Jul 15 - Cascadia Weekly

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Jul 15 - Cascadia Weekly
ALAN RHODES, P.6 Š .0(( -- + -/*-4ƒ+‚x} Š RUMOR HAS IT, P.20
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REPORTING FROM THE
HEART OF CASCADIA
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WHATCOM SKAGIT ISLAND LOWER B.C.
07.08.09 :: #27, v.04 :: !-
ª
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*!!/# #-/.„ OUR LIFE IN GRAPHS, P.8
''$)"#(+-$ „ OUT AND ABOUT, P.13
*
2#//# # &„ INDIE ACTION IN ANACORTES, P.20
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/# !0)&›$)!0. SOUNDS
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
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OF THE ACORN PROJECT WILL KICK OFF THE
FIRST DOWNTOWN SOUNDS CONCERT OF THE
SEASON JULY 8 ON BAY STREET. THE FREE
OUTDOOR GIGS CONTINUE WEEKLY THROUGH
AUG. 12, SO PLAN AHEAD
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
A glance at what’s happening this week
Bellingham Farmers Market: 10am-3pm, Depot
Market Square
Street Law: 1-4pm, Railroad Avenue
Gay Pr ide Show: 6pm, Rumors Cabaret
07.08.09
WEDNESDAY
GET OUT
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
ON STAGE
2
Chuckanut Foot Race: 9am, Marine Park
Butter flies Are Free: 7:30pm, Walton Theatre
VISUAL ARTS
MUSIC
Festival of Ar ts: 9am-9pm, Lummi Island Congregational Church
Ar t by the Bay: 10am-5pm, Utsalady Elementary,
Camano Island
Ar tists’ Yard Sale: 10am-6pm, Camano Island
Color Me Wearable: 11am-3pm, La Conner Quilt
Museum
Elusive Elements and Ellen Solod Reception:
2-5pm, MoNA, La Conner
Becky Fletcher Reception: 5-8pm, Smith & Vallee
Gallery, Edison
Ar t Feeds: 7pm, Eagles Hall
Mhur i Mar imba Ensemble: Noon, Performing
Arts Center Plaza
GET OUT
Chowder Char ter: 6pm, Squalicum Harbor
07.09.09
THURSDAY
ON STAGE
The Star-Spangled Girl: 7:30pm, Walton Theatre
Good, Bad, Ugly: 8pm, Upfront Theatre
Bard on the Beach: Through Sept. 26 at Vanier
Park, Vancouver, B.C.
07.12.09
SUNDAY
MUSIC
ON STAGE
Amber Darland: 6-8pm, Elizabeth Park
The Compleat Works: 6pm, Whatcom Community
College
The Star-Spangled Girl: 7:30pm, Walton Theatre
Comedy Night: 8pm, Fairhaven Pub
COMMUNITY
Pr ide Kickof f Bar Crawl: 7:30pm, WTA Station
Traveling Wall: On display through June 12, Sunnyland Memorial Park
07.10.09
FRIDAY
ON STAGE
Doubt: 7:30pm, Walton Theatre
Games Galore: 9pm, Upfront Theatre
# '+. -*›2**'' 4
ARTIST BECKY FLETCHER CELEBRATE
HER NEW SERIES OF PAINTINGS,
APTLY DUBBED “ROCKS & TREES,” AT
AN OPENING RECEPTION JULY 11 AT
EDISON’S SMITH & VALLEE GALLERY
DANCE
Dance Sensation: 7pm, RiverBelle Dinner Theatre,
Mount Vernon
Dance Par ty: 9-11pm, U & Me Dance
MUSIC
Er ic Bibb: 7:30pm, Conway Muse
Outdoor Gather ing: 8pm, the Slab, Ferndale
COMMUNITY
Everson-Nooksack Summer Festival: Today and
tomorrow, Everson City Park
Pr ide Silent Auction: 9pm, Rumors Cabaret
VISUAL ARTS
Festival of Ar ts: 8am-9pm, Lummi Island Congregational Church
Ar tists’ Yard Sale: 10am-6pm, Camano Island
07.11.09
SATURDAY
ON STAGE
The Compleat Works: 2pm, Whatcom Community
College
Pinocchio: 3pm and 7pm, Mount Baker Theatre
Butter flies Are Free: 7:30pm, Walton Theatre
Director ’s Cut: 9pm, Upfront Theatre
DANCE
Dance Sensation: 7pm, RiverBelle Dinner Theatre,
Mount Vernon
Contra Dance: 7:30-10pm, Glen Echo Community
Club, Everson
Tango by the Bay: 8-11pm, Squalicum Yacht Club
MUSIC
Breakfest: 11am-midnight, Common Ground Coffee
House, Burlington
Haynie Opr y: 3pm and 7pm, Haynie Grange, Custer
The Chr yslers: 7pm, Boulevard Park
Lonestar: 7pm and 9:30pm, Skagit Valley Casino
Resort
MaD Fusion: 7:30pm, Blaine Performing Arts Center
Festival of Music Concer t: 7:30pm, WWU Performing Arts Center
FILM
Kung Fu Panda: Dusk, Fairhaven Village Green
COMMUNITY
Skagit Valley Highland Games: 9am-6pm, Edgewater Park, Mount Vernon
Ferndale Farmers Market: 9am-3pm, the Riverwalk
MUSIC
Festival Chamber Players: 2pm and 6pm, Bellingham Cruise Terminal
Organ Society Concert: 3pm, Mount Baker Theatre
Yambique: 3-6pm, Fairhaven Village Green
COMMUNITY
Skagit Valley Highland Games: 9am-6pm, Edgewater Park, Mount Vernon
Pr ide Parade: 11am, Bellingham High School
Eat Local Food Fest: 12-3pm, Cordata Co-op
Vines & Twines: 3-6pm, Boundary Bay Brewery
GET OUT
Padden MTN Pedal: 10am, Lake Padden
VISUAL ARTS
Ar t by the Bay: 10am-5pm, Utsalady Elementary,
Camano Island
Ar tists’ Yard Sale: 10am-6pm, Camano Island
Open House: 12-5pm, Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood
07.13.09
MONDAY
WORDS
Seabur y Blair, Jr.: 7pm, Village Books
Poetr y Night: 8pm, the Darkroom
9
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FREE ALL-DAY CLASSIC ROCK FESTIVAL
542
5
542
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Saturday, July 18. Gates open at 11am.
Entertainment begins at noon. See website
at nooksackcasinos.com for all acts and full
Summer Concert schedule.
WWW.NOOKSACKCASINOS.COM U 1.877.935.9300 U 5048 MOUNT BAKER HIGHWAY U DEMING WA 98244
FOOD 34
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
WORDS 13
CASCADIA WEEKLY
539
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
Tickets on sale June 14,
online and in person at
Nooksack River Casino.
General Admission: $50
Reserved: $75
CURRENTS 8
Wednesday,
July 29
VIEWS 6
GRETCHEN
WILSON
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS 28
NOOKSACK RIVER CASINO
3
MAIL
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
THIS ISSUE
“I want to say, and
this is very important:
at the end we lucked
out. It was luck that
prevented nuclear
war. We came that
close to nuclear war
at the end. Rational
individuals: Kennedy
was rational; Khrushchev was rational;
Castro was rational.
Rational individuals
came that close to total destruction of their societies. And
that danger exists today.”
—ROBERT S. MCNAMARA, FORMER U.S. SECRETARY OF DEFENSE AND THE
PROCLAIMED “ARCHITECT OF THE VIETNAM WAR,” WHO DIED AT THE AGE OF 93
ON MONDAY
VIEWS & NEWS
4: We’ve got mail
6: Watching Whatcom
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
8: Off the charts
11: Last week’s news
12: Crimes of the times
ART & LIFE
13: The Pride of Bellingham
14: Bucks in the bar
WORDS 13
18: Art and action
20: What the Heck?
24: One word: Bruno
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
27: Moon landing
REAR END
28: Services, Ogg’s World, Troubletown
29: Wellness
30: Advice Goddess, Sudoku
31: Crossword
32: This Modern World, Tom the Dancing
Bug
33: Free Will Astrology
07.08.09
DO IT 2
34: Any way you slice it
#27.04
mail
Cascadia Weekly:
D 360.647.8200
Editorial
Editor & Publisher:
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D ext 260
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cascadiaweekly.com
CONT ENT S
CREDI T S
L E T T ER S
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16: Theater in the round
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Contact
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©2009 CASCADIA WEEKLY (ISSN 1931-3292) is published each Wednesday by
Cascadia Newspaper Company LLC. Direct all correspondence to: Cascadia Weekly
PO Box 2833 Bellingham WA 98227-2833 | Phone/Fax: 360.647.8200
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ALAN RHODES, P.6Š.0(( -- + -/*-4ƒ+‚x}ŠRUMOR HAS IT, P.20
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REPORTING FROM THE
HEART OF CASCADIA
*
*
*
WHATCOM SKAGIT ISLAND LOWER B.C.
07.08.09 :: #27, v.04 :: !-
ª
‚x
*!!/# #-/.„ OUR LIFE IN GRAPHS, P.8
''$)"#(+-$ „ OUT AND ABOUT, P.13
*
2#//# # &„ INDIE ACTION IN ANACORTES, P.20
COVER ART: Willow Misterly’s
“Encompassing the Entire
Carcass”
4
NEWSPAPER ADVISORY GROUP: Robert Hall, Seth Murphy, Michael Petryni, David Syre
LAW ENFORCEMENT
A PRIORITY
I’ve been hearing about the
forced furloughs for Whatcom
County employees and I’m very
concerned about how this will
impact public safety.
Because the Sheriff’s Office
covers more than 2,000 square
miles and even now is stretched
too thin, I can’t imagine the effect on crime victims and the
general public if deputies are
forced to take time off.
Although no one likes to cut
services, there are a number of
county departments that could
and should take a hit ahead of
a public safety agency. I hope
the County Executive and the
County Council will give serious
consideration to restructuring
the budget so that the Sheriff’s
Office will receive top priority.
interests and ignoring the public’s protests as long as we have
an electoral system that requires
most of them to do that in order
to get elected. As Molly Ivins
used to say, “You gotta dance
with them what brung you.”
If the public is to own the
system, there is no choice but
to pay for it. Publicly financed
elections would not be cheap,
but compared to the financial
industry bailout extravaganza
and the miseries of a depression, they would be a bargain.
The “Just 6 Dollars” campaign
(youstreet.org) estimates that
as the per-person cost of publicly funded federal elections.
Compare that to the thousands
in per-person debt we have recently acquired thanks to our
government by and for the big
spenders.
—Diane Ford, Bellingham
—Karen Carlson, via email
GET WHAT YOU PAY
FOR
A SMIDGEN OF
SOCIALISM
It is useless to berate politicians for selling out to corporate
All Americans should have
a healthcare plan that affords
us the same lifelong coverage
our federal representatives in
Congress and their families
enjoy. A plan that ensures
none of their homes will be
foreclosed on due to illness
and inability to pay their
medical bills.
In order to truly control
costs and compete with private health insurance plans, a
strong public health insurance
option must be available nationwide. If it’s good enough
for our elected officials, it’s
good enough for all of us.
—Andrea Gilman, via email
DEPT OF
CORRECTIONS
In the last issue, we neglected
to give credit to Rick Hebenstreit
of Shawnee, Kansas for the awesome photo used in the “Have a
Blast!” story focusing on what to
do on the 4th of July. We regret
the error.
FOOD 34
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
WORDS 13
VIEWS 6
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
CURRENTS 8
5
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
THE GRISTLE
6
views
TEA, WITH LEMONS: They stood along the Guide
Meridian, baking in the sun. They waved colorful
flags in support of the grand past of the nation’s
independence; they chopped the air with signs
critical of the nation and fearful of the future.
Symbolic of their movement, Bellingham’s second
TEA Party anti-government rally was a mile long
and one person deep. Symbolic of their movement, their numbers were impressive and responsive to traffic jams and fenderbenders, ubiquitous
fast-food chains, auto detailers and mega-marts.
In the half-life of their outrage, there were perhaps 1,200 teabaggers at the peak of weekend activity, half the number present at their first outing April 15. Their anti-tax snarl was of similarly
diminished volume as Whatcom County Council
collected the measure of their mini-initiative.
(Bless ’em, the council discussed the proposal in their roughhouse way—whether they
should voluntarily restrict their ability to raise
taxes—then decided 4-3 against it. Or rather,
they decided to continue what they’ve been doing, which is to voluntarily restrict their ability
to raise taxes for going on 16 years now. About
as many folks showed up to thank them for that
restraint as showed up to foam and claw the air
about the county’s arrogant excesses.)
These dwindling events are more than a little
heartbreaking, for this is all we have for populism and organized protest. It’s not hard to like
these people, their passion; but it sure is hard to
like what they’re advocating.
Heartbreaking, to think this is to be the spectrum of discourse in county politics this season:
career politicians versus stooges fronted by the
Building Industry Association. Taxes, as an organizing principle… in a county that doesn’t
raise taxes.
Heartbreaking, to think of these people: full of
angst and anger at their perceived loss of quality
of life, gathering at Whatcom BIA headquarters to
decorate signs supplied by real estate developers
and resellers from a list of narrowly authorized
and approved pro-corporate slogans, then bused
to the asphalt outskirts of the mega-retailers,
companies who’ve outsourced to Red China their
means of income and even the clothes on their
backs, in order to express their anguish to return
to “a better America” that simply promises more
of the same—more development, more outsourcing, more angst and anguish. More injustice.
“You know you’re a peasant when you worship
the very people who are right now, this minute,
conning you and taking your shit. Whatever the
master does, you’re on board,” Rolling Stone columnist Matt Taibbi commented in April. “A good
peasant is loyal, simpleminded, and full of misdirected anger. And that’s what we’ve got now, a
lot of misdirected anger searching around for a
non-target to mis-punish.”
But, understand the strategy—because the
lords of the manorhouse are never so blundering
as the peasants in the field.
Even when they are discredited and disorganized, unable to front reasonable candidates for
office, the lords of the manor can still retain the
power to control local government by advocat-
OP INIONS
T HE GR I S T L E
BY ALAN RHODES
Watching Over Whatcom
A CHANGING OF THE GUARD AT WHATCOM WATCH
IF I were asked to pick the three
best newspapers in Whatcom County,
I’d name Cascadia Weekly (naturally),
the Bellingham Business Journal, and
Whatcom Watch. Of the three, Whatcom
Watch puts the greatest demands on
readers, but delivers stories with a
depth you’ll seldom see elsewhere. Focusing largely, but not exclusively, on
local environmental issues, the paper
assumes a readership that won’t be intimidated by a 12,000-word, four-part
series on a weighty subject, footnoted, with statistical charts, bar graphs
and a polysyllabic lexicon.
From a modest six-page beginning in 1992, this monthly paper has
grown in size, scope and quality, with
considerable credit going to its retiring editor, Sally Hewitt, who steps
down this month after nine years at
the helm. Sally is eager to get back
to work on a novel and two screenplays she put on hold because of the
Herculean demands of editing.
Recently I drove out to Sally’s
house, tucked in the mountains of
the eastern county. As we sat on the
porch watching the hummingbirds
darting around the hanging fuchsia
baskets, we chatted about the past
and future of the paper.
Cascadia Weekly: Who reads Whatcom Watch?
Sally Hewitt: We have around 7,500
readers throughout the county.
People involved in local government read us, and people interested in the environment. Generally
we have an educated and politically astute readership. But not everybody likes us. I remember one guy
waving a copy in front of County
Council and calling us a “commie
rag.” And at one time a county li-
brary asked us to remove the paper
because of complaints.
CW: How do you answer people who
say the paper is too demanding and
technical?
SH: (laughing) They can read the Herald.
CW: What articles that appeared during your tenure are you especially
happy about?
SH: John Rawlins’ series on Peak Oil
was one of our best. Since it appeared the City of Bellingham has
established a Peak Oil Task Force.
And we’ve had great work from
Robyn du Pré and Wendy Steffensen
on the restoration of Bellingham
Bay, and April Markiewicz has written very important pieces on the
degradation of Lake Whatcom.
CW: This is sounding like a Who’s Who
of local environmental superstars.
SH: Yes, definitely. And we’ve loved
Joe Meche’s columns on birding,
and all the informative pieces Ken
Wilcox has written. And we’ve been
really lucky to have George Jartos’
political cartoons. He’s world famous and we have him in the Watch.
There is so much amazing talent in
this county!
CW: What are some of the things the
Watch is doing that aren’t getting
done elsewhere?
SH: Your editor, Tim Johnson, once
told me that our raison d’être was
our voting reports.
