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PDF-1 - RUcore - Rutgers University
ALEX
NEW
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F
JERSEY'S
145
.06
1'448
2002
VISITORS
NEW
JERSEY
GUIDE
COMMERCE
OFFICE
&
OF
ECONOMIC
TRAVEL
GROWTH
&
TOURISM
COMMISSION
SITO'
NEW ]ERSEY'S
TABLE
OF
I
CONTENTS
IN
UCTION
CULTURE
3
CULTURAL
7
ART
10
INSTITUTION
EXHIBITS
MUSIC
6:
D'
N
FESTIVALS
13
:
IV
ITINERARIES
This guide is representative
of sites, attractions and other offerings
for those visiting New Jersey. Information
supplied in this publication is believed to
be correct at the time of publication.
The New Jersey Commerce and Economic
Growth Commission is not responsible for
changes and/or typographical errors.
Many events in this Guide are
held annually. If you miss an event,
contact the event's organizers for
next year's
To
Americans
schedule.
receive
details
with
Disabilities
on
the
Act
(ADA)compliance,
please contact
each location directly.
www.vlsitnj.org
20
SKYLANDS
21
ATEWAY
26
D
27
SH
28
,-•TLANTIC
29
U
30
REGION
REGION
LAWARE
RE
RIVER
REGI©
N
•
CITY
ERN
REGION
REGION
SHORE
GARDENS
32
GAM
34
ß
S •
RE
SIA
ALS
!
N
Governor
James
E. McGreevey
and
Mrs.DinaMatosMcGreevey
wtth
theirdaughter
Jacqueline
at the
Jersey
Shore.
R
0
D
U
C
T
!
0
N
T
oday,nearlyhalfa millionAsian-Americans
maketheir
homein theGardenState.Theyhavecomeseeking
opportunityfromplaces
asvariedastheIndiansubcontinent,
theFar
EastandSoutheast
Asia.AstheylivetheAmericandream,
theyenrichNewJersey
notonlythroughhardworkandlove
of learning,
butalsothrough
a hostof festivals,
artexhibits,
concerts and restaurants that reflect their traditions.
AsianAmericans
areproudof theirvariedcultures.
Thisbrochure
will takeyouto theplaces
whereyoucanenjoy
thebestof Asiain NewJersey,
whetheryouareseeking
to
visitaJapanese
garden,
hearIndianmusic,enjoya Chinese
danceperformance,
checkout a Filipinoparadeor taste
Korean food in our state's own little Seoul.
Nowtheyhavebecome
partof thefabricof lifein
NewJersey.
Andthatgivesevenmoremeaning
to whatwe
liketo say:NewJersey
andyou,per•cttogether.
Scenes
ofAsianculture
that
flourishes
in NewJersey:
(top)lg•man
writestraditional
Chinese
calk•raphy;
(center)
Trying
onaJapanese
dress
kimono;
(bottom)
Celebrating
at theIndianAmerican
j•stivalat SriI•nkateswara
•mpleand
Community
Center
in Bridgewater.
NEW JERSEY
NEW JERSEY REGIONS MAP
INFORMATION
•
WELCOME
CENTERS
ATLANTIC
CITY
EXPRESSWAY
FarleyPlazaRestArea
Mile Marker 21
Hammonton,NJ 08037
609-96%6316
ATLANTIC
SKYLANDS
OF•nm•.
GATEWAY;
CITY
Mile Maker 3.5
East of Pleasantville Toll Plaza
Pleasantville,
NJ 08232
-- •nho•
e•'•iF
? Paters•
609-383-2727
DEEPWATER
Route 1-295 North
Deepwater,
NJ 08023
856-299-5272
-3
KNOWLTON
PerthAmbo¾
Route 1-80 East, Mile Marker 7
Columbia,NJ 07832
908-496-4994
Ptlncetm•
0
LIBERTY
H•mdel
STATE PARK
Exit14BoffNJ Turnpike,
MorrisPesinDrive
Jersey
City, NJ 07305
2O 1-915-344O
LIBERTY
VILLAGE
LibertyVillagePremium
Outlets
One Church Street
,.
•a •,••.
Flemington,
NJ 08822
SHORE
908-788-8550
DELAWARE
RIVER
MOLLY
PITCHER
MollyPitcherTravelPhza
NJTurnpikeSouth
Mile Marker 71.7
Cranbury,
NJ 08512
•
•/
609-655-1610
v AT•CI•/
MONTVALE
Montvale Travel Plaza
L•OUTHEeN
SHORE
•
GardenStateParkway,
Mile Maker172North
"
Montvale,NJ 07645
201-391-5737
NEWARK
INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
Terminal B, International Arrivals
Conderge
Satellite
Center
Newark,NJ 07114
973-624-1014
OCEAN
VIEW
GardenStateParkway
SKYLANOS
908
REGION
•,-IORE
496-8598
856
Mile Marker 18.3 South
RECIO
OceanView,NJ 08230
757-9400
609-624-0918
TOLL FREE 1 800-4oSKYLAN
www. njskylands.com
GREATER
ATLANTIC
CITY
TOLL FREE I 888-AC-VISIT
GATEWAY
201
REGION
REGI•
SOMERSET
360 Grove Street & Route 22 East
436-6009
•'•UTHERN
TOLL FREE I 877-498-3930
908
SHORE
REGION
463-6415
Bridgewater,
NJ 08807
908-725-1552
TOLL FREE 1 800-227-2297
DELAWARE
856
757-9400
RIVER
REGION
TRENTON
Lafayette
& Barrack
Streets
P.O. Box 206
Trenton,NJ 08625-0206
609-777-1770
c
u
L
T
U
R
A
L
!
N
$
T
!
T
U
T
!
*
Chinese warriors
stand
guardat
The Art Museum,
Princeton
University.
3
CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS
ATLANTIC
COUNTY
StocktonPerforming
Arts Center
RichardStocktonCollege
of NewJersey
Jimrole Leeds Road
Pomona
609-652-9000
www.stockton.edu/pac
Celebrating
its 25th yearof
outstandingprogramming,
the
(\
StocktonPerforming
Arts Center
continues to be a cultural oasis in
South3ersey.Featuredon April6
wiLLbe a performance
of
"he Songof Mu[an."
A little
CAMDEN
COUNTY
Garden State
BERGEN
COUNTY
DiscoveryMuseum
16 N. Springdale
Road
more about Seabrook- -
Thetownof Seabrook
is30 milessouthof
Chero/
Hil•,in thecul-de-sac
thatdeadends
intotheDe{aware
Bay.It issurrounded
by
vegetable
•elds in an areasoruralthata
Seabrook
familymember
said,"Youcandrive
east.for
40 miles•fthoutseeing
a mall."
Thetownis named.for
Charles
F.
American Labor
CherryHill
Museum/BottoHouse
856-424-1233
83 Norwood Street
Haledon
www.discoverymuseum.com
Seabrook
ca•edthe "Spinach
King,"and
A museum for children where
.founder
o.fwhatLifemagazine
called"the
biggest
vegetob{e
factoryonearth."Hetrans.formed
a 57-acre
farmpurchased
in 1893by
hisfather,Arthur,intoa 20,000-acre
fad•ity
.forgro•ng,processing
andj•eezfngvegetab{e
973-595-7953
TheAmericanLaborMuseum/Botto
House National Landmark offers
free Lending
books,an audioand
videocassette
Library,
restored
periodrooms,changing
exhibits,
a museum
store,OLdWorLd
gar-
theyenjoyLearning
andtaking
partin fun activities.Young
visitorswiLL
gigglewith delight
whentheyexperience
the handson exhibits,specialevents
and annual celebrations.
It was in 1944 that Seabrookbecame
dens, educationaland cultural
programs.
PeriodicaLLy
the Botto
CUMBERLAND
COUNTY
Housepresentsculturalexhibits.
3ohn Harms
Center for the Arts
30 North Van Brunt Street
EngLewood
201-567-3600
www.johnharms.org
Located
just minutesfromthe
GeorgeWashington
Bridge,this
northernNew3erseytheater
provides
the perfectsettingto
showcase
greatentertainment.
The •ohn Harms Center for
the Artshasbeenrecognized
as a "Regional
Centerfor Arts
ExceLLence"
by the NewJersey
State Council of the Arts.
Charles's
ingenuity
wassuchthat thepress
dubbed
him "TheHenryFordo.fAgricultura"
Seabrook Educationat
and Cultura[ Center
1325 State Highway77
Seabrook
856~451-8393
Visitors wiLLsee exhibits
depicting
the muLticuLturaL
history
of Seabrook in the 1940s and
1950s,whenJapaneseAmericans
andJapanese
Peruvians
relocated
frominternmentcampsandsettied
therealongwithwartimerefugees
fromEurope
andmigrantworkers.
Thereis a Large-scaLe
modelof the
viLLage,
exhibitsof cuLturaL
artifacts,periodphotographs
and
printedandrecorded
memoirs.
notab{e
notastheheadquarters
o.fan
American
industrial
giant,butashometo a
burgeoning
$apanese
American
community.
It wasin thatyearthat World
WarII-era {abor
shortages
prompted
Charles
Seabrook
tosearch
far and•de .forworkers.
Hisquest{edhimto
camps
in theWestern
stateswhere
$apanese
Americans
wereinterned.for
thedurotion
o.fthe
war.Ignoring
theviru{ent
anti-,7apanese
sen•:
mentthatgripped
thenation,Seabrook
oj•ered
$apanese
internees
a goingwage,a house•fth
heatandutilities,andschools.for
children
- in
exchange.for
a six-month
commitment
to work
at Seabrook Farms.
By1946,morethan500$apanese
familiestookSeabrook
uponhisoj•erandbegan
to builda community
thatb•ended
Asianand
American
culture.
A•though
thesizeo.fthe
$apanese
American
community
hasd•nd•ed
overtheyears,it is a community
thathas
tenadously
heldonto itstraditions.
Institutions that indude the Seabrook
Buddhist
Temple
andSeabrook
Community
Housearestilltheanchors
.forsuchevents
astheBonOdoriand6irl• Day.festivals.
< "OnceUpona •me in
ChineseAmerica" headlines
apacked
2002schedule
at
theNewJersey
Per•rming
Arts Center in Newark.
œSSœX
COUNTY
The Newark Museum
49 Washington
Street
Newark
973-596-6550
or
1-800-7MUSEUM
www.newarkmuseum.org
Newaersey'slargestmuseum
contains a wealth of cultural
The Newark
treasuresincludinga world-
Museum
•aturesan
extensive
collection
of
Asianart, including
renowned Tibetan art collection
as well as importantcollections
celebratingAsiancultures.
a Tibetan
Buddhist
altar(left)
anda
New 3ersey
PerformingArts Center
beer
jug•om Eastern
Tibet
•aturingiron,
goMandsilver
One Center Street
Newark
1-888-GO-NaPAC or
973-642-0404
decorations.
www.njpac.org
Heraldedby the mediaas one
of the mostprominentart centers
in the country,NaPAC
promisesto
providethe finestentertainment.
N3PAC
is the ultimatesettingfor
award-winning
performances
by
HUDSON
COUNTY
Liberty ScienceCenter
LibertyState Park
Norris Pesin Drive
Asian ensembles and artists.
