Act June 06.qxp

Comments

Transcription

Act June 06.qxp
AUGUST 2006
IN THIS ISSUE
• Latest Version of CSR SafeShip
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
• Guidance for Controlling Distortion
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
• ABS Classes First Jackup Rig in UAE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
• ABS Class Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
news
Latest Version of ABS CSR SafeShip
Classification Conformance for
A
BS has released an enhanced
new version of the CSR
SafeShip for Tankers software.
The new version 6.8 is an upgrade
of the previous version 6.63, which
shipyards have been using to evaluate tanker designs for conformance
with the new IACS Common
Structural Rules (CSR) since February
2006. The new release includes
the latest CSR requirements
including Corrigenda 1 of the
Rules and incorporates the
considerable feedback that
has been gained from industry
over the last several months.
Bold graphics, NAPA modeling and ease
of use characterize the initial scantling
evaluation (ISE) process using the latest
version of ABS CSR SafeShip for the
evaluation of tanker designs to the new
IACS common structural rules.
ABS had been working with leading
shipyards, especially in Asia, for an
extended period prior to the introduction of the CSR in April 2006,
assisting the yards to develop new
designs that conform to the more
technically advanced Rules.
“This cooperation has been invaluable for both the yards and for the
ABS engineering staff,” said Dr. Kirsi
Tikka, Vice President for Special
Projects at ABS who has spearheaded the ABS Common Rules program.
“It meant that some shipyards had
new CSR compliant designs available to offer shipowners as soon as
the new Rules took effect. The first
order for a CSR-compliant tanker
to ABS class was placed in April and
others have followed. These designs
have been developed using the new
ABS CSR SafeShip software.”
The software has proved to be a
powerful tool which incorporates
all the CSR structural assessment
requirements in a single comprehensive rule check package. It uses an
advanced graphic user interface for
modeling the hull form, the compartments and the structural members. The unique features such as
automatic copy functions for repeat
structural members and the ship-
PAG E 2
specific templates assist designers
to generate a 3-D structural model
including longitudinal and transverse members as well as complex
configurations such as the intersection of corrugated bulkheads with
other structures.
The software generates a NAPA
model which provides the steel
weight for the structure and can
be further developed into a complete
NAPA Steel model if desired by the
shipyard. NAPA is widely used by
shipyards around the world as an
integrated part of their design process
and ABS CSR SafeShip is the only
classification software that incorporates a NAPA model from the outset.
“In furthering the development of
the SafeShip software, the challenge
has been to balance the designer’s
sometimes competing needs,”
explains Tikka. “At the earliest stage
of development, a designer’s preference is for speed and ease of use.
Yet the more information that can
be generated initially, the faster and
easier it is to complete the latter
stages of the design that involve
more complex analysis. By introducing elements such as the NAPA
modeling during the Initial
Scantling Evaluation not only is
the entire classification verification
process improved, but also the
design can be then more easily
integrated with the other design
tools and functions adopted by a
shipyard that go beyond class.”
ABS CSR SafeShip uses Prescriptive
Rule Spreadsheets for the CSR Initial
Scantling Evaluation (ISE). This
approach provides a simplified method
that promotes transparency and
avoids a ‘black box’ approach to
the engineering calculations. The
spreadsheets have been developed
for easy verification of the intermediate and final results and for easy
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
news
Software Simplifies
New Tanker Designs
evaluation of alternatives thus providing flexibility in the design process.
An ISE conducted using SafeShip
comprehensively covers the prescriptive requirements for the global
hull girder, local plate and stiffeners,
primary support members, applying
the specified yielding, buckling and
fatigue acceptance criteria, while
automatically applying the appropriate net thickness values in accordance with the CSR philosophy. The
ABS SafeShip system is also unique
in that its ISE considers the whole
ship, covering the forward and aft
ends of the ship as well as the midship region of the vessel.
The subsequent CSR Total Strength
Assessment (TSA) process requires
a mandatory Finite Element Analysis
which, in the SafeShip software, is
supported by an extensive graphic
user interface for generating the
3-D FE model, the tank information
as well as the boundary constraints
and design loading. The general
data is imported from the ISE module to eliminate repeat data entry.
The system also offers a standalone
option for TSA with a graphic user
interface when only the FE analysis
is needed. The model generation
includes global, local and fatigue
models which are required to carry
out the total strength assessment
for the CSR. Alternatively, the system also includes the flexibility to
import most independent usergenerated FE models which are
then loaded and assessed using the
SafeShip system. The system offers
user-friendly tools to check and view
the model. Different parts of the
model can be selected for strength,
fatigue or buckling evaluations.
rates local strength
screening.
SafeShip also
incorporates the
advanced buckling check for
a complete Rule
Check package.
The SafeShip TSA
module is a powerful tool
which brings the benefits of the
final Rule verification to the earliest
stages of the design process. This
provides designers with the information necessary to finalize the scantlings at the outset, simplifying the
subsequent design process.
The ABS SafeShip system for tankers
designed to the IACS Common Rules
clearly identifies critical stress areas
during the Total Strength Assessment
phase.
“ABS is committed to providing the
most comprehensive technical support possible to both shipyards and
shipowners as they adjust to the
application of the new Common
Structural Rule requirements to their
designs,” Tikka stressed. “This latest
version of CSR SafesShip provides a
technically advanced yet simple and
logical tool that, in its earlier iterations, has already clearly demonstrated the advantages it brings to
the design development process.
We are continuing to work with
NAPA and with our clients to complete development of comparably
advanced software for application
to bulk carrier designs that will
be a significant technical improvement over the initial system that
is being used at present.”
Advanced finite element modeling is
integral to the Total Strength Assessment
(TSA) conducted on proposed designs
for tankers conforming to the new IACS
Common Structural Rules using the ABS
SafeShip evaluation system.
To assist the designers to identify
critical areas for local mesh modeling and analysis, SafeShip incorpoACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 3
NEWS
ABS Reports Solid Performance in 2005
U P WA R D T R E N D C O N T I N U E S I N 2 0 0 6
new record fleet size and
a solid financial performance were the 2005
highlights reported at the
Annual Members’ Meeting in
New York by ABS Chairman and
Chief Executive Officer Robert
D. Somerville.
A
By the end of 2005 the ABS fleet
had grown to a record 121 million gross tons, an increase of
6.5m gt over the previous year.
Further strong growth in 2006
has pushed the toal fleet size to
123.3m gt. Just over half of that
tonnage is less than 10 years old,
continuing the remarkable rejuvenation of the ABS fleet that
has been taking place over the
last three to four years. In
numerical terms, the fleet grew
by almost 300 vessels in 2005
to just over 9,500. By end-June
2006 it was nearing 9,700.
Gerhard Kurz (left) receives a plaque of appreciation for his service on the ABS Board of Directors
from 2001-2006 from ABS Chairman & CEO Robert D. Somerville at the society’s Annual
Members’ Meeting.
ABS FLEET SIZE (1990-2005)
123.3
Millions of GT
120.9
120
110.6
109.1
110
Somerville noted that newbuilding
orders continued to be placed
throughout 2005 at a pace that had
not been seen for many years. “ABS
has benefited from this display of
confidence by owners of all ship
types,” he said. “At the end of 2005
our orderbook stood at an all time
record of more than 1,400 vessels
aggregating over 26 million gross
tons. And it has grown even further
this year.” The latest figures show
that the ABS orderbook totalled
1,677 vessels aggregating almost
30m gt at end-June 2006.
100.3
100
95.1
91.5
91.8
1991
1993
93.3
90
80
70
PAG E 4
“There is no doubt that we continue
to benefit from the overall strength
of the shipping and offshore industries,” Somerville told the assembled
members of the not-for-profit organization. As a result “our orderbook
is healthy and our finances are
sound,” he said.
1995
1997
1999
2001
2003
2005 June
2006
This represents a 19 percent share
of all tonnage on order around the
world and is markedly higher than
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
NEWS
the society’s third place share of the
world’s existing fleet. Tankers and
bulk carriers remain the backbone
of the ABS fleet on a tonnage basis.
Together they account for almost
60 percent of the total tonnage
and, for both ship types, the ABS
orderbook share at end-2005 and
subsequently remains substantially
higher than the society’s share of
the existing fleet.
“Twenty-three percent of the current
world tanker fleet operates under
ABS class,” ABS President and Chief
Operating Officer Robert E. Kramek,
told the meeting. “But 27 percent of
all new tankers on order are building or will be built to our standards.” Kramek noted that owners
of all size ranges of tankers have displayed a preference for ABS, with
the society receiving particular support from suezmax owners.
Within the bulk sector Kramek
acknowledged the dominant presence of Japanese owners noting that,
“for class societies the challenge is
to secure second place.” With a
16 percent share of all bulk carriers
on order, ABS ended 2005 with a
newbuilding share a full 5 points
higher than its share of the existing
fleet and 9 points higher than the
class society with the third largest
bulk carrier orderbook.
A great deal of emphasis is currently
placed on the LNG sector and
Kramek was able to report to the
ABS membership that the society
had secured a 31 percent share of
all the LNG newbuilding contracts
placed during 2005, including
orders for ships of greater than
200,000m3 capacity.
A very important component of ABS’
success in 2005 was the offshore
sector. Eighty-four percent of all
jackups on order at end-2005 were
to ABS class. And approximately one
half of the exploration semisubmersibles and drillships were also on
order to ABS giving the society an
overall 73 percent share of the entire
drill rig orderbook. The ABS share of
production units on order at end2005 stood at 44 percent.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
Cressy and Tyler Elected to Board of Directors
Dr. Peter H. Cressy, distinguished
educator and retired US Navy
Rear Admiral and Leonard H.
Tyler, President, Maine Maritime
Academy were elected to the ABS
Board of Directors by the ABS
Council at the Annual Members’
Meeting.
Cressy’s academic career included
positions as the Chancellor of
the University of Massachusetts
Dartmouth and President of the
Massachusetts Maritime Academy
as well as
numerous
teaching
assignments.
His naval
career
spanned
28 years
and included
key appointDr. Peter H. Cressy,
ments at
Rear Admiral USN
the State
Retired
Department, House of Representatives,
the Pentagon and several commanding officer positions in
addition to operational assignments throughout the world.
He brings to ABS a unique combination of broad based experience with industry specific
knowledge. Cressy is known for
his outstanding leadership and
commitment to corporate social
responsibility.
Under Tyler’s
leadership
the Maine
Maritime
Academy
has benefited
from the
most farreaching
fundraising
Leonard H. Tyler,
drive
President, Maine
attempted
Maritime Academy
by a US
maritime college. Because of this
successful campaign, extensive
campus expansions and renovations are currently underway.
Tyler is also a founding officer
of the International Association
of Maritime Universities (IAMU),
established in 1999. The organization is a worldwide network
of maritime universities dedicated
to enhancing the safety of international ocean traffic and promoting maritime education and
training worldwide.
Earlier at the meeting, several
prominent members of the international maritime community
were elected to three-year
terms on the ABS Council,
an advisory body to the
management of ABS. The new
Council members are:
• William T. Bennett, Jr.
• Robert P. Curt, ExxonMobil
• Christos Kanellakis, Alpha
Tankers & Freighters
International Ltd.
• C. R. Palmer*
• Basil Ph. Papachristidis
• Spyros M. Polemis
• Antony Prince, G.T.R. Campbell
Marine Consultants Ltd.
• John Reinhart, MAERSK Line,
Ltd.
• Ing. Stefano Rosina, Premuda
Tankers
• Basil C. Scarvelis
• Leonard H. Tyler, Maine
Maritime Academy
• Captain Antonio J. Valdes,
ConocoPhillips
• Richard H. Vortmann*
* Emeritus members
ABS governance is vested in a
Membership comprising more
than 800 individuals eminent
in the marine, offshore and other
related industries, from which
the Council and Board of
Directors is elected.
