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66
Photography • Art Criticism
26
Steve Dzerigian
Anecdote: From Instant Images
to Enduring Memories
Dzerigian reminisces about The Great AA,
the huge Polaroid, the Yosemite workshops, and how Ansel’s large personality
and generous nature endeared him to
many as instructor and friend.
Wayne Norton
Perry Dilbeck
75
Portfolio : John Sexton
Recollections:
Three Decades of Photographs
A selection of images from Sexton’s latest
book, Recollections: Three Decades of Photographs – images that recount his many
photographic interests over the years.
31
fromPortfolio
Fishermen
Waters 92
: Wayne Norton
Desert Relations
EndNotes by Bill Jay
by Moisés
Levy
Somewhere between a scavenger
and a cultural archaeologist,
Current LensWork Offerings
Norton creates photo-narrations of the
Start on Page 94!
junk and imprints left in the desert.
Sep - Oct 2006
Interview: John Sexton
Anecdote: Steve Dzerigian
Editor’s Comments: Brooks Jensen
EndNotes: Bill Jay
65
Interview with John Sexton
In this interview, Sexton discusses
the process of collecting 30 years of
images into a new book, and talks about
publishing and the challenges of creating
a book of one’s photographic artwork.
Hemlock trim
to these lines
Wayne Norton
24 images
plus video interview
27 images
plus audio interview
99 images
plus audio interview
24 images
plus audio interview
Bill Jay Video
Tierra Desnuda

Darkroom Tour Video
Anthony Mournain
Moisés Levy
EXTENDED Extras
• Oliver Gagliani Audio
• LensWork Podcasts
• Book excerpts
• Additional Bill Jay EndNotes
John Sexton
Audio: Oliver Gagliani
We had the privilege of talking photography and art
philosophy with Oliver Gagliani on several occasions
before he passed away. In this LensWork EXTENDED
exclusive, we present several excerpts from our
conversations with this master photographer and
well-loved workshop instructor. Recorded when Oliver was well into his 80s, he reflects on life, artmaking,
photography, money, and the importance of being
true to yourself and dedicated to your art.
LensWork Extended is a true multimedia publication that
dramatically expands the contents of our 96-page magazine,
Portfolios
Interview
EndNotes
LensWork — then loads-in
lots of audio, video,
and “extendSystem Requirements: This CD can be
extras.” In the spirit
of the
paper publication, theBill
focus
played on your PC or Mac computer usPerry ed
Dilbeck
John
Sexton
Jay
ing the free Adobe Acrobat Reader™
continues on the creative process, with each CD offering an
Version 6 or newer available via downMoisésengaging
Levy mix that only multimedia makes possible.
load from www.adobe.com.
Anecdote
Wayne Norton
John Sexton
$
Steve Dzerigian
ISBN 1-888803-84-3
12•95 U S / 17•50 Canada
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•
5 1 6 9 5
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Photography • Art Criticism
9
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E X T E N D E D ·6 6
Recollections
Purchase this item from our online store
Sample Pages from
by
Extended
Portfolios
with
Audio
Comments
Perry Dilbeck
Moisés Levy
Wayne Norton
John Sexton
Anecdote
Steve Dzerigian
Interview
John Sexton
LensWork
Bonus Portfolios
Web links
Video
samples
and more!
LensWork
Extended
John Sexton
From the book Recollections by John Sexton.
Available from Ventana Editions at www.VentanaEditions.com
All images in this portfolio © 2006 John Sexton. All rights reserved.
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Desert Relations
The Last Harvest
Photography and the Creative Process • Articles • Audio Interviews • Extended Portfolios
13
Portfolio : Moisés Levy
Fishermen Waters
A remote lagoon near
Acapulco, Mexico, is the scene for this
elegant choreography of light,
water, fishermen and photographer.
45
Portfolio : Perry Dilbeck
The Last Harvest:
Truck Farmers of the Deep South
Dilbeck’s 10-year project is in full fruition,
with a book out this Fall. A tribute to the
disappearing truck farmers of the South
– and the way of life they’ve lived.
Perry Dilbeck
EXTENDED
John Sexton
Moisés Levy
8
Editor’s Comments
When Photography Becomes Art
Photography must ask the great questions
of Life, which ultimately does not include
“Which camera did you use?”
No. 66 Sep - Oct 2006
Moisés Levy
Fishermen Waters
Recollections
Photography and the Creative Process • Articles • Interviews • Portfolios • Fine Art Special Editions
Brooks Jensen & Maureen Gallagher, Editors
John Sexton
LensWork 66 • Print Version
Sep – Oct 2006
Photography and the Creative Process
Articles • Interviews • Portfolios
LensWork
Photography and the Creative Process • Articles • Interviews • Portfolios • Fine Art Special Editions
66
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by Moisés Levy
LensWork 66
LensWork 66 • Print Version
Sep – Oct 2006
8
Editor’s Comments
When Photography Becomes Art
Photography must ask the great questions
of Life, which ultimately does not include
“Which camera did you use?”
