September 19, 2013 - The Colchester Sun

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September 19, 2013 - The Colchester Sun
The ColChesTer sun
WWW.COLCHESTERSUN.COM
SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
VOL. 12 No. 38
Prsrt Std ECRWSS
U.S. Postage Paid Permit No. 91
Essex Junction, VT 05452 Postal Patron-Residential
Local Motion ponders full week
Non-profit reports successful
ferry season after two-year
flood hiatus
By JASON STARR
The Colchester Sun
This year’s increased schedule of bike ferry
service connecting the Island Line Trail from
Colchester to South Hero across the gap in the
Colchester Causeway was successful enough
to encourage the service’s director, Brian
Costello, to push for seven-day-a-week service
next season.
The ferry, sponsored by the Burlington
non-profit Local Motion (of which Costello is
co-founder), was increased from running only
summer weekends in years past to running
Friday through Sunday this season. The service
started earlier than before, in June, and is still
running on weekends through Columbus Day,
Oct. 14 — the latest it’s ever run.
Costello reports that an average of 150 riders
per day used the service this summer. Initiated
in 2003, the ferry was unable to operate in both
2011 and 2012 as the causeway underwent
federally funded repairs after the damaging
floods of 2011. The repaired causeway was
a noticeable upgrade for cyclists, whose thin
“The silver lining to the flood and
the causeway rebuild is that it really
united all the partners and made
everybody realize the Island Line is
bigger than the sum of its parts.”
Brian Costello
Ferry Director
tires fared better on the newer, smoother
surface, Costello said.
The Island Line Trail attracted riders from
across the country, many on rides that spanned
multiple states and Canadian provinces, he
added.
“It was very weather dependent, which we
knew, but it was very steady. If it was a nice
day, we had riders,” he said.
Local Motion helped raise the local match
to the federal disaster funds that repaired
the causeway over the past two years. The
fundraising campaign helped bring together the
municipalities and organizations with a stake
in the causeway’s future, including Burlington,
Colchester, South Hero and Local Motion. The
result is not only a smoother causeway, but
–See CAUSEWAY on page 2
A unanimous
Ô noÕ to missile
defense in
Jericho
By JASON STARR
The Colchester Sun
No one in Vermont cheered the Pentagon’s
announcement last week that the United States
Department of Defense has chosen the Vermont
National Guard’s Ethan Allen Firing Range in
Jericho as a candidate to host an underground
array of defense missiles.
The missiles would be part of a homeland
defense strategy that went operational with the
opening of a 40-missile site in Alaska in 2004.
Since then, one other missile defense site has been
opened, in California in 2006. The five candidates
chosen as a possible third site are all in the eastern
half of the country. They were chosen after an
initial survey of dozens of possibilities, according
to Vermont National Guard Spokesman Cpt.
Chris Gookin.
The missile defense system involves missiles
placed in concrete underground silos that would
be launched as interceptors in the case of a missile
attack on the U.S. mainland.
“It can intercept a hostile ballistic missile
in space,” explained Missile Defense Agency
Spokesman Richard Lehner. “It collides directly
with an incoming warhead.”
Congress directed the department to conduct
the study as part of the 2013 National Defense
Authorization Act. But Vermont’s Congressional
delegation is against the program. Sen. Patrick
Leahy called it “technologically challenged” and
a “monumental waste of money” in a statement he
released Thursday following the announcement.
“I am emphatically against putting one of
these sites in Vermont,” he said.
Sen. Bernie Sanders and Congressman Peter
Welch are equally unsupportive.
–See MISSILES on page 2
Members of the Colchester Historical Society, from left, Clark Sweeney, Nancy Burke, Clinton Reichard and Suzanne Furst, plan for Saturday's
historical guided walking tour of Main Street on Monday evening at the Historical Society building.
OLIVER PARINI
A Saturday stroll back in time
Historical Society presents walking tour
of the village for 250th
It will be a stroll down Main Street as well as one down memory
lane.
The Colchester Historical Society presents a chance for
newcomers and longtime residents to learn the history of Colchester’s
village with a guided walking tour. The event is part of Colchester’s
yearlong celebration of the 250th anniversary of the signing of the
town charter.
On Saturday starting at 1 p.m., residents are invited to gather at
the Colchester Historical Society building (next to the Town Meeting
House) on Main Street for a guided tour of village landmarks. The
tour will be followed by complimentary tea. Both the tour and tea are
free for participants. Reservations are requested by calling 878-0014.
The afternoon’s tour guide trio— Nancy Burke, Coralie Magoon
and Suzanne Furst — answered questions from The Colchester Sun
about their perspectives of the event.
Q: How long have you lived in Colchester?
–See WALK on page 3
GMCR employees gather to
‘Stop Hunger Now’
Sanders: federal cuts to
nutrition assistance
Ô morally repugnantÕ
By JASON STARR
The Colchester Sun
Dozens of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters
employees formed assembly lines Tuesday at
the Champlain Valley Exposition in Essex to
package dehydrated meals bound for Haitians still
recovering from the devastating 2010 earthquake.
The volunteer effort coincided with September
National Hunger Month and was a partnership
with Stop Hunger Now, a national non-profit
headquartered in North Carolina that sends food
to 40 countries. The effort was part of Green
Mountain Coffee Roasters’ employee appreciation
day, which attracted hundreds of the company’s
workforce to the Expo for games, food, learning
opportunities and volunteering.
“It’s our company culture. We like to do
good things,” said Donna Carlton, a resident of
Worcester, Vt., and an accountant at GMCR’s
Waterbury headquarters, as she scooped dehydrated
soy into a funnel for packaging.
Carlton was one of dozens scooping,
weighing, sealing and boxing vegetarian meals
of soy, vegetables and rice. The employees came
in shifts over the course of the afternoon with
a goal of packaging 40,000 meals. Combined
with simultaneous efforts at GMCR’s offices in
Tennessee and Massachusetts, the company was
planning to wrap 75,000 meals Tuesday afternoon.
It also donated 25 cents to Stop Hunger Now for
each meal packaged.
Chris Craven, who coordinates corporate
volunteer days for Stop Hunger Now, made an
announcement when the assembly line hit 3,000
meals about 12:30 p.m., precipitating cheers from
the volunteers.
“It’s good to see the enthusiasm,” Craven said.
“They are really getting into it.”
Green Mountain Coffee Roasters hosts an
employee appreciation day every year. With its
growing presence on Kellogg Road in Essex, the
company moved the event from Waterbury to
Essex last year. This is the first time an opportunity
to volunteer has been included in the festivities.
“It’s an easy way to involve a lot of employees
and it’s an issue we care about a lot as a
company,” said Laura Peterson, GMCR corporate
communications director. “Unlike many of our
volunteer efforts, this is an international effort.”
The company offers 52 hours of paid
volunteering time to full-timers and employs a
full-time volunteer coordinator.
“Volunteering is such an important part of our
culture that we made it a part of our employee
appreciation day,” Peterson said.
Hunger closer to home was the topic the day
before, as a group of state legislators convened
with local leaders for a Hunger Council of
–See GMCR on page 3
Green Mountain Coffee Roaster’s Courtney Folden, of Colchester, volunteers during
Employee Appreciation Day on an assembly line packaging meals for Stop Hunger Now,
an international relief agency, at the Champlain Valley Exposition on Tuesday afternoon.
OLIVER PARINI
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
2
CAUSEWAY
from page 1
also a more supportive and
tied together community,
Costello said.
“The silver lining to
the flood and the causeway
rebuild is that it really united
all the partners and made
everybody realize the Island
Line is bigger than the sum
of its parts,” he said. “It’s
become more appreciated.”
Local Motion took
another step in fundraising
beyond
the
$300,000
local match needed for
flood
rehabilitation.
It
added $250,000 to the
fundraising goal to realize
improvements to the service
that were planned before the
flood. Those improvements
are set to break ground
this fall, with new docks
and ramps at the cut, small
shelters to work as ticketing
windows and information
booths, a new boat with
weather protection and
wave breaks that will allow
the ferry to run in high
winds (winds shut down the
service during a handful of
days each season.)
It will all make for a more
reliable service next year.
Whether it runs seven days a
week is a decision Costello
plans to make this fall as
Local Motion prepares its
next-year budget. Costello
said it is likely.
“Then people can count
on it and know it’s there
every day for them,” he said.
Principal of the Year heads to D.C.
Colchester Principal Amy Minor receives cheers from Colchester High School students and faculty during a surprise send off celebration on Tuesday afternoon
before she travels to Washington, D.C. to receive the 2013/2014 Vermont Principal of the Year award from the Vermont Principals’ Association. OLIVER PARINI
MISSILES
from page 1
“This is absurd,” said
Welch. “It’s the wrong
location for a bad idea and
dead on arrival.”
The Vermont National
Guard struck a patient and
procedural tone in the wake of
the announcement, explaining
that U.S. Missile Defense
Agency representatives will
be conducting site visits to
the firing range in Jericho to
assess its suitability to host
the missiles. The firing range
is renowned as a mountain
fighting training center for
U.S. soldiers and National
Guard members. Agency
personnel will be assessing
the site’s electrical, water and
transportation infrastructure
to compare it with four other
candidate sites: Fort Drum in
New York, a Naval air training
site in Maine, Camp Ravenna
in Ohio, and Fort Custer in
Michigan.
The Department of Defense
plans to choose three of the
five for an Environmental
Impact Statement analysis and
ultimately choose a preferred
location.
“This is all preliminary
and no final decisions have
been made,” said Col. Michael
Heston, the Vermont Guard’s
deputy adjutant general.
“We’re all trying to get
more information and get
a complete understanding
of what this initiative is all
about,” said Cpt. Gookin,
guard spokesman.
Meanwhile, the Vermont
National Guard is in the
middle of another siting
study to determine whether
it will host the Air Force’s
next generation fighter jet,
the F-35. That study has
created controversy with
strong opinions both in favor
and opposed to the basing.
Support for the F-35 proposal
does not equal support for
missile defense.
Nicole Citro has organized
a campaign in Chittenden
County to support the F-35
basing. She agrees with the
Congressional delegation on
missile defense.
“I don’t feel it has a
practical application with
what’s going on in the world
right now,” she said.
Supporters of the F-35s,
including Greater Burlington
Industrial
Corporation
President Frank Cioffi, have
pointed to the economic boost
the basing would have for
the region. Cioffi said it’s
unclear what type of positive
economic impact a missile
basing would have. Whatever
the economic benefits, the
GBIC would be against
Vermont being chosen.
“We always have to make
sure it’s a fit for Vermont,”
said Cioffi. “Sometimes you
have to be willing to say no.”
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The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
3
Billy Collins reads his work at UVM
Former U.S. Poet Laureate Billy
Collins will speak about and read from his
work in a special Vermont Humanities
Council event at Burlington’s Ira Allen
Chapel on Oct. 2. “An Evening with
Billy Collins,” held jointly as a Vermont
Reads and First Wednesdays program,
takes place at 7 p.m. and is free and open
to the public.
Collins’s makes his appearance
on behalf of Vermont Reads, VHC’s
statewide one-book community reading
program. Collins is the editor of Poetry
180: A Turning Back to Poetry, a poema-day anthology and VHC’s 2013
Vermont Reads selection.
Collins’s appearance also opens
the new season of First Wednesdays
in Chittenden County. It is one of nine
talks around the state taking place on the
same night as part of First Wednesdays,
VHC’s monthly free lecture program
taking place October through May.
“We are very fortunate to have Mr.
Collins join us here in Vermont, and
it is a great opportunity to hear and
see firsthand why he is so loved and
admired,” said Mark Fitzsimmons,
VHC’s Vermont Reads director. “His
has garnered both critical respect
and wide, popular acclaim, an almost
unheard-of combination in the world of
poetry.”
Collins, whose book is inspired
by his poem-a-day program with the
Library of Congress, has been one of
America’s great ambassadors of poetry.
The New York Times has called him
“the most popular poet in America,” and
he is known internationally for work
that is wry, generous, and accessible,
and that connects with a wide variety
of readers on multiple levels. He is the
author of thirteen books of poetry, and
has had his work published in Poetry,
American Poetry Review, American
Scholar, Harper’s, Paris Review and
The New Yorker.
“This will be a memorable event, not
just for lovers of poetry, but for anybody
who admires an acutely observant mind
at work,” said Fitzsimmons.
Seating for “An Evening with Billy
Collins” is first-come, first-served.
Parking is available after 6 p.m. in any
UVM lot that is not zoned residential
(avoid these lots or you may be towed).
Closest parking to the Iran Allen Chapel
is immediately behind the chapel in the
Votey Lot, the entrance to which is off
Colchester Avenue, directly across the
street from Chiropractic Works, LLC.
For more information, contact Max
Matthews at 802.262.2626 x304 or
[email protected], or visit
www.vermonthumanities.org.
WALK
from page 1
BURKE: I moved to
Colchester about nine years
ago. Both my children live
here, and I wanted to be
nearer to them.
FURST: I have lived in
Colchester in the Malletts Bay
area since 1979.
MAGOON: I have lived
in Colchester since 1945.
Q: How/why did you
become interested in local
history?
BURKE: I want to know
about the area I live in and
the Historical Society is a
great place to start. Coming
from the Philadelphia area,
where history is so evident, it
was important to me to know
about this area — and I have
learned so much.
FURST: I became
interested in local history
after attending a Colchester
Historic Home tour in the
1980’s and subsequently
became a member of the
Colchester Historical Society.
MAGOON: I attended
some meetings of the
newly organized Colchester
Historical Society many years
ago, which started my interest
in Colchester. Unfortunately,
other interests in my life
took precedence and I have
just renewed my interest in
the past 10 years. The town
has many favorite sons and
daughters dating back to Ira
Allen, who, together, have
woven a colorful fabric.
Q: What kind of
historical research have
you done to be able to
conduct the tours?
BURKE: We have
benefited from several
excellent reference books.
“Colchester Vermont From
Ice-Cap to Interstate” is
good for general information
about the area and what it
was like living here in the
past. “Colchester Center,
The Evolution of a Village”
by Kenneth A. Degree is
super for finding out about
the individual homes and
their histories. We also spoke
with current residents who
can share their knowledge of
their homes.
FURST: I studied about
the history of the area using
“Colchester Center - the
Evolution of a Village”
by Ken Degree, “Images
of America - Colchester”
by Inge Schaefer, and
“Colchester Vermont: From
Ice-Cap to Interstate” by
Ruth Wright. I also talked
to Joyce Sweeney and her
son Clark whose family goes
back many generations in
Colchester, and also to Carol
Reichard.
MAGOON: I have
gained much information
about past residents and their
endeavors on the land from
town histories: “Colchester
Vermont from Ice-Cap to
Interstate”, “Look Around
Colchester and Milton,
Vermont” and “Colchester
Center, The Evolution of a
Village”, as well as much
help from Carol Reichard,
who sifted through many
old pictures and handwritten
stories of past residents.
Q: What are some of the
more interesting anecdotes
about the Village’s history
you’ve learned?
BURKE: The home that
Josh Sweeney lives in was
once the home of one of the
founding fathers (Isreal and
Juiette Hine) and was moved
to its present location from
East Road. Another home
was once a gas station sitting
in the middle of the road.
Also the center was once the
hub of the area with stores,
blacksmiths and tailors on
Main Street.
FURST: At various times
since the 1800’s in the section
of Main Street I am covering
on the tour, there have been
farms, three schools, a
church, a carpenter, a butcher,
a cooper, a blacksmith,
an auto repair shop, gas
station, a boarding house,
an American Woodman of
America building, a volunteer
fire station, among other
small businesses as well as
family residences. Many
residents had a business on
their property or in their
home.
Q: What else makes
Colchester’s Village area
unique?