VIEWS EXPRESSED ARE NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF CASCADIA WEEKLY
CW: Those are great—every month a
record of how every member of City
Council, County Council and the Port
Commission voted on every issue!
Nobody else does that.
SH: Another thing we do is give our
writers almost unlimited wordage.
They can fully explore the topic,
and if it’s too long it can become a
two- or three-part piece. You’ll see
footnotes in many of our articles.
We like depth and documentation.
CW: Any sadness about leaving?
SH: Oh, sure, but I’m leaving the
paper in capable hands. The new
editor, Emily Linroth, is a perfect
fit. She’s an environmentalist who’s
completing a degree at Western
in environmental journalism. Emily brings way more experience to
the paper than I had in June 2000.
She worked on Huxley’s The Planet
magazine for two years. During the
2008–09 school year she was the
editor in chief and also won two
journalism department awards for
her leadership on the magazine.
Sally and I continued our talk as
she showed me around her native
plant garden, and then it was time
for me to head back to town. Driving along the Mt. Baker Highway on
a beautiful summer afternoon, I was
once again enraptured by the extraordinary beauty of the place where
we live. There are people who would
destroy that without a thought, all in
the pursuit of quick profits. It’s good
to know that Whatcom Watch is keeping an eye on things.
Whatcom Watch is available
throughout the county at libraries,
markets, coffee shops, etc.; subscribe
at: whatcomwatch.org
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
Excellent
(ALF0OUND"URGERS
GET OUT 14
4HE"EST
0AN&RIED/YSTERS
WORDS 13
#OCKTAILS
CURRENTS 8
Exit 221
/NLY3ECONDS
7ESTOFTHE&REEWAY
SUMMER REPERTORY THEATRE
Theatre - in - the - Round
#27.04
3 CAPTIVATING PLAYS, 6 NIGHTS A WEEK!
JULY 8-AUG 1
TUES-SAT 7:30PM
SUN 3PM
$18
plus
applicable
fees
JULY / AUGUST CALENDAR
Sun
Mon
5
6
12
13
19
20
S
D
B
26
Tues
Wed
B
B S
S D
D B
7
8
14
15
21
22
1
27
28
29
Thurs
Fri
Sat
S
D
B
S
D
B
S
D
B
S
D
B
9
16
23
30
10
17
24
31
11
DO IT 2
MOUNT BAKER THEATRE PRESENTS
07.08.09
(360) 445-4733
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
-AINs#ONWAY7!
Butterflies
Are Free
The
Star-Spangled Girl
Doubt,
A Parable
CASCADIA WEEKLY
ing for the slashing of public budgets
and services. While it may be true their
own agendas will not be supported by
the majority, the BIA and its allies can
still thwart a more progressive agenda
from the sidelines and in the minority.
And to the manor-born go the spoils.
Yet, what is the majority?
As we mentioned last week and present in greater detail this week, a recent
survey commissioned by the Whatcom
Legacy Project attempts to get at the
values most people share. And we find
most people share them with great
passion and conviction and stability.
Heartbreaking, that the construction
lobby and their allies get to control so
much of our dialogue, when their values are expressed by as little as 12 percent (and in no case greater than 20
percent) of the general population.
Heartbreaking, that the greatest contributors to the expansion of local government (and its percolation upward to
bloat state and national government)
are the externalized and distributed
costs of growth: police, fire and public
infrastructure all grow in tandem with
policies the BIA and its allies support.
And these organizations then have
the gall to publicly support the most
regressive of means to finance it all.
Small wonder the teabaggers are enraged beyond comprehension, just not
at the real culprits who are, as Taibbi
notes, “taking their shit.”
“If you’re not careful, issues can
become polarized and bogged down,”
warns Adam Davis, a consultant who
helped prepare the survey.
“When you have an understanding
of a representative cross-section of
your community, it can introduce the
middle ground on many of those issues
and therefore introduce something new
into the discussion.
“Decision makers can then say
they’re hearing each end of the spectrum. But decision makers also have an
obligation to hear from the middle of
the spectrum. And they must balance
all beliefs and values, all desires for
what Whatcom County is going to look
like in 50 years,” Davis explained.
“You can then say, ‘Come on, let’s
get together on some of these issues’
because a majority of residents are not
in the camps of any extreme.
“Knowing this information can introduce healthier, more inclusive discussions and stronger and better public policy and planning decisions,” he
said.
Without that knowledge, all we’ve
left is hot water and a misreading of
washed-up tea leaves.
FOOD 34
THE GRISTLE
18
25
B = Butterflies Are Free
S = Star Spangled Girl D = Doubt, A Parable
Cast
Includes:
Patrick Dizney
Zach Harrison
Acclaimed WWU Professor
with multiple TV credits
WWU Summer Stock veteran
performing off-Broadway
www.mountbakertheatre.com . 360.734.6080
7
news
VIEWS 6
07.08.09
SUPPORT INVESTING IN PUBLIC TRANSIT
AND TRAILS VS. NEW ROADS
46%
Public Transit and
Trails (strong support)
22%
Public Transit and Trails
WHATCOM EXPRESSES STRONG
VALUES AND BELIEFS
2%
Neither
2%
Don’t Know
11%
SUPPORT ADDING HOUSES IN NEIGHBORHOODS VS.
CONVERTING FARMLAND TO RESIDENCES
Roads
18%
Roads
56%
Add houses in
existing
neighborhoods
(strong support)
25%
Add houses in
existing
neighborhoods
SUPPORT DEVELOPERS RATHER THAN TAXPAYERS
PAYING FOR NEW PUBLIC SERVICES
2%
60%
Neither
#27.04
CASCADIA WEEKLY
briefs
*!!
/# #-/.
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
commentary
BY TIM JOHNSON
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
currents
22%
8%
Convert working
farmland for
growth
CHARTS AND GRAPHICS BY JESSE KINSMAN
Developers
should pay
(strong support)
rtt)
8%
Convert
working
farmland
for growth
Developers
should pay
2%
Don’t Know
5%
Taxpayers
should pay
8
KEY: SURVEY RESPONDENTS WERE GIVEN HARD CHOICES. THEN THEY WERE ASKED HOW STRONGLY THEY BELIEVED IN THE
CHOICES THEY MADE. STRONG COLORS EQUAL STRONGLY HELD VALUES AND BELIEFS, LIGHTER COLORS LESS STRONG.
7%
Taxpayers
should pay
4%
2%
Neither
Don’t Know
Traffic congestion will cost the county new jobs
58%
Growth will be concentrated in existing cities, and working
farmland and forested foothills will be left undeveloped
69%
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
Likely
Desirable
I AGREE:
Planning for growth needs to be done over the next 50 years
89%
to assure a high quality of life for residents in 2060
81%
8% 81%
78%
8% 13%
New neighborhoods with higher-density development are OK if
they are carefully designed and provide open space
Over next 50 years, having one more housing unit per block in
my neighborhood is a reasonable price to pay to keep farmland
from being developed
67%
10%
20%
If everyone else does too, I am willing to have more people in
my neighborhood so that less rural open space next to cities
will have to be developed
44%
14%
41%
Local government ought to try to slow down population
growth
24%
0%
8%
We have plenty of room for growth and shouldn’t worry about
66%
20%
40%
60%
cities/towns spreading out as they grow
80%
100%
Strongly/Somewhat Agree
Neutral
DK
Strongly/Somewhat Disagree
WHATCOM COUNTY SHOULD FOCUS ON:
28%
55%
15%
57%
24%
52%
29%
11%
39%
20%
Retain rural open spaces for recreation and wildlife
20%
47%
60%
Revitalize town and city centers
Set aside more land, other than working farmland, for
residential development and businesses
70%
40%
Protect drinking water quality
Protect working farmland
32%
46%
20%
0%
14%
Open up working farmland for businesses and residential
developments throughout the county
80%
100%
Urgent
High
Medium
Low
CHARTS, CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
FOOD 34
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
61%
27%
ART 18
86%
STAGE 16
There will be more family-wage jobs
63%
GET OUT 14
71%
40%
WORDS 13
Economic growth will receive greater emphasis than
environmental protection
More people will be living in my neighborhood
CURRENTS 8
73%
46%
VIEWS 6
87%
MAIL 4
Use of public transit, biking and walking, as alternatives to
the automobile, will increase significantly
79%
DO IT 2
30%
2
07.08.09
Whatcom County’s current population will double
#27.04
89%
county as a whole,” he said.
“It’s encouraging to see such
solidarity across rural and urban areas,” Davis said. “But you
have a very large investment in
protecting and preserving your
quality of life.
“You often hear about an
urban-rural divide. But when it
comes to these kinds of values,
it cuts across political parties
and, yes, transcends politics.”
In fact, the major split was
not along lines of identity, but
whether respondents were generally optimistic or pessimistic
about the future.
The survey found “residents
were evenly split as to whether
the county will be a better or
worse place to live in the next
50 years, with older residents
and those living on working
farms” among the more pessimistic. While nine residents in
10 believe the county’s population will double within 50 years,
only a third were really eager for
that outcome.
“Younger and shorter term residents, urbanites, and those with
smaller incomes were more supportive of growth and expansion
in the county, however they did
find the conservation of natural
areas, high density development,
and the use of alternative modes
of transportation as very important elements of growth and development.” They were also, the
survey found, a bit more optimistic about the future.
“More optimistic residents
thought the county would practice smart growth as it developed. They believe the outcome
of planned growth will be positive,” Davis reported, “while
those who thought it would be
a worse place to live reported
their concerns about population
growth and the potential loss of
undeveloped and natural areas
as the county grows.”
Planning, an overwhelming
number of respondents said, was
key to ensuring community goals
were achieved.
“Elements of planning for
which residents showed their
support were high density
growth in cities and existing
neighborhoods so less natural
space and working farmland
will need to be developed in
CASCADIA WEEKLY
WHAT IS LIKELY TO HAPPEN OVER THE NEXT 50 YEARS?
WHAT IS DESIRABLE TO HAPPEN?
hatcom
County
has a reputation
for feisty politics,
as liberals and
conservatives—city
dwellers
and country folks, slicks and
hicks—vie for control of the
area’s destiny.
Beneath that is a remarkably
robust and durable set of values
and beliefs that belie divisive
politics, a recent survey shows.
Our values, it seems, are not so
different as our differing politics might suggest.
“It really is interesting to
learn how solid this community is,” Seth Cool observed.
Cool was a coordinator for the
Whatcom Legacy Project, which
sponsored the valies and beliefs
survey. Funded by a grant from
Whatcom County government
and supported by large steering
and advisory committees drawn
from all sectors of the community, the project’s goals are to
collect suitable data to help
map out a desirable future for
county residents.
The first step, obviously, was
to discover what residents desired. The project hired Portland,
Ore., consultants Davis, Hibbitts
& Midghall to find out.
Overwhelmingly, the survey
found, “residents value the
landscape and location of Whatcom County and what those
things add to their quality of
life, including the beauty and
natural surroundings, climate,
clean environment, open spaces, and the small town feeling
and community.”
The DHM consultants contacted more than 400 county
residents during one week last
January. Results from their
20-minute survey were compared against current Census
data to ensure the sampling was
representative of gender, age,
length of residency, type of area
of residence, and incomes typical to Whatcom County.
“The data is right on the
money,” in terms of representing ages, income and geographic
distribution of residents,” Adam
Davis explained. Davis presented the data to Bellingham City
Council last week. Whatcom
County Council saw a similar
presentation in May. “It’s a great
snapshot of where you are as a
9
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
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VIEWS 6
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07.08.09
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MAIL 4
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F ROM PAGE 9
the future,” Davis said. “In fact,
residents greatly value preserving
working farmland, natural areas, and
open spaces used by wildlife and for
recreational activities. In addition,
residents reported it is both important and desirable to invest in more
public transit and trails as the county develops.”
STRONG COMMITMENT TO
DIFFICULT CHOICES
)471*!495.3:11
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
Eff!Xjmefsnvui!BSOQ!! XpnfoÖt!Ifbmui!Ovstf!Qsbdujujpofs!'!Dmbttjdbm!Ipnfpqbui
CHART S,
671-3414
THE NUMBERS
Survey respondents showed remarkable comprehension of the difficult choice between infill of existing neighborhoods, and the threat
that places on the character of those
neighborhoods, versus spreading
into fertile farmlands. “If everyone
else does too,” the survey asked, “I
am willing to have more people in my
neighborhood so that less rural open
space next to cities will have to be
developed”—nearly seven out of 10
respondents said they agreed with
this statrement.
The question was paired with another, describing one additional
housing unit per block in neighborhoods as a reasonable price to pay to
preserve farmland. Nearly nine in 10
agreed that sounded reasonable.
“I have found, across the county,
that discussions about infill and
density, urban renewal, will always
be shut down unless you qualify the
discussion, qualitatively and quantitatively,” Davis noted. “People have
to have an idea of what you mean by
higher density. But if you give people an idea of what levels of density
you’re talking about, and whether it
will be accompanied by such things
as open space, whether the distribution will be fair and equitable,
that helps a lot. Because people are
fearful.”
Interestingly, the survey was conducted at a particularly fearful time,
following an uneasy cascade of economic crisis and truculent and divisive national politics.
“Current events don’t always impact public opinion,” Davis said,
“but it should be noted that this
survey was conducted with heightened media attention to a banking
crisis, major downturns in domestic
and international markets, and the
unemployment rate reaching close
to 6.5 percent nationally.” Despite
the gloom, respondents were fairly
evenly split on optimism toward the
future.
“While majorities of residents
found it likely that the county will
double in size, [they believe] economic growth will receive more emphasis than environmental protection,” Davis said. Not all were certain
this was a desirable outcome.
“Trends residents found desirable
were the increased use of public
transit, biking, and walking as alternatives to the automobile, more
family-wage jobs, and growth concentrated in existing cities while
working farmland and forested foothills are left undeveloped,” the survey found.
In terms of who should pay to bring
public services like water, sewer and
roads to their property, residents
were significantly more likely to think
it should be paid by developers and
not by taxpayers.
“Some people felt ‘someone else’
should pay, obviously, as a matter of
what seems equitable,” Davis commented. “But, also, there’s a segment who just oppose growth.”
The survey gets at that in different ways.
“I always like to ask the question
about quality of drinking water and
compare it to other places,” Davis
explained. “It is the iconic environmental issue.
“One quarter—28 percent—of your
residents believe protection of drinking water to be an urgent priority.
Another 55 percent ranked it among
the highest priorities for local government over the next 50 years,” Davis said. “That is a very strong public
commitment.”
Farmland protection carried similar conviction.
“Three out of four—72 percent—believe farmland protection to be a top
priority. These results are remarkably
consistent,” Davis observed. “All the
more so, because we asked the question multiple times in different ways.
Northwesterners understand and
support the need for economic development, Davis said. “But be careful
about that. They support it as long
as it doesn’t jeopardize what they
value about living here.
“Your natural beauty just blows
people’s socks off. And your residents are willing to commit to hard
choices to preserve that.”
THE WEEK IN REVIEW
07.01.09
WEDNESDAY
The City of Sumas files a complaint with Gov. Christine Gregoire to
oppose a gravel mine in Abbottsford, B.C., because of fears the 85-acre
gravel pit may threated the city’s aquifer. The Canadian company reports
it has been mining 30 acres adjacent to the new site with no water
quality-concerns.
07.03.09
FRIDAY
Fireworks, carelessly tossed into a dry
field, touches off a large grass fire near
Ten Mile Creek. The blaze burns half an
acre before crews are able to extinguish it.
A lawyer for former NFL quarterback Ryan Leaf tells reporters a fugitive
action filed against the former football player in Whatcom County has
been dismissed. The Whatcom County Prosecutor filed an interstate fugitive case against Leaf after he was arrested in Blaine last month while on
his way to Texas to face drug and burglary charges. While Leaf does not
have to retun to the area, charges against him in Texas are in effect.
The Panther Creek Fire in the Ross Lake recreation area
continues to burn
07.04.09
SATURDAY
Meridian for a second round of TEA Party
tax protests.
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
More than 1,000 Whatcom County residents gather on the Guide
To the east, a fire near Panther Creek
on a remote slope in the Ross Lake National Recreation Area—first reported June
28—continues to burn. The fire, started
by a lightning strike, has consumed approximately 123 acres of a heavily forested area in extremely steep terrain on the
east flank of Ruby Mountain.
ART 18
Calls pour into 911 to report an early
morning fire on Portage Island across
the bay from Bellingham. Fire crews from
Whatcom County Fire District 8, Lummi
Natural Resources, and Washington State
Department of Natural Recourses cut a
fire break but are unable to get adequate
water to extinguish the smoldering fire
until tides permit boat and water pump
access. The cause of the blaze is under
investigation.