JerseyCity
Seton Hall University
Asia Center
Alfieri Hall 2g
www.state.nj.us/dep/forestry/
parks/Uberty.
htm
www.tsc.org
400 SouthOrangeAvenue
South Orange
Thisinnovativelearningresource
201-200-1000
973-275-2305
http://acade
mic.sh
u.edu/asiacenter
5
for the lifelongexploration
of
nature,humanityandtechnology
has dozens of hands-on exhibits
for all ages,a 3-D laserlight show,
The mission of the Asian Center
an INAX © theater and more.
of Seton Hall Universityis to
NearbyLibertyState Parkis the
bridgethe politicaland cultural
launching
pointfor ferryfides
Exhibits
at theLiberty
Science
divide between East and West.
to the Statueof Liberty,a beacon
to generations
of immigrants,
excite
both
young
andoldasthey
and Ellis Island, which housesa
teach and entertain.
The AsianCenterpromotes
researchon Asianaffairs,develops
diplomatand scholarexchange
programs,
providesmulticuLtural
educationopportunities,
and
sponsors
forumsand conferences.
museumchroniclingthe immigrant
experience.
Center,
inJersey
City,aresureto
I
CULTU
k•
•
I
Thedazzlsng
acrobatics
andmartialartsskills
ofthe
Songshan
Shaolin
Martial
Monksl•oupe- betterknown
as the ShaMin Warriors - will
htghhght
theStateTheater}
2002pe•rmance ale r.
The State Theatre
MORRIS
COUNTY
15 LivingstonAvenue
PrincetonUniversityArt
New Brunswick
Museum
McCorreick Ha[[
Princeton
609-258-3788
732-247-7200
The Morris Museum
ext. 542
877-STATEll
www.StateTheatreNa.org
6 Norreandy
HeightsRoad
Morristown
973-971-3714
www.reorris
reuseure.org
http://webware.
princeton.
edu/artreus/
The museum
offersan impressive
rangeof art from ancientto modern times.Amongthe greatest
strengthsare the coLLections
of
Chineseart, with importanthoLdingssuchas bronzes,tombfigures,
paintingsand caLLigraphy.
Someof the best performances
from aroundthe worldgracethe
stageof the State Theatre,since
it's openingin 1988. TheTheater
continuesto offera varietyof performaningartists,includingthe
Nai-NiChenDanceCompany.
Foundedin 1913, the Morris
Museumexploresand celebrates
the arts, sciencesand humanities
throughexhibitions,educational
programs,
theatricalproductions
and specialevents.The Morris
Museumis the third largest
in the state of New3ersey.
MONMOUTH
MIDDLESEX
COUNTY
COUNTY
New 3ersey Vietnam Veterans
3ane Voorhees
Art Museum
Memorial and Vietnam Era
Educational Center
Grounds of PNC Arts Center
HoLredeL
Zimmerli
RutgersUniversity
71 Hareitton Street
New Brunswick
732-932-7237
GardenState Parkway,Exit 116
WWW.
Zirereer[ireuseure.rutgers.edu
800-648-8387
732-335-0033
or
www.njvvref.
org
TheZimmer[iMuseum
hasholdings
The Vietnam Era Educational
of 60,000 works of art from various
Center is the first educational
cultures,datingfromthe 16th century to the present.Seeongoing
exhibitof $aponisme--part
of the
museum's
permanent
coLLection.
center and museum of its kind
in the United States. Dedicated
in September1998, the center
is devotedto gainingan understandingof the conflictin
•rii Kotondo} Rain, a woodcut
Southeast Asia and the surround-
at theJane•orheesZimmerli
ing politicalstrifein America.
Art Museum.
Arpata C r, Treeof
Suffer'qg,
Treeof L;fe,
Treeof Enlightenment,
1998 Collectton
of
Maddipote
• ,d Kar l•
I
B
C5oudr•.
At theJane
I
l•orhees Zimrterli
Art Mu ev •
T
S
3ane Voorhees Zimmer[i
Art Museum
RutgersUniversity
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick
732-932-7237
www.
zimmer[imuseum.rutgers.edu
$aponisme:
Highlightsand
e •es
om
•o
•
•
Ongoing
Through
December
2002
In the earlyphaseof
3aponisme
(from1860sto the
1880s),Western
artistscreated
their own romantidzed visions
of 3apan,oftenby incorporating imagesof 3apanese
objects
in their works. This exhibition
illustrates the mutual influence
Gulart RasoolSa
v titled, oil on c•nva•.
Collection:Ka, l
Zimmerli Art Museum
and fascinationof 3apanese
and Western art in the [ate
nineteenthcentury.
india: Contemporary
Art from
Re,ional P ' ate Co ectfons
AprilthroughDecember
2002
Approximately
60 worksof
art from about 12 collections,
emphasizing
the art production
AmvalofAmerzcan
Shzps:
of the postindependence
era
Ptcture
of
a
Gatherzng
of
from 1947 to the present,
Feudal Retmners,9/l/1889
are on dispray.
At theJanel•orhees
merlt Ar M
eum
ART
EXHIBITS
On thispage:
The Newark
Museum} Asian
collection includes
suchdiverse
pieces
asO•rl•fi) a
1Thetan hatr
ornament made
Permanent
Asian
The mostextraordinary
collection
of Tibetan art in the Western
hemisphere
is on v•ewin eight
permanentgaLLeries
at this museum, the centerpieceof whichis a
Buddhist altar consecrated in 1990
by His Holiness,
the 14th Dalai
ofturquoise
set
in giltsilver;
(bottom)
a copper
statue
ofBuddha
)•omChina;
(top/eft)
a six-panelpaper
screen
j•aturing
Japanese
ink
calligraphy;
(topright)a
Collections
Buddha
Rockwell
CoLlection
of aapaneseArt,
givingthe museum
one of the
majoraapanese
coLLections
in the
figureonplaid
cotton
cloth
flora
13th-cent
eastern United States. Tt includes
paintings,sculpture,
netsuke,ojirne,
andinto, andis strongin u/q•vo-e
printsin exceptional
condition.
Asia; and
" (bottom
right)
: anearly
20thcentury
wool
Lama.* The collection has its off-
ginsin a remarkable
groupof items brought
fromthe Sino-Tibetan
..
borderland in 1911
by
Dr.ALbert
L
:
-/"' •': '""
SheLton,
a
'•medical
mis- •'
sionary,with additional objectscoL-
Lected
between
1914and1920.The
museum
also
acquired
threeothermissionary
coLLections from northeastern Tibet,
enrichingits holdingsin ethnographicand ceremonialart.
Paintings,sculptures,ritual
objects,dancemasks,tents, saddles, headdress
and weaponsare
amongthe featuredobjects.
i
)an
ThemagnificentAsianCollections,
representing
the majorculturesof
East and South Asia, was estab-
tishedin 1909 with the acquisition
of the museum's
firstobjects,the
Wide-ranging
holdingsencompass
textiles, metaLwork,enamels, Lac-
quer-ware,woodand stonecarvingsand ceramics,as weLL
as
•
Buddhist
pieces.
The
Korean
collection,
begun
in •9•3, hasnotableexamples
of potte• and porce•in dating
fmm the 4th to the •7th centu•,
and hasmcent[ybeenenhanced
by additionsof textiles,folk
paintingon panelsandscreens,
sculpture,fumitumand
architectural elements.
Monumental stone and wood
sculpturefromIndia hightight
the holdings.Thesculptureand
relatedpaintingsrepresentthree
majorreligionsof India: Hinduism,
Buddhismand 2ainism, with
examplesdatingfromthe second
centuryto the 17th century.
-L
ß www.newarkmuseum.org
.
...:':i
April 19--August 18
Shapedwith a Passion:
The CartA. Weyerhaeuser
Cotted=ion
of 3apanese
Ceramics From the 1970s
In TheHeart o! TheHome
November
2002 - February
2003
THE MORRIS MUSEUM
6 NormandyHeightsRoad
Morristown
Museum's
BradyGallery
973-971-3700
www.mordsmuseum.org
In celebration of Newark's
CherryBlossom
Festiva[,
The NewarkMuseumpresents
a majorcollectionof 20thcentury3apanesefolk and
tea ceremonyceramics.
This exhibit re-creates traditionaL kitchen architecture
with contemporary
authentic
artifactsof Ayutthaya,ThaiLand,
Michoancan, Mexico and Naxos,
Greece.As visitorsenter, they
wilt pick up a passportwith
culturaland geographical
Special Asian Exhibits
information
In a GenUeman'sStudy:
KoreanCattigraphyand
ScholarlyPursuits
ThroughDecember29, 2002
TigerRug,early20thcentury,
is partof thepermanent
collection
of The Newark Museum.
Theexhibitionis designed
to
suggesta gentleman's
private
studyin 19th-centuryKorea.
Items suchas screenspainted
with Confucianquotations,a
deskfor storingbooksand
otherartifactsare typicalof an
educated, welt-to-do man's
persona[
things.ALsoon view
are paper,brushes
and ink cake,
usedto createfinely written
documents and scrolls.
Fair Winds and Ctear Water:
;JapanesePoetic CatUgraphy
ThroughDecember29, 2002
Screens
and hangingscrollsin
the classical tradition with work
by famous$apanesepoetsand
intellectuaLs
of the 17th through
19th centuries.Oneoutstanding
exampleis the six-pane[screen
by RaiSanyothat featuresthe
strikingeffectof 12 tinesof bold
black ink characters.
o
o
0
and wilt be
introduced to each
cu[ture'sfamily kitchen.
HU
DANCE
P E RFO
u
RIq
ANC
E c
Internationally
renowned
mimeartistYass
Hakoshima
blends
theclassic
tradition
of
mimewiththemystery
and•talism of
s
Japanese
theater
andtheathleticism
of
modern
dance.
Heisaj•equent
per•rmer
at NewJersey
venues.
Asdirector
ofthe
!
c
YassHakoshima Mime Theater and the
NewJersey
Center
j•r Mime,Yass
leads
workshops
teaching
students
theartof
body
statement.
Formoreinj•rmation,
visitwww.
yasshakoshtma.
con
call 973-783-984
.
D
A
N
C
E
P
E
R
ChineseAmer'
F
ß mance Ense ,
O
I
R
N!
A
N
C
E
S
100 South Street, Morristown
973-539-8008
www.communitytheatrenj.com
TheCommunity
Theatre
presentsdiverseprogramming
year-round,andAsianperformancescontinueto be part of
its overallofferings.Amongthe
popularperformances
presented
this yearwerethe Bayanihan
Philippine National Dance
Companyand HidoH, as we[[
as the Acrobats of China and
Voiceof the DragonOnceUpon a Time in
Chinese America
Fred Ho's newest martial
arts action/adventure
epic. Thisblendsmusic
theater and ballet with
pyrotechnica!
Chinese
filartialArtsto portray
a heroicstoryabout
the ShaolinTemple.
the TokyoString Quartet.
MidoH
Scenes
j•ompe•rmances
bytheKingLai
Cultural
Dance
Theater,
a NewJerseybased
troupe
thatpromotes
Chinese
heritage NEW JERSEY
ARTS
through
theartofclassical
andJ•lkdance. PERFORMIN{}
The
group
isa regular
atevents
throughoutCENTER
thestate
andor,rsa strong
educational OneCenterStreet, Newark
component
J•r budding
dancers.
Formore
888-fi0- N3P^C
infbrmation,
visithttp://kinglaidance.
bizland.
com/or call201-767-8046.
Muswj9omChina,an ensemble
New ShanghaiCircus
January2003
Kodo Drummers
March 2003
Watchthe KodoDrummers
explore
thelimitless
possibilities
of thetraditional
Japanese
drum,thetaiko,astheymake
a stopthroughNewarkon their
world tour.
combining
traditional
andcontemporary Comeandexperience
the thrill
Chinese
instruments
andsounds,
ataperof Chineseacrobatswith the
J•rmance
heldaspartoftheRaritan
River
NewShanghai
Circus,
a troupe
MusicFestival.a multiculturaleventheld
annually.