PAG E 5
news
“All the signs indicate that the
world’s demand for energy will only
continue to increase, further stimulating technological innovation
within the offshore sector,” said
Somerville. “We are determined to
maintain, and wherever possible
increase, our participation in this
all important marine frontier as we
invest in further research to maintain our technical leadership.”
Read More at
As a result of the strong offshore
market, the continued boom in
new ship construction and the
increased demand for surveys
on ships in service, ABS turned
in a solid financial performance
for the year in line with its status
as a not-for-profit entity. However,
Somerville noted that the continued
impact from the introduction of
advanced information technologies
in recent years
has allowed the
society to further
improve operating
efficiencies and
service delivery.
www.eagle.org
A full copy the ABS 2005 Annual
Review is available from the ABS website
at: http://www.eagle.org/news/pubs.html
The Review contains more complete statistical
data and a summary of the organization’s
activities, including the principal technical
projects that were undertaken in 2005.
At the meeting,
Somerville informed
the membership
that he has assumed
the position of
Chairman of the
ABS affiliate, ABS
Group of Companies,
Inc., following the
retirement of Frank
Tony Nassif, ABS Group of Companies
President and Chief Executive Officer
J. Iarossi as Chairman and CEO
of ABS Group. Tony Nassif, the
current ABS Group President, has
assumed the additional responsibilities of Chief Executive Officer for
the affiliate.
ABS Announces Tang-Jensen to
Provide Technology Leadership
BS announces the appointment of Peter Tang-Jensen to
the position of Senior Vice
President of Technology. TangJensen, former Executive Vice
President of Odense Steel Shipyard,
Ltd., will be based at the ABS World
Headquarters in Houston, TX, USA.
Tang-Jensen assumes his new duties
in September.
A
A well-respected member of the
maritime community with more
than 33 years of experience in
shipbuilding design and engineering, Tang-Jensen will provide
strategic leadership for the society’s
technology group which includes
research and product development.
“We feel fortunate to have Peter
joining our team as technology
initiatives underpin all we do to
develop and improve ABS’ suite
PAG E 6
of Rules and Guides for the design,
construction and maintenance of
ships and offshore structures,” said
ABS President and COO Robert E.
Kramek. “I believe technology tools
and advancements are key differentiating factors for clients when selecting a classification society.”
Tang-Jensen earned a Master’s of
Science degree in Naval Architecture
and Marine Engineering from the
Technical University of Denmark
(DTU) and attended Harvard
Business School as well as the
Centre Européen D’éducation
Permanente (CEDEP) in Fontainebleau, France for advanced business
management training. He is a
member of numerous boards and
committees including: Member
of the Technical Advisory
Committee for the Joint European
Shipbuilding Organization; Deputy
Chairman for Odense University
College of Engineering; and Member
of the Board for the Independent
Scandinavian Technical Research
and Investigation Institute (Force
Technology). Tang-Jensen has
also been a member of the ABS
Technical Committee since 1997.
This special purpose committee
provides the society with direct
industry input that helps guide
policies and rule-making procedures. Tang-Jensen is also a
frequent speaker at key industry
conferences and technical programs.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
news
ABS Classed Tanker Receives Green Award
Green Award Tankers
Two-Thirds Less Likely to
be Detained in Port
A
milestone in the Rotterdambased Green Award scheme
was achieved when the 200th
Green Award certificate was awarded
to Athens-based Thenamaris Ships
Management for its 105,000 dwt
double hull ABS classed tanker
M/T Seaoath.
The Green Award scheme is a
voluntary, industry-led initiative
that rewards tanker and bulk carrier
owners for demonstrating an extra
commitment to environmentally
friendly design features and adopting safety, quality and operational
procedures.
Approximately 30 percent of the
certified Green Award vessels are
ABS classed. “We are proud of our
association with owners who pursue
safety and environmental systems
that go beyond mandated regulations,” said ABS Europe President
and COO Christopher J. Wiernicki.
“The Green Award publicly demonstrates an owner’s commitment to
the highest standards and a belief
in a more proactive approach.”
ports and port and ship service
companies that participate in the
scheme. On average, the savings
typically range between 5 to 7
percent.
The philosophy behind the
Rotterdam-based Green Scheme
Award and ABS’ certification systems
are similar. Both are committed to
creating and upholding the highest
safety and environmental standards
and procedures.
Owners with ABS classed vessels
participating in the Green Scheme
program include: Kuwait Oil
Tanker Company, Arab Maritime
Petroleum Transport Corp., Kristen
Navigation, Marine Sea Navigation,
Tanker Pacific Management,
Sun Enterprises, Eagle Ship
Management, International Tanker
Management, Cavodoro Shipping
Corporation, Unicom, Northern
Marine Management and
Thenamaris among others.
ABS notes that the 12-year-old
Green Award scheme program is
voluntary and the fact that Green
Award tankers are two-thirds less
likely to be detained in port compared
to the general tanker population is
a testimonial to the program.
Celebrating receiving the 200th Green
Award certificate (from left): Capt. Yannis
Kontofrios, Marine Superintendent, Safety
& Quality Support, Thenamaris Ships
Management Inc.; Capt. John Mavrides,
Manager, Safety & Quality Support,
Thenamaris Ships Management Inc.;
Dean Tseretopoulos, Technical Director,
Thenamaris Ships Management Inc.; Jan
Fransen, Managing Director, Green Award;
Chris Wiernicki, President & COO, ABS
Europe; and Emmanuel Vordonis, Executive
Director, Thenamaris Ships Management Inc.
The most immediate benefits accrue
from the reductions in fees levied
on Green Award vessels by the
The ABS classed
M/T SEAOATH
managed by
Athens-based
Thenamaris Ships
Management was
awarded the
200th Green
Award certificate
during a ceremony
at the international
shipping exhibition
Posidonia.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 7
news
Consolidated Marine Management Inc.
IS FIRST COMPANY TO MEET ABS HEALTH, SAFETY, QUALITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS
onsolidated Marine
Management Inc. (CMM)
of Greece, operators of a fleet
of product tankers and LPG carriers
engaged in international trading,
is the first company to attain the
recently expanded Health, Safety,
Quality and Environmental (HSQE)
notation issued by ABS. The HSQE
notation indicates that CMM has
been audited and found in compliance with the standards contained
in the ABS Guide for Marine Health,
Safety, Quality and Environmental
Management.
C
These standards expand upon
the previous Safety, Quality and
Environmental standards by adding
management system criteria specifically tailored to the marine industry
that are based on the specification
for Occupational Health and Safety
management systems (OHSAS
18001:1999). The standards require
the company to establish, implement and maintain documented
occupational health and safety
objectives at each relevant function
and level within the organization.
In doing so the company is required
to establish and maintain procedures for the ongoing identification
of hazards, the assessment of risks
and the implementation of necessary control measures for routine
and non-routine activities, for the
PAG E 8
activities of all personnel having
access to the workplace, including
subcontractors, and for the workplace facilities themselves.
When presenting the HSQE certificate to CMM Managing Director
Dimitrios Dragatsis, ABS Europe
President and Chief Operating
Officer Christopher J. Wiernicki
expressed his admiration for the
commitment made by CMM management and staff to embracing the
highest standards of ship operations.
HSQE certificate
celebration with
members from
Consolidated
Marine
Management,
from left: Sokratis
Dimakopoulos,
CMM Designated
Management
Representative,
DPA, CSO; Dimitri
Houliarakis, ABS
Europe Eastern
Region VP; Kostas
Vlachos, CMM Chief
Operating Officer;
Chris Wiernicki, ABS Europe President &
COO; Steve Blair, ABS Europe Head of
Safety, Environmental & Security
Certification; Dimitrios Dragatsis, CMM
Managing Director & Chief Executive
Officer; and Vassilios Kroustallis, ABS
Greece Country Manager.
face to demonstrate continuous
improvement in their operations.
“There is no room left in this
business for ship operators who
are not prepared to run their fleets
to the highest possible standards,”
he said. “We believe that certification to internationally recognized
standards, such as those offered by
ABS, is the best way of demonstrating to the industry that we are
doing everything we can to improve
standards.”
“Today government regulators
exhibit zero tolerance for operators
who fall short of the highest standards of operation and pollution
prevention,” Wiernicki said. “By
achieving certification to these
expanded standards,
Consolidated Marine
Management has provided charterers and
port and flag State repRead More at
resentatives with the
clearest possible
validation of their
commitment to meetA free electronic copy of the ABS
ing those standards
Guide for Marine Health, Safety, Quality and
across their fleet and
Environmental Management (Pub #92) is
throughout their manavailable from the ABS website in its Rules
agement structure.”
www.eagle.org
Dragatsis stressed the
increased pressure that
all ship operators now
and Guides download section at:
http://www.eagle.org/rules/downloads.html
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
news
EARLY PLANNING ESSENTIAL FOR CAS
Owners are reminded that the process for compliance with MARPOL’s mandatory Condition Assessment Scheme
(CAS) must begin at least eight months prior to the initial CAS survey. The timeline of specific responsibilities and
deadlines for planning the survey, beginning with notification to the relevant flag State and to ABS, is laid out in the
accompanying table. All Category 1 and Category 2 single hull tankers must satisfactorily complete the CAS survey
(with no outstandings) in order to trade beyond their relevant phase out date as per MARPOL 13G.
SCHEDULE OF PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION REQUIRED UNDER CAS
Timing
Action Required for Completion of CAS Surveys
Action by
Recipient
8 months prior to PC
Notification of intent to seek CAS certification
Co
CS / A
7 months prior to PC
Issue Questionnaire and changes to diminution limits
CS
Co
5 months prior to PC
Response to Questionnaire
Co
CS
2 months prior to PC
Develop Survey Plan / Convene Pre-Survey Meeting
Co / CS
A
PC
Planned Commencement of Survey
IS/SS due prior to CC
Completion of Survey within 18/15 months ESP window
CS / Co
–
2 months before CC
Issuance of Final CAS Report
CS
Co / A
Prior to CC
Review Final Report / Issue Statement of Compliance
A
CS
CC
CAS Compliance: Anniversary Date in 2005 (Cat.1) and 2010 (Cat.2)
Co: Company
CS: Class Society
A: Administration
ABS on Board with High Tech Dredge
he ABS classed 390-foot trailing suction hopper dredge,
recently delivered to Manson
Construction, incorporates many
new design features.
T
The Glenn Edwards, named for
Manson’s president, was built
to service US Army Corps of
Engineers contracts, primarily in
the Gulf of Mexico. However, to
clear the way for overseas work
the vessel is fully SOLAS compliant and classed by ABS.
To satisfy the Corps’ concern
about accuracy in dredging,
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
navigational controls on the
Glenn Edwards are state-of-theart. Onboard computers compare
the vessel’s differential GPS position and reconcile to a database
containing complete Corps
hydrographic mapping. This high
degree of automation and remote
control is aimed at reducing operator error and keeping personnel
clear of machinery in motion.
the operator’s station in the
wheelhouse, offers 180-degree
visibility.
Both dredging operations and
navigation are served from a
single operator station, with
navigation stations at both wings
of the wheelhouse. For visibility,
The 9,600 gt dredge GLENN EDWARDS
has 12,000 cubic yards capacity.
The newly classed and delivered
Glenn Edwards joins Manson
Construction Company’s fleet
of derrick barges, cutter-head
dredges, hopper, clamshell and
pipeline dredges operating across
the nation.
PAG E 9
news
Dry Dock Administration
Streamlined with Software
▲
▲Companies with representatives at the ABS Nautical Systems
workshop included Dorchester
Maritime, Great Lakes Dredge
and Dock, Interlake Steamship,
MARAD, Maritrans, OSG Ship
Management, SMT Services
and Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institute.