Photography and the Creative Process
Articles • Interviews • Portfolios
Brooks Jensen & Maureen Gallagher, Editors
John Sexton
Moisés Levy
13
Portfolio : Moisés Levy
Fishermen Waters
A remote lagoon near
Acapulco, Mexico, is the scene for this
elegant choreography of light,
water, fishermen and photographer.
Cover LW66P.indd 1
26
Steve Dzerigian
Anecdote: From Instant Images
to Enduring Memories
Dzerigian reminisces about The Great AA,
the huge Polaroid, the Yosemite workshops, and how Ansel’s large personality
and generous nature endeared him to
many as instructor and friend.
31
Portfolio : Wayne Norton
Desert Relations
Somewhere between a scavenger
and a cultural archaeologist,
Norton creates photo-narrations of the
junk and imprints left in the desert.
Wayne Norton
Interview: John Sexton
Anecdote: Steve Dzerigian
Editor’s Comments: Brooks Jensen
EndNotes: Bill Jay
Perry Dilbeck
Editor’s Comments
Of course, those who are actively engaged
in digital photography will defend themselves by saying it’s not as easy as it looks.
They will explain that it requires considerable skill and hours, if not years, to
develop the technological abilities to succeed in a rapidly changing environment;
that the medium of a photograph does not
determine its validity; that new tools offer
new vision, etc.
Current LensWork Offerings
Start on Page 94!
LensWork
So if the real challenge of photography
is not printmaking, then what is it? This
is a difficult question and one that I believe – even after 35 years of pursuing it
– I cannot answer to my complete satisfaction. I know a little bit of what it is; I know
it when I see it, but defining it eludes me.
I sometimes see glimpses of it in others’
work. I know that great art is about
compassion when I see W. Eugene Smith’s
photograph Tomoko Uemura in Her Bath,
Minimata, 172. I know great art is about
reverence and humility in the presence
of great things when I see Ansel Adams’
Clearing Winter Storm. I know great art
is about optimism and endurance when
I see Paul Strand’s work in the Hebrides
– and I know it is about pessimism when
I see Robert Capa’s photograph of the falling Spanish soldier. I know it is about the
human search for spirituality when I look
at the work of Linda Connor. I know it is
about the loneliness of life when I look at
the work of André Kertész. I know is it is
about revelation when I look at the work
of Josef Sudek and I know it is about the
obscurity and the confusion of life when
I look at the photographs of Robert Frank
or Garry Winogrand.
It is a tall order to consider such questions
in a medium that is graphic instead of
verbal. It is not easy. But, that is precisely
why photography is so worthy of being
called a fine art. Music, too, is nonverbal,
but it has the ability to move us to tears.
Although much of his photographic studies have been self-taught, he has taken
several workshops along the way (with Academia de Artes Visuales in Mexico, and
with Dan Burkholder in the USA). While his career is centered on architecture, and
his appreciation of light began there, he states “I have a preference for landscape
photography because it lets me be more organic and flexible than my work as an
architect.” For that reason he is working on a project titled Naked Earth – where
land meets sky – and nary a support column in sight.
Works with:
Mamiya 7 6x7 medium format and Canon 5D digital. Scans film
with Nikon Coolscan 9000 to Mac G5. Prints on Epson 4000 and
in Platinum/Palladium.
13
Desert Relations
Born in Brian, Texas, in 1958, Wayne Norton grew up in Ames, Iowa,
then moved at the age of 21 to Santa Barbara, California, where he
attended Brooks Institute of Photography. After graduating with a
Bachelor of Arts in commercial photography he then moved to San
Diego and established Norton Photography. This small commercial
photography business has been his sole occupation for nearly 25
years.
While working in a commercial capacity, Norton has managed to
work on personal fine art projects over the years. To further his fine
art interests he is working towards his MFA in photography through
the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. Upon graduation
he plans to dedicate himself to fine art photography.
He states “I think the photographs of Ansel Adams and the book
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance influenced me to become
sort of a control-freak with my photography. I’ve also notice that I’m
increasingly interested in ‘American’ art.” In painting that includes
Edward Hopper and Winslow Homer; musically speaking it includes
Bob Dylan and J.J. Cale.
Norton currently lives in Escondido, California, but will be relocating
to the desert town of Wickenburg, Arizona, in January, 2007.
Web site:
www.nortonphoto.com
Works with:
4x5 view camera with digital back, one studio
strobe light. Archival inkjet prints made with
Epson Ultrachrome inks and photo rag archival
fine art paper.
Represented by:
Currently seeking representation.

