richard macdonald

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richard macdonald
R ICHARD M ACDONALD
The Artist
R ICHARD M ACDONALD
R
ichard MacDonald
is world renowned
for art that reveals
a profound understanding
of the human experience
and which celebrates the
ascendancy of the human
spirit. His fascination of
the human form and with
mankind’s broad emotional
range has inspired him to
create dynamic, sensitive
works, each infused with a
quality that withstands the
passage of time, taste, and
trend.
Born in California,
Richard MacDonald is
an artist both classically
trained and self-taught –
this paradox can be seen as
part of the reason for the
striking originality of his
work. Classical training in
the discipline of figurative
painting and drawing was
not easy to find in midcentury America, but an
elite few received rigorous
training at the Arts Center
in Pasadena. MacDonald
forged an alchemy of
experience to become an
artist whose drawings,
paintings and sculpture
portray the passion inherent
in the human condition.
The inspiration behind
MacDonald’s 1996 tour
de force, The Flair, a 26foot gymnast caught in the
execution of the maneuver,
actually emerged from a
painting he created for
the 1984 Olympics. And
although he based his
design on the studies he
did of Kurt Thomas for the
painting, The Flair’s essence
lies more in the struggle,
determination and hours of
training, all brought to that
instant when performance
is everything. Therein lies
the metaphor for his artistic
achievements. MacDonald
went
on
to
create,
among other masterworks,
Momentum, a 15-foot, 15ton sculpture created in
celebration of the 100th
playing of the U.S. Open
Golf Championship at
Pebble Beach.
The
absence
of
opportunity and training
in figurative sculpture has
created a void not only in
the preservation of fine art,
but in the persistence of
life, which MacDonald, a
natural teacher and devoted
mentor, works relentlessly
to fill. He works tirelessly
to increase the appreciation
and understanding of
figurative art throughout
the world.
MacDonald also graciously
gives of his art and his time
to hundreds of charitable
organizations,
among
those Boys and Girls Clubs
of America, Make a Wish
continued on the next page
Foundation, and New York’s “Free Arts
for Abused Children,” which was a charity
event sponsored by Cirque du Soleil and
Lincoln Automotive. His commitment to
fostering the future of post-modern, neofigurative art is realized not only in creating
monuments to human triumph, but by
imparting his knowledge and technique,
his experience and his lessons to emerging
international and national professional
artists through intensive master classes on
location at his own studio.
A life long passion for dance led Richard
MacDonald to create a significant body of
work inspired by dancers, performers, and
mimes. Works such as Nureyev and Doves
draw on his love for classical ballet, while
in 2001 he began working with performers
from Cirque du Soleil, and an entirely new
genre was born. The excitement and energy
conveyed by MacDonald’s Cirque du Soleil
inspired works quickly won admirers –
including Guy Laliberte, the creator of
Cirque du Soleil. Their mutual admiration
developed into a partnership that brings the
world Richard MacDonald’s experience of
the theatrical wonders of Cirque du Soleil:
sculptures that reflect the unique, 21st
century art form that is Cirque du Soleil.
As the neo-figurative movement gains
momentum, Richard MacDonald is once
again on the forefront, pushing back the
boundaries and working to make the 21st
century a new golden age for figurative
sculpture.
.................................................................
Richard MacDonald
Born, June 6, 1946, Los Angeles, CA
Resident of Carmel Highlands, CA
Education
Bachelor of Professional Arts, Cum
Laude
Los Angeles Art Center, College of
Design, 1971, Pasadena, CA
Disciplines, Medium
and Subject
Sculpture, Painting & Drawing
Bronze, Lucite, Plaster, Oil, Charcoals,
Watercolor, Figurative, Landscape,
Animals
Artistic Influences
Michelangelo, Donatello, Leonardo,
Bernini, Valasquez, El Greco, Rodin,
Matisse, Monet, Picasso, Duchamp,
George Bellows, Henri, Egon Scheile,
Mozart and Vivaldi.
