Landowner to Landowner - Forest Landowners Association

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Landowner to Landowner - Forest Landowners Association
M E E K S’
F
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INthisISSUE
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010
FEATURES
20
2008 FARMBILL
AGROFORESTRY
Doug Wallace & Rich Straight
26
FOREST
CERTIFICATION
Joann Meyer Cox
24
TIMBER PRICES DROP
32
WATER QUALITY
34
U.S. COMPETITIVE IN WORLD
PULPWOOD MARKETS
36
WOOD TO ENERGY
39
LETTERS SUPPORT CARBON
NEUTRALITY OF BIOMASS,
NATIONAL RES
Letters to the Editor
We welcome feedback about Forest Landowner
magazine and its contents. Please email the
Editor at [email protected] with
your thoughts and suggestions.
Photos
Send us your forestry and wildlife photos for possible publication in Forest Landowner magazine.
Please send to Forest Landowner Association at 900
Circle 75 Parkway, Suite 205; Atlanta, GA 30339.
Your hard copy photos will be returned after
publication.
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010
www.forestlandowners.com
DEPARTMENTS
4
Action Source
6
How To...
Get Involved in the Forest Stewardship Program
10
4
Landowner to Landowner
How do you get your children, grandchildren, and
other heirs interested in your forestland?
14
Hardwood Management
High Impact Options for Hardwoods: Before,
During, and After Harvest
16
Legal Issues
Convert Your Forest Land Into A Cash Assett
18
Tax Issues
Income Tax and Carbon Markets
42
Association News
44
Advertisers’ Index
Forest Landowner (ISSN-1087-9110) is published bi-monthly by Forest
Landowners Association, Inc. (Publication Number 204940). Forest Landowner,
900 Circle 75 Parkway, Suite 205, Atlanta, GA 30339. Periodicals postage
paid in Atlanta, Georgia and at additional mailing offices Subscription to
Forest Landowner is offered only with association membership. Dues range
upward from $55, which includes $15 per year for the magazine subscription.
POSTMASTER send address changes to Forest Landowner, 900 Circle 75
Parkway, Suite 205, Atlanta, GA 30339. Phone (404) 325-2954; fax (404)
325-2955. Allow 4 to 6 weeks for a change to become effective. Please
include address label.
Vol. 69, No. 6
FROMthePRESIDENT
2010
EDITORIAL
Publisher
Scott P. Jones
Editor
Eddie Lee Rider
Design Director
Tim Robinson
Publications Subcommittee
Barrett McCall, Chairman—Mobile, AL
Brad Dethero—Florence, AL
Derek Dougherty—Athens, GA
John Hearnsberger—Hot Springs, AR
Bill Hubbard—Athens, GA
Mary Jeanne Packer—Watkins Glen, NY
Claire Payne—Asheville, NC
Matthew Smith—Wayne, PA
Eric Taylor—Overton, TX
ADVERTISING
Jane Robinson
[email protected]
(770) 207-1130
MEMBERSHIP
Alicia Niles
[email protected]
(800) 325-2954
FLA OFFICERS
President
Mary Clapp—El Dorado, AR
Incoming President
Derek Dougherty—Athens, GA
Over the past 10 years or so, it seems many
organizations, including the Forest Landowners
Association, have reported on and feared the
potential impact our growing population would
have on our forests. Still today it is easy to get
caught up in the numbers that are reported, such
as, “Atlanta, Georgia, loses 150 acres a day to
urban sprawl,” or “Our nation loses about 6,000
acres a day on average to developments and other
uses.” Although I’m not prepared to dispute these
figures, I do think it’s important to look at some additional figures that show
how our forests have dealt with population growth over time.
In 1900, the United States had a population of 76 million and 189,000 housing starts. In 2000, we had 281 million people and 1.6 million housing starts.
During this time, our forestland has remained constant around 755 million
acres, and I believe that we can point to vibrant markets for our forest products
as one of the biggest reasons why this level has remained unchanged. It is also
my belief that vibrant markets will help our forest endure even more challenges
into the future. However, with federal and local governments taking such a
controlling interest in the development of new markets and the continuation
of existing markets, we must assert our voice on the issues. If not for our sake,
then for the sake of our future, we will continue to advocate for existing and
new markets for our forests.