Formore
infbrmation.
visit
www.
raritanrivermusic.
orgorcall
908-213-1100.
Mu• omChina
that has touredthe worldwith
theirseries
of magicand
acrobatic
productions.
Yearof the Sheepby
-
Nai-NiChenDanceCompany
KingLai Cul ßl DanceTheater
FanDance
February
2003
Children
aged6 to 14canring
in the"Year
of theSheep"
with
thisdazzling
program
offolk
andcontemporary
musicand
dance,performed
in traditional
costume
by a NewJersey-based
ensemble.
Chinese
A
DanceEnsemble
McCARTER
THEATRE
CENTER
91 UniversityPlace,Princeton
609-258-2787
www.
mccarter.
org
Anoushka Shankar
November 2002
Trained
by herfather,the
legendary
sitar virtuosoRavi
Shankar,AnoushkaShankar
ispoisedto carryforwardher
father's
legacy
in representing
thegreatmusical
tradition
of
India.A dazzling
performance.
(right)TheKodo
Drummers make
the traditional
'\
Japanese
drum,
the taiko, come
toli• at a recent
per•rmance
in
theNewJersey
Per•rming
Arts
Center.
I
1'4 U SIC
DANCE
PERFORMANCES
Shaolin 13•rriors
IvlcCARTER
THEATRE
CENTER
Con•nued
The Peking Acrobats
Narch 2003
TokyoString Quartet
Enjoythe hoopdiving,plate
spinning,bowlbalandng,
poleclimbing--direct
•om
the People•Republic
of China
theirperformances
captivate
November 2002
Thequartetthat hasreigned
as oneof the supremechamber
ensembles
of the worldfor more
than 30 yearsbringstheir music
audiences.
to Princeton.
Kodo Drummers
SarahChang
March 2003
Narch 2003
3apan• all-malepowerdrum
corpsinvokesthe spiritof the
Samuraiin a programthat is
part athleticfeat, part musical
phenomenon.
SarahChangleadsthe ranksof
the nextgeneration•violinsuperstars.Withmorethana decadeof
international
concert
expedence
at the ageof 21, Chang•is a
must-see
performance.
The PekingOpera
April 2003
Bridgingthe gap between
historicperformance
art and
moderntheatrics,the Opera
combines music with martial
arts,acrobatics,
juggling,
mimeandstylizedacting
uniqueto Chinese
culture.
CloudGateDanceTheater,
courtesy
ofNewJersey
Per•rming
ArtsCenter.
The Nai-NiChenDanceCompany's
NAI-NI
CHEN
P.O. Box 1121
DANCE
Fort Lee
C01•IPANY
Scheduted Performance:
201-947-8403
TheNai-NiChenDanceCompany
wasfoundedin 1988 by choreogra-
pher/dancer,
Nai-NiChen,to bringChinese
American
heritageintothe
contemporary
danceworld.Thecompany
hasdeveloped
morethan
20 workswiththemesfrom ancientChinese
poeticdramathat reflect
issuesof the presenttime to highlyabstract,contemporary
dances
inspiredby the art of Chinese
calligraphy.
The Year of the Sheep
February5-10, 2003
New3ersey
Performing
ArtsCenter
One CenterStreet, Newark
888-GO-N3PAC
c
E
E
B
A
T
i
0
N
S
i
V
A
L
S
•
Branch
Brook
t
Park
Main
L•k• SL
I
Ballamine
Gateway
Entrance
•------•l
Clifton Ave.
Mt Prospect
Main Entrance
Ave.
Cherry
Blossom
April 2003
OpeningDay
GospelChoir and Talent
Competition
A visitfromJapan'sCherry
Please ca[[ 973-643-1611
Festival
B[ossornQueen kicks off festivi-
ties. Activities include demon-
origarni,flowerarranging,
calligraphyand bonsai.Therewill also
be traditional dance and music,
horseand carriagerides,an arts
and craftsshow,an antiquecar
exhibit, caricatures,balloon
scu[pting
andfacepainting.
Participants
will enjoythe
scenicrunsthroughb[ossorning
cherrytreesin three races.For
EssexCounty Bike Tour
strations of rnartiat arts and
Japanesehandicraftssuchas
CherryBlossom1OKRun
A dayof fun for the entirefamily.
more information or to obtain
an application,pleasecall
973-268-3500.
CELEBRATIONS
FESTIVALS
April 2003
BranchBrookParkCherry
Blossom Festival
744 BroadStreet(31stFloor)
Branch Brook Park Alliance
Newark, 973-643461•
www.
branchbrookpark.org
The annualcelebrationis t•medto
coinride
w•ththeflowering
ofthe
famed3apanese
cherry
blossom
trees.
Thefestiva[
hasincluded
a variety
of
3apanese
culturalactivitiesand
demonstrationssuch as
orgami,calligraphy,bonsai,
martial
arts and
! traditional
ß'dance
and
• TkeSa•aSa
• C'd, ,ltaeit geœerj3erspvto• a [5il, ,i esmgkd
d,' •
m
music.
•
•
of eachyearis sponsored
by
Philopine
Flag
Day
fromChina).
Philippine-American
FriendshipDayParade
Paradebeginsat
3une
West Side Avenue
FCC(Familieswith Children
Lincoln Park
aerseyCity
l•aditional
Japanese
kimono
May
FCCAnnualChinaDay
Celebration
PhiUppineFlagRaising
Recreation & Cultural Affairs
3erseyCity
City Hall
201-547-4582
201-547-5522
Floats,beautyqueens,
tradit5ona[
www.jerseycityi.corn
Passaic
City Halt
TfugaoandAtS-Atihan
costumes
973-365-5500
Liberty
StatePark,3ersey
City
www.
cityofpassaic.com
3erseyCity Recreation&
Thetownsof •erseyCityand
Passaic
holdannualflag-raising
ceremonies
duringthe thirdweek
in •une to markthe Phi[ippines's
Independence
Day.
Cultural Affairs
201-547-4582
Thisone-day
event,heldin Nay
andmusichighlight
the parade,
heldannually
onthefourthSunday
in aune. The route takes marchers
five milesfrom LincolnParkon West
SideAvenue
to Exchange
Hace.
Aian
nations
have
their
owndhtinctive
holidays,
fidl ofpageant
andcolor,
unique
customs
and•ypical
j3oth.NewJe•xeyans
withtiestothose
nations
often
maintain
those
traditions
andshare
themwithother
people
in
the state.
Oneofthebest-known
Asianholidays
isLunarNewI3ar,celebrated
byJapanese,
Korean,
l/ietnamese
andmany
Chinese
expatriates
allover
theworM.
Thisisa time
j3rj•llowship
andcelebrations
withfireworks,
papier-rmich•
dragons
andcostumes.
Chinese
Americans
decorate
theirhomes
withsymbols
ofgood
j3rtune:
bright
redsymbolizes
happiness
in thecoming
months,
golden
ornaments
standj3r
desired
wealth,
while
fruitslikeoranges
andtangerines
areassodated
withgood
health.
Since
thecelebration
depena5
onthelunarcalendar,
thedateofLunarNewI•ar changes
each
season,
although
it
usual•,
•lh in lateJanuary
orFebruar•
In India,one
J•stive
holiday
isHoli,thecelebration
ofthecolor
ofspring
inFebruary
orMarch.
Duringthe
mornings,
people
celebrate
byshooting
colored
water
ateach
other
witha device
called
a pichkari,
while
inthe
Danceat theIndianAmerican
Festival
in Bridgewater
Indian
American
Festival
Sri Venkateswara
Temple(Balaji
Mandir)andCommunity
Center
Bridgewater
908-725-4477
AI'RICAN
An annual fun-fiUed carnival of
Indian food, musicand entertain-
mentthat is alsoheldto helpthe
community
becomemoreinvolved
in American
governance.
PhiUppineFiesta
Meadowrands
Exposition
Cente• Secaucus
212-682-6610
An annual business-oriented trade
August
show,with exhibitorsfrom the
3erseyCity Indian Parade
City of aerseyCity
be business and educational semi-
Philippines
and the U.S.There
Recreation &Cu[tura[
Affairs
201-547-4582
Annual celebration of Indian her-
Japanese
j•stivalin Edgewater
itage,with a paradefromNewark
Avenue to Leonard Gordon Park.
nars,a job fair and muchopportunity for networking.Alsofeaturing
an on-the-spotpaintingcontest,
photoand art exhibits,martial
arts, plusinternationaland
[oca[ entertainers.
CELEBRATIONS
I• FESTIVALS
evenings
colored
powders
called
Gulal
amsmeared
onpeople.
Children
eatsweet
treats,
often
made
ofherbed
nuts
withsugar,
andSmilles
sitbo(bre
a bonfire
along
with
friends
andneighbors.
In the
fall,Dashera
andDiwali
amreligious
fiaivals
18days
apa•During
Dashera,
Hindus
pray
andexchange
presents
andmessages
ofgood
wdl.
During
Diwali,
people
decorate
their
homes
withrows
oflamps
andexchange
presents.
InJapan,
theNewlOar}
holiday
known
asShogatsu
takes
place
over
the
firstthree
days
in]anua•People
eat
osechi
ryouri,
adish
packed
inaJubako
box
anful.l•
presented
inseveral
layers:
prawns
j3rlong
li•, sweet
black
beans
j3rhealth,
herring
me
j3rfertili{•
sweet
chestnuts
andmashed
sweet
potatoes
j3rhappiness.
Apar•cularly
Japanese
celebration
isOtsukimg
or';•loon
Viewin•
"Onthe
fi, tfidlmoon
night
inSeptember,
people
enjoy
a
countryside
picnic
withrice
cakes,
fruits
andvegetables.
Onginal.l•
it was
meant
togive
thanks
j3rtheharvest.
Koreans
have
their
ownThanksgivin•
anancestral
harvestj-•stival
known
asChusok,
held
the15thdayofthe
8thlunar
month,
which
usual.l•
turns
outtobeinmid-August.
Families
take
three
days
off
j%mwork
togive
thanks
andsham
songphyun,
rice
cakes
withbeans,
sesame
seeds
andchestnuts.
Children
dance
andsing
traditional
songs,
andmany
•milies
visit
thetombs
oftheir
ancestors
withofj•rings.
Navidad,
orChristmas,
isanimportant
celebration
inthePhilippines,
Asia}
onO
predominant•y
Catholic
countrig.
Filipinos
enjoy
a mi•ofindigenous
andcolonial
Spanish
customs.
After
church
service,
celebrants
drink
salabat,
aginger
tea,andeatputo
bumbong,
a violet
glutinous
rice
steamed
intubes
served
with
sugar
andgrated
coconut.
In addition,
many
Filipinos
prepare
roast
pigj3rChristmas
dinner,
ahoa tradition
inLatin
America.
Asinmuch
oftheSpanish-speaking
wor•celebrations
last
untilJanuary
6, Three
Kings
Day.
Children in traditional Indian dressat Sri •nkateswara
•mpleandCommuni{y
Center
Carnival India
BrookdalePark, Bloomfield
CoaUtion of Indian
Organizations
NewJersey
973-285-0311
Held on the weekend dosest to
IndianIndependence
Day,(August
SinoMonthlyMagazine
15), this open-aircelebration
featuresIndiandance,music,fashions,
Chinese Festiva[
18 SheppardHace
cuisine,
handicrafts,
jewdE/and
Edison
"Nehendi" artists.
732-650-7466
September
3erseyCity ChineseFestival
LibertyStatePark,JerseyCity
201-547-4322
Comecelebrate
Chinese
heritage
in
,lerseyCity•th the N,]YouthAsian
DanceTroupeandthe N,1Youth
WorldDrumTroupe
astheypresent
theireducational
program.