Awards and Commissions
Leap of Faith, Half Life
bronze, 49 x 16 x 23”
National Sculpture Society Annual
Exhibition, 2007
Tampa Museum of Art and
New York, NY
The Honorable Mayor Willie Brown Bust
bronze Commission, City of San
Francisco,
2004 San Francisco, CA
Brenda I
bronze, 13 x 8 x 22.5”
National Sculpture Society Annual
Exhibition, 2002
Brookgreen Gardens, South Carolina
and New York, NY
Angelic Crystal
bronze, 20 x 11 x 13.5”
National Sculpture Society,
“Angels, Cupids & Winged Creatures of
Fantasy”, 2002
New York, NY
Diana Huntress
bronze, 17 x 5.5 x 10.5”
National Sculpture Society,
“Angels, Cupids & Winged Creatures of
Fantasy”, 2002
New York, NY
Angelic Crystal Column
bronze, 6’2” x 11 x 14.75”
National Sculpture Society Annual
Exhibition, 2001
Brookgreen Gardens, South Carolina
and New York, NY
Free Rein
bronze, 17 x 26 x 15”
National Sculpture Society,
“Animals in the Atrium” Exhibition, 2001
New York, NY
Diana & the Coursing Cheetahs
bronze, 30 x 40 x 15”
National Sculpture Society,
“Animals in the Atrium” Exhibition, 2001
New York, NY
Coursing Cheetahs
bronze, 24 x 38 x 15”
National Sculpture Society,
“Animals in the Atrium” Exhibition, 2001
New York, NY
Samburu, Cheetah Bust
bronze, 12.5 x 17 x 18”
National Sculpture Society,
“Animals in the Atrium” Exhibition, 2001
New York, NY
United States Sports Academy,
Sport Artist of the Year, 2001
Daphne, Alabama
Nureyev, Half Life
bronze, 43” x 27” x 14”
National Sculpture Society,
“Excellence in Sculpture: Work by
Fellows of the National Sculpture
Society”, 2001 New York, NY
Gymnast, Half Life
bronze, 51.5” x 18.5” x 40.5”
National Sculpture Society,
“Excellence in Sculpture: Work by
Fellows of the National Sculpture
Society”, 2001, New York, NY
continued on the next page
Joie de Vivre, Half Life
bronze, 56” x 50” x 40”
National Sculpture Society,
“Excellence in Sculpture: Work by
Fellows of the National Sculpture
Society”, 2001
New York, NY
Momentum
bronze, 15’ x 12’6” x 8’
A monument to commemorate the
100th U.S. Open Golf Championship,
2000
Pebble Beach, California
Three Graces
bronze, 31” x 22” x 15”
The Van Vechten-Lineberry Taos Art
Museum, “The American Scene”, 2000
Taos, New Mexico
Joie de Vivre, Half Life
bronze, 56” x 50” x 40”
The Van Vechten-Lineberry Taos Art
Museum, “The American Scene”, 2000
Taos, New Mexico
Three Graces
bronze, 31” x 22” x 15”
Montana Memorial Award,
National Sculpture Society Annual
Exhibition, 1999
New York, NY
Rachel
bronze, 20” x 13” x 12.5”
National Sculpture Society,
“Everyday Life” Exhibition, 1999
New York, NY
Nureyev, Half Life
bronze, 43” x 27” x 14”
The Van Vechten-Lineberry Taos Art
Museum,
“The American Scene”, 1999
Taos, New Mexico
Nureyev, Half Life
bronze, 43” x 27” x 14”
Contemporary Sculpture at
Chesterwood, 1997
Stockbridge, MA
Trumpeter, Half Life, Draped
bronze, 37” x 28” x 16”
Contemporary Sculpture at
Chesterwood Estate & Museum, 1997
Stockbridge, MA
Dr. Burt Brent Bust
plaster, 20” x 18” x 10.5”
Montana Memorial Award,
National Sculpture Society Annual
Exhibition, 1996
New York, NY
Latim Bust
bronze, 22” x 15” x 10.5”
National Sculpture Society,
Making Faces Exhibition, 1996
New York, NY
The Flair
bronze, 46” x 18.5” x 40”
National Sculpture Society,
Maquette to Monument Exhibition, 1996
New York, NY
Nureyev
bronze, 24” x 15” x 10”
100 years of the National Sculpture
Society
of America in Italy
Saravezza, Italy, 1994
Butterfly
bronze, 21.5” x 8” x 19”
100 years of the National Sculpture
Society
of America in Italy
Saravezza, Italy, 1994
continued on the next page
Butterfly
bronze, 21.5” x 8” x 19”
Gold Medal Winner, Best of Show
Knickerbocher Artists Annual Exhibit,
The Salmagundi Club, 1991
New York, NY
William Henry Seward
bronze, 10’ x 54” x 54” and plaza design