BURKE: The fact that it
started out as a path through
the forest and then became a
viable busy community and
then became a residential area
is interesting to me. Now it is
the archetypical New England
village but close to the
interstate. The knowledge that
Ira Allen (brother of Ethan
Allen) was the first town
clerk who owned nearly half
of all the land in Colchester
is fascinating, and his history
and demise is ironic, to say
the least.
FURST: Before
1920, the Winooski Falls
area of Winooski was part
of Colchester. There were
many years of struggle
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between the Winooski
Falls and Colchester village
areas. Each wanted to be
the town’s “center” — one
industrial in character, the
other mainly agricultural and
family business oriented.
The areas were eventually
divided. Winooski Falls
became part of the Village
of Winooski, which became
a city in 1921. In 1922
the Town of Colchester
was incorporated.
Currently, Colchester Center
or village is only one of
several distinct areas in the
larger town of Colchester.
MAGOON: In one way
the Village has been unique in
that early settlers came here
to live and work the land,
and the area evolved into a
“settlement” through which
many people traveled from
east and west and north and
south on their way to other
opportunities.
Q: How will the history
be presented to participants
at Saturday’s walking tour
event?
BURKE: The tour,
starting at the Historical
Society building, will be
divided by the guides. We
will share our information as
we walk down Main Street
and then our tour takers
will be invited back to the
Historical Society for tea.
FURST: This is a
walking tour down Main
Street. Participants will begin
the tour at the Colchester
Historical Society white
house on the green and
then walk west on Main
Street (on the sidewalk)
from just beyond East Road
to Route 7 – originally named
West Road. Main Street has
been divided into sections
with a guide for each section.
As they walk, the guide will
point out interesting facts and
sites. We won’t be going into
any of the houses.
Everyone is invited to
enjoy tea and snacks at the
Colchester Historical Society
house and take a tour of the
house before or after the
walking tour.
MAGOON: The
history will be presented to
participants on the tour by
giving information on when
and by whom each historic
home was built, how it was
used and by whom through
its history.
GMCR
from page 1
Chittenden County meeting in
Burlington. The meeting was
convened to discuss the effects
to food access in Vermont of
federal budget cuts to programs
like Meals on Wheels, Head
Start and Women, Infants and
Children. The United States
Department of Agriculture
published new data last week
indicating that one in eight
Vermont
households
do
not have access to enough
nutritious food because of
financial constraints, according
to a press release announcing
the meeting from Hunger Free
Vermont.
“The number of Vermonters
in Chittenden County going
hungry will likely increase this
fall as heating costs increase
and benefit levels for those
receiving 3SquaresVT are cut
in November. This increase in
hunger will be compounded
by the federal cuts in heating
and housing assistance as well
as continuing cuts in nutrition
programs unless Congress
acts,” said Travis Poulin,
Chittenden Community Action
Director and co-chair of the
hunger council. “We want
hunger council members to
be aware of these cuts and be
prepared to take action to do
what we can to solve hunger in
our community.”
Monday’s meeting included
comments from a panel of
providers about the current
state of hunger in the region
and whether they are able to
meet the need for food. The
panelists also discussed what
the impact on the community
would be if Congress allows
the “sequester” budget cuts to
continue into 2014. The group
also discussed local solutions to
mitigate the effects of the cuts
and improve food access in the
region.
Sen. Bernie Sanders, who
sits on the Senate Budget
Committee, released a statement
Monday railing against the
proposed sequester cuts pushed
by Republicans in the House of
Representatives. Sanders said
it would be a “tragic mistake”
and a “terrible precedent” if
the Senate were to go along
with the House and further
slash programs for children, the
elderly, working families and
the most vulnerable people in
this country.
If the Senate accepts
the House Republican plan,
Sanders said, “more Americans
will lose their jobs; more
children will be thrown off of
Head Start; more Americans
“It’s an
easy way to
involve a lot
of employees
and it’s an
issue we care
about a lot as
a company.”
Laura Peterson,
GMCR corporate
communications
director
will be unable to afford to
send their kids to child care;
more teachers will be thrown
out on the street; more senior
citizens will go hungry, and
more working families will be
unable to heat their homes this
winter. In the richest country on
the face of the earth, that would
be morally repugnant and bad
economic policy.”
Sanders’ office reports that
the House proposal, to be voted
on this week, would result in
a $1 billion, 12 percent, cut in
Head Start compared to 2002
spending levels. A $2.3 billion
cut in education programs for
disadvantaged children would
represent a 14 percent cut since
2010. Home heating assistance
for the elderly and families
with children would be slashed
by more than $1.8 billion
compared to 2010, a 35 percent
cut. Another $1.4 billion would
be lopped off a program that
provides affordable housing for
working families with children,
a 60 percent cut compared to
three years ago.
“Many of us have fought
to replace these harmful cuts
by closing tax loopholes that
benefit the most profitable
corporations and wealthiest
people in this country, but not
one Republican has joined us
in this effort.” Sanders said.
“At a time when 21.5 million
Americans are unemployed
or under-employed, and
the number of Americans
living in poverty is near an
all-time high, the American
people cannot take even more
austerity.”
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Come Join Lake
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Television’s new performing arts
showcase with a live performance of
The Puppet Shoppe, a new play by the
Colchester-based Saints & Poets Productions, taped before
a studio audience. Free and open to the public with a suggested
Donation. Seating is limited.
More info at [email protected] / lcatv.org / 862-5724
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
4
OPINION
Perspective
Information Vermont
can’t ignore
By EMERSON LYNN
In Vermont, there is no incentive for welfare recipients
to find a job, according to a study released this week from
the Cato Institute, a conservative think tank. We rank 8th
nationally in what is currently provided in welfare benefits,
and from 1995 to the present we have increased the total value
of that package by $9,367. No other state comes close to that
level increase. The District of Columbia was second, with an
$8,730 increase. Hawaii was third with a $7,265 increase.
Eighteen states showed decreases.
The study was an examination of the total level of welfare
benefits offered in each of the 50 states and the District of
Columbia. Politically, the study’s purpose was to highlight
the fact that high benefit levels undermine the need to work,
which traps families into cycles of poverty.
The tendency in Vermont will be to ignore the study and its
conclusions. The institute is conservative, Vermont is liberal.
We have no interest in parroting the beliefs or behaviors
of states that would rank at the top of the Cato Institute’s
list of those who provide the least assistance to the poor –
Mississippi, for example.
One could argue, and many Vermonters do, that being at
the top of the list is a good thing, not a bad thing. In fact, it’s
our high level of assistance that continually gives Vermont
its high ranking as one of the nation’s healthiest states.
Mississippi traditionally ranks toward the bottom.
But it’s useful to view the report for what it is, which is
a composite of what Vermont does offer in welfare benefits
and how we compare to others. The report does not single
out any state, thus, it’s not a referendum on Vermont. It also
provides an update from the institute’s original report, which
was released in 1995.
Here are some of the conclusions:
• On a pretax equivalency scale, we rank 8th. The original
amount of the welfare benefits package was $31,590 in 1995,
it’s $42,350 today. That $10,770 increase was tops in the
nation, $3,920 higher than the District of Columbia, which
was second.
• Vermont was eighth nationally when computing welfare
benefits as hourly wage equivalents. Our wage equivalent is
$20.36.
• Vermont was 2nd nationally, when comparing our pretax
wage equivalents to the median salary. Vermont’s benefit
package puts a recipient at 124.5 percent of the state’s median
salary.
• Vermont’s benefit package is 193.1 percent of the Federal
Poverty Level, which ranks us 8th.
• We’re the third most generous state when it comes to
benefits given through the Temporary Assistance for Needy
Families [TANF].
• We rank 49th for the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance
Program, but states that rank high with TANF benefits
correspondingly rank low on SNAP benefits.
• We rank 12th for Medicaid benefits, and 7th for housing
assistance.
• We rank 5th for the percentage of TANF households that
receive housing assistance. 23.1 percent of TANF households
in Vermont also receive housing assistance.
• If housing assistance is included, the size of Vermont’s
welfare benefits package ranks us 9th nationally.
• Vermont ranks third nationally in the amount it provides to
pay for the cost of utilities - $900 annually.
• We rank 14th for our Women, Infants and Children
program.
• We rank 8th nationally for the total value of welfare
benefits.
• We rank 2nd nationally if only the core welfare programs –
TANF, SNAP and Medicaid – are counted. [This is important
in that almost all those on welfare are on these three programs.]
• We rank 47th nationally as a state that requires its recipients
to be involved in some sort of work program if they receive
assistance. Idaho, for example, is ranked number one because
87.9 percent of those on assistance are involved in some
sort of work program. In Vermont, 30.2 percent participate.
Interestingly, Wisconsin, a somewhat liberal state, ranks third
with a 73.7 percent participation rate. New Hampshire is 18th
with a 49.3 percent rate.
Politics aside, there is value to the information being
provided. It helps explain, for example, why Gov. Peter
Shumlin felt confident enough to propose shifting money
from the Earned Income Tax
Credit to improved child
care options. He understands
the numbers and the fact
that Vermont has nothing to
apologize for when it comes
to assisting those in need.
General Manager
He stressed the relationship
Suzanne Lynn
between
education
and
improved job opportunities.
Editor
It also explains why the
Elsie Lynn
[email protected]
Legislature scuttled the idea:
There is a strong constituency
Office Manager/Web Editor
that favors the level of
Susan Bondaryk
assistance we offer, which
[email protected]
also explains why Vermont’s
increase in “contributions”
Reporter/Editorial Page Editor
over the last 18 years exceeds
Jason Starr
that of all other states.
[email protected]
The study is valuable in
one key respect: It provides
Sports Editor
Vermonters with information
Kelly March
most have not seen in a way
[email protected]
that gives us perspective. We
Advertising Manager
can use it to endorse what we
Wendy Ewing
do, or we can use it to reach
[email protected]
for different results.
What we can’t do is ignore
Advertising Sales
it.
Kelly K. Malone
[email protected]
Emerson Lynn is co-publisher
Advertising Sales
of The Essex Reporter and The
Miles Gasek
Colchester Sun and publisher
[email protected]
of the St. Albans Messenger.
Apple picker
Colchester photographer Lee Cordner
glimpsed this deer feeding on apple
trees just before dark during a walk
near his home in late August. More of
Cordner’s photography can be viewed
at www.colchestersun.com/communityphotos.
Letter To The Editor
Paid sick days as preventative
medicine
While working my local school system, I witnessed sick
kids coming to school, staff (including food service workers)
often becoming sick, and kids who needed to stay at school
laying on cots because their parents could not make other
arrangements for their children to be cared for.
After talking to some parents, I realized how much they
agonize over the choice of losing a valuable day’s pay or
staying home with their sick child. Parents always want to stay
home to take care of sick kids, but losing even one day’s pay
is a sacrifice that could mean being behind on the bills. This is
especially true for single parents, relying on one paycheck.
This scene played out over and over again for the 12 years
I worked in a school. Fellow staff members were at risk for
any and all ailments that came through the front door, and
then bringing it home, where other family members took it
somewhere else. Thus a never-ending cycle, which could have
been prevented by paid sick days. Paid sick days could be some
of the best preventative medicine we could have in Vermont.
If paid sick days were in place, it would take care of many
problems. Parents wouldn’t have to worry, and all workers
would have the right to a healthy workplace. Healthcare is
more than just going to the doctor, it means taking a proactive
approach to a problem that we can solve together.
The Vermont Paid Sick Days Campaign will be
officially launched Sept. 19 at 10 a.m. at Red Hen Bakery
in Middlesex. Coming to this event is a great way to find
out more and get involved in this issue that’s crucial to all
Vermonters — and eat some great bread!
Stauch Blaise
Randolph
Shumlin’s peculiar collection of ‘Facts’
JOHN MCCLAUGHRY
On Sept. 5, Gov. Peter Shumlin gave a televised
interview to Steve Pappas, editor of the Times Argus. The
bulk of it dealt with the new health insurance Exchange and
its scheduled successor Green Mountain Care. As usual, the
governor appeared articulate and well informed.
The problem is that the information Shumlin hands
out often bears only a tenuous
relationship to the truth.
Shumlin offered as an important
reason for moving into single payer
health care the inability of hospitals
to share patient data and diagnostic
results. A single payer system, he
said, would solve this problem.
He cited a Fletcher Allen patient
who subsequently went to Dartmouth
Hitchcock, which proposed to run
the tests all over again because they
Shumlin signed into law.
But now, five years into this program, the governor
says we need a new multi-billion dollar single payer plan to
somehow make the providers share medical information that
Vermonters have already spent millions of dollars in higher
premiums to make possible.
Shumlin again invoked his mantra of “health care is a
right, not a privilege”. He may believe that health care ought
to be a right, but it simply is not.
Even the Democratic Legislature
that approved Shumlin’s landmark
health care bill (Act 48 of 2011)
stopped short of declaring health
care to be a right, describing it only
a “public good” (which it also is
not).
Shumlin then stated that
“Americans born today are
projected to live less long than
their parents.” Unless somebody is
projecting an asteroid impact, this
is obviously false. According to the World Bank, using U.S.
government data, American children born today can expect
to live 78.64 years. Their parents in 1990 could expect 75.22
years; every cohort before that expected even fewer years
of life.
Shumlin let loose this whopper: “American health care
costs are three to four hundred times the spending of other
developed countries.” Let’s assume Shumlin was referring
to per person spending. According to the OECD, Americans
(public and private) in 2009 spent $7,960 per person, which
is two and half times the OECD average of $3,283 per
person.
To get a fantastic multiplier like “three or four hundred”,
one would have to match America’s total health care
spending with that of some very small developed country
– say Estonia, with a population four tenths of a percent of
ours.
In the same interview, on another topic, Shumlin averred
that Vermont Yankee would require 300 employees for five
or six years after shutting down in October 2014; thus there
would be no catastrophic “jobs cliff” in the local economy.
According to experts in nuclear plant decommissioning,
the real employment number will be around 300 during
the first year after Vermont Yankee’s shutdown, and less
than 100 after two years. These will mostly be guards and
plumbers, not high-income executives and engineers.
It’s not uncommon for politicians to play fast and loose
with facts. But few play so fast and loose, with such seeming
sincerity, as Peter Shumlin. This could lead to a credibility
problem.
The problem is that the
information Shumlin
hands out often bears only
a tenuous relationship
to the truth.
The ColChesTer sun
Publisher
Lynn Publications Inc.
Mailing Address:
462 Hegeman Ave., Suite 105
Colchester, VT 05446
Phone: 651-6882
Fax: 651-9635
Published Thursdays
Advertising deadline:
Friday 5 p.m.
Subscription rate:
$75 per year
$38 for six months
The Colchester Sun is owned and
published by Angelo Lynn and
Emerson Lynn of Lynn Publications,
Inc. and is a member of the Champlain
Valley Newspaper Group.
The Colchester Sun makes every effort
to be accurate. If you notice an error,
please contact us at 651-6882, ext. 202
or by e-mail at [email protected]
com. Note “correction” in the subject line.
(allegedly) couldn’t obtain
the previous test results
from Fletcher Allen.
But why do we need
Green Mountain Care to
solve this problem? In 2008,
when Shumlin was Senate
leader,
the
Legislature
passed a law (Act192)
that authorized a Health
Information
Technology
(HIT) plan to create “an
integrated electronic health
information infrastructure
for the sharing of electronic
health information among
health care facilities, health
care professionals, public
and private payers, and
patients.”
The Legislature also
levied a new tax of .199
of one percent of health
insurance claims to pay
for implementing the plan.
Three years into this program
the HIT plan required even
more money, so in 2011 the
Legislature (many of whose
members regularly intone
that “health insurance is not
affordable”) quadrupled the
tax rate on claims, which
John McClaughry is vice president of the Ethan Allen
Institute (www.ethanallen.org).
