and Ethan Bleg- Gavin Studer was the runner-up, and Rixen Auman fingi and Marcus Gahr tied for third.
third.
ished third.
In soccer kick, first place went to Kayne Smith, LuIn the frisbee throw, first place went to Dannilyn GeitIn home run derby, first place went to Alexa Chamcia Hayes was the runner-up, and Erin Skillman finished ner, Emily Joshnick was the runner-up, and Sam Rettger berlin, Clarissa Seltzer and McKayla Hart tied for second,
finished third.
third.
and Liam Smith finished third.
In football punt, first place went to Casey Young, BriIn the 4-5 girls age group, first place went to Avery
elle Smith was the runner-up, and Cortland Kronenwetter Stauffer, Mia Azzato was second, and Kaylee Zore finfinished third.
ished third.
Thailand’s Ariya Jutanugarn
wins Women’s British Open
Photo submitted
In the 12-13 boys age group, first place went to Dylan
Romanic and Alex Seltzer finished second.
Brewers catcher Lucroy
blocks trade to Indians
MILWAUKEE
(AP)
— Milwaukee Brewers
catcher Jonathan Lucroy
has blocked his proposed
trade to the Cleveland Indians.
Lucroy said Sunday
he wasn’t going to go into
the details behind his decision, but the long term is
more important than the
short term for him and his
family.
The teams had reached
a preliminary agreement
on a deal to send Lucroy,
a two-time All-Star, to
the Indians. Milwaukee
general manager David
Stearns says the Brewers will move on after Lucroy refused to waive the
no-trade provision in his
contract. He says there’s
no chance of re-working a
deal with Cleveland.
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel first reported
Lucroy’s decision. Indians
president Chris Antonetti
did not comment on Lucroy’s veto.
Cleveland,
which
leads the AL Central, has
been looking for a catcher
since Yan Gomes separated his shoulder earlier in
July.
MILTON KEYNES,
England (AP) — Ariya
Jutanugarn
won
the
Women’s British Open
on Sunday at Woburn for
her first major championship and fourth LPGA
Tour victory of the year.
The 20-year-old Jutanugarn closed with
an even-par 72 for a
three-stroke victory over
American Mo Martin and
South Korea’s Mirim Lee.
Jutanugarn became the
first major winner from
Thailand.
“I think it’s really
important for me and
for Thai golf, also,” Jutanugarn said. “After my
first tournament on tour,
my goal is I really want
to win a major. I did, so
I’m very proud of myself.”
She finished at 16-under 272 on the Marquess
Course, the hilly, forest layout that is a big
change from the usual
seaside layouts in the
tournament rotation.
The long-hitting Jutanugarn had a six-stroke
lead over Lee at the turn,
but Lee picked up five
strokes on the next four
holes with three birdies
and Jutanugarn’s double
bogey on the par-4 13th.
“I think I got mad
after that hole,” Jutanugarn said. “I’m like,
‘Oh, what’s wrong with
me.’ But after that, I’m
Photo submitted
really like be patient and
In
the
4-5
boys
age
group,
fi
rst
place
went
to Max
I can come back really
Jovenitti, Max Castalano was second, and Landry Brem
good.”
finished third.
Specials
1 time $15.00
2 times $21.00
3 times $25.00
Dates To Run: _____________,________________,_______________
Ad Information: Must List Location, Days & Time
1. ____________ 2. ____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________
5. ____________ 6. ____________ 7. ____________ 8. ____________
9. ____________ 10. ____________ 11. ____________ 12. ____________
13. ____________ 14. ____________ 15. ____________ 16. ____________
17. ____________ 18. ____________ 19. ____________ 20. ____________
Ad placed by: Name___________________________
Address___________________________ Phone__________
Ads must be 20 words or less to receive specials above. All ads must be paid in advance.
Individual ads only, business ads are priced at open rate. Coupon must accompany payment.
MAIL OR DROP OFF WITH PAYMENT TO
THE DAILY PRESS
CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT
245 BRUSSELLES STREET
ST. MARYS, PA 15857
Classified Deadlines
4:00 p.m. 2 Days Prior of Publication
No Ads Will Be Accepted Over The Phone.
9
www.smdailypress.com
Peyton Manning appears on
Saints practice field – in a tie
WHITE SULPHUR
SPRINGS, W.Va. (AP) —
A lanky 6-foot-5 man in a
button-down, long-sleeve
shirt and tie walked onto
the field during Saints
training camp on Sunday, bringing a mixture
of good and painful memories to veteran safety
Roman Harper.
After a brief and
friendly chat, Harper
gave recently retired
NFL quarterback Peyton
Manning a hug.
“I was still angry,
because last time I saw
him, confetti was going all his way,” Harper,
who spent the past two
seasons with Carolina,
said in reference to last
season’s Super Bowl that
was won by Manning’s
Denver Broncos.
“He said we were
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
Additional winners from Activity Day
even and we laughed
about it,” Harper added,
alluding to the Saints’
Super Bowl triumph
over Manning’s Indianapolis Colts to cap the
2009 season. “At the end
of the day you just tip
your hat off to him and
understand that we’re
all competitors. He was
able to do it for 18 years
in this league and be able
to be so great for so long.
It’s just amazing that he
gets to go out on top the
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
way he did.”
In the 6-7 girls age group, first place went to Macy
In the 6-7 boys age group, first place went to Nickalas
Saints coach Sean
Payton has mentioned Wendel, Lydia Simbeck was second, and Ella Castalano Chamberlin, Vinnie Defilippi was second, and Chandler
Nunamaker and Brady Leathers tied for third.
the possibility of adding finished third.
a fourth quarterback to
the roster during preseason and smiled at a
lighthearted
question
asking whether that’s
why Manning showed
up.