LensWork
Anecdote
Steve Dzerigian
EXTENDED
Wayne Norton
Desert Relations
Sample Pages from
LensWork
Perry Dilbeck
The Last Harvest: Truck Farmers of
the Deep South
by
Wayne Norton
LensWork
30
Renew online
Bill Jay
Anecdote: From Instant Images to Enduring Memories
by Steve Dzerigian
Dzerigian reminisces about The Great AA, the huge
Polaroid, the Yosemite workshops, and how Ansel’s
large personality and generous nature endeared
him to many as instructor and friend.
by
Moisés Levy
12
Subscribe online
Overview of
EndNotes
EndNotes by Bill Jay
About seven years ago he began to explore photography more deeply, with a broad
interest in artistic composition, influences, history and styles. Levy appreciates the
history of the medium, and states that he has learned from the photographic work
of Sebastião Salgado, Edward Weston, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, and Eugene Atgét.
From other creative venues his musical preference is classical, and includes Mozart,
Bach and Vivaldi, and he enjoys the written works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and
Edgar Allen Poe.
www.levylevy.com.mx
John Sexton
Fishermen Waters
In 1982, when he began his studies in architecture at Universidad Iberoamericana,
his appreciation of the natural relation between light and architecture was deepened.
Subsequent travel to Boston, Paris and Venice served to illuminate the unbreakable
bond between architecture and its relationship with light. It was this early interest
in the qualities of light that lead Levy to photography, and as a counterpoint to his
work as an architect he has now been drawn to landscape work.
[email protected]
Interview
Perry Dilbeck
Moisés Levy
Wayne Norton
John Sexton
Editor’s Comments
When Photography Becomes Art
Photography must ask the great questions of Life,
which ultimately does not include “Which camera
did you use?”
In short, great photographs are never
about photography but seem to be about
life, and not, generally, the small things
in life. The best photographers appear to
be engaged in the great dialog of life – the
dialog that is usually the field-of-play for
philosophers and theologians, for mystics or even political scientists. The great
photographers don’t seem to be asking
questions about f/stops or shutter speeds,
developers or enlarging papers, but are
asking the same kinds of questions that
were asked by philosophers Aristotle,
Plato, Thomas Aquinas, Nietzsche, or
Freud – the same questions asked by the
poets Aeschylus, Dante, Goethe, Victor
Hugo and Mark Twain. What is man?
Who am I? What is good? Why is there
evil? How should we treat one another?
Why don’t we? Why does suffering exist?
These are the questions of art because
these are the questions of humankind.
Born in Mexico City in 1963, Moisés Levy is a lifelong resident there, and works
in the city as an established architect. His earliest interest in architecture and
photography occurred on a trip to New York City when he was 13 years old. “I was
fascinated with the buildings and the evening shadows of the city.”
Web site:
Portfolios
Articles
92
EndNotes by Bill Jay
I can’t help but think that both camps are
missing the far more important point.
The hard part of photography has never
been technology. There have been hundreds, if not thousands, of technically
accomplished photographers – and a
peek back through the early photography
magazines and photographic annuals
will yield a harvest of technologically
accomplished photographers whose work
is now forgotten – because it deserves to
be. You see, the hard part of photography
has never been technology, but rather
the more difficult process of artmaking
– a process that is stubbornly unsolvable
through technological means and remains
the sole province of the human heart, the
human mind, and human soul. If art were
solely about technique then why is it that
the technical masters like Rembrandt or
Ansel Adams don’t make masterpieces
each and every time they create a new
piece? Is it because when one achieves
technical mastery one hasn’t, in essence,
accomplished much of merit? Technical
Email:
Moisés Levy
Fishermen Waters
8/14/2006 4:14:39 PM
75
Portfolio : John Sexton
Recollections:
Three Decades of Photographs
A selection of images from Sexton’s latest
book, Recollections: Three Decades of Photographs – images that recount his many
photographic interests over the years.
The debate ensues – and sometimes rage
soon follows.
Portfolios
LensWork
65
Interview with John Sexton
In this interview, Sexton discusses
the process of collecting 30 years of
images into a new book, and talks about
publishing and the challenges of creating
a book of one’s photographic artwork.
mastery is important, it is a challenge,
it may take years to accomplish, but it is
merely a first step. Mastering technique
is like graduating from high school; it is
an achievement worthy of a small celebration, but is best seen as the conclusion
of preparation rather than as true
accomplishment.
When Photography Becomes Art
Some photographic old-timers find
themselves naturally resistant to digital
technologies because it seems to make the
process of photography a little too easy.
When I was first learning photography
(in the pre-Jurassic era of 1970), it was
known that every person of accomplishment had, in their turn, sweated bullets
over the Zone System and the subtle craft
of making a fine print. Now, these darned
youngsters come along with their whipsnap “digital image capture devices” and
pound out inkjet-o-graphs with rapidity
– and even have the nerve to call it art.
(Listen carefully and you can just hear
the rocking chairs creaking during such
discussions.)
45
Portfolio : Perry Dilbeck
The Last Harvest:
Truck Farmers of the Deep South
Dilbeck’s 10-year project is in full fruition,
with a book out this Fall. A tribute to the
disappearing truck farmers of the South
– and the way of life they’ve lived.