AnnualChinesebookand CDshow,
•th appearances
byauthors
and
concerts
by musica[
a•sts. Check
for date and location. Different
themesandlocations
eachyear.
I
c
LEBRATIONS
az
FESTIVALS
October
Dushahra Festiva[
East FreeholdPark, Freehold
www. dushahra.com
732-360-2059
Millennium
A celebration
of the "Victory
of Good
OverEviL"marking
the traditionat
homecoming
of LordRama,hero
of the epic"Ramayana,"
afterhis
victoryoverRavana,
Kingof Lanka.
Therewit[be danceprograms
with
talentedboysandgirts,tail tales
of RamandRavan,gamesandrides,
andfireworks
featuringthe spectacutarburning
of a 40-foot-taiL
Ravan
effigyimportedfromTndia.
Raritan Center,
Navratri
FieldcrestAvenue, Edison
732-283-9696
Thiscenturies-old
retigious
festiva[,
celebrated
throughout
Tndia,has
become
oneof the targestannual
Indian festivals held in the United
States. There will be food from various
regions
of India,games,
activities,
vendors
selling
jewe[njandhandicrafts,ptustotsof danceandmusic.
A
ild in
aditional
garbata
Japanese
Festival in
Edgewater.
Asian Moon Festiva[
Morristown
Community
Theater
:tO0South Street, Morristown
EdisonJewishCommunity
Center/Temple
BethEl
The ancient Asian celebration of
9:t 3efferson Boulevard
the Harvest Moon is the basis for
Edison
this event,organizedby the Nai-Ni
ChenDanceCompany.
Therealso
wit[ be a performance
by mimes
201-933-8963
Movement Theater.
For tickets 973-257-88:t0
Recreation & Cultural Affairs
20:t-547-6800/ 692:t
This annual event features music
anddanceperformances,
a wide
selection of ethnic foods, crafts,
and clothing.
Children
dancing
at
a Diwali Show at the
Bridgewater
Indian
American Festival
DiwaU Festivat
20:t-947-8403
from the Yass Hakoshima
JerseyCity ChineseFestiva[
LibertyState Park
JerseyCity
November
Hindus and Sikhs share the
Festiva[of lights, Diwati.There
wilt be a ceremoniat
Ughtingof
traditionattampsby youngpeopie, a youthfair, entertainment,
games,surprises,
ethnicfoods
and a five DJ with dance music.
NEW
JERSEY
5
ASIAN
VISITOR
GUIDE
'S
19
S
K
Y
LA
N
D
S
R
E
G
!
O
N
T
. ravelbackto NewJerseys
pastin thenorthwestern
region
of the state,dotted with small townsthat retain the charm of the
Pickyourown
vegetables
at ChiaSinFarms,asyou
explore
thenatural
sites
ofHunterdon
Coun{y.
colonial
era.Trytheantique
stores
in Andover,
Lafayette
or Stillwater,
or strollthroughthetinybutenchanting
towncenters
in Hopeand
Blairstown.
In Lambertville,
righton theDelaware
River,youcan
spendanafternoon
shopping
at artsandcraftsboutiques
andthen
dineatgourmet
restaurants.
Formoremodern
findings
atbargain
prices,
don'tmissFlemingtons
discount
oudets,
withhousewares,
clothing
andmanyotheritemsatfactory
prices.
Enjoynatureasyoudrivealongthewindingcountryroads
thatconnect
thedifferenttownsthroughforests
andmountains.
Headup Route23 to HighPoint,thehighest
placein NewJersey,
wherethebordermeetsNewYorkandPennsylvania.
Enjoythe
panoramic
viewfromthelookout.FarthersouthistheDelaware
RiverNationalRecreation
Area,andin MorrisCountyyouwill
findtheGreatSwamp
NationalWildlifeRefuge.
Altogether
there
aresome60,000acres
of stateparkland
thatincludea section
of theAppalachian
Trail.
It'stheoutdoors
forallseasons.
Duringthewarmmonths
youcanhike,campor justobserve
nature.In thewinterthere's
downhillskiingandsnowboarding
at HiddenValleyandMountain
Creek,pluscross-country
skiingat theHighPointCross
Country
Ski Center.
Skiingisoneof
theSkylands
Region}
most
popular
attractions.
GATEWAY
REGION
Thevibrantcenters
ofNewJersey}
AsianAmerican
communities
arelocated
herein NewJersey}
most
populous
anddiverse
region.
MIDDLESEX
COUNTY
T
hestate's
largest
community
of IndianAmericans
makes
its
homein theWoodbridge-Edison-Iselin
area.Plentyof neighborhood
shops
andrestaurants
enablethevisitorto enjoy---or
getto knowfor
the first time--the
ancient culture of the Indian subcontinent.
Startyourvisitat theOakTreeRoadCenterin Edison,a five-to
six-block
areaoffRt. 27 thatisfullof Indianrestaurants
andshops.
The restaurants
areamazingly
diverse:
Youcandelightin thefineIndian
cuisine
of your
choice from the
variousregions
of
southern
and
northern India.
"
'•-
In theshops
nearbyyoucanpick
uppastries
made .• !
withgoat
milk
,.• - _
and
ghee.
Haveanelegant
sari
customdesigned
toyour
taste,fromsilkor
satin
fabrics
inter-Sho,
,in: atone
oNew
Jets
.3Asian:
ocer,
stores
wovenwithgold
threads
andelaborately
embroidered
withpearls
andsequins.
Walk
downa fewstores
andselect
fromsomeof theelaborate
andbeautifully
carved
goldjewelryin Indiandesign
to complement
yournewlyacquired
wardrobe.
Indianbookstores,
travelagencies,
insurance
brokers,
lawyers,
-\
doctors, dentistsand other servicesand officesare all on or near Oak
Tree Road.
If youheadnorthyouwill bemagically
transported
east--you'll
still be in Edison but will alsohave traveledfrom the Indian subcontinent
to East Asia and the Kam Man Food Center on Old Post Road between
A visit to Middlesex
Coun{y
brings
the
traveler into the heart
ofNew]ersey•
Asian
American
communi•.
(top)Luxurious
Indian
dressmaterial at a
boutique;
(center)
Squeezing
sugar
cane
juiceat anIndian
restaurant;
(bottom)
Dresses
galore
at the
MarryMe Boutique.
Rt. 1 andVineyardRoad.You'llfinda miniChinatown
thatalsocarries
a goodselection
of Filipino,
Vietnamese,
ThaiandMalaygroceries.
Thecluster
of indoorstores
features
a bakery
forfreshChinese
pastries,
a supermarket
forAsianfruits,freshChinese
vegetables,
staples
likerice,
noodles,
soymilk,or freshtofu,pluslivefishyoucanpickandhave
prepared
to yourspecifications.
Youcanalsobuyfreshlycookedfood
soldbythepoundto takehome.Thelargesupermarket
at thecenter
alsoofferschinaandporcelain
wares,kitchenutensils
andotherChinese
household
items,manyof whichmakegreatgifts.
Thecenteralsofeatures
a bookstore
wherecalligraphy
supplies
andChinese
newspapers
canbepurchased,
anopticalcenter,a videoand
audiorentalstore,anherbal/pharmacy
centerandjewelrystores.
GATEWAY
An Indian-language
class
at a Central
Jersey
temple
REGION
Justacross
thestreetyouwill finda Korean/sushi
restaurant
andthe
Ah ReumKoreanMart, whereyoucandiscover
freshkimchi,prepared
fishandvegetables,
KoreanandJapanese
groceries,
andhousehold
items.
AnotherEastAsianshopping
experience
canbehadat theChinese
Crossroads
on Rt. 27 andPlainfield
Avenue.StopbytheShiSheido
cosmetics
counterfora makeover
andfacialgrooming.
Walkacross
the
parking
lot intotheRaritanFloristto select
bonsai as well as hard-to-find Asian indoor
andoutdoor
plants.Forthehome,stopat
Redwood Furniture a bit south on Rt. 27.
Youwill findAsian-style
carved
redwood
sofas,
cabinets,
diningroomsets,bedroom
sets,andgoldembossed
screens.
Across
from
the furniture store is the Asian Food Center
witha gigantic
selection
of freshfruit,
vegetables
andChinese
freshgroceries.
In a moodforsnacks,
Shanghai-style,
or an authentic Thai meal? A five-minute
drivetakesyouintotheheartof Highland
Park,whereyoucantry freshhand-rolled
pastries
at Shanghai
Parkor a feastin
authentic
Thaiatmosphere
at PadThai.
BERGEN
COUNTY
T
-!
heFarEastalsoextends
aninvitation
to visitBergen
County.For
anintense
AsianAmerican
experience
in theGardenState,youcannot
do betterthandowntown
Palisades
Park.Nearlyhalfof thePalisades
Park
population
isof Asiandescent--the
largest
percentage
in NewJersey-withmostof theseresidents
beingof Korean
origin.On BroadAvenue,
a
visitorcanfindnearlyanything
Korean.Choose
fromthewideselection
of restaurants
serving
kimchiandotherdelicacies
or takehomeyourown
specialty
cutsfromtheKoreaMeatMarket.Buya bookor a comicat
Seoul Comic Books. Check out the furniture and home decorations at
GrandFurniture,or pickup a movieat KoamVideo.
FortLeealsohasa strongKorean
presence
in itsmainshopping
district,butisnotedforitspan-Asian
diversity.
Withina fewblocks
you
will findmorethana dozenrestaurants
featuring
thecuisines
of Korea,
GATEWAY
REGION
China,India,VietnamandJapan.
Andjustbelow,in Cliffside
Park,isthe
Palisadium,
a luxurious
Korean
spa/health
dubspecializing
in massage
and
bodyscrubs
withherbaltreatments.
Whenyouaredonepampering
yourself,headupstairs
to themaindiningroom,whichoverlooks
theHudson
andtheNewYorkCityskyline.
Lunchanddinnerareserved
buffetstyle.
Youalsocanhavea Korean
barbecue
rightatyourtable.
Foranauthentic
Japanese
experience,
visittheMitsuwaMarketplace
on RiverRoadin Edgewater.
It isa largeindoorshopping
centerthat
caters
to themanyJapanese
families
wholivenearby,
butit welcomes
everyone
witha tastefor thingsJapanese.
Thereisanextensive
Japanese
marketwithfreshvegetables,
specialty
riceandnoodles,
plusanexcdlent
varietyof fishandfishproducts
notfoundrisewhere.
Stopbytheexquisitecounters
of theKitchoanSweetShopandtastesweets
madewith
fruitor beanfillings.
Walkto theothersideof themartandwatchwaffles
beingmadeon
thespotwithredbeanfillings,
a perfect
snack
anytimeor a greatbreakfast treat. For lunch, there is no better value than the take-out cafeteria
A varie{y
ofproducu
are available on
shopping
expeditions
in NewJersey}
Asian
communities.
withsushi,sashimi,
shrimptempuraor a mixedplatterthatcomes
with
misosoupandsaladforlessthan$10.
Youcanalsopickupsouvenirs
andnovelties
at theMitsuwagiftshop
or at thenearbyUtsuwaNo Yakata.
Waresat theMitsuwagiftshoprun
thegamutfromhandmadepaperscreens
andlampsto smalllacquer
tablesto futons,kimonos
andsandals.
Utsuwaoffersexquisite
handpaintedporcelain
teasets,platters
andbowls,aswellasanexcellent
varietyof lacquer
items.Aftershopping,
enjoylunchor dinnerat
nearby
Matsushima,
a Japanese
restaurant
witha waterfront
view.