Daily Scoreboard
Major League Baseball
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
American League
East Division
Toronto
Baltimore
Boston
New York
Tampa Bay
Central Division
Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota
West Division
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Boston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
W L
59 45
58 45
56 46
52 51
41 61
Pct GB
.567 —
.563 1/2
.549 2
.50561/2
.402 17
W L
59 42
56 48
51 53
49 54
39 64
Pct GB
.584 —
.53841/2
.49091/2
.476 11
.379 21
W L Pct GB
Texas
61 44 .581 —
Houston
55 48 .534 5
Seattle
52 50 .51071/2
Los Angeles
47 57 .452131/2
Oakland
47 57 .452131/2
___
Saturday’s Games
Toronto 9, Baltimore 1
Seattle 4, Chicago Cubs 1
Tampa Bay 6, N.Y. Yankees 3
Chicago White Sox 6, Minnesota 5, 10
innings
Cleveland 6, Oakland 3
Detroit 3, Houston 2
Texas 2, Kansas City 1
L.A. Angels 5, Boston 2
Sunday’s Games
Baltimore 6, Toronto 2, 12 innings
Cleveland 8, Oakland 0
Detroit 11, Houston 0
Tampa Bay 5, N.Y. Yankees 3
Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox 4
Texas 5, Kansas City 3
Boston 5, L.A. Angels 3
Seattle at Chicago Cubs, 8:08 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Kansas City (Duffy 6-1) at Tampa Bay (Archer
5-14), 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duffey 5-8) at Cleveland (Salazar
11-3), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 6-8) at N.Y. Mets
(Verrett 3-6), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Stroman 8-4) at Houston (Fister
10-7), 8:10 p.m.
Boston (Rodriguez 2-4) at Seattle (Paxton
3-5), 10:10 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
National League
East Division
Washington
Miami
New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Central Division
Chicago
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
West Division
W L
61 43
56 48
53 50
48 58
36 68
Pct GB
.587 —
.538 5
.51571/2
.453 14
.346 25
W L
62 41
56 48
52 50
46 56
41 62
Pct GB
.602 —
.53861/2
.51091/2
.451151/2
.398 21
W L Pct GB
San Francisco
60 44 .577 —
Los Angeles
58 46 .558 2
Colorado
52 52 .500 8
San Diego
45 59 .433 15
Arizona
43 61 .413 17
___
Saturday’s Games
Seattle 4, Chicago Cubs 1
San Francisco 5, Washington 3
Colorado 7, N.Y. Mets 2
Miami 11, St. Louis 0
Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 3
Philadelphia 9, Atlanta 5
San Diego 2, Cincinnati 1, 10 innings
Arizona 4, L.A. Dodgers 2
Sunday’s Games
Miami 5, St. Louis 4
N.Y. Mets 6, Colorado 4
Atlanta 2, Philadelphia 1
Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 2
San Francisco 3, Washington 1
L.A. Dodgers 14, Arizona 3
Cincinnati 3, San Diego 2
Seattle at Chicago Cubs, 8:08 p.m.
Monday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 6-8) at N.Y. Mets
(Verrett 3-6), 7:10 p.m.
Miami (Koehler 8-8) at Chicago Cubs (Hendricks 9-7), 8:05 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 14-1) at Arizona
(Bradley 4-6), 9:40 p.m.
Milwaukee (Nelson 6-9) at San Diego (Cosart
0-1), 10:10 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Miami at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Major League Soccer
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
New York City FC 10 7 6 36 40 40
New York
9 9 4 31 36 28
Philadelphia
8 7 6 30 35 33
Montreal
7 5 8 29 35 30
Toronto FC
7 7 6 27 25 23
New England
6 7 8 26 27 33
Orlando City
4 5 11 23 32 35
D.C. United
5 8 7 22 19 25
Columbus
3 7 10 19 26 32
Chicago
4 10 5 17 17 25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
FC Dallas
12 6 5 41 35 31
Colorado
10 3 8 38 24 19
Los Angeles
9 3 8 35 34 19
Sporting Kansas City 9 10 4 31 27 25
Real Salt Lake
8 6 7 31 30 31
Vancouver
8 8 6 30 33 35
Portland
7 7 8 29 33 33
San Jose
6 6 8 26 22 23
Seattle
6 12 2 20 20 27
Houston
4 9 7 19 23 26
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for
tie.
___
Saturday’s Games
New York City FC 5, Colorado 1
Sunday, July 31
Sporting Kansas City 1, Portland 0
Los Angeles 1, Seattle 1, tie
FC Dallas 2, Vancouver 0
Montreal 1, D.C. United 1, tie
New York 2, Chicago 2, tie
Real Salt Lake 2, Philadelphia 1
Orlando City 3, New England 1
Toronto FC 3, Columbus 0
San Jose 1, Houston 1, tie
Wednesday, August 3
Real Salt Lake at Toronto FC, 7 p.m.
Friday, August 5
New York City FC at San Jose, 11 p.m.
Saturday, August 6
Philadelphia at D.C. United, 7 p.m.
Houston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
New England at Toronto FC, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m.
Sunday, August 7
Sporting Kansas City at Portland, 4 p.m.
Seattle at Orlando City, 7 p.m.
Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX — Sent RHP Craig
Kimbrel to Pawtucket (IL) for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Traded LHP Zach
Duke to St. Louis for OF Charlie Tilson. Reinstated LHP Carlos Rodon from the 15-day DL.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Optioned C/INF
Austin Barnes to Oklahoma City (PCL). Reinstated INF/OF Kike Hernandez from the 15-day
DL.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Traded LHP
Andrew Miller to Cleveland for OF Clint Frazier,
LHP Justus Sheffield and RHPs Ben Heller and
J.P. Feyereisen. Traded RHP Vicente Campos
to Arizona for RHP Tyler Clippard. Assigned
Frazier and Heller to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL),
Feyereisen to Trenton (EL) and Sheffield to
Tampa (FSL).
TEXAS RANGERS — Assigned 3B Matt
Duffy outright to Round Rock (PCL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Optioned
LHP Zac Curtis to Mobile (SL). Designated 1B
Mike Freeman and RHP Josh Collmenter for
assignment. Selected the contracts of LHPs
Steve Hathaway and Adam Loewen from Reno
(PCL).
CHICAGO CUBS — Optioned RHP Justin
Grimm to Iowa (PCL).
MIAMI MARLINS — Assigned 1B Don Kelly
outright to New Orleans (PCL). Optioned RHP
Jose Urena to New Orleans. Placed RHP Colin
Rea on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHPs Brian
Ellington and Nefi Ogando from New Orleans.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Sent SS Jhonny
Peralta to Palm Beach (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
SAN DIEGO PADRES — Selected the contract of OF Jabari Blash from El Paso (PCL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Sent 3B Matt
Duffy to Sacramento (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent RHP
Joe Ross to Syracuse (IL) for a rehab assignment.
American Association
JOPLIN BLASTERS — Signed RHP Santos
Arias.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS — Signed RHP Graham Johnson.
Can-Am League
NEW JERSEY JACKALS — Released RHP
Justin Brantly.
QUEBEC CAPITALES — Released RHP
Deryk Hooker.
TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES — Signed RHP
Edgar Valle.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Waived TE Nick
Truesdell. Signed TE Konrad Reuland.
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Waived CB Tyler Patmon. Placed DE Dion Jordan on the active/nonfootball injury list. Signed CB Brandon Harris.
Activated RB Arian Foster from the PUP list.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Placed S Jaquiski Tartt on the active/non-football injury list.
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
Photo submitted
In the 8-9 girls age group, first place went to Roan
In the 8-9 boys age group, first place went to Mason
Lion, Zoe Romanic was second, and Jaiden Mattivi fin- Nicklas, Frankie Smith was second, and Milo Brem finished third.
ished third.
In the 10-11 girls age group, first place went to Alexis
In the 12-13 girls age group, first place went to Torie
Wendel and Rylee Nicklas finished second.
Swackhammer and Morgan Billotte finished second.
In the basketball shoot event, first place went to JorIn the volleyball serve event, first place went to Pidan Skillman, David Smith was the runner-up, and Koehn lar Pfoutz, Ava Schlimm was the runner-up, and Joycory
Hoy and Aaron Smith tied for third.
Close finished third.
Rain postpones NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Pocono
LONG POND (AP)
— Pocono CEO Brandon Igdalsky took refuge from the rain inside
a garage stall that was
being used as the site of
the drivers meeting.
His message Sunday morning to Jimmie
Johnson, Jeff Gordon,
Tony Stewart and the
rest of the field: “I love
you guys. But I don’t
want to see you tomorrow.”
Well, tough luck.
Call it, Pocono Rainway.
Rain washed out the
NASCAR Sprint Cup
race at Pocono Raceway and the 400-mile
race will now run at 11
a.m. Monday. Martin
Truex Jr. is on the pole
and Kurt Busch tries
to sweep Pocono in the
track’s second Monday
race of the season.
The June Pocono
race also was delayed
a day. NASCAR said
this was the first time a
track had two rain-postponed races in the same
season.
This was NASCAR’s
10th postponed race
since 2011. The 2012
rain-shortened race at
Pocono was marred by
lightning strikes that
killed one fan and injured nine others.
Drugs & Alcohol
LISTEN TO THEM • TALK TO THEM
A community outlook on the
Prevention of Drug & Alcohol abuse
TALKING TO YOUR TEEN ABOUT DRUG ABUSE
It can be difficult to talk to your
teen about drug abuse. Start by
choosing a comfortable time and
setting. If you’re anxious, share
your feelings with your teen. You
might also consider sharing the responsibility with another nurturing
adult in your teen’s life.
When you discuss teen drug
abuse, you might:
Ask your teen’s views. Listen to
your teen’s opinions — which may
differ from your own — and questions about drug use. Encourage
your teen to talk by asking openended questions, such as “Tell me
what you think about ... .”
Discuss reasons not to abuse
drugs. Avoid scare tactics. Em-
phasize how drug use can affect
things important to your teen —
such as sports, driving, health and
appearance. Explain that even a
teen can develop a drug problem.
Consider media messages. Some
television programs, movies, Web
sites or songs glamorize or trivialize drug use. Talk about what your
teen has seen or heard.
Plan specific ways to resist peer
pressure. Brainstorm with your
teen about how to respond to offers of drugs. Suggest that your
teen try saying, “No thanks,” or “I
don’t do drugs because it could get
me kicked off the team.” Your teen
also might offer friends a socially
acceptable alternative activity,
such as watching a movie.
Be ready to discuss your own
drug use. Think ahead about how
you’ll respond if your teen asks
about your own drug use. If you
chose not to use drugs, explain
why. If you did use drugs, share
what the experience taught you.