Phil Moore and John Hathaway
from Interlake Steamship
reviewed the modules for dry
dock management and provided
suggestions for improvement to
Nautical Systems representatives
Darren Unger (far left) and Evan
Michaelides (standing).
A
BS Nautical Systems, an affiliate of ABS and developer of
fleet management software for
the marine and offshore industries,
recently held a special workshop
for users of its Maintenance &
Repair and Purchasing & Inventory modules. The purpose was
to introduce new tools in the
NS 5 suite that improve dry dock
administration and management.
A total of 21 users attended the
two-day meeting. NS 5 software
improves the dry dock administration and management process by
streamlining: setup of a maintenance event; bid solicitation and
comparison; dry dock specifications preparation and work
management; and execution.
PAG E 1 0
Jennifer Bewley, Business
Development and Client Liaison
Manager, Nautical Systems
said, “The goal is for clients
to manage a dry dock from our
software without the need for
additional budgeting spreadsheets or documents to draft
specifications. Combined with
the ability to manage planned
and unplanned maintenance,
users will be able to capture
more complete vessel costs in
the NS 5 system.”
The next NS User Conference
event is scheduled for 3-5
October in San Francisco, CA,
USA. The development plan for
NS 5 and introduction of new
tools will be on the agenda.
For more information contact:
Jennifer Bewley
Business Development Manager
ABS Nautical Systems LLC
Email: [email protected]
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
technology
ABS Addresses World Maritime Technology Conference
Kramek discussed the technical
challenges posed by the size
and complexity of new ships
and offshore units.
T
he Institute of Marine
Engineering, Science and
Technology (IMarEST)
hosted the second World Maritime
Technology Conference (WMTC)
in partnership with the world’s
leading maritime associations in
London this year. The conference
is held every three years.
The program “Maritime Innovation
– Delivering Global Solutions”
included a host of industry experts.
ABS President and COO Robert E.
Kramek’s presentation Classification
Developments Affecting the Safety
and Security of Ships
and Offshore Installations
offered the observation that
increased complexity and larger structures for operation in
harsher, more remote environments are driving the adoption
of safety equivalency standards
or unified standards.
ABS has incorporated more riskbased approaches to life cycle
management
which promote continuous operation while
mitigating
risk. Said
Kramek,
“Class is
able to help
the shipping
and energy
industries
transform complicated risk pictures,
resulting from boundary pushing
projects, into quantifiable and
systematic solutions that address
structural mechanical integrity
management requirements without
compromising the need for protecting safety and the environment.”
ABS President Robert Kramek greets His
Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh
at the World Maritime Technology
Conference in London. Prince Philip,
naval officer and recreational yachtsman,
provided the opening address at the
conference, attended by 1,500 delegates
from around the world.
Setting the Stage for WMTC ’09
aghuvir Bhavnani, ABS’
Country Manager for India,
is also the President of the
Institute of Marine Engineers
(IMarEST) chapter in India.
Bhavnani was invited to address
the conference during the WMTC
closing session. He set the groundwork for the next WMTC to be
held in 2009 in Mumbai. Bhavnani
discussed the galloping economic
and maritime activity in India and
the activities of the Institute of
Marine Engineers (India) before
extending his personal invitation
to participants.
R
ticated ships being built in-country,
including the first Indian-built vessel with diesel electric propulsion
joystick controls and dynamic
positioning systems. “Right now
trends in the Indian shipbuilding industry are
moving toward smaller
size, high value vessels
such as chemical
carriers, high capability multi-role
support vessels
and very fast
patrol vessels,” he
added.
According to Bhavnani, India’s shipping is in an expansion mode and is
likely to grow 10 to 12 percent per
year over the next several years. ABS
is classing some of the most sophisACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 1 1
technology
Robust and Predictable Electrical Power Systems
ABS Issues Guidance for Control
of Harmonics in Electrical Power Systems
BS has issued guidance for
controlling distortion in
electrical power supply
wave forms on vessels and offshore
units. The ABS Guidance Notes on
Control of Harmonics in Electrical
Power Systems cover topics such
as the fundamental physics of
harmonics, mitigation of the
electrical distortion and practical
testing methods. These technical
standards will assist electrical
engineers and designers with
the increased use of power
electronic equipment such as
electrical propulsion systems.
A
This distortion, or harmonics, is
caused primarily by variable frequency drives for motor power or
speed control. “With recent rapid
advances of power electronics
technology, so called non-linear
loads such as variable frequency
drives for motor power and speed
control are increasingly finding
their way to shipboard applications,”
says Yoshi Ozaki, Engineering
Systems Manager, ABS Rules &
Standards Development. “Harmonics
induced by these non-linear loads
are a potential risk if they are not
predicted and controlled.”
Electrical variable speed drives
are the main producer of harmonic
Read More at
www.eagle.org
currents. Ozaki
explains that
unlike transient
power quality
issues stemming
from a momentary dip in voltage
and frequency,
the non-linear
currents from
the voltage supply
of variable drives
is continuous
and the resulting
voltage distortion
can cause equipment performance
and reliability
problems as
well as safety
concerns.
Electrical engineers studying
distorted waveforms or electrical
systems say that
in recent years
the growing
Test monitoring of an electrical system on board a vessel to track
proliferation
electrical
wave forms for distortion.
of non-linear
subsystems for
controlling energy flow to electrical
loads has steadily increased the presence of distorted voltages and currents in systems. In recognition of
this phenomenon in
the marine environment, ABS has
released the first
comprehensive set
of guidelines for
controlling harmonics
from a class society.
A free electronic copy of the ABS
Guidance Notes on Control of Harmonics
in Electrical Power Systems (Pub #150) is
available from the ABS website in its Rules
and Guides download section at:
http://www.eagle.org/absdownloads/index.cfm
PAG E 1 2
Ozaki says the
guidance notes aid
designers in the early
planning stages so
that electrical power
systems can be
designed to be more
robust and predictable.
For more information, contact:
Yoshi Ozaki
Manager Engineering Systems
ABS Rules & Standards Development
Email: [email protected]
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
Energy
ABS Supports Brazil’s Energy Independence
The PETROBRAS P50 was converted
from an ABS classed tanker, the
VLCC FELIPE CAMARAO.
(Photo courtesy of Petrobras)
ABS’ prior FPSO experience
with Petrobras has involved the
classification of several units.
Until recently all Petrobras FPSO
units had been from ship-shaped
tanker conversions, but ABS
has granted Approval in
Principal (AIP) for two novel
non-ship-shaped FPSO hull
production concepts, the FPSO
BR and the MONOBR designed
by Petrobras at its Cenpes
Research and Development facility.
Pacheco noted, however, that
ship-shaped FPSO vessels remain
the preferred development option
for frontier prospects offshore
deepwater Brazil.
razilian history was made
this spring when Petrobas,
the national oil company,
threw the switch to start production
on the Petrobras 50 floating production, storage and offloading unit
(FPSO) in the giant Albacora Leste
field, in the northern part of the
Campos Basin offshore Brazil.
B
The significance of the FPSO, converted from a 280,000 dwt oil
tanker, is that with its production,
Brazil is expected to reach the production mark of two million barrels
a day – enough to cover consistently
the domestic market’s daily consumption of 1.8 million barrels.
Brazil’s President Luiz Inacio Lula
da Silva was on board to celebrate
this significant milestone, setting the
stage for future fuel sustainability.
The national production goal set in
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
the 2015 Petrobras Strategic Plan is
2.3 million barrels a day by 2010.
To achieve its national goals,
Petrobras will continue to develop major oil production projects.
“ABS’ experience with the emerging size and types of FPSOs
can continue to be of benefit,”
summarized Pacheco. “We are
certainly proud to help Petrobras
achieve the energy goals of the
company and the country,”
ABS – Behind the Scenes
After decades of in-country
experience, ABS played a role in
this historic enterprise by classing
the converted FPSO. As an interesting twist, ABS also classed the
original tanker, the VLCC Felipe
Camarao.
With Jurong Shipyard acting as
the main contractor, Petrobras
awarded contracts for the various
P50 modules to different suppliers
in many locations. “This approach
presented management challenges
for the classification,” said ABS
Brazil Country Manager João Carlos
Pacheco. “However, ABS is accustomed to working on fast-track fabrication and installation schedules.”
For more information, contact:
João Carlos Pacheco
ABS Brazil Country Manager
Email: [email protected]
PAG E 1 3
energy
Large FPSOs Demand Technology, Innovation
W
hen the Agbami FPSO
destined for service offshore
Nigeria is completed by
Daewoo Shipbuilding in South
Korea and Marine Engineering
(DSME) in 2008, it will become
the largest FPSO to date. Measuring
320m length overall x 59m breadth
x 32m depth, the vessel has oil
storage capabilities of 2.1 million
barrels and process capacity of
250,000 bpd.
The Agbami is just one of many
newbuild floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) units
with giant proportions currently
being classed by ABS. This next
generation of FPSOs poses its own
set of challenges for class societies.
One of the requirements is careful
integration of the topside structure
with the hull structure. For ABS,
this means detailed review of the
loads as well as calculations for
the hull’s strength and fatigue
assessment.
Accounting for Risk
In addition to providing sophisticated ABS SafeHull structural analysis
to better class FPSOs, ABS
has refined a risk-based
approach to topside processing systems in its class review
and continues to be at the
forefront of developing riskbased methodology in its
Rules and requirements, providing operators with a more
flexible approach to meeting
standards.
ABS has also published a
series of Guides, including
Guide for Risk Evaluations for
the Classification of MarineRelated Facilities, Guidance Notes
on Review and Approval of Novel
Concepts and Guide for Surveys
Using Risk-Based Inspection for the
Offshore Industry, to pave the way
for risk-based evaluation metrics
supporting accelerated offshore
innovation.
Lagos
Port Harcourt
AGBAMI
Niger Delta
“Risk-based approaches allow a
better understanding of the risks
associated with the operation of
purpose-built offshore structures
rather than depending upon generic
prescriptive rule and inspection
schedules,” commented William J.
Sember, ABS Vice President of
Energy Development.
Growing Market Share
The investment ABS has made in
keeping pace with the development
of super-FPSOs is showing returns.
Today, nearly half (46 percent) of
all floating production units on
order or under construction are
to ABS class standards including
FPSOs, floating storage offloading
units (FSOs), semisubmersibles, tension leg platforms (TLPs) and spars.
A Record-Holder – For Now
The keel laying ceremony for the AGBAMI FPSO
at Daewoo Shipyard & Marine Engineering in
Korea was attended by (from left) H. K. Jeon,
ABS Senior Engineer; Peter Higginbotham, ABS
Senior Surveyor-in-Charge; Brian Barton, ABS
Senior Surveyor; and Zibi Puwalski, District
Principal Surveyor of ABS Pacific.
The AGBAMI FPSO is the largest FPSO ordered
to date, with a projected daily production rate of
about 250,000 barrels of oil, is destined for offshore Nigeria with first oil targeted in early 2008.
ABS review includes the hull structure, topsides,
processing equipment, mooring systems, utility
and safety systems as well as accommodations
and the offloading systems. The 13 topside
models weigh about 35,000 tons, requiring
close review of loads as well as calculation
for hull strength and fatigue assessment.
PAG E 1 4
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
energy
ABS TEAMS UP FOR LNG RESEARCH
A
BS Technology has joined
forces with three key shipyards in Korea to tackle
emerging needs in the maritime
industry, particularly with LNG
transport.
The first of these Joint Development
Projects (JDPs) was with Daewoo
Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering
(DSME) in 2004 with a focus
on LNG technology. Joint projects
include: ship hull deflection and
shaft alignment measurement;
low cycle fatigue; sloshing simulation program development and
validation for LNG ships; and
dynamic strength assessment of
LNG No. 96 containment systems.
