Healthwise Winter - Southeastern Health

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Healthwise Winter - Southeastern Health
Healthwise
Winter 2013–14
The new
ABCs
This community
project spells out
healthy goals
Diabetes?
Stay in control
Physician
Directory
We’ve got the
provider for you
25 + YEARS
Healthwise
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HEALTHWISE is published quarterly as a community
service for the friends of SOUTHEASTERN HEALTH,
300 W. 27th St., Lumberton, NC 28358,
telephone 910-671-5000,
www.southeasternhealth.org
SOUTHEASTERN HOSPICE 28TH FESTIVAL OF TREES
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SOUTHEASTERN HEALTH
President and Chief Executive Officer
Joann Anderson, MSN, FACHE
Coordinator of Public Relations
Amanda L. Crabtree
Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 9 and 10,
9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
2013 Southeastern Health Board of Trustees
Faye C. Caton, Chairwoman
Michael T. Stone, Vice Chair/Secretary
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Chair, Southeastern Health Foundation
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DJP
President and CEO
Medical Staff Officers
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Member: American Hospital Association; NCHA;
Coastal Carolinas Health Alliance; Premier, Inc.;
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Accredited by:ʾ
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Please address all letters to:
Southeastern Health
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Lumberton, NC 28359
Townsend Building, Osterneck Auditorium,
102 N. Chestnut St., Lumberton, NC
(Across from the Robeson County Public Library)
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tions about specific content that may affect your health,
please contact your health care provider. Models may
be used in photos and illustrations.
Sunday, Dec. 8, 1 to 5 p.m.
Admission fees
✓ $3 for adults.
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HSM29758
✓ $2 for senior citizens and children
(under 12 admitted free).
✓ PrivilegesPlus members may present their
cards for free admission.
Call 910-671-5577 for more information.
Proceeds benefit Southeastern Hospice and Camp Care.
2
)FBMUIXJTFtwww.southeasternhealth.org
When you need
special care
You can view our online Medical Staff
Directory at www.southeasternhealth.org.
Click on Find a Physician.
5
wondrous winter vegetables
To get more seasonal health tips, follow us on
Facebook at www.facebook.com/srmclumberton.
WHEN THE WEATHER
outside is frightful,
fresh vegetables can
still be delightful.
It’s surprising, perhaps, but true. You don’t have to take the
garden’s goodness off the menu when
the seasons change. In fact, this is a good
time for several versatile veggies. Here are
five worth considering.
Suggestions for serving: Kale may be
steamed, sautéed, roasted or boiled. It’s
great with noodles—just add chopped
pieces to your pasta when it’s about five
minutes from being cooked—and it goes
nicely with rice or potatoes.
Brussels sprouts
Cauliflower
The peak season for these tasty treats—
which are high in riboflavin, iron, magnesium and vitamin C—is October through
December.
What to look for: Choose young
sprouts that are fi rm and bright green.
Older sprouts often smell like cabbage.
Suggestions for serving: Brussels
sprouts can be served a variety of
ways. Try tossing them in olive oil
and baking them at 400 degrees for
40 minutes, including them in a
stir-fry (they’re great with carrots,
snow peas and sweet onions), or
steaming them and then topping them with low-fat cheddar
cheese or adding them to pasta.
A good source of folate and
vitamin C, cauliflower is at
the peak of flavor between
December and March.
What to look for: The
curds should be compact
with fi rmly attached green
leaves. The head should be
heavy for its size. There are
purple, green and orange varieties in addition to traditional
white.
Suggestions for serving:
Cauliflower is great raw—
perhaps served with a
vegetable dip. It can also
be steamed and mashed
with low-fat milk or
yogurt, a bit of butter, and
some salt and pepper. Try it
as an addition to salads too.
Acorn squash
These dark-green- or orangeskinned squash are shaped like
an acorn. Generally, all winter squash
are good sources of vitamins A and C and
potassium.
What to look for: You want a squash
with a hard, tough skin. Avoid those that
have soft spots, mold or holes.
Suggestions for serving: Acorn squash
has amazing potential. You can make
cream of squash soup; stuff it with a
meatloaf mixture, then bake it; or roast it
with other veggies, such as carrots, potatoes, onions and parsnips.
And surprise! It even makes a tasty
dessert. Try sautéing half a peach and half
an apple in ¼ teaspoon of butter, along
with some honey and nutmeg, until the
fruit is tender. Then microwave a piece of
hollowed-out squash until tender and fi ll
with fruit mixture.
Turnips
Kale
Th is vegetable is similar to mild cabbage.
It’s loaded with calcium; iron; and vitamins A, C and K.
What to look for: Generally, smaller
bunches with leaves that are dark green
and not wilted or damaged by insects are
best.
These hardy vegetables are high in
vitamin C and fiber. Turnip greens also
contain vitamin A and calcium.
What to look for: Heavy, fi rm turnips
with fresh-looking leaves are the best.
Large turnips tend to be the least sweet.
Suggestions for serving: Feeling bold?
Shred turnips in place of cabbage when
you make homemade coleslaw. You can
slice them and dip them in peanut butter.
If you’re a little less daring, try baked,
boiled or steamed turnips flavored with
a little butter or lemon juice. And don’t
overlook turnip greens. They’re great sautéed or cooked as you’d prepare spinach.
Sources: Produce for Better Health Foundation; Utah State
University Cooperative Extension
www.southeasternhealth.org t)FBMUIXJTF
3
Healthy Robeson
Southeastern Health program aims to help county businesses,
churches and community sites promote positive choices
IF THINGS GO the way
Brandon Rivera hopes they will, the
people of Robeson County will never
think of their ABCs in quite the same
way again.
But they will think of them—every
day, in fact. Each of the 26 letters of
the alphabet will remind them of one
simple thing they can do to improve
their overall health.
Rivera is a project specialist for
Southeastern Health’s Healthy Robeson
Project. The Healthy Robeson A to Z
Program is the alphabet-based tool he
uses to educate people at participating
sites about making wise lifestyle choices to protect their long-term health.