STAGE 16
SUNDAY
GET OUT 14
THAT WAS
WORDS 13
07.05.09
CURRENTS 8
ee
IL CAFFE RIFUGIO
CASCADIA WEEKLY
THE
The State Patrol says drugs or alcohol
were involved in a fatal wrong-way crash
on I-5 in Bellingham. Troopers say a
22-year-old Bellingham man was driving
north in the southbound lanes when he
collided with a pickup truck and was fatally injured. The other driver, a 25-yearold Mount Vernon man, is treated at St.
Joseph Hospital for his injuries.
VIEWS 6
BY TIM JOHNSON
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
CURRENTS
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INDEX
{ƒz|
FUZZ BUZZ
YOUR WEEK ON DRUGS
On July 2, four members of a Burlington
family were indicted by a federal grand
jury in Seattle for conspiracy to distribute two kilos of cocaine. The family
members were arrested in April following an arranged drug deal with an undercover police officer. The defendants
were originally charged in Whatcom
County Superior Court. After consultation with the Whatcom County Prosecutors Office and the Northwest Regional
Drug Task Force (NWRDTF), the case was
referred for federal prosecution. The effort was assisted by detectives from
the Whatcom County Sheriff’s
Department, the Bellingham
Police Department, the Ferndale Police Department, the
Washington State Patrol, and
an agent of the U.S. Border
Patrol assisted in this case by
agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives (ATF).
On June 26, a British Columbia woman
was jailed for allegedly trying to smuggle
100,000 tablets of the drug benzylpiperazine (BZP) into the United States
through the truck crossing in Blaine.
The 23-year-old reportedly had a “very
sophisticated secret compartment in the
back of a Ford Explorer” for transporting the drug, estimated at more than $1
million. Originally a worming treatment
for cattle, BZP mimics the effects of the
drug Ecstasy, border agents reported.
On June 23, a Kendall woman opened
her door to find a masked man on the
other side pointing a gun at her. He
demanded her prescription drugs. After
failing to gain entry to her house, the
man fled. He was chased by a neighbor
and a relative of the victim, who recognized the 20-year-old after he’d re-
NOT-SO-CLEAN GETAWAY
On June 16, a seriously impaired driver
smashed through the front doors of a
laundromat in Blaine. The driver backed
up and fled the scene. “Officers paralleled
the driver’s trail through front and side
yards down 3rd Street until they overtook
and stopped the inebriate,” Blaine Police
reported. “The 29-year-old Blaine man
was arrested and processed for DUI, and
hit-and-run driving. The damage to the
laundromat is still being tallied,” police
noted.
RELATIVE HEALTHCARE MARKET competition in Bellingham, according to U.S. Justice
Dept.’s anti-trust rating. Figures above 1,800 are considered “highly concentrated” by DOJ,
meaning an absence of competition among healthcare insurance providers.
PRICE AT CLOSE
moved his mask. The pair notified deputies, who arrested the man as he was
attempting to drive off. The gun turned
out to be a toy pistol.
|
PERCENT OF BELLINGHAM’S health
insurance market held by Premera Blue
Cross.
y
PERCENT OF BELLINGHAM’S health
insurance market held by Group Health
Cooperative.
LOCO FOR FOUR LOCO
On June 19, Bellingham
Police cited a woman after
watching her “hurrying to
guzzle down a 24-ounce can
of Four Loco” with 11 percent
alcohol content per volume.
“Upon receiving her ticket she
tore it up and made some obscene
comments,” police reported.
~
€{
COMBINED TOTAL (PERCENT) of Bellingham’s health insurance market held by two
companies.
CHANCE IN 100 a health insurance
market nationwide is considered “highly
concentrated” and non-competitive
under U.S. Justice Dept. guidelines.
xy„y€
{y¾
GROWTH IN HEALTH insurance costs per
family versus growth in U.S. wages, 19992007 (percents).
INCREASE IN PROFITS at 10 of the
¹xyƒ~z
¹xx‚}
NET INCOME, in millions, paid to CEOs of
America’s top 10 heath insurance providers
in 2007 (428 percent increase over 2000).
ADDITIONAL EXECUTIVE PAY compen-
AUTO EROTICISM
On June 27, Bellingham Police officers
spoke sternly to a man who’d been observed driving through a neighborhood
near Whatcom Community College while
masturbating.
FLEET OF FOOT
On June 25, Bellingham Police officers
near Mac’s Motel off Samish Way observed a man running from them. Several businesses and citizens reported the
man was running in and out of yards to
avoid officers. Police eventually caught
up with the man, who explained he’d
asked a homeowner to borrow a phone
to call for help because he was being
chased. When the homeowner if the
man needed help from police, he ran off
again. He was cited for trespassing.
nation’s largest publicly traded health
insurance companies, 2000-2007, from
$2.4 billion to $12.9 billion annually.
sation, in millions, to CEOs of America’s
top 10 heath insurance providers in 2007.
SOURCES: American Medical Association, “Competition in health insurance: A comprehensive study of U.S. markets: 2007 update;” U.S. Dept. of Justice; Health Care For America
Now; U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
CURRENTS
POLICE SCANNER
CASCADIA WEEKLY
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TRUE COLORS, SHINING THROUGH
IF YOU’VE lived in Whatcom County for any
length of time, you’re likely aware this area has
a celebration for just about anything, be it Ferndale’s pioneers, Lummi Island’s artists or Fairhaven
legend Dirty Dan Harris. If you’re a good citizen,
you attend and support as many of these events
as you can, so they can return the following year,
bigger and better than ever.
Nick Milhoan, one of the organizers behind the
ATTEND
8th annual Bellingham Pride festival, wants people
WHAT: Bellingham
Pride
to know that the four-day happening—which, in
WHEN: July 9-12
addition to being a whole lot of fun, draws atWHERE: Throughout
tention to the rights of gay, lesbian, bisexual and
Bellingham
trangendered folks—is not unlike any other occurCOST: Most events
rence on the summer calendar.
are free
INFO: bhampride.org
“We need to be proud and our pride is no different than the celebration of strawberries in
Lynden, the tulips in Skagit Valley or Ski to Sea here in Bellingham,”
Milhoan says. “It’s a chance to come together as a community and en-
MON., JULY 13
POE TRY NIGHT: Sign up for Poetry Night at 8pm at
the Darkroom, 310 W. Champion St.
POETRYNIGHT.ORG
COMMUNITY
WED., JULY 8
WEDNESDAY MARKE T: The Wednesday Market can
be visited from 12-5pm weekly at the Fairhaven Village Green.
BELLINGHAMFARMERS.ORG
JULY 9-12
TRAVELING WALL: American Veterans will bring
a traveling tribute of “The Wall” to town from July
9-12 at Sunnyland Memorial Park in Bellingham.
AVTT.ORG
FOOD 34
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
CHEESY EVENTS: At 11am, Tami Parr, author of
Artisan Cheese of the Pacific Northwest, will be on
hand at the “Chefs in the Market” booth at the Bellingham Farmers Market. At 7pm, she’ll host a slide
show and share cheese samples at Village Books,
1200 11th St.
VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
STAGE 16
SAT., JULY 11
GET OUT 14
BOOK SALE: A Used Book Sale happens from
10am-4pm at the Everson McBeath Community Library, 104 Kirsch Dr.
966-5100
JULY 10-11
SUMMER FEST: The Everson-Nooksack Summer
Festival happens through the weekend at Everson
City Park.
EVERSONNOOKSACKCHAMBER.ORG
SAT., JULY 11
FERNDALE MARKE T: The Ferndale Farmers Market happens from 9am-3pm every Saturday through
Oct. 17 at the Riverwalk on Main Street.
FERNDALEFARMERSMARKET.ORG
BELLINGHAM MARKE T: The Bellingham Farmers
Market is open for business from 10am-3pm at the
Depot Market Square, located at Railroad Avenue
and Chestnut Street.
BELLINGHAMFARMERS.ORG
JULY 11-12
HIGHLAND GAMES: The 15th annual Skagit Valley
Highland Games and Celtic Festival happens from
9am-6pm through the weekend at Mount Vernon’s
Edgewater Park. Entry is $7-$13.
SUN., JULY 12
FOOD FEST: Attend an “Eat Local Food Fest” from
12-3pm at the Cordata Community Food Co-op.
734-8158
VINES & T WINES: Benefit the Bellingham Sister
Cities Association by attending “Vines & Twines”
from 3-6pm at Boundary Bay Brewery, 1107 Railroad Ave. Tickets are $15-$20.
647-0219 OR BSCA.ORG
VIEWS 6
Bellingham Pride
JULY 10-11
MAIL 4
BY AMY KEPFERLE
joy life… I think all of us should
be proud of who we are and not
be afraid to show our true colors.
Pride is a chance to be free and not
ashamed and to tell the rest of the
world we are here, we are proud and
we will not be going away.”
Milhoan notes that the flurry of
events happening through the week
is for everyone, whether they’re gay,
straight or somewhere in between.
To that end, things will get started Thursday with an all-inclusive
bar crawl. Meet at 7:30pm at the
Whatcom Transit Authority station,
and then continue on to a bevy of
downtown Bellingham drinking establishments. If you’re still onboard
at 9pm, the “official” kickoff will be
proclaimed at Cap Hansen’s.
Friday will feature a silent auction and the 5th anniversary celebration of the Betty Pages at Rumors Cabaret, while Saturday brings
a noontime picnic, a 6-10:30pm
“lesbians only” dance at the Royal,
and the “Absolutely Gay Fabulous”
pride show at 6pm at Rumors. The
culmination of Pride—and the one
that puts a very public face to the
people who support it—is the parade that begins at 11am at Bellingham High School and continues on
to the Depot Market Square, which
will be hopping with live entertainment, vendors and a colorful array
of humans.
Milhoan points out that not many
cities of Bellingham’s size have such
an array of Pride events—not to
mention a parade that shuts down
public streets—and says he’s looking forward to connecting with the
friends he seems to see only when
Pride rolls around each year. He’s
also hoping to see some new faces.
“Bellingham Pride is what pride
started out as, a focus on our community and a call to action, with a
chance to celebrate,” Milhoan says.
“We are very community oriented
and want to show everyone that you
have people who care about you and
you can make connections that can
last a lifetime. You are not alone,
and pride reinforces that.”
WORDS 13
LACE MAKERS: Heather Barbieri reads from The
Lace Makers of Glenmara at 7pm at Village Books,
1200 11th St.
671-2626
CURRENTS 8
THURS., JULY 9
DO IT 2
BOOKS
WRITERS’ THEATER: The Chuckanut Sandstone Writers Theatre commences at 7pm at the café at the Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave.
676-5853
07.08.09
LECTURES
WED., JULY 8
#27.04
COMMUNITY
WORDS
CASCADIA WEEKLY
words
doit
13
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
getout
HIK ING
RUNNING
DO IT
WED., JULY 8
CHOWDER
CHARTER:
The weekly three-hour
sail known as the “Chowder Charter” takes place
from 6-9pm on the 65-foot
Shawmanee leaving from
Squalicum Harbor. Cost is
$45.
734-9849 OR
PHOTO BY KRISSA WOIWOD
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
BELLINGHAMSAILING.COM
WORDS 13
CURRENTS 8
VIEWS 6
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
07.08.09
#27.04
CASCADIA WEEKLY
14
C YCL ING
doit
BY IAN CHANT
Big Buck Party
THE THRILL OF THE HUNT
SINCE ITS
debut in 2001, Big Buck
Hunter has been transformed from a barroom
novelty to become pool for the 21st century.
Eight years later, it’s the new gold-standard
bar game for any night of intoxicated revelry, a competitive crucible in which lifelong
friendships are cast.
On the off chance anyone reading this is
ATTEND
unfamiliar with Big Buck Hunter, a simple
WHAT: Big Buck
rundown is in order. The series of games, now
Party
in its sixth iteration, is a near-perfect digiWHEN: 8-11pm
tal refinement of sport hunting. Gone are the
Thurs., July 9
WHERE: Grand
hassles of the hunt: the days spent waiting
Avenue Alehouse,
in frigid forests, the tedious tracking of prey
113 Grand Ave.
and the eventual strapping of a nearly frozen
COST: Free
carcass to a truck hood.
INFO: 671-3080 or
Eschewing all the hue and cry of the exbigbuckhunter.com
pedition, Big Buck Hunter has brought the
thrill of the hunt into your local bar, providing carousers the world
over with the real American Dream; a chance to get drunk and discharge firearms in public without the accompanying unpleasantness
of shooting your best friend in the face.
And when the Grand Avenue Alehouse
hosts a Big Buck Party Thurs., July 9,
you’ll have a chance to develop a more
sophisticated understanding of all
things Big Buck Hunter while you play
alongside your friends and enjoy cheap
drinks, free schwag and the Big Buck
Girls themselves. Truly, this is the best
of all possible worlds.
The Big Buck Party is a travelling
show featuring game developers, representatives and—did I mention?—the
Big Buck Girls, who will be on hand to
help you hone your skills in all things
Big Buck. With drink specials and raffles
going all night, even folks without itchy
trigger fingers will have no problem
finding some way to amuse themselves.
Meanwhile, the hardest of the hardcore
hunters can prove their mettle on a field
more expansive than the tavern floor
and learn how to enter the Big Buck
Hunter 2009 World Championships.
For the sake of brevity, I’ll eschew
any commentary at this point on what
the popularity of this particular pastime says about the mental makeup
of my generation. Instead, I’ll let the
Grand’s own Shellie Veit, a registered
Big Buck tournament player and the
mastermind behind turning the Grand
into Bellingham’s coolest hunting lodge
for a night, opine on just what it is that
makes stalking and gunning down virtual animals so irresistible: “People inherently want to shoot things, especially
endangered species.”
OK, so it’s not exactly the discreet
charm of the bourgeoisie. Still, Thursday promises to be an evening of easy
laughs and mind-numbing violence, the
sort of singular time and place in which
you can make a friend for life or begin a
rivalry that will live in the songs of your
ancestors for seven generations.
Then again, maybe you just want to
have a couple of brews and actually
exchange a couple of words with the
sort of women you’ve only ever seen
in video games. And that’s OK, too.
Again, I’ll let Veit put it more eloquently than I could hope to in summing up the nights events. “There’s going to be cheap beer, hot chicks, video
games and free prizes. What else do
you want?”
WORK PART Y: Join Bellingham Parks and Rec for
a work party from 6:308:30pm at Boulevard Park.
You’ll be removing invasive
plants, so dress accordingly.
778-7105
THURS., JULY 9
HISTORY CRUISE: Whatcom Museum historian
Richard Vanderway helms
the 23rd season of the Bellingham Bay History Cruise.
At 6:30 every Thursday
through the summer, the
Island Caper will depart
from Squalicum Harbor.
Cost is $20-$25.
778-8963 OR
WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
FRI., JULY 10
BEAVER SEARCH: Explore
the nocturnal world of
creatures at a family program dubbed “In Search
of Beavers” from 7-9pm
at Ferndale’s Tennant Lake
Interpretive Center, 5236
Nielsen Ave. Cost is $7 per
person.
733-2900
JULY 10-12
SALMON DERBY: The
Bellingham Salmon Derby
happens through the weekend in Area 7 (San Juan
Islands). Facilities and
activities will be based out
of Squalicum Harbor.
BELLINGHAMPSA.COM
SAT., JULY 11
MOUNTAIN STEWARDS:
The Mt. Baker Ranger District is looking for volunteers to educate visitors. If
you’re interested in taking
part, apply, and then head
to a training session at
8am at the ranger station
in Sedro-Woolley.
(360) 856-5700, EXT. 225
FOOT RACE: The Chuckanut Foot Race—at 42,
Washington’s oldest running race—kicks off at 9am
at Marine Park. Runners
and walkers are welcome,
and there’s no day-of registration. Entry is $15.
676-4955 OR
FAIRHAVENRUNNERS.COM
SAFE SEAS: A “Safe Sea
Kayaking in the Pacific
Northwest” seminar and
paddle happens from 1-5pm
at the Community Boating
Center, 501 Harris Ave. The
event is free, and happens
again Aug. 15.
SAILPADDLEROW.ORG
RIVER
STEWARDS:
NSEA’s River Stewards program begins with a “Wild
About Salmon” campfire
talk at 6pm at the Douglas Fir Campground Picnic
Shelter in the Mt. Baker
Snowqualmie
National
Forest. Tomorrow, meet
at 9am at the Horseshoe
Bend Trailhead for “Noisy
Waters: A Nooksack River
Walk.” Both events are free
and open to the public.