Don’t be afraid that talking about
teen drug abuse will plant ideas in
your teen’s head. Conversations
about drug abuse won’t tempt your
teen to try drugs. Instead, talking
about drug abuse lets your teen
know your views and understand
what you expect of him or her.
Why teens abuse drugs
Various factors may contribute to
teen drug abuse, from insecurity
and self-doubt to a desire for social
acceptance. Teens often feel indestructible and may not consider
the consequences of their actions,
leading them to take potentially
dangerous risks — such as abusing legal or illegal drugs
10
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
4. EMPLOYMENT
4. EMPLOYMENT
HIRING TRUCK
DRIVERS
4. EMPLOYMENT
Fuel Delivery Driver
2 Years CDL Experience
Tanker Endorsement
Necessary
Retirement Plan &
Health Benefits Available.
Competitive Pay
5 yrs. Class A
CDL Experience.
Hazmat/Tanker
Endorsements.
Send Resume &
References To:
Beimel
Transportation, Inc.
814-885-8990
Friday Gas & Oil Co.
PO Box 84
Byrnedale, PA 15827
To place a classified ad call 781-1596.
4. EMPLOYMENT
www.smdailypress.com
4. EMPLOYMENT
4. EMPLOYMENT
4. EMPLOYMENT
RN/LPN’s
HELP WANTED
For Sorting &
Light Duty Work
All Shifts Available.
Applications at:
Arete QIS
103 Bridge St.
Ridgway, PA 15853
(Daguscahonda)
Come join our Team!! Metaldyne is a world leader in producing powdered metal components for automotive industry leaders, including Ford,
GM and Honda. We are growing and need talent. Our customers rate us
as one of the best powdered metal companies in North America. Come see
what we are about.
Metaldyne Sintered Components, Ridgway is seeking motivated, responsible individuals for the following position:
PRODUCT ENGINEER
Applicant should have a minimum of an Associates Degree in Engineering (Bachelor’s Degree preferred) and 5 years work experience in the
Powdered Metal industry. This position will be working with customers
from the initial design and development thru the entire life cycle of the
product. Working knowledge of TS16949, Lean Manufacturing, Materials, Kaizen, Minitab, and DOE is preferred. Experience with Pro-E a plus.
Preference will be given to those with experience working with automotive customers.
Job duties for this position include but are not limited to:
t%FTJHOEFWFMPQNFOUBOEDIBOHFTXJUIDVTUPNFS
(before and after PPAP)
t3'21SPDFTT'MPX2VPUF3FWJFX
t/FX1SPEVDU-BVODI/1-NFFUJOH.-1
t0XOT1SPUPUZQF11"1#VJMET
t.BUFSJBM#JMMPG.BUFSJBMT.4%44QFDJĕDBUJPOT
t1SPDFTT$POUSPMT1*TJFNPMETJOUFSTJ[F
t'BDJMJUBUFTDVTUPNFSWJTJUTCPUIJOIPVTFBOEBUDVTUPNFSMPDBUJPO
t'BDJMJUBUFTUFBNQSPKFDUTUPDPNQMFUJPO(BOUDIBSUUJNJOHBDUJWJUZ
for tooling, samples, ramp-up & SOP
t.3#4DSBQ3FXPSL
t$SPTTGVODUJPOBMEFWFMPQNFOUPG$POUSPM1MBOBOE1'.&"
All interested candidates should apply by logging on to:
www.metaldyne.com
and clicking on the Career Link.
Metaldyne Sintered Components is an Equal Opportunity Employer, minority/female/disabled/veteran
SHIFT
SUPERVISOR
(VARIOUS SHIFTS AVAILABLE)
Metal Powder Products (MPP), a leader in the Powder Metal IndusWU\LVH[SHULHQFLQJVLJQL¿FDQWEXVLQHVVJURZWKDQGKDVRSSRUWXQLWLHV
IRUH[SHULHQFHGVXSHUYLVRUVDWERWKRIRXU6W0DU\V'LYLVLRQV)RUG
5RDGDQG:DVKLQJWRQ6WUHHW
WHAT WE ARE LOOKING FOR
&DQGLGDWHVSRVVHVVLQJDSRVLWLYHZRUNDWWLWXGHDQGDYHUL¿DEOHZRUN
KLVWRU\WKDWGHPRQVWUDWHVWKHLUDELOLW\WRVXSHUYLVHDQGFRRUGLQDWHWKH
DFWLYLWLHVRIWKHSURGXFWLRQZRUNHUVDQGPDLQWDLQDVDIHHI¿FLHQWGLVFLSOLQHGDQGKDUPRQLRXVZRUNSODFH
Experience:
0LQLPXPVHYHQ\HDUVRIH[SHULHQFHLQWKH30EXVLQHVVDQGDWOHDVW
WZR\HDUVRIH[SHULHQFHLQVXSHUYLVLRQ
Skills:
‡$ELOLW\WRLGHQWLI\SUREOHPVZLWKWKHSURGXFWSURFHVVDQGTXDOLW\
V\VWHP
‡*RRGVXSHUYLVRU\VNLOOV
‡3UR¿FLHQF\LQ062XWORRN:RUGDQG([FHO
‡([FHOOHQWOHDGHUVKLSVNLOOV
Key Expectations:
6DIHW\ HI¿FLHQF\ TXDOLW\ SURFHVV LPSURYHPHQW UHSRUWLQJ DQG SODQW
FOHDQOLQHVV
WHAT WE HAVE TO OFFER
$Q RSSRUWXQLW\ WR MRLQ D JURZLQJ FRPSDQ\ WKDW VHUYHV DQ XQXVXDOO\
diverse market
Competitive Pay Rates
Health Care Program, Life Insurance, 401k with Company Match
Paid Holidays and Vacation Time
,I\RXUTXDOL¿FDWLRQVPHHWWKHDERYHFULWHULDSOHDVHVHQGRUID[\RXU
UHVXPH LQFOXGLQJ VKLIW SUHIHUHQFH VDODU\ KLVWRU\UHTXLUHPHQWV DQG
references to:
Guy and Mary Felt Manor, a 40 bed
skilled nursing facility is seeking qualified
RN/LPN’s to fulfill openings for full-time
and part-time positions. Our busy nursing home provides high quality care to
long and short-term residents. We use
and electronic medical record system to
coordinate the care we render. Flexible
scheduling and negotiable salary package.