Commission, Z.J. Loussac Public Library,
1990
Anchorage, AK
Architectonica
bronze, 6’6” x 24” x 24”
National Sculpture Society Annual
Exhibition, 1989
New York, NY
Stephen F. Austin
bronze, 10’ x 8’8” x 8’8” and foundation
Winner of Texas Sesquicentennial
commission, Stephen F. Austin University,
1986
Austin, TX
Christus-Rex
bronze, 9’ x 5’7” x 5’6” and stained glass
window, 24’ x 8’
Commission, St. Patrick’s Episcopal
Church, 1985
Atlanta, GA
Teaching
The Art Institute of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA
Guest Lecturer, High Museum of Art,
Atlanta, GA
Guest Lecturer, The Ringling School of Art, Sarasota, FL
Masters Workshops, The Scottsdale
Artist’s School, Scottsdale, AZ
Masters Workshops, The Loveland
Academy of Art, Loveland, CO
Guest Lecturer, Young Presidents
Organization
Masters Workshops,
Richard MacDonald Studio, 2002-2006
Membership
Member, Cosmos Club
Member, National Directory of Who’s
Who Member, International Directory
of Who’s Who
Member, National Sculpture Society
Member, Society of Illustrators
Exhibitions
Invitational Tour, Korea and Japan including both major gallery tour and
university tour
Flair Across America Nationwide
Tour, 1996
The Corcoran Gallery of Art,
Washington DC, 1996
Contemporary Sculpture at
Chesterwood, Stockbridge, MA 1997
Japanese JCA Invitational
Knickerbocher Artists Annual Exhibit,
Best in Show, 1991
Los Angeles Art Center Alumni,
Best in Show
National Parkinson Foundation
Exhibition
National Sculpture Society Annual
Exhibit 1989-2006
New York One Show
25th Anniversary of The National Art
Museum of Sport
100 Years of the National Sculpture
Society of America, in Italy, Saravezzo,
Italy, 1994
The Van Vechten-Lineberry Taos Art
Museum, 2000 & 2001
Publications
Southern Accents, Nov/Dec. 1984
Art Talk, January 1996
American Artist, August 1996
Southwest Art, July 1997
American Artist, November 1999
USA Today, June 19, 2000
The World and I, Vol. 16, No. 5 2001
Sculpture Review Magazine, Fall 2002
Space Magazine, 2005
American Art Collector, April 2006
Collector’s Sourcebook, Fall 2007
65 Degrees, Winter 2009
Books
Richard MacDonald Sculpture, 1999 by
Richard MacDonald Studio
City of Art, Kansas City’s Public Art,
2001
International Encyclopedia Dictionary of
Modern and Contemporary Art
2000/2001
Millennium Collection, 2002
The Art of Richard MacDonald, 2008
Collectors
Partial list of Collectors
American Aviation Underwriters
Pebble Beach Company
American Express
Prince Faisal Al Saud
Anheuser-Busch
Richard Marx
AT&T
Sylvester Stallone
CNN
The Franklin Mint
Coca-Cola
Vincente Fox
Dean Koontz
Walt Disney
Exxon
William Payne
Filmcorp Group, Inc.
William Roctzheim
Gary Primm
Gift of Life Foundation
Helen Boehm
Hillary Clinton
Honorable Mayor Willie Brown
IBM
Irene Valenti
Ken Venturi
LeAnn Rimes
Lynda and Stewart Resnick
M.J. Chirkinian
Mannie Jackson
Marilyn Carlson Nelson
Mashid Rizzone
Michael Jackson
Mike and Judy Mendoza
Mitsubishi Chairman of the Board
National Basketball Association
Hall of Fame
National Football League Hall of Fame
Nigel Lythgoe
Noel Wadsworth
Orin Smith
Social Responsibility
Social Responsibility
R
ichard MacDonald supports numerous charitable organizations and foundations that
benefit children causes throughout the United States. These organizations are an
extension of his personal commitment to improving the lives of children through art.
Recently, Mr. MacDonald teamed up with Mohammed Ali at “Celebrity Fight Night,” hailed
by Larry King as the “Best Auction in America,” the event has raised more than $25 million
for charities over the past 10 years in the battle against Parkinson’s. Donating one his most
significant master works “Doves, Third Life” MacDonald’s sculpture raised $110,000 for
Parkinson’s research.