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
5
Burnham Memorial Library
COLCHESTER’S WEEKLY
BOOK REVIEWS
Town News
“I’ll See You Again,”
By Jackie Hance – Young Adult Biography, 2013
“Colchester, Vermont, located on Lake Champlain’s Malletts Bay, is a diverse, civic-minded
community endowed with a rich heritage of commercial, agricultural, recreational, and
educational gifts. Proud of the quality of life already enjoyed here, the people of Colchester
seek to build upon this foundation to ensure economic prosperity, recreational opportunity,
and an entrepreneurial spirit for future generations”
Vision Statement, Heritage Project, 2012
Town Manager’s Office
Reported by Dawn Francis, town manager
The Vermont State Legislature is considering
H.526 a Shoreland Protection Bill, aimed at
improved management of water quality on
Lake Champlain. While the Town recognizes the
need for shoreline regulations and improved
water quality, there are concerns regarding the
proposed bill. As a part of the public review
process, the Select board has approved a
preliminary position statement regarding the
proposed bill.
The Select Board has warned Supplement
33 for a public hearing on Oct. 8. Previously
approved by the Planning Commission,
Supplement 33 consists of various Zoning
changes in the Heineberg Drive/Prim Road
area.
Kathy OReilly began work this week
as the Town’s new Director of Economic
Development. She met with the Board this
week to begin discussing some of the necessary
steps and challenges related to promoting
addition development within the community.
Police Department
Reported by Jennifer Morrison, police chief
Continued aggressive motor vehicle work
has led to seven arrests in the past week.
CPD made five Driving Under the Influence
arrests, one arrest for driving with a criminally
suspended license and one arrest for
misdemeanor possession of drugs.
Officers Chris Jones and Steve Gutierrez were
responsible for all five DUI arrests on night shift
this week. Their efforts to keep our streets safe
are greatly appreciated.
Eighteen-year-old Allie Blaise, of Colchester,
was arrested and charged with Domestic
Assault, first degree Unlawful Restraint
and Interference with Access to Emergency
Services.
CPD
responded to 179 calls for
service and had 88
contacts through motor
Read the complete
newsletter online:
www.colchestersun.com
vehicle stops.
This week Sgt. Charlie Cole is attending
week one of a prestigious law enforcement
leadership school. The curriculum is three
weeks long over the course of three months
and is presented by the International
Association of Chiefs of Police.
The 12th Vermont Police Canine Association
Iron Dog Challenge is coming up on Sept. 29.
This fun and challenging event is now open
to the public and includes obstacles courses,
timed sprints with your dog, etc. For more
details contact Cpl. Dave Dewey at 264-5620 or
check out the CPD Facebook page.
Economic Development
Reported by Kathi Walker O’Reilly, director
This is my first week on the job.
Tuesday made a presentation at the Select
Board Meeting.
Had four tours of the community regarding
available inventory and vacancies, zoning
changes and possible expansions.
Met with local realtor, developer and
businesses.
Burnham Memorial Library
Reported by Kelly Tomaseski, Director
At the Burnham Library, we have a few
updates:
• We now have three e-readers that can be
borrowed by patrons
• The Friends are running a flower bulb
fundraiser, which runs until Oct. 4
• We are working to start up a Scrabble
program for adults
For more information on all three, ask at the
front desk or call us.
For more information about the Town of Colchester visit the
town offices at 781 Blakely Road, Colchester, online at
www.colchestervt.gov
or call (802) 264-5500.
You’ve often said,
“Someday I’ll get around
to preplanning my funeral.”
Last time we checked,
there is no someday
on the calendar.
Reviewed by Kelly Tomaseski, Library Director
Everyone has heard about the horrific car accident that
occurred on July 26, 2009 on New York’s Taconic State
Parkway that took eight lives. Hance was the mother of three
of those victims, and this is the story of her choosing to live
despite her great loss. The first half of the book is hard to read
— following the tragedy Hance was enveloped in a fortress of
love and support. Despite her devoted husband and charitable
friends she found herself in despair so great she regularly
contemplated suicide and often attacked those who tried to
help her. Readers who can endure these dark days will be
rewarded with the gift of hope. Note, this book does not offer
any more facts about the tragedy, and is not one that should be
read when in need of pick-me-up.
“Visual Encyclopedia Military Aircraft,”
By Jim Winchester – Adult Fiction, 2013
Reviewed by Josh Muse, Library Technology
In his book, Winchester harkens back to the massive
and meticulously illustrated books on military aviation that
seemed to disappear with the end of the Cold War. Planes are
presented in rough chronological order, with each two-page
spread covering a particular class of aircraft or aspect of a
conflict.
The categories and summarizing text provide some
context, but this is not a book for those completely new to
the topic. Each entry features a full-color side view of a
specific example of the aircraft, along with a short description
and a list of specifications. The book doesn’t aim to be
comprehensive. The best-known aircraft are presented in a
wide range of models and color schemes, while some less significant models don’t appear at all.
Despite occasional errors, the drawings are impressive, and it should appeal to those who know
the difference between an A-10, an F-15 and a B-24; it may be particularly worthwhile for those
who build models.
Sept. 28 is National hunting and fishing day
National Hunting and Fishing Day on
Sept. 28 is a perfect day to celebrate the
contributions by hunters and anglers to fish
and wildlife conservation through the Sportfish
and Wildlife Restoration Program.
“Celebrating National Hunting and
Fishing Day helps recognize that hunters
and anglers have been the leaders in major
conservation programs since the beginning
of the 20th century,” said Vermont Fish
and Wildlife Commissioner Patrick Berry.
“They are responsible for the majority of
funding for Vermont’s Fish and Wildlife
Department through the federal excise taxes
they lobbied to create and through the annual
licenses they purchase. Thanks to the federal
Pittman-Robertson and Dingell-Johnson Acts,
the money collected must be dedicated to
supporting fish and wildlife conservation.”
The resulting scientifically based fish
and wildlife conservation programs have led
to the dramatic comeback of many species
that appeared to be headed for extinction in
Vermont.
To learn more about fish and wildlife
conservation in Vermont, go to www.
vtfishandwildlife.com. For more information
about National Hunting and Fishing Day,
check in at www.NHFDAY.org.
Iʼll spend the time you need
Preplan today.
3
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Thursday
Friday
for excellent care.
Saturday
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Essex Junction
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43 Timber Lane, South Burlington, VT
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
6
Sites from the Farmers’ Market
TOP LEFT:
Suzanne Kelly, left, and her son, choose from Dr. Alicia Jacobs’ carrots during the Colchester
Farmers’ Market end of season celebration last Wednesday.
TOP RIGHT:
Libby Davidson, of Starflower Studio, smiles with a face full of paint done by her daughter, Ellie.
LEFT: Dr. Alicia Jacobs’ veggies and herbs were on sale by donation for her Health and Wellness
weekly programs.
BELOW: Pam Jacobs recently picked some fresh Macintosh apples.
PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED
COME & PICK YOUR OWN
Fall raspberries and for the first time ever at
Paul Mazza's — APPLES (while supplies last)
Fall Decorating
Supplies
Go to
paulmazzas.com or
like us on Facebook
for details and
specials!
We have squash to
gourds, to pumpkins
VT
APPLES
FOR
SALE!
OUR OWN
SWEET
CORN
Essex
Only
Paul Mazza's Fruit & Vegetable Stand
s
Event
182 River Rd., Essex 135 Poor Farm Rd., Colchester
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22 Wee
1
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879-3760 8 am - 7:30 pm 879-0102 8 am - 7:30 S
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Majestic 10 voted best theater 2013!
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Refreshm
Want more
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in your
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1 FREE SM
Popcorn
with this coupon.
with this coupon. Valid for up to 6 people.
movie guide: (802) 878-2010
Maple Tree Place, Williston, VT 05495
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movie guide: (802) 878-2010
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Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2
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Francesco Attesti, Pianoforte
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
7
Running in the
t
e
n
m m e Colchester Sun
o
October 3, 2013
H ve
o de
r
p ui
m
G
I
Rotarians
sponsor
concert
to raise
Music
by Saint-Saens,
Rossini,
Verdi, Landini,
Liszt, funds
& Poulenc
2013
FALL
Showcase
Homes
of
To advertise your
listings contact
your ad rep today!
802-878-5282
Kelly K. Malone x 207
[email protected]
The Essex and Colchester Rotary Clubs, along with other Rotary Clubs in this area, are sponsoring a concert at St. Michael’s
College on Sept. 24 to benefit the victims of the train explosion in Lac Megantic, Quebec. The concert will feature two Italian
musicians Pietro Tagliaferri, on the Clarinet, and Francesco Attesti, on the Piano. They will perform music by Saint-Saens, Rossini,
Verdi, Landini and Poulenc. Tickets are available at www.flynntix.org and are $20 per adult and $15 per child/student.
Miles Gasek x 209
[email protected]
Visit our
Open House
or Call for an
Appointment
CONTRIBUTED
to benefit the victims of the train explosion inPHOTO
Lac
Megantic, Quebec
Volunteers
esday, September 24, 7:00 PM
SUE ALENICK
UNITED Way Volunteer
the food in their own kitchen
and transport it to meeting
sites. Flexible scheduling.
Some experience cooking
healthy food for families is
important but you don’t have
to be an expert chef.
of hockey is essential.
Practices are held on Sunday
afternoons in Cairns Arena in
South Burlington, and there
are other games and events
to attend. September through
April.
Food For Thought –
Two local groups are looking
for volunteers to prepare
meals and treats as part of
their ongoing programs:
VNA Family Room –
Volunteers are needed to
prepare preschool lunches
3three mornings a week
during the school year. Menus
and recipes are provided,
but creativity is welcome.
Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Prevent Child Abuse
Vermont –
Prepare meals or snacks
for a variety of weekly
parent support groups. All
ingredients,
recipes
and
materials
are
provided.
Volunteers generally prepare
Sled Hockey–
Northeast
Disabled
Athletic
Association
is
looking for a head coach
for the Vermont Sledcats.
Previous
sled
hockey
coaching is preferred but
not required, but knowledge
Math Mentor –
Hiawatha
Elementary
School in Essex Junction is
seeking a volunteer to mentor
an accelerated third-grade
student who is an enthusiastic
math
learner.
Flexible
weekday schedule, 1 hrour
per week. References and
background check required.
Healthy Community –
Volunteers can play a major
role in the Roots of Prevention
Awards Celebration on Oct.
23 at the ECHO Center in
Burlington. The event honors
those who contribute to
making Burlington a safer and
healthier place to live. Help
the event run smoothly from
6-11 a.m.
McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College
Colchester, Vermont
The listings below are a
sample of the 300+ volunteer
needs from more than 200
agencies found on-line at
www.unitedwaycc.org. More
information available at 8601677, Mon.-Fri. from 8:30
a.m.-4:30 p.m.
STARTING SOON!
Introducing the Berkshire in “Harborview”St Albans newest
neighborhood, gorgeous views, 66 acres of common land, large great
room with fireplace, spacious country kitchen with island, formal dining
room, 1st floor den/office, nice master with private full bath and walkcloset, 1st floor laundry and mud room, plumbing for additional bath
Larkin reaLty in
and central vac ready, 2 car garage with stairs to the lower level, still
802.238.9736 time to make choice of cabinets, and flooring. Likeness Only. $311,900.
Jon Templeton Directions: From I89 to left on Main St., (Rt7) approx 1 mile, left onto
www.harborviewstalbans.com Harborview.
20 adults $15 children and students
October Events –
A number of local agencies
are planning special events in
October and need volunteers
to help make their efforts a
success:
Tickets at Flynntix (802) 863-5966 or www.flynntix.org
Laura Kate Winterbottom
Memorial Fund –
Help publicize Laura’s
March, the annual walk
to end sexual assault.
Volunteers can hang posters
beginning Oct. 1 and check
on them weekly to make sure
they are still visible.
Brain Injury Association of
Vermont –
Help stage the largest oneday gathering of brain injury
survivors, family members,
providers and professionals.
Volunteers can prepare the
survivor art show, fundraising auction, help at
check-in, on-site logistics
and an information table.
Lunch and complimentary
registration are provided.
Oct. 8, 3-hour shifts from
7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
CVOEO –
Celebrate the health of
Burlington families and
community by helping to
organize and promote a free
event at City Hall’s Contois
auditorium. Health Connect
Navigators will be available
to answer questions about
changes to the health care
system. Volunteers can also
help with event activities.
Family friendly acoustic
musicians, entertainers and
a face-painting team are also
needed. Saturday, Oct. 12,
2-6 p.m.
Burlington Partnership for a
Healthy Community –
On Oct. 26, the Partnership
will be teaming with
the
Burlington
Police
Department
for
a
“Prescription Drug Take
Back Day” to help address
drug abuse and trafficking.
During the weeks leading up
to the event, volunteers can
help post flyers and talk with
community members about
the event.
Burlington Partnership for a
PEACEFUL NEIGHBORHOOD
Island Beverage
Firewood
For Sale
Green or Dry
Selling
Wood Pellets
Bags and Tons
In Essex Junction. This remodeled 4 bedroom colonial offers a great plan for
entertaining & daily living. Hardwood flooring, 2 fireplaces, a private master
suite, 3 1/2 baths, kitchen with island plus an addition over the garage with 2
rooms plus a bath. Lovely landscaped yard. Offered at $399,000
Carol Audette at Coldwell Banker Hickok and Boardman
(802) 846-8800 | www.carolaudette.com
Call for Delivery 802-324-1955
LOOKING
FOR MORE?
$275,000
Be among the first to know about new properties as they come on the market!
VThomefinder.com
Consider 16 Cherry Street
and experience more.
More living space, more
extra space, more quality
details, more upgrades and
more garage / shop space.
Character, Quality, Function
& Opportunity await your
discovery. A complete
property
with
unique
value and a 26’x32’ shop
building that offers premium
hobby or in home business
opportunities. Milton
provided by john abry ● realtor ● remax north professionals ● 861.3278 ● [email protected]
Colchester-Essex Network
Transportation Study
Four Seasons Real Estate Inc. 802-893-4316
Hometown experience, service and pride . . . everyday.
Public Meeting
September 24th at 6:30 PM
Colchester Meeting House
830 Main Street, Colchester
Sponsored by the Town of Colchester
Come give your feedback on alternatives for
improving travel on Severance Road and on
Main Street in Colchester Village!
NEW LISTING!
The
Hometown
Team
Jack associates
(802) 893-2436
MILTON
- NEW LISTING!
Milton — Just Reduced!
Very
nice
3 bedroom,
on This
a .51254
acresquare
lot infoot
a
Great
4 bedroom,
1 bath 1.5
ranchBathroom
in the heartRanch
of Milton.
great
location!
Includes
gas
fireplace,
laminate
flooring,
hardwood
ranch contains hardwood floors, 4-5 year old windows and doors throughout, a
under
carpet
LR, partially
fenced
back
16’x32’
aboveinground
pool, andfinished
a screenedbasement,
in porch for deck,
the summer
evenings.
yard
with isstorage
shed, paved
drive,
water
and more!
Location
close to schools,
shopping,
and themunicipal
bus line. Call
Don Turner
& The
Enjoy
this great
home
which is
the village
close
Hometown
Teamneighborhood
today at C21 Jack
Associates
at in
893-2436!
MLSand
4245642.
to $192,500.
shopping, banks, grocery and both schools. Call Don Turner and
the Hometown Team at C21 Jack Associates at 893-2436 today for
more information! Call Don Turner & the Hometown Team at C21
Jack Associates at 893-2436. MLS 4149939.
$204,900.
Open
House
Sunday, Sept. 22, 1-3 PM
www.ccrpcvt.org/cents
The Study is sponsored by the Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission (CCRPC) and the Town of
Colchester. All are welcome and encouraged to attend. In accordance with provisions of the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the CCRPC will ensure that public meeting sites are accessible to people with
disabilities. Requests for free interpretive or translation services, assistive devices, or other accommodations
should be made to Christine Forde, Senior Transportation Planner, [email protected], 802-846-4490 ext. 13
(711 for Telecommunications Relay Services), at least 72 hours in advance.