715-0283 OR N-SEA.ORG
SUN., JULY 12
PADDEN PEDAL: The annual “Padden MTN Pedal”
starts at 10am at Lake Padden. A variety of skill level
races are available, and
day-of registration opens
at 8am. Prices vary.
INDIESERIES.COM
EXPERIENCE SAILING:
If you’re new to the water,
sign up for “Experience
Sailing” from 1-4pm at the
Community Boating Center, 501 Harris Ave. There,
you’ll learn the basics out
on the water. Cost is $35,
and the class happens every Sunday through the
summer.
SAILPADDLEROW.ORG
MON., JULY 13
CREAK Y KNEES: Seabury
Blair, Jr. gives tips related to his book The Creaky
Knees Guide (Washington):
The 100 Best Easy Hikes in
the State at 7pm at Village
Books, 1200 11th St.
671-2626
TUES., JULY 14
NATURE CAMP: “On the
Wing” will be the theme of
a Nature Day Camp happening from 10am-3pm today
through Friday at Ferndale’s
Tennant Lake Interpretive
Center, 5236 Nielsen Ave.
The camp, which is for kids
7-8, costs $85.
733-2900
WED., JULY 15
WORK PART Y: Pack a
picnic dinner and join
Bellingham Parks and Rec
for a trail work party from
6:30-8:30pm at Woodstock
Farm. Tools and gloves will
be provided, but dress accordingly.
778-7105
FOOD 34
CLASSIFIEDS 28
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MUSIC 20
FILM 24
Eat Local
Food Fest!
ART 18
Sunday, July 12
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CURRENTS 8
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Cordata Pkwy
at Westerly Rd
VIEWS 6
Try a made-from-scratch sockeye salmon burger–
you’ll be hooked! Our new menu also includes
bison and turkey burgers (if you’re game).
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GET OUT 14
Catch Me
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AND OH SO POPULAR
MAIL 4
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Cordata Pkwy at Westerly Rd
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noon to 3 pm
07.08.09
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Community Food Co-op
15
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
stage
T HE AT ER
DANCE
PROF IL E S
THURS., JULY 9
GOOD, BAD, UGLY: Catch “The Good, the Bad and
the Ugly” at 8pm at the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay
St. At 10pm, stick around for “The Project.” Cost
is $3-$5.
THEUPFRONT.COM
PHOTO BY SANDI HEINRICH
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
BARD ON THE BEACH: Othello, The Comedy of Errors, All’s Well That Ends Well, and Richard II play in
repertory through Sept. 26 during the 20th season
of Bard on the Beach at Vancouver, B.C.’s Vanier
Park. Ticket prices vary.
BARDONTHEBEACH.ORG
CURRENTS 8
VIEWS 6
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
07.08.09
#27.04
CASCADIA WEEKLY
S TA G E
JULY 9-15
Zach Harrison and Heather Dudenbostel rehearse for the Summer Repertory play, Butterflies Are Free
16
doit
BY AMY KEPFERLE
Add It Up
BUTTERFLIES, NUNS AND LOVE TRIANGLES
MATH DOESN’T come easy for everybody. Still, even the most
simpleminded among us won’t need an abacus to figure out that when
you add up one award-winning director, three world-famous plays, four
professional actors and the Mount Baker Theatre’s 170-seat theater in
the round, the primary number equals a swell summer of show business.
For the second year in a row, Western Washington University theatre
arts professor Mark Kuntz is helming the stage of MBT’s intimate Walton
Theatre as part of the venue’s Summer Repertory season. From July 8
through Aug. 1, audiences can sit in for a Tony-nominated comedy, a
Catholic school drama or a Neil Simon classic (or all three, if your pocketbook can handle the subtractions).
First up is Butterflies Are Free. Although the subject matter—a blind
guitarist gets his own pad in the big city in an attempt to flee his controlling mother—could well be serious in nature, that’s not the case for
this lighthearted romantic comedy. When the aspiring musician meets
his neighbor lady—played by Goldie Hawn in 1972’s celluloid version and
Heather Dudenbostel in the Bellingham iteration—you’ll soon see sparks
fly as the two learn that there’s more to
their relationship than meets the eye.
If love triangles are more your thing,
The Star-Spangled Girl may be your choice
du jour. The comedy of errors is pure Neil
Simon, with a storyline focusing on two
friends and political activists and their
neighbor, an all-American Southern belle
who moves in next store. Sure, there’s love
at first sight, but friendships threaten to
get divided when the one who wants love
may not be the one who’s getting it.
On the opposite end of the spectrum,
Doubt, A Parable focuses on the dramatic
power of rumors and the thrill of power.
When Sister Aloysius, a stern nun who’s
the principle at a Catholic school in the
Bronx, suspects the liberal Father Flynn of
pedophilia, it’s not long before the youknow-what hits the
fan. Anyone who’s seen
the film version—with
Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman
imbuing their respective roles with rampant realism—knows
this isn’t just a story
SEE IT
WHAT: Summer
of what happens when
Repertory Theatre
someone has a suspifeaturing Butcion something isn’t
terflies Are Free,
right; it’s also a cauDoubt, and The
tionary tale about moStar-Spangled
rality, trust and lies.
Girl
With a goal to bring
WHEN: July 8
quality theater to Bellthrough Aug. 1
ingham for prices that
WHERE: MBT’s
won’t deplete your
Walton Theatre
COST: $10-$18
bank balance, Kuntz
INFO: 734-6080
has brought together
or mountbakerthefour lead actors who
atre.com
will take turns under
the spotlight. Each of the four will perform
in two of the plays, while three other supporting actors will each be placed in one.
Most of the thespians have worked with
Kuntz before, so the comfort level was already there when rehearsals began.
If you’d like to see high-quality theater
continue at the Walton Theatre each summer, the vagaries of arithmetic aren’t part
of the requirement. Simply purchase a ticket, get there at the prescribed time and, to
sum it up, enjoy the show.
JUNE 10-11
ROMEO AND THE DR.: Peter Bloedel’s The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet shows at 7pm Fri. and 2pm
and 5pm Sat. at the Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave. Tickets will be $5 at the door.
[email protected]
MIXED BAG: At 9pm Fri., view “Games Galore” at
the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St. Show up at the
same time on Saturday for “Director’s Cut.” Tickets
are $8-$10.
733-8855 OR THEUPFRONT.COM
SAT., JULY 11
IMPROV FOR K IDS: Sheila Goldsmith will helm a
free introductory improv class for kids at 11am at
302 W. Illinois St.
756-0756
PINOCCHIO: Local kids will join actors from the
Missoula Children’s Theatre for performances of Pinocchio at 3pm and 7pm at the Mount Baker Theatre,
104 N. Commercial St. Tickets are $6-$10.
734-6080 OR MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
JULY 11-12
THE COMPLEAT WORK S: The Skagit River Shakespeare Festival presents The Compleat Works of Wllm
Shkspr (Abridged) at 2pm Sat and 6pm Sun. on the
lawn at Whatcom Community College and 2pm Sun.
at Burlington’s Jason Boerner Memorial Park. Admission is by donation.
SHAKESNW.ORG
SUN., JULY 12
COMEDY NIGHT: A weekly Comedy Night happens
at 8pm every Sunday at the Fairhaven Pub & Martini
Bar, 1114 Harris Ave.
FAIRHAVENPUB.COM
WED., JULY 15
DROP DEAD: A mystery comedy dinner, Sock Hop
‘Til You Drop…Dead, begins at 7pm at the Silver Reef
Casino, 4876 Haxton Way. Tickets are $35.
384-7077 OR SILVERREEFCASINO.COM
DANCE
JULY 10-11
DANCE SENSAT ION: “Dance Sensation” shows at
7pm at Mount Vernon’s RiverBelle Dinner Theatre,
100 E. Montgomery St. Tickets are $12-$14.
RIVERBELLEDINNERTHEATRE.COM
SAT., JULY 11
CONTRA DANCE: The Bellingham Country Dance
Society will host a Contra Dance from 7:30-10pm
at Everson’s Glen Echo Community Club.Suggested
donation is $8-$10.
676-1554
TANGO BY THE BAY: The monthly “Tango by the
Bay” takes place from 8-11pm at the Squalicum
Yacht Club, 720 Coho Way. Admission is $3-$5.
734-5676
4029 Northwest Ave.
One block north of Jerry Chambers Chevrolet
(360) 734-2330
Squalicum Parkway Patients:
Please See Us at Our New Location
Urgent Care for Medicare & DSHS Patients Welcome
ONLY
$17.95
Per Person
FILM 24
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
AND
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
SEMIAHMOO SUMMER SAVER
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
Northwest Ave. Clinic
Flu & Other Immunizations
Injury & Illness Treatment
Lab & X-Ray Available
Mammography & Ultrasound Available
Occupational Health Care
School, Sports & DOT Physicals
Travel Consultations
Work-Related Injuries
MUSIC 20
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ART 18
7 Days a Week ➲ No Appointment Necessary
Board Certified M.D.’s on Staf f
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visual
GALLERIES
OPENINGS
PROFILES
doit
EVENTS
JULY 10-11
FEST IVAL OF ARTS: A
“Festival of Arts, Crafts &
Rummage” happens from
8am-9pm Fri. and 9am-9pm
Sat. at the Lummi Island
Congregational
Church,
3913 Legoe Bay Rd.
758-4118
CASCADIA WEEKLY
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07.08.09
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MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
“UNTITLED” BY KATIE RICKARD
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
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ART
ART 18
18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
JULY 10-12
18
BY AMY KEPFERLE
Art Feeds
CAROUSE FOR A CAUSE
METAPHORS ARE marvelous things, but they don’t
necessarily put supper on the table. Or do they?
When Sheana Sisselman came up with the idea for Art Feeds
as a way to enact social change by utilizing the talents of visual and sonic artists, it wasn’t long before the event took on a
life of its own. This Saturday, her altruistic brainchild will see
the light of day at the hallowed halls of the Fraternal Order of
Eagles.
Through the efforts of 21 fine artists, five bands, numerous sponsors and a plethora of volunteers, Art Feeds will work
through the night to raise funds for the Slum Doctor Programme,
a local nonprofit dedicated to improving the lives of Africans
impacted by HIV and AIDS by providing food, education, healthcare and, above all, hope.
“I loved the idea of Art Feeds as a concept because it works
on so many different levels,” says Marie Biondolillo, who’s been
helping get the word out about the grassroots endeavor. “The
money from this will literally help feed people, but it also feeds
the community by helping artists.”
Sisselman, a student and an artist in
her own right, says she first heard about
the Slum Doctor Programme when founder
Tim Costello spoke at one of her classes at
Western Washington University. It made her
think about how people in this town are apt
to want to give, and got her wondering how
she could help.
“I decided to try to do art that made
sense,” Sisselman says. “I wanted to do
more than just a show for the show’s sake.
Plus, I think people are more apt to have fun
and to give money to things when it’s for a
good cause.”
Looking at the roster of the festivities
at the inaugural event,
it seems a few people
might focus so much on
the enjoyment of the
evening they’ll forget
the goal of the gathering. What with a live
ATTEND
auction, music by Karl
WHAT: Art Feeds:
A Benefit for the
Blau, Wooden Wings,
Slum Doctor ProGo Slowpoke, Carcrashgramme
lander, Anna Arvin,
WHEN: 7pm Sat.,
Biagio Biondolillo, and
July 11
Kat Bula alongside a
WHERE: Eagles
Hall, 1125 N. Forcadre of original art—
est St.
not to mention a keg
COST: $3 suggestof heady Boundary Bay
ed donation; the
beer—those in attenevent is 21-plus
dance may lose track of
INFO: 201-2883 or
artfeedsbellingwhy they’re there. They
ham.weebly.com
needn’t worry, as organizers will keep track of
where the funds are funneled at the end of
the night.
If you want to go, but don’t have a lot
of green in your wallet, don’t worry. Sisselman and Biondolillo note attendees will
have a lot to choose from, whether it’s a
$400 sculpture or a $10 print. Some artists
have donated their pieces outright, while
others will get a percentage of the sales.
Money raised from the silent auction will go
wholly to the Programme, though, as will
drink sales.
“Our goal is to do Slum Doctors justice
and get them as much money as possible,”
Sisselman says. “We want to do this in the
future for other nonprofits, and keep building community through art.”
ART YARD SALE: The
third annual “Artists’ Yard
Sale” happens from 10am6pm at 370 N. East Camano
Dr., building C, on Camano
Island.
SEAGRASSGALLERY.COM
SAT., JULY 11
MONA OPENING: An opening reception for “Elusive
Elements” and Ellen Sollod’s “Lake Washington Palimpsest” exhibit happens
from 2-5pm at La Conner’s
Museum of Northwest Art,
121 S. First St.
MUSEUMOFNWART.ORG
ROCK S AND TREES: A reception for Becky Fletcher’s “Rocks & Trees” exhibit
of oil paintings takes place
from 5-8pm at Edison’s
Smith & Vallee Gallery,
5742 Gilkey Ave.
(360) 305-4892 OR
SMITHANDVALLEE.COM
QUILT RECEPTIONS: View
the Fidalgo Island Quilters’ “Color Me Wearable”
exhibit and “The Fiber
Quest” through Sept. 27
at the La Conner Quilt &
Textile Museum, 703 S.
2nd St. A reception for the
first exhibit happens from
11am-3pm Sat., and “The
Fiber Quest” reception
takes place from 1-4pm
Sun. Admission is $5.
LACONNERQUILTS.COM
JULY 11-12
ART BY THE BAY: The
17th annual StanwoodCamano Festival of Art
and Music—also known as
“Art by the Bay”—happens
from 10am-5pm at Utsalady Elementary School, 608
Arrowhead Rd.
STANWOODCAMANOARTS.
COM
SUN., JULY 12
OPEN HOUSE: Take advantage of a rare opportunity
to meet artists and view
award-winning facilities
at an Open House from 125pm at Stanwood’s Pilchuck
Glass School. Admission is
$20 for adults, free for kids
12 and under.
PILCHUCK.COM
O N GO I N G
EXHIBITS
ALLIED ARTS: The juried artist series continues
with Mira Kamada’s “Intersections,” which will be up
through July 31 at Allied
Arts, 1418 Cornwall Ave.
676-8548
ART ISTS GALLERY: Works
by 31 local artists can be
seen at Youthnet’s Benefit
Art Show and Sale through
July 15 at Mount Vernon’s
Artists Cooperative Gallery, 312 Pine Square.
(360) 840-9842
BLUE HORSE: See more
than 100 pieces from inhouse artists, as well as a
showing of art from Egyptian children, until July 31
at the Blue Horse Gallery,
301 W. Holly St.
671-2305
BOUNDARY BAY: View
and bid on pieces as part
of NSEA’s “Salmon at the
Bay” through Aug. 15 at
Boundary Bay Brewery,
1107 Railroad Ave.
715-0283
DEPOT ARTS CENTER:
Jon Mills’ “Watercolors”
shows through Aug. 3 at
the Gallery at the Depot,
611 R Ave, Anacortes.
(360) 293-3663
INSIGHTS: Gallery artists
will take part in the “Summer Show” on display until
July 31 at Insights Gallery,
516 Commercial Ave., Anacortes.
INSIGHTSGALLERY.COM
LUCIA DOUGLAS: Works
by 20 of our region’s finest
artists working in various
print techniques can be
seen at the “Summer 2009
Print Invitational” until
July 25 at the Lucia Douglas Gallery, 1415 13th St.
733-5361 OR
LUCIADOUGLAS.COM
MINDPORT: “Bones: Essential
Grace”
shows
through July 14 at Mindport Exhibits, 210 W. Holly
St. Entry is $2.
MINDPORT.ORG
SK AGIT MUSEUM: Peruse
“Harvesting the Light:
Images of Contemporary
Skagit Farm Life” at La
Conner’s Skagit County
Historical Museum, 501 S.
4th St. Entry is $3.
(360) 466-3365 OR
SKAGITCOUNT Y.NET
WHATCOM MUSEUM: “On
a Grand Scale” and “ARTIFACTual: The Object In
View” are currently on display at the Whatcom Museum, 121 Prospect St.
WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
WORKING AROUND THE HOUSE OR YARD?
$10 off Equipment Rental from Birch Equipment, $10 off
Sanitary Services Hauling Services. Save $10 at the ReStore.
10% off pottery from The Garden Spot and 10% off native
plants from Plantas Nativa.
PICK UP A COPY AT
Coupons don’t expire until 10/31/09!