In the program, each letter of the alphabet corresponds to a specific health
tip. A, for example, is Add physical
activity to my day, followed by Bake or
grill my food, not fry, and so on, through
ZZZs—get more of them. By following
the tips, over time, those involved in
the program can develop healthy habits
bound to make them healthier people.
“We want to impact people’s personal
lives and help them make long-term lifestyle changes,” Rivera says. “Little things
you do can make a difference for years to
come.”
Tailored for
our county
The A to Z program grew out of
SeHealth’s most recent community
health assessment, which is conducted
every three years to learn what health
issues are most important to area
residents.
According to Lekisha Hammonds, director of Community Health Services and
the Diabetes Community Center, that assessment and other data identified issues
surrounding nutrition, physical activity
and substance abuse as being particularly
relevant to people in Robeson County.
The A to Z program, which is modeled
after other successful health initiatives
in North Carolina, focuses on these areas
as well as other health and safety habits.
Ultimately, its goal is to reduce rates of
heart disease, cancer, diabetes and stroke.
These health problems are significant in
Robeson County and are often linked
to poor diet and lack of exercise. But
healthy lifestyle choices can greatly reduce the risk of getting these diseases.
“That’s what this program is all
about—prevention,” says Hammonds.
“What excites me the most is that we
have the ability to impact the health
status of the people in Robeson County. I
grew up in this county. I love this county.
I want to see the people in Robeson
County thrive and do well.”
Easy to adopt
The program is rolling out in three
phases, each targeting a different audience. Phase 1 focuses on worksites, or
area businesses. The second involves
churches, and phase 3 reaches out to the
community as a whole.
Rivera does an assessment at a participating site to determine which tips
might be most helpful at that location.
Then he provides handouts, signs and
other materials to help people understand the program’s messages.
He also helps track the progress of
What are the ABC's of a healthier lifestyle?
The Healthy
Robeson A to Z
Program suggests
the following
choices.
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A to Z
each person participating, as well as the
location as a whole. In many cases, Rivera
also works with site leaders to develop
incentives to spur participation.
Making it real
Part of what makes the program special
is that Rivera doesn’t just lecture the participants, hoping they’ll take his words to
heart. He also provides interactive displays
that help everyone relate to the material.
One of those messages, for example,
stresses the importance of cutting back
on sugary drinks, such as sodas. They’re a
major source of calories for many people
and a contributor to the nation’s obesity
crisis.
In the program, the letter X stands for
X out sweetened beverages. To drive that
message home, Rivera sets up a display
of empty soda bottles. He then adds dry
sugar to each bottle, using the nutrition
information on the soda labels to measure out the amount of sugar each soda
contains. It creates a vivid visual display.
“Having 60 grams of sugar in your soda
doesn’t mean a lot to some people,” he
says. “But if you figure that’s 15 teaspoons
and we label that as 15 teaspoons of
sugar, it becomes more relevant and more
impactful.”
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If you’d like to help build a healthier community
through your monetary support, call 910-671-5583.
To learn more about bringing the Healthy Robeson
A to Z Program to your workplace, call 910-272-1186.
Already, these displays have convinced
people of the need to ease off of the
drinks, says Rivera. Some participants
have even eliminated sweetened beverages from their diets altogether.
That’s exactly the kind of lifestyle
change the program hopes to promote.
But stopping bad habits isn’t its only
focus; starting good habits is a point of
emphasis too.
E, for instance, corresponds to Eat
more fresh fruits daily and V, Vegetables
(at least three a day). These letters are
often paired together, and the program
can help bring their message to life with
on-site food tastings that teach people
how easy—and tasty—healthier choices
can be.
The hope is that people will take
responsibility for changing their own habits, but also model those habits at home
with their families and in the community
at large.
in the lives of area residents. And, because
it fits so well with the mission of SeHealth
Community Health Services, plans call for
continuing the program indefi nitely.
That, of course, requires fi nancial support, something SeHealth has provided
for the program from the very beginning.
Moving forward, grants are being sought
to enhance the program as well, and personal donations are always welcome.
“All dollars donated, whether they’re
from grant funding or from individuals,
are dollars that are greatly needed to help
our community,” says Sissy Grantham,
executive director of the Southeastern
Health Foundation.
How you can
take part
It’s expected that the Healthy Robeson A
to Z program will make a real difference
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Brandon Rivera,
Healthy Robeson
Project Specialist
Lekisha Hammonds,
Director, Community
Health Services
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5
Test your knowledge
about prediabetes
PREDIABETES: It’s an in-between condition in which blood sugar (glucose)
levels are too high to be healthy but not
high enough to be considered diabetes.
What do you know about this potentially serious health problem? Take this
quick true or false quiz and fi nd out. And
talk to your doctor for more information.
Q.
A
It’s easy to tell if you have prediabetes because you feel sick most of the
time.
False. Most people with prediabetes
feel perfectly fi ne. In fact, even
those with full-blown diabetes may not
have symptoms. It takes a blood test to
determine if you have diabetes, prediabetes or normal glucose levels.
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way. A healthy diet is one that
cuts back on calories and fat
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lean meats, dried beans, fish,
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6
)FBMUIXJTFtwww.southeasternhealth.org
Southeastern Health’s accredited
Diabetes Community Center
offers information about living
with diabetes. A physician referral
is required. Call 910-618-0655.
Sources: American Diabetes Association; National Diabetes
Information Clearinghouse
Why weight matters
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HEART CONDITIONS
HEART CONDITIONS
18%
4%
22%
40%
DIABETES
OBESE
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a week.
Once you have prediabetes, fullblown diabetes is just a matter of
time.
False. There are a lot of things you
can do to prevent diabetes, even if
you already have prediabetes.
For example, you can lower your risk
by losing weight. Even losing a little—
about 5 to 7 percent of your current
weight—can make a big difference.
Exercise is also important. In fact, by
eating right and exercising, you may be
able to return your blood glucose levels
to normal.
Your doctor may also suggest medications to help control your blood sugar.
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Q
A
Every adult should be tested for
prediabetes.
False. But testing is important
for people in certain groups. For
example, it’s often suggested for:
➜ People who are overweight and
45 years old or older.