Please contact the Director of Nursing
at 486-4802 with any questions or apply
online at:
www.guyandmaryfeltmanor.com
GET YOUR CAREER
STARTED IN HEALTHCARE
FREE
Paid 5-week Nurse Aide Training Class
Classes begin October 10
Pinecrest Manor, Penn Highlands Elk
Apply online at click on Careers, and Penn Highlands Elk
or call 814-788-8534
19. MISC.
$,5/,1( &$
5((56 EHJLQ KHUH
*HWKDQGVRQWUDLQ
LQJDV)$$FHUWLILHG
$YLDWLRQ7HFKQLFLDQ
)LQDQFLDO $LG IRU
TXDOLILHG VWXGHQWV
-RE SODFHPHQW DV
VLVWDQFH&$//$YL
DWLRQ ,QVWLWXWH RI
0DLQWHQDQFH 48,&.%22.6 3$<52//7UDLQLQJ
3URJUDP2QOLQH&D
UHHU 7UDLQLQJ FDQ
JHW \RX MRE UHDG\
$VN DERXW RXU
/DSWRS3URJUDP+6
'LSORPD*(' UH
TXLUHG 2&($1 &,7<
0$5</$1' %HVW
VHOHFWLRQ RI DIIRUG
DEOH UHQWDOV )XOO
SDUWLDO ZHHNV &DOO
IRU )5(( EURFKXUH
2SHQGDLO\+ROLGD\
5HVRUW 6HUYLFHV 2Q
OLQH UHVHUYDWLRQV
+ < 3 ( 5 / , 1 .
KWWSZZZKROL
G D \ R F F R P ZZZKROLGD\RFFRP
6$:0,//6 IURP
RQO\ 0$.( 6$9(
021(< ZLWK \RXU
RZQEDQGPLOOs&XW
OXPEHU DQ\ GLPHQ
VLRQ,QVWRFNUHDG\
WR VKLS )UHH
LQIR'9'+<3(5
/
,
1
.
KWWSZZZ1RU
ZRRG6DZPLOOVFRP
ZZZ1RUZRRG6DZ
PLOOVFRP ([W1
3XUVXDQWWR‚
RIWKH3HQQV\OYDQLD
'HSDUWPHQWRI$JUL
FXOWXUH7LWOHUHJX
ODWLRQV *52:
0$5. )6 //&
KHUHE\ JLYHV QRWLFH
RI JURXQG DSSOLFD
WLRQ RI 5HVWULFWHG
8VH 3HVWLFLGHV IRU
WKHSURWHFWLRQRIDJ
ULFXOWXUDO FURSV LQ
PXQLFLSDOLWLHV LQ
3HQQV\OYDQLD GXU
LQJWKHQH[WGD\V
5HVLGHQWVRIFRQWLJX
RXV SURSHUW\ WR RXU
DSSOLFDWLRQ VLWHV
VKRXOGFRQWDFW\RXU
ORFDO *52:0$5.
)6//&IDFLOLW\IRU
DGGLWLRQDO LQIRUPD
WLRQ&RQFHUQHG&LW
L]HQVVKRXOGFRQWDFW
0LFKDHO /D\WRQ
0*5 6DIHW\ (Q
Y L U R Q P H Q W POD\WRQ#JURZ
PDUNIVFRP*52:
0$5.)6//&
1( )URQW 6WUHHW
0LOIRUG '( &DOO CAUTION
It is impossible for The
Daily Press to check each
and every classified ad
which is mailed to our
office. The advent of
“900” phone lines have
opened a new type of
scam.
We caution our readers
NOT to fall prey to “work
at home ads” which sound
too good to be true. If the
ad required that you
advance money.
WE SUGGEST
EXTREME CAUTION
THE DAILY PRESS
CLASSIFIED RATE
$2.85 PER LINE
With following
discounts:
3 time insertion - $2.55
6 time insertion - $2.25
10 time insertion - $2.00
30 time insertion - $1.65
Staggered ads - No
discount.
A minimum of 3 Lines
per day on all insertions
---------A charge of $5 additional
is made for blind key
advertisements of a
classified nature. Advertisements providing for
answers to be left at The
Daily
Press
are
considered as blind or key
advertisements. A charge
of $5 additional to blind
key advertisements to
have answers mailed to
advertiser.
Deadlines
4 p.m. 2 days before
publication.
For
publication on Monday,
deadline is 4 p.m.
Thursday.
Customer Service Hotline
781-1596
Applications must be received by August 17.
Please call if...
•
•
•
•
•
•
Penn Highlands is an Equal Opportunity Employer
BURKE’S
Home Center
CASHIERS
Part-time Cashier
needed at Burke’s
Home Center.
Must be able to work
all hours and
weekends.
Apply in the office.
WANTED
TRACTOR TRAILER
DRIVER
2 years experience
necessary.