Most recently ABS and DSME
have launched a special JDP for
the Qmax LNG carrier design.
Currently work is taking place
on low cycle fatigue validation
for tankers and FPSOs, pump
tower load measurement and 3D
loading analyses as applied to
large containerships.
ABS has also entered an agreement
with Hyundai Heavy Industries
(HHI) to examine ice capable
LNG carrier development as
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
ABS and SHI staff members met to launch the second slate of Joint Development Projects
in April 2006. Seated, from left: James Liebertz, ABS Pacific President and COO; S. H.
Lee, SHI Chief Technology Officer; Robert E. Kramek, ABS President and COO; S. Y. Han,
Marine Research Institute Vice President. Standing, from left: Chengbo Wang, ABS
Engineer; Jang-Whan Kim, ABS Senior Engineer; M. K. Ha, SHI Vice President; Han-Chang
Yu, ABS Staff Consultant; J.W. Choi, SHI Principal Engineer; Hoseong Lee, ABS Pacific
Director of Engineering; and C. Y. Kim, SHI Vice President.
well as a JDP for the Qmax LNG
carrier design which will include
wet drop testing of the membrane
type containment systems for
these vessels.
for our customers. They are winwin arrangements in every sense
of the word.”
The third agreement, with Samsung
Heavy Industries (SHI), focuses
on core LNG technology. As
explained by Han-Chang Yu,
Staff Consultant, ABS Research
& Product Development, the
agreement made sense because
“SHI wanted to be more competitive
in large LNG carrier developments
to satisfy the owner’s requirements,
and ABS Technology wanted to
be more efficient in supporting
clients’ needs.”
Reporting on a recent trip to SHI,
Yu commented, “These collaborations lead to greater efficiencies
and are beneficial both for us and
For more information, contact:
Han-Chang Yu, Staff Consultant
ABS Technology, R&PD
Email: [email protected]
PAG E 1 5
ENERGY
EXECUTIVE TOUR STRENGTHENS TIES
uring a recent
D
tour of major
Korean shipyards,
ABS President and
COO Robert E.
Kramek and others
from the ABS Pacific
management team
met with top management from
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine
Engineering (DSME).
Shown here in front of
the DSME main building
“Trust Hall” from left:
D.W. Shin, Director of
Business Planning, DSME;
Mark McGrath, ABS
Pacific Northern Region
VP; B. E. Jeong, Vice
President, Design, DSME; H.C. Kim, Senior Executive Vice President, DSME; Kramek; Y.M. Lee, Executive Vice President, Head
of Design & Technology, DSME; James Liebertz, ABS Pacific President and COO; Zibi Puwalski, Koje District Principal Surveyor,
ABS Pacific; Peter Higginbotham, Senior Surveyor-in-Charge for ABS onsite at the DSME office; and D.K. Lee, Executive Vice
President, Production, DSME.
OFFSHORE SUPPORT FOR MEXICO
O
n a recent trip
to Mexico, ABS
Americas, North
America Regional Vice
President Robert Gilman
met with Perforadora
Central. The operator is
a provider of offshore
and onshore drilling
services mainly for
PEMEX. Discussed
were plans to build two
OSV vessels and the
PANUCO jackup rig at
LeTourneau Shipyard
in Vicksburg, MS, USA.
From left: Jorge Borrego,
Director, Perforadora Central;
Gilman; Patricio Morphy,
Owner of Perforadora Central;
and Luis Morphy, Perforadora
Central.
PAG E 1 6
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
energy
ABS Classes First Jackup Rigs to be Built in the UAE
the world with
water depth
capacity of 300
feet and drill
down capacity
to 30,000 feet.”
BS has been awarded the
contracts for the first jackup
drilling rigs to be built in the
United Arab Emirates (UAE). A
total of four units will be built
to ABS standards: two units for
Thule Drilling ASA and two units
for Mosvold Drilling Ltd.
A
The Thule rigs (Thule Energy and
Thule Force) will be built at QGM
Group LLC rig construction yard
in Dubai based upon the Friede &
Goldman (F&G) Super M2 rig
design. The Mosvold rigs will also
be F&G Super M2 designs and
will be built at Maritime Industrial
Services Co. Ltd. Inc. (MIS) in
Sharjah.
According to ABS’ Country
Manager for the UAE Joe Brincat,
“The rigs will be designated as
ÀA1 Self Elevating Drilling Units
and are suitable for operating in
non-harsh environments of
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
The Super
M2 design is
an updated
version of
F&G’s L 780
Mod II jackup
rig of which
more than 30
are operating
worldwide.
Brincat says
the Super
M2 design
features an
enhanced leg
design with
extended reach
cantilever,
wrap around
quarters and
modular hull
design. The
specialized
leg fixation
system and overall platform construction will be built to ABS Rules
and survey.
direction as to how to apply and
interpret class Rules to projects.
Now one of the most comprehensive documents available to
industry, jackup builders refer
to ABS MODU Rules for guidance
on detailed design, material selection, welding, structural analysis
requirements, hull and equipment
criteria, machinery and surveys
after construction.
The document provides not only
guidance but clarification and
analysis of issues such as: description of stepping wave through the
structure; loading directions of the
waves; how to include the P (force)Delta effect in the analysis; details
of the hydrodynamic leg-modeling
procedure; consideration of gravity
loads and buoyancy; importance
of leg buoyancy; clarification of
total-elevated load; and emphasis
of the effects contributed from
spudcan during the analysis.
To date ABS has more than 60
jackups on order to its classification
with three deliveries already this
year. Overall ABS market share of
the worldwide drilling rig fleet is
approximately 76 percent.
Industry analysts report the
Middle East is the fastest growing
jackup market in the world.
With rig utilization rates at an
all time high, the jackup market
is exceptionally strong. With commodity prices likely to remain
high, drilling activity continues
to increase. With yards in China,
Singapore and the US Gulf Coast
nearing capacity, new yards such
as UAE’s QGM and MIS have seen
an opportunity.
Since publishing the first Rules
for Building and Classing Offshore
Mobile Drilling Units (MODUs)
in 1968, ABS has responded to
the technical challenges posed
by jackup modifications and new
designs with frequent updates and
commentaries providing specific
For more information, contact:
Joe Brincat
ABS UAE Country Manager
Email: [email protected]
PAG E 1 7
people & pl aces
Aluminum Risers First for Offshore Industry
T
he ASME International
Petroleum Technology
Institute presented the
2006 Woelfel Best Mechanical
Engineering Achievement Award
to ABS client Noble Technology
Services. Noble received the award
for the development of an aluminum
alloy riser that allows deepwater
oil and drilling on a conventional
offshore platform.
The risers are patented Noble
designs and the novel technology
process took about ten years to
develop. According to Noble’s Hans
Deul, Vice President, Subsea &
Drilling Systems, ABS involvement
was valuable because processes
could be verified and a huge
amount of analysis and testing
was conducted by ABS to verify
the risers’ safety and reliability.
According to
Harish Patel,
ABS Principal
Engineer,
Advanced
Analysis, “The
challenge was
to take a material
designed primarily
for outer space
and approve it
for use in the
offshore environment. It was a
fascinating project
that took a lot
of engineering
analysis, especially
concerning corrosion of the weldment and fatigue
and fracture
mechanics.”
Noble Corporation received the Woelfel Award for Best Mechanical
Engineering Design at the Offshore Technology Conference in
Houston for its aluminum alloy drilling riser. ABS provided independent review certification as part of an ABS-classed certified
drilling system. From left, Noble representatives Project Engineer
Tom Prosser; Mechanical Systems Specialist Patrick O’ Neill;
Director of Compliance Jim Gormanson, ABS Principal Engineer
(Materials) Gopalkrishna Magadi; and ABS Principal Engineer
(Advanced Analysis) Harish Patel.
ABS Stands Out at OTC 2006
consolidates the principles of safety,
efficiency and sound environmental
rules.
Robert E. Kramek, President and COO of
ABS, offered a look at offshore energy and
development challenges as the featured
topical luncheon speaker on opening day
of OTC.2006.
ABS’ Director of Corporate
Operational Safety & Evaluation
Chris Serratella chaired Structural
Integrity Management of Fixed and
Floating Structures, one of over
300 technical sessions at the event.
Leading a technical session for setting
standards for the offshore industry, ABS’
Director of Operational Safety & Evaluation
Chris Serratella.
A
BS had several presentation
opportunities at this year’s
Offshore Technology
Conference held recently in
Houston. President and COO Robert
E. Kramek, as the featured topical
luncheon speaker on opening day,
offered a look at offshore energy
and development challenges in his
presentation Safe Development of the
Energy Frontier: Today’s Challenges
and Opportunities for Innovation. He
emphasized the need for a balanced
approach in the safety regime that
PAG E 1 8
ABS Best Paper Award winners at SNAME’s
OTC.2006 Reception include Lee; Wang;
Peter Noble, Manager Marine Transportation, ConocoPhillips and Vice President –
Gulf & Central Region, SNAME; Spong,
Serratella; Malcolm Sharples, Director, Keppel
Offshore & Marine and SNAME Fellow.
Co-authors of the technical paper
Flexible Approaches to Risk-Based
Inspection of FPSOs (OTC 18364)
were presented the Best Paper OTC
2006 Award by the Society of Naval
Architects and Marine Engineers
(SNAME). The paper was jointly
authored by ABS’ Corporate
Technology representatives Director
Roger Basu, Senior Engineer Michael
Lee, Principal Engineer George
Wang, as well as Chris Serratella
and Vice President of Energo
Engineering Inc. Robert Spong.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
people & pl aces
Address Changes
Please note the following changes
to contact details for ABS offices.
BANGLADESH • CHITTAGONG
ABS Pacific
‘Daar-E-Shahudi’ Building, 5th Floor,
69, Agrabad C/A,
Chittagong, Bangladesh
Shamsul Arefeen, Surveyor
Mobile: 880-1715-062900
FINLAND • HELSINKI
ABS Europe Ltd
P.O. Box 1397
Fin 00101 Helsinki
Finland
Telephone/fax numbers remain unchanged.
GREECE • PIRAEUS
ABS Europe Division
Safety, Environmental & Security
Certification (SESC)
4th Floor, 6 Skouze Street
Piraeus, GR 185 36
Greece
Tel.:
Fax:
30-210-4294046
30-210-4294047
30-310-4293809
ABS Expands Presence in Denmark
with New Copenhagen Office
T
o better serve the increasingly
active Danish shipping sector,
ABS has opened a new office in
Copenhagen headed by Principal
Surveyor
Thore
Johnsson
who has
relocated
from the
class society’s
regional
office in
Gothenburg,
Sweden.
Thore Johnsson
“ABS is
now better placed to support
the region’s expanding shipping
community,” said Christopher J.
Wiernicki, President & COO, ABS
Europe. “This location improves
our ability to service the growing
client base with more dedicated
local support for Copenhagenbased shipping operations,” he
added. Wiernicki commented that
in addition to survey services,
ABS plans to work closely with
owners and operators in the
region to anticipate, understand
and address technical and regulatory
issues.
For example, in conjunction
with the opening of the new office
ABS held a seminar to provide
information on the implementation
of the new Common Structural
Rules, the latest International
Association of Classification
Societies (IACS) initiatives and
the new cargo tank coating systems
performance standard scheduled
to enter into force in July 2008.
Calling such seminars “an essential
part of our dialogue with the
shipping community” Wiernicki
hoped the expanded presence in
Copenhagen would facilitate more
discussion and industry feedback
from the local shipping community.
In addition to Copenhagen, ABS
has staff in Aarhus, Esbjerg, and
Odense with a survey team of
seven working in the region.