It is unfortunate that the development of bioenergy markets that utilize
woody biomass have been so polarizing, but as I stated above, we will be
unapologetic about our advocacy on behalf of landowners in these debates in
Washington, DC, and around the country. It makes me wonder, would we be
in the same situation if the free market were the driver in this industry and not
the government? We may never know, but for now, we will continue to work to
ensure landowners have open access to markets for their products. For without
markets, where would our forest be today?
Sincerely,
Immediate Past President
Philip A. Hardin, PhD—Bellevue, WA
Regional Vice Presidents
Richard Brinker, PhD—Auburn, AL
Carrol W. Cochran—Ruston, LA
Derek Dougherty—Athens, GA
Troy Harris—Cumming, GA
Kirk Rodgers—Falls Church, VA
Scott Rowland—Magnolia, AR
Earl Smith—Greensboro, GA
Mary Clapp, President, Forest Landowners Association
Information & Education Chair
John Hearnsberger—Hot Springs, AR
Forest Landowner Foundation President
Robert Olszewski—Atlanta, GA
Governmental Affairs Chair
Joe Hopkins—Folkston, GA
Membership Chair
Troy Harris—Cumming, GA
Chief Executive Officer
Scott P. Jones—Atlanta, GA
Private forest landowners protect America’s natural resources. The Forest
Landowners Association (FLA) protects private forest landowners. Since 1941,
FLA has provided its members, who own and operate more than 40 million
acres of forestland in 48 states, with education, information, and national
grassroots advocacy, which enables them to sustain their forestlands across
generations. FLA’s outreach on behalf of private forest landowners nationwide enhances their forestland
management practices and stewardship, and provides peace of mind that they have an advocate working
to bring them richly deserved compensation for their work that safeguards America’s forestlands.
ACTIONsource
Your Connection to Congress
SOAPBOX
EPA Issues Guidance Under Clean Air Act: Future of Biomass Still Uncertain
O
n November 10, 2010,
the
Environmental
Protection
Agency
(EPA) made available
guidance and tools to
help state and local air permitting
authorities
identify
pollution
reduction options for greenhouse
gases (GHGs) under the Clean Air
Act. This action is in response to the
Forest Landowners Association and
its allies communications with EPA’s
Gina McCarthy about the agency’s
approach to new GHG permitting of
the emissions sources outlined this
spring in the Tailoring Rule, which
assigns wood burning emissions the
same level of pollution as fossil fuels.
By focusing EPA requirements
on state and local governments,
FLA sees more of the same endrun around Congress by an Obama
administration that has failed to pass
legislation through Congress and,
instead, will utilize agency’s and states
for both regulation and legislation
opportunities to enable its agenda.
To identify GHG reduction options,
EPA and the states will apply the same
processes they have used for other
pollutants.
EPA recommends that permitting
authorities use the Best Available
Control Technology (BACT) process to
look at all available emission reduction
options for GHGs. The guidance does
not define or require a specific control
option for a particular type of source
because BACT is determined on a caseby-case basis.
4
www.forestlandowners.com
“We have made it clear that we
understand that biomass is part of an
overall national strategy to reduce our
reliance on fossil fuels and provide
significant benefits, and we believe
there are ways to account for those
benefits and we’re encouraging states
to do so,” McCarthy said. She added
that EPA will provide additional
guidance in January to ensure that
states understand how to do that
effectively and ensure that “they are on
solid ground.”Dave Tenny, President
and CEO of the National Alliance of
Forest Owners (NAFO), issued the
following statement in response to the
announcement:
EPA’s announcement on how it
will implement the PSD Tailoring
Rule through Best Available Control
Technology (BACT) guidance sends
very mixed message to forest owners.
EPA has again acknowledged
that biomass has significant carbon
benefits over fossil fuels that should
be considered when implementing the
Tailoring Rule. While we agree with that
premise, today’s announcement does
not take the necessary action to apply
it. Consequently, EPA has not removed
the uncertainty around biomass energy
under the Tailoring Rule.
The fundamental problem remains.
The Tailoring Rule still regulates
biomass the same as fossil fuels and
must be amended to correct that flaw.
FLA personnel hear rumors that the
January deadline for implementation
of the Tailoring Rule may have to
be postponed until May, since the
pressure from Congress and the
American people has forced EPA to
take another look at their curious
decision to rethink existing rules and
their own, previous conclusions that
wood burning is carbon neutral and,
therefore, has no adverse impacts on
GHGs.