Overin Bergenfield,
a smallbutgrowing
Filipinocommunity
offers
thevisitora varietyof restaurants
andshops
alongWashington
Avenue.
GATEWAY
REGION
HUDSON
COUNTY
I ersey
City
is
home
to
asubstantial
Indian
populat
as
well
sthestate's
largest
concentration
of Filipinos.
Oneof thelargest
Indianneighborhoods
iscentered
aroundtheintersection
ofTonnele
andNewarkavenues,
whereyouwill findfamily-run
groceries,
fabricand
clothing
stores
andjewelryshops.
Try theRasoiRestaurant,
which
specializes
in rasoichicken
and
•
mangolassi.
•r ,
TheFilipino
community
ismore
spread
outthroughout
thecity,but
'
youwill find several
restaurants
and
•
shops
in a numberof neighborhoods. On Newark Avenue near
[I
the
county
courthous
you
will
see
.
CasaVictoria,a community
center
hometo anelegant
restaurant
as
wellasanexhibition
space
for
Filipinoartists.
Thereisalsothe
,
•' •
Philippine
Bread
House,
which
I
started
outasa smallbakery
and
has now become a mini-mall for
Hudson
County}
streets
arefilledwitha
wid•arrayofstores
and restaurantswhere
onecansample
Asian
products
andcuisine.
Filipinos
seeking
authentic
homecooking,
products
andservices.
Another
neighborhood
to tryisthesouthern
section
ofJersey
Avenue,
wherethe
aromaof hotpandesal
breadwaftsfrombakeries.
Youcanalsovisit
ManilaAvenue,
formerly
knownasGroveStreet.
DuringtheChristmas
season,
residents
decorate
theirhomes
withtraditional
parollanterns.
On
thecorner
of Second
Street
andManilaAvenue
isPhilippine
Plaza,
with
a bustdedicated
to Philippine
American
veterans
ofWorldWarII.
GATEWAY
REGION
OTHER
ATTRACTIONS
Tere
is
plenty
to
see
and
do
in
the
Gateway
Region
ThereisLibertyStatePark,withitsviewsof theStatueof Liberty
andeasyaccess
to thefascinating
immigrant
museum
at EllisIsland,
wheremorethan12millionimmigrants
entered
theUnitedStates
between
1892and1954.Besureto visittheLibertyScience
Center,
whichhasdozens
of hands-on
exhibits
forallages,
a 3-D laserlight
show,
anIMAX© theater
andmore.
Of course
thereistheshopping
forwhichtheregionisfamous.
Checkouttheupscale
Mall at ShortHills,thehugeWestfield
Shopping
Townin Paramus,
theJersey
Gardens
Mall in Elizabeth
andthediscount
outletsin Secaucus,near Giants Stadium and the restof the
Meadowlands
Sports
Complex.
Urbanized
andsuburbanized
asit is,theGateway
Region
stillleaves
roomfornature.Withinsightof theNewJersey
Turnpike
andtheskyscrapers
of NewYorkCity isDeKorteStatePark,wherea boardwalk
trail
leads
a visitorthrough
marshes
teeming
withdozens
of species
of birds.
Anothernaturespectacle
norto bemissed
isthefallmigration
flightin
theskies
above
theMontclair
HawkWatch,onEdgecliff
Roadin Upper
Montclair.
Everyautumn,tensof thousands
of birdsof preyon their
waysouthfly above
thecliffonwhichtheHawkWatchislocated.
Indian womenuse
dyes
J9om
mehand•
a plantbetter
known as henna,
tobeauti•their
hantts
andj•et
b•re such
big
OCcasionsas
weddings
and
holidays.
DELAWARE
RIVER
REGION
B}egin
your
tour
in
Princeton,
home
to
one
of
the
world
mos
prestigious
institutions
of higherlearning.
Enjoya strollthrough
the
campus
withitsmixof colonial,
neo-Gothic
andmodern
buildings.
Thencross
Nassau
Streetanddiscover
theuniqueshops
thereandalong
PalmerSquare.
And beon thelookoutfor a classical
concert,a stimulatinglecture
or a play,allpartof thewealthof culturalandintellectual
offerings
thattheuniversity
opens
to thepublic.VisitthePrinceton
University
Museum, which
hasan impressive
collection of
Chinese bronzes,
•'-
tombfigures,
paintings
and
calligraphy.
Take a short
drive to Trenton,
whereyoucan
visit the State
Museum and the
capitol,originally
built in 1792. Its
distinctive
golden
dome was added
in the mid-19th
-
century,and
recentlya major
renovation was
completed.
Nearby,
visittheOld Barracks,
whichhoused
Britishtroops
duringtheRevolutionary
War.
Then drive farthersouthto Camden and its waterfront,which
features
theNewJersey
StateAquarium
andtheCamdenChildren's
Garden,
a four-acre
interactive
horticultural
playground
wherepeople
of allagescanexplore
and
discover the natural world.
Visitthefloating
museum
housed in the historic bat-
tleshipUSSNewJersey
as
well as a 6,500-seat ball-
ManyAsiang•
shops
carrya wide
range
ofbooks,
parkoffering
minorleague
baseball.
cards and
stationery.
Explore
thenatural
worm at Garden
StateDiscovery
Museum located
in Cherry
Hill.
S
H
O
R
E
R
E
G
1.0
N
Y
ourtourof theShoreRegionstartsinland,withquietreflectionsat theNewJersey
VietnamVeterans
MemorialandVietnam
Era Educational Center at the PNC Arts Center in Holmdd.
ThereisalsothePNC BankArtsCenteritsdf,whichfrequently
hosts
ethnicfestivals
featuring
music,foodandcraftsfromdifferent
Asiancountries,
enabling
thesecommunities
to enjoytheirculture
and share it with others.
Besureto visittheJapanese
Gardenat Georgian
CourtCollege
in Lakewood.
Enjoythetraditionalteahouse
surrounded
by a
windingpaththatfeatures
gnarled
oldJapanese
maples,
cherry
treesandothertypicalplants.
Thenyoucanhit thebeach,for nothingismoreNewJersey
than"goingdowntheShore."
The GardenStatehas71 milesof
surfand35 sandybeaches
in MonmouthandOceancounties
alone.ThereisSandyHook,whereyoucanswimor fish;the
livelyboardwalks
andamusement
piersof PointPleasant
or Seaside
Heights;
quietresidential
townslikeSpringLake,Lavallette
and
ShipBottom;andthenaturalsolitude
of IslandBeachStateParle
Backinland,youcanspenda dayat SixFlagsGreatAdventure,
in Jackson.
Afterthekidsthrillto thehair-raising
rides,drive
throughtheWild
Safari, where the
entirefamilycan
see animals from
acrossthe world;
don'tbesurprised
if some come
rightup to your
car. And don't
leave the area
withoutstopping
at theJackson
OutletVillage.
GREATER
TL
"1
T famous
resort
town
of
Atlantic
City
is
home
to
one
of
NewJerseys
largest
Vietnamese
communities.
Sample
thedelicious
fare at one of the several Vietnamese restaurants in town. Then marvel
at thesix-mileBoardwalk,
with itscasinos
andamusement
rides.Try the
famous
saltwater
taffy.Whileon theBoardwalk,
takethefamilyshoppingin OceanOne,whereyou'llfind 125shops,
restaurants
anda
familyamusement
arcade
all underoneroof.
In theevening
takein dinneranda showat thecasinos.
Callthe
AtlanticCityConvention
Centerforinformation
on restaurants
(1-888-222-3683).
There are also numerous attractions
thatcanbeenjoyedat a moreleisurely
pace,likethe RenaultWinery,America's
oldest.Storybook
Landin Cardiffisa
greatfamilyattraction.
The naturelover
shouldbesureto visitBrigantine's
Edwin
B. Forsythe
NationalWildlifeRefuge
and
its2,200acres
of pristinehabitat.Alsoin
Brigantine
istheSeaLifeMuseum-Marine
MammalStranding
Center,wheretravelerscanseehowdolphins,
whales
and
otheraquaticcreatures
arerescued
and
,11 I III1•
•t
t!
Ill
II
I
II
8'",.
41
returned to their habitats.
I'll
ATLANT;:
Exciting
nightli•and
worM-class entertainment
await visitorsat Atlantic
Ci•y}j•medcasinos.
21TY
Kck
off
your
tour
at
the
Seabrook
Education
and
CulturalCenter,whichtellsthestoryof oneof NewJerseys
first
AsianAmerican
communities.
Photographs,
culturalartifacts
and
a modelvillagereflectthehistory
of theJapanese
Americans
and
Japanese
Peruvians
whosetdedin Seabrook
in the 1940sand1950s
afterrelocating
fromwartimecamps.
Fromtheremakeyourwayto CapeMay,oneof theoldestshore
resorts
in theUnitedStates,
withquaintshops,
restaurants
andmore
than600 charming
Victorianhouses,
manyof whichhavebeenrenovatedasbed-and-breakfasts.
Ridethelocaltrolleyor takea tourin an
old-fashioned
horse-drawn
cart.In thespring
andfall,besureto bring
binoculars
andjoin thebirdwatchers from all over the wodd
whoflockto CapeMay to witnessthespectacle
of migration.
Experts
gatherto watchtensof
thousands
of hawksfly by at a
platformthatfrontsthebeachin theStatePark.Or takea whale-and
dolphin-watching
touroffthecoastoncomfortable
boats.
ForanotherSouthern
Shoreexperience,
drivea fewmilesnorthon
theParkway
toWildwood,
whereyoucanenjoyfood,games,
ridesand
waterparksalongthetwo-mileWildwoodBoardwalk.
Whenthesun
hasset,dozens
of nightspots
helpyoucontinue
thefun.There's
also
OceanCity,wherea 2.5-mileboardwalk
of amusements
andfrequent
festivals
addto thetownsappeal
asa vacation
destination.
A bit farther
northistheCapeMay CountyParkandZoo.Itsexhibits
of numerous
mammals,
birdsandreptiles
wouldmakea bigcityproud.
A
G
A
ardening
isanartj3rminJapan,
onerooted
in spirituality
andtradition.
Japanese
gardens
reflect
ancient
Shinto
religious
practices,
withthebelioC
thatthespirits
ofthegods
arepresent
in nature--inrocks,
trees,
mountains
andwate•7•lh.
Every
tree,
plantandstone
isdeliberately
placed
tosymbolize
a
larger
ideadeeply
connected
--
I
toJapanese
culture.
Man-made
objects
also
j•atureprominently.
•ahouses,
bridges,
lanterns
andwater•lls aremeanttoenhance
thetranquilli{y
a visitor
experiences
in aJapanese
garden,
gently
walled
off
j•omtherestoftheworldto
j•rm aplacej•rrelaxation
andcontemplation.
A peaceful
autumn
scene
in theJapanese
Garden
at Georgian
CourtCollege,
Lakewood.
GeorgianCourt College
gO0lakewood
Avenue[Lakewood 1732-36/,-2200
Ext.373
www.õeorõian.edu/arboretum
Designed
byTakeoShiotaandcompleted
in 1910,thisgarden
isset
on aboutoneacreof landsurrounded
on threesidesbya yewhedge.
To approach
the"Sukiya"
teahouse,
visitors
takea curving
pathpast
gnarled
oldJapanese
maples
andacross
woodenfootbridges
thatspan
aniris-lined
drystonestream.
The teagarden
includes
a series
of little
hills,a waterfall
anda meandering
brook.Amongtheplantvarieties
areHinokifalsecypress,
Japanese
cherry,
weeping
Higancherry,
Japanese
maple,Japanese
snowbell,
yucca,
peonyandjuniper.