NIGERIA • LAGOS
ABS Ltd.
No.5 Imam Abibu Adetoro Street
Off Ajose Adeogun Street
Victoria Island
Lagos, Nigeria
Tel.:
Fax:
234-1-4613680 (Country Mgr.)
234-1-4613681
234-1-4613682
234-1-4613683
234-1-4613684
ITALY • VENICE
The Venice office closed on 1 July 2006.
The two Surveyors will continue as a Station.
Igor Filipovic, Principal Surveyor
Via San Francesco 12
30020 Marcon (Venice)
Mobile: 39-335-7241752
Fax:
39-041-5951686
Renzo Scarpa, Senior Surveyor
San Polo 487
30125 Venice
Mobile: 39-335-7241753
Fax:
30-041-241-3677
ABS Chairman and Member Honored
ABS Chairman and CEO
Robert D. Somerville (center)
joins the ranks of prominent
members of the International
Maritime Hall of Fame by
being inducted into the group
during the 13th Annual
International Maritime Hall
of Fame 2006 Awards at the
United Nations in New York
City. Also inducted at the
ceremony was ABS Member
and former Council Member
Capt. Panagiotis N. Tsakos,
Founder, Tsakos Shipping
& Trading SA of Greece
(right). Also pictured is
Peter I. Keller, Executive
Vice President & COO
NYK Line, North America.
(Photo credit: Fran Dickson)
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 1 9
people & Pl aces
ABS Membership Plaques
James Liebertz, ABS Pacific President &
COO (front row, far left), presented
plaques to new members (front row, from
left) Nelson Yeo, Keppel Shipyard Ltd.
Executive Director and Michael Chia,
Keppel Fels Ltd. Executive Director along
with Thomas Tan, ABS Singapore Country
Manager. Liebertz was also joined by
(back row, from left) Takagi Tamiki, ABS
Pacific Southern Region Engineering
Director; Adam Moilanen, ABS Pacific
Southern Region VP; Richard Ton Chong
Heong, Keppel O & M Ltd. Managing
Director & COO and ABS Member; Kang
Mui Wong, ABS Pacific Central Region
Engineering Director; Aziz Merchant,
Keppel O & M Ltd. General Manager of
Engineering and Southeast Asia Technical
Committee Member; and Teruaki Kaibara,
ABS Pacific VP of Engineering.
Peter Schmitz, ABS Germany Country Manager (left), presents an
ABS membership plaque to Juergen Salamon, Managing Director,
Dr. Peters GmbH & Co. KG.
Nikolaus Schues of F. Laeisz Schiffahrtsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG
(left), receives his ABS membership plaque from Chris Wiernicki, ABS
Europe President & COO.
Shri Hajara, Chairman and Managing Director, The Shipping
Corporation of India (left), receives his membership plaque from
Adam Moilanen, ABS Pacific Southern Region VP.
Karel Van Campenhout, ABS Europe Western Region VP (left) presents an ABS membership plaque to Dipl.-Ing. Juergen-A. Hansen,
Managing Director, MPC Muenchmeyer Petersen Marine GmbH.
PAG E 2 0
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
people & pl aces
Ulrich Thamm of Salamon Aktiengesselschaft (left) receives his
ABS membership plaque from Peter Schmitz, ABS Germany Country
Manager.
Managing Director Dieter Gast of Peter Gast Shipping GmbH (left)
receives his ABS membership plaque from Karel Van Campenhout,
ABS Europe Western Region VP.
William Douglas Robinson, COO, V.Ships MSI Pte. Ltd. (left) receives
his ABS membership plaque from James Liebertz, ABS Pacific
President & COO.
Retired Rear Admiral T. S. Ganeshan, current Chairman and
Managing Director, Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers Ltd.
(left) receives his membership plaque from Adam Moilanen, ABS
Pacific Southern Region VP.
Dr. Hans-Heinrich Noell, Chief Managing Director of VDR Verband
Deutscher Reeder (left), receives his ABS membership plaque from
Karel Van Campenhout, ABS Europe Western Region VP.
Matt Nichols, President, Nichols Bros. Boat Builders (left) receives his
ABS membership plaque from Robert Gilman, ABS Americas North
America Region VP.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 2 1
people & pl aces
ABS Americas North America Region VP Robert Gilman (left) and
ABS President & COO Robert Kramek (right) present an ABS membership plaque to Ed Hoffman, President of Pournaras & Hoffman.
Karel Van Campenhout, ABS Europe Western Region VP (left)
presents Gerhard Kempf, Managing Director of Blohm + Voss Repair
GmbH with an ABS membership plaque.
Commander M. Jitendran, VSM, Chairman and Managing Director,
Cochin Shipyard Ltd. (center), receives his membership plaque
from Adam Moilanen, ABS Pacific Southern Region VP (right) with
Raghu Bhavnani, ABS India Country Manager.
Chris Wiernicki, ABS Europe President & COO (left) presents Roland
F. Hoeger of Komrowski Befrachtungskontor KG (GmbH & Co.) with
his ABS membership plaque.
Peter Schmitz, ABS Germany Country Manager (left), presents an
ABS membership plaque to Tom Jacob of Ernst Jacob (GmbH &
Co. KG).
Robert Gilman, ABS Americas North America Region VP (left)
presents an ABS membership plaque to Richard “Rich” W. Griffith,
Senior VP of American Shipping Group, Inc. (formerly of Totem
Ocean Trailer Express, Inc.).
PAG E 2 2
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
people & pl aces
Peter Schmitz, ABS Germany Country Manager (left), presents an
ABS membership plaque to Werner Lueken, Managing Director,
Lloyd Werft Bremerhaven GmbH.
Karel Van Campenhout, ABS Europe Western Region VP (left)
presents an ABS membership plaque to Chief Executive Officer
Martin Strohtmann of Ideenkapital Marine Finance.
Henrik Jensen of Vorsetzen Bereederungs-und Schiffahrtsckontor
GmbH & Co. KG (left) receives his ABS membership plaque from
ABS Europe President & COO Chris Wiernicki.
Todd Grove, ABS Americas President & COO (left) and Robert
Kramek, ABS President & COO, (right) present an ABS membership
plaque to Paul Slater, Chairman, First International.
Robert Gilman, ABS Americas North America Region VP (left)
presents Timothy Behr, Senior VP of Aon Risk Services with his
ABS membership plaque.
John Gallagher, ABS Americas Eastern District Manager (left)
presents David Meehan, President & CEO, Aker Philadelphia
Shipyard Inc. with his ABS membership plaque.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 2 3
people & pl aces
Nikolai Woelki, Chairman of the Board of Directors, SeeBerufsgenosssenschaft (left), receives his ABS membership plaque
from Karel Van Campenhout, ABS Europe Western Region VP.
James Sweeney, VP of Operations, Penn Maritime (center),
accepts his ABS Membership plaque from Robert Gilman (left),
ABS Americas North America Region VP and Robert Kramek,
ABS President & COO.
Admiral Sergio Anaya of the Navy of Mexico (left) presents Robert
Gilman, ABS North American Region VP, with a commemorative
plaque from the Mexican Navy.
Chris Wiernicki, ABS Europe President & COO (left), presents an
ABS membership plaque to Gerhard Binder, Aug. Bolten, Wm.
Miller’s Nachfolger (GmbH & Co.) KG.
John Gallagher, ABS Americas Eastern District Manager (left) presents David R. Rodger, Technical Services Manager for Horizon Lines
LLC with a plaque for his current membership in the ABS Technical
Committee and a plaque honoring his work with a previous committee.
ABS Pacific President & COO James Liebertz (left) presents Joseph
Kwok, Advisor for AET Group of Companies in Singapore with a
plaque and gift to commemorate his service and support to ABS
while serving on the ABS Board of Directors and Council.
PAG E 2 4
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
rules & Guides
Free Downloads, Unlimited Access
All ABS publications are available for download completely free of charge. Users are able to open, copy and
save searchable PDF documents by simply creating an account. Users are also encouraged to sign up to receive
email notifications whenever new publications or notices are posted to the ABS website at www.eagle.org.
R e c e n t ly P u b l i s h e d P u b l i c at i o n s
The following listing reflects Rules and Guides updates from March to June 2006.
Guide for Building and Classing Liquefied Petroleum Gas Carriers with Type-A
Independent Tanks, March 2006 (Pub 144)
This Guide provides criteria that can be applied in the classification of the hull structure of a Liquefied
Petroleum Gas carrier with Type-A independent tanks. The strength criteria are to be used to verify compliance with the structural analysis requirements in the International Code for the Construction and
Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code) as a condition of classification. These
strength criteria are supplemental to those given in Part 5, Chapter 8 of the Steel Vessel Rules.
Guide for Vessel Maneuverability, March 2006 (Pub 145)
This Guide is intended to assist users in applying IMO maneuvering standards and to allow the owner, designer and builder to
rate the vessel’s maneuvering performance relative to statistical data of vessel maneuvering characteristics. The Guide also summarizes
procedures to be used in assessing a vessel’s maneuvering performance.
Guidance Notes on Propulsion Shafting Alignment, April 2006 (Pub 128)
Originally published in 2004, these Guidance Notes have been updated to clarify shaft alignment requirements for ABS
field inspectors and design review engineers to encourage consistency of the survey and plan approval process. The guidelines may also
help the industry to improve its approach towards shaft alignment analyses and procedures. This publication is only available
for download.
Guide for Vessels with Oil Recovery Capabilities, April 2006 (Pub 146)
This Guide was developed to provide specific requirements for tugboats, supply vessels and other vessels that are equipped for
the storage of recovered oil floating on the sea. Such vessels may not be equipped with permanent means for recovering spilled oil
floating on the sea and typically do not have fixed piping systems for the transfer of recovered oil overboard. This publication is only
available for download.
Guidance Notes on Ship Vibration, April 2006 (Pub 147)
These Guidance Notes have been developed to provide users with specific guidance on the
design, analysis, measurement procedures and criteria in order to achieve the goal of limiting the ship
vibration to an acceptable level.
Guidance Notes on Strength Assessment of Membrane-Type LNG Containment
Systems Under Sloshing Loads, April 2006 (Pub 148)
Created as a supplement to the hull structural requirements of LNG carriers, these Guidance Notes provide procedures for determining sloshing loads on LNG cargo tanks and contain strength assessment procedures for membranetype containment systems. This publication is only available for download.
Guidance Notes on Sloshing and Structural Analysis of LNG Pump Tower, April 2006 (Pub 149)
This publication provides guidance for applying direct calculation procedures for the structural assessment of the pump tower
structure. This approach takes advantage of the principles and the experiences gained from the application of the ABS Dynamic Load
Approach (DLA), advances in numerical simulation of the sloshing, and experiences from the structural analysis and evaluation of tubular structures. This publication is only available for download.
Guide for Building and Classing Subsea Pipeline Systems, May 2006 (Pub 64)
This Guide applies to classification of design, construction and installation of offshore pipelines made of metallic materials,
as well as the periodic surveys required for maintenance of classification. Serviceability of pipelines is also addressed, but only to the
extent that proper functioning of the pipe and its components affects safety. This Guide replaces the 2005 edition and may also be used
for certification or verification of design, construction or installation of pipelines.
Guide for Building and Classing Subsea Riser Systems, May 2006 (Pub 123)
This Guide applies to classification of design, construction and installation of risers made of metallic materials, as well as the
periodic surveys required for maintenance of classification. Serviceability of risers is also addressed, but only to the extent that proper
functioning of the pipe and its components affects safety. This Guide replaces the 2005 edition and may also be used for certification or
verification of design, construction or installation of risers.