Your Connection to Congress
FLA Members Take Action
FLA Supporters Encourage Candidates
to Sign Death Tax Repeal Pledge
This October, the Forest Landowners
Association requested that its members
and friends encourage both sitting
Members of Congress and their
challengers to sign a pledge to repeal
the federal death tax. More than 500
congressional candidates have now
signed the Death Tax Repeal Pledge
to support the elimination of the tax,
according to long-time ally American
Family Business Institute (AFBI), the
organization that authored the pledge
and sponsored the effort. FLA and
AFBI are excited to have 500 signers
of the pledge, a vast improvement over
the 30 candidates who had signed the
pledge going into the 2008 elections.
The death tax has become a
particularly hot issue in the Western
states, including in Washington’s
Senate contest, and some rural House
districts where Democratic incumbents
appear vulnerable. The tax tends to be
a popular issue in rural areas because
it raises concerns particularly among
farmers and forest landowners.
During the Bush administration,
Congress passed a law that lowered
the death tax gradually and repealed
it entirely for 2010. It is set to spring
back January 1 to its 2001 level, absent
congressional action, with a top rate of
55% and an exemption for the first $1
million of an estate’s value.
ACTIONsource
The current Congress seems likely to
consider a new version of the death tax,
rather than full repeal, in a lame-duck
session after the November election
as part of a package of extensions of
expiring Bush-era tax breaks.
FLA Asks Texas Members
to Support New Renewable
Energy Center
The Forest Landowners Association
asked our Texas members and allies
to voice their support for the Davy
Crockett Renewable Energy Center
(DCREC), a 52 MW net biomass power
project being developed in Crockett,
Texas by FLA member company
American Renewables, LLC.
Private forest landowners need the
new markets and new demand for lowvalue wood products that biomass power
will encourage. The operation of biomass
facilities and DCREC in particular, will
improve forest health, provide muchneeded economic benefits and security
to the forestry industry, and will help
“keep forests in forest.” We would like
to thank our Texas Board Members
including Justin Penick for lending their
support to this effort.
FLA PAC
Private forest landowners face significant
challenges in Washington, DC. In order
for private forest landowners to be
successful, we must have a place at the
table to have our voices heard.
FOREST LANDOWNER
The Forest Landowners Association
works to ensure private forest
landowners’ interests are properly
stated as Congress debates issues that
affect forestland ownership, such as
bioenergy and ecosystem services,
protecting private forestland from
government over regulation, and
protecting American timber markets
from unlawful international trade.
The Forest Landowners Association
Political Action Committee (FLAPAC) collects contributions from
individuals, then disburses these funds
to political candidates who support
the goals and objectives of FLA. Your
donation can help elect and retain
those members of Congress who share
our private land values.
Here is a quick look at how our PAC
faired in the past election cycle.
We had over 75 individual donors
to our PAC this cycle who contributed
nearly $50,000 to help us support those
candidates best suited to assist private
forest landowners in Congress. In a
break from tradition we funded several
non incumbents in areas where there
were open seats or strong opposition
to the sitting member.
All in all it was a very successful year
for the FLA PAC and I encourage you
to participate through giving at any
amount so we can continue to enjoy
the level of access we currently have
with Congressional leaders.
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010
5
HOWto
Get Involved in the Forest Stewardship Program
Ted Bush
S
ome 15 years ago, a small
tract of timberland owned by
my sisters and me, adjoining
the George Washington–Jefferson
National Forest in Augusta County,
Virginia, was certified as a Stewardship
Forest. Recently I was able to obtain
Stewardship Forest certification for
three separate but adjoining tracts of
timberland, belonging to my wife Gail
and two of her daughters in Wilkes
County, Georgia.
The Forest Stewardship Program,
established in 1991, is a national
program for non-industrial private
landowners. The USDA Forest Service
sponsors it, and each individual state
forestry division (commission or
department) administers it:
“The program provides technical
assistance, through State forestry agency
partners, to nonindustrial private forest
owners to encourage and enable active
long-term forest management. Forest
Stewardship plans layout strategies for
achieving unique landowner objectives
and sustaining forest health and vigor.
Forest Stewardship plans motivate
landowners to become more active in
planning and managing their forests,
greatly increasing the likelihood
that their forests will remain intact,
productive and healthy, and that the
social, economic and environmental
benefits of these lands will be sustained
for future generations” (Retrieved from
www.fs.fed.us/spf/coop/programs/
loa/fsp.shtml).
