www .ouranos.ca

Comments

Transcription

www .ouranos.ca
› › › › › › › › › › › › › COMPLETED PROJECT › › › › › › › › › › › › ›
SOCIOECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF CLIMATE CHANGE
IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION IN QUEBEC’S TOURISM INDUSTRY
IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION
PROGRAM : TOURISM
PROJECT START AND END DATES
FEBRUARY 2010 • DECEMBER 2012
Information :
Michel Archambault
[email protected]
514-282-6464
photo: Parc national du Mont-Tremblant, Mathieu Dupuis, Sépaq
LEAD scientiST
CO NTE X T Climate change (CC) represents a challenge for Quebec’s tourism industry, in part
because the outdoors plays a role in many activities for tourists. However, there has
not been much research on how climate change will affect the socioeconomics of
tourism in various regions of the province, or how the sector could adapt to these
changes. The tourism sector has also been lacking a forum for reflection and information sharing, with a particular focus on realistic adaptation strategies.
O B JECTI V ES
•
•
•
Assess possible socioeconomic impacts of climate change on outdoor activities and
tourist attractions studied.
Assess the perceptions of climate change in pilot regions and sectors, and identify
relevant adaptation strategies.
Establish a list of adaptation measures to implement in the pilot regions and develop
preliminary general recommendations for the Quebec tourism industry.
www.ouranos.ca
A PPROACH
•
•
•
•
Current and future CC impacts (2020, 2050) on tourism and economic activities
were estimated based on climate scenarios and data on daily attendance at 19
tourism businesses.
Results were collected and validated through five participatory workshops, an
on-line questionnaire and telephone interviews.
Best adaptation practices at the global level were identified.
Two regional round tables resulted in a list of practical actions.
● Michel Archambault
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)
OTHER PARTICIPANTS
● Association des stations de ski
du Québec (ASSQ)
● Association des terrains de camping
du Québec (Camping Québec)
● Association des terrains de golf
du Québec (ATGQ)
● Centre local de développement d’Antoine-Labelle
● Centre local de développement
des Laurentides (CLD Laurentides)
● Centre local de développement
des Pays-d’en-Haut
● Fédération des clubs de
motoneigistes du Québec (FCMQ).
● Ministère du Tourisme du Québec (MTO)
● Société des établissements
de plein air du Québec (SEPAQ)
● Tourisme Cantons-de-l’Est
● Tourisme Laurentides (ATRL)
R EFER ENCE
Bleau S., K. Germain, M. Archambault et D. Matte 2012. Analyse socioéconomique des
impacts et de l’adaptation aux changements climatiques de l’industrie touristique
québécoise. Final report for Ouranos.
http://www.ouranos.ca/media/publication/276_RapportArchambault2012.pdf
See reverse side for results.
FUNDING
C O N S O R T I U M O N R E G I O N A L C L I M ATO LO G Y
A N D A D A P TAT I O N T O C L I M AT E C H A N G E
and other funding
› › › › › › › › › › COMPLETED PROJECT (CON'T ) › › › › › › › › ›
SOCIOECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF CLIMATE CHANGE
IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION IN QUEBEC’S TOURISM INDUSTRY
R ESULTS
Based on tourism projections that do not include possible new mitigation and adaptation measures, summer activities in the pilot
regions will show economic gains, while winter activities will experience losses (Scott et al., 2011*). The losses will be greatest for
cross-country skiing and snowmobiling, with snowmobiling accounting for more than 70% of the estimated losses. Downhill skiing is
at lower risk of losses over the medium-term due to an adaptation strategy based on snow-making, but operators will have to explore
other avenues for adapting to a changing climate (2020-2050). Future research efforts should devote particular attention to assessing
high tourist-traffic periods such as the holiday season and spring break, which would benefit the long-term planning of operations.
Climate change adds to a range of challenges and opportunities that tourism operators already face. Operators do not necessarily
consider climate as a strategic asset, even though it affects their businesses at a number of levels (technical, human, financial,
environmental, strategic, image, reputation, clientele) that they cannot control.
However, businesses often respond to the lack of current information about weather and climate variations by relying on flexible
packages, investment in technologies, partnerships and product diversification. As first steps, the tourism industry needs to focus on
improving adaptation capacity and its ability to assess vulnerabilities in areas of high economic and natural worth.
During the participatory research-action process (RAP), stakeholders identified with great precision both recent climate impacts and the
direct and indirect consequences for various spheres of business. Mobilized stakeholders also identified seven areas for strategic intervention and four regional measures (Figure 1).
Despite the dichotomy between the (short-term)
world of business and the (long-term) scientific
world, the techniques used (social analysis
system - SAS) for the collaborative process
made it possible to develop adaptation strategies for the longer term (5 years). Another 15
adaptation actions were suggested by the regions.
The main challenge remains the financing of
medium- and large-scale actions (Figure 1).
This research highlights the importance of
equipping the tourism industry with bettertargeted scientific tools and reliable statistical
and economic data that is consistent across
the sector. More than 200 small and mediumsize businesses have already embarked on this
process, a first in Canada.
BENEFITS FO R A DA P TATI O N
This project has:
➔ revealed that it is to the advantage of the tourism industry to take a proactive leadership role in raising awareness and training;
➔ increased knowledge among participants and encouraged decision-making bodies in the pilot regions to adopt a practical
approach to climate change adaptation;
➔ encouraged Tourisme Québec to clarify its role and future research avenues in the 2013-2020 Climate Change Action Plan (2013-2020 CCAP) in collaboration with other public organizations involved;
➔ shown the need for a support system and regulatory framework for the tourism industry that will encourage better climate
change adaptation.
C O N S O R T I U M O N R E G I O N A L C L I M ATO LO G Y
A N D A D A P TAT I O N T O C L I M AT E C H A N G E
›››››››››››››››››››››››››››

Similar documents