Guidance Notes on Control of Harmonics in Electrical Power Systems, May 2006 (Pub 150)
These Guidance Notes were developed to raise awareness of the potential risks associated with harmonics in electrical power
systems onboard ships or offshore installations. The Notes are intended to assist system designers to plan harmonics mitigation early in
the design stage of electrical power distribution systems to make the systems more robust and predictable. This publication is only
available for download.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 2 5
rules & guides
Notices & Corrigenda s
Pub 2
Pub 5
Rules for Building and Classing Steel
Vessels (2006)
Rule Change Notice 2, March 2006
Rule Change Notice 3, April 2006
Rule Change Notice 4, July 2006
Corrigenda (IACS Common Structural Rules for
Double Hull Oil Tankers), April 2006
Corrigenda, June 2006
Rules for Building and Classing Steel Vessels
Under 90 Meters (295 Feet) in Length (2006)
Rule Change Notice 1, July 2006
Corrigenda, June 2006
Pub 6
Rules for Building and Classing Mobile Offshore
Drilling Units (2006)
Corrigenda, June 2006
Pub 10
Rules for Building and Classing Steel
Barges (2003)
Corrigenda, July 2006
Pub 22
Rules for Materials and Welding – Part 2,
Aluminum and Fiber Reinforced Plastics
(FRP) (2006)
Corrigenda, June 2006
Pub 63
Guide for Building and Classing Facilities on
Offshore Installations (2000)
Notice 1, June 2006
Pub 82
Guide for Building and Classing Floating
Production Installations (2004)
Corrigenda, June 2006
Pub 107 Guide for Building and Classing Liftboats (2002)
Corrigenda, June 2006
Pub 109 Guide for Building and Classing High Speed
Naval Craft (2003)
Rule Change Notice 4, March 2006
Rule Change Notice 5, July 2006
Corrigenda, June 2006
Pub 126 Guide for Buckling and Ultimate Strength
Assessment for Offshore Structures (2004)
Corrigenda, June 2006
Pub 145 Guide for Vessel Maneuverability (2006)
Corrigenda, June 2006
ABS Events and Conferences Calendar
20 - 25 August 2006
ISSC Congress
Southampton, UK
www.issc.ac
ABS Presenters: Glenn Ashe,
George Wang
30 - 31 August 2006
Maritime Risk International 2006
Singapore
www.ibc-asia.com
11 - 12 September 2006
Asia Maritime & Logistics
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
www.portsworld.com/news/
nst1March20-06.htm
ABS Booth: 42
11 - 14 September 2006
Rio Oil & Gas 2006 Conference
and Expo
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
www.ibp.org.br
ABS Booth: Pavillion 4, #H6
26 - 29 September 2006
SMM 2006
Hamburg, Germany
www.hamburg-messe.de/smm/
ABS Booth: Hall 10 EG, Stand 460
10 - 13 October 2006
SNAME Maritime Technology
Conference & Expo
Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA
www.sname.org/AM2006/
ABS Booth: 200 & 202
12 - 14 October 2006
Vietnam Oil & Gas Expo 2006
Hochimihn City, Vietnam
www.cpexhibition.com/vnoffshore/
ABS Booth: 1I-5
16 - 18 November 2006
Pacific Marine Expo
Seattle, WA, USA
www.pacificmarineexpo.com
ABS Booth: 811
Detailed information regarding conferences and symposiums can
be found in the News & Events section on the ABS website at
www.eagle.org/news/schedule.cfm
PAG E 2 6
28 - 30 November 2006
Deep Offshore Technology
Houston, TX, USA
http://dot06.events.pennnet.com
29 Nov. – 1 Dec. 2006
International WorkBoat Show
New Orleans, LA, USA
www.workboatshow.com
ABS Booth: 657
4 - 6 December 2006
Seatrade Middle East Dubai
Dubai, UAE
www.seatrade-middleeast.com
ABS Booth: 1644
4 - 7 December 2006
Gastech 2006
Abu Dhabi, UAE
www.gastech.co.uk
ABS Booth: J80
5 - 8 December 2006
OSEA
Singapore
www.osea-asia.com
ABS Booth: 4N2-3
ABS Presenter: Bill Sember
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
abs activity
Newly Classed Vessels
and Facilities
TANKERS
ADONIS, ARISTIDIS, 23,270 gt / 36,680 dwt, SH, SHCM, Ice Class “IA”, VEC-L,
built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard for Barclay Shipping
ALASKAN NAVIGATOR, 110,693 gt / 193,050 dwt, SH, SHCM, DLA, VEC-L, built
by National Steel & Shipbuilding Company for AMI Leasing
ALKIVIADIS, 23,270 gt / 36,721 dwt, SH, SHCM, ES, Ice Class “IA”, VEC-L, built
by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard for Adrian Shipholding
ARIES VOYAGER, 160,808 gt / 364,910 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, VEC-L, built by
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering for Blackhawk
ARIS, 23,270 gt / 36,721 dwt, SH, SHCM, ES, Ice Class “IA”, VEC-L, built by
Hyundai Mipo Dockyard for Gladiator Marine
BONITA, 57,711 gt / 106,144 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, Ice Class “IA”, VEC, TCM,
built by Hyundai H I (MAN - B & W) for Agilera Shipping
CALIOPE, 7,064 gt / 10,715 dwt, VEC, built by Nok Bong Shipbuilding for Lotus
Shipping
CIELO DI GUANGZHOU, 25,510 gt / 38,877 dwt, SHR, PORT, VEC, built by
Guangzhou Shipyard International for Solar Shipping
CLIPPER BAROLO, 3,021 gt / 3,522 dwt, ES, R2, VEC, built by Yardimci Gemi
Insa for Barolo Shipping
CLIPPER KARINA, 7,687 gt / 11,420 dwt, RES, VEC, built by STX Shipbuilding for
Karina Shipping
CLIPPER KRISTIN, 7,687 gt / 11,316 dwt, RES, VEC, built by STX Shipbuilding for
Kristin Shipping
COSGRAND LAKE, 156,914 gt / 298,997 dwt, SH, VEC, built by Universal
Shipbuilding for Cosgrand Lake Maritime
DESPINA, 40,698 gt / 72,247 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, VEC-L, built by HudongZhonghua Shipbuilding for San Michael Investment
DIFKO LISBETH, 41,503 gt / 72,714 dwt, SH, SHCM, VEC, built by Samsung H I
for Torm Singapore
ETERNAL DILIGENCE, 40,803 gt / 74,994 dwt, SH, SHCM,
VEC-L, built by Onomichi Dockyard for T & M Maritime
ETERNAL PRIDE, 40,803 gt / 74,993 dwt, SH, SHCM, VEC-L, built
by Onomichi Dockyard for M & M Shipholding
FORMOSAPETRO GIANT, 149,274 gt / 281,396 dwt, SH, VEC,
built by IHI Marine United for Formosa Giant Marine Corp
FR8 VENTURE, 42,010 gt / 74,065 dwt, SH, SHCM, VEC, built by
New Century Shipbuilding for FR8 Venture Shipping
FUTURA, 25,373 gt / 40,085 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, VEC, built by
Shina Shipbuilding for Morfini
GLOBAL TRITON, 7,341 gt / 12,990 dwt, VEC, built by Higaki
Shipbuilding for Cybele Shipping
ICE ENERGY, 38,832 gt / 70,377 dwt, SH, SHCM, Ice Class “IA”,
VEC-L, built by Onomichi Dockyard for Baxter Trading
ICE VICTORY, 38,832 gt / 70,377 dwt, SH, SHCM, Ice Class “IA”,
VEC-L, built by Onomichi Dockyard for Hansa Line
KANSAS, 29,242 gt / 46,922 dwt, SH, SHCM, ES, VEC, built by
Hyundai Mipo Dockyard for Kansas Shipping
ICE VICTORY, 70,300 dwt double hull oil carrier, Ice Class “IA”, VEC-L, SH,
SHCM, built at Onomichi Dockyard for Hansa Line Co.
Naming ceremony for SAFE BRISTOLIA, a column stabilized accommodation
unit for Consafe Offshore AB at Yantai Raffles.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 2 7
abs activity
Naming ceremony (above) for the JIN HE,
a 77,250 dwt bulk carrier, HCS, SHR,
(below) built at Oshima Shipbuilding
for Jin He Marine Inc.
LMZ NAFSIKA, 40,038 gt / 69,431 dwt, SH, SHCM, ES, RES, VEC-L, built by Daewoo-Mangalia H I for
Cimba Marine
LMZ NEFELI, 40,038 gt / 69,510 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, ES, VEC-L, built by Daewoo-Mangalia H I for
Prose Navigation
MARIA COSULICH, 4,969 gt / 7,032 dwt, built by Zhenjiang Sopo Shipbuilding for Fratelli Cosulich
MINERVA CLARA, 58,156 gt / 103,232 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, Ice Class “IA”, VEC, built by Samsung H I
for Alexandra Maritime
MINERVA VIRGO, 28,960 gt / 50,922 dwt, SHR, RES, Ice Class “IA”, VEC, built by STX Shipbuilding for
Armata Marine
MINI ME, 8,539 gt / 13,050 dwt, VEC, built by 21st Century Shipbuilding for Redcliff Maritime
MINITANK THREE, 5,573 gt / 8,057 dwt, VEC, built by Nok Bong Shipbuilding for Mini Tank Three
MONTENERO, 24,990 gt / 40,158 dwt, SHR, VEC, built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard for D’Alesio
Group
OCEAN NEPTUNE, 30,971 gt / 50,346 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, VEC, built by Shina Shipbuilding for Xin An
Shipping
OCEAN SEDNA, 30,965 gt / 50,401 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, VEC, built by Shina Shipbuilding for
Da Guang Tankers
OTTOMANA, 17,782 gt / 25,000 dwt, SH, SHCM, VEC, built by Celiktekne Tersanesi for Mediterranea
Di Navigazione
PLEVNE, 4,471 gt / 6,938 dwt, ES, Ice Class “IC”, VEC, built by Celiktekne Tersanesi for Deval Denizcilik
Ve Ticaret
PUNICA, 19,549 gt / 29,006 dwt, SH, VEC, built by STX Shipbuilding for Motia Compagnia Di
Navigazione
REPUBLICAN, 29,242 gt / 46,917 dwt, SH, SHCM, ES, VEC, built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard for
Republican Shipping
SEACROSS, SEADANCER, 84,601 gt / 163,292 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, Ice Class “IB”, VEC-L, TCM, built
by Hyundai Samho H I for Narcissus Enterprises
STOLTZULU, 16,442 gt / 25,197 dwt, VEC, built by Fukuoka Shipbuilding, Nagasaki Yard for Berry Cetus
STORVIKEN, 82,647 gt / 152,013 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, VEC, built by Samsung H I for Viken Crude III
SYMPHONIC, 156,933 gt / 298,522 dwt, SH, SHCM, OMBO, VEC-L, built by Universal Shipbuilding for
Skyview Shipping
WABASH, 29,242 gt / 46,893 dwt, SH, SHCM, ES, VEC, built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard for Wabash
Shipping
BULK CARRIERS
AVORE, 88,930 gt / 174,093 dwt, SH, SHCM, HCS, built by Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipbuilding for Avore
Shipping
BOSSCLIP TRADER, 19,918 gt / 30,634 dwt, SH, SHCM, built by Cochin Shipyard for Cotrader One
CORONIS, 40,485 gt / 74,381 dwt, SH, SHCM, HCS, built by Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding for Vesta
Commercial
DUNCAN BAY, 16,951 gt / 28,414 dwt, HCS, built by Shimanami Shipyard for Kowa Shipping
FORMOSABULK FORTUNE, 84,448 gt / 170,000 dwt, SH, built by IHI Marine United for Formosa
Fortune Marine
KAVO ALKYON, 38,845 gt / 75,409 dwt, SH, SHCM, HCS, built by Sanoyas Hishino Meisho Corp for
Gourdomichalis Maritime
PAC DENEB, 20,471 gt / 27,415 dwt, SH, SHCM, GRAB, built by Domestic Trade Ministry Kouan
Shipbuilding for Deneb Shipping
REGINA OLDENDORFF, 22,698 gt / 37,504 dwt, SH, SHCM, RES, GRAB, built by Saiki H I for Southern
Route Maritime
CONTAINERSHIPS
ECEM KALKAVAN, 9,978 gt, Ice Class “IC”, built by Sedef Gemi Insaati for Sedef Gemi Insaati
GORNYAK KAMCHATKI, 1,591 gt, Ice Class “IC”, built by Jiangsu Eastern Shipyard for Arhipelag Limited
IREM KALKAVAN, 9,978 gt, Ice Class “IC”, built by Sedef Gemi Insaati for Ecir Kalkavan
Schiffseigentums
OOCL ASIA, 89,097 gt, SH, ES, built by Samsung H I for Swan National (Commercial) Leasing
SENA KALKAVAN, 9,978 gt, Ice Class “IC”, built by Sedef Gemi Insaati AS for Lese Kalkavan
Schiffseigentums
YM INTELLIGENT, 16,488 gt, SH, SHCM, built by China Shipbuilding (Keelung) for All Oceans
Transportation
GAS CARRIERS
SALALAH LNG, 147,000 m3 dwt, SH, DLA, SHCM, built by Samsung H I for Tiwi LNG Carrier
METHANE RITA ANDREA, 145,000 m3, SH, SH-DLA, SHCM, NIBS, built by Samsung H I for National
Australia Finance
OFFSHORE
GLOBAL TRITON, a 12,700 dwt double hull
oil and chemical carrier, built at Higaki
Shipbuilding for Cybele Shipping S.A.