No Overnight,
No Weekends
Part-time or Full-time
Hospitalization,
Paid Holidays and
Vacation
Send Resume to:
City Transfer Inc.
900 Brussells St.
St. Marys, PA 15857
HELP
WANTED
SUBSTITUTE
DELIVERY
DRIVER
8. FOR RENT
/J %5 QHZ DSW
GRZQWRZQ QR
SHWVVPRNLQJ
PRXWLOOHDVH
FOR
SALE/
RENT
New 50’ x 80’
Industrial
Building.
Located in the
Airport
Industrial Park,
St. Marys.
KOZ Benefits
Call Mike at:
814-594-3797
The Daily Press
is your classified
market place. To
place an ad call
781-1596.
You would likehome delivery of The Daily Press.
Your paper did not arrive by 5:30pm Mon-Sat.
Your paper was damaged.
You have a problem with a newsrack.
You are going on vacation.
You have a question about your subscription.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT HOURS:
Mon.-Fri. 8:00am - 4:30pm
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Your local connection to local businesses & services!
Check us out on the web at: www.smdailypress.com
Construction
RANDY
WORTMAN
ROOFING
Waterproofing
Housing
WET BASEMENT? ELK TOWERS
roofing
- ELDERLY HOUSING Waterp
lties ! An Affordable Residence You’ll
Specia
nts
m aranteed Dry Baseme
STEEL ROOFING
ASPHALT SHINGLES ¯ Gu ior Digging!
mNo Exter
¯
DECKS, RAMPS
mCracked Wall Repair!
¯
& SIDING
TE!
mFREE ESTIMA
¯
FREE Estimates
Insured PA 054421
35 Years Local Experience
Call Randy @
814-834-1689
4-772-9291
81Info
& Referrals at:
Be Proud To Call Home!
CALL FOR DETAILS
Preference given to extremly low income applicants
185 Center St., St. Marys, PA 15857
(814) 834-4445
waterproofyourhome.com
PAID
TRAINING
Approx. 5 hrs
per day.
Must have your
own vehicle &
valid PA
driver’s license.
Call or Text
594-0963
Check Us Out
Online
Metal Powder Products – Attn: H.R. Mgr.
150 Ford Rd.
St. Marys, PA 15857
Fax: (814) 781-5125
E-mail: [email protected]
$Q(TXDO2SSRUWXQLW\(PSOR\HU
19. MISC.
Smokey - adult female Tabby,
house trained, current shots.
Call 834-3247 to adopt.
Arthur - baby male Tuxedo,
house trained, current shots.
Call 834-3247 to adopt.
Residents of Elk County can adopt a pet by calling
Elk County Humane Society at 834-3247,
Penny’s Grooming
Large Inside Dogs Welcomed
Call 885-6678
NDGAA certied groomer
www.smdailypress.com
Marian - baby female Tuxedo,
house trained, current shots.
Call 834-3247 to adopt.
Pine Haven
Veterinary Clinic
Call Today!
837-7929
11
www.smdailypress.com
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
DEAR ANNIE®
COPYRIGHT 2016 CREATORS SYNDICATE, INC.
Dear Annie: My 10-year-old’s
school administrators are over-the-top
nosey and won’t stay out of our business.
I think they mean well, but at times, they
try to micromanage the care of our child.
For example, his favorite pair of shoes
are falling apart, and although he has
new shoes, he prefers the old ones. The
school sent home a pair of shoes, as if
we couldn’t afford to buy any. It seemed
insulting and passive-aggressive, and my
son liked those shoes even less than the
new ones we’d bought him. So that was a
waste.
Also, our son recently had a cut
that became infected. The school nurse
spotted the beginning of the infection, so
we are grateful for that, though we were
watching it closely, too. We took him in
immediately and began treatment. The
school sent home notes about where we
could take him in case we could not afford a doctor. (We can and have never
implied that we don’t have the means or
insurance.) The administrators even sent
instructions on how to give him a bath
using Epsom salt for the wound. They
know that we are both professionals with
advanced degrees, yet they treat us like
nimrods. -- Capable With a Cub
Dear Capable: Unless the school
addressed the note home to “Mr. and
Mrs. Nimrod,” you’re jumping to conclusions. I guarantee that the administrators
were just trying to help.
Your son really shouldn’t wear
shoes that are disintegrating -- no matter what he “prefers.” A 10-year-old might
prefer to eat pizza rolls three meals a
day and play Xbox all night; that doesn’t
mean you let him.
We make concessions where we
can as parents, but some matters aren’t
up for debate. Make your son wear the
new shoes, no matter how much whining
follows. (I know, I know. Easier said than
done.) Sometimes cubs need tough love.
Dear Annie: My brother-in-law
keeps borrowing money, and my husband just can’t say no to his big brother.
This wouldn’t be a problem if we were
Rockefellers. We’re not. We both work
full time. We have kids of our own to put
through school. We are barely scraping
by and even have debt. We’re just not in
a position to lend money.
Larry, my brother-in-law, seems to
have a new career every year. This year,
he’s trying to get his real estate license.
Last year, he started an online store,
which never took off. In the past, he’s
tried photography and painting.
It’s hard to watch him fail, and I
would feel sorry for him if I weren’t so
ticked off that he’s flushed thousands
of our dollars down the drain along with
each of these new enterprises.
And now I find out that behind my
back, my husband co-signed a loan,
which his brother defaulted on, and we
had to take out a second mortgage on the
house to pay it. How can I get my husband to stop giving him money? How can
I stop resenting both my brother-in-law
and his wife for this? -- Broke and Bitter
Dear Broke: You’re right. He’s
wrong. But you probably married him
because you fell in love with his generous disposition and his desire and willingness to help others in need -- qualities at
play here. Recognize that big heart of his
while also telling him it’s unacceptable to
make such decisions behind your back.