Affordable Business Systems, Bay City Supply, Community Food Co-op, Fairhaven Runners & Walkers,
Film is Truth, Gone Diving, Greenhouse, Griggs Office Supplies, Haggen, Mother Baby Center, NW
Handspun Yarns, Pastazza, Quicksilver Photo Lab, Samuel’s Furniture, The REStore, Village Books,
Pickford Cinema, or Yes Massages
ONLY $10
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
VISITING THE FARMERS MARKET? Get FREE
Mushrooms from Cascadia Mushrooms, 15% off any Red
Boots Design item. 15% off fresh organic veggies from
Rabbit Fields Farm.
ART 18
PLANNING A STAYCATION? Receive FREE Movie
Rentals at Film is Truth. $5 off any program at the YMCA.
Save $150 on Country Club membership. 15% off a sunset
cruise around the bay on the Gato Verde.
STAGE 16
LOVE FOOD? Save $10 on groceries from the
Community Food Co-op and $10 at Haggen. FREE Coffee
from Fresh Start Espresso, Stop-n-Go Espresso &
Hammerhead Coffee Roasters. Save $5 off Ciao Thyme ‘In
the Kitchen’ cooking classes.
GET OUT 14
Save on items you need and want.
FOOD 34
SAVE MONEY NOW!
Choose local businesses taking action for a healthy community.
Summer Concerts
Wednesdays July 15-August 12
5:00-9:00pm
with
August 12
3 on the Tree
Sponsored
by:
Sponsored by:
Volunteer Sponsor:
Appliance Depot
Volunteer Sponsor:
Kulshan Community Land Trust
July 29
w/ King Ludd
August 5
Dikki Du & the
Zydeco Krewe
w/ Monday Night
Project
The Senate
w/ Bentgrass
Meet us at our NEW LOCATION
on Bay St. between Holly St. &
W. Champion St.
FREE! all ages! bring the family!
Sponsored by:
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a
s
c
a
d
i
DowntownBellingham.com
a
sound reinforcement-audio engineering-lighting- production
Amjay Screen Printing - Bellingham Chamber of Commerce - CH2M Hill - Kulshan Cycles - Nimbus - Port of Subs - Shrimp Shack - WECU
CURRENTS 8
Acorn
Project
Handful of Luvin
w/ Maggie’s Fury
VIEWS 6
Delhi 2 Dublin
MAIL 4
July 15
15
Sponsored by
DO IT 2
July 22
P R E S E N T S
07.08.09
Sponsored by:
P A R T N E R S H I P
#27.04
B E L L I N G H A M
CASCADIA WEEKLY
D O W N T O W N
WORDS 13
www.SustainableConnecitons.org
19
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
music
RUMOR HA S I T
MUSICpreview
WOLVES I N THE
THR ON E R OOM
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
PRE V IE W S
20
BY IAN CHANT
What the Heck Fest
SUMMER FESTIVAL PAR EXCELLENCE
IT’S THAT time of year again, when a young man’s fancy turns
to driving for hours to sit in the sun and listen to music for days on
end. That most American of times, the summer music festival season, is upon us, and next week brings the weirdest and most fun of
the Pacific Northwest’s various paloozas, well, maybe not right into
our backyard, but pretty darned close anyhow.
For the eighth consecutive year, What The Heck Fest is turning
sleepy little Anacortes into a veritable Mecca for independent music
from all over the Northwest.
With shows in parks, bars and warehouses across the city, this
three-day weekend of music, art and community is regionally recognized as a premier venue for great tunes, well-intentioned strangeness and laid-back good vibes.
You can check out their manifesto online, but suffice it to say that
What the Heck Fest is about what nearly every multi-day music fes-
tival tries or purports to be about: listening to music, having fun, meeting
people and being part of something
bigger than yourself. It just happens
to do this better than most of the big
boys, with Anacortes providing a cozy,
off-the-beaten-path incubator for a
festival that hosts the quirkiest, mostwelcoming series of rock ’n’ roll shows
in the Evergreen State year after year.
Every spiraling arm of the Northwest
music galaxy will be represented at
this year’s festival, from the wonky,
clap-your-hands-and-sing-along folk
of Kimya Dawson to the droning, endof-the-world metal of Wolves in the
Throne Room. At the risk of gushing,
this is a show where you can see Mirah,
Mt. Eerie, and Earth in the span of a
couple of hours, on one stage. Then
you can hang out with friends until you
pass out on a friendly couch or comfy
WHAT THE HECK, ON NEXT PAGE
Rumor Has It
NO EVENT IN this town, charitable or otherwise,
can ever seem to happen without its very own
musical component. This is a fact I’ve made frequent mention of. The reasons for this are as
abundant as they are obvious: 1. we are lucky
enough to live in a community rife with exceedingly skilled musicians, 2. said musicians
are typically more than willing to donate those
skills to whatever charities/causes/charitable
causes require them to do so (and the altruistic
attitude of so many of these musicians should
be neither underestimated nor underappreciated) and 3. the public has now been duly trained
to expect some form of aural entertainment,
regardless of the overall intent of whatever
fundraiser they happen to be attending.
Case in point: Art
Feeds, a fundraiser
that is part art exhibit, part silent auction and—natch—
part concert, all to
benefit the Slum
Doctors Programme.
Yes, this is the same
event that was origiBY CAREY ROSS
nally scheduled to
take place at Jinx last month, but is now slated
for Sat., June 11 at the Eagles Hall. If you’re
not familiar with Slum Doctors, it’s an organization devoted to improving the lives of those
with HIV/AIDS in a number of real, substantive
ways, and has already earned itself a reputation for partnering with various segments of
the arts community to achieve that end.
Art Feeds continues that worthy tradition,
with music by the ever-excellent Biagio Biondolillo, Go Slowpoke, Karl Blau, Wooden Wings
(I believe I’ve made abundantly clear my feelings about this dynamic duo), and more. And
musicians are getting in on the art part of
these fundraising festivities, although the list
of artists goes far beyond just the music makers involved. The best part of Art Feeds: you
can take in a cross-section of local culture,
help raise a little cash for an unquestionably
worthy cause and do your part to further facilitate such happenings in the future—all for
the bargain price of just $3 (more, of course,
if you find yourself bidding on silent auction
offerings). Now that you know all this, I expect
to see you there.
If your locale happens to be a little more far
flung, say, somewhere in the environs of the
north county, making Art Feeds a geographically undesirable event for you, you can always
hit up the Haynie Opry at the 100-year-old
Haynie Grange in Custer. This event, dreamed
up and hosted by Matt Audette of Matt Audette
and His Circle of Friends (which I have to assume are legion), is a country- and gospel-flavored day of family-friendly musical merrymaking. With both afternoon and evening shows,
the Haynie Opry aims to meet all your musical
scheduling needs. Sure, it’s not hardcore at the
Rome Grange, but, then again, what is?
MUSIC preview
THE 2009
Bellingham Festival of Music
enters its second week, and if you missed either of the concerts at WWU’s Performing Arts
Center Concert Hall, you have another chance
to redeem yourself and enjoy all the offerings
still remaining in this year’s festival.
Coming up, you can hear the music of Johannes Brahms brought to life by the Festival
Orchestra and a duo of singers—soprano Katie Van Kooten and baritone Charles Robert
Stephens—along with the Festival Chorus July
11 at the PAC Concert Hall. Or, for the sounds
of Schubert set against a picturesque backdrop,
join the Festival Chamber Players for two shows
July 12 at the Bellingham Cruise Terminal.
The Festival of Music continues through July
19, when it concludes with another concert at
the PAC Concert Hall, this time featuring the
Festival Orchestra, as well as the guitar quartet known as the Romeros. For more information, including full schedule and ticket prices,
check out bellinghamfestival.org.
SAT., JULY 11
BREAKFEST: From 11am-midnight, attend
“Breakfest” at Burlington’s Common Ground
Coffee House, 351 Pease Rd. The fundraiser
will include music from the likes of Animal
Nation, We Fight Like Lions, Tumble Down,
Blood and Thunder, Swamp Monster, and
many others. Admission is $15 in advance,
$20 at the door.
(360) 757-1015
TOM HODGE: Guitarist and ukulele master
Tom Hodge performs at 3pm and 7pm at
Custer’s Haynie Grange, 3344 Haynie Rd. The
concert, which will also feature Brother Dalton’s Euphonic Elixir, is part of the “Haynie
Opry” music series. Tickets are $5 for the
early show, $10 for the late one.
366-3321 OR HAYNIEOPRY.COM
CHRYSLERS: The rock and soul sounds of the
Chryslers can be heard at a free concert from
7-9pm at Boulevard Park. This is said to be
the ensemble’s final public concert, so come
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www.OldWorldDeli1.com
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www.everybodys.com
HONE YBEES: The four-part harmonies of the
Honeybees can be heard at a free lunchtime
concert at 12:30pm at the Whatcom Museum,
121 Prospect St.
WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
WED., JULY 15
SUMMER SERIES: The Summer Noon Concert
Series continues with a performance featuring “One Crazy Raven,” Gene Tagaban, from
12-1pm at WWU’s Performing Arts Center
Plaza.
WWU.EDU
DOWNTOWN SOUNDS: The funk-infused
sounds of the Acorn Project will kick off the
first Downtown Sounds concert of the summer from 5-9pm in downtown Bellingham
on Bay Street between Holly and Champion
streets. The show is free, and additional gigs
will happen weekly through Aug. 12.
DOWNTOWNBELLINGHAM.COM
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FILM 24
#27.04
1 Person River Rafts
Local Comb Honey
Great Sandwiches
Custom Cold Cuts
Handsome Shirts
Bennett Farm Steaks
We Grow Veggies 4U
TUES., JULY 14
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Join us Wednesday, July 15th
from 6 – 8pm with Batali’s Famous
Salumi and Dan the Wine Guy,
featuring Northwest wines.
Call us or stop by for more details.
st
YAMBIQUE: Listen and dance to the Afro
Cuban jazz ensemble known as Yambique at
a free Fiddlin’ Fox show from 3-6pm at the
Fairhaven Village Green.
FAIRHAVEN.COM
MUSIC 20
OUTDOOR AC T ION: Nine DJs from the Puget
Sound area—including Sonny Chiba, Tha
Godfather, Tim Trip, and many more—will
take the reins during an Outdoor Gathering
starting at 8pm at the Slab in Ferndale (located at the end of Henry Road). Tickets are
$8-$10.
223-3924 OR BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM
THE BELLINGHAM FESTIVAL OF
MUSIC
ORGAN SOCIE T Y: Tom Roughton, Melany
Armstrong, and Wally Stevenson will perform
on the Mighty Wurlitzer at today’s Mount
Baker Theater Organ Society concert at 3pm
at the Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St. Suggested donation is $10.
734-6080 OR MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
ART 18
Hooked On Classics
SUN., JULY 12
STAGE 16
ERIC BIBB: Bluesman Eric Bibb makes music
magic at 7:30pm at the Conway Muse, 18444
Spruce St., Conway. Tickets are $25-$28.
(360) 445-3000
GET OUT 14
FRI., JULY 10
WORDS 13
AMBER DARLAND: Folk and pop purveyor
Amber Darland makes music at a free concert
from 6-8pm at Bellingham’s Elizabeth Park.
778-7000
BLAINE JAZZ FEST IVAL: The Grammynominated trio MaD Fusion kicks off a week
of acclaimed music as part of the 8th annual Jazz Festival at 7:30pm at the Blaine
Performing Arts Center, 975 H St. Jazz singer
Greta Matassa, Gene Pritsker and many others will perform at various times during the
week. Prices and venues vary.
PACIFICARTSASSOC.ORG
CURRENTS 8
THURS., JULY 9
PHOTO BY KATIE VAN KOOTEN
park bench, wake up in the morning, have a
late breakfast, maybe get your rummage sale
on and then go right back to seeing shows.
And if you can find even one thing you don’t
like about those last couple of sentences, I
just don’t know what to tell you—I assume
you live a sad life, and you have my pity.
Full passes for the three-day event are sold
out, but as we go to print, partial passes for
the festival are still on sale. These nifty, notquite-all-access accessories will get you into
any show except for the
dinner concerts, so if
you’re the sort who gets
tickets late, be sure to
pack a brown-bag lunch
for this one. But look on
the bright side: you can
see most of the line// ) still
up
on
the partial pass,
WHAT: What the
and
most
of the lineup for
Heck Fest
WHEN: Fri., July
What the Heck Fest is still
17-Sun., July 19
more fun than just about
WHERE: Various
any other music festival.
locales, Anacortes
And as far as accomMORE INFO:
modations
are conwhatheheckfest.
com
cerned, you’ll want to
call a friend in Anacortes
and angle for a corner of living-room floor or
just pack a tent when you leave. The Department of Safety won’t be opening its doors as
a hostel for concert-goers this year, which
means your best bet for a good night’s sleep
is under the stars in a nearby campsite. After
all, it wouldn’t be a real summer music festival if you didn’t get a little better acquainted
with your sleeping bag, right?
JULY 11-18
VIEWS 6
FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
show your support.
778-7000
MAIL 4
WHAT THE HECK,
SUMMER SERIES: The Summer Noon Concert
Series continues with a performance featuring the Mhuri Marimba Ensemble from 12-1pm
at WWU’s Performing Arts Center Plaza.
WWU.EDU
DO IT 2
WED., JULY 8
FOOD 34
miscMUSIC
07.08.09
MUSIC preview
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21
FOOD 34
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
WORDS 13
CURRENTS 8
VIEWS 6
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
07.08.09
#27.04
CASCADIA WEEKLY
22
•(
Venues –
See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
Archer Ale House
Boundary Bay
Brewery
07.08.09
07.09.09
07.10.09
07.11.09
07.12.09
07.13.09
07.14.09
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Laura Overstreet
T-Bone Taylor
T-Bone Taylor
Yogoman's Wild Rumpus
Happy Hour Music w/The
High, Wide & Handsome
Band (early), Vaughn
Brown Lantern
Alehouse
Open Mic
Chuckanut Brewery
Bella Ruse
Paul Klein (tap room),
The Naked Hearts (beer
garden)
Atlantics (early), Megatron,
Proceed (late)
Jazz Jam feat. Brian Cunningham Trio
End of the Road String
Band
RACHEL RIES/July 10/Green Frog
Chuckanut Ridge
Wine Company
Julian MacDonough Jazz
Trio
Commodore Ballroom
Reverend Horton Heat
Department of Safety
Drakkar Sauna
Edison Inn
Fairhaven Pub
Karaoke
DJ Bam Bam
Bob Caloca and Friends
Daddy Treetops, Jon Parry
The Bow Diddlers
The Dagwoods
Spaceband
Comedy Night
College Night
Archer Ale House UI4Ut | Boondocks .FUDBMG4U4FESP8PPMMFZt
| Boundary Bay Brewing Co. 3BJMSPBE"WFt]Brown Lantern Ale House$PNNFSDJBM"WF
"OBDPSUFTt
]Chuckanut Brewery8)PMMZ4Ut
]Chuckanut Ridge Wine Company/4UBUF4Ut]Commodore Ballroom(SBOWJMMF4U7BODPVWFSt
]Common Ground Coffeehouse1FBTF3PBE#VSMJOHUPOt
]Department of Safety UI4U"OBDPSUFTt
]Edison Inn $BJOT$U&EJTPOt]Fairhaven
Pub & Martini Bar )BSSJT"WFt]Graham’s Restaurant.PVOU#BLFS)XZ(MBDJFSt
]Green Frog Café Acoustic Tavern/4UBUF4Ut]Honey Moon/4UBUF4U
t]Hot Shotz/4UBUF4Ut
07.10.09
07.11.09
07.12.09
07.13.09
07.14.09
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
DJ Mikey Swift
DJ Triple Crown
DJ Booger
DJ GrapeNuts
DJ Cide
20 String Band
Goh Kurosawa
Rachel Ries
Michael Vermillion, Chuckanut Drive, Big Sur
Citizen Escape
Prozac Mtn. Boys
Open Mic
The Naked Hearts
Scrub
The Penny Stinkers
Karaoke w/Poops
The Beav, Ape Man Lizard
Citizen Escape
Blindfate
Karaoke
Country Karaoke
Jack Benson Band
The Popoffs
Karaoke
Crossfox
Azure Ray, Kristin AllenZito, Tiny Vipers
DJ Clint Westwood, DJ
Swervewon, DJ 100 Proof
DJ Clint Westwood, DJ
Swervewon, DJ 100 Proof
Hot Shotz
Main St. Bar and Grill
Nightlight Lounge
David Lindley, James
Taylor, Jon Parry
DJ Clint Westwood, DJ
Swervewon, DJ 100 Proof
Poppe's
Richard's on Richards
The Shadies
Karaoke w/Betty Desire
Karaoke w/Poops
MUSIC 20
Honeymoon
Second Sunday Singer
Songwriter Slam
ART 18
Green Frog Café
Acoustic Tavern
’90s Night feat. DJ Josh
Holland
STAGE 16
Glow
CLASSIFIEDS 28
07.09.09
FILM 24
07.08.09
WEDNESDAY
GET OUT 14
See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
FOOD 34
•(
Venues –
The Abbyssinians
LONESTAR/July 11/Skagit Valley Casino
One Hit Wonder Night
DJ Jester
DJ Jester
DJ Jester
Rumors
Betty Desire Show, DJ
Velveteen
DJ Buckshot, DJ Deerhead
Pride Silent Auction, DJ
Q-bnza
Gay Pride Show, DJ Mike
Tollenson
Tweety and the Tomcats
Tweety and the Tomcats
Karaoke
The Goods (Lounge)
Lonestar (Showroom), The
Goods (Lounge)
Michael Patrick
Tim Matheis & Ray Downey
The Spencetet
Jerry Kramer
Travis Hartnett
Skagit Valley Casino
Skylark's
Three Trees
Coffeehouse
Tivoli
Watertown Pub
Wild Buffalo
WORDS 13
70s Disco Night
Karaoke w/Poops
DJ Postal, DJ Shortwave
Irish Session
Open Mic feat. Paul
Bretting
#27.04
Silver Reef Hotel
Casino & Spa
DJ Jester
Bar Tabac
Karaoke w/DJ Steve
Lucas Cates Band (early),
Reggae Night w/Blessed
Coast DJs (late)
CURRENTS 8
Royal
VIEWS 6
The All Nighters, The Boss
Martians
MAIL 4
Slow Suicide, Rishloo,
Sunderlyn
DO IT 2
Rogue Hero
07.08.09
The Stilly River Band
DRAKKAR SAUNA/July 11/Dept. of Safety
Snug Harbor, Cold Note,
Nefarious Jones
Live Music
Vicci Martinez
Open Mic Night feat.