➜ Younger people who are overweight—
especially if they’re also inactive, have a
family history of diabetes or have other
risk factors. Your doctor can tell you if
testing is right for you.
NORMAL
Take the path
to better
health
Q
A
HEART CONDITIONS
42%
15%
42%
58%
30
7%
35%
49%
%
DIABETES
DIABETES
HIGH CHOLESTEROL
HIGH CHOLESTEROL
JOINT PAIN
JOINT PAIN
HIGH CHOLESTEROL
JOINT PAIN
*Approximate
percentages
Source: Agency for
Healthcare Research
and Quality
Diabetes
Get help for easy
meal planning
Your life, your illness
A personal plan can
help you live well with
a chronic illness
YOU CAN’T FIX IT or make it go away—
that’s usually what it means to live with a
chronic illness.
But you can choose how you’ll manage
a health condition such as diabetes, arthritis or heart disease, and those choices
can make a big difference in your health
and well-being.
Evidence suggests that self-management
of these and other long-term conditions
could make you feel better, reduce your risk
for hospitalization and emergency room
visits, and lower your medical costs.
Have a plan
The American Academy of Family
Physicians recommends working with
your doctor to develop a self-management
plan.
The plan should include your goals, the
specific steps you’ll take to reach them,
and what kinds of support and resources
you’ll need to get there.
If, for instance, exercise would improve
your condition, talk to your doctor about
what kinds of exercise are right for you.
Choose an activity you can enjoy and a
goal that you are confident you can reach
in a set amount of time.
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need a meal plan for that. But an online
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Association can also help.
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.diabetes.org can help you understand
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they mesh with your meal plan.
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search criteria, such as for foods low in
carbohydrates, sodium or calories. Or you
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and meat substitutes, and restaurant
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nutrients you eat every day.
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search for recipes by amount of calories,
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such as salmon.
More management tips
➜ Educate yourself. Seek reliable sources
of information, such as government or
medical association websites that specialize in your condition.
➜ Consult with experts. For example, if a
dietary change will make a difference in
managing your illness, consider meeting
with a dietitian. Ask your doctor if there
are therapists or other medical specialists
who may be of help to you.
➜ Be realistic. If you set a goal that’s too
hard to reach, rethink your plan. Proceed
at a pace you can handle.
➜ Don’t ignore potential obstacles. Think
of things that could go wrong, and plan
ways to deal with them. For example,
where will you walk in bad weather?
How can you avoid overeating during the
holidays?
➜ Take 15 to 20 minutes a day to sit qui-
etly, breathe deeply and think of a peaceful scene. Remember when things felt
right, good and relaxed. Apply those good
feelings to the challenges you’re facing.
Expect good things to happen.
➜ Ask for help. Talk to family and friends
about your goals, and suggest ways they
can help. Joining a support group that
includes people with the same chronic
illness is helpful to some people.
➜ Keep your doctor posted on your progress. As your plan goes forward, you may
need more advice to set new goals.
Visit www.southeasternhealth.org/
primarycare to find a primary care
provider in the Southeastern
Health network.
www.southeasternhealth.org t)FBMUIXJTF
7
Exercise
&
cancer
By Catherine Gaines, PA-C
Gibson Cancer Center Patient Navigator
EXERCISE AND CANCER: It’s not an oxymoron. More and more evidence points
to the importance of exercise throughout every stage of our lives, including
serious illness. The idea that a debilitating disease eliminates the need for
exercise is gone. Studies now show that
light exercise and other complementary
medical techniques can enhance quality
of life, decrease perception of pain and
even enhance longevity.
As a cancer navigator, I often meet
with people at very stressful periods of
their lives. A new diagnosis of cancer, or
really of any serious illness, introduces
the patient and family to a barrage of
new words, medications and procedures.
There is so much new information that
often it can take several visits, phone
calls and emails to take it all in. Th is is
probably why I get some unusual looks
from patients and family members when
I start discussing exercise and “prehabilitation.” Pre-habilitation is the active process of getting your body ready
See what we have to offer
The Gibson Cancer Center is a comprehensive outpatient center for providing radiation
oncology, chemotherapy and hematology services. With its state-of-the-art equipment
and advanced software, radiation oncology professionals can deliver image-guided radiation therapy in addition to intensity-modulated radiation therapy, which allows for
more precise treatment with higher doses of radiation to the tumor and less irradiation
to healthy tissue. This technique results in fewer side effects for patients. In addition
to chemotherapy, medical oncologists at the Center offer care for patients with blood
disorders.
Also available are the comprehensive support services of an on-site pharmacy and
laboratory, an information resource library, an oncology therapist and a dietitian. In
cooperation with the local chapter of the American Cancer Society, the Center offers
support groups and educational programs. Call 910-671-5730 or visit www.southeastern
health.org/main/gibsoncancerhome.html.
8
)FBMUIXJTFtwww.southeasternhealth.org
for the surgery, chemotherapy or other
procedures that may be indicated for
your diagnosis. It’s better to think of it
as getting a prize fighter ready for a big
fight. Whether you have cancer, congestive heart failure, COPD or another
serious illness, we need you in as great a
physical shape as you can be to get you
ready for this battle.
Nutrition
Fighters are usually on strict diets and
follow rigorous exercise routines. They
employ sports psychology to prepare
themselves for the big event. In the same
way, you can prepare for your tangle
with your new diagnosis.
Nutrition is so important during this
time of stress for your body. Either too
much or too little of some foods can
make your condition worse.
Ask your provider
for dietary suggestions
or ask for a referral to a
dietitian. These people
are specially trained to
assist you in making
good nutrition choices
during this time of
increased stress on
Catherine Gaines,
PA-C
your body. Talk to
the empty carton with as much water as
you can comfortably lift, and it makes
a portable weight lifting system. While
sitting in your recliner, you can do
bicep curls, straight arm lifts and
shoulder exercises.
And don’t forget our local experts at the Southeastern Lifestyle
Center for Fitness. Our exercise
professionals can help you fi nd
ways to add light exercise to your
medical regimen. Don’t think
you have time to exercise? Let
these fitness gurus fi nd ways
to assist you in fi nding exercises that fit into your daily
routine.