Tell him that his continuing to do so would
be a betrayal of your trust.
Encourage him to support his
brother in ways that have no bearing on
your finances. He could help Larry work
out a budget or set realistic career goals.
In the long run, that kind of aid is better
than simply handing him a check whenever he’s in a pinch. Teach a man to fish.
Send your questions for Annie
Lane to [email protected] To find
out more about Annie Lane and read features by other Creators Syndicate columnists and cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate website at www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2016 CREATORS.COM
C R O S SWO R D
5(7$,1,1* :$//6 ‡ %5,&. 3$9(56 ‡ 1$785$/ 9(1((5
6721(‡/,0(6721(‡6$1'6721(‡6&5((1('72362,/
$1'08&+025(
“ALL THE NEWS YOU CAN USE”
0LOOLRQ'ROODU+Z\‡
YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
Today’s New Moon is the best
day all year to look at the balance
in your life with work versus play,
socializing and appreciating your
creativity. Life should not be all
about work.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
This is the best day of the year to
see ways to improve your home
and your family relationships. It’s
a great day to make resolutions!
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Today’s New Moon is the perfect
day to think about your style of
communicating to others. Are
you clear in all your communications?
For Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2016 - by Francis Drake
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
You are frugal by nature. Nevertheless, today is the only New Moon
all year urging you to make resolutions about how you handle your
wealth.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Take a serious look in the mirror
to see how you can improve your
appearance and create a better impression on your world? Appearances count.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Take a moment today to think
about the values that guide you on
a daily basis. This is something we
take for granted and often never
think about.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Today’s New Moon is your opportunity to think about how you can
improve your friendships and your
relationships with groups. After all,
there’s always room for improvement, isn’t there?
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
People skills are important, especially when dealing with bosses
and VIPs. How are your skills for
dealing with authority figures?
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
You love to travel, and you love to
learn. Today’s New Moon urges
you to think of ways to enrich
your life through travel and further
study.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Each New Moon is a chance to make
resolutions. Today’s New Moon offers
you a chance to think about how to get
out of debt and handle shared property in a better way.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
What can you do to improve your
partnerships and closest relationships? This might be the best day of
the year to think about this. Be honest
with yourself.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Today’s New Moon is your chance
to think about how to improve your
health, as well as how to improve your
job or how you do your job. What are
some top things to consider?
YOU BORN TODAY You are intense, yet calm. You are also
compassionate and sympathetic.
Your charismatic charm makes you
great at socializing! Initially, this
year begins quietly, which is why
you might not see major changes
until next year; however, it will be
a year of growth, construction
and building. Do what you can to
reduce your debt and strengthen
your financial position. You are
building for your future!
Birthdate of: Isabel Allende, author; Simon Kinberg, screenwriter/
producer; Mary Louise Parker, actress.
(c) 2016 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
“FAST DELIVERY IS OUR SPECIALTY”
ZZZMPGVWRQHVFRP‡+RXUV0RQ)UL‡6DW‡6XQ
12
The Daily Press
Monday, August 1, 2016
www.smdailypress.com
Pro Process achieves 3,000 safe days
Photo submitted
Pro Process, LLC, a locally-owned and operated machining facility, recently achieved an astonishing 3,000 safe days without a lost time accident. Currently employing 90 full-time and part-time
employees, Pro Process machines powder metal components for a variety of industries including
automotive, lawn and garden, healthcare, recreational vehicles, and commercial equipment. Servicing a global economy, they have experienced steady growth in nearly every year of their
14-year history and continue to grow with new equipment purchases, building expansions, and
increasing job opportunities for the area. Pro Process has worked over 12 years for a total of over
900,000 hours without a lost time accident. All employees were rewarded for their dedication and
commitment to safety with a fleece jacket commemorating their milestone of 3,000 safe days.
Co-workers remember Armstrong
with bench, tree and scholarship
BRADFORD – Coworkers and friends are
remembering Jeff Armstrong, a member of the
facilities staff at the University of Pittsburgh at
Bradford, with a memorial
bench by the Tunungwant
Creek, a tree, and a scholarship.
Armstrong,
who
worked at Pitt-Bradford for
40 years, died unexpectedly
in October at the age of 60.
Heartbroken
colleagues began discussions
about finding a way to
remember Armstrong on
campus.
Led by the Pitt-Bradford Staff Association, employees chose to place a
bench along the creek in
his memory, and an anonymous donor offered to purchase a tree. Armstrong
was an avid outdoorsman,
and both memorials were
appealing because of his
love for and pride in the
campus’s grounds.
“It did not take long
to raise the money needed
for the bench,” said Jessica
Kramer, president of the
Staff Association. “So many
staff members wanted to
do something to remember
Jeff. The hardest part was
asking people to be patient
while Staff Association
Council worked out the
details for the bench and
scholarship.”
With the $1,000 raised
in excess of the cost of the
Jeff
Armstrong
bench, the
Staff Association chose
to
make
an annual
scholarship
to an environmental
studies student during
the 2016-17
academic
year.
The association would
like to make the gift annually or even endow a
scholarship in Armstrong’s
honor, but continuing donations would be needed.
“We’re grateful for all
the donations we’ve received but would certainly
welcome more to keep the
scholarship funded in future years,” Kramer said.
Armstrong
began
working for Pitt-Bradford’s first president, Dr.
