Back Matter - Western Historical Quarterly

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Back Matter - Western Historical Quarterly
The Church in the Barrio
Mexican American EthnoCatholicism in Houston
ROBERTO R. TREVINO
Religion, resistance, and accommodation
"Trevino deftly illuminates the significance
of religion among mexicano newcomers
in early zoth-century Houston and
the ir descendants dow n to the Chicano
movement of the 1960s and 1970S.
Explo ring both the Catholic Church in
the barrio and t he activism of barrio
Catholics in their church, he makes a
vital contribution to the growing body
of historical scholarship that critically
examines Latino/a religion."
- Timot hy Matovina, author of
Guadalupe and Her Faithful
328 pp.,21 i1lus. $59.95 cloth / $22.50 paper
Making Home Work
Domesticity and Native American Assimilation in the American
West, 7860 -7979
JANE E. SIMONSEN
Using domesticity to organize-and expose-the nation's inequality
"A wonderful contribution to scholarship that integrates Native content and
experiences into Amer ican history in order to enr ich and expand our understandings of American colonial and cultural development."-K. Ts ianina
Lomaw aima, Univers ity of Arizona
"Gracefu lly wr itte n, imagi nat ively conceived, imp ressively researched, and int erdiscipli nary to it s core, t his book prom ises t o significantly enhance our understa nding of th e hom e as a site fo r cult ural w ork as we ll as a place of domest ic
labor."- Eileen Boris, University of Califo rnia, Sa nta Barbara
Gender and America n Culture
Approx. 328 pp., 29 illus. $59.95 cloth / $22.50 paper
Available May 2006
The University of
NO RT H CA R0 LIN A
at bookstoresor 800-848-6224 I www.uncpress.unc.edu
Press
WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION
"Its purpose shall be to promote the study of the
North Ame rican West in its varied aspects and broadest sense ."
PRESIDENT
PRESIDENT,ELECT
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Notre Dame (emeritus)
Univer sity of Texas at Dallas
Uni versity of New Mexico
wnugentfs nd.ed u
edmundsesurdalla s.edu
wha @unm .edu
R. David Edmunds
Walter Nugent
Paul Andrew Hutton
THE COUNCIL
Thomas G. Alexander
(2007)
Brigham Young University (emeritus)
Art Gomez (2008)
National Park Service
Malcolm J. Rohrbough
thomas_alexand [email protected]
arc [email protected]
malcolm-r ohrb ougb fsuto wa.edu
Iris H. W. Engstrand
Jerome Greene
(2006)
National Park Service
Virginia Scharff (2006)
jerry-grec [email protected]
[email protected] .edu
(2006)
Univ ersity of San Diego
[email protected] ego.edu
Yale Uni versity
Peter Iverson (2007)
Ari zona Stat e University
[email protected] .edu
peter.iverson @asu.edu
John Mack Faragher
(2007)
(2008)
Univ ersity of Iowa
University of New Mex ico
DONORS
Gordon Bakken
Anne M. Butler
Paul A. Hutton
Anthony A. Kinninger
L. G. Moses
Paula Petr ik
Walter S. Rosenb erry 1II
Hal Rothman
Virgini a Scha rff
Robert Utle y & Melody Webh
Richard White
PATRONS
Annette Atkins
Peter Del.afo sse
Iris H. W. Engstrand
William T. Hagan
Albert L. Hurtado
Thomas D. !sern
Peter Iverson
Gail Kelly-Cu ster
Holly Arnold Kinney
David Rich l ewis
Walt er Nugent
James P. Ronda
Caroline F. Sc h immel
Willi am F. St robridge
Elliott West
David M. Wrohel
John R. Wunder
SPONSORING MEMBERS
A. K. Smiley Public Library
Amon Carter Museum Library
Ari zona Historic al Society
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and Public Records
Arizon a St are U n iversity,
Department of History
Buffalo Bill Historic al CenterMcCr acken Resear ch library
Bureau of l and Management ,
Colorado Sta te Office
C harles Redd Ce nte r for Western
Studi es
Colorado Historical Society
Arthur H. C lark Co mpany
Co lorado Springs Pione ers Museum
Autr y Institute for the Study of th e
DeGolyer library, Southern
Methodist U n iversity
Am eric an West
The Bancroft Librar y, University of
C aliforn ia, Berkeley
Denver Public Library
Go Native America
Hayden Memori al Library, Ari zona
Hi storic al Foundation
Historical Research Associates Inc.
The Huntington Librar y
Institute of American Indian Studies,
Univ ersity of South Dakota
JRP Historical C onsulting
Kit Carson Home & Museum,
Taos, New Mexico
longmont Museum & Cultural Center
MNRR, National Park Service
Montana Historical Society
Mormon History Association
Museum of the Rockies
Natural History Museum of
Los Angeles County
Ninth Judicial Circuit Historical
Society
University of Oklahoma,
Department of History
Oklahoma State University,
Department of History
University of Oklahoma Libraries
Penrose Public Library, Special
Collections
Nebraska State Historical Society
Salt River Project
New Mexico State Records Center
& Archives
True West Publishing
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University of New Mexico,
Department of History
University of Utah Press
University of Washington,
Department of History
Utah State University
Washington State University,
Department of History
Western Writers of America
SUSTAINING MEMBERS
William F. Deverell
Gail L. Didonato
Bruce J. Dinges
Brian W. Dippie
R. David Edmunds
Ann Fabian
John M. Findlay
Doug Flamming
Karl E. Geier
Robert A. Goldberg
Art Gomez
David G. Gutierrez
46
TH
Alexandra Harmon
B.J. Harris
Paivi Hoikkala
Marv Kaiser
Todd Kerstetter
Andy Kirk
Roger W. Lotchin
Carol L. MacGregor
John H. Marshall
Marfa E. Montoya
Paula M. Nelson
James Nottage
Richard J. Orsi
Charlene Porsild
Malcolm J. Rohrbough
Marni Sandweiss
Frank N. Schubert
Frederick Schult
Jean A. Stuntz
Donald J. Sweimler
[ulidta Tarver
Joseph E. Taylor III
Joan Carpenter Troccoli
Kerry Wyatt
ANNUAL CONFERENCE
11-14 October 2006
St. Louis, Missouri
Hyatt Regency at Union Station
PROGRAM COMMITTEE CO..CHAIRS
LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS
Annette Atkins
Department of History
St. Johns University/
College of St. Benedict
Collegeville, MN 56321
Marc S. Rodriguez
Department of History
University of Notre Dame
South Bend, IN 46556
[email protected]
574,631,2761
320,363,2138
[email protected]
John Hoover
Director, St. Louis Mercantile Library
[email protected]
Carlos Schwantes
University of Missouri, St. Louis
caschwantcsfesbcglobal.net
The Western Historical Quarterly is the journal of the Western History Association. Membership in the association is open to anyone interested in the history and culture of the American West. Applications for personal
membership in the WHA should be sent to the Western History Association, MSC06 3770, 1 University of New
Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131,0001. Telephone: (505) 277,5234; fax: (505) 277,5275; email: [email protected];
website: www.unm.edu/-wha. Annual dues (calendar year): Regular, $60; Joint, $80; Student, $25; Emeritus, $40;
Sustaining, $125; Sponsor (institutions), $150; Patron, $250; Donor, $500. Members receive the Western Historical
Quarterly, Montana The Magazine of Western History, and the WHA Newsletter. Emeritus and student memberships
include only the Western Historical Quarterly, conference material, and the WHA Newsletter. Library and other
institutional subscriptions should be addressed to the Western Historical Quarterly. U.S. institutions, $70; foreign
institutions, $85; single copies, $15. Microfilm available: 1-4 reels, $25 per reel; 5 or more reels, $20 per reel.
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47
th
CALL FOR P ROPOSALS
ANNUAL CONFERENCE
WESTERN HISTORY ASSOCIATION
3-6 October 2007
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Prc lim ina ry Submiss ion Dc adline: 31 A ugust 20 06
Crossroads of the West: Meetings and Exchanges , Old and New
T hc program co mmittee for the 200 7 meeting of th e Western H istor y Associat ion invi tes proposals for pan els and pap ers. The associa tio n will gat he r for its annua l co nfe rence in O klaho ma
C ity d uring October 200 7, a ycar th at marks th e ce nten n ial of O klaho ma state hood. Perh aps no
oth er sta te in th e uni on offe rs such a d iversity of landscapes an d cult ures. Rugged tree-covered
mountains resemb lin g th e A pp alachi an s grace th e state's easte rn borde rs, wh ile th e southeas te rn
corne r, known even toda y as "Lit tle Dixie" resembles many region s of the Upp er So uth . T he tall
grass prair ie from the Midw est invad es th e north -central portions of the stare , the n grad ually gives
way to th e h igh plains of the western counties. T he so uth weste rn q uadrant fea tures the rocky
cliffs and bould er-st rewn gullies of the Wichita Mountains th at , alon g with th e Panhand le (on ce
kn own as "No Man 's Land ") , hint at landscapes more familiar in th e A merican So ut hwest .
In a sim ilar vein , th e region lon g h as been a crossroads for peop le, co mmerce, ami cultu res.
Tri bal peo ple, both indigenous an d th ose remo ved from ot her sta tes and ter rito ries, have co nreste d for and int ermin gled in the region. They have been joi ned by A frican A merica ns, A ngloA me ricans, and Hi spanics to create a popul ati on th orou gh ly Am er ican in its multi plic ity. O klahom a long has been an econom ic c ross road: n region where co mme rce in trade goods, livestock,
oil, and, mor e recen tly, ind ust rial prod uct s ha s flo urish cd . The modern Soone r S tare is a un ique
blend of both th e O ld and t he Ne w West, a microcosm of the changing West at th e beginn ing of
th e twenty-first cent ury.
Thc program committ ee welcomes papers and panels th at reflect th is diversity, both in Ok lahom a an d in the larger A merican West . We espec ially welcom e papc rs and panel s th at explore
ne w interpretations of the western cu ltura l ex perience, con side ring issues of ct h n lcity, race , gen der, and th e env iron ment . Sessions may follow a tradi tion al scholarly co nference for mat , but we
also e nco urage innovative sessions focusing upon art, film, music, or objects of material c ulture.
In add ition, we welcom e sessions on reaching west ern h istor y, and/or teaching the hi stor y of
e thn ic groups whose presen ce e nriches th is region .
Submissions may be for an en ti re session, a panel discussion , or an indiv idu al pape r. W hen
submitting an ent ire session , incl ude an abst ract that o utl ines the purpose of the session , and
des ignate on e pa neli st or parti cipant as the contact pe rson. Each paper proposal, whether ind ividua l or part of a session, shou ld incl ude a one-page abstract and a one page c.v, including th e
addre ss, phone, and emai l address for each participant . T he committ ee will assume that all listed
indi vid uals have agreed to part icipate. Subm issions sho uld be post marked by 3 1 August 2006 .
Program co mmittee co- cha irs arc L. G. Moses, Dep t. of Histo ry, O klaho ma State University,
and Meli ssa Meyer, Dep t. of H istor y, UCLA. All submissions should be sent to L. G. Moses, Dept.
of Hi stor y, LSW 501 , O klaho ma Star e U n ive rsity, Sti llwate r, OK 7407 8-3054 (mo [email protected] .
cdu). Phon e: 405 -744 -8180.
Other comm ittee members include: Donna Akers, UN , Linco ln ; Gary Anderson , UO, Nor man; Andrea Boardm an , SMU, Dalla s; W illiam Destefa no , William P. C lements Ce nter for the
So uthwest: Emily Greenwald , H isto rical Research Associate s, Misso ula , MT; Meg Hack er, Na tio na l Archives, Ft. Worth; John Hearon , UA, Fairb anks ; Meli nda Helm, OSU, Stillwater; St eve
Kart, A ut ry Nationa l Ce nte r, LA; James Leiker, Johnson County Co mmun ity Co llege, Ov erland,
KS ; Mich ell e N ickerson, UT, Dall as; Barb ara Reyes, UN M, A lbuq uerq ue; Michael Sea rles, A ugusta S tate Uni versit y, A ugusta , GA ; Jan Shi pps, emer ita, lU PU I; Elliott West, UA, Fayetteville;
Lipin g Zh u, Eastern Was hi ngto n U n ive rsity, C he ncy.
Ethnohistory
Ethnohistory, the official journal of the American Society for
Ethno history, reflects the wide range of current scholarship
that is inspired by anthropological and historica l approaches to
the human condition. Of particular interest are those analyses
and interpretations that seek to make evident the experience,
organization, and identities of indigenous, diasporic, and minority
peoples that otherwise elude the histories and anthropologies of
nations, states, and colonial empires.
Recent special issues include
"Colon ial lconicity in Africa: Lake Rudolf (Turkana) and Beyond"
(53:1) - Mustafa Kemal Mirze/er, special issue editor
"Outs ide Gods: History Making in the Pacific" (52:1)
-Martha Kaplan, special issue editor
Subscription Information
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To or der, please ca ll to ll-free 888-651-0122 (in the U.S. and Canada)
or 9 19-688-5134, or e-mai l [email protected] uke upress .edu .
For more informat ion, visit www.dukeupress.edu/ethnohistory.
on the web:
califomiajoumaIs.com/ phr
available online at:
pacific
historical review
caliber.ucpress.net
For over 70 years, the Pacific Historica l Review
has accurately and adeptly covered the history of American expansion to the Pacific
and beyond, as well as the post- fro ntier
developments
of the 20th-century
American West. Published quarterly for
the Pacific Coast Branch of the American
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Winter 20041°5, #144, s12.50 plus $3.50 postage
• Delves into the experience ofbeingyoungand gmwingup in I9d'-and20th-century BC.
"O n the Environment"
Summer!Autumn 2004, #I421r43, $22 plus $5.50 postage
• Explores broad que stions about the environment within a British Columbian context.
Also look for "Domestic Spaces," "Native Geographies,"
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"She Speaks as One Having Authority:" Mary E. Downey's Use of
Libraries as a Means to Public Power
Suzanne M. Stauffer
Classification and Definition of a Discipline: The Dewey
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