SPACIOUS ESSEX JUNCTION RANCH
15 CORDUROY ROAD
4 bedroom, 4 bath ranch on a lovely corner lot in a great family neighborhood
- walk to schools and village! Over 4300 square feet with updated kitchen
with granite counters and Viking appliances, master suite on main level,
unbelievable finished lower level with bar, billiards room, TV room, playroom and
workshop. Formal living and dining rooms, family room, 3 car garage. Listed at
$389,000. Directions: Rt 15 to Brickyard Rd, left on Corduroy.
Real Estate Associates 802-343-9266
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
CALENDAR
8
Bus Day Trip to
akwEsasnE MOhawk CasInO
Hogansburg, New York
MOnDay, OCtOBEr 7
[
$30 PEr PErsOn
Please make your reservations early.
FrEE extras include: $15 Free Slot Play
Coffee & Donuts
Bottled Water
$10 Buffet Coupon
Movies Aboard
[
Meet at Colchester Park & ride
Off I89 Exit 17 between 6:45am-7:15am
Bus Departs: 7:15am | Depart the Casino: 4:30pm
Call BarBara at 802.829.7403
REBECCA J. COLLMAN, MD
Pediatrics
Primary medical care for newborns
through age 18
• 20 years in Colchester
• Board certified
• High continuity of care
• Available 24 hours
• Intimate office
• Personalized attention
• Convenient location
• Complimentary prenatal visits
164 Main St • Colchester
878-7844
LEE J. WELTMAN D.D.S.
905 Roosevelt Highway, Suite 230, Colchester, VT 05446 Above The Rehab Gym
Wand Technology for an Anxiety-Free Experience
• Veneers/Bonding
• TMJ
• Implants
• Invisalign
• Lumineers Certied • Digital X-Rays
New Patients & Emergencies Welcome
655-5305
www.DentistVT.com
VT.com • www.sunnyhollow
www.sunnyhollowdental.com
SUNNY HOLLOW DENTAL WHERE SUNNY SMILES GROW
Special event
coming up?
19
Presentation. “Prepare for Homeownership,
Part 1.” Speakers: NEFCU Mortgage Loan
Officers. Free, seating limited. New England Federal Credit Union, 141 Harvest
Lane, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Contact: 8798790 or sign up at nefcu.com.
Film screening. ”I am in here,“ a movie written by Mark Utter and directed by Emily
Anderson and Jim Heltz that raises awareness about autism. McCarthy Arts Center,
St. Michael‘s College, Colchester, 7 p.m.
Meet the artist. A talk and Q&A with artist
Katharine Montstream. Free and open
to the public. Frog Hollow Vermont State
Craft Center, 85 Church Street, Burlington,
6:30 p.m.
Film screening. “The Angels’ Share,” is the latest feature film from director Ken Loach.
Free and open to the public. The Main
Street Landing Film House, 60 Lake Street,
Burlington, 7 p.m.
Essex Junction Planning Commission meeting. Municipal Building, 2 Lincoln Street,
Essex Junction, 6 p.m. Contact: 878-6950.
Square Dance workshop. All levels invited
to try square dancing. Led by the Green
Mountain Steppers. Cost: $6, free for newcomers. Maple Street Park Building, Essex
Junction, 7-9 p.m. Contact: 658-6554.
20
Susan would love
to hear about it!
Email Susan at:
[email protected]
ACORNS WANTED
Tired of stepping on acorns
or running over them
with your lawnmower?
I’ll remove them FREE
within 20 miles of Colchester and Essex Junction
Fully insured
Call Patrick 802-363-1582
or [email protected]
E
E
FR
KIDS HARVEST FEST
Raising awareness for foster care in Vermont
Sunday September 22
11:45 am - 3:00 pm
Bayside Park | Colchester
An afternoon of FREE fun for the whole family:
hamburgers | hot dogs | cotton candy | popcorn
homemade desserts | face painting | games
inflatables | magician | pony rides
10:45 - 11:30 am
Join us for an outdoor church service
Bring your own blankets & chairs
Thursday
Friday
Concert. The Modern Grass Quintet. Contemporary, progressive and traditional bluegrass for all audiences. Suggested donation: $10. Round Church, Richmond, 7 p.m.
Contact: 434-4565.
Reception. “Real Life.” A juried photography
exhibit exploring the state of things as
they actually exist. Refreshments provided.
Free and open to the public. Runs through
Oct. 13. Darkroom Gallery, 12 Main
Street, Essex Junction, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
St. James Coffee House. “Musicians and Minstrels.” Enjoy local talent and refreshments. St. James Episcopal Church, 4 St.
James Place, Essex Junction, 7-9 p.m. Contact: 878-4014.
control – stray
SUMMARY: He may
only stand 18 inches from
the floor, but if Ringo was
scouted for the NBA draft,
he’d be a top pick. This little
guy has mad ups—we’re
talking a five foot vertical
jump! We see “Champion
Disk Dog” written all over
him. Springs for legs isn’t
Ringo’s only outstanding
quality: this spunky guy is
incredibly outgoing and
confident, too—and you can
tell by that smile that he’s got
charm to spare! Drop by
HSCC to get a boost from
this little sparkplug.
Humane Society of Chittenden County
802-862-0135
Rummage sale. Old Morgan Horse Museum,
122 Bostwick Road, Shelburne, 9 a.m.-1
p.m. Contact: 985-2827.
Teddy Roosevelt day. Commemorating the
visit of Roosevelt to Isle La Motte in 190l.
Features food vendors, artisans, live music and entertainment, apple picking, art
demonstrations and an appearance from
“Teddy Roosevelt,” himself. Isle La Motte,
various locations and times. Schedule of
events, maps and details: 928-3364 or
[email protected]
Historic walk and tea. Join Historical Society
members in a stroll down Main St and
learn about the history of homes along
the way. Historical Society Parsonage,
next to the Town Meeting House, Colchester, 1-3 p.m. Reserve a spot: 878-0014.
Open house. See ambulances, fire trucks and
police cars up close. Also, giveaways,
baked goods and free IHOP pancakes.
Essex Rescue, 1 Educational Drive, Essex
Junction, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Concert. “Sing for Peace.” A performance by
Counterpoint. Free admission; donations
to Planting Hope will be collected. Bethany Church, 115 Main Street, Montpelier,
4 p.m.
Tag sale. Also Sept. 21. Baby items and maternity clothing. All proceeds benefit Care
Net Pregnancy Centers. Church of the
Nazarene, Williston, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Contact
Pat: 658-8046.
Wing night. Hosted by the Men’s Auxiliary.
Live entertainment: One Duzzi. Cost: $47. VFW Post 6689, 73 Pearl Street, Essex
Junction, 5:30 p.m. Contact: 878-0700.
Elder Education Enrichment lecture. “U.S.
Middle East Policy after the Arab Spring,”
Haviland Smith, Retired CIA Station Chief.
Cost: $5. Handicapped accessible. Faith
United Methodist Church, 899 Dorset
Street, South Burlington, 2-3 p.m Contact:
864-3516.
2 year-old Neutered Male
Reason Here: Animal
Craft show. “Apple Squeeze For Early Detection.” Also Sept. 22. A fundraiser for
Making Strides Against Breast Cancer.
Pick your own apples, shop local crafters,
face painting and bake sale. Allenholm
Farm, South Street, South Hero, 10 a.m.-3
p.m. Contact: 777-9406
Jazz concert. The Steve Wilson/Lewis Nash
Duo, featuring Nat Reeve. Free and open
to the public. McCarthy Arts Center, St. Michael’s College, Colchester, 8 p.m.
Driver safety class. A road refresher course
for ages 50+. Cost: $12.25-14.25. Essex
Junction Senior Center, Essex Junction, 9
a.m.-2 p.m. Preregister: 878-6940.
Ringo
carving class at the Birds of Vermont
Museum with David Tuttle of the Green
Mountain Woodcarvers. Carve and paint
a small turtle. Wood blank, eyes, snacks,
and coffee provided. No carving experience required. Cost: $25-35. Birds of
Vermont Museum, 900 Sherman Hollow
Road, Huntington, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Register:
434-2167 or [email protected]
org.
22
Pet of the Week
daybreakvermont.org
THE FIRST DAY OF
AUTUMN IS SEPT. 22
Send us your Fall Foliage
photos!
Upload a photo and a
description to
www.colchestersun.com/
submit-community-photo
Silent auction. Also Sept. 21. A fundraiser to
benefit local programs, presented by
MOVE (Mobilization of Volunteer Efforts).
Quad Commons, St. Michael’s College,
Colchester, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Casino night. Play blackjack, Texas Hold’em,
craps, roulette and wheel of fortune for a
good cause. Sponsored by the Colchester
Milton Rotary Club, all proceeds will raise
funds for local food shelves, mentoring and
water projects. Cash prizes. Admission:
$10. Hampton Inn, Colchester, 7-11 p.m.
Pre-register: 6 p.m. Contact: 658-4182.
For more information:
United Church of Colchester, Main Street,
next to the Burnham Memorial Library,
Colchester, 3 p.m.
SEPT
22
Essex Junction 5 Corners Farmers’ Market.
Check out this great community event! Every Friday until Oct. Local produce, activities, vendors and more. Lincoln Place, Essex
Junction, 3:30-7:30 p.m.
PTO Family movie night. “The Croods.” Founders Memorial School, Essex Junction, 6:15
p.m.
21
Sunday
Walk to Defeat ALS. A 2.5-mile walk to raise
awareness and funds for ALS. Dorset
Park, corner of Dorset and Swift Streets,
South Burlington, 10:30 a.m. registration.
To register or volunteer, contact Amy:
603-969-3004 or [email protected]
or Deb: 862-0389 or [email protected]
com. Info: www.walktodefeatals.org
Discussion. Jane Austen in Vt. series. “Two
Hundred Years of Publishing and Collecting Pride and Prejudice” with Deborah
Barnum, of Bygone Books. Free and open
to the public. light refreshments served.
Hauke Conference Center, Champlain
College, 375 Maple Street, Burlington,
2-4 p.m. Contact: 343-2294.
Kids Harvest Fest. An afternoon of free fun
for the whole family. Cookout, desserts,
kids activities and a magician. An event
to raise awareness for foster care in Vt.
Bayside Park, Colchester, 11:45 a.m.-3
p.m. Contact: 338-9118.
Musicale performance. Colchester resident
Heidi Soons, an accomplished harpist, will
perform. Light refreshments will follow.
23
Monday
Pajama story time. Bring kids in pajamas with
their favorite stuffed animal for stories, a
craft, and a bedtime snack. Free. Dorothy
Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Lane,
Williston, 6:30 p.m. Contact: 878-4918.
Elder Education Enrichment lecture. “Burlington’s Old North End,” Patricia Araujo, Old
North End Researcher, Guide for Preservation Burlington. Cost: $5. Handicapped
accessible. Faith United Methodist Church,
899 Dorset Street, South Burlington, 2-3
p.m Contact: 864-3516.
Autumn Equinox walk. A stroll through the
trails at the Ethan Allen Homestead to
celebrate the coming of fall. Binoculars
and information guides will be available.
Ethan Allen Homestead, Burlington, 5-7
p.m. Info: www.wvpd.org.
Chittenden County Saves Week. Through
Sept. 27. The week includes over 15 free
classes taught by local experts on everything from saving money at the grocery
store to creating a family budget to tax
tips for small business owners. Attend the
kickoff event with State Treasurer Beth
Pearce. Amy Tarrant Gallery, Flynn Center, 153 Main Street, Burlington, 11 a.m.12 p.m. Info: www.MoneyEd.Vermont.gov.
24
Tuesday
Workshop. Focus: parent training for children
with special needs. Meet other parents,
discuss how to support other families,
learn about peer support and how to
support another parent with a few phone
calls. Dinner provided. Vermont Family
Network, Williston, 5-7:30 p.m. Register:
www.vermontfamilynetwork.org/
training/workshops.
Science story time. “It’s a Wonderful Leaf!”
Listen to stories with science educator
Kristen Littlefield and make a leaf collage. Free. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Lane, Williston, 11 a.m.
Contact: 878-4918.
Presentation. How does a 200+ year-old
company stay relevant in today’s increasingly “paperless” world? Speaker:
Charles Kittredge, Chairman and CEO,
Crane & Co. Free and open to the public.
Perry Presentation Room, Champlain College, Burlington, 7 p.m.
Benefit concert. Selections from Saint-Saens,
Rossini, Verdi, Landini, and Poulenc. Proceeds benefit victims of the train explosion in Lac Megantic, Quebec. Sponsored
by local Rotary Clubs. Tickets: $15-20.
McCarthy Arts Center, St. Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Contact: 8635966 or www.flynntix.org.
25
Wednesday
Heart & Soul community action summit.
Residents come together to celebrate the
one-year anniversary of the Heart & Soul
launch party and set priorities for future
action. Cafeteria, Essex High School, Essex Junction, 6-8:30 p.m.
Workshop. “Grow It!” The third installment
in the statewide Community and School
Garden Leader Workshop series. Designed for community and school garden
leaders and open to anyone working with
a community or school garden. Cost: $30,
sliding scale based on ability to pay.
O’Brien Community Center, 32 Malletts
Bay Avenue, Winooski, 4-8 p.m. Register:
861-4769.
WALK TO DEFEAT ALS
Join in the effort to spread awareness, raise funds for patient
services and research, and offer support for those who have
fought and are fighting the disease.
The 2.5-mile walk takes place rain or shine. Registration
begins at 10:30 a.m. and the walk kicks off at 11:30 a.m.
Donated snacks, ice cream, and plenty of water will be
provided for walkers to enjoy.
South Burlington Recreation Park
(Carnes Arena) on the corner of Dorset and Swift Street,
South Burlington.
To register or volunteer, visit www.walktodefeatals.org.
Presentation.
“Consolidating Retirement Assets.”
Speakers: Lyn Tober and
Jonathan Whitehouse, financial consultants. Free,
seating limited. New England Federal Credit Union,
141 Harvest Lane, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Contact:
879-8790 or sign up at
nefcu.com.
SEPT
22
Saturday
Workshop. “Google Search for Genealogists.” Ed McGuire will discuss why and
when to use tools like Google. Class: $5.
Vermont Genealogy Library, Hegeman
Avenue, Fort Ethan Allen, Colchester, 10:30
a.m.-12 p.m. Contact: 238-5934 or www.
vt-fcgs.org.
Wee turtle carving class. Come to a one-day
AUG
24
Team Huzzah for Frank, fundraisers for ALS research.
PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
CALENDAR
Gnostic meet up. Free. Foot of the Hill building, 6 Fairfield Hill Road, St. Albans, 7
p.m. Contact: 524-9706.
Reiki sample session. Williston resident Sandy Jefferis, a Reiki practitioner, will introduce this healing treatment. Following
a brief introduction to Reiki, 15 minute
sample sessions will be offered. Dorothy
Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Lane,
Williston, 6 p.m. Contact: 878-4918.
26
Thursday
Presentation. “Cheese and God: How Spirituality and Religion Shaped the History of
Cheese.” Paul Kindstedt, Professor in the
UVM Dept of Nutrition and Food Sciences will give a talk. Vt. farmhouse cheese
tasting to follow. Fleming Museum of Art,
University of Vermont, 61 Colchester
Avenue, Burlington, 6 p.m. Contact: 6562090.
Presentation. “Prepare for Homeownership,
Part 2.” Speakers: a local realtor, home
inspector and attorney. Free, seating limited. New England Federal Credit Union,
141 Harvest Lane, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m.
Contact: 879-8790 or sign up at nefcu.
com.
Workshops. Six classes through Oct. 31.
“Healthier Living With Chronic Conditions.” Are you living with an ongoing
condition like arthritis, heart disease,
asthma or osteoporosis? Learn practical
tools to manage your own health and improve your quality of life. Free and open
to individuals, their family members and
caregivers. Space is limited. Essex Junction Senior Center, 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Register: 847-2268.