No. 66 Sep - Oct 2006
Overview of
Sep - Oct 2006
Table of Contents
Photography and the Creative Process • Articles • Interviews • Portfolios • Fine Art Special Editions
Photography and the Creative Process • Articles • Interviews • Portfolios • Fine Art Special Editions
66
LensWork
LensWork
LensWork
66
LensWork
31
Painted Window
Striped Boulder
Anaheim, California 1978
Saddle Canyon, Grand Canyon, Arizona 1997
88
89
Sample Pages from
Interview with John Sexton
TIn this interview, Sexton discusses the process of
collecting 30 years of images into a new book, and
talks about publishing and the challenges of creating a book of one’s photographic artwork.
Purchase this item from our online store
LensWork
EXTENDED
John Sexton
Recollections: Three Decades of Photographs
Purchase 10 Years of LensWork (issues #1-50) as PDF files on a single CD
enhanced.lenswork .com – Preview of LensWork #66
Close
 
LensWork
EX TENDED
66
LensWork #66
In Print
LensWork
Extended #66
John Sexton
16 images
24 images
Plus audio and video
interviews
Perry Dilbeck
17 images
99 images
Plus audio interview
Moisés Levy
11 images
27 images
Plus audio interview
Wayne Norton
11 images
24 images
Plus audio interview
LensWork #66
featuring...
Video
LensWork Introduces
Darkroom Video Tours
This video of John Sexton’s darkroom is
our first in a series of LensWork EXTENDED
exclusive tours of photographers’ darkrooms,
digital workspaces, and studios.

Selected technical data
Bill Jay’s EndNotes
2-pages
4-pages
Editor’s comment


Audio Interviews
with photographers




Bonus Articles
Video
Book excerpts
Bonus Gallery
Bonus Gallery PDFs
Tierra Desnuda
by Moisés Levy
66
ExtEndEd Portfolios
Perry Dilbeck
Wayne Norton
99 images
plus audio interview
24 images
plus audio interview
Desert Relations
The Last Harvest
EXTENDED
Moisés Levy
27 images
plus audio interview
Fishermen Waters
Recollections
LensWork
John Sexton
24 images
plus video interview
Subscribe online

System Requirements: This CD can be
played on your PC or Mac computer using the free Adobe Acrobat Reader™
Version 6 or newer available via download from www.adobe.com.
John Sexton
Audio: Oliver Gagliani
We had the privilege of talking photography and art
philosophy with Oliver Gagliani on several occasions
before he passed away. In this LensWork EXTENDED
exclusive, we present several excerpts from our
conversations with this master photographer and
well-loved workshop instructor. Recorded when Oliver was well into his 80s, he reflects on life, artmaking,
photography, money, and the importance of being
true to yourself and dedicated to your art.
LensWork Extended is a true multimedia publication that
dramatically expands the contents of our 96-page magazine,
LensWork — then loads-in lots of audio, video, and “extended extras.” In the spirit of the paper publication, the focus
continues on the creative process, with each CD offering an
engaging mix that only multimedia makes possible.
ISBN 1-888803-84-3
$
12•95 U S / 17•50 Canada
•
•
$
Photography • Art Criticism
How to Build a Bonus Gallery PDF
Renew online
Darkroom Tour Video
Anthony Mournain
Moisés Levy
Purchase this item from our online store
9
5 1 6 9 5
Photography and the Creative Process • Articles • Audio Interviews • Extended Portfolios
Bill Jay Video
Tierra Desnuda
EXTENDED Extras
• Oliver Gagliani Audio
• LensWork Podcasts
• Book excerpts
• Additional Bill Jay EndNotes
Hemlock trim
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Overview of
LensWork
EXTENDED
Sample Pages from
LensWork
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LensWork
E X T E N D E D ·6 6
Bonus Gallery
Bill Jay
LensWork
Scoring guides
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The
Anthony
Mournian
Video Interviews
Overview of
Extended
Portfolios
with
Audio
Comments
Perry Dilbeck
Moisés Levy
Wayne Norton
John Sexton
Anecdote
Steve Dzerigian
Interview
John Sexton
Bonus Portfolios
Web links
Video
samples
and more!
LensWork
Extended
Extended portfolios, more images •
Short audio interviews with photographers • Audio comments on
individual images • Videos on photography and the creative process
• Printable high resolution fine art
images • Direct links to web sites,
email addresses • Video interviews
with photographers • And more all
on a single CD using the Acrobat 6
Reader.