Blues Jam
Main Street Bar & Grill .BJO4U'FSOEBMFt]The Nightlight Lounge&$IFTUOVU4U]Old Foundry &.BQMF4Ut]Porterhouse Pub8FTU(BUFT4U.PVOU7FSOPOt
]Quarterback Pub and EateryUI4Ut]Richard’s on Richards 3JDIBSET4U7BODPVWFSt
]Rockfish Grill $PNNFSDJBM"WF"OBDPSUFTt
]The Rogue
Hero /4UBUF4Ut]The Royal &)PMMZ4Ut]Rumors Cabaret3BJMSPBE"WFt]Silver Reef Casino )BYUPO8BZ'FSOEBMFt]Skagit Valley Casino Resort
/%BSSL-BOF#PXt
]Skylark’s Hidden Cafe UI4Ut]Star Bar$PNNFSDJBM"WF"OBDPSUFTt
]Stuart’s at the Market $PSOXBMM"WFt]
Swinomish Casino$BTJOP%S"OBDPSUFTt]Three Trees Coffeehouse 8)PMMZ4Ut | Tivoli $PNNFSDJBM4Ut | Underground Coffeehouse 7JLJOH6OJPOSE'MPPS
886 | Watertown Pub $PNNFSDJBM"WF"OBDPSUFTt
| Wild Buffalo 8)PMMZ4UtXXXXJMECVGGBMPOFU]5PHFUZPVSMJWFNVTJDMJTUJOHTJODMVEFEJOUIJTFTUFFNFEOFXTQSJOUTFOEJOGPUP
DMVCT!DBTDBEJBXFFLMZDPN%FBEMJOFTBSFBMXBZTBUQN'SJEBZ
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Rockfish Grill
Paul Green and Straight
Shot
23
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
film
F IL M T IME S
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
RE V IE W S
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUCH OF THE FUN
IS TO BE DERIVED
FROM WATCHING THE
CONSTERNATION AND
REACTION OF THOSE
WHO ARE NOT IN ON THE
JOKE—BUT AFTER BORAT
IT’S CLEAR MANY PEOPLE
ARE WISER AND THE
MAKERS MAY HAVE HAD
TO WORK HARDER TO
SPRING THE SURPRISES.
24
REVIEWED BY RICHARD MOWE
Bruno
LETTING IT ALL HANG OUT
THE CROWN of the reigning king of bad taste must pass from John
Waters to Sacha Baron Cohen. After Borat he pushes the envelope even
further in Bruno with frontal nudity, graphic sex and Nazi jokes and much
worse besides. It’s gross, offensive and puerile in equal measure—but it
is impossible not to laugh while you wince and recoil. Prospects, despite
the R rating (for pervasive strong and crude sexual content, graphic nudity
and language), must be rosy.
The pattern is the same as Borat, except this time Sacha Baron Cohen has
created for himself a gay Austrian fashionista who sets off to the States
with his trusty German assistant to become, in his words, “the biggest gay
movie star since Schwarzenegger.”
He finds himself at a loose end after he’s
fired from his Austrian television show because he brought the house down, almost
literally, when his Velcro outfit created a
major incident at a fashion show in Milan.
So what does he get up to in Hollywood?
He hosts a TV talk show with guests Paula
Abdul and LaToya Jackson, who take to their
heels after being served sushi from the body
of a naked Mexican. There is a half-hearted
attempt to go straight “just like Tom Cruise,
John Travolta, and Kevin Spacey.” And he
calls in a focus group to give their verdicts on
a totally disgusting television show he has.
At one point he becomes chained to his
assistant for a bit of bondage and then they
try to board a bus—naked and unashamed.
There’s a wrestling match in a cave and a
swingers’ party that swings in unexpected
directions. He tries to seduce Ron Paul, the
former Presidential candidate, and there’s
a hilarious scene when, acting as the producer of a film, he tells the proud parents
of a prospective cast member that their son
would be expected to dress as a Nazi and
push a wheelbarrow into an oven. Its contents are a Jewish baby. The mother’s unrepentant response is: “That’s fine, as long as
he gets the gig.”
Much of the fun is to be derived from
watching the consternation and reaction of
those who are not in on the joke—but after
Borat it’s clear many people are wiser and
the makers may have had to work harder to
spring the surprises.
Its crisp running time (just 83 minutes)
ensures not a second feels labored, and
there’s barely enough time to recover from
one assault on the senses before another
comes along to take your breath away.
Some audiences will embrace it all with
a venom, others may shrink from Bruno’s
vulgarity—but whatever your persuasion, a
smirk of some kind seems certain to appear
from nowhere despite yourself and your
better nature. The answer is probably to let
it all hang out: Sacha certainly does.
FOOD 34
HONEY MOON
M E A D tW I N E tC I D E R
CLASSIFIEDS 28
Meet Me at
the Meadery
T U E S - S U N 5 -1 1 P M
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
24
FILM
LIVE MUSIC
T U E S -T H U R - S AT 8 P M
1053 N. STATE ST. -ALLEY
DOWNTOWN BELLINGHAM
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
Sell your car!
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
Production Wineryt Wine Bar
Light Appetizers & Desserts
25
classifieds.cascadiaweekly.com
SCHEDULE
you? ★★1(tISNJO
#FMMJT'BJSBN]]]]
BY CAREY ROSS
Public Enemies: Johnny Depp plays John
%JMMJOHFS‰BLB i1VCMJD &OFNZ /P w‰BOE $ISJTtian Bale plays the G-man charged with capturing
him in this offering helmed by Michael Mann. I don’t
know about you, but when I see those two on the
big screen together, all I can think is Batman vs. the
Riddler. ★★★3tISTNJO
4VOTFU4RVBSF]]]]]
]]
FILM SHORTS
Away We Go: Starring John Krasinski (The Office),
Maya Rudolph, and Maggie Gyllenhaal, directed by
Sam Mendes from a script penned by none other than
(OMG!) Dave Eggers, this film is the stuff indie movie
dreams are made of: touching, tenderly funny and
achingly insightful. ★★★★3tISNJO
1JDLGPSE]
Star Trek: Directed by J.J. Abrams and completely recast, this Star Trek installment not only explores “space,
the final frontier,” but could also be said to be “boldly
going where no man has gone before.” In case you
hadn’t already guessed, “These are the voyages of the
Starship, Enterprise.” ★★★★1(tISTNJO
#FMMJT'BJS]]]
Bruno: See review previous page. ★★★★3tIS
NJO
4FIPNF]]]]
The Hangover: Sure, Bradley Cooper is the breakout star of this decidedly funny movie—and well
he should be after laboring in semi-obscurity in a
number of supporting roles on television as well as
film—but none other than Mike Tyson might be the
scene stealer in this show with his rendition of Phil
Collins’ “In the Air Tonight.” Oh, Iron Mike, what will
you do next? ★★★★3tISNJO
4VOTFU4RVBSF]]]
I Love You, Beth Cooper: Judging by its preview, this
movie seems to be about a dude who blurts out the
titular line during high-school graduation, and then
derivative physical comedy and uninspired toilet humor
ensue. However, I could be wrong about that. The film
could be a sensitive and insightfully wrought comingof-age story about two teens finding love for the first
time. But it’s not. ★★1(tISNJO
4VOTFU4RVBSFBN]]]]
Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs File this one under
the heading of movies no one realized required another
sequel. I thought when all the ice melted in the last
installment—thus signaling the end of the ice age—
UIFTFSJFTIBEDPNFUPBOFOEBTXFMM"QQBSFOUMZUI
Century Fox is looking to extend this franchise into the
next ice age. Lucky for us. ★★1(tISNJO
#FMMJT'BJS]]]]]]
]]]
I L OV E YOU ,
BE T H C OOP E R
Kung Fu Panda: This movie is very similar to Karate
Kid, except instead of Ralph Macchio in the lead role,
it’s played by a rotund and rather clueless animated
panda, and no one, at any point, creepily utters the
line, “Put him in a body bag,” and follows it up with a
maniacal cackle. This is a good thing. Get there early
and listen to the sweet sounds of Barnum Jack.
Fairhaven Village Green Dusk
Land of the Lost: Growing up, this television series, which emerged from the weird and wonderful
minds of Sid and Marty Kroft, was among my favorites. With Will Ferrell and Danny McBride on board—
not to mention those creepy creepy Sleestaks—the
big-screen version might not look or sound much
like the TV show of my youth, but it should be funny
nonetheless. ★★★1(tISNJO
#FMMJT'BJS]]]
My Sister’s Keeper: Somehow I happened to read
this best-selling book by Jodi Picoult about a girl
(played by Abigail Breslin), her leukemia-stricken
sister and the surprising decision she makes and its
impact upon her beleaguered family. At the time I
felt it to be perfect fodder for the Lifetime Movie
Network. Aim high, Hollywood. ★★★1(tIS
NJO
4VOTFU4RVBSF]]]
Moon: See review next page. ★★★★ 3 t IS min.)
1JDLGPSE]
The Proposal: Sandra Bullock, who, by now, should
really know better, finds herself mired down in yet
another mediocre rom-com. Fine, Sandra, I get that
you apparently no longer care about your career, but
do you really have to bring Ryan Reynolds down with
Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen: An abundance
of abysmal reviews could not stop this film from unMFBTIJOH BO BMNPTU NJMMJPO POTMBVHIU PO CPY
offices worldwide, numbers that almost match those
of Dark Knight just a summer ago. The difference between the two summer blockbusters? When it comes
to making movies that don’t suck, Batman kicks ass all
over Optimus Prime. ★★1(tISTNJO
4FIPNF ] ] ] ] ] ]
]
Up: Truthfully, the only thing you need to know
about this film is that Pixar is responsible for it,
which means it will be by turns thoughtful, funny,
touching—and, of course, absolutely stunning on a
scale other animated efforts can only dream of. ★★
★★★1(tISNJO
#FMMJT'BJSBN]]]]
Year One: Michael Cera and Jack Black team up to
play, well, Michael Cera and Jack Black. Except as
cavemen. On a road trip. Apparently, this movie isn’t
one bit funny. I retract any earlier statement I may
have made that implied otherwise. ★★ 1( t ISNJO
4VOTFU4RVBSF]]]]
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
FILM
NOW SHOWING
CASCADIA WEEKLY
J U LY 1 0 - 1 6
ch
Delicious Lun es
Away We Go
Yum Birthday Cakes
my
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
@ The Pickford Cinema
Exqu
isite Wedding Cakes
La Vie
En Rose
26
111 W. Holly St.
360-715-1839
Indie Smash Continues!
“Rudolph and Krasinski are absolutely extraordinary.
Ditto the film, which sneaks up and floors you.”
Rolling Stone, Peter Travers
t64"tNJOt3
'SJćV
1.
Moon
Stars Sam Rockwell
“After the chaos of Transformers, it’s
refreshing to encounter a science fiction film
that respects the intelligence and attention
span of an adult.” The Reel Views
t6,tNJOt3
'SJćV
1.
$8.25 regular | $6.25 matinees & under 12 | $5.25 members | 1416 Cornwall | movie line: 360.738.0735 | pickfordcinema.org
REVIEWED BY PETER HOWELL
Moon
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
07.08.09
#27.04
Spacey), a super computer that both
nurtures and natters.
Comparisons to HAL 9000 from 2001
are apt, and so is the scenario in which
Sam leaves his moon base in a lunar rover to check a suspected mechanical flaw
in an H3 harvester. Something goes awry
and Sam awakes to find himself back at
home base, in sickbay, with Gerty carefully monitoring him. Gerty tells Sam
that he’ll need to take it easy for a few
days, but something conspires mightily
against that prognosis. It’s the sudden
appearance of another astronaut who
looks like Sam Bell and who calls himself
Sam Bell, but who cops a much more aggressive attitude than the original Sam.
Sci-fi fans may think they know exactly where Moon is headed, but the
beauty of the film is the way it keeps
surprising and challenging us. As with
the best sci-fi, there’s a moral undercurrent that questions the wisdom of
allowing technology to ignore humanity values and God’s laws.
The film is like a Rubik’s Cube where
the solution at first appears simple but
the execution of it is anything but.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
GROUND CONTROL to Major
Tom: Moon rocks.
Acknowledging his influences while
boldly going his way, British video director Duncan Jones makes his feature
debut with a terrific sci-fi thriller that
engages the eye, the mind and the soul.
Jones is better known as Zowie Bowie, son of rocker David, and Moon pays
tribute both to dad’s hit tune “Space
Oddity” and to Stanley Kubrick’s classic
2001: A Space Odyssey in its chronicle of
a disconnected astronaut.
Sam Rockwell is Sam Bell, a blue-collar astronaut living alone on the moon’s
dark side and tasked with mining Helium-3, a rare and real-life substance used
in nuclear fission. A newsreel prologue,
set in the not-too-distant future, establishes how lunar harvesting of H3 has
helped conquer Earth’s energy crisis.
Sam’s cost-conscious corporation has
him working solo, but his three-year
stint will end in just two weeks, allowing him to return home to his wife and
infant daughter. The only live voice he’s
heard all this time, if you want to call it
that, comes from Gerty (voiced by Kevin
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
OPEN THE POD BAY DOORS, HAL
FOOD 34
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CLASSIFIEDS 28
REVIEW
FILM 24
24
FILM
FILM
Aggressive.
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27
classifieds
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS
288
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
broadcast
28
100
EMPLOYMENT
HELP WANTED
Mystery
Shoppers
Wanted! National Market
Research Firm seeks individuals to evaluate service at local
Bar and Grill. Meals reimbursed for completion of online survey form. Please apply
at www.bestmark.com
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
VAN.B.C. WORK All skills,
especially
trades.
Live/
work/both sides of the border. Van.bc is booming,esp.
construction, the Olympics/
oil and gas. Fast track work
visas.1800 661 7799 or www.
businessnavigator.com
EMPLOYMENT
WANTED
Housesit te r/Pe tsit ter
Available I am an experienced housesitter/petsitter
available to take care of your
home and loved ones while
you are away. References
available upon request. Fee
based on day-to-day needs
of home and pets. I may
also be interested in partial
barter for services. If interested, please write to me
at [email protected]
com.
EDUCATIONINSTRUCTION
ATTEND College online
from home. Medical, Business, Paralegal, Computers,
Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer
provided. Financial aid if
qualified. Call 1(866)858-
100
EMPLOYMENT
100
EMPLOYMENT
200
SERVICES
2121; www.OnlineTidewaterTech.com
The Every Day Gourmet Executive Chef, Gail
Walker has opened The Everyday Gourmet, a personal
chef service for Christmas
parties, private parties,
brunches or special dinners for guests 2-100 and
anything in between. The
Everyday Gourmet specializes in quality, gourmet, low
cost parties. In this service,
the client buys the food and
Walker prepares it in connivance of the hosts home.
