Lush Hour Activity Week

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Lush Hour Activity Week
Your school’s hands-o
n guide to coordinatin
g an
action packed walkin
g and cycling activity
week
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About Sustrans
Sustrans makes smarter travel choices possible, desirable and
inevitable. We’re a leading UK charity enabling people to travel by
foot, bike or public transport for more of the journeys we make
every day. We work with families, communities, policy-makers and
partner organisations so that people are able to choose healthier,
cleaner and cheaper journeys, with better places and spaces to
move through and live in.
It’s time we all began making smarter travel choices. Make your
move and support Sustrans today. www.sustrans.org.uk
Sustrans Cymru
123 Bute Street
Cardiff Bay
Cardiff
CF10 5AE
Head Office
Sustrans
2 Cathedral Square
College Green
Bristol
BS1 5DD
© Sustrans June 2011
Registered Charity No. 326550 (England and Wales) SCO39263 (Scotland)
VAT Registration No. 416740656
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Table of contents
Lush Hour Activity Week
Introduction
Activity Key
Benefits to Schools of Promoting Active Travel
Case Studies: School Information
Activity Descriptions
Lush Hour Breakfast
Lush Hour Non-Uniform Day
BMX Try Outs
Lush Hour Assembly
Lush Hour Olympics
Bike-Powered Smoothie Maker
Dr. Bike
Treasure Hunt
Bike Bands
Lush Hour Raffle
Film: Street Trials Pro Rider and ‘The Race to School’
Bike Hockey
Flag Tag
Photography Competition
Bike Shop and Gadgets Demonstration
Puncture Race
Additional Lush Hour Activity Suggestions
Evaluating the Impact of Lush Hour Activity Week
Index of Appendices
Appendix 1 – Template Press Release
Appendix 2 – Template Letter (Prizes)
Appendix 3 – Lush Hour Promotional Materials
Appendix 4 – Template Letter (Lush Hour Breakfast)
Appendix 5 – Lush Hour Breakfast Risk Assessment
Appendix 6 – Template Score Sheet for BMX Try Outs
Appendix 7 – Cycling Activities Risk Assessment
Appendix 8 – Assembly Presentation Ideas
Appendix 9 – Example Lush Hour Activity Week Timetables
Appendix 10 – Bicycle Gears Explanation
Appendix 11 – Description of Lush Hour Obstacle Course Activities
Appendix 12 – Template Letter (Smoothie Maker)
Appendix 13 – Risk Assessment for Bike Powered Smoothie Maker activity
Appendix 14 – Template Letter (Dr. Bike)
Appendix 15 – Treasure Hunt Clues Template
Appendix 16 – Bike-Bands and Puncture Repair Activities Risk Assessment
Appendix 17 – Instructions for Making Flag-Tags
Appendix 18 – Pre- and Post- Lush Hour Activity Week Questionnaire
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
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Lush Hour Activity Week
Activity Key
Time taken to coordinate activity
Specialist equipment needed?
Introduction
This briefing provides an overview of the activities
developed during the trial of Lush Hour Activity
Week. Each of the activities outlined was developed
and trialled as part of the Sustrans School Travel
Project, a pilot project aimed at encouraging more
secondary school pupils to cycle and walk to
school. Instructions for the coordination of each
activity are provided, along with guidance for the
number of supervisors and the equipment needed1.
In addition, a full risk assessment2 has been
carried out for each of the activities described.
These, along with additional tools you may find
useful in coordinating the activities, can be found in
the appendices.
The activities are listed in order of their popularity,
both indicated by pupils who worked with us during
the development and trial of Lush Hour Activity
Week and by the participation rates at each of the
schools which trialled these activities. However each
school is encouraged to select the activities it would
like to coordinate based on the individual needs and
interests of the pupil population. To assist in this, a
quick reference guide is provided at the top of each
activity description.
£
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
£
Suitable for indoors coordination?
Number of pupils that can get involved
Number of supervisors needed
£
££
£
Does this activity need bikes?
Potential costs involved
(although please note suggestions are
provided for how sponsorship can be sought
to help cover these costs)
Throughout the design and delivery of the Sustrans
School Travel Project, we have looked to encourage
pupil participation in decision making wherever
possible. To further support this pupil-led approach,
each activity description includes a number of
questions that could be considered by pupils
interested in taking a leadership role in the
coordination of Lush Hour Activity Week.
coordinated by a member of Sustrans staff they
may be able to provide these prizes. If you are
coordinating Lush Hour Activity Week
independently of Sustrans you may wish to appeal
to local businesses to provide these prizes. Please
see Appendix 2 for a template letter which you
may find useful for approaching businesses with
this request. NB: The most popular prizes offered
during the trial of Lush Hour Activity Week were
reflective wrist and ankle bands. These can be
purchased from the Sustrans website