6
www.forestlandowners.com
Preparing a Plan
Consulting foresters normally write
the Forest Stewardship plans, but
sometimes a forester with the state
forestry agency writes the plan. The
first step is to make formal application
to the state forestry agency, through
the forester who will develop the
plan. Once a plan is approved, the
consulting forester receives a small
fee from the state agency (currently
$600 in Georgia). I got the first plan
approved in October 2008, and the
other two in the winter of 2009. The
representatives of the Georgia Forestry
Commission, NRCS, and Wildlife
Resources Division were very helpful
in providing recommendations and
advice on obtaining financial assistance
in implementing plan activities.
The plans list the landowner’s
objectives and include timber type
maps, soils maps, aerial photos,
illustrative photos, and stand-bystand descriptions and management
recommendations.
Individual landowners’ objectives
vary of course, some putting priority
on long-term timber income, some on
hunting, some on general recreation
and aesthetics, etc. However, regardless
of the primary objective, the plans
need to address soil and water quality;
wildlife habitat; aesthetics; and if
present on the property, protection of
threatened or endangered plants and
HOWto
animals; and archaeological, cultural,
and historic resources.
Approving the Plan
In Georgia, a District Stewardship
Forester with the Georgia Forestry
Commission, a Wildlife Biologist
with the Wildlife Resources Division
of the Georgia Department of
Natural Resources, and a District
Soils Conservationist from the USDA
Natural Resource Conservation Service
(NRCS) must approve the plans. Once
a Forest Stewardship Plan has been
approved, and specific activities and
prescriptions called for in the plan
have been implemented (usually
takes several years), those same
representatives conduct inspections
and review the activities conducted,
then if approving, grant Stewardship
Forest Certification. When certified,
the landowner receives a Stewardship
Forest metal sign, and a wooden plaque
naming them as an Outstanding Forest
Steward.
Implementation of the Plan
Among the specific plan activities that
we implemented were prescribed burns,
logging road stabilization and seeding,
boundary line painting, spraying to
kill invasive plant species (Chinese
privet and non-native turf grasses in
clearings), and creating several twoto three-acre wildlife openings in a
2005 site-prepared loblolly plantation.
Through the cooperation and
assistance of the NRCS we were able to
obtain significant cost sharing through
QUIP and WHIP. As I understand it, it
is easier to get such cost sharing money
approved if it will be used as part of an
approved Stewardship Forest plan.
One of Gail’s and my primary reasons
for joining the Forest Stewardship
Program was to help develop an
appreciation for stewardship of natural
resources and enjoyment of field and
forest in our family. Between us, we have
six daughters, eight grandchildren,
and five sons-in-law. We started a
FOREST LANDOWNER
tradition two years ago of assembling
the entire family at our home one or
two weekends before Christmas for a
family holiday dinner and the next day
taking the entire group on a two-mile
Stewardship Forest nature hike and
picnic. Along the way, we stop and
discuss conservation, diversity, timber,
and wildlife management practices,
and note the improvements that have
been made. We find and identify
animal tracks, pick and eat wild
persimmons, and gather greenery and
red berries for Christmas decorations.
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010
7
HOWto...
Conclusion
It is my opinion, based on extensive
experience in buying and selling
timberland, that Stewardship Forest
Certification of private lands,
especially relatively small ownerships
(under 1,000 acres and definitely
under 500 acres) will enhance the
market value of the property. I
certainly do not want to discount
the importance of well-managed
timber as a significant source of
value. Still, Stewardship Forest plans
can be implemented to serve all the
objectives mentioned above with only
a very small sacrifice of commercial
timber production. Many private
buyers of timberland tracts today
want the property to include some
hardwood stands, be well managed
for wildlife, and often provide an
attractive site for a vacation cabin or
rural homesite.
8
To learn more about the Stewardship
Forest Program contact a forester with
your State forestry agency (often a
County or District Forester), or discuss it
with a consulting forester. Information
about the national program can be
obtained by following this link: www.
fs.fed.us/spf/coop/programs/loa/fsp.
shtml
About the Author
Ted Bush is a “mostly” retired consulting
forester. A consulting member of the
Forest Landowner Association, he
served for many years on the Board
of Directors and on the Executive
Committee and as a Regional Vice
President. He is a Georgia Registered
Forester and Real Estate Broker.
www.forestlandowners.com
What is Your Land Worth?