Sports psychology
them about any dietary restrictions that
may be a part of your illness. What about
supplements? What is helpful, and what is
a waste of your money?
Consider buying your fruits and vegetables locally. Plan meals for the week
based on what’s available from the local
farmer’s market. As a rule of thumb,
fresher is better, and if the food comes in
a plastic wrapper, avoid it. Does this take
more time? Yes. Are you and your family
worth it? Oh yes.
Great players will hit a
wall at some point in
their career. Many use
sports psychologists to prep them
for their games. In the same way, you
can use similar experts to assist you in
preparation for your battle with serious
disease.
Psychologists, pastors and good
friends can help with the spiritual
questions that arise with these tough
illnesses. Talk to them. Try guided
meditation, walking a labyrinth, prayer
beads or spiritual books.
YouTube has a large selection of free
videos to help with meditation for the
novice, and there are now apps for your
smartphone to give you access to quick
snatches of quiet and calm in a life that
may seem suddenly alien to you.
Exercise
Really? When I feel this bad? Yes, really,
because it will help you feel better. Light
exercise can help with joint stiff ness,
lower blood pressure, decrease your perception of pain, help your body with fluid
balance and decrease swelling.
Some examples of self-paced exercises include yoga, Pilates and isometric exercises. You can use large rubber
bands or, for the ultimate in cost savings,
washed out empty milk cartons. Just fi ll
The tools you need
These three complementary therapies—
good food, light exercise and spiritual
push-ups—can prop up the new pills,
procedures and treatments that accompany your new diagnosis. Use them
liberally. Prepare for this fight with all
the intensity and drive of an athlete. For
in many cases, this may be the fight of
your life. Our team stands ready to help
you train to win.
Set the
record straight
4 myths about cancer
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cancer is still a scary disease to many people.
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mation—particularly on the Internet—about
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Myth No. 1: 6TJOHEFPEPSBOUTBOEBOUJQFS
spirants can cause breast cancer.
Reality:ʾJTNZUIJTCBTFEPOUIFQSFNJTF
that underarm products contain harmful
substances that can cause breast cancer
XIFOUIFZBSFBCTPSCFEUISPVHIUIFTLJOPS
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JOH#VUOFJUIFSUIF/BUJPOBM$BODFS*OTUJUVUF
OPSUIF64'PPEBOE%SVH"ENJOJTUSBUJPO
has found any link between breast cancer and
deodorants or antiperspirants.
Myth No. 2: -JWJOHJOBQPMMVUFEDJUZJODSFBT
FTZPVSSJTLGPSMVOHDBODFSBTNVDIBTJGZPV
TNPLFEBQBDLPGDJHBSFUUFTFWFSZEBZ
Reality: Air pollution may make it hard to
CSFBUIF‰QBSUJDVMBSMZJGZPVIBWFBMVOH
EJTFBTFMJLFBTUINB‰CVUJUTOPUHPJOHUP
TJHOJmDBOUMZSBJTFZPVSSJTLPGMVOHDBODFS
4NPLJOHPOUIFPUIFSIBOEJTUIF/PSJTL
factor for the disease.
Myth No. 3: 5BMLJOHPOBDFMMQIPOFDBOHJWF
you brain cancer.
Reality: In fact, just the opposite may be
USVF"DDPSEJOHUPUIF"NFSJDBO$BODFS
4PDJFUZPOFTUVEZGPVOEUIBUMPOHUFSN
cellphone users appear to have a lower risk of
brain cancer.
Myth No. 4: Breast cancer survivors need to
avoid soy.
Reality: Soy foods contain isoflavones, which
DBOBDUMJLFBXFBLFTUSPHFOJOUIFCPEZʾF
DPODFSOIBTCFFOUIBUFBUJOHUIFTFGPPET
DPVMEGVFMFTUSPHFOSFMBUFEDBODFST)PXFWFS
MBSHFQPQVMBUJPOTUVEJFTIBWFTIPXOUIBU
FBUJOHTPZJONPEFSBUFBNPVOUT‰POFUPUXP
TUBOEBSETFSWJOHTBEBZ‰JT0,GPSXPNFO
XIPWFIBECSFBTUDBODFS5BLJOHTPZTVQQMF
NFOUTUIPVHIJTOPUSFDPNNFOEFE
Additional source: American Institute for Cancer Research
www.southeasternhealth.org t)FBMUIXJTF
9
Is screening
for lung cancer
right for you?
Awareness is important
What every woman should know
about ovarian cancer
OVARIAN CANCER IS RARE.
But there are some important things
you ought to know about it, including
this: Of all gynecologic cancers, it is the
deadliest.
What makes ovarian cancer so often
incurable?
One reason is that ovarian tumors
can be hard to find during an examination, notes the American Cancer Society
(ACS).
Another reason is that the symptoms
of ovarian cancer may not necessarily
ring any serious alarms with women.
They might think they’re having stomach
problems, for instance.
But research has focused in on this
disease, narrowing the essential information women need to know. And ongoing clinical trials may provide more help.
➜ Abdominal bloating.
➜ Urinary urgency.
➜ Urinary frequency.
➜ Feeling full quickly or trouble eating.
Almost everyone occasionally has
one or more of these symptoms. What
is important, however, is if any of the
symptoms you have are new, persistent
and frequent—noticeably different
than how you usually feel. If so, that’s
a signal to take your concerns to your
doctor as soon as possible, advises the
ACS.
Again, treatment is most effective
when ovarian cancer is found early.
The ACS estimates that more than
90 percent of women whose cancer is
found when it is still confined to the
ovaries are alive five years later.
The next step
Common early symptoms
Ovarian cancer is most easily treated
when it’s discovered early. According to
the ACS, research has identified specific
symptoms common in women diagnosed
with it:
➜ Pelvic pressure or abdominal pain.
10
)FBMUIXJTFtwww.southeasternhealth.org
Unfortunately, there is no single, reliable
way to test for ovarian cancer. Still, your
doctor can do a full physical exam.
He or she might want you to undergo
an ultrasound of your pelvis as well as a
CT scan. You might also have blood tests
or other tests.