I
Duke Farms Gardens
Route
206
,HilLsborou,
h 'g08-243-3600
A collection
of 11gardens
fromdiverse
cultures
andregions
of theworld.
DorisDukepersonally
designed
andbeganthecreation
of thesedisplay
gardens.
Italian,English,
French,Chinese,
Japanese
andIndo-Persian
designs
arejuxtaposed
neardesert,
semitropical
andjungleenvironments.
OpenOctober1 - May 31. Guidedwalkingtour 12-3p.m.,reservations
recommended.
In thespring,
irises,
rhododendronsand a
varie{y
ofother
plants
beautis5
thepath
through
Georgian
CourtCollege
•
Japanese
Garden.
In theJapanese
garden.serenity
istheobjective,
stimulated
by a stylized,
controlled
naturalism.
A narrowfootpathleadsfroma
display
of dwarfbonsai
treespasta treehouse,
leading
thevisitorthrough
vegetation
accented
withredmaple.The gardenhasa three-level
design
symbolizing
heaven,
manandearth.
Nearbyin thetranquilChinesegardenyoucanfollowa
crooked
walkway
overa stream
filledwithgoldfish,
symbolizing
good
luckandlonglife.All aroundisa profusion
of Chinese
plantings:
bamboo,
camphor
trees,bleeding
hearts,
hybridtulipsandjasmine.
Stopandlookat theboldrockformations,
thenacross
a pondto a
mysterious
grottoanda MoonGateto a latticecourtyard.
BranchBrook Par•Cher.ry Blossom
Branch
Brook
Park
AlLiance
I Newark 1744Broad
Street
(31st
Floor)
g73-643-1611
It'snottechnically
a garden,but2,700cherryblossom
treesthatflower
at BranchBrookParkmakeanunforgettable
revelry
of pinkandwhite
blooms.
Half a millionpeoplevisitit duringthebloomin April,when
theparkhoststheannualCherryBlossom
festival.
The firstcherryblossom
saplings
in Branch
I•
ß
Brookwereplantedin the1890s.Asthepark
•,
,
expanded,
CarolineBarnberger
Fuldgavea gift
" ,.,•%,,•$, of
2,000
trees
in1927.
Additional
trees
donated
almost
every
year
continue
tomake
thespectacle
.
,. • grow.
Thepark
asawhole
encompasses
nearly
360 acresof landplus36.6 acres
of water.It
stretches
approximately
twomilesfromRoute
•
*
280 and Clifton Avenuein Newarkto the
Second River and Mill Street in Belleville.
(Seemap& schedule
ofevents
onpage24)
s
P
o
YOGA
A
Rootedin Hindubeliefs
datingfromaroundthe2ndcentury
BC,
yo• teaches
onehowto turnthesenses
fromtheoutside
worldto the
mindwithin.Adherents
of thediscipline
believe
it isa wayto getto
knowyourauthentic
selfandachieve
innerpeace
by liberating
the
mindfromthelimitations
of theflesh,thesenses
andeventhought.
In addition,
physical
exercises
involved
in various
branches
ofyo•
canincrease
flexibilityandimprovehealth.
Therearedozens
of centers
in NewJersey
whereonecanlearn
or practice
yoga.Checkthefollowing
websites:
M
v•w. self-realization.com/yo•_centers_new_jersey.
htm
R
T
S
G
v•w. kevala.co.uk/search or
E
S
R
E
L
A
X
A
T
I
O
N
CRICKET
Cricket,themostpopularsportin theIndiansubcontinent,
is
gainingpopularity
in NewJersey
ascommunities
fromthatregion
of theworldbringtheirtraditions
to theGardenState.
Crickethaditsorigins
in England
duringthe1780s.It spread
throughout
theBritishEmpire,andtodayit attracts
hugecrowds
in
England,
theIndiansubcontinent,
SouthAfricaandtheWestIndies.
In theUnitedStates
cricketwasfairlypopularuntiltheadventof
baseball.
The earliest
cricketclubin thecountryisbelieved
to have
been the Union Cricket Club of Camden, founded around 1840.
Todaytherearetwomajorcricketleagues
thatplayregularly
in
NewJersey,
in a season
thatextends
fromspringthrough
earlyfall.
The CricketLeague
of NewJersey
(www.
njcricket.com)
andthe
GardenStateCricketLeague
(www.
gscl.org),
bothusepublicparks.
Matches
takeplaceat venues
thatinclude
Warinanco
Parkin Elizabeth,
HolmddParkin MonmouthCount>Johnson
Parkin NewBrunswick,
Newark•Branch
BrookParkandWatsessing
Parkin Bloomfield.
NewJersey
alsohosted
topflightinternational
cricket,
when
teamsfromIndia,Pakistan,
SriLanka,theWestIndies,Bangladesh
andEngland
broughtsomeof thebest-known
players
in theworld
to a tournament
heldin July2001in Jersey
City'sLincolnPark.
ANIME
AND
MANGA
In theUnitedStates,
cartoons
andcomicbooksaremostlyforkids.In
Japan,
however,
theyarea mass
mediaphenomenon
enjoyed
byeveryage
group.Increasingly,
Japanese
animation
filmsknownasanime,
aswellas
comicbookscalledmanga,
aregrowing
in popularity
in theUnitedStates.
Someof thebest-known
animeandmangatellscience
fictionor
fantasy
stories.
However,
justabouteverygenremaybefound-romance,
comedy,
action/adventure
andhorror.
Animeandmanga
enthusiasts
oftenjoinclubsto showfavorite
films,
tradebooksorvideos,
andjustdiscuss
theirhobby.Thereareseveral
such
clubsin NewJersey.
TheAnimeMangaProject
in Bayville
meets
periodi-
callyat theOceanCountyLibraryBerkeley
Branch,
andmaybecontacted
at http:llampclub.tripod.
coml.TheSouthJersey
AnimeSociety
hasa web
siteatwww.
sjas.org
andhasheldmeetings
attheCoilingswood
Public
Library.Therearealsostudent
clubsat theNewJersey
Institute
of
Technology,
Newark;
Stevens
Institute
of Technology,
Hoboken
and
Rutgers
University,
NewBrunswick.
In addition,
fansof onemanga
subgenre
knownasshoujo•mainly
produced
byfemale
artists
andaimedat girlsandyoungwomen haveheld
their lasttwo annualconventionsat hotelsin Newark and EastBrunswick,
featuring
screenings,
vendors
selling
comicboole,animation
celsandvideo
games
based
oncharacters.
A numberof shops
in thestatecarrymangaor anime.Oneof the
largest
selections
maybefoundat Kinokuniya,
in theMitsuwaPlaza
Mall in Edgewater
on RiverRoad.Justdowntheroadyou'llfindJBC
Books
specializes
in vintage
manga.
Otherretailers
include
FatJacks
Comicrypt
in OaklynandKnightDreamsComicRealm,in Princeton.
CHESS
!
!
With itskings,
queens
andbishops,
thegameof chess
brings
to mind
images
of medieval
Europe.
Itsorigins,
however,
aredistinctly
Asian.
Chess
hasitsancient
rootsin 6th centuryIndia,wherea gamecalled
Chaturanga
pittedarmies
featuring
rajahs,
elephants
andothersoldiers
on a boardof 64 squares.
Chess
historians
believe
that
Buddhists
fleeing
persecution
brought
thisgameto
China,whereit wasmodified
intoXiangQi,a form
of chess
thatiswidelyenjoyed
in populous
China.
A modifiedversion
of Chaturanga
firstappeared
in Persia
aroundA.D. 600. KnownasShatranj,
it was
thisgamethatmadeitswayto Europein the7th century,
whereit developed
intotheformof chess
bestknownin
theWest.In additionto XiangQi, a numberof other
formsof chess
developed
in Asiannations,
wherethey
arestillenjoyed:
Changgi
(Korea),Makruk(Thailand),
ß
Sittuyin
(Myanmar),
andShogi
(Japan).
In NewJersey,
theWestern
formof chess
enjoys
a widespread
following
andopportunities
abound
for
players
to testtheirskill.The NewJersey
StateChess
Federation
(NJSCF)annually
hoststheU.S.Amateur
Team/East
Tournament,
theNewJersey
Open,NewJersey
Individual
Scholastic
Championship
andtheNewJersey
TeamScholastic
Championship.
In addition,dozens
of chess
clubsoperating
in thestate
bringaficionados
of thegametogether
ona regular
bas,s.
Information
on tournaments
andlocalclublistings
areavailable
at theNJSCF's
website,www.njscf.
org.
T
H
E
F
0
0
D
S
0
F
A
S
I
A
hecuisines
ofAsiaaresovaried
andsodi•rent thatit is
almost
a misnomer
tospeak
of'Ylsian
j3od"in anything
buta geographic
sense.
A traveler
in NewJersey
witha curious
palate
willfind a wealthofAsianj3odtoenjoy.
Chinese
restaurants,
ofcourse,
havebeen
apresence
injustaboutevery
townin NewJersey
J3rdecades.
ButnowAsianAmerican
cuisine
isasvariedandexotic
astheculture
itself.
CHINESE
CUISINE
Chinesefoodis doubtlessly
the mostfamiliarAsiancuisinein New
Jersey.
Chinese
restaurants
in NewJersey
rangefromtherare,gourmet
delicacies
of Chengdu
46 in Cliftonto thefamiliarfareof thetiny
restaurant
downtheblock.Cantonese
food,fromthesoutheastern
region
thatincludes
HongKong,wasoneof thefirstto become
popularin the
West;it hasa reputation
forbeingdelicate
andrefined.
Manyof the
dishes
arecooked
by usingthetraditional
stir-frying
techniques
and
servedwith steamedrice. Cantonesecuisinealsoincludesdim sum, little
dumplings
andpastries
stuffed
withmeatsandvegetables
thatareserved
on carts,allowing
dinersto experiment
withthemanydelicious
varieties.
Anotherpopular
regional
Chinese
cuisine
comes
fromtheBeijing
area,and is termed Mandarin. One differencebetweenit and Cantonese
isitsreliance
onwheatastheingredient
thattiesit alltogether
instead
of rice. The result is a cuisine that featuresnoodlesand round, baked
orsteamed
bunsstuffed
withmeats
andvegetables.
BothMandarin
and
Cantonese
foodarefairlymildeventhough
garlicandginger
arewidely
usedingredients,
andthatmildness
distinguishes
bothfromthespicy
Szechwan
andHunancuisines
alsowidelyavailable
in theGardenState.
Bothregions,
whichneighbor
eachotherin southwestern
China,are
famedfortheuseof garlic,scallions
andchili.
Whichever
regional
style,andwhethersomelikeit hotor mild,
a visitorissureto findfineChinese
foodthroughout
NewJersey.
INDIAN
CUISINE
With nearly900 millionpeoplefound
in diverse
settings,
ranging
fromthe
snowyHimalayas
to steaming
jungles,
India is a continent unto itself; its vari-
ouscuisines
proveit.
There are several common threads
A participant
in a dance
perj3rmance
at theSri thatrunthroughout
Indiancuisine.
Venkateswara
7•mple
and
Nearlyall Indiandishes
areextrava-
Community
Center
in
with herbs,condiments
Bridgewater. gantlyseasoned
andspices--some
hot,somenot.
Fiatbreads are baked in traditional
tandooriovens,
anddairyproducts
arealsowidelyused.
Dinner is servedat the Rasoi
Indianrestaurant
inJersey
City.
Indiandishes
varybyregion.Parsicuisine,
with itscenterin the
Bombay
area,hasitsrootsin thecooking
of ancient
Persia,
withits
emphasis
on lamb.Kashmir,
highin theHimalayas,
isfamous
forits
subdeyetassertive
ricedishes.