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LANDOWNERtoLANDOWNER
The Forest Landowners Association recently asked its members, “How do you get your children, grandchildren,
and other heirs interested in your forestland?”
Our children grew up on the farm. Walking and trail riding
through the woods as well as the harvesting and planting of
trees are an integral part of their heritage. We consider ourselves to be very fortunate to have been able to bring up our
family in this environment. We are continuing this with our
grandchildren.
—Hugh Lentile, Chester, GA
Take them hunting on the property. Once they enjoy utilizing the property for this purpose you begin to explore how to
perpetuate family ownership of the property through profitable
forest managment so that the land can continue to be available
for hunting. Utilizing the enjoyable aspect of hunting, children,
grandchildren and other heirs are more likely to buy into the
business aspects of keeping ownership of the forest land in the
family. In final analysis, the enjoyment will, hopefully, be more
than just hunting.
—R. Ford, Ebony, VA
Most family members are stockholders in the family company
They attend annual stockholder meetings which serve also as family reunions. Stockholders are encouraged to visit family lands.
Some of them camp out, fish, or recreate on the properties.
—Kirk Rodgers, Falls Church, Virginia
Enjoy it with them. Do fun stuff, build forts, got target shooting,
play paint ball, pick berries, have picnics.
—Bill Stewart, Grays Harbor County, WA
We live out-of-state, so we built a small cottage in a patch of
long-leaf forest. We spend holidays there and hope that our
sons will continue to do so as they grow older and marry. Our
college-age sons know the land is paying for college, and that is
important. Plus, we clear fire lanes together and visit with the
forester annually for an inspection of the land.
—Anne Collins, Stillwater, OK
Bring them out to the plantation where they can ride around
and count trees, eat food grown here, and collect eggs from the
chicken house. Do your best to make your property a model of
10
www.forestlandowners.com
forest management so that they will have pride and love of the
land. After 10 generations of family living on our land here in
Twiggs County, we’re pretty intense about our heritage.
—Roselane Leavell, Bullard GA
Just as my father had done for me, I started by getting my children in the woods at an early age. These early trips consists of
walks through our forest or maybe a ride on the ATV. As my
children grew, so did their interest in our forest. There seemed
to always be something of interest going on at “the farm” as we
refer to our property. From fishing in our small pond, to the
weekend hunting adventures, my children’s love for the farm
and the activities taking place there grew as they did. And now
as young adults, my children view the farm as a place where
they can soak up the peace and solitude it offers. And don’t forget, I always expected enough work from them on things such
as fence mending, tree planting and boundary maintenance
that they too have developed a sense of pride in owning a piece
of God’s earth.
—Paul Padgett, Brewton, AL
By keeping them involved in the long range planning and
spending a “day in the woods” with them, at least 3-4 times a
year. At these outings we discussed the history of the property
and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to our
planning.
—Mark Karnes, Arkadelphia, AR
By planning fun activities on site such as picnics, hayrides,
campouts, or other fun events. It’s easier to teach them about
ownership, planning and responsibility if they are actually on
site and enjoying themselves.
—Brad Dethero, Florence, AL
Sharing the proceeds helps.
—Ralph Willoughby, Salley, SC
By taking them to the woods early and often and introducing
them and making them comfortable with being in the woods. I
have found if you carefully choose your first experiences with your
LANDOWNERtoLANDOWNER
children and granchildren to make sure those first experiences
are good, they develop a lifelong love of enjoying the woods.
—Don Heath, Hoover, AL
Let them participate in the management decisions. Explain the
pros vs the cons and how it will affect them. They must participate in maintenance of plantation if they want benefits. Accept
their decisions.
—Jim Dunn, Lebanon, IL
My two sons were raised with a mom who was a Realtor, and
a U.S. Coast Guard father whose dream was to own a farm,
so they were hatched with land in their genes. They watched
their parents achieve their goals and dreams and were part of
the plan. They helped us build a 3,600 sq. ft. log cabin, knowing they would always have a home here. We put the farm in a
Living Trust in 2003. They were made aware of the importance
of that decision. As I learn things, I pass it on to them. I have
told them that this is their retirement. They love the farm and
value it just like their parents. I am confident that when the
time comes they will know what to do. They have been raised
up knowing the different programs for both agriculture and
forest land. They sat in when we were creating the forestry plan
in 2004. They have watched a tree harvest and the re-planting
and are amazed at how fast the second-generation pines are
growing. I am a small landowner by most standards, just 436
acres, but each acre has a purpose and a goal. My boys know
that and they look forward to seeing the farm achieve as much
as possible while keeping it in agricultural/forestry use.