Full service and clean up are
also offered in the low price.
For custom designed menus
to fit your special occasion,
shopping lists, wine and beverage suggestions, contact
Executive Chef Gail Walker
and the Everyday Gourmet at
(360)392-8527. Gail Walker
was featured on Comcast’s
popular show “A Taste Of,”
during her ownership of Emerald Bay Events.
ible schedule. Low overhead
= competitive prices. And
our hypo-allergenic cleaning
products are safe for pets,
children, and anyone with allergies. Safeco insured. Call
360-510-3404!
200
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
Auto Detailing - Happy
Helpers We will come out to
a location of your choice and
detail your car, motorcycle,
boat, RV or anything you
want. We clean the windows,
carpet, door jams, dash,
trunk, the rims, the seats
and the floor mats then we
Armor All every surface that
takes it. The charge for this
service is $55 for a soft shell
wax, please call Travis at 360224-0473.
Earthworks Tree Service
Earthworks a low impact tree
service. Preserving and maintaining the health, safety and
beauty of the trees in our
community with a mentality
of beneficial environmental
impact. From hazard tree removals to pruning a full spectrum of tree maintainence
and preservation. Free estimate, Licensed & Insured.
Call Brandon (360)305-5525
Want live music for your
office party? James Higgins & the Muddy Boots Band.
Price $500. Lively, upbeat folk
and good-time blues with emphasis on fun. You’ll want to
wrap them up and take them
home. For more info, or to
book, please call (360)6769857. Price negotiable.
CERISE
NOAH
Let Carpet Medic rescue your rugs and upholstery We’re a small, responsible business providing
a quick,effective cleaning
job that dries fast, without
your paying premium for
services (such as deodorizer and soil retardant)
included in our rates. You
arrange for service directly
with the technician and
receive free estimates for
work performed on a flex-
Hey Home
Buyers
Rates are low
and selection is
high. 8K Tax
Credit plus Zip
Realty Rebate.
Zero Down
Loans. Call your
local Realtor,
MIND BODY
SPIRIT
Homeopathy & Massage Baby Wellness
Classes Saturday & Sunday August 1&2 from 10am
to 12. Bring you and your
baby. Learn skills from two
age-old systems of healing.
Learn how to safely relieve
discomfort from colic, wind,
constipation, teething, ear
infections, diaper rash, colds
and more. Cost is $75 for
both days. For more informa-
Enjoy the stability of
homeownership for
ONLY $142,000
Total monthly housing costs of
about $1010 with $1500 down!
A permanently
affordable house for sale
3 Bedrooms, 1 Bath
and a large yard in the
Birchwood neighborhood.
Windermere Real Estate Whatcom, Inc.
Licensed
since 1996
Helping buyers and sellers with their
Real Estate needs throughout Washington State.
Business (360) 734-7500 Ext. 273
Cell (360) 393-5826
“If you’re buying or selling
Real Estate, contact us.
You’ll be glad you did!”
Canadian Financing Available
GORDON & KIMBERLY AMES
11 Bellwether Way, Suite 105
Bellingham, WA 98225
360-527-8785 office
[email protected]
You may
be eligible if you:
Have good credit
and are able to
obtain a bank loan
Meet the income
guidelines for your
family size
(See our website for
new income limits!)
For more information
visit
www.kclt.org
or call
360-671-5600, ext. 7
000
COMICS
TO PLACE AN AD
CLASSIFIEDS.CASCADIAWEEKLY.COM
000
COMICS
000
COMICS
000
COMICS
SOAPS,
LOTIONS,
WOOL HATS ,TRUFFLES, JEWELERY Hand
milled oatmeal soaps, hand
and body lotions, hand knit
wool hats and chocolate
truffles for sale. Call Rena
at 360-714-0570
Spirituality, Regression, Smoking, Weight Loss.
HERBS & TEAS & SPICES
–60min. –90min.
Laura S. Lilly LMP
www.
bellinghamsbestmassage.com
360-733-0517
GRAND RE-OPENING June 1st, 2009
Body Type Bra Fitting
5 ELEMENTS ACUPUNCTURE
Based on 8 Body Types
Maria Monti, Postural Therapist
For chronic pain & infectious diseases
s#USTOMfiTTEDs#USTOMALTERED
s#USTOMMADE
s,ONGLASTINGs'REATvalue
Herbal & Dietary Consultation included
Healthy Bra Company
www.onearrowacupuncture.com
Fairhaven - 360-815-3205
1155 N State St #624
The
by appt. only
Bellingham Herald Building #618
Free Parking!
www.theHealthyBraCompany.com
CALL TODAY!
Marisa 360-224-2387
[email protected]
Journey to a Healing…
Classical Oriental Medicine
Acupuncture/Electroacupuncture
Chinese Herbs
Tuina (Chinese Massage)
Nutritional/Lifestyle Guidance
And More…
Initial Consultation & First Treatment: $65
360.441.6768
~Ask for Specials/Discounts~
T.N. Kim
Available for lectures on 8 body type diets
Tasneem A. Sheikh, L.Ac
(360) 224-5178, for an appointment
1221 Fraser, Suite E, Bellingham, WA 98225
Q: Weight Gain, Hormone Imbalances?
A:
$225 FOR A TOTAL OF 13 WEEKS
OF ADVERTISING COVERING ALL OF
WHATCOM, SKAGIT, ISLAND COUNTIES
AND LOWER MAINLAND, B.C.!
Rejuvenation–Healthy Fast Track Weight Loss Program:
YOGA NORTHWEST
The B.K.S. Iyengar Yoga Center of Bellingham
Come stretch, breathe & relax with the most highly
trained & certified group of instructors in the NW.
STAGE 16
Great
Massage!
ART 18
Sliding Scale Rates
WONDERLAND
1305 Railroad Rd. Bellingham
MUSIC 20
Depression, Anxiety, Gender Identity, Recovery,
Call for More Information
Locally made
Healing Tea Blends
Herb Classes • Colorful Teapots
Oils • Vitamins • Books
FILM 24
Life Transitions, LGBTQ, Relationships,
Codependency, PTSD/Trauma Relief, Grief/Loss,
GET OUT 14
Cheer1SPEVDUT6TFE…/P/VU0JMT
and Dance! All
girls aging from 7-14 are
welcome to come cheer
and dance! You will learn
basic cheer jumps, work on
flexibility, and learn short
choreographed dances. No
experience necessary! Date
and Cost: Every Monday
4pm-5pm. Only $10 an hour!
La Vida Dance Studio: 929-B
North State St., Bellingham,
WA. For more inforamtion
or to add your name to the
list please email: [email protected]
360-599-2627
WORDS 13
738-4121
Sue Stackhouse, RC, CHT, CRMT
CURRENTS 8
Bear Hug is pleased to
Experience
the joy LMT,
of RMT announce that we are
Jessica David
adding an office
playing
marimba (woodenNat. Certified
MA#00017175
location in downtown
key xylophones) at a free
introductory class. InformaBlaine beginning in
tion: [email protected]
July 2009! Most
-BCPS*OEVTUSJFT.PUPS7FIJDMFT
net or 360-920-6494.
.PTU*OTVSBODFT"DDFQUFE
insurances will be
0OMZ0SHBOJD)ZQPBMMFSHFOJD
taken at this location!!
CLASSIFIEDS
28
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
Spring Specials at
BearHug
Massage!
Paraffin Dip $25, includes
THREE BED FURNITURE
BARNS GMC Furniture
Barm has 200+ beds, All sizes, $79.95 Queens; George’s
58th Year on Guide Rd; 3982771 Please Lv. Msg.
CLASSES &
WORKSHOPS
Only a few spaces left!
Counseling | Hypnotherapy | EFT | Reiki
VIEWS 6
Alternatives for Depression/ Anxiety Relief New Year’s Discounts
apply till 02/15/08. For
more information contact
Monique Arsenault, RC at
The Natural Health Clinic
1707 F Street (360)7341560
“On the Spectrum”
thrift store is now open!
All of our proceeds go to
organizations that support people on the Autism
spectrum. This year’s recipients are the Univervisity of Washington (CHDD),
Autism Society of Washington, Wintros Academy,
Toddler Learning Center,
and Autism Outreach.
We only sell pre-washed,
gently-worn clothing. We
have brand name clothing
for men, women, children,
and infants. We also accept donations at the store
or email us for the pickup schedule [email protected] 4152
Meridian Street, suite 113,
Bellingham [(360) 7333013](across from Lover’s
Pkg.).
BULLETIN BOARD
On Eagle’s Wings Counseling
MAIL 4
C O M PA S S I O NAT E
BIRTH SUPPORT Local
Doula Now Accepting NEW
Clients!! Comforting, compassionate care celebrating birth as a life changing
experience of infinite possibility. NURTURING PRENATAL, LABOR and POSTPARTUM SUPPORT. For
more information about my
services and rates please
view my website at: http://
karunawellness.blogspot.
com
BUY SELL TRADE
400
DO IT 2
Law of Attraction Spirituality Group meets the
first Wednesday of each
month from 6:30 to 7:30. For
more information contact
Marguerite Johnson, Spiritual Guidance facilitator, at
360-715-2580 or [email protected]
300
Fun in the Sun
+ Yard Work
+ Got to Clean
Out the Garage
+ Softball
= Massage
A hypothalamus detox & balancing program with homeopathy & supplements…
No HCG injections (the hypothalamus controls the endocrine system including weight.)
t)FMQTDPSSFDUNFUBCPMJTNyZPVSCPEZTOBUVSBMBCJMJUZUPLFFQXFJHIUPGG
07.08.09
Energy work Integrated
Energy Therapy that removes old emotions and
replaces them with healthy
healing emotions in your
organ systems and chakras.
This may help accelerate
you on your path and ability
to receive higher vibrational
energy. Session may include
tuning forks and bowls. 1
hour for $45 Lona Way LMP
360-303-7964
massage of dipped area.
Deep, soothing heat and
incredible softening for
hands, feet or elbows. Excellent for arthritic or painful joints. ADD hands OR
feet to your Massage for
$15, or add both for $25!
Buy 3 Massage certificates
and get 1 FREE! A $50 savings! 1.5 Hour Massage
for only $60. Wow! Call to
schedule your appointment
now! BearHug Massage
Therapy (360) 738-4121
To p l a c e y o u r a d , c o n t a c t M a r i s a P a p e t t i 3 6 0 - 2 2 4 - 2 3 8 7 o r m a r i s a @ c a s c a d i a w e e k l y. c o m
t5IPTFUIBUGPMMPXUIFQMBOUFOEUPMPTFXFJHIURVJDLMZBWFSBHJOHMCEBZ
t%JTDPVOUTBWBJMBCMFGPSZPVBOEBGSJFOE
Vo t e d B e s t Yo g a S t u d i o 2 0 0 8 !
t *34UBYDSFEJUSFJNCVSTFNFOUGPSFYQFOEJUVSFXIFO
ZPVS%SSFDPNNFOETXFJHIUMPTTGPSZPVSIFBMUI
Jan Templeton
yoganorthwest.com
360.647.0712
t $BMMUPSFHJTUFSGPSGSFF
JOGPSNBUJPODMBTT
Natural Health Specialist
Lost 42 lbs. in 42 days
over two years ago…
and kept it off!
Health for the Body, Home & Office
360.647.7667
www.enharmony.net
What Are You
Waiting For?
Call Now
to Advertise!
#27.04
tion and to sign up please
contact Monique Arsenault
or Christin Nelson at the
Natural Health Clinic 1707
F Street Bellingham WA
98225 Tel: (360)734-1560.
Registration
Deadline
7/31/09 5pm.
200
SERVICES
CASCADIA WEEKLY
200
SERVICES
29
REAR END
AMY ALKON
FOOD 34
presents
July 11
Kung
Fu Panda
Starting at 8:30 with live music by Barnum Jack
Jul. 18: Iron Man
Aug. 1: Young Frankenstein
Jul. 25: The Muppet Movie Aug. 8: Twilight
Aug. 15: Marley & Me
Aug. 22: Vicky Christina Barcelona
Aug. 29: The Princess Bride
Produced by Epic Events, 360.733.2682, www.EpicEvents.US
THE ADVICE
GODDESS
CAN’T GET THERE FROM
HAIR
My first wife and I married in our early 20s
and broke up several years later. When we were
married, she had very short hair, even though
I wanted her to grow it long. She was not only
adamant about keeping it short; but she also
claimed she couldn’t get it past “the awkward
stage.” Also, she’d always bite her nails, a
habit that annoyed me. I’ve been happily
married to my second wife for 10 years, but
I can’t help but be surprised that my ex, who
I’ve seen a few times in passing, now has hair
down to the middle of her back and nice nails.
Please note I don’t want her back; I just want
to know why she wouldn’t grow her hair and
nails when we were together. Should I ask her?
—Wondering
“The awkward stage” is what you enter
when you ring up your ex-wife and ask
why she was such a nervous, nail-gnawing
hag back when you were together.
Sometimes a hairstyle is just a hairstyle and not a coded message: “L’Oreal,
because I’m worth it. Short hair and bitten nails? Because you’re not.” Maybe
she was into a particular style, or maybe
she thought she looked better with short
hair. Of course, it is possible the apparent foreverness of marriage made her
figure you were stuck with her, so why
3
6
07.08.09
How to
Sudoku:
5
9
6
7
3
#27.04
CASCADIA WEEKLY
30
spend all the extra time hot-oiling and
blow-drying?
Many women don’t understand or accept how important visuals are to men,
thanks largely to the toxic feminism
that’s seeped into regular people’s lives.
While there are lipstick feminists out
there, the prevailing message of the
women’s studies feministollahs is that
male sexuality is criminal or close to it,
and women degrade themselves by doing
anything to appeal to their “patriarchal
oppressors.” As a result, women like your
ex-wife may feel justified for taking the
lazy way out with the soccer mom hair
cap and the all-you-can-eat fingernails.
Men, across cultures, seem hard-wired
to prefer long hair—probably because
it signals youth, health and fertility. In
a Hungarian study, women’s faces that
were rated as less attractive by men were
judged much more attractive when the
researchers stuck long hairstyles on the
photos. Darwin noted the preference for
long hair in the West African population,
and in Survival of the Prettiest, psychologist Nancy Etcoff points to all the classic
paintings of women with flowing tresses.
If you truly are 10 years into a happy
marriage, you might just accept that while
hair and nails do not continue growing
after death, they often grow like crazy
after a divorce. Sure, Socrates did say the
unexamined life is not worth living. Unfortunately, he was forced to off himself
before he could add that the overly examined ex-wife is a great way to discover,
for the second time, that women often
change their hair after a breakup.
Sudoku
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS
28
CLASSIFIEDS 28
BY AMY ALKON
3
1
1
8
4
9
6
7
9
2
2
1
5
1
8
2
4
9
2
5
8
Arrange the
digits 1-9 in
such a way
that each
digit occurs
only once
in each row,
only once
in each
column, and
only once
in each box.
Try it!
CROSSWORD
YOU’RE GIVING ME A HEADACHE
Across
1 One of a pair of
fairy tale brothers
6 Thing: abbr.
9 Eat
13 Fable payoff
14 Like some vaccines
16 In the thick of
17 Where you may
get your “Get
Fuzzy” fix, e.g.
19 Subterfuge
20 The Bible’s Enos,
relatively speaking?