Workshop. “Food for Schools” is for parents
and their children to learn more about
the food plate, see a cooking demo, and
prepare a healthy, allergen-free school
lunch to bring home for the next day. Essex Elementary School, 6:30-8 p.m. Contact Lauren: 878-6715.
Look Good — Feel Better program. Female
cancer patients receive beauty techniques to help restore their appearance
and help them feel good about they way
they look during chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Free. American Cancer Society Hope Lodge, Lois McClure –
Bee Tabakin Building, 237 East Avenue,
Burlington, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Contact:
658-0649.
27
Workshop. “Early Literacy Math Skills for Childcare Providers.” Youth Librarians from
Brownell and Burnham Libraries will train Childcare Providers in using picture
books to develop math skills with preschoolers. Each childcare facility will receive
paperback books and related math toys. Free, space is limited. Please register
using the link on our website, or call us at 878-0313. Takes place at the Colchester
Meeting House. 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Sept. 21
Practice SAT Exam. Take a free, current, genuine, professionally-scored SAT, and then
learn how to improve your score on the official test. A two-part event. The sessions
take place just down the street at the Our Lady of Grace church. Register for both
using the link on our website. 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Sept. 24
Adult book discussion group. Join an afternoon discussion group. Discussion will be
led by a staff member. This month: “Let’s Pretend this Never Happened,” by Jenny
Lawson. 1 p.m.
Sept. 25
Videography of birds. At the Colchester Meeting House. A program by the Green
Mountain Audubon Society on Mark Paul’s videography of birds from South America. 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 28
Practice SAT Exam. At the second session you’ll receive your scores, and go over potential problem areas and strategies with a Princeton Review instructor. A twopart event. The sessions take place just down the street at the Our Lady of Grace
church. Register for both using the link on our website. 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Island night. An island-themed meal. Live Entertainment. No cover. $7 adults, $3 children under 12. Open to the public. VFW
Post 6689, 73 Pearl Street, Essex Junction,
5:30-10 p.m. Contact: 233-2673
Elder Education Enrichment lecture. “America
in a Fast-Changing World: Will We Be Up
to the Challenge?” George Jaeger, Senior Foreign Service Officer, retired. Cost:
$5. Handicapped accessible. Faith United
Methodist Church, 899 Dorset Street, South
Burlington, 2-3 p.m Contact: 802-8643516.
Essex Junction 5 Corners Farmers’ Market.
Check out this great community event! Every Friday until Oct. Local produce, activities, vendors and more. Lincoln Place, Essex
Junction, 3:30-7:30 p.m.
Documentary screening. “The Hungry Heart,”
by Bess O’Brien marks the Second Annual
Recovery Day in Burlington, a day to acknowledge and honor individuals who have
actively chosen to enter recovery from addiction. Tickets: $15-30, free for individuals
in recovery. Includes a discussion after the
movie. Flynn Center, Burlington, 7 p.m. Tickets at www.flynntix.com.
Saturday
Bristol harvest festival. Crafters, vendors, live
music, children’s activities, contests and a
5K race. Bristol Town Green, Bristol, 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Contact: 388-7951 x1. Info:
www.BristolHarvestFest.com.
Old Fashioned Harvest Market. A 2-day family-friendly community fair with entertainment, food, kids activities, and over 100
crafters. Admission: free; suggested donation of a nonperishable food item encouraged. Also Sept 29: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. United
Church of Underhill, intersection of Route
15 and Park Street, Underhill, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Contact: 899-1722. For a full schedule and
details: underhillharvestmarket.com.
DO YOU RECOGNIZE THE SUBTLE
SIGNS OF SICKNESS?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Inappropriate elimination
Unexplained weight loss or gain
Changes in grooming habits
Changes in interaction
Changes in activity
Changes in sleeping habits
Changes in food or
water consumption
8. Signs of stress
9. Changes in vocalization
10. Bad breath
Affectionately Cats
Feline Veterinary Hospital and Boarding Suites
www.affectionatelycats.com
60 Commerce St. Williston, VT. 05495
860-CATS
(2287)
Attention
lA CraApplf teeIslrandsResort in South Hero
Oktoberfestival Craft Fair
Saturday, October 12, 2013
10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
We are looking for crafters who would like to be a part of this event.
Whether it be selling Vermont Maple Syrup or other Vermont made
items the more of a variety the better. Table space is by donation with
proceeds going to a local charity. All Items must be handmade. T he event
wil be held outside if the weather cooperates, inside the Clubhouse if not.
71 Route 2 - South Hero, VT
Activities Office: 802.378.5463
Sept. 30
Intergenerational dessert book discussion. For anyone grade 6 to adult who loves a
good “read–and–rant!” Eat something sweet and talk about a great book. Stop
by to sign up. This month: “Poetry 180,” by Billy Collins. 6:30 p.m.
[email protected]
ONGOING
Burnham Knitters. Knitters of all skill levels meet Wednesdays. Beginners welcome.
Colchester Meeting House or Burnham Memorial Library, 6-8 p.m.
Hydrant Flushing
NOTICE
Colchester Fire District No.3
Preschool music with Mr. Chris. Wednesdays. Mr. Chris brings music and fun to the
library. Best for ages 3-5. 1-1:30 p.m.
Drop-in gentle Hatha yoga. Tuesdays. Bring a mat and enjoy poses for mindful stretching and relaxation. Beginners and intermediates welcome. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Call
878-0313 to sign up.
Drop-in story-time. Saturdays. A weekly selection of music and books for children of
all ages. No sign-up required. Contact: 878-0313. 10 a.m.
Toddler story-time. Tuesdays. A weekly selection of music, rhymes, and stories. For ages
18 months-3 years. Call to sign-up. 10:30 a.m.
Preschool summer story-time. Mondays and Thursdays. Join us for stories followed by
a craft or activity. For ages 3-6. Call to register. 10:30 a.m.
Burnham Library hours
Monday, Wednesday: 10 a.m.-8 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday: 12-5 p.m.; Saturday: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Friday
Academic convocation. Faculty awards will
be presented for scholarship, teaching
and service. Speaker will be Professor of
English Robert Niemi, winner of the 2012
Faculty Scholarship Award. McCarthy Arts
Center, St. Michael’s College, Colchester, 3
p.m.
28
EVENTS AT BURNHAM MEMORIAL LIBRARY
Sept. 19
Burnham Library Trustees meeting. The library’s trustees meet monthly, and meetings
are open to the public. 4 p.m.
9
898 Main Street, Colchester
Contact: 879-7576 or [email protected]
Vermont history through song. Singer and
researcher Linda Radtke joined by pianist
Arthur Zorn bring Vermont history to life
with songs from the Vermont Historical Society’s collection of sheet music. Dressed
in period costume, Radtke will add commentary to set the scenes. Dorothy Alling
Memorial Library, 21 Library Lane, Williston, 1 p.m. Contact: 878-4918.
Zombie run. An untimed 5K obstacle course
fun run with mud, music and zombies. Put
together a team and keep away from the
undead. A benefit for Smile Train. Champlain Valley Exposition, Essex Junction, 10
a.m.-3 p.m. Register: zombierun.com.
Bird monitoring walk. Join experienced birders for monthly bird monitoring. Please
bring binoculars. Free and best for adults
and older children. Birds of Vermont Museum, 900 Sherman Hollow Road, Huntington, 8-9:30 a.m. Register: 434-2167
or [email protected]
Dog walk fundraiser. Two separate dog walks
to benefit Lucy’s House for the Prevention
of Homeless Pets. Vendors, children’s activities and K9 units. Bombardier Park,
Milton, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Pre-registration is
encouraged. Contact: 879-0898.
29
Sunday
Green Mountain Iron Dog competition. A 1.5
mile course where handler and dog run
through a variety of obstacles over various terrain. Competitors are a mix of military, Police, and civilian. All abilities and
dog breeds are welcome. Camp Dudley
at Kiniya, Camp Kiniya Road, Colchester,
8 a.m.-4 p.m. Info: www.vtk9.com.
Pumpkin Chuckin’ Festival. Features three
rounds of competitive pumpkin chuckin’.
Also children’s activities, food vendors,
chili cook-off, and live music. Admission:
$5 per person. Proceeds benefit the
Lamoille Family Center. Stoweflake Resort
and Spa, Stowe, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Contact:
630-4800 or [email protected]
Pie fest and Cider House Run. Join in a family-friendly 2 or 4-mile run/walk through
the orchard. Fee: $25. Afterward, prizes
will be awarded for favorite pies in a
separate competition and everyone is
invited to help eat all entries after judging. Live entertainment on site. Shelburne
Orchards, 9:45 a.m. run registration, 11
a.m. run, 12 p.m. pie judging. Info: 3167142, [email protected]
Ongoing
Causeway Bike Ferry. The ferry runs this summer
through Oct. 14 on Saturdays and Sundays
10 a.m.-6 p.m. Adult $8; youth (7-17) $5;
under age 6 riders are free.
Basketball skills clinic. Sundays in Sept. Open
to girls in grades 6-12. Cost: $25 per session. St. Michael’s College, Colchester, 9:30
a.m.-12 p.m. Contact Women’s Basketball
Head Coach Shannon Kynoch: 654-2503.
Bingo. Sponsored by the Whitcomb Woods Residents Association. Whitcomb Woods, 128
West Street, Essex Junction. Mondays at 6
p.m. Contact: 879-1829.
Beginner yoga classes. Tuesdays. In lieu of a
fee, please bring a non-perishable item or
monetary donation for the Richmond Food
Shelf. Richmond Free Library, 201 Bridge
Street, Richmond, 6-7 p.m. Contact: [email protected] or 318-5570.
Burlington Farmers’ Market. Saturdays. A
weekly selection of seasonal produce, artisan products and more from over ninety
outdoor stands. Free and open to the public. City Hall Park, Burlington, 8:30 a.m.-2
p.m.
Burlington Writers Workshop. A free writing
workshop for all Vermonters. Meets every
Wednesday in downtown Burlington. Free
and open to the public. Participants must
register at meetup.com. More info: burlingtonwritersworkshop.com.
Cell phones for soldiers. Local residents can
support these collection drives by donating
their old cell phones at A. W. Rich Funeral
Home, 57 Main Street, Essex Junction. Or
at the American Legion, 3650 Roosevelt
Highway, Colchester. Collections accepted
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Contact: 849-6261.
For more calendar events, visit
www.colchestersun.com/calendar
Colchester Fire District No. 3 will be conducting it’s annual
Hydrant Flushing Program starting on September 3, 2013October 18, 2013.
Flushing will begin at 7:00 a.m. and end at 3:00 p.m. All
residents and businesses could experience low water pressure
and orange or brown water at times during flushing.
To clear discolored water, let your cold water run for
approximately 5-10 minutes on an outside hose bib. Repeat
this process if necessary.
If you experience low water pressure during the evening hours,
please call Colchester Fire District No. 3 to inform us of the
situation, or if you have any questions regarding this notice
please contact us at 878-4337 or 999-6962.
Colchester
Religious Directory
Daybreak Community Church
67 Creek Farm Plaza, Colchester VT. 05446
802-338-9118 or [email protected]
www.daybreakvermont.org
Sunday Service at 10:30am
Lead Pastor, Brent Devenney
Holy Cross Church
416 Church Road, Colchester; 863-3002
Summer Mass Schedule
Saturday: 4:30 p.m.;
Sunday: 9 a.m.; 11 a.m.; 6 p.m.
Monday - Wednesday & Friday: 9 a.m.
For Catholics who are returning home to the Church,
welcome. We are happy that the Holy Spirit is leading you
and we are pleased to welcome you.
Come Join Us!
Islamic Society of Vermont
182 Hegeman Avenue. 655-6711
Islamic Society of Vermont. Join Imam Islam Hassan
([email protected]) for the five daily prayers. Timings at
ISVT homepage www.isvt.org The call for Friday Jumah
prayers is exactly at 1:00PM followed by Khutbah and
prayer. Additional Friday night lectures between Magrib
and Isha prayers. Weekend Islamic classes on Sundays
9:45AM-1:30PM for all children 4 years and older during the
school year. Interested non-members always welcome.
(802) 655-6711 or [email protected] or Facebook.
Malletts Bay Congregational Church UCC
1672 West Lakeshore Dr.
658-9155. Rev. Mary Nelson Abbott, Pastor.
Worship Service: Sunday at 9:30 a.m.
Church School: Sunday at 10:00 a.m.
Fellowship time: Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Childcare provided.
All are welcome!
St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church
1063 Prim Road, 658-0533.
Rev. Lisette Baxter, Rector
Sundays: 8 a.m. & 10 a.m.,
Holy Eucharist 10 a.m.
Sunday School: Nursery & all grades
Wednesdays: 11:30 Bible class; 12:30 Holy Eucharist
For evening services & Adult Education,
check answering machine. All are always welcome.
United Church Of Colchester - ABC
Rte 2A-Village Green, 879-5442.
Pastor Josh Steely.
Worship: 10:30 a.m.
Adult Sunday School: 9:00 a.m.
Youth Sunday School during 10:30
worship; pre-school through 11 years.
Nursery care available during worship.
Christ Centered - Family Oriented.
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
10
SCHOOLS
CHS
COLCHESTER
SCHOOL
DISTRICT
Calendar
of Events
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
What: Malletts Bay School Open House
When: 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
What: Malletts Bay School Instrument Take-Home Night
Where: MBS gymnasium
When: 4 – 8:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
CHS physical education students participate in a paddling unit at Bayside Park.
PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
SUP at Colchester High
At Colchester High School, students
in physical education have been taking
part in a paddling unit.
Taking advantage of their proximity
to Bayside Park on Lake Champlain,
students may choose from canoes, kayaks
and stand-up paddleboards.
“This has been taught for years,” said
CHS Physical Education Teacher Morgan
Samler. “We have anywhere from 16 to
25 students participating in the activity.”
Kayaking and canoeing provide
excellent, low-impact, healthy physical
activity, allowing enthusiasts to paddle in
scenic environments on rivers, lakes and
ponds and even the ocean.
For more information, contact CHS at
264-5700.
What: Colchester High School Senior College Night
Where: Colchester High School library
When: 6:30 – 8 p.m.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
What: Porters Point Open House
When: 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
UMS
CMS
PPS
At Union Memorial School, students
in Erin Sorenson’s first-grade class
participate in daily math lessons
that begin with Math Meeting.
Students sing songs relating to the
calendar and other topics about numbers,
after which they spend time discussing the calendar and
the date. Part of Math Meeting is the Number of the Day
routine. Students use the number representing the number of
days thus far in the school year to base a variety of numberrelated activities including counting, addition and subtraction,
lessons about currency and more. These creative enterprises
set the stage for engaging daily math instruction to help hold
students’ interest and curiosity.
For more information, contact UMS at 264-5959.
At Colchester Middle School, students participate in a
wide variety of teacher-directed clubs in an effort to further
promote a positive and comfortable learning environment. The
clubs provide additional opportunities for students to work
collaboratively with others to learn a new skill and make a
positive contribution. In this way, students from across houses
and grade levels can work with one another toward common
goals.
In Amy Kriger’s knitting club, increasing numbers of
students are learning to knit; Nancy Breiner volunteers with
the knitters. Many of the participating students are knitting
warm hats for donation to the Vermont Children’s Hospital,
which provides a tangible outlet for students to give back to
the community.
For more information, or to donate knitting supplies to the
club, contact CMS at 264-5800.
At Porters Point School, guidance counselor Greg Kriger
has been working with the students to introduce the idea of
Whole-Body Listening — the concept that listening is more
than just hearing the words said by others but also listening
with the whole body, including eyes, ears, mouths, hands,
feet, brain and heart. He is also working to help reinforce
PPS’s school-wide expectations, which are “Be Safe,” “Be
Respectful” and “Be Ready to Learn.”