Boys and Girls Club
Buckaroo Ball
Celebrity Fight Night
Chartwell School
ChildHelp USA
Children’s Miracle Network
Free Arts for Abused Children
Friends of Legal Services for Seniors
Gateway Center
Jimmy Fund Golf Program
Laura’s House Transitional Housing Center
Make a Wish Foundation
National Sculpture Society
Noche de Gala-Door of Faith Foundation
Opera Pacific
Orange County Child Abuse Prevention Center
Pacific Repertory Theatre, Carmel
Parkinson’s Foundation
Spector Dance
The Junior League
United States Gymnastics Association
In the News
Monuments
Flair
Atlanta, GA
Olympic Games
(1996)
A
t a height of more than 26 feet, the
masterful sculpture
of a gymnast strained
in the execution of the
move called the “Flair”
is both powerful and
commanding.
Created by
internationally acclaimed
artist Richard MacDonald,
the monument exalts the
determination, tenacity
and dedication inherent in
the pursuit of excellence.
Created for the 1996
Atlanta Summer Olympics,
Flair Across America
celebrates the triumph of
the human spirit and the
idealization of the human
form while promoting
an appreciation for
the arts within diverse
communities. At a height
of twenty-six feet, the
massive sculpture of
a gymnast highlights
the athlete’s struggle
and ultimate triumph,
representing the power
and heroic determination
that inspire Olympians
to excel. As with all
the monuments he has
completed, MacDonald
designed the plaza on
which The Flair sits.
The beautifully rendered
environment includes a
3,600 square foot granite
plaza with dome shaped
pedestal signifying the
curvature of the earth, a
large reflective pool and
fountain engendering
movement and the essence
of life.
En route to the Atlanta
Olympic Games to donate
The Flair to the state of
Georgia, the Georgia
World Congress Center,
and the city of Atlanta,
MacDonald stopped in
cities across America
to display the sculpture
and to educate people
about the importance
of figurative art in our
society. Epitomizing the
energy that MacDonald
devotes to his monuments,
the artist brought together
gold-medal Olympic
athletes to tour with the
monument, including
Kurt Thomas who
popularized the gymnastic
movement called The
Flair. Concurrent with the
tour, the Corcoran Gallery
of Art in Washington,
D.C., exhibited The
Flair and other works
by MacDonald. In
addition, the artist
donated a portion of the
proceeds from the tour to
children’s art programs
across the United States,
demonstrating the kind
of philanthropy that is
vital to the arts in today’s
culture climate.
Monument
for the
100th U.S Open
Pebble Beach, CA
100th U.S. Open
(2000)
A
rtist Richard
MacDonald, in celebration of
the new Millennium,
has created a 15-foot
monument to commemorate
the 100th U.S. Open
Golf Championship at
Pebble Beach.
The artist took great
strides to ensure the
sculpture accurately
portrayed a golfer in full
swing as he has viewed
hours of tape of many of
the game’s greats. He also
invited friend and PGA
Tour pro Frank Lickliter
into his Monterey studio
to personally study his
mechanics, as well as local
professional Laird Small,
one of Golf Magazine’s
“Top 100 Teachers” and
director of the Pebble Beach
Golf Academy.
The 10,000-pound
sculpture sits atop a
22,000-pound granite base.
The granite base features
the names of all 99 previous
winners of the U.S. Open,
with a special place reserved
for the 100th winner. To
ensure the enduring quality
of the monument, the
reverse side provides space
for the next century of
champions.
The inspiration for a
monument to both figurative
art and the essence of the
human spirit comes from
many places, such as history
and accomplishment, as well
as somewhere deep within
the artist.
Stephen F.
Austin
Austin, TX
(1986)
I
n 1986, Richard
MacDonald was
unanimously chosen
from a field of 180
sculptors to create an epic
monument of the noble
Stephen F. Austin for the
sesquicentennial celebration
of Texas. He designed
and created not only the
sculpture, but also the
entire plaza where it was
installed.
Christus Rex
Atlanta, GA
(1985)
C
hristus Rex,
commissioned
in 1985 for St.
Patrick’s Episcopal Church
in Atlanta, Georgia, is
a larger-then-life bronze
suspended above the heads
of the parishioners in front
of a stained glass window
also designed by Richard
MacDonald. Recalling
a medieval religious
sculptural tradition,
MacDonald’s Christ speaks
to a modern audience. Fully
robed, he is poised in midstep, reaching forward and
outward with his upturned
palms, his face soft and
welcoming. MacDonald
sculpted Christus-Rex
with a great awareness
of its ultimate placement:
he incorporated exquisite
detail into the soles of
the feet and the surfaces
that would be seen from
below just as Michelangelo
undercut the hair and
features of his David,
originally designed for one
of the high buttresses of the
Duomo in Florence.