—Duane Preston, Ivor, VA
My children were around when their grandfather, William
Morgan, planned and planted his pine trees. They went with
him frequently to watch the progression of the trees’ growth. It
was exciting to measure the trees and to see how fast they grew!
My son, William Henry Morgan Lloyd has always hunted in his
grandfather’s land and feels like it is a part of him. I think that
it is important to take your children and let them fish in the
ponds and hunt and enjoy the fruits of the family’s land. My
son and I both enjoy this heritage that my father provided for
us and future generations.
—Bess Watson, Greenwood, MS and Atlanta, GA
Take them with you to the tree farm, but plan something new
for each trip to include fun and adventure plus learning about
management, how trees benefit all of us, and how to make a
profit. Break up the fun and learning on each visit so as not to
lose their interest. I have never lost my boyish love of adventure
and I transfer that to them by involving them into the planning
session in person, by phone, or via Skype.
—Frank Greskovich, Pensacola, FL
We spend fun times at the farm with our children—fishing,
riding the four-wheelers, playing with the dogs, shooting skeet,
and walking in the woods. Even work projects (such as planting
cypress trees along the lakeshore, laying pine flooring in the
hall at the farmhouse, or replacing the age-old barn planking)
gets everyone busy and working together for a single achievable task. We celebrate when the task is finished with a photo
session and sometimes we even pay our “farm-hands” with an
evening out in a nice, nearby restaurant! We talk frequently
with our children about decisions related to the farm business;
we encourage them to ask questions and to make suggestions.
Also, our children recognize that occassional monetary help for
them sometimes comes out of the farm accounts, so the profitabilty of the farm is important to them, too.
—Patrice O’Brien, Brandon, MS
Take them to the tree farm and point out various items that
may interest younger people such as the diversity of plants,
wildlife and geologic features. Help them to understand that
forests protect wildlife and supply many useful things to the
FOREST LANDOWNER
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010
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LANDOWNERtoLANDOWNER
environment. For older people, help them to see the forest as
an investment that can continually provide a stream of income
over many years.
—Albert Whiteside, Columbia, SC
By showing them the importance of preserving all the things
God gave us. I already told my only daughter, who is heir to all
my property, that it is hers to enjoy and use responsibly. She
is expected to pass it on to the next generation. The beauty
and wonderment of nature is something that man can never
re-create. For $50,000 I can buy 25-50 acres of timberland or I
can buy a new truck. Have you ever stopped to think about all
the life that is on an acre of forestland that you are allowing to
have a home? Seems like a no-brainer to me
—Frank Ridel, Canfield, OH
My wife and I formed an LLC for our timberland. Each year,
we give our daughters a small percentage of ownership in the
LLC. They share in the decisions of land management. Our
grandchildren like to visit and hunt.
—W. Waldrop, Loudon, TN
We are in the process of dividing/distributing our joint family
holdings so each family-unit can better identify with “their”
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www.forestlandowners.com
property. Previously we have been joint owners, with 3-10 other
extended family members and we have been only managing
with our forester for timber. The problem as you can imagine
is, few of us really have enough ownership to be interested or
able to have much control. Especially our teenager and 20-30
something children.. I have discussed with our children their
grandfathers interest and what we are doing and why. The longterm economic of timberland is still a challenge since we really
haven’t been raised on any of this land. I take some of our girls
to an FLA annual meeting and to a Fly-In to DC which was also
an education in more ways than one.
—Ed Harris, Raleigh, NC
Bring them to the woods and let them have freedoms they
don’t have at home. All my kids learned to drive an old truck
in the woods. Using a compas, they went on a scavenger hunt.
All shot their first gun (and game) and fished there. Each time
they are there, they spend at least some time with our forester
talking about what’s going on. When they were younger it was
big equipment and fire that attracted them. Now they are more
in tune with the growth cycle and it as a business. Even our 20
year old, goes to find the tree with the fishing bobber tied to it
that was planted the year she was born to see how big it is.
—William Hodges, Durham, NC

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