LUNG CANCER kills more men and
women in this country than any other
type of cancer. By the time it causes
symptoms, it often has spread outside
the lungs, making it difficult to treat.
That’s why the National Cancer
Institute sponsored a major study
called the National Lung Screening
Trial (NLST). It compared two different methods used to spot lung cancer:
standard chest x-ray and low-dose
helical computed tomography (CT).
Researchers wanted to find out if
screening current and former smokers with either test would result in
fewer lung cancer deaths.
Nearly 53,450 people took part.
All were between the ages of 55 and
74 with a history of heavy smoking.
Each person was randomly assigned
to undergo three annual screenings
with either chest x-rays or CT scans.
At the end of the study, there were
20 percent fewer deaths from lung
cancer among the people who received CT scans compared with those
who had chest x-rays.
Although the results of the NLST
suggest that this type of screening
may help prevent deaths from lung
cancer, the study also found that:
➜ More than 96 percent of the CT
scans that appeared positive for lung
cancer were false alarms.
➜ Each false positive required added
testing.
In addition, most insurance providers don’t pay for CT screening, and
the radiation in CT scans can raise
your lifetime risk for cancer.
Southeastern Health began offering lung cancer screening through a
low-dose CT scan in October.
To find out if you qualify for the
$75 screening and the locations
where you can obtain the
screening, call 910-735-8818.
Living with
knee pain from
osteoarthritis?
MAKOplasty can reduce
your pain and restore your
quality of life
MAKOPLASTY partial knee resurfacing
is an innovative new treatment option
for people with early to mid-stage osteoarthritis of the knee. Powered by robotic
technology, the potential benefits of this
minimally invasive procedure over total
knee replacement include:
➜ More rapid recovery.
➜ Shorter hospital stay.
➜ More natural-feeling knee.
And for you, that can mean relief from
pain and a rapid return to daily activities.
In many cases, patients are permitted
to walk soon after surgery, drive a car
within two weeks and return to normal
daily activities shortly thereafter.
Like other knee arthroplasty procedures, MAKOplasty is typically covered
by most Medicare-approved and private
health insurance providers. Please speak
with your physician to determine if
MAKOplasty may be the right treatment
option for you.
For more information, please call 910-738-1065 or
visit our website at www.southeasternhealth.org.
Southeastern Surgical Center
celebrates second anniversary
SOUTHEASTERN SURGICAL CENTER celebrated its second anniversary on Sunday,
Sept. 15. Now located in the Southeastern
Health Mall at Biggs Park Mall, the
center fi rst opened in 2011 adjacent to
Southeastern Regional Medical Center.
Lya Crichlow, MD, and Eric Velazquez,
MD, who both trained in New York in
minimally invasive surgery, partnered
to open the practice. In the past two
years, Southeastern Surgical Center has
pioneered advanced minimally invasive
procedures in Robeson County. “It has certainly been a pleasure to be
able to provide care for the past two years
to the residents of Robeson County,” says
Dr. Velazquez. “We are looking forward to expanding
our services in the coming years,” adds
Dr. Crichlow.
As part of a strategic growth plan,
Physician Assistant Karolyn Martin
joined the practice early in 2013. The
center is also pleased to announce that
Bamdad Farhad, DO, will be joining the
practice later this year. Dr. Farhad completed his training in Boston in minimally
invasive surgery.
Take the next step
Call 910-739-0022 to schedule
an appointment.
Visit www.southeasternhealth.org/
surgicalcenter.
“I am very excited to join Southeastern
Surgical Center,” Dr. Farhad says.
Southeastern Surgical Center was the
fi rst general surgery clinic to be owned
and operated by Southeastern Health.
The providers in the practice specialize
in general surgery, bariatric surgery and
minimally invasive surgery as well as procedures using the da Vinci robot, including single-site da Vinci procedures.
www.southeasternhealth.org t)FBMUIXJTF
11
Physician directory
For more information, visit www.southesternhealth.org'SPNUIFIPNFQBHFDMJDLPOFind a physician, where you
NBZBDDFTTQIZTJDJBOJOGPSNBUJPOCZOBNFPSTQFDJBMUZJODMVEJOHQIPUPBOEFEVDBUJPOBMCBDLHSPVOE
Anesthesiology
SOUTHEASTERN ANESTHESIA
300 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-5320
%PSB3'SBO[POJ.%
5BNFSB)JYPO.%
.JDIBFM(,JEE.%
+1BUSJDF.BZOPS.%
&SJD8.JMMFS.%
Audiology
SOUTHEASTERN CENTER OF
AUDIOLOGY
'BSSJOHEPN4U
Lumberton, NC
910-671-5014
#SJUUBOZ#SPXO"V%
4VTBO&WBOT(PSF"V%
Cardiology
DUKE CARDIOLOGY OF