Kriger is also introducing a social thinking concept with
first- and second-graders called “Too Much, Too Little and
Just Right,” which involves teaching students about the
intensity of their words and actions. The goal is for students
to understand and regularly practice the Just Right intensity in
response to a direction or expectation of their teachers.
For more information, contact PPS at 264-5920.
Students become counselors at CKS
An installation ceremony for Christ the King School’s 20132014 Student Council was held after Mass on Sept. 5. Eight
officers were elected from the seventh and eighth grades and each
class in grades three through eight elected two representatives
to serve on the Council. Student Council Treasurer Nacole
Barrett is from Colchester.
Members of the CKS Student Council pledged to live out the
mission of Christ the King School, represent their classes with
integrity, and to support the needs of their school and parish
community. The CKS Student Council plans and executes
various school and community service activities throughout the
year and they celebrate all that is special about Christ the King
School through school Spirit activities. Advisors to the Council
include CKS Principal Angela Pohlen, Associate Principal
Odile Steel, and Pastor Fr. Rich O’Donnell.
Fr. Rich O’Donnell talks to the newly installed Christ the King
School Student Council about the importance of being leaders
and positive examples.
PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
April is
National
Facial
Protection
Month
Malletts Bay School
At Malletts Bay School, students in Kari Carney’s
fourth-grade class are hard at work exploring mathematics
and literacy in creative ways.
Carney has designed a variety of math stations through
which students rotate each day in order to investigate such
mathematical conventions as points, lines, line segments,
rays and other geometric figures. Carney also incorporates
a broad assortment of games into math instruction to assist
students with skills comprehension and practice. Through a
program called Everyday Math Online, parents can access
the student reference book, parent letters, study links and
math games from virtually anywhere to help their children
reinforce fact fluency and skills.
Carney’s students are also learning about Internet safety
and creating their own blogs and avatars, and are using
a five-component model for reading to further enhance
literacy skills.
For more information, contact MBS at 264-5900.
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Everyone is welcome!
Go to www.mylifemysmile.org to find an orthodontist near you or ask your dentist for a referral.
Orthodontists are specialists in straightening teeth and aligning your bite. They have two to three
years of education beyond dental school. So they’re experts at helping you and your child, get a great
smile—that feels great, too.
Go to www.mylifemysmile.org to find an orthodontist near you or ask your dentist for a referral.
© 2012 American Association of Orthodontists.
Drs. Peterson, Ryan & Eaton
Williston • 878-5323
St. Albans • 527-7100
© 2012 American Association of Orthodontists.
www.champlainortho.net
Stern Center
Breast Cancer Awareness Month activities.
We’ll tell local stories about raising money,
for Language and Learning
providing support and fighting
Williston, VT | White River Jct., VT
the disease first hand.
802-878-2332 | www.sterncenter.org
SportS
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19,
2013
THE
COLCHESTER SUN / SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
11
Arts & Entertainment
pages 16 and 17
FOOTBALL
Colchester’s defense tackles
a player from Middlebury on
Friday evening in Colchester.
PHOTOS BY OLIVER PARINI
Colchester falls to Middlebury
By KELLY MARCH
The Colchester Sun
Friday night marked the second week in a row that Colchester
scored on its first possession of a Friday night football game to
secure an early lead against a Division I power. And for the
second week in a row the Lakers watched that lead slip away
and fell short of picking up their first win of the season.
Colchester (0-3) opened Friday’s game against Middlebury
(3-0) with a quick drive that ended when senior quarterback JP
Olson found junior Pascal Bechade with a 10-yard touchdown
pass for a 6-0 Laker lead. But Middlebury senior Jacob
Trautwein scored on the ensuing possession and the Tigers
never looked back, rallying to a 13-6 halftime lead and a 28-6
victory.
“It’s a weird year for us,” reflected Colchester head coach
Tom Perry. “Usually, you can count on us to be a team that
makes the plays we need to make to pull things out in the fourth
quarter. But we’re very young this year and we’ve had a lot of
injuries.
“To their credit, our kids are doing a great job battling
adversity,” Perry added, noting that Colchester has lost four
players to injury this season. “We’ve had a first-half injury in
every game so far, meaning kids that haven’t had that many
chances to play have had to jump in against really good teams
and try to figure things out on the fly.”
The Lakers inexperience has translated into some obvious
mistakes on the field, but the team has showed more promise
than its 35-9, 49-14 and 28-6 losses suggest. Perry noted that
two dropped balls in the end zone cost Colchester a halftime
lead against Middlebury on Friday, which can be seen as a
measure of both the team’s potential and shortcomings.
“We’re getting better every week,” Perry said. “The kids are
leaning quickly and looking better everyday. No one is getting
discouraged; the kids still look forward to every Friday and
that’s really the most important thing.”
The Lakers will travel to Essex to take on the Hornets (1-2)
in a rematch of last year’s Division I quarterfinal, which Essex
won 35-7, on Friday at 7 p.m.
“We’ll see what this week brings,” Perry said. “I think Essex
is in the same boat as us in terms of experience, so it should be
an exciting game.”
Colchester junior Pascal Bechade yells with excitement after
scoring a touchdown on Friday evening in Colchester.
Colchester runs strong
in Burlington
Four days after competing in a regional
meet in St. Albans, the Colchester High School
cross country team refocused its energy
and stormed the Burlington Invitational on
Saturday.
Colchester’s varsity boys’ squad placed
9th of 24 with 228 points, nearly 70 points
ahead of 10th-place Rice Memorial. Three
Lakers broke the top-50 in a field of 127
runners, with junior Nigel Sarrazin placing
36th in 18:26.6, senior Jordan Lamay placing
Colchester
cross
country
runners
Andrew Pike, left,
and Ethan Thibault
race in St. Albans
last Tuesday. Pike
and Thibault were
two of the first five
Lakers to cross
the finish line at
the
Burlington
Invitational
on
Saturday.
Colchester girls’ results:
63 Hannah Echo
78 Peri Navarro
93 Katrina Groseclose
94 Julia Bessy
95 Maddie Prevost
97 Libby Connors
100 Megan Severance
schedule
Lakers’
FIELD HOCKEY:
9/19 Colchester
at Mt. Mansfield
FOOTBALL:
9/20 Colchester
at Essex
Colchester boys’ results:
36 Nigel Sarrazin
43 Jordan Lamay
45 Angus Doherty
55 Ethan Thibault
63 Andrew Pike
75 Ian Sarrazin
88 Micheal Granai
18:26.6
18:37.8
18:41.0
18:58.6
19:06.7
19:38.6
20:19.0
For JV and middle school results from
the Burlington Invitational, visit us online at
www.colchestersun.com.
JOSH KAUFMANN
CROSS COUNTRY:
9/21 Colchester
at Hard’ack
10 a.m.
23:44.7
24:35.7
25:47.1
25:51.6
25:53.4
26:05.7
26:08.2
43rd in 18:37.8 and sophomore Angus
Doherty placing 45th in 18:41.
The Lakers’ varsity girls placed 14th of 22
with 393 points, edging Missisquoi Valley for
the spot by just one point. Colchester junior
Hannah Echo led the squad with a 63rd-place
finish in a field of 119 runners with a time of
23:44.7.
The Lakers’ varsity results from the
Burlington Invitational were as follows:
GIRLS’ SOCCER:
9/20 Colchester
at S. Burlington 3:45 p.m.
BOYS’ SOCCER:
9/21 Colchester
at S. Burlington
9/21 Colchester
vs. Essex
10 a.m.
9/23 Colchester
at Harwood
4:30 p.m.
9/24 Colchester
at Essex
4:30 p.m.
9/25 Colchester
vs. Burlington
9/25 Colchester
at Essex
4:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
7 p.m.
10 a.m.
12
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
Prices go up after Sept. 23!
HAPPINESS IS...
a season pass to your
LOCAL MOUNTAIN.
Adult: $569
Youth (7-17): $159*
Senior (65-74): $299
*When purchased with parent’s
Adult All Access Season Pass.
NEW for 2013-14!
Senior Plus (75+): $29
Night Pass (All Ages): $119
Season long ski & snowboard leases
for all ages starting at $99.
boltonvalley.com • 1.877.9BOLTON
Bolton Valley and Smugglers’ Notch Resort have joined forces to offer
full-time college students an unrestricted, all access pass to both
Bolton & Smuggs for just $249 if you purchase by Halloween 2013.
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
13
SPORTS
CMS excels in
season-opening meet
The Colchester Middle
School cross country team
opened the fall season with
a strong performance in the
Burlington Invitational on
Saturday.
The Cougars’ girls’ squad
placed fourth of 26 with
a team time of 1:11:15.2,
just over a second behind
third-place finisher Edmund
Middle School. Seventh-
grader Myla Jacobs topped
the competition, placing first
of 200 runners in the 3K with
a time of 12:19. Seventhgrader Shyanne Roberge
also broke the meet’s top 10,
placing sixth in 12:55.
Colchester’s boys’ squad
placed fifth of 24 with a
team time of 1:04:14.3, led
by seventh-grader Alex
Frank’s 17th-place finish in
12:21. Camden LeClair was
the next Cougar to cross the
line, placing 22nd in a field
of 234 runners with a time of
12:36.
The Cougars took on
Essex Middle School on
Wednesday, after press time,
and will compete in the U-32
Invitational on Saturday,
Sept. 28, starting at 9 a.m.
–Kelly March
Colchester Middle School eighth-grader Kristian Labrie competes in the Burlington Invitational on
Saturday.
PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
The Colchester Middle School cross country team celebrates after running strong in its first meet
of the season Saturday at the Burlington Invitational.
Kelly Brush Century Ride
sets fundraising record
The Colchester Middle School girls’ cross country team is all smiles after placing fourth of 26 on
Saturday.
THIS WEEK IN
ST. MICHAEL’S COLLEGE
ATHLETICS
Men’s cross country wins VTC Invitational
The men’s cross country team had four top10 finishes on Saturday to claim the team title
at the Vermont Technical College Invitational.
Junior Peter McKenna clocked in at 30:20 to
place second in the 8K race, while classmate
Alex Gilgore claimed fourth place at 30:32, just
0.99 ticks short of third. First-year Matthaus
Ayers placed seventh in 30:59 during his
college debut, and senior Dana Glubiak was
ninth at 31:42. Junior Erik Hoiseth completed
his team’s top five by placing 12th.
Kelly Brush Davisson, center, leads a field of 25 adaptive athletes and hundreds of bicyclists
at the start of the Kelly Brush Century Ride last Saturday in Middlebury. The eighth annual ride
raised over $300,000 for spinal cord injury prevention, ski racing safety and adaptive sports
equipment grants.
RAJAN CHAWLA PHOTOGRAPHY
Cyclists help raise over
$300,000 for charity
Over 750 bicyclists and 25 handcyclists
rolled through the hills of the Champlain
Valley during the Kelly Brush Century
Ride, Vermont’s largest charity ride, last
Saturday. Riding in teams or individually,
the cyclists raised more than $300,000 for
adaptive athletes and ski racing safety,
setting a new fundraising record for the
event.
“With the incredible generosity of
our riders and sponsors, the Kelly Brush
Century Ride Powered by VBT Bicycle and
Walking Vacations has now raised nearly
$1.5 million for adaptive athletes and ski
racing safety,” noted foundation president
Charlie Brush. “With this support, the Kelly
Brush Foundation is able to make a positive
difference in the lives of those living with
spinal cord injury, through helping with
the purchase of specialized adaptive sports
equipment. In addition, our supporters
have helped put safety first in ski racing by
underwriting the cost for over 400 miles of
safety netting.”
The ride was started by the Middlebury
College Ski Team as a way to raise money to
buy an adaptive mono-ski for team member
Kelly Brush Davisson, who was paralyzed
as the result of a ski racing crash. Brush and
her family later founded a nonprofit and the
ride was opened to the public eight years
ago.
Funds raised through the ride support
the Kelly Brush Foundation’s mission to
“conquer the challenges of paralysis through
love of sport by helping athletes with spinal
cord injuries purchase specialized sports
equipment.” The foundation has awarded
more than 60 grants for adaptive equipment,
including adaptive gear for skiing, cycling,
bowling, rowing and horse carriage racing.
In addition, the foundation has carried out a
safety awareness campaign and purchased
safety netting for race courses across the
country.
For information about the Kelly Brush
Foundation or to apply for an adaptive gear
grant, visit www.kellybrushfoundation.org.
Women’s cross country finishes second
The women’s cross country team finished
behind only nationally-ranked Middlebury
College at the Panthers’ Aldrich Invitational
on Saturday. For the second straight year,
the Purple Knights came in second behind
Middlebury, which is ranked 10th in Division
III by the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country
Coaches Association (USTFCCCA). Junior
Chloe Boutelle was the only non-Middlebury
runner among the top 13 finishers in the 5K
race, claiming ninth at 19:00. Classmate Lindy
Heffernan was 14th at 19:24, and junior Colleen
Gilliatt placed 18th in 19:46. Classmate Allie
Gratton took 23rd by crossing in 20:18, and
senior Daniela Czark completed her team’s top
five in 24th place thanks to a time of 21:01.
Men’s golf finishes 15th in Middlebury
The men’s golf team competed in two
meets in the last two weekends, taking sixth at
the Franklin Pierce Division II Fall Invitational,
which concluded last Monday, and notching a
15th-place showing at Middlebury College’s
Duke Nelson Invitational on Sunday. It was
the Purple Knights’ best placement at the Duke
Nelson since taking 13th in 2003.
Senior Steve French carded an 84 on the
last day of the Franklin Pierce Division II Fall
Invitational to finish tied for 11th with 163
strokes. Classmate Spencer Mallette shaved
10 strokes off his Sunday total on day two,
firing a 78 to complete the meet with 166 shots
and stand 19th. Sophomore Nathaniel Young
and junior Matt Rosencranz were the Purple
Knights’ next two scorers, while senior Corey
Carlos was the team’s fifth competitor.
In Middlebury, the Purple Knights posted
the second-best second-round improvement,
trimming 11 strokes off of their Saturday
total. Young fired a five-over 75 to shave
a tournament-high-tying 14 strokes off his
opening-round score. He tied for 14th during
the final round, coming within five shots of
the leader, while tying for 78th as his final
placement for the invitational. Mallette tied
for 18th on Sunday by carding a 76, eventually
finishing the tournament tied for 45th overall at
156 strokes. Both Mallette and Young posted
career-best rounds during the final day. French
tied for 61st at 159, which included a day-two
78, and Rosencranz completed the weekend
by tying for 66th at 161. Sophomore Brodie
McCusker was the team’s fifth competitor.
Women’s volleyball finishes as runner-up
The St. Michael’s College women’s
volleyball team went 3-1 over the weekend
at the State University of New York at
Plattsburgh’s Best Western-Ground Round
Cardinal Classic, finishing as the runner-up to
the hosts. The Purple Knights won 3-0 decisions
against Elms College and Cazenovia (N.Y.)
College on Friday before splitting on Saturday,
defeating Norwich University 3-0, before falling
to SUNY Plattsburgh, 3-1, in the title match.
Sophomore Kelsey Flaherty was named to the
all-tournament team.
During the second day, senior Chelsey
Covitz broke Justine Fletcher’s ‘09 program
record for career blocking assists, pushing her
total to 136. With 792 kills, she trails former
teammate Tracy Peterka ‘13 by one kill for
seventh in program history. Senior Jess McLeod
eclipsed the 3,000-assist plateau on Saturday,
now claiming 3,038 for her career.
In the opener against the Blazers, Covitz
had six kills, four aces and four blocks, while
classmate Brianna Saunders totaled five kills.
Sophomore Candace Washington added
four kills, and Flaherty and first-year Megan
Mulvaney notched three kills apiece. McLeod
collected 13 assists and seven digs in two sets,
while first-year Catie Weller dished off eight
helpers in her lone set. Classmate Natalie Moore
chipped in three aces, junior Hillary Miller
tacked on 11 digs, and senior Lindsay Phenix
had three blocks.