Coconutmilk isa favored
ingredient
in
thesouth,whilein Bengal
theaccent
isonfishfromtheregions
many
rivers.
ThenthereisMughalcuisine,
centered
in Ddhi andoneof the
mostwidelyavailable
of theregional
styles.
Because
of Hindureligious
bdiefsagainst
eatingbeef,manydishes
arevegetarian--and
chefshave
created
whatmaybecalledthegreatest
vegetarian
cuisine
in thewodd.
A woddapartisthecuisine
of Goa,a formerPortuguese
colonywhere
beefiswidelyavailable
anddishes
areoftenseasoned
Portuguese
style,
withgadicandvinegar.
In NewJersey,
Indianfood(whether
in a restaurant
or a specialty
grocer)canmosteasilybefoundin townswithlargeIndianpopulations
suchasEdison,
Woodbridge
andJersey
City.Butmoreandmore,newly
openedrestaurants
arebringingthefabulous,
flavorfulspices
of Indiato
the rest of the Garden State.
JAPANESE
CUISINE
Formality
andelegance
arethehallmarks
of classic
Japanese
cuisine,
whichisdesigned
to bea culinaryfeastfor theeyesaswellasthepalate.
To a Japanese
chef,thepresentation
of a dishisasimportantasitstaste,
whichiswhyfoodin a Japanese
restaurant--whether
in Tokyoor Fort
Lee--isartistically
arranged
sothescheme
of colorsandtextures
in the
fooditselfformsa beautiful
design.
Japanese
dishes
demandfreshseasonal
ingredients,
because
cooking
methods
andseasonings
aresimpleandstraightforward
to allowthetaste
of themaindishto shinethrough.
And,of course,
a sushidishmustconsistof the freshestseafoodavailable,sinceit is to be eatenraw.Seafood,
whetherraw,friedin batteror steamed,
isthetreasure
ofJapanese
cuisine.
Vegetables
areimportant
too,lighdysteamed
ordeep-fried
in tempura
batter.Chickeniscommon
aswell,butbeefisrarein Japanese
cooking,
because
thecountryissodensely
populated
thereislittlefarmland
for
cowsto graze.
The world-famous
hand-massaged
beeffromKobeisa rare
andtremendously
expensive
treatforthemostdemanding
of gourmets.
Japanese
restaurants
aboundin NewJersey,
particularly
in FortLee,
whichhasbecome
theGardenState•capitalofJapanese
culinaryarts.
Butevenin places
withoutlargeJapanese
communities,
a visitorwill find
a Japanese
restaurant.
In manyof them,thechefwill slicethefoodand
cookit rightat thetable,on a largegrillingsurface.
I
KOREAN
CUISINE
Korean
foodisknownforspiciness
offset
bythemildtasteof rice,which
is consideredthe main courseof the meal. The traditional Korean dinner
The Palisadium Restaurant in
CliffideParkoj•rsdiners
a tremendous
menuofJapanese
andKorean
specialties,
aswellasspectacular
views
oftheNewYorkskyline.
iscalledhanjongshik,
whichmeans
"full-course
meal"
andinvolves
multiplesidedishes.
Asidefromrice,
it includes
a varietyof vegetables,
seafood
andmeats.
Indispensable
amongtheseiskimchi,
thenational
dish.
It consists
of cabbage
andwhiteradishes
spiced
with
redpepperandgarlic,pickledin brine,and,in the
mosttraditional
recipes,
buriedin earthenware
crocks
andfermented
formonths.
The resultisa spicy,
savory
vegetarian
platterthatKoreans
loveto eatasa sidedish.
Alongwithriceandkimchi,a hanjongshik
would
alsoinclude
grilledfishandeitherbeefor pork,often
charcoal
broiledandslicedthin.A typicalseasoning
is
chiliandsesame,
whichgivesKorean
fooditsdefining
characteristic
of spiciness
combined
with nuttiness.
In FortLee,andto an evenlargerextentin
Palisades
Park,a visitorwill findseveral
genuine
Koreanrestaurants
on thesameblock.The resultisauthenticity--as
profoundly
Korean
asanything
youmightfindin Koreaitself.
MALAYSIAN
CUISINE
In Malaysia,
thetraditional
dishes
oftheMalaypeople
havemerged
with
those
ofothercultures
to forma "fusion"
cuisine
featuring
elements
both
unique
andfamiliar
toresidents
ofotherAsiannations.
Coconut
milkisone
ofthemostoftenused
ingredients,
lending
therich,nuttytaste
thatistypical
ofMalaysian
cuisine.
Onepopular
treatisnasi/emak,
ricecooked
in coconut
milkandserved
withanchovies,
squid,
eggs
andcucumber,
madespicy
bythe
addition
of chilipaste.
Another
well-known
preparation
issatay,
barbecued
meatonskewers
thatisserved
withcucumber
anddipped
in a peanut
sauce.
Oneinteresting
cooking
styleisknownasNyomz
It wasdeveloped
400
years
agoin commtmities
of mixed
MalayandChinese
origin,
andischaracterized
bytheharmomous
contrasts
ofspices,
sweets
andsours.
Among
the
best-known
Nyona
dishes
areotak-otak,
grilled
spicy
fishwrapped
in a banana
leaf,anditiktint duckwithsalted
vegetables.
Malaysian
restaurants
arefairlynewto NewJersey.
Manywilloffer
notonlythetraditional
Malaysian
dishes,
butalsoChinese,
Indianand/or
Indonesianfood. The most famousIndonesiandish is the Dutch-influenced
rijstaffb•
asmorgasbord
thatcombines
a dozen
ormoresweet
orspicy
fish,
vegetable
andmeatdishes,
withriceandcondiments.
FILIPINO
CUISINE
TakeChinese
cooking.
AddSpanish
cuisine.
AddAmerican
dishes.
Mix well
anduseindigenous
Tagalog
ingredients.
Whatyougetisthetraditional
foodof thePhilippines,
whichhastaken
foreign
elements
andmade
themitsown.
Filipino
cuisine
begins
withthebase
of indigenous
ingredients
andthetraditional
Tagalog
preference
forsubde
combinations
ofsweetness,
saltiness
and
sourness.
Thelatterflavor,
in particular,
isessential
to Filipino
cuisine.
One
typical
technique
istouseunripe
localfruitssuchasguava,
mango
and
tamarind
asa souring
agent.
TheChinese
introduced
stir-frying,
along
withChinese-style
noodles
and
soysauces.
Filipinos
tookthose
techniques
andingredients
andmadethem
local.Forinstance,
pansit
consists
ofChinese
noodles
"Filipinized"
byadding
asquirtof ka/amans/,
a fruitthattastes
somewhere
between
a lemonandan
orange.
Similarly,
theFilipino
version
ofeggrolls,
called
lumpia,
arestuffed
withmeatorlocalvegetables
anddippedinvinegar
andsoysauce.
TheSpanish
cuisine
thatarrived
in the1500sunderwent
thesametransformation.
Spaniards
brought
theirtraditional
adobo,
a base
ofoliveoil,garlic
andbayleaves
inwhichmeats
aresauteed.
Filipinos
keptthegarlic
andbay
leaves,
butadded
vinegar
andsoysauce.
Another
dishdating
fromSpanish
daysiskchon
asado,
suckling
pigslowly
roasted
overcoals
to makeit crispy
andserved
witha sweet-sour
sauce
simmered
withvinegar,
sugar
andherbs.
AndthenthereistheAmerican
influence,
whichbegan
in 1898.A Filipino
restaurant
mightserve
hamburgers•but
instead
ofcatsup
thecondiment
of
choice
willbevinegar
andsoysauce.
A visitor
toNewJersey
ismostlikelyto findFilipino
restaurants
inJersey
Cir• hometo thelargest
Filipino
community
in thestate,
andin Bergenfield.
THAI
CUISINE
With itsinsistence
onfreshingredients
andonharmonious
combinations
ofspicy
hotwiththesweet
andmild,Thaicuisine
hasbecome
a trendsetter
in the world of food.
Thai chefsdemanddishesthat balancethe differentflavorsthe human
sense
oftaste
canrecognize
hot,sour,
sweet,
salty,
bitter.Forinstance,
a
soup
known
astomyumgaicombines
tartness
fromlimeleaves,
hotchilis,
thecreamy
sweetness
ofcoconut
milkandapungently
salty
fishsauce
called
hamp& whichhasbeencalled
"thequintessential
condiment"
ofThaicuisine.It is made from anchoviesdried in the sun and fermentedin brine.
Thedominant
spice
ischili,whichmightbecalled
pr/} inThairestaurant
menus.
It adds
eye-tearing
hotness
toanydish.Butthespiciness
isalways
offset
bysomething
mildonthesame
plate.
Rice,
ofcourse,
acts
asagentle
agentin mostThaimeals.
Butevenriceisfarfromblandin Thaicuisine,
as
attested
bythesubtle
perfume
ofjasmine
rice.Riceissoimportant
toThai
cooking
thattheverywordforfood,gankao,isliterally
translated
as"with
rice."A typical
Thaimealalsoincludes
cucumber,
whichserves
to cool
andfreshen
thepalate.
Since
there
arenolarge
Thaineighborhoods
inNewJerse)•
there
isno
single
place
where
avisitor
cangoforavariety
of restaurants
withina few
blocks
ofoneanother.
Thairestaurants
aresprinkled
throughout
thestate;
however,
mostareupscale
andrefined
dining
establishments.
I VIETNAMESE
ß N] Online's Dining Guide
www.njo.com/dining
ß Zagat Restaurant Guide
www.zagat.com
ß New Jersey Dining Guide
www.nidiningguide.com
CUISINE
LikeFilipinos,
Vietnamese
cooks
historically
combined
indigenous
ingredients
withculinary
traditions
fromChinaandEurope.
Butwhilein the
Philippines
theEuropean
influence
came
fromSpain,
inVietnam
it came
fromFrance.
Vietnamese
chefs
areproud
oftheircombined
heritage,
and
some
have
referred
toVietnamese
cooking
as"thenouvelle
cuisine'
ofAsia."
Riceisa staple,
asthroughout
mostofAsia,andsoarenoodles,
whichcan
bemadeofrice,wheatormungbeans.
Theyareoftenputin a French-style
consomme
called
phobo.A number
ofterrines
andsausages,
also
derived
fromFrench
dishes,
arealsopopular.
Onethingisforsure,
Vietnamese
foodishealthy.
Nomealiscomplete
without
afresh
salad
ofcucumbers,
bean
sprouts,
pepper,
sprigs
ofbasil,
coriander,
mintplustraditional
Vietnamese
herbs.Dishes
thatcombine
meat
ß New Jersey Internet
Restaurant Directory
www.restaurants-nj.com
ß New Jersey
Restaurant
Association
www.njra.org
andfresh
fruits
arealso
popular,
such
asaplatter
thatuses
green
papaya
anda
kindofbeef
jer•. Beef
dishes,
aswellasthemany
varieties
ofgrilled
shrimp,
areoftenservedwith noucroam,a fishsaucethat is to Vietnamese
cuisine
whatsoysauce
isin otherpartsofAsia.
TheChinese
influence
shows
in thewidespread
useofstir-frying,
andin
thevariety
ofspring
rolls.
Indiainfluenced
Vietnamese
cuisine
too•coconut
milkisaningredient
ofmanydishes.
NewJerseys
Vietnamese
restaurant
scene
isjuststarting
togrow.Some
maybefound
inVietnamese
neighborhoods
inJersey
CityandAtlantic
Civ3
butbecause
ofthecuisines
growing
fame,
restaurants
maybefound
in many
other communitiesacrossthe state.