LUMBERTON
/PSUI&MN4U4VJUF
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-6619
,FMMZ"MMFO&WBOT'/1$
.BUUIFX4$VNNJOHT.%
4DPUU+%FOBSEP.%
.FMWJO3&DIPMT.%
3PCFSU(&WFSIBSU.%
#SJFO-FXJT#SZBOU%/1$
"CJ0HVOMFZF'/1$
4ZEOFZ(4IPSU.%
$ISJTUPQIFS8BMUFST.%
MEDICAL SPECIALISTS’ CLINIC
'BZFUUFWJMMF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-1141
4BEBOBOE#)FHEF.%
Cardiovascular/
thoracic surgery
DUKE CARDIOVASCULAR
SURGERY OF LUMBERTON
/PSUI&MN4U4VJUF
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-6619
5FSSZ4-PXSZ.%
3PCFSU-.D&MWFFO%0
"MMJTPO4DPUU'/1$
12
Critical care
medicine
SOUTHEASTERN REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
300 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-5000
+PIO)PZU.%
8JTTBN#.BOTPVS.%
.JMU.D1IFSTPO.%
"EJ.JSP.%
,BSPM"3JDIBSET.%
3JDIBSE8PFSOEMF%0
Dermatology
SOUTHEASTERN
DERMATOLOGY
'BZFUUFWJMMF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-7154
"OESFX")FOESJDLT.%
Ear, nose
and throat
(otolaryngology)
CAMPBELL ENT AND FACIAL
PLASTIC SURGERY
*OEFQFOEFODF%SJWF
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-1038
+FGGSFZ1$BNQCFMM.%
Emergency
medicine
SOUTHEASTERN REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
300 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-5032
-BXSFODF"EBJS1"$
+BTPOȓ"EBNT1"$
.FHIBO#JTTFMM1"$
&MJ[BCFUI#SPPLTIJSF1"$
,JN%BOJFMF1"$
+PTFQI%FFTF.%
4IBSJ%FM%P.%
+PIO%PSTDI%
,.JDIBFM%VFSS.%
$BUIFSJOF(BJOFT1"$
)FBMUIXJTFtwww.southeasternhealth.org
+PIO(VIB.%
"OUIPOZ)BSUNBOO.%
+FGGSFZ,MFJO.%
.BSMB-FXJT/1$
"OOFUUF.FMWJO/1$
%POBME.FU[HFS1"$
5BCJUIB0CFEB/1$
.BSZBN1BTIB.%
+PIO1FOSPTF.%
3POBME1PXFMM.%
+PIO3FFE.%
.BSL3JTFS%0
+PTFQI4BOEVTLZ/1$
,BUIMFFO4DIVQOFS.%
,JSL4FSWJDF.%
(JOB4UFQIFOT/1$
1IJMMJQ4UFQIFOT1"$
"OUIPOZ4UFSMJOH1"$
'SBOLMJO5SFOFSZ1"$
3JDIBSE:PVOH1"$
ROBESON FAMILY PRACTICE
$&'PVSUI"WF
3FE4QSJOHT/$
910-843-3311
)FSNBO$IBWJT.%
,FOOFUI&-PDLMFBS.%
SOUTHEASTERN HEALTH
CENTER CLARKTON
/PSUI83-BUIBN4U
$MBSLUPO/$
910-647-1503
4IBSPO#BYMFZ'/1$
4UFQIFO#SJEHFST.%
"MMJTPO1SJFTU'/1$
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
CLINIC BLADENBORO
Family medicine
302 S. Main St.
Bladenboro, NC 28320
910-863-2400
)FBUIFS81BJU1"$
"NZ3BOTPN1"$
DR. ARTHUR J. ROBINSON
MEDICAL CLINIC
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
CLINIC FAIRMONT
%S.BSUJO-,JOH+S%S
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-3957
8BOEB'BJSDMPUI'/1$
+BNFT%.D-FPE.%
%FOOJT04UVBSU.%
/8BMOVU4U
'BJSNPOU/$
910-628-0655
"VOESFB&NBOVFM'/1$
,FMWJO4BNQTPO1"$
%POBME.PSBOEP%0
J. BENFORD HARDIN, MD
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
CLINIC GR AY’S CREEK
/PSUI&MN4U
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-8164
LUMBER RIVER FAMILY
PR ACTICE
3005 N. Elm St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-7789
+PTFQI&3PCFSUT.%
LUMBERTON FAMILY AND
URGENT CARE CENTER
309 Roberts Ave.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-0272
Arbus Locklear, PA
LUMBERTON HEALTH CENTER
/1JOF4U4VJUF$
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-1666
3PCJO:1FBDF.%
$IJDLFO'PPU3PBE
)PQF.JMMT/$
910-423-1278
5SBDZ#VMMBSE.%
,BSM+.PP:PVOH%0
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
CLINIC MAXTON
"OESFX+BDLTPO)JHIXBZ
.BYUPO/$ȓ
910-844-2004
%BXO-BOHMFZ1"$
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
CLINIC NORTH LUMBERTON
0BLSJEHF#MWE4VJUF#
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-0052
&BSM$VNNJOHT1"$
$IBSMFOF3-PDLMFBS.%
"OESFB44JNNPOT.%
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
CLINIC RED SPRINGS
302 Mt. Tabor Road
3FE4QSJOHT/$
910-843-9991
.BTIFMMF#SBEGPSE.PSSJT%0
3PCFSU)PMMJOHTXPSUI1"$
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
CLINIC ROWLAND
/#POE4U
Rowland, NC 28383
910-422-3350
/(MPSZ6HBI.%
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
CLINIC ST. PAULS
&#SPBE4U
4U1BVMT/$
910-865-5955
#BSCBSB,FJUI'/1$
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
CLINIC WHITE LAKE
8IJUF-BLF%SJWF
&MJ[BCFUIUPXO/$
910-862-6491
1FHHZ/FXNBO'/1$
Gastroenterology
ACME MEDICAL SPECIALTIES
'BZFUUFWJMMF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-5197
,XBEXP"HZFJ(ZBNGJ.%
Hospital medicine
SOUTHEASTERN REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
300 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-5000
#BCBKJEF"MVLP.%
4BRJC"[J[.%
-FTB#FUIFB.%
3BIVM%BMWJ.%.1)
"TIXJO%PTT.%
#SVDF%PXOFT.%
#SPDL%SBQLJO.%
+VMJFU&LBUBO.%
1BVM(PSEPO.%
1+FGGSFZ(SJNN.%
1SBOBW+BJO.%
.BSL+PSEBO.%
7BNTIJ,PMMJ.%
7BOFTI,VNBS.%
7JKBZ,VNBS.%
7JOPE,VNBS.%
4ZFE/BTTFS.%
(PEGSFZ0OJNF.%
+PBOOB3FBE1"$
+PTFQI3PCFSUT.%
0NBS3PESJHVF[.%
4PIBJM4BSXBS.%
.BSHBSFU4DBOOFMM.%
5SPZ4UFSL%0
+BNFT8FTU.%
Infectious diseases
ROBESON DIGESTIVE DISEASES
CAROLINA INFECTIOUS
DISEASES CONSULTANTS
8PPESJEHF%SJWF
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-8825