Versus Cazenovia, Flaherty dropped 15 kills
on 24 swings while also contributing 11 digs,
and Covitz collected six kills. Washington had
four kills, Moore tallied six aces and six digs,
senior Cynthia Edgerton totaled four aces, and
first-year Natalia Maccarrone picked up five
digs. McLeod turned in 22 assists in two sets,
and Weller had five in one set.
Against Norwich, Phenix dropped eight kills,
while Flaherty had five kills and five digs. Covitz
notched six kills, Weller had 13 assists and seven
digs in two sets, and McLeod dished out 10
helpers. Miller collected 10 digs, while Mulvaney
and Washington each recorded three blocks.
Flaherty had a well-rounded 12 kills, 16
digs, three aces and three blocks versus the
hosts, Covitz tallied 12 kills and six blocks, and
Washington tallied 11 kills. McLeod contributed
41 assists and 18 digs, while Phenix and senior
Maddie Gaughan notched five and three blocks,
respectively. Moore provided 33 digs, and
Maccarrone posted 21.
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
14
Friday at 5pm
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Colchester VT 05446
SERVICES
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INDOOR WINTER
STORAGE
available for cars,
motorcycles,
landscaping
equipment,
etc. Dry,
clean, secure.
In Jericho on
paved highway.
Available 10/13.
David at 8993572.
YARD SALES
SUNDERLAND
WOODS
AUTUMN YARD
SALE, Saturday,
September 21st.
Multi-family;
9 AM to 3 PM
Rain or shineSunderland
Woods in
Colchester. Lots
of toys, clothes,
furniture, kitchen
wares etc.
Treasures to be
found!
GARAGE SALE:
19 TAMARACK
DRIVE Essex
Junction
Saturday,
September 21,
9am – 2pm
Furniture
(bookcases.
filing cabinets,
tables, lamps),
household items,
collectibles.
FOR SALE
AIR
CONDITIONER,
KENMORE, Sears.
Asking $55. 802527-0808
APPLE PARER,
SLICER and corer.
In original box
with instructions.
Never used. $10.
802-868-5177
BREADMAN
BREADMAKER,
WITH
DEADLINES
Friday at 5 p.m. for line ads
to run in the following
Thursday paper
instructions $30.
Call 802-4858266
Fry/Cook/Steam/
Slowcook. $15
802-527-9822
THINKING OF
AN ADVENTURE,
this is the rig!
2006 Class A
Winnebago
Voyage 33V
6,060 miles - one
round trip to
Florida Excellent
condition,
wintered under
cover Perfect
floor plan and
interior finish
Two slide outs
plus many extra
features Detailed
info & pictures
available Email:
voyage motor
[email protected]
com Call: #802
878 2616
DORM
REFRIGERATOR,
SMALL, approx.
3 ft. high. Runs
excellent. $125.
802-868-4471
DEEP FRYER,
DAZEY 3.5 quart,
MONOPOLY
1961, SEALED
GRILL, GEORGE
FOREMAN, stand
up. $5. 802-7609142
REFRIGERATOR,
MID-SIZE, great
for apartment,
office or family
room. $125. 802868-7975
SLOW COOKER,
LARGE, never
used. $25. 802393-5127
TOWN OF COLCHESTER
SELECT BOARD
Pursuant to Title 24 VSA, Chapter 117,
the Colchester Select Board will hold
a public hearing on Tuesday, October
8, 2013 at 6:30 P.M. at the Colchester
Meeting House on Main Street to hear
citizen’s comments and questions on
Supplement 33 of the Zoning Regulations.
Information can be obtained on the Town
Website: www.colchestervt.gov or by
calling the Town Offices at 264-5509.
Publication date:
September 19, 2013
PUBLIC HEARING-COLCHESTER
DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD
Pursuant to Title 24 VSA, Chapter 117,
the Development Review Board will
hold a public hearing on Wednesday,
October 9, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at the
Meeting House, 830 Main St., to hear the
following requests under the Subdivision
and Zoning Regulations:
1.
Preliminary and Final Plat
applications of Gary Benway for a
Planned Unit Development to subdivide
a 1.63 acre parcel into two lots. Property
is located at 128 Foley Road, Tax Map
48, Parcel 9.
2.
Variance
application
of
Housing Foundation, Inc. for an overall
dimensional variance for front and rear
yard setbacks for an existing Mobile
Home Park. Subject property is located
on Johnson Avenue, Tax Map 19, Parcel
13.
Copies of the application are available
for public inspection at the Planning
& Zoning Office in the Colchester
Municipal Offices located at 781 Blakely
Road.
September 19, 2013
How To Write A Classified
Always start with a keyword that makes it clear
what you are advertising. Include as much
description as you can so the buyer or potential
employee knows exactly what you are offering.
This may avoid unnecessary calls with redundant
questions!
Still need some help, call us and we will help
write your ad and design it for FREE!
in original
cellophane, US
made $25. 802485-8266
SPOOL BED,
ANTIQUE, Jenny
Lind. $100. 802485-8266
an offer. 802933-4257
$10. 802-6581636
COUNTERTOP,
NEW, BEIGE/
BLACK grain,
119X25.5". $120.
802-343-4330
U.S. NAVAL
ACADEMY Lucky
Bag Graduation
Books, 1950,
1951, 1952,
1953. $20. each.
802-933-4257
WINDOWS,
WOOD FRAME,
double hung,
with aluminum
combination
window/screen.
(1) double, (1)
single. Call for
prices and sizes.
802-527-7235
MUSICAL
LADY DOLL,
mechanical.
20" tall. Wind
up, moves and
sings Material
Girl. $20. or
best offer. 802524-1139 leave
message.
BOOKS, 125PLUS, murder
mystery,
historical fiction,
several complete
series by Rhys
Bowen, Victoria
Thompson,
Carola Dean, and
more. $25. 802524-3245
BEN HOGAN
IRONS
Set of Graphite
Irons #3-7.
Hogan H 40. $80
for set.
Call 233-5177
INTERNATIONAL
POSTAGE STAMP
Album and
Modern Postage
Stamp Album.
Both partial
collection. Make
BATHROBE,
NEW, LADIES'
heavy bathrobe
with belt. 100%
cotton, size M.
Black with white
designs. $15.
802-658-1636
BOOTS, LADIES,
CHIPPEWA,
black, size 9. $25.
802-868-5606
DANSKO CLOGS,
WOMEN'S 39,
brand new. $49.
802-760-9142
HAT, LADIES',
NEW, light
purple, beautiful.
Has brim and
flaps that cover
ears. Size 7 1/4.
SOMETIMES ERRORS OCCUR
CHILDREN'S
BOOKS, WIDE
variety, over 150
titles. $25. 802527-9822
CAMCORDER,
JVC, SMALL tape
goes into big
cassette. Comes
with everything.
Excellent
condition. $50.
802-891-9255
COMPUTER
DESK, OAK
finish, sliding
shelf, casters.
$25. 802-5279822
COLOR TV, 24
inch, remote
and component
ports, $10. 802527-9822
DESKTOP
COMPUTERS (2),
has everything
except mouse.
$35. each. 802868-0096
GPS SYSTEM,
TOM-TOM,
excellent
condition. $80.
Call 802-8919255
USB NETGEAR
N-300 wireless
adaptor, brand
new, only used
once. $25. 802524-5070
PERSONAL
STEREO,
MEMOREX, am/
fm radio and
CD player with
headphones. $5.
802-527-9822
HOT TUNA
CONCERT tickets
(2), Saturday,
November 30, at
Jay Peak, Foeger
Ballroom. $95.
for the pair. Call
David anytime
802-524-4804.
SCANNER, 200
CHANNEL,
programmable,
Radio Shack
brand, has
weather channel.
$50. 802-8919255
PRESS POSITION
Full time newspaper press position open with the St.
Albans Messenger. Day shift with excellent benefits,
Monday through Friday. Successful applicant should
have good mechanical skills, solid work ethic and ability
to work as a team. Prior press experience, or pre-press
experience a plus. Send resume to:
Emerson Lynn
281 North Main Street
St. Albans, VT 05478
or email to:
[email protected]
Professional
Advertising Sales
Representative
SOLUTION
The St. Albans Messenger is seeking a highly motivated individual
interested in sales - for print, web and various niche products. The
position has an existing client base with strong repeat customers,
and the prospects going forward are considerable We are looking
for someone who appreciates the need to listen, and who understands
the importance of relationship selling.
The successful candidate will possess strong organizational skills, a
sense of optimism and the ability to work well with others.
Excellent benefits are included.
Email your resume to:
[email protected]
or mail to:
Emerson Lynn
C/o St. Albans Messenger
281 North Main Street
St. Albans, Vermont 05478
It is your responsibility to check your ad on
the first day of publication for any errors.
Refunds are not issued for classified ads, but
if notification is given to our department after
the first day of publication, we will run your
corrected ad for one extra day. We will not
be responsible for more than one incorrect
publication of each ad.
SONY RECEIVER,
WORKS great.
$40. 802-8680096
SUBWOOFER,
ALTEC LANSING
XA3001. $20.
802-343-4330
TELEVISION
Small, $10.
802-393-5127
leave message
VCR WITH
REMOTE control.
Asking $25. 802527-0808
VCR, WORKS
GREAT, $20. 802868-0096
VIDEO CASSETTE
PLAYER,
Symphonic,
remote. $15.
802-527-8922
WIRED ROUTER,
LINKSYS, 4 Port.
$15. 802-5279822
WIRELESS
ROUTER,
LINKSYS, 2.4 GHz,
802.11g. $25.
802-527-9822
SAWMILLS FROM
ONLY $4897.
MAKE AND
SAVE MONEY
with your own
bandmill. Cut
lumber any
dimension. In
stock ready to
ship. FREE Info/
DVD:
www.Norwood
Sawmills.com
1-800-578-1363
Ext. 300N
AB LOUNGE, (2),
like new. $10.
802-760-9142
BIKE, CRUISER,
24", purple girls
bike, big white
wall tires, light
weight frame,
manual pedal,
large seat. Used
very little. $150.
802-868-9594
EXERCISE BIKE
$15.
802-393-5127
leave message
GOLF CLUBS
$3. each
Call for details
802-524-1139
HOME EXERCISE
GYM, Weider
8620, works
upper and lower
body. Excellent
condition. $100.
802-527-7345
SILAGE
TRUCK, 1997
International, triaxle, 22 ft. dump
body. For more
details call 802782-0139.
CAMPFIRE
WOOD AND
kindling. $3./box
or all 4 boxes for
$10. 802-8687975
BED, ANTIQUE,
4-POSTER, with
mattress and box
spring. Like new.
$100. Call 802393-5127 leave
message.
CEDAR CHEST,
GOOD sized
and deep, two
drawers on
the bottom
that open.
Made out of
cedar. Excellent
condition. $150.
802-782-9436
DRESSER,
ANTIQUE WITH
Noah's Ark and
animals on
the front side
and top of the
dresser. $25.
802-393-5127
leave message.
DRESSER, WITH
(8) drawers, a
mirror and corner
shelves. $50.
802-393-5127
leave message.
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER, SOLID
oak, 29x17x43, 2
storage shelves
behind glass
doors, casters,
includes 20 inch
color TV, with
remote. $65.
802-527-9822
School Bus Drivers,
Mechanics
(Milton, Vermont & surrounding towns)
Mountain Transit is interviewing
Commercial Drivers who hold an A or B
CDL with the following endorsements,
Air Brakes, Passenger and School Bus.
$1000 signing bonus. Call 802-893-1334
or visit our office at 19 Pre-Cast Dr.,
Milton, VT.
Location: Milton, Vermont
Compensation: Starting pay $13.00 to
$14.60 per hour depending on experience.
This is a part-time job with plenty of
opportunity to add hours that fit your
schedule.
Mechanic job is 40+ hours per week
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
15
ideas
64. Bloodless
65. Fed.
procurement
group
67. External
69. Armrest?
70. Singular of
#50 Across
71. “The Barber
of Seville,” e.g.
72. Religious
offshoot
73. Clinton ___
Rodham
74. Tina Fey’s Liz
CROSSWORD
THEME: FALL IN
THE AIR
ACROSS
1. *What a
harvester does
6. On #2 button
9. Lyme disease
carrier
13. The N of
U.S.N.A.
14. Romanian
money
15. Languidly
16. Got up
17. “The Lord
of the Rings”
character
18. Distinguish
oneself
19. *Fall TV time
21. *Colorful
autumn
attraction
23. Eggs
24. Not mint
25. Rare find
28. Means
justifiers
30. Comment
35. Lyric poems
37. Bit
39. Musical show
40. Tangerine
grapefruit hybrid
41. *Autumnal
feeling in air
43. ___ Verde
National Park
44. Capital of
Morocco
46. It’s capped
ColChester PoliCe rePort
Emergency 911 • Non-emergency 264-5556
835 Blakely Rd, Colchester, VT 05446
September 3—September 9, 2013
Wednesday, September 11
0041 Suspicious event on Roosevelt Hwy
0643 Prop damage on Place St Michaels
0706 MV complaint on Roosevelt Hwy
0820 Suspicious event on Overlake Dr
0947 Juvenile problem in Colchester
1000 Juvenile problem in Colchester
1210 Drugs in Colchester
1520 Motorist assist on US Route 2
1551 MV complaint on Jasper Mine Rd
1706 Accident on Roosevelt Hwy
1731 MV larceny on Roosevelt Hwy
1950 DUI on Sand Rd
2217 Prop damage on College Pkwy
Tuesday, September 10
0053 Simple assault on Mercier Dr
0743 Prop damage on Heineberg Dr
1128 Juvenile problem in Colchester
1203 Suspicious event on Oak Cir
1238 Agency assist on Blakely Rd
1257 Counterfeiting on Prim Rd
1436 Agency assist on Camel Hump Rd
1541 Accident on Roosevelt Hwy
1801 Traffic hazard on Roosevelt Hwy
1819 Traffic hazard on College Pkwy
1950 Fireworks on Claypoint Rd
1957 Disturbance on Main St
2004 Prop damage on S Park Dr
2023 Juvenile problem in Colchester
2048 ATV complaint on Blakely Rd
2231 Suspicious event on Julie Dr
Thursday, September 12
0429 Prop damage on Roosevelt Hwy
47. At a previous
time, archaic
48. Motion
picture type
50. *Nut
droppers
52. Distress
signal
53. Chicken ____
55. *Halloween
time
57. *Apple
orchard activity
61. Re-use old
DOWN
1. Nucleic acid
2. Lobe holders
3. Assert
4. Leisurely walk
5. *Fall’s usually
the time for a
long one
6. Hoppy beers
7. “Fresh Prince
of ___-Air”
8. Some have
links
9. Curbside call
10. Famous
Peruvian group
11. Horsefly
12. Actor ____
MacLachlan
15. Metalworker
20. Bank run,
e.g.
22. “___ the land
of the free...”
24. Sir Peter
_______, English
actor
0827 MV larceny on Red Pines Ln
0831 Suspicious event on Hazelwood Pl
0907 Vandalism on Laker Ln
0935 Prop damage on Roosevelt Hwy
1141 MV larceny on Dalton Dr
1143 Vandalism on Gilman Cir
1149 MV larceny on Cashman Rd
1156 Retail theft on Lower Mtn View Dr
1415 Suspicious event on Prim Rd
1420 Suspicious event on S Park Dr
1828 Agency assist on Laker Ln
1831 MV larceny on Johnson Ln
1832 Juvenile problem in Colchester
Friday, September 13
0751 Juvenile problem in Colchester
0906 Agency assist on Laker Ln
0915 Medical on Main St
1052 MV complaint on Roosevelt Hwy
1134 Suspicious event on Ethan Allen Ave
1231 Suspicious event on Heineberg Dr
1255 Citizen dispute on Prim Rd
1259 Prop damage on Holy Cross Rd
1541 Juvenile problem in Colchester
25. *Natural
decoration
26. Degas or Poe
27. Peach _____
dessert
29. “____
Diaries” book
series
31. Same, in
French
32. Certifies
33. Actress Rene
34. *”To
Autumn” poet
36. Thailand,
formerly
38. Seaward
42. Superior
grade of black
tea
45. “There for
the ______”
49. Wrath, e.g.
51. *It starts all
over
54. Incite
56. Greyish
brown
57. Forward
move in football
58. ____ of Man
59. All the rage
60. Cigarette
brand
61. *Used for
gathering
62. Flower
supporter
63. Deli offering
66. Sigma Alpha
Epsilon
68. Campaigned
GOT
AN
IDEA
?