Donald Swarts, before he
even graduated from high
school, mowing Swarts’s
lawn, and sometimes stay-
ing for a bit to chat with
him on the patio.
At the time of Armstrong’s death, he was still
taking care of the PittBradford president’s home
at 120 School St., where he
built the garden walls himself with bricks from the
old Bradford Hospital.
Student workers always took a shine to Armstrong, and he to them.
He took students hunting
and fishing. He knew their
names for all the secret
places on campus. They
trusted him, and he taught
them by modeling a work
ethic that required always
doing things the right way
the first time and contributing the most possible to
the orientation.
Contributions to the
Jeffrey P. Armstrong Scholarship may made by contacting the Pitt-Bradford
Office
of
Institutional
Advancement at 814-3625091 or by visiting www.
givetoupb.org.
Pro-Dig Enterprises
Excavating, Underground
Utilities, Retaining Walls
& more 594-3797
Sacred Heart Bread Sale
8/4 4-6, 8/5 10-3
pre-orders
834-7861 or 834-3698
Whissels
Open Daily 2pm-9pm
Closed Mondays
834-4185
Pioneer Construction
Excavation, Utilities,
Concrete, Tree Services
& More 814-594-1116
Affordable Contractors
Senior Assisted Living
Bathrooms available
We Call Back 788-0044
Simbeck's Southern
Carpet
Residential, Commercial
& Vinyl Flooring 781-3072
SMAHS Class of "71"
Reunion Aug 27, 1-7
call Dan @787-7477
Moose #146 Cash Bash
8/20 Doors open @4
CFD Training Grounds
W. Creek Rd
For details 834-2781
Hollywood Hardscape
Concrete/Hardscaping,
Driveways, Retaining
Walls, Stonework
335-7657
Nussbaums 788-5097
Fresh Hardneck and
Elephant Garlic for Sale
Super Bingo Fri. 8/5
Sacred Heart @4:30
Jack [email protected] 2,400
Door Prizes
Oven Ready Baked Ziti
Lg $14.99 Sm $7.99
Thompson's 834-9781
Local Butter Sugar
Sweet corn daily @
Burkes & Valley Farm
Market
Liver Dumplings
8/1-8/5 all week!
Tablespoons Cafe
10 Erie Ave 781-8257
be conducted Thursday,
Aug. 4 at 10 a.m. at Holy
Rosary Church, Johnsonburg. Officiating will be
Rev. David J. Wilson, pastor. Interment will be in
Holy Rosary Cemetery,
Johnsonburg.
Friends will be received Wednesday evening,
Aug. 3 from 6-8 p.m. at the
Anthony F. Ferragine Funeral Home, 401 Chestnut
St., Johnsonburg.
Share your condolences at www.ferraginefuneralhome.com.
Diane L. Snyder are private and are being held at
the convenience of the family.
Lynch-Green Funeral
Home, 151 N. Michael St.,
St. Marys, is handling the
arrangements and online
condolences may be made
to the family at www.lynchgreenfuneralhome.com.
Funeral Services
KRUG – A Mass of
Christian Burial for Thomas K. Krug Sr. will be celebrated Tuesday, Aug. 2
at 10 a.m. in the Queen of
the World Church with the
Rev. Ross Miceli officiating.
Burial will be in the St.
Mary’s Cemetery.
Visitation is at the
Lynch-Radkowski Funeral
Home on Monday evening
from 6-8 p.m.
Online
condolences
may be offered at www.
lynch-radkowski.com.
OCCHIUTO – A Mass
of Christian Burial for
Margaret C. Occhiuto will
1022 DeLaum Rd., St. Marys
834-1464
SNYDER – Funeral
and committal services for
Mon.-Fri. 7 AM-5 PM, Sat. by appt. 7 AM-12 PM
FIREWOOD
Lottery Numbers
The following winning
numbers were drawn in
Sunday's
Pennsylvania
Lottery:
MIDDAY
Pick 2
05
Pick 3
380
Pick 4
0386
Pick 5
58740
FOR SALE
Cut & Split 16” in Stock.
Other sizes available upon request.
Treasure Hunt
14 15 17 21 23
Delivery Available
FIREWOOD KEPT
UNDER ROOF.
EVENING
Pick 2
32
Pick 3
188
Pick 4
2471
Pick 5
63385
Cash 5
13 15 23 38 42
REDUCED PRICING!
Premium
Wood Pellets
Bulk Rock Salt
ANIMAL
BEDDING
for local farmers.
REGISTER YOUR VEHICLE
ON THE SPOT
• All types of Titles and Notary Work
Notary & Registration Serivces, LLC
• Registration Renewals
• Replacements of: Stickers, Cards &
• Plates
• ATV/Snowmobiles & Boats
572B S. St. Marys St., St. Marys, PA
814-245-2207 • 814-245-2900
Hours: Mon 9-6; Tues, Wed,
Thurs, Fri 9-5; Sat 9-12
[email protected]
nt
Attend the session of your choice.
If you have any questions, please call 781-2108.
me
Wednesday, August 10, 2016
10:00 a.m. or 5:00 p.m.
e
orc
CARPIN AUDITORIUM
Enf
Parents/Guardians,
Freshmen and
Transfer Students
Law
Freshman Orientation
r
no
Ho
977 South St. Marys Rd., St. Marys, PA 15857
d to
Prou
ST. MARYS AREA
HIGH SCHOOL
Thank you for your service to our community!
COTTER WWW.COTTERGMC.COM
435 Hall Ave. St. Marys, PA 15857
814-834-2063
“Honest sales and service you can
trust - ask around!”

Similar documents