PAG E 2 8
Self Elevating Drilling Units
AL-HAIL, 9,264 gt, built by Keppel Fels Singapore for National Drilling Company
ENSCO 107, 9,696 gt, built by Keppel Fels Singapore for Ensco Offshore International
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
abs activity
Keel laying
ceremony for
Samsung Hull
No. 1538, a
8,063 teu
container
carrier for
Orient
Overseas
Container
Line Ltd.
China Progress
ABS representatives celebrate at
the naming ceremony for CHINA
PROGRESS, a 175,000 dwt bulk
carrier, SH, HCS, SHCM, built at
Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipbuilding
Co. Ltd. for Exmar.
From left, Bradley Achorn,
ABS Malaysia Country
Manager; Wingkee Ho,
General Manager, ABS
China; James Liebertz,
President & COO, ABS
Pacific; Kingsley Koo,
Senior Vice President –
Central Region, ABS China;
Thomas Blenk, Senior
Surveyor, ABS Shanghai;
and Pei-Sen Zhang, Surveyor,
ABS Shanghai.
Keel laying
ceremony for
Hull No. H1048,
a 156,500 dwt
bulk carrier built
at Shanghai
Waigaoqiao
Shipbuilding Co.
Ltd. for Chinese
Maritime
Transport Ltd.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 2 9
ABS Activity
Single Point Mooring
DAS ISLAND ADMA OPCO BUOY built by Bluewater Energy Services for Abu Dhabi Marine
Operating Co. (Adma Opco)
MISCELLANEOUS
Barges
ARUNG PERKASA 9, 3,151 gt, built by Taizhou Sanfu Ship Engineering for Armada Arung
Samudra Shipping
ASIA STAR 707, 3,141 gt, built by Nanjing Wujiazui Shipbuilding for Asia Bay Shipping & Trading
ATK 3701, 5,380 gt, built by Nantong Tiannan Shipyard for Pacific Ocean Engineering & Trading
BRITOIL 7, BRITOIL 11, 3,387 gt, built by P T Britoil Offshore Indonesia for Britoil Offshore
Services
CB 1211, 5,194 gt, built by Jingjiang Nanyang Shipbuilding for Beauford Marine
DBL 103, 7,132 gt, built by Bollinger Marine Fabricators for K-Sea Transportation Partners
DOUBLE SKIN 59, 4,235 gt, built by Jeffboat for Vane Line Bunering
ENERGY 13502, 9,787 gt, built by Leevac Industries for Hornbeck Offshore Services
FS 1, 13,916 gt, built by Brasfels for Felssetal
GALUH, 4,784 gt, built by Jingjiang Nanyang Shipbuilding for PT Saranakelola Investa
KALTIM FT 8012, 3,539 gt, built by P T ASL Shipyard Indonesia for ASL Project Services
LABROY 235, 2,288 gt, built by P T Nan Indah Mutiara Shipyard for Labroy Shipbuilding &
Engineering
MANDIRI BRAVO 3, 5,266 gt, built by Nanjing Yonghua Shipbuilding for QSA Marine & Logistics
NA-KAO, 4,076 gt, built by Zidell Marine for Tow Boat Services & Management
RTC-101, 7,311 gt, built by SENESCO for Reinauer Transportation Companies
SMS3701, 5,380 gt, built by Nantong Tiannan Shipyard for Pacific Ocean Engineering & Trading
WESTWARD TRADER, 5,862 gt, built by Gunderson Marine for Key Equipment Finance
ATLANTIC DREAM, 28,350 dwt bulk carrier, HCS,
built at Shimanami Shipyard for S. T. Line S.A.
Government Service Vessels
BAHITH II, research vessel, 200 gt, built by Lung Teh Shipbuilding for Kuwait Institute for Scientific
Research
KASTURBA GANDHI, 342 gt, HSC, built by Goa Shipyard for Indian Coast Guard
SEAFIGHTER, HSC Naval Craft, OE, R2-S, built by Nichols Bros. Boat Builders for Office of Naval
Research, US Navy
Passenger Vessels
VIA AUSTRALIS, 2,716 gt, built by Astilleros Y Servicios for Navarino Administradora De Naves
Tugs, Workboats and OSVs
PAC DUBHE, a 27,000 dwt bulk and container
carrier, SH, GRAB, SHCM, built at Domestic Trade
Ministry Kouan Shipbuilding Industry Company for
Dubhe Shipping PTE Ltd.
ETERNAL PRIDE, 75,000 dwt double hull oil
carrier, VEC-L, SH, SHCM, built at Onomichi
Dockyard for M & M Shipholdings S.A.
PAG E 3 0
ACTIVE QUEEN, 1,951 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, ÀDPS-2, built by Jaya Shipbuilding &
Engineering for Active Venture V
AJANG DUHA, 286 gt, HSC Crew Boat, built by NGV Tech for Ajang Shipping
ALDEN J LABORDE, 4,544 gt, ÀDPS-2, built by Yantai Raffles Offshore for Tidewater Marine
ASSO VENTISEI, 2,308 gt, Oil Recovery Vessel Class 1, ÀDPS-1, built by Aker Promar for
Augusta Offshore Brasileira
BROMPTON STAR, 719 gt, HSC, built by Sam Aluminum Engineering for Brompton Investments
CASTELO DE OBIDOS, 1,083 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, built by Guangzhou Hope Yue
Shipbuilding Industry for Globalspectre
CHIEF BAYO KUKU, 359 gt, HSC Crew Boat, built by Neuville Boat Works for Seacor Offshore
CHRISTIAN CHOUEST, 2,994 gt, ÀDPS-2, built by North American Fabricators for Island
Ventures II
C-STAR, 1,677 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, built by Fujian Southeast Shipyard for Edison
Chouest Offshore
CURRIE TIDE, 1,421 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, built by P T Batamec Shipyard for Tidewater
Assets
HADI 19, 1,727 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, built by Keppel Singmarine for Hadi H AlHammam (Panama)
INGRID MCCALL, 447 gt, HSC Crew Boat, built by Gulf Craft for Seacor Marine
JAYA SUPPORTER, 1,951 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, ÀDPS-2, built by Jaya Shipbuilding &
Engineering for Airia Jaya Marine
JEANINE PARQUI, HSC, built by Aluboot B V for Koninklijke Nederlandse Redding Maatschappij
MENENDEZ TIDE, 1,807 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, ÀDPS-1, built by INP H I for Tidewater
Assets
NOR SUN, 1,958 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, ÀDPS-2, built by Jaya Shipbuilding &
Engineering for Java Marine Lines
SEACOR STRENGTH, 498 gt, ÀDPS-1, built by Master Boat Builders for Seacor Marine
SMIT KOMODO, 2,588 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, ÀDPS-2, built by Keppel Singmarine for
Smit International
SMIT LOMBOK, 1,727 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, built by Keppel Singmarine for Smit
Singapore
TANJUNG HUMA, 1,601 gt, Fire Fighting Vessel Class 1, built by MSET Shipbuilding for Tanjung
Offshore Services
Yachts
ALILA, 182 gt, built by Cantieri Navali Lavagna for Cantieri Navali Lavagna
CHOSEN ONE, 290 gt, built by Intermarine USA for Swingman
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
abs activity
IMPETUS, 186 gt, built by Inace Industria Naval Do Ceara for Impetus Marine
LADY M II, 439 gt, built by Intermarine Savannah for D & E charters
LIA FAIL, 498 gt, built by Northern Marine for Murphy Marine
MAN OF STEEL, 245 gt, built by Heesen Yacht Builders for Man of Steel
MUSTANG SALLY, 465 gt, built by Trinity Yachts for Cervantes Marine
NICE N EASY, 499 gt, built by Christenen Shipyard for ACA Yacht Sales
ROSEHEARTY, 499 gt, built by Perini Navi for Kayarem Yachting
TALISMAN C, 692 gt, built by Proteksan Turkuaz Yat. San. for Talisman Sea
VANGO, 490 gt, built by Westport Shipyard for Van Go International
ZOOM ZOOM ZOOM, 465 gt, built by Trinity Yachts for Captain Heinz W Krodel
Other
AJANG MARWA, 492 gt, landing craft, built by Sarawak Slipways for Ajang Shipping
KIMTRANS EMPEROR, KIMTRANS JADE, 835 gt, cargo vessel, built by P T Tunas Karya
Bahari Indonesia for Sembawang Kimtrans
NANDU, 119 gt, pilot launch, built by Detroit Chile for Remolcadores Ultragas
SEALINK VANESSA 4, 496 gt, multi-purpose vessel, built by Sealink Shipyard for Sealink
Naming ceremony for ALKIVIADIS, 37,000 dwt double
hull oil and chemical carrier, Ice Class “IA,” 9388 kW,
VEC-L, FL 25, SH, SHCM, built at Hyundai Mipo
Dockyard for Adrian Shipholding Inc.
ICE ENERGY, 70,300 dwt double hull oil carrier, Ice Class “IA,” VEC-L, SH, SHCM,
built at Onomichi Dockyard for Baxter Trading.
Naming Ceremony for IBRA LNG, a 147,000 m3 LNG carrier, NIBS, SH, SH-DLA,
SHCM at Samsung for SNG Corentin.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
Launching ceremony for BERTINA at 21st Century
Shipbuilding, a 13,000 dwt chemical carrier, VEC, for
Bergshav Management A.S.
PAG E 3 1
ABS Activity
Recent Class
Contracts
TANKERS
Naming ceremony for METHANE JANE ELIZABETH at Samsung Heavy
Industries, a 145,000 m3 LNG carrier, NIBS, TCM, FL 40, SH, SH-DLA,
SHCM, HM2+R, SFA 40, for BN LNG.