WE’RE
ALL
EARS
write to us at:
[email protected]
1653 Prop damage on Heineberg Dr
1803 Agency assist on Main St
1911 Disorderly conduct on Second St
2016 Theft on S Park Dr
2132 Accident on Roosevelt Hwy
2138 Citizen dispute on Roosevelt Hwy
2216 Intoxication on Roosevelt Hwy
2244 Agency assist on Blakely Rd
Sunday, September 15
0054 Simple assault on College Pkwy
0132 Intoxication on Sullivan Ln
0230 Theft on Lower Mtn View Dr
0338 Intoxication on Campus Rd
0711 Disorderly conduct on Red Oak Dr
1017 Suspicious event on Joey Dr
1034 Suspicious event on US Route 2
1102 Disorderly conduct on College Pkwy
1125 Disorderly conduct on Roosevelt Hwy
1152 Agency assist on Malletts Bay
1244 Disturbance on Prim Rd
1340 Suspicious event on College Pkwy
1404 Welfare check on Ethan Allen Ave
1631 Burning complaint on W Lakeshore Dr
1644 Fire dept assist on Overlake Dr
1705 Prop damage on Heineberg Dr
1850 Domestic disturbance in Colchester
1928 Intoxication on College Pkwy
1941 Accident on Roosevelt Hwy
2048 Alcohol offense on Campus Rd
2106 Drugs on Campus Rd
2159 Disorderly conduct on Prim Rd
Saturday, September 14
0137 Welfare check on Joey Dr
0153 Intoxication on Main St
0758 Vandalism on Heineberg Dr
1049 Medical on Laker Ln
1238 Boating incident on Valcour Island
1248 Retail theft on Creek Farm Rd
1404 Medical on Severance Rd
1427 Disorderly conduct on Roosevelt Hwy
1803 Citizen dispute on Second St
1904 Agency assist on Mill Pond Rd
1943 Alcohol offense on Campus Rd
2150 Suspicious event on US Route 7
2158 Motorist assist on College Pkwy
2249 Citizen dispute on Young St
2314 Intoxication on Ethan Allen Ave
Monday, September 16
0643 Traffic hazard on W Lakeshore Dr
1005 Drugs on Blakely Rd
1124 Medical on Thayer Beach Rd
1222 Prop damage on College Pkwy
1414 Accident on Lower Mtn View Dr
1448 Agency assist on Village Dr
1506 MV complaint on College Pkwy
1525 Prop damage on College Pkwy
1649 Prop damage on Roosevelt Hwy
1906 Agency assist on Blakely Rd
1956 Suspicious event on Belair Dr
1957 Agency assist on Route 15
2018 Suspicious event on Village Dr
For more information
about these and other
incidents, contact the
Colchester Police
Department
(802) 264-5556
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
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The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
16
Current
Exhibits
September
Spotlight on
Heidi Soons
BY SUSAN BONDARYK
The Colchester Sun
mu·si·cale, noun: a music program
forming the main part of a social
occasion.
and currently teaches the
harp at the University of
Vermont.
Spend this Sunday afternoon listening
to the 47 strings of the harp in an
intimate and informal performance by
Colchester resident Heidi Soons.
Uncommon is right. So
SymphonyKids harpist Heidi Soons, of
is Soons’s own start with
Colchester,
explained the sound mechanics of
the stringed instrument.
a
harp
during
a “Harp and Soul” performance
Most children learn piano,
for
Malletts
Bay
School third-, fourth- and fifthdrums or woodwinds at an
grade students in January.
early age. Soons describes
her exposure to the harp at
OLIVER PARINI
the tender age of eleven as
a “happy accident.”
In its third Musicale event, the
Colchester 250th Committee continues
the celebration of Colchester with a
special program of classical and nonclassical pieces by the accomplished
harpist.
On a visit to a family
friend’s home, a young
Soons spied a harp resting in the living
room. The instrument intrigued her
and she was allowed to play with it. The
owner of the harp turned out to be the
late Jane Weidensaul, a legendary harp
teacher at the Juilliard School in New
York City. Weidensaul offered to teach
Soons the harp, and the rest — as they
say — is history.
IN
FO
“The audience will have a chance to
hear and learn about the harp, which
is an instrument that isn’t as common,”
said Soons, who has played for 35 years
WHAT:
Musicale performance
with Heidi Soons
Now, Soons fills her days with music.
As well as teaching at her alma mater,
Soons also conducts private lessons.
She plays with the Vermont Symphony
Orchestra as the Principal Harpist and
often accompanies choirs (The Essex
Children’s Choir, Counterpoint and
UVM Choral Union to name a few) in
concert settings.
WHERE:
United Church of Colchester,
Main Street
next to the
Burnham Memorial Library
Colchester
WHEN:
Sept. 22 at 3 p.m.
What else? Soons travels around the
state of Vermont with flautist Ann
Jansen as part of the VSO educational
Cost: Free and open to the public
OPEN
FRI., SAT.,
SUN. ONLY
Showtime
Dusk
7:30 approx.
1- Rid
dick/
2 Guns
/
Kick A
ss 2
3- The
Purg
Elysium e/
/
Conjur
ing
2- We’
re T
Millers he
/
Getaw Heat/
ay
4-Plane
program, “SymphonyKids.” Calling
themselves “Harp and Soul,” Soons
and Jansen have entertained numerous
elementary schools with in-school
presentations, demonstrations and
Q&A sessions.
Soons says that Sunday’s Musicale
performance should prove just as
entertaining.
“I like to talk in between pieces and
answer questions “ it’ll be informal and
fun,” explained Soons, whose repertoire
ranges from classical to popular.
“It’ll be a treat,” Colchester Community
Chorus director and Musicale
coordinator, Carol Reichard said of
Soons. “She’s a wonderful performer
and a marvelous musician — so full of
life.”
And no musicale would be complete
without an eventual encore
performance, right? With the
help of Reichard, we’ll see
Soons again — well, soon. She’ll
accompany the Colchester
Community Chorus in a
special holiday performance
in early December. Keep an
eye out for dates and details at
colchester250.org.
s/
Despica
b
Grown le Me 2/
Ups 2
862-1800 • ADULTS $8.00
KIDS UNDER 12 $2.00
Malletts Bay
Sunday
a
ay
Bru
Br
runch
c
ch
Special
a
al
Monday–
Sunday
4:30 p.m. –
9:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.
Daily
lly Drink
Specials
Football Sunday
Drink Specials
Domestic Drafts $2.50
O'Brien Ale $2.25.
Bloodys $4
Dancing with
Style
Located on 127
Porters Point Road,
Colchester, VT
Fridays
4:00-5:00pm-Kids Ages 5 -9 years old
Beginner Latin/Hip-Hop
7:00-8:00pm- Adult Beginner Line Dance Class(Learn Country, Latin Dances in a Line)
8:15-9:15pm- Adult Beginner Salsa/Latin/
Ballroom Dance Class
9:15-10:00pm- Adult Beginner Waltz Dance Class
Saturdays
11:00-12:00-Kids Ages 9-12 Beginner
Latin/ Hip- Hop
12:30-1:30-Adults- Beginner Latin
Body Movement-( Salsa, Latin Fusion )
Thursdays
4:30-5:30pm-Teen Ages 13-18
Beginner Salsa/Swing Dance Class
7:00-8:00pm- Teen Ages 13-18
Beginner Hip- Hop/Latin Dance Class
8:15-9:15pm- Adult Beginner Tango/
Rumba Dance Class
Free Wedding Consultation
802-793-7524 www.dancingwithstylevt.net Come solo or with a partner! You do not need experience
Brunch, Lunch & Dinner Menus
served all day on Sundays during
the Football Season!
ENJOY The Game!
Also Great Game Specials!
Weekday
Food
Specials
9/19 — Film screening.“I am in here,” a
movie written by Mark Utter and directed
by Emily Anderson and Jim Heltz that
raises awareness about autism. McCarthy
Arts Center, St. Michael‘s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. 9/19 — Meet the artist. A talk and Q&A
with artist Katharine Montstream. Free and
open to the public. Frog Hollow Vermont
State Craft Center, 85 Church Street, Burlington, 6:30 p.m.
9/20 — Concert. The Modern Grass
Quintet. Suggested donation: $10. Round
Church, Richmond, 7 p.m. Contact: 4344565.
9/20 — Reception. “Real Life.” Free and
open to the public. Runs through Oct. 13.
Darkroom Gallery, 12 Main Street, Essex
Junction, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
9/20 — “Musicians and Minstrels.” Enjoy
local talent and refreshments. St. James
Episcopal Church, 4 St. James Place, Essex
Junction, 7-9 p.m. Contact: 878-4014.
Wednesdays
12:00-1:00 - Beginner Tai Chi
5:00 - 6:00 - Beginner Tai Chi
6:00 - 8:00 - Intermediate Ballroom/
Latin Technique
Beginners and all levels
welcome, from kids
to adults!
$3 Mimosas & $4 Bloody Marys
Dinners
Upcoming
Events
September
Tuesdays
12:00-1:00- For Seniors Only!!
Learn Traditional Ballroom Dance
4:00-5:00pm-Kids Ages 9-12
Beginner Ballroom/Standard
5:30-6:30pm
Adult Beginner Jive/Swing Dance Class
Dance Studio
9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Book your
business lunch or
private party
with us
Group show. Watercolors by Kathleen
Berry Bergeron and her students. Exhibit
runs through Oct. 6. Emile A Gruppe Gallery, 22 Barber Farm Road, Jericho. Contact:
899-3211. “Real Life.” A juried photography exhibit
exploring the state of things as they actually exist. Runs through Oct. 13. Darkroom
Gallery, 12 Main Street, Essex Junction.
“Two Threads.” Works by Carol E. S. MacDonald. Runs through Oct. 26. River Arts,
74 Pleasant Street, Morrisville. Contact:
888-1261.
“Look Again: Images of Daily Life, 17th21st Century.” Genre scenes depicting
daily life through 5 centuries. Runs Oct.
1-Dec. 13. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, 61 Colchester Avenue,
Burlington. Contact: 656-2090.
“The Vermont Queer Archives.” Through
Sept. 28. Aspects of the Vermont LGBT
(Lesbian, gay, Bisexual and Transgender),
from zines to photographs to dance
posters, are preserved. Pickering Room.
Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street,
Burlington. Contact: 865-7211.
“This Was Me.” Self-taught art from the
G.R.A.C.E. gallery collection. Thirty works
by nearly a dozen artists affiliated with
Hardwick’s community-art organization,
including Gayleen Aiken and Larry Bissonnette. Through Sept. 26. New City Galerie,
132 Church Street, Burlington. Contact:
735-2542.
“Exposed.” An annual exhibit of sculptures
from established and emerging artists
displayed in the gallery, as well as throughout Stowe Village and the recreation path.
Through Oct. 15. Helen Day Art Center, 90
Pond Street, Stowe. Contact: 253-8358.
Sunday
Brunch
9:30 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
471 CHURCH ROAD FIND US ON FACEBOOK
O‘BRIENS CLOVER HOUSE
COLCHESTER
JACK & GRILL
Open Everyday
Serving the Entire Menu
at 11:30 a.m.
SUNDAY FOOTBALL
50 CENT WINGS
$5 Burgers All Day - includes our Veggie
HOSTED BY
and Salmon Burgers
GENERAL
KNOWLEDGE
Tuesdays:
Trivia
Tuesdays:
Trivia Night!
Night! (It’s
(It’s FREE)
FREE)
Wednesdays: Girls Night “Skinny Bitch” Martini on
Contact Us
special & 1/2 Price Desserts
for all your
Fridays:
Save on Fish Fry Platters
Catering Needs.
Saturdays: $3 Switchback Pints
Sundays:
Brunch 9am–2pm
Your Place
Everyday:
50¢ Wings 4pm–6pm
Or Ours!
FREE Prime Rib Happy Hour on Mon Wed & Fri
Mondays:
18 Severance Corners Colchester
www.jackngrillvt.com
876-7770
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
continued
Of Land & Local
Of Land & Local is a statewide exhibition
opening at seven locations this September. It is a
multidisciplinary exhibition designed to initiate a
dialogue about the Vermont landscape, featuring
works from over 40 international and Vermont-based
artists. Each of the seven locations will host events
throughout the fall; the “Of Land & Local” website
will feature all events, artists and components of this
statewide exhibition.
The projects – done in a variety of media – explore
the notion that culture helps defines place, but also
that place plays a significant role in establishing
culture. Here are a few:
• Brian Collier introduced an “Eat Local Invasives,”
a project focused on finding ways to eat Vermont’s
edible invasive plant species.
• Meara McGinniss’ current work uses cloth as
structure and metaphor to explore intimacy, work
and identity.
• Jean Luc Dushime is an adventurous and worldly
storyteller who produced a series of photographs
capturing the stories of New American farming in
Vermont.
Locations:
Sept. 27-Dec. 7:
The BCA Center, Burlington.
Oct. 4-20:
Shelburne Farms Coach Barn, Shelburne.
17
Know an artist?
FREE
ENERGY AUDIT
Fall is the perfect season for a free energy audit!
We can identify steps you can take to make your home
more energy efficient, helping you save money.
Fall is the smart time
for an efficiency upgrade!
An insulation upgrade can keep your home warmer
and reduce your heating costs. Start saving this fall
with insulation, heating or hot water upgrades. You may
wish to act quickly to avoid the seasonal busy period
for contractors.
If you qualify for a free energy audit,
one of our BPI certified energy auditors will perform a
comprehensive energy audit, assessing equipment and
insulation levels. We’ll recommend efficiency upgrades
and show you how much you may save by implementing
each one. Plus, we’ll be happy to give you a list of qualified
contractors and even help manage the project. After the
work is completed, we’ll check that it’s up to our energy
efficiency standards and your satisfaction!
Rebates and financing
Often we can rebate 1/3 the cost of insulation
upgrades and offer zero interest financing for this
and other high efficiency upgrades, including
heating and hot water systems.
Clean Energy. Clean Air.
Free Hay Testing
DROP OFF YOUR
HAY SAMPLES:
9/21 - 9/25 at 12pm
FREE ANALYSIS:
9/25 from 4-7pm
at Depot Home & Garden
We will analyze your hay and make nutrition recommendations
customized for your horses. Enjoy refreshments and information
on the latest equine nutrition from Nutrena and Triple Crown.
Sign up to win door prizes including a $100 gift card!
DEPOT
HOME & GARDEN
The Little Store With More
878-8596 • 36 Park Street, Essex Jct. • Mon-Sat 8-6, Sun 10-4
Monthly savings coupon at DepotHomeAndGarden.net
Let Susan know today!
Email
[email protected]
or call 878-5282.
Saving
is Easy.
Visit our website
to see if you
qualify and for free
money-saving tips.
vermontgas.com
or email or call us at:
[email protected]
802.863.4511 ext.321
18
The Colchester Sun | Thursday, September 19, 2013
It’s time to enjoy a little variety. Now there’s a new way to compare health care
plans side by side, so you can find the right one for your budget and lifestyle.
Call 1-855-899-9600 or visit us at VermontHealthConnect.gov to get started.

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