781888 803846
Hemlock trim
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Sample Pages from
LensWork
EXTENDED
Purchase 10 Years of LensWork (issues #1-50) as PDF files on a single CD
enhanced.lenswork .com – Preview of LensWork #66
Close
 
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66
66
LensWork
LensWork
Photography and the Creative Process • Articles • Interviews • Portfolios • Fine Art Special Editions
Overview of
LensWork
Table of Contents
LensWork 66 • Print Version
No. 66 Sep - Oct 2006
Photography and the Creative Process • Articles • Interviews • Portfolios • Fine Art Special Editions
8
Editor’s Comments
When Photography Becomes Art
Photography must ask the great questions
of Life, which ultimately does not include
“Which camera did you use?”
13
Portfolio : Moisés Levy
Fishermen Waters
A remote lagoon near
Acapulco, Mexico, is the scene for this
elegant choreography of light,
water, fishermen and photographer.
26
Steve Dzerigian
Anecdote: From Instant Images
to Enduring Memories
Dzerigian reminisces about The Great AA,
the huge Polaroid, the Yosemite workshops, and how Ansel’s large personality
and generous nature endeared him to
many as instructor and friend.
Sep - Oct 2006
Portfolios
Interview
Perry Dilbeck
Moisés Levy
Wayne Norton
John Sexton
John Sexton
EndNotes
Bill Jay
Anecdote
Steve Dzerigian
31
Portfolio : Wayne Norton
Desert Relations
Somewhere between a scavenger
and a cultural archaeologist,
Norton creates photo-narrations of the
junk and imprints left in the desert.
45
Portfolio : Perry Dilbeck
The Last Harvest:
Truck Farmers of the Deep South
Dilbeck’s 10-year project is in full fruition,
with a book out this Fall. A tribute to the
disappearing truck farmers of the South
– and the way of life they’ve lived.
65
Interview with John Sexton
In this interview, Sexton discusses
the process of collecting 30 years of
images into a new book, and talks about
publishing and the challenges of creating
a book of one’s photographic artwork.
75
Portfolio : John Sexton
Recollections:
Three Decades of Photographs
A selection of images from Sexton’s latest
book, Recollections: Three Decades of Photographs – images that recount his many
photographic interests over the years.

LensWork
EXTENDED
Sample Pages from
LensWork
92
EndNotes by Bill Jay
Current LensWork Offerings
Start on Page 94!
Sample Pages from
LensWork
8/14/2006 4:14:39 PM
Subscribe online
Overview of
Renew online
Purchase this item from our online store
EXTENDED
Purchase 10 Years of LensWork (issues #1-50) as PDF files on a single CD
enhanced.lenswork .com – Preview of LensWork #66
Close
 
Sample Pages from
LensWork
66
Overview of
LensWork
LensWork
Editor’s Comments
The debate ensues – and sometimes rage
soon follows.
mastery is important, it is a challenge,
it may take years to accomplish, but it is
merely a first step. Mastering technique
is like graduating from high school; it is
an achievement worthy of a small celebration, but is best seen as the conclusion
of preparation rather than as true
accomplishment.
I can’t help but think that both camps are
missing the far more important point.
The hard part of photography has never
been technology. There have been hundreds, if not thousands, of technically
accomplished photographers – and a
peek back through the early photography
magazines and photographic annuals
will yield a harvest of technologically
accomplished photographers whose work
is now forgotten – because it deserves to
be. You see, the hard part of photography
has never been technology, but rather
the more difficult process of artmaking
– a process that is stubbornly unsolvable
through technological means and remains
the sole province of the human heart, the
human mind, and human soul. If art were
solely about technique then why is it that
the technical masters like Rembrandt or
Ansel Adams don’t make masterpieces
each and every time they create a new
piece? Is it because when one achieves
technical mastery one hasn’t, in essence,
accomplished much of merit? Technical
So if the real challenge of photography
is not printmaking, then what is it? This
is a difficult question and one that I believe – even after 35 years of pursuing it
– I cannot answer to my complete satisfaction. I know a little bit of what it is; I know
it when I see it, but defining it eludes me.
I sometimes see glimpses of it in others’
work. I know that great art is about
compassion when I see W. Eugene Smith’s
photograph Tomoko Uemura in Her Bath,
Minimata, 172. I know great art is about
reverence and humility in the presence
of great things when I see Ansel Adams’
Clearing Winter Storm. I know great art
is about optimism and endurance when
I see Paul Strand’s work in the Hebrides
– and I know it is about pessimism when
I see Robert Capa’s photograph of the falling Spanish soldier. I know it is about the
human search for spirituality when I look
at the work of Linda Connor. I know it is
about the loneliness of life when I look at
the work of André Kertész. I know is it is
about revelation when I look at the work
When Photography Becomes Art
Some photographic old-timers find
themselves naturally resistant to digital
technologies because it seems to make the
process of photography a little too easy.
When I was first learning photography
(in the pre-Jurassic era of 1970), it was
known that every person of accomplishment had, in their turn, sweated bullets
over the Zone System and the subtle craft
of making a fine print. Now, these darned
youngsters come along with their whipsnap “digital image capture devices” and
pound out inkjet-o-graphs with rapidity
– and even have the nerve to call it art.