Eight 4,200 gt / 5,600 dwt for Evaland Shipping at Qingdao Hyundai
Shipbuilding
Seven 59,300 gt / 114,500 dwt for Cido Shipping at Sasebo H I
Seven 25,000 gt / 37,000 dwt for Geden Lines at Hyundai Mipo Dockyard
Six 42,000 gt / 73,800 dwt for Dolco Investments at Sungdong Shipbuilding
& Marine Engineering
Four 25,400 gt / 40,000 dwt for Unicorn Shipping at Shina Shipbuilding
Four 15,500 gt / 20,000 dwt for Garanti Denizcilik at Admarin Gemi Yapim
Four 8,446 gt / 12,800 dwt for Modion Maritime Management at Samho
Shipbuilding
Three 157,200 gt / 297,400 dwt at Universal Shipbuilding
Three 43,160 gt / 76,000 dwt for IMC Shipping at Dalian Shipyard
Three 7,064 gt / 10,800 dwt for GS Tankers at Nok Bong Shipbuilding
Two 152,000 gt / 297,000 dwt for Cosco (H.K.) Shipping at Universal
Shipbuilding
Two 11,000 gt / 17,000 dwt at Yardimci Gemi Insa
Two 10,000 gt / 16,800 dwt for PACC Ship Managers at Fujian Ningde Bai
Ma Shun Shipbuilding
Two 8,000 gt / 16,800 dwt for Pacific Carriers at Liaoning Hongguan
Shipbuilding
Two 3,000 gt / 6,500 dwt for Fratelli Cosulich at Zhenjiang Sopo Shipbuilding
One 83,000 gt / 139,600 dwt for Modec at Samsung H I
One 4,960 gt / 6,500 dwt for Fratelli Cosulich at Zhenjiang Sopo
Shipbuilding
One 4,300 gt / 6,500 dwt for MK Marine at Jiangmen Yinxing Shipbuilding
One 2,750 gt / 3,500 dwt for Yardimci Gemi Insa at Yardimci Gemi Insa
One 2,500 gt / 3,600 dwt for Veysel Vardal Gemicilik Dinizcilik Ve Ticaret at
Dentas Gemi Insa Ve Onarim
BULK CARRIERS
Eight 90,000 gt / 177,000 dwt at Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipbuilding
Two 32,600 gt / 58,500 dwt at Tsuneishi H I
Two 22,800 gt / 37,000 dwt for Mitsui at Saiki H I
CONTAINERSHIPS
Two 40,500 gt at Samsung H I
Keel laying ceremony for Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding Group
Co. Ltd Hull No. H1309A, a 147,200 m3 LNG carrier for Yuegang
LNG Shipping Co. Ltd.
GAS CARRIERS
Two 154,800 m3 LNG gas carriers for Chevron Shipping at Samsung H I
OFFSHORE
FPSOs
Two 52,361 gt / 78,544 dwt for Mosvold Shipping at Samsung H I
Fixed Platforms
Two 10,000 gt for Seatankers Management at Jurong Shipyard
One 9,000 gt for Smedvig Asia at Keppel Fels Singapore
Self Elevating Drilling Units
Two 10,000 gt for Noble Drilling Holding at Dalian Shipbuilding Industry
Two 8,000 gt at P T Graha Trisaka
One 10,000 gt for Rowan Companies at LeTourneau
One 10,000 gt for Scorpion Offshore at Keppel Amfels
One 8,000 gt for Perforadora Central at LeTourneau
One 7,500 gt for Diamond Offshore Services at Keppel Amfels
One 7,000 gt for Atwood Oceanics at Keppel Amfels
One 7,000 gt at Keppel Fels
Other Offshore
DUNCAN BAY, 28,350 dwt bulk carrier, HCS, built at Shimanami
Shipyard for Kowa Shipping S.A.
PAG E 3 2
One self-propelled crane pipe-laying vessel 6,500 gt / 11,300 dwt at
Jingjiang Nanyang Shipbuilding
One self elevating unit, lift boat 2,350 gt / 4,800 dwt for A A Turri at SEMCO
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
abs activity
MISCELLANEOUS
Barges
Three 4,499 gt for Hornbeck Offshore Operators at Bollinger Marine Fabricators
Three 2,641 gt / 6,335 dwt for Greathorse Shipping at Cosco Dalian Marine
Engineering
Two 3,953 gt / 9,200 dwt for Vane Line Bunkering at Jeffboat
Two 1,050 gt / 4,500 dwt for K-Sea Operating Partnership at Bollinger Marine
Fabricators
One 10,000 gt / 15,000 dwt for Maritrans at Bender Shipbuilding & Repair
One 9,761 gt / 22,362 dwt for Vane Line Bunkering at Bay Shipbuilding
One 8,925 gt / 12,144 dwt at Gunderson Marine
One 8,568 gt / 11,659 dwt for Alaska Railbelt Marine at Gunderson Marine
One 6,774 gt for K-Sea Operating Partnership at Bollinger Marine Fabricators
One 4,375 gt / 7,500 dwt for Petroleum Transport at Bollinger Marine Fabricators
One 1,500 gt / 3,500 dwt for Otto Industrial at Pacific Marine & Shipbuilding
Government Service Vessels
One 300 gt / 490 dwt for Indian Coast Guard at Goa Shipyard
One 180 gt / 300 dwt for US Dept of Army at Quality Shipyards
One 75 gt / 99 dwt for US Army Tank, Automotive & Armaments Command at Orange
Shipbuilding
Delivery ceremony for METHANE RITA ANDREA, a 145,000 m3 LNG
carrier, NIBS, TCM, FL 40, SH, SH-DLA, SHCM, HM2+R, SFA 40, for
BN LNG at Samsung.
Tugs, Workboats and OSVs
Two 4,500 gt / 4,218 dwt for Edison Chouest Offshore at North American Shipbuilding
Two 2,999 gt / 2,812 dwt for Tidewater Marine at Leevac Industries
Two 2,360 gt / 2,200 dwt at P T Jaya Asiatic Shipyard
Two 2,000 gt / 2,800 dwt at Pan-United Marine
Two 2,000 gt for Otto Industrial Co. at P T Batamec Shipyard
Two 1,500 gt / 1,950 dwt for Tidewater Marine at P T Pan United Shipyard Indonesia
Two 1,163 gt / 954 dwt for Zamil Operations & Maintenance at Cheoy Lee Shipyards
One 2,300 gt / 2,700 dwt for Semco Salvage & Marine at Universal Shipbuilding,
Keihin S Shipyard
One 1,700 gt / 2,313 dwt at Bender Shipbuilding & Repair
One 1,600 gt / 1,632 dwt for Tidewater Marine at Quality Shipyards
One 1,599 gt / 1,542 dwt for Kilgore Offshore at Leevac Industries
Yachts
Four 200 gt at Cantieri Navali Lavagna
Three 614 gt at Heesen Yacht Builders
Two 300 gt at Azimut – Benetti
Two 200 gt at San Lorenzo
One 642 gt at Vitters Shipyard
One 535 gt at Northern Marine
One 425 gt at Heesen Yacht Builders
One 300 gt at Perini Navi
One 300 gt at RMK Marine Yacht Division
One 250 gt at Cantieri Navali Lavagna
Other
Two 520 gt / 410 dwt high speed craft for Brompton Investment at Sam
Aluminium Engineering
Two 210 gt / 300 dwt high speed craft for Seacoral Maritime at Sam
Aluminium Engineering
One 5,000 gt / 7,000 dwt special purpose vessel for Ajang Shipping at
P T ASL Shipyard Indonesia
One 150 gt / 150 dwt high speed crewboat for Esnaad at Abu Dhabi Ship
Building
Steel cutting ceremony for Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding Group
Hull No. H1371A, a 4,250 teu container carrier for Orient
Overseas Container Line Ltd.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
MINERVA CLARA, a 104,400 dwt double hull oil carrier, VEC, FL 25, SH,
RES, SHCM, built at Samsung Heavy Industries for Alexandra Maritime S.A.
PAG E 3 3
ABS ACtivity
Jackup Classing
Circles the Globe
Steel striking ceremony for Hull
No. B285, a B-Class deepwater
jackup for Wilhemsen at Keppel
Fels. Attending the event were
(from left) David Neo, Manager Ship Engineering, ABS Singapore;
Kolbjorn Akselvoll, Awilco,
Regional Manager; Thomas Tan,
Country Manager, ABS Singapore;
and Shye Kita Tan, Surveyor, ABS
SIngapore.
ABS, PPL, and Japan Drilling representatives gather to commemorate the
steel striking ceremony for Hull No.
P2010, a Class 275 deepwater jackup.
Keel laying
ceremony
for Hull No.
B272, a BClass deepwater jackup
for SeaDrill.
PAG E 3 4
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
abs activity
ABS representatives celebrate at the naming ceremony for the OOCL
ASIA on the bridge of the vessel with Orient Overseas (International)
Ltd. Chairman C.C. Tung (center). From left, Heikki Varemaki, ABS Senior
Surveyor and Project Manager; Eric Kleess, ABS Country Manager Korea;
Tung; Zibi Puwalski, ABS Koje District Principal; In-Yong Jeong, ABS
Principal Surveyor; and Xue-Bin, ABS Senior Surveyor.
OOCL ASIA, an 8,063 teu container carrier, NIBS, SH, ES, built at
Samsung Heavy Industries for Orient Overseas Container Line Ltd.
Delivery ceremony for HAI YANG SHI YOU 941, a self-elevating drilling
unit, built at Dalian Shipbuilding Industry Co. Ltd.
Keel laying ceremony for
Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding
Group’s Hull No. H1370A, a
4,250 teu container carrier for
Orient Overseas Container Line
Ltd. Celebrating are (from left)
James Liebertz, President & COO,
ABS Pacific; C.C. Cheung, OOCL
Manager; Ji-Gang Shi of HudongZhonghua Shipbuilding Group;
Kingsley Koo, Senior Vice President
– Central Region, ABS Pacific.
ACTIVITIES • AUGUST 2006
PAG E 3 5
Presorted
Standard
US Postage
PAID
Houston, TX
Permit No. 553
Corporate Marketing Development & Communications
16855 NORTHCHASE DRIVE
HOUSTON, TX 77060 USA
Return Service Requested
ABS WORLD HEADQUARTERS
ABS Plaza
16855 Northchase Drive
Houston, TX 77060 USA
Tel: 1-281-877-5800
Fax: 1-281-877-5803
Telex: 6737929 ABS HQ
Email: [email protected]
ABS EUROPE DIVISION
ABS House
No. 1 Frying Pan Alley
London E1 7HR, United Kingdom
Tel: 44-207-247-3255
Fax: 44-207-377-2453
Email: [email protected]
ABS PACIFIC DIVISION
438 Alexandra Road #10-00
Alexandra Point
Singapore 119958
Republic of Singapore
Tel: 65-6276-8700
Fax: 65-6276-8711
Email: [email protected]
ABS AMERICAS DIVISION
ABS Plaza
16855 Northchase Drive
Houston, TX 77060 USA
Tel: 1-281-877-6000
Fax: 1-281-877-6001
Email: [email protected]
www.eagle.org
We Welcome Your Thoughts
ABS Activities is intended to provide our members and clients with ABS views, news
and research. Editorial content is gathered from ABS engineering and field offices
around the globe.
Editor:
Stewart Wade
Contributing Editors: Susan V. Gonzalez & Rhonda Patterson
Graphic Designer:
Sharon Tamplain
To comment, please contact Stewart Wade, Vice President, External Affairs, at
Tel: 1-281-877-5850 or email [email protected]
The mission of ABS is to serve the public interest as well as the needs of our clients
by promoting the security of life, property and the natural environment primarily
through the development and verification of standards for the design, construction
and operational maintenance of marine-related facilities.
ON THE COVER
The ABS classed M/T Seaoath (105,000 dwt) managed by Athens-based Thenamaris
Ships Management was awarded the 200th Green Award Certificate during a ceremony
at the 2006 Posidonia Conference and Exhibition.
TX 07/06 6120 11000

Similar documents