22 Outdoor goods
retailer
23 Champagne
buckets
24 British ship that
shares its name
with a New York
“village”
31 Jon’s dog
32 Swearing-in words
33 Snake that killed
Cleopatra
36 Former name of
the airport in
Phoenix, Arizona
41 2009 “American
Idol” finalist
Rounds
42 Do an athletic
taboo
43 Shakespearean
king
44 NASA OK
48 “Chasing Pavements” singer
51 Company that
reported a $61.7
billion loss in
2008
52 “I’m fine with it”
58 1970s hairdo
59 Coke’s competitor
to Pepsi’s Mountain Dew
62 “___ Our Thing”
Last Week’s Puzzle
(Booker T. & the
M.G.’s album)
63 It’s given when
being bratty,
slangily
64 Islamic ruler: var.
65 Like some cheeses
66 Chemin de ___
(card game)
67 Dietary restriction that the long
answers manage to
disregard
Down
1 Big inits. in trucks
2 Friend of Tigger
3 “The Joy of
Cooking” author
Rombauer
4 Mansion worker
5 Mid-1990s Boston
Celtics coach
6 “My mistake”
7 Speak highly about
oneself
8 Jaromir who helped
the Penguins win the
Stanley Cup in 1991
and 1992
9 Feature of “Christmas” or “chimera”
10 Play the jester
11 Sun-blocking hat
12 Perfect places
15 Thompson of
“Back to the Future”
18 Captain Hook’s
right-hand man
21 Not, in Germany
24 “___ and Other
Poems” (Allen Ginsberg collection)
#ARING3TAFF
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s+IRSTIN#URTIS!2.0
s2EN£E7ILGRESS!2.0
s(IGH1UALITY#ARE
s(IGH0ATIENT3ATISFACTION
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#ONVENIENT-EDICAL#ARE
s#ONVENIENT,OCATION
s7ALKINS7ELCOME
s-OST)NSURANCES
s)MMUNIZATIONS
s3PORTS0HYSICALS
s#OLDS&LU#OUGHS
#OMPREHENSIVE0RIMARY#ARE
s7OMENS(EALTH
s&AMILY0LANNING34$
s3TRESS$EPRESSION
s2EFERRALSTO3PECIALISTS
s-ENS(EALTH
s4EENS#HILDREN
s$ERMATOLOGY
s(EALTH#OUNSELING
www.BellinghamHealth.com
TH3Ts3EHOME6ILLAGEs"ELLINGHAM7!
For an Appontment Call: 360-756-9793
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
“People are Happy Seeing Nurse Practitioners”
WORDS 13
Additive Properties
25 DCCLI doubled
26 Flower box location
27 After-haircut
styler
28 Intrusive: var.
29 Shake your tail
30 “Give ___ rest,
will you?”
33 Blows away
34 ___ paneer (Indian cheese dish)
35 Firestarter
37 Keeps the engine
running
38 MSN competitor
39 Base cops
40 “Slippery” tree
44 M&M’s flavor
45 E!’s “The Daily
Ten” cohost Catt ___
46 One of the Jackson 5
47 “Adoration” director Atom
48 Carne ___
49 Dashboard heater
setting
50 Weirder than
weird
53 Clock reference
for the BBC World
Service: abbr.
54 Egg, in French
cooking
55 Merrie ___
England
56 Sticky note
57 K-6, in some
districts: abbr.
60 Guitar maker Paul
61 moveon.___
CURRENTS 8
BY MATT JONES
VIEWS 6
Caring
Convenient
Comprehensive
MAIL 4
Bellingham Family Health Clinic
DO IT 2
north
th cascades institute
07.08.09
www.ncascades.org/getoutside 360 856 5700 x209
#27.04
Our annual writing retreat continues this summer
at the confluence of writers Rick Bass, Kathleen
Dean Moore, Holly Hughes and Jim Bertolino.
You’ll learn techniques for crisp, powerful writing inspired by nature. Seasoned writer or eager
newcomer, we hope you’ll join us for this unique
literary mountain rendezvous!
CASCADIA WEEKLY
writing retreat
2009
JJuly
uly 3
30-Aug
0--A
A ug 2
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS
28
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
REAR END
31
©2009 Jonesin’
Crosswords ([email protected]
jonesincrosswords.
com)
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
CLASSIFIEDS
28
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
REAR END
32
COMIX
CANCER (June 21-July 22): I believe that when
you chatter carelessly about a big change that’s in the
works, you’re in danger of draining it of some of its potency. So I don’t want to trumpet or gossip about the
gift that’s on its way to you. I’ll just mention that it’s
coming, and urge you to prepare a clean, well-lit place
for it to land. Here’s a hint: It could, among other
things, help you convert one of your vulnerabilities
into a strength or inspire you to start transforming an
area of ignorance into a future source of brilliance.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): At the farmers market, an
escape artist performed in the middle of the street. As
a crowd gawked, he had two big strong men tie him
up tight in a straitjacket and 50 feet of chain. For the
next 20 minutes he shimmied and contorted and bent
over backwards. His face grew red and sweaty. There
were no Houdini-like magic tricks. There were no puffs
of smoke or magic boxes or mirrors or distracting assistants. He rarely spoke as the ordeal progressed, but in
the end, after the last of the chains slipped off and he
wrestled his way out of the straitjacket, he said simply,
“Now I invite all of you to go home and use what I just
did as a metaphor for your life.” It was a supremely
sexy performance, and I realized maybe it would help
you with your current situation.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Your concentration for
dicey assignments, like conquering fear and adversity,
is sharp. And I bet you’ll summon a lot of stamina
and resourcefulness if you’re pressed to solve a crucial
riddle during a turning point in your own personal
hero’s journey. On the other hand, humdrum details
have the potential to flummox you, especially if they
involve tasks you’re not even that interested in or
FOOD 34
CLASSIFIEDS
28
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I don’t care what
you feel this week, as long as you don’t feel nothing.
Get inflamed with hunger or justice or sadness or
beauty or love, but don’t submit to apathy. Don’t let
yourself be shunted into numbness. You can’t afford to
be cut off from the source of your secret self, even if
it means having to feel like hell for a while. And the
odd thing is that if you’re willing to go through hell,
you won’t have to go through hell. So to hell with your
poker face and neutrality and dispassionate stance. Be
a wild thing, not a mild thing.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Iliad is an
ancient Greek epic poem that describes events near the
end of the Trojan War. Most modern critics regard it as
a foundation stone of Western literature. In my opinion, though, it’s mostly just a gruesome tale of macho
haters who are inflamed with pride, treat women like
property, and can’t stop killing each other. I share the
perspective of poet Diane di Prima, who once had a
dream in which the Iliad was cast as gangsta rap. Now
please adopt the style of our critique for use in your
own life, Aquarius. What supposedly noble or important
situation is actually pretty trivial or clichéd? It’s time
for you to tell the truth about the hype.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “May you live in interesting times.” That old toast is actually a droll curse
meant to be heaped upon an enemy. “Interesting” implies rapid change, rampant uncertainty, and constant
adjustment. What’s preferable is to live during a boring
era when stability reigns. Or so the argument goes. But
I reject that line of thought. I celebrate the fact that
we’re embroiled in interesting times. I proclaim our
struggles to navigate the sharp turns and uphill climbs
to be a jubilee of the first degree. What fantastic luck
it is to be on the planet when everything mutates! May
we be up to the task of bringing heaven down to earth.
May we be worthy of the trust the universe is placing
in us. Now get out there, Pisces, and enjoy the hell out
of the epic and entertaining drama we’re stewarding.
This is your time to be a leader and a luminary..
STAGE 16
ART 18
CHEESE
GET OUT 14
Ages, people became adults when they turned seven
years old. These days, the threshold is much later. I’m
happy about that. In my view, the longer you can hold
on to your playful irreverence and innocent lust for
life, the better. Still, there is value in taking on the
kinds of responsibilities that help you express yourself
with grace and power. So I don’t mean to rush you, but
it might be time to take a step towards being on the
verge of tiptoeing to the brink of preparing to accept
more adulthood into your heart. You could make the
process less harrowing by hanging out with those rare
wise guys and wise girrrls who’ve survived the transition to greater maturity and a higher degree of professionalism with their youthful flair more or less intact.
Savor & Celebrate
Our Region’s
WORDS 13
GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I wouldn’t get too
agitated about the supposed “writing on the wall” if I
were you. The handwriting is not God’s, for God’s sake.
It’s not even that of a wise elder or young genius. So
don’t attribute too much authority to it, please. It’s
just the opinion of someone who doesn’t know any
more about the ultimate truth than you do. So I suggest you cover it up with black spray paint and then
carefully inscribe your own version of the writing on
the wall. Reality is especially malleable right now, so
the most forcefully expressed prophecy will probably
come true.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In the Middle
CURRENTS 8
up, the father of basketball superstar Pat Riley forced
him to play basketball with kids who were stronger and
tougher than he was. He said it forged his son into a
winner. I can see the principle at work, but it doesn’t
come naturally to me. In my efforts to provide you with
the parenting you missed as a kid, I’ve always preferred
a gentler, more nurturing approach. Nevertheless, the
time has come to override my personal desires for the
sake of your character-building needs. I recommend
that you force yourself to play with grown-up kids
who’re stronger and tougher than you.
Saturday, July 11th
TWO FREE EVENTS!
TAMI
PARR
11:00am ”Chef in the
Market”-Meet Tami &
local cheesemakers
at the Bellingham Farmer’s Market
VIEWS 6
TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When he was growing
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): How well are you
capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities,
Scorpio? Since we’re midway through 2009, let’s take
an inventory. I hope that by now you have at least
begun building the power spot or energy source that
will serve as your foundation for the coming years. So
much the better if it’s more than halfway finished and
will be ready for full use by the end of summer or early
fall. Remember my promises: Life has been and will
continue to be conspiring to get you settled in your
ideal home base, supercharge your relationships with
your closest allies, and connect you with the resources
that will fuel your long-term quest.
MAIL 4
A pointless pain in the butt will soon stop bugging
you. Meanwhile, an annoying itch in your heart is
subsiding, and may even disappear. As a result of
these happy developments, you will be able to concentrate on a much more interesting and provocative
torment that has been waiting impatiently for your
loving attention. Actually, it’s an ancient torment
dressed up in a new package. But as before, it’s a
torment you’ve never had the right name for. That’s
about to change, however. You’re finally ready to find
the right name for it, and when you do, you’ll be
halfway toward a permanent cure.
DO IT 2
ARIES (March 21-April 19): Miracle of miracles:
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The sky will not start
falling. But something resembling heavenly tokens may
cascade down with such frequency that you’ll be wise
to keep looking up a lot. You never know when another
piece of the blessed puzzle will come raining down.
And it would be a shame to suffer the embarrassment
of having your favorable fortune knock you over. Who’d
have ever guessed that a shower of good news would
be such a tricky trial?
8_ddbYQ^W\UTbY`
1bYfUb_VZeYSU_^]i\Y`c
<YS[UTS\UQ^Ri
]id_^WeU
07.08.09
FREE WILL
ASTROLOGY
committed to. The moral of the story: Banish absentmindedness by keeping yourself focused on only the
most riveting challenges.
Co-sponsored by the Bellingham Farmer’s Market
7:00pm Meet Tami, see a
slide show, and TASTE
ARTISAN CHEESE!
at Village Books
Quel Fromage
YUM!
Co-sponsored by
VILLAGE BOOKS
1200 11th St., Bellingham
360.671.2626
VILLAGEBOOKS.com
#27.04
BY ROB BREZSNY
ASTROLOGY
CASCADIA WEEKLY
REAR END
33
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
34
FOOD
chow
RE V IE W S
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
REC IPE S
34
BY IAN CHANT
New York Pizza and Bar
AN OBSCURE OBJECT OF DESIRE
NEW YORK Pizza and Bar, newly opened in the State Street
space that once housed Bargainica, as well as Bellingham’s shortlived but fondly recalled Wingdome, has its sights set squarely
on becoming that obscure object of desire—a restaurant and bar
that’s classy without being pretentious.
It’s the sort of place you could go to impress a date with delicious food and quality cocktails one night and come back the
next evening to watch a game with some friends and quaff a
pitcher of PBR while arguing loudly over whether or not soccer
players know where the ball is going when they kick it (which,
for the record, they totally don’t).
Right off the bat, the place seems to be succeeding. The interior is beautifully designed without being
intimidating, featuring cozy lighting, comfy
seats and work by a variety of local artists
adorning the walls. Food and drinks are prepared and served by a friendly, knowledgeable staff eager to share their passion and
wisdom in all things alcoholic and delicious,
the sort of staff who describe themselves
as “offended and disturbed to the core by
EAT
prepackaged sour mix.”
WHAT: New
The bar is well stocked with a selection of
York Pizza and
Bar
underappreciated liquors, including a great
WHERE: 902 N.
variety of rarely seen bourbons and rye
State St.
whiskeys. The selection is enhanced by a bar
INFO: 733-3171
staff who knows its booze inside and out and
or newyorkpizcan wax eloquent on what you’re drinking.
zaandbar.com
Of their classic and delicious old-fashioned
($8), bartender Jabriel Donohue says, “If this drink doesn’t take
you three minutes to make, you’re doing it wrong.”
The cocktails are on the expensive end of things, but the
higher quality is apparent from the moment you order your first
drink. And for the cost conscious—and who isn’t among our
slightly chintzy ranks these days—nightly specials like cheap
wells on Tuesday evenings and affordable and luxurious Whiskey Wednesdays mean an evening of cocktails or a night spent
finding your favorite bourbon doesn’t have to break the bank.
But try as one might, man does not live by whiskey alone, and
the kitchen specializes in pizza that’s among the best in town.
Just as any building has to start on a good foundation, any
worthwhile pizza has to start with a good crust. The pie at New
York Pizza and Bar has a just-right crust that’s thin, crunchy and
chewy, but never goes soggy or soft as so many
thin crusts can. The crust remains sturdy enough
to hold its own, refusing to droop beneath the
weight of generously heaped toppings of quality
ingredients like sweet, crisp green peppers and
juicy, delicious Italian sausage. It even leaves a
perfect lining of grease on the pan; not enough to
create a puddle, just enough to give it a bit of a
sheen as a reminder of just what a decadent dinner
pizza should really be.
The Queens Supreme ($12.99-$19.99), with sausage, pepperoni, mushrooms, olives, peppers and
onions is a classic pizza recipe executed to near
perfection. Meanwhile, more exotic pies such as
the Rustic Italian ($12.99-$23.99)—featuring
toppings like prosciutto and baked egg—arrived
further down the bar, eliciting satisfied exclamations from my fellow diners. But despite its name,
New York Pizza and Bar is far from a one-trick
pony, featuring a menu replete with a mouthwatering variety of burgers and pasta, including
the juicy and tender Italian ($8.99 at lunchtime),
which my dining companion found more akin to a
little steak than a traditional burger in its tenderness, flavor and quality.
For those with a little less than a full dinner
appetite, there are also a wide array of appetizers, including a huge Portobello mushroom cap
stuffed to the brim with fresh pesto and parmesan cheese and topped with roasted peppers,
basil and melted mozzarella ($8.99). And what’s
more, the staff is knowledgeable about the food
they serve and people’s dietary restrictions and is
happy to offer lots of options for diners.
“That’s one of the things about being in the
food industry: you have to know your job,”
Donohue says. And the folks at New York Pizza
and Bar know their jobs damn well.
ALSO SOLD AT THESE FINE ESTABLISHMENTS
Community Food Co-op
Forest Street and
Cordata Stores
The Market at Birch Bay
and Food Pavilion (FH)
Crossroads Grocery
Haggen Sehome,
Meridian, Barkley, and
Fairhaven Market
Now available at Joe’s Gardens through late summer
Since 1995 www.avenuebread.com 360-715-DELI
Handmade and Baked Fresh Daily
#27.04
07.08.09
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 13
GET OUT 14
We’re one mile west of I-5 on Grandview road. Exit 266 in Ferndale
Tuesday-Saturday 10-6. 360-366-4013
CLASSIFIEDS 28
FOOD 34
Avenue Bread Downtown Avenue Bread Fairhaven Avenue Bread James St.
1313 Railroad Avenue
1135 11th Street
2301 James Street
FILM 24
Real bread, made by real people.
MUSIC 20
Stone-hearth Baked
ART 18
Locally Produced
Phone: 360-366-3199
Coupon Good Only at
Birch Bay Location
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Preservative-Free
STAGE 16
OUR DELICIOUS LOAVES ARE:
35
50% OFF BURGER
w/Purchase of the Same
(Equal or Lesser Value) Offer Expires July 16th, 2009
New!
Weekly Cash Prize Drawings!
Thursdays, July 16 & 23,
Thursdays
23 Hourly,
Hourly 2 – 8 pm
Grand Prize Drawings!
Thursday, July 30, Hourly, 2 – 7 pm
BIG CATCH Drawing at 8 pm
Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe
Win a 2009 Crestliner Super Hawk
Series 1800 I/O and Trailer
Includes Fishing Gear and Crab Pots
A $25,000 Value!
M t be
Must
b a Rewards
R d Club
Cll b M
Member
b –M
Membership
b hi isi FREE!
Visit the Rewards Club Center for details
CO M E D I A N S
Jon Reep & Adam Ferrara
Friday & Saturday,
August 21 & 22 at 8 pm
Get tickets at theskagit.com
800-745-3000
Buy Show Tickets Service Charge Free
at the Casino Cashier Cage
*&YJUt.JOVUFT4PVUIPG#FMMJOHIBNtUIFTLBHJUDPNt
Casino opens at 9 am daily. Must be 21 or older with valid ID. *Management reserves all rights. Rewards discounts cannot be combined with any other offer. Tax and gratuity not included.
CW

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