RUTGERSTHE STATEUN VERSTY
0 03091520
C
,-g
"Something
Good,Something
Good"
Asianproduce
entrepreneur
Charlie
Huang
oj•rsSomething
good"
to visitors.
w
antto getthe freshest
Asianvegetables
possible?
ThendolikesomanyAsianpeople
fromNewJersey
do,andhead
to Pittstown,
in Hunterdon
County.
That'swhereChiaChcng"Charlie"Huang
hasfor 10yearsowned
a 40-acre
pick-your-own
farmthatgrowstraditional
vegetables
andherbs
fromChinaandotherpartsof EastAsia,suchasThaibasil,yellow
watermelon,
Taiwancabbage,
Chinese
cucurnbcrs
andspecialty
peppers.
Uponarriving,
a visitorwillsecastandof tallbamboo
anda wooden
signwithChinese
characters
thatsays"Chia-Sin
Farms,"
whichrncans
"Something
Good,Something
Good."Duringharvest
season,
throngs
of people
showup:families,
friends,
eventourgroups
fromasfaraway
asNewYorkCity.Manylookat thevisitasanoutingto socialize
in the
country.
Visitors
walkdowntherowsof plantings,
picking
produce
that
maybchardto findelsewhere
andareof course
asfreshascanbcfound
anywhererightoffthefarm.Youalsowillfinda wideselection
of flowers,
bothin theopenairandin greenhouses.
CharlieHuangstudied
horticulture
in hisnative
Taiwan,
wherehewas
raised
in a fanning
village.
Aftergraduating
fromcollege,
hcwenttowork
foranorchidcompany
thattransferred
himto Hunterdon
Countyin 1974
Hisistheall-American
storyof immigrant
success:
Hc learned
America
was
a landof opportunity,
andafterleaving
theorchidcompany
andspending
I•11owwatermelon,
10
years
farming
on
rented
land,
in
1992
hc
finally
bought
his
ownfarm
oneofthespecial{y
vegetables
grownat
Chia-Sin Farms.
on Rt. 579, near Interstate78.
Andit'snotonlyduringharvest
season
thatpeople
visit:Chia-Sin
Farms also sells Christmas trees.
Photo/ArtCredits
CmecChinese
American
DanceEnsemble,
courtesy
KingLaiCultural
DanceTheater:
Tibetanbeerjug, courtesy
TheNewark
Museum:
Branch
Broo•Pa• cou•;y TheStar-Ledger;
Clfildren
in costume.
photo
Edward
Lea;TorilKotondo's
R•fn,courtesy
of 3aneVeo•nees
Zimmedi
Art Museum.
Rutgers,
TheStateUnivers•y
of New3ersey;
MimeYass
Hakoshima,
photo3ohanElbe•,courtesy
Danmart
Ltd.;Paperscreen
withcallig•phy,cou•;y TheNewark
Museum.
Pg1: Commerce
Secretary
WiU.
iamO.WatLey
withyoungsters
at TheNewark
Museum.
photoRogerBrown.Pg3: Standing
waniorswithshield,photoBruce
M.White,courtesy
TheArtMuseum,
Princetun
University.
Giroof an
alumnus,
Classo• 1959. Pg4: 'OnceUpona Timein Chinese
America,'
photoRainerFehringer,
cou•;y New,le•ey Performing
ArtsCenter.
Pg5: TibetanBuddhist
attarandTibetan
beerjug, cou•;y TheNewark
Museum;
Science
exhibit,photoChrisCalfis,cou•;y LibertyScience
Center.
Pg6: ShaoEn
Wanior,
cou•;y TheStateTbeal•e;Torii
Kotondo's
Rmn,cou•;y of 3anaVeo•nees
Zimmedl
Art Museum,
Rutgers,
TheStateUniversibj
of New3ersey.
Pg7: Arpana
CaufsTree
of Suffering,
Treeof Life,Treeof EnEghtenment'
GulamP,
asoo[Santash's
UntitledandToshu
Shogetsu's
A•va[ of American
Ships:Picture
of a
Gathering
of Feudal
Retainers,
courtesy
o•3anaVoo•nees
Zimmedl
Art
Museum,
Rutgers,
TheStateL•Tiver•bj
of New3ersey.
Pg8: Paper
screen
withcaliig•phy,courtesy
TheNewark
Museum,
Hairornament,
courtesy
TheNewark
Museum;
Bodfsattva,
photoRichard
Goodbod,j.
cou•;y TheNewark
Museum.
Gi• of C.Saydam
Cuing, lg50.
Pg9: Ratnasarnbh•a,
photoSarahWeUs,
cou•;y TheNewark
Museum;
T•gerrug,cou•;y TheNewark
Museum.
Pg10: MimeYassHakushima,
photo,lohanEthers,
cou•;y Danmart
Ltd.;Midori,photoSusan
,lohano,
courtesy
New,le•ey Fe•rorming
ArtsCenter;
Chinese
American
Dance
EnsembLe,
cou•;y KingLalCultural
Dance
Theater.
Pg11: Music
fromChina,cou•;y RaritanR•verMusicFestival;
Chinese
American
DanceEnsembLe,
cou•;y KingLaiCultural
DanceTheater;
FanDance,
cou•;y KingLaiCultural
Dance
Theater;
KodoDrummers,
photo
R'•v•chi
Okano,
cou•;y New3ersey
Fe•rorming
ArtsCenter.
Pg12:
ShaDtin
Wa•ors,photoZhaoHui,cou•;y New3erseyPerforming
Arts
Center;
CloudGateDanceTheater,photoLiuChen-Hs•ang,
courtesy
New
3erseyFe•ng
ArtsCenter.
Pg13: Woman
in Korean
d•ss, cou•;y
Kineart
National
Tourism
Organization.
Pg14: Branch
B•ooI•
Park,phot•
LuciUe
Annunz•ata.
Pg15: Woman
in kimono,
photoGlenFrieson,
courtesyEssex
CountyOepartment
of Parks.
Recreation
& Cultural
Affairs;
Samahan
Cultural
HeritageFe•rormers,
cou•;y Samahan
Cultural
He•f•gePerforrrers;
PhiEppme-American
Friendship
Day,photoFeEno
F. Nebiar;PhiEpp•ne
RagDay,photoFeEnoF. Nebiar.
Pg16: Fireworks.
PhotoDisc•;
3apanese
festivalphotoCayce
Cummins;
•nd•anAmerican
FestivalphotoRohiniTieraja.Pg17: Children
in costume,
photo
Edward
Lea.Pg18: D•gen,Phot•O•s•;Childin ,lapanese
garb,photo
Cayce
Cummins;
O•ildren
dancing,
photoRohinJ
Tieraja.Pg19: Family
picnic,PhotoDis•.Pg20: ChJa-Sin
Farms,
NoahAddis,courtesy
The
Star-Ledger;
Skiing,PhotoDis•;Family,PhotoO•. Pg25: 3eweby,
photoRohiniTheraja,
cou•;y BalajiCo•ls& Pearls,
•nc Pg26: New
JerseySteleAquarium,
cou•;y New3erseySteleAquarium;
Garden
SteleO•scovery
Museum,
cou•;y Garden
SteleO•scovery
Museum.
Pg27: Bk•cte,PhotoO•s•.Pg28: Casinos
at night,BeachumbreUus
andBeach•
boat,courtesy
AtlanticCityConvention
& Visitors
Aotho6ty.Pg29: ShoteEee,
photoFatTambu•.Pg30: Branch
Brook
Park,courtesy
TheStar-Ledger;
3apanese
Garden,
photoMichael
F.
Gross,
courtesy
Georgian
CourtCoUege.
Pg31: 3apanese
Garden
path,
photoMichael.
F.Gross,
cou•;y Georgian
CourtCoUege;
Chemjbldssorns,
cou•;y TheStar-Ledger.
Pg32: Yoga,Phot•Dis•; Cricket.
PhotoD•. Pg33: Chess,
Phot•Dis•. Pg35: Dancer,
photoRohini
Theraja.
Pg36: 5ushLPhot•D•sc
©. Pg37: O•ners,
phot•Shelley
Kusnetz.
Pg38: Cook,cou•;y TheStar-Ledger.
Pg40: Chia-Sin
Farms,
NoahAddis,cou•;y TheStar-Ledgec
DonnaConnor
for DonnaConnor
Photography,
Sweo•vater,
kklIrts•de
Cover.Asianfigure.Pg17: Woman
reading.Pg21: Oress
material;
Squeezing
sugarcane:Shopp• Grocery
shopping.
Pg22: Indian
language
duss;Catstatues;
Vases;
Women
shopping.
Pg23: 3apanese
restarn-ant;
Sesame
pastecakes;Asiantable lamps:Manandwoman
s•pping. Pg2a: Woman
•
basl• Manandwoman;Busyst•.ot.
Pg25: Porcelain
figure;Henna-dyed
hands.Pg26: Cards
andstationary.Pg27: Asianfigures;
Woman
shopper.
Pg28: Sushichef.Pg29:
Woman
shopper;
Children
at beach.Pg3•: Cook;O•nner
beingserved.
Pg35: Chinese
dish.Pg36: Dinnerat Rasoi.Pg37: Cookies;
Fish.
Pg38: R•cePg3•: Cook.
GETTING
NEW
THERE
,1ERSEY
TRANSIT
BUS
&
RAiL
Northern New 3erseyand MercerCounty
Daily,6amto midnight
800 772-2222
Heatingimpaired(N2 on[y,w•thte[epfinter)
800 772 - 2287
Outof state(NorthernN2)
973 762-5100
SouthernNew3ersey
Daily,6amto midnight
800 582-5946
Outof state(SouthernN•)
215 569-3752
Atlantic City Raft Line
8oo ACTRAIN
PATH
800
234-PATH
PATCO
856
772-6900
SEPTA
215
580-7800
AMTRAK
800
USA RAiL
NEW
,1ERSEY
&
V•C•N•TY
A•RPORTS
NewarkTnternafiona[
Airport
973-961-6000
Kennedy
Tnternationa[
Airport
718-244-4444
LaGuardia
Airport
718-533-3400
Philadelphia
InternationalAirport
800-PHL-GATE
At[anticCity Tnternafiona[
AirportPomona
609-645-7895
Central3erseyRegionalAirportHilLsborough/Manville908-526-2822
Teterboro
201-288-1775
Trenton/Mercer
Airport
609-882-1600
Forcomplete
generalaviationairportlistingscontact:Divisionof Aeronautics
of the NewJersey,
Department
of Transportation
609-530-2900
To plan your next New3erseyvacation, day trip
or stop over ask for a compEmentarycopy of
the New 3ersey Asian Visitor's Guide,
ca[[ 1-800-V•S•T-N3, EXT. 2957
or visit our website at www.visitnj.org
Produced
ior theNew•
Commerce
& Economic
Growth
Commission
by TheWrf•ngCompany,
Neweric
Oes•nby Tareb.
rrfOes•n.e Capyr•htZOO2.
A• r•hts
GoVERn'"'
.....
ALEXA•'
RUTGE
I,l[w
......
,TY
N.J.
GOVERNMENT
PUBLICATIONS
/•'_EX,' .DER LIBRARY
RU,G c=
UNIVERSITY
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J.
NEW
]ERSEY'S
'
!.
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NJ COMMERCE
GROVVTH
GUIDE
& ECONOMIC
COMMISSION
OFFICE
OF TRAVEL
20 West
State
P.O. Box
820
& TOURISM
Street
Trenton, NJ 08625-0820
609-777-0885
www. visitnj.org
JAMES
E. MCGREEVEY
WILUAM
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CEO
D. WATLEY
& SECRETARY
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