(Listen carefully and you can just hear
the rocking chairs creaking during such
discussions.)
Of course, those who are actively engaged
in digital photography will defend themselves by saying it’s not as easy as it looks.
They will explain that it requires considerable skill and hours, if not years, to
develop the technological abilities to succeed in a rapidly changing environment;
that the medium of a photograph does not
determine its validity; that new tools offer
new vision, etc.
of Josef Sudek and I know it is about the
obscurity and the confusion of life when
I look at the photographs of Robert Frank
or Garry Winogrand.
In short, great photographs are never
about photography but seem to be about
life, and not, generally, the small things
in life. The best photographers appear to
be engaged in the great dialog of life – the
dialog that is usually the field-of-play for
philosophers and theologians, for mystics or even political scientists. The great
photographers don’t seem to be asking
questions about f/stops or shutter speeds,
developers or enlarging papers, but are
asking the same kinds of questions that
were asked by philosophers Aristotle,
Plato, Thomas Aquinas, Nietzsche, or
Freud – the same questions asked by the
poets Aeschylus, Dante, Goethe, Victor
Hugo and Mark Twain. What is man?
Who am I? What is good? Why is there
evil? How should we treat one another?
Why don’t we? Why does suffering exist?
These are the questions of art because
these are the questions of humankind.
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It is a tall order to consider such questions
in a medium that is graphic instead of
verbal. It is not easy. But, that is precisely
why photography is so worthy of being
called a fine art. Music, too, is nonverbal,
but it has the ability to move us to tears.
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Who can look at Dorothea Lange’s
Migrant Mother and not feel something
of her pain? Is this a great photograph
because Lange so adroitly used the correct
aperture and film development? Or is the
magic in this photograph the skill with
which Lange shows us the human heart
in such frankness?
But I suppose I should return in my
thoughts to less lofty individuals and
less accomplished artists and talk more
pragmatically of you and of me. We are
not Cervantes or Alfred Stieglitz. Heck,
I’m not even sure I’m Tiny Tim. But
I would contend that it makes no difference that you and I are not great artists in
the sense that our mortality is exactly the
same as theirs and our questions about
the mysteries of life are exactly the same,
too. And that is precisely why it is worth
our time and our efforts to produce art.
There is value in what we produce, but
there is even more value, at least for us as
individuals, that we engage in the creative
act and ask such questions and search
for such answers. We make self-portraits
because we want to understand ourselves
and to assert our existence. We make photographs of others so we can understand
the community in which we live. We photograph the grand landscape so we can
know the context and the planetary stage
on which our dramas unfold. We photograph nostalgia so that we can remember;
abstracts so we can play with the patterns
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in our visual mind; flowers so we can
marvel at the wonders of creation. These
are worthy, soaring pursuits, even if our
results remain grounded and somewhat
pedestrian.
in technology. The future is unpredictable
and our impact on it – that is to say, on the
photographers of tomorrow – is equally
unknown. We owe them our best, just as
we do those who have gone before us.
There is a common theme in all of this,
and that is our compunction to explore
the world in order to find understanding, in order to find meaning. For some
(I think of Diane Arbus or Joel-Peter
Witkin) the world they find is frightening,
uncomfortable, disturbing. Through their
photographs we can explore our dark side.
For others, (I think of Elliott Erwitt and
occasionally Edward Weston) I see their
laughter at our human folly.
Some believe that the great artists are
extraordinary people doing extraordinary
things; others would propose that great
artists are simply ordinary people doing
extraordinary things. In some regards
it makes no difference which of these is
correct because in either case it is people
doing things, creating what they can while
they can. We must never forget that every
artist who accomplishes great things
started, at one point in their career, from
exactly the same position that you and
I are in – unknown, contemporary, just
another person using their best efforts to
try to bring forth something which does
not yet exist, which is, of course, the essential act of creation.
And there is another reason why we
should strive for more than mere technical excellence: Just as we do with the
photographs of those who have gone
before us, if we’re lucky, if we work hard,
if we have talent, and if we are sensitive,
we might just make photographs that
others can use to explore their humanity.
I am reminded of that jazz singer from
the 1930s, Connee Boswell, now long
forgotten – except that her excellence and
creative life were acknowledged as the roll
model, inspiration, and musical mentor by
a grateful Ella Fitzgerald, whom everyone
knows. We do not always know how our
work or our life will influence others, but
known or not this, too, is a reason for us
to strive for more than mere competence
10
there are some who would say that Minor
White may actually be standing next to
them – in his white robe and flowing hair,
like Gandalf back from the great beyond
– but I digress) watching our creative
response. Or, so it feels. It is not intimidating. I find it a comfort. It would be
much more frightening to be all alone in
a creative desert that stretched both directions in time, isolating me from others
in some hellish art-void. Sure, it may be
a bit creepy to think that Diane Arbus
is sitting on your shoulder, or that Fred
Picker is looking through your ground
glass, but it is comforting to remember
that they, in their turn, had their previous
generation of photographers to inspire
and motivate them. We are links in a long,
creative chain.
I may never be a great artist and I may
never make great artwork, but this will
surely come to pass if I don’t try, or if
I mistake the challenges of technique/
technology with the challenges of understanding and expressing the human soul.
Anyone – no, everyone – can master
technology. It is the artist who can turn
such mechanical prowess into a work that
resonates with the human heart. And, that
is the challenge that transcends all equipment, all technique, and all time.
As naïve and simplistic as it sounds,
I think about this when I am out photographing. I am viscerally, consciously
aware that Edward Weston, or Eugene
Atgét, or Harry Callahan, or Minor White
have probably looked at the same subject
I am gazing at. They (or someone) have
probably photographed it, too. We are
fellow travelers, those previous photographers and us alive today. Figuratively,
they are standing next to us (although
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66
Born in Mexico City in 1963, Moisés Levy is a lifelong resident there, and works
in the city as an established architect. His earliest interest in architecture and
photography occurred on a trip to New York City when he was 13 years old. “I was
fascinated with the buildings and the evening shadows of the city.”
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In 1982, when he began his studies in architecture at Universidad Iberoamericana,
his appreciation of the natural relation between light and architecture was deepened.
Subsequent travel to Boston, Paris and Venice served to illuminate the unbreakable
bond between architecture and its relationship with light. It was this early interest
in the qualities of light that lead Levy to photography, and as a counterpoint to his
work as an architect he has now been drawn to landscape work.
About seven years ago he began to explore photography more deeply, with a broad
interest in artistic composition, influences, history and styles. Levy appreciates the
history of the medium, and states that he has learned from the photographic work
of Sebastião Salgado, Edward Weston, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, and Eugene Atgét.
From other creative venues his musical preference is classical, and includes Mozart,
Bach and Vivaldi, and he enjoys the written works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and
Edgar Allen Poe.
Although much of his photographic studies have been self-taught, he has taken
several workshops along the way (with Academia de Artes Visuales in Mexico, and
with Dan Burkholder in the USA). While his career is centered on architecture, and
his appreciation of light began there, he states “I have a preference for landscape
photography because it lets me be more organic and flexible than my work as an
architect.” For that reason he is working on a project titled Naked Earth – where
land meets sky – and nary a support column in sight.
Web site:
www.levylevy.com.mx
Email:
[email protected]
Works with:
Mamiya 7 6x7 medium format and Canon 5D digital. Scans film
with Nikon Coolscan 9000 to Mac G5. Prints on Epson 4000 and
in Platinum/Palladium.
12
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Moisés Levy
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66
Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1963, Jonathan Moller studied at the School of the
Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Tufts University
Born in Brian, Texas, in 1958, Wayne Norton grew up in Ames, Iowa,
(Medford, MA) in 1990.
then moved at the age of 21 to Santa Barbara, California, where he
attended Brooks Institute of Photography. After graduating with a
Moller has spent seven of the past 14 years in Central America. In 1991, shortly after
Bachelor of Arts in commercial photography he then moved to San
graduation, he began working in Nicaragua, and since 1992 has lived primarily in GuateDiego and established Norton Photography. This small commercial
mala, where he began work with two human rights organizations supporting populations
photography business has been his sole occupation for nearly 25
uprooted by the civil war. As a member of the Foreign Press Club of Guatemala, Moller
years.
has also worked as a part-time freelance photographer in Guatemala and El Salvador. In
2000-2001 he was photographer on a Guatemalan forensic anthropology team exhuming
While working in a commercial capacity, Norton has managed to
clandestine cemeteries.
work on personal fine art projects over the years. To further his fine
art interests he is working towards his MFA in photography through
The recipient of numerous awards, Moller received the 2005 Center for Photographic Arts
the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. Upon graduation
Award; in 2003 the Golden Light Award from the Maine Photographic Workshops; in 2003
he plans to dedicate himself to fine art photography.
the Vision Award from the Santa Fe Center for Visual Arts, and in 2001 he was awarded the
Henry Dunant Prize for Excellence in Journalism by the International Red Cross for best
He states “I think the photographs of Ansel Adams and the book
photo-reportage in Central America and the Caribbean.
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance influenced me to become
sort of a control-freak with my photography. I’ve also notice that I’m
His work has been widely exhibited and is in permanent collections including the San
increasingly interested in ‘American’ art.” In painting that includes
Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the George Eastman House; the Museum of Fine Arts,
Edward Hopper and Winslow Homer; musically speaking it includes
Houston; the Minneapolis Institute of Arts; the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Brooklyn
Bob Dylan and J.J. Cale.
Museum of Art; the Portland Art Museum; the University of California Berkeley Art
Museum; the Milwaukee Art Museum; the International Polaroid Corporation; Centro de
Norton currently lives in Escondido, California, but will be relocating
la Imagen, Mexico City; and the Casa de Las Americas, Havana, Cuba.
to the desert town of Wickenburg, Arizona, in January, 2007.
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Our Culture
Is
Our Resistance
Desert
Relations
Repression, Refuge, and Healing in Guatemala
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He currently lives in Denver, Colorado.
Web site:
Works with:
Book:
www.jonathanmoller.org
Web site:
www.nortonphoto.com
Mamiya 6
4x5 view camera with digital back, one studio
Works with:
Our Culture is Our
strobe
Resistance:
light. Archival
Repression,
inkjet Refuge
prints made
and Healing
with in Guatemala
(Powerhouse Books,
Epson2004,
Ultrachrome
ISBN #1-57687-212-2.
inks and photo rag
Spanish
archivallanguage edition
simultaneously published
fine art paper.
by Turner Libros, Madrid and Mexico City.)
Represented by: Represented
Polaris Images
by: (stock
Currently
and assignment)
seeking representation.
42
30
Jonathan
Wayne Norton
Moller
Juan and Maria’s wedding.
Tzucuna, Cabá, Quiché, Guatemala 1993
43
31
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Born in 1965 in Atlanta and raised in McDonough, Georgia, Perry Dilbeck attended
Georgia State University, where he earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, and then
went on to earn a Master of Fine Arts from Savannah College of Art & Design. After
working in Atlanta as a commercial freelance photographer for six years, he began
teaching photography full-time at Art Institute of Atlanta, where he’s been since
1998.
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The Last Harvest
Truck Farmers of the Deep South
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Although Dilbeck’s photographic interests emerged in high school, he initially opted
to major in business and marketing in college. That plan was dramatically altered
in 1985 when he saw Richard Avedon’s portraits from In the American West. “The
power of those images changed my life forever. I quit business school and immediately
enrolled in photography school.”
While at Georgia State University he studied under John McWilliams (a former student
of Harry Callahan). “Here, I was exposed to a very underrated photographer named
Bill Burke. His fine art approach to creating documentary journals was very unique.”
He also points to Keith Carter’s book Mojo and Sally Mann’s Immediate Family portraits as superb examples of make the simple things in life extraordinary.
Dilbeck has received a number of awards, including: Artist sponsorship from Blue
Earth Alliance in Seattle, Washington (2006); Fellowship from the Texas Photographic
Society (2004); and Vision Award Winner from the Santa Fe Center for Visual Arts
(2003). He was also awarded sabbatical in 2003 from The Art Institute of Atlanta,
where he has been a full-time photography instructor for eight years. He lives with
his wife Deborah in Locust Grove, Georgia, between Macon and Atlanta.
Web site:
www.perrydilbeck.com
Works with:
Holga plastic cameras and one Pentax 6x7 medium format
camera. Prints are made in a traditional wet darkroom.
Book:
The Last Harvest: Truck Farmers in the Deep South (Center
for American Places, October, 2006. ISBN #193006649X).
Represented by:
Photo-eye Books & Prints, Santa Fe, NM, or contact the
photographer directly at [email protected]
44
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Perry Dilbeck
Spring Plowing
45
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Red Berry with 1957 Farmall Tractor
Red Berry #5
50
51
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Recollections
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Three Decades of Photographs
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John Sexton
Trees, Blowing Snow
Yosemite Valley, California 1982
From the book Recollections by John Sexton.
PaintedatWindow
Available from Ventana Editions
www.VentanaEditions.com
Anaheim,
California
1978
All images in this portfolio
© 2006 John
Sexton.
All rights reserved.
75 88
Striped Boulder
Saddle Canyon, Grand Canyon, Arizona 1997
89
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Stone Carving
Cracked Mud
Narita Japan, 1983
Oljeto Wash, San Juan River, Utah 1992
76
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99 images
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Recollections
24 images
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Desert Relations
The Last Harvest
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Darkroom Tour Video
Anthony Mournain
Moisés Levy
John Sexton
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We had the privilege of talking photography and art
philosophy with Oliver Gagliani on several occasions
before he passed away. In this LensWork EXTENDED
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conversations with this master photographer and
well-loved workshop instructor. Recorded when Oliver was well into his 80s, he reflects on life, artmaking,
photography, money, and the importance of being
true to yourself and dedicated to your art.
LensWork Extended is a true multimedia publication that
dramatically expands the contents of our 96-page magazine,
LensWork — then loads-in lots of audio, video, and “extended extras.” In the spirit of the paper publication, the focus
continues on the creative process, with each CD offering an
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From the book Recollections by John Sexton.
Available from Ventana Editions at www.VentanaEditions.com
All images in this portfolio © 2006 John Sexton. All rights reserved.
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La Mirada, California 1977
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Beijing, China 1983
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Left Fork of North Creek, Utah 1998
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Fresh Snow Trees
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Yellowstone National Park
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