(SFHPSZ-PDLMFBS.%
395 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-3434
0CJFGVOB0LPZF.%.1)
SOUTHEASTERN DIGESTIVE
HEALTH CENTER
Internal medicine
0BLSJEHF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-3103
)BSWFZ)"MMFO+S.%
5BE&EXBSET1"$
HIREN R. PATEL, MD
SOUTHEASTERN
GASTROENTEROLOGY &
INTERNAL MEDICINE
395 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-7551
$IBSMFT3#FBTMFZ.%
.JDIBFM#SPPLT.%
(FSBSE%FWJOF.%
+FOOJGFS(SBIBN1"$
.BEIVS(VQUB.%
4IBGBR,IBJSJ.%
8UI4U
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-0770
4BOUPTI"VHVTUJOF.%
Gynecology
MARY B. LANE, MD
JOHN C. ROZIER JR., MD
295 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-5550
3009 N. Elm St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-9227
LUMBERTON MEDICAL CLINIC
MEDICAL SPECIALISTS’ CLINIC
'BZFUUFWJMMF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-1141
4BEBOBOE#)FHEF.%
ROBESON MEDICAL CLINIC
'BZFUUFWJMMF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-2330
"SUIVS#SBEGPSE.%
4BOEIZB5IPNBT.POUJMVT.%
SOUTHEASTERN CARDIOLOGY
/&MN4U
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-6177
4UFQIFO)3PZBM.%
'BZFUUFWJMMF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-8899
1BVM"(PSEPO.%
(PEGSFZ%0OJNF.%
Nephrology
CAROLINA KIDNEY CARE
8FTMFZ1JOFT3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-618-1055
.PTFT:"CPBHZF,VNJ.%
.BVSFFO/"DIVLP.%
8JMMJBN&#VDIBOBO+S.%
.BSL",BTBSJ.%
:VBO-V.%1I%
&[SB-FF.D$POOFMM***.%
,FOOFUI.FMUPO.%
4BOKBZ.JUUBM.%
3JDINPOE,/VBNBI.%
&NJMZ94VO.%
Neurology
NEUROLOGY CENTER OF
LUMBERTON
0BLSJEHF#MWE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-2343
*OESB4(BUJXBMB.%
SOUTHEASTERN NEUROLOGY
Neurosurgery
SOUTHEASTERN SPINE
AND PAIN
'BSNCSPPL%SJWF
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-9298
7JSHJMJP.BUIFVT%0
LUMBERTON OB/GYN
ASSOCIATES
8PPESJEHF%SJWF
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-9601
$POTUBODF.VMSPZ.%
SOUTHEASTERN WOMEN’S
HEALTHCARE
SOUTHEASTERN MEDICAL
PR ACTICE
&'BZFUUFWJMMF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-0407
+JBOGFOH;FOH.%
Obstetricsgynecology
'BZFUUFWJMMF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-608-3078
Lisa Blake, CNM
Connie Canady, CNM
-B4IBVOB%FFTF.%
#SBOEPO-PDLMFBS.%
.POJDB0YFOEJOF$/.
.FSFEJUI8BUTPO-PDLMFBS.%
THE WOMEN’S LIFE CENTER OF
LUMBERTON
0BLSJEHF#MWE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-2454
&EXJO-#BLFS***.%
4BNVFM.$VNNJOHT.%
-BSSZ")FBSOF.%
5BXBOEB#8JMMJBNT.%
Occupational/
environmental
medicine
SOUTHEASTERN
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
WORKS
0BLSJEHF#MWE4VJUF"
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-272-9675
#SPPLF(SPPNT'/1$
"OOFUUF.FMWJO'/1$
Oncology/
hematology
GIBSON CANCER CENTER
1JOF3VO%SJWF
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-5730
.BMFLB"INFE.%
.BSJCFUI4DISVN1"$
.BSWFSFUUB4UFWFOTPO.%
-JOEB.4VUUPO.%
‰$POUJOVFEPOQBHF
www.southeasternhealth.org t)FBMUIXJTF
13
Physician
Directory
‰$POUJOVFEGSPNQBHF
Ophthalmology
DONALD R. WHALEY, MD
0BLSJEHF#MWE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-7857
SOUTHEASTERN EYE CARE
'BSNCSPPL%SJWF4VJUF#
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-4856
54DPUU.PVTFS.%
SOUTHEASTERN EYE CLINIC
-VEHBUF4U
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-1981
3JDIBSE#FBVDIFNJO+S.%
Orthopedics
ALLEN ORTHOPEDICS
)BUGJFME$PVSU
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-3358
%BWJE3"MMFO+S.%
SOUTHEASTERN ORTHOPEDICS
0BLSJEHF#MWE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-1065
%BWJE"%BMTJNFS%0
.BUUIFX%BWJT1"$
4UBMFZ5+BDLTPO.%
3JZB[+JOOBI.%
4DPUU.D(JOMFZ.%
"OBTUBTJPT1BQBEPOJLPMBLJT.%
Pediatrics
Psychiatry
Sleep medicine
LUMBERTON CHILDREN’S
CLINIC
SOUTHEASTERN REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER BEHAVORIAL
HEALTH
SOUTHEASTERN PULMONARY
AND SLEEP CLINIC
-JCFSUZ)JMM3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-3318
"ZPUVOEF'BXFZB.%
$ISJTUJOB)BSEJO%JBM.%
4IFUVM1BUFM.%
3JDBSEP01PKPM.%
84DPUU3ZBO.%
PEMBROKE PEDIATRICS
$BOEZ1BSL3PBE
Pembroke, NC 28372
910-521-0201
+PTFQI5#FMM.%
ROBESON CHILD HEALTH PLUS
Robeson County Health
%FQBSUNFOU
$PVOUSZ$MVC%SJWF
Lumberton, NC 28360
910-608-2100
3PCFSU3&BSOFTU.%
Physical medicine
and rehabilitation
SOUTHEASTERN
NEUROMUSCULAR
REHABILITATION CENTER
0BLSJEHF#MWE4VJUF"
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-735-2831
.POJDB$BSSJPO+POFT.%
SOUTHEASTERN SPINE
AND PAIN
'BSNCSPPL%SJWF
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-9298
,BJMBTI$IBOEXBOJ.%
5IPNBT''MPSJBO.%
Pathology
Podiatry
SOUTHEASTERN PATHOLOGY
ASSOCIATES
CAPE FEAR PODIATRY
10#PY
Lumberton, NC 28359
910-671-5074
3JDIBSE%+PIOTPO.%
8BMUFS8BMFL.%
'BZFUUFWJMMF3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-4811
4IFMMJ#SFXJOHUPO%1.
.BUUIFX+5IPNQTPO%1.
THE FOOT & ANKLE INSTITUTE
8FTMFZ1JOFT3PBE
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-737-6600
.JMMJDFOU##SPXO%1.
1BUSJDL+3JDPUUB%1.
14
)FBMUIXJTFtwww.southeasternhealth.org
300 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-5000
"SMFOF#SJUU'/1$
$MZEF&QQT1"$
4JE)PTTFJOJ%01I%
+FOOJGFS-BNC'/1$
-FF3BVEFOCVTI1"$
Pulmonology
LUMBERTON MEDICAL CLINIC
395 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-7551
$IBSMFT3#FBTMFZ.%
SOUTHEASTERN PULMONARY
AND SLEEP CLINIC
8UI4U
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-9414
.BSJF$BNQCFMM'/1$
4PNOBUI//BJL.%
Surgery (general)
LUMBERTON SURGICAL
ASSOCIATES
/&MN4U
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-8556
4BNVFM&#SJUU**.%
#BSSZ&8JMMJBNTPO.%
SOUTHEASTERN SURGICAL
CENTER
8UI4U
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-9414
.BSJF$BNQCFMM'/1$
4PNOBUI//BJL.%
/&MN4U4VJUF&
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-0022
-ZB$SJDIMPX.%
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Radiation oncology
Urology
GIBSON CANCER CENTER
CAROLINA UROLOGY
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Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-5730
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Lumberton, NC 28358
910-739-6364
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Radiology
LUMBERTON UROLOGY CLINIC
LUMBERTON RADIOLOGICAL
ASSOCIATES
209 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-8222
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Rheumatology
SOUTHEASTERN ARTHRITIS
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Lumberton, NC 28358
910-671-9298
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Lumberton, NC 28358
910-738-7166
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Gluten-free veggie-lover rice-crust pizza
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INGREDIENTS
DIRECTIONS
2½
¼
ž
✓ 1SFIFBUPWFOUPEFHSFFT
✓ $PBUJODISPVOEQJ[[BQBOPSCBLJOHTIFFUXJUIDPPLJOHTQSBZ
✓ In medium saucepan, combine rice, water and salt.
✓ #SJOHUPCPJMPWFSNFEJVNIJHIIFBUSFEVDFIFBUDPWFSBOEDPPLVOUJMSJDFJTTPGU
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✓ *OMBSHFNJYJOHCPXMDPNCJOFIPUSJDFXJUIžDVQPG1BSNFTBODIFFTFBOEFHHBOEVTF
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✓ .PVOESJDFNJYUVSFJODFOUFSPGQSFQBSFEQBO
✓ 8JUICBDLPGGPSLTQSFBESJDFPVUUPDPWFSQBOUIFONBLFFEHFOFBU
✓ #BLFDSVTUVOUJMTVSGBDFGFFMTESZBOEmSNUPNJOVUFT
✓ .FBOXIJMFIFBUPJMJONFEJVNTLJMMFUPWFSNFEJVNIJHIIFBU
✓ "EEPOJPOHSFFOQFQQFSBOEHBSMJDBOEDPPLTUJSSJOHGSFRVFOUMZVOUJMPOJPOJT
translucent, 5 minutes.
✓ Add mushrooms and pepper and cook until all moisture has evaporated from mushrooms
BOEUIFZBSFCSPXOFEBCPVUNJOVUFTTUJSSJOHNPSFGSFRVFOUMZUPXBSEUIFFOE
✓ Add salt to taste.
✓ 4QSFBENVTISPPNNJYUVSFPWFSSJDFDSVTU
✓ 4QPPOUPNBUPTBVDFPWFSWFHFUBCMFT
✓ 4QSJOLMFPOCBTJMBOEPSFHBOPUIFONP[[BSFMMBBOESFNBJOJOHUBCMFTQPPOPG1BSNFTBO
cheese.
✓ #BLFQJ[[BJOPWFOVOUJMDIFFTFJTNFMUFEBOETUBSUTUPCSPXOBCPVUNJOVUFT
✓ Remove from oven and let stand 5 minutes.
✓ $VUQJ[[BJOUPGPVSXFEHFT4FSWFJNNFEJBUFMZ
½
2
›
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cups water
teaspoon salt
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Parmesan cheese, divided
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cup chopped onion
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HBSMJDDMPWFTmOFMZDIPQQFE
cups thinly sliced mushrooms
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Salt to taste
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NUTRITION INFORMATION
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HDBS
CPIZESBUFTHQSPUFJOHEJFUBSZmCFS
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Source: American Institute for Cancer Research
www.southeasternhealth.org t)FBMUIXJTF
15
REACH US
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Medical Center
300 W. 27th St.
Lumberton, NC 28358
Numbers to know
.BJOOVNCFS
1IPOFSFHJTUSBUJPO #JMMJOHBOEJOTVSBODF 'JOBODJBMBTTJTUBODF *OGPSNBUJPOEFTL )VNBO3FTPVSDFT (JGUTIPQ )PNFIFBMUI
.FEJDBMFRVJQNFOU /POQSPmU0SH
641PTUBHF
1"*%
Senatobia, MS
Permit #368
Check out our website
www.southeasternhealth.org
E
PRESS
LANE
Southeastern Health located inside Lumberton’s Walmart:
Urgent Care services at Primary Care Co-pay rates
Physicals, flu shots, vaccinations, and minor wound
care are just a few of the services we offer in a
location you probably visit every week. To make
your care even more convenient, we’ll give you
a restaurant-style pager so you can shop while
waiting for your appointment. And of course,
Walmart’s pharmacy is just a few steps away.
operated by
910-739-0133 | www.SRMCclinics.org
9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. — 7 days a week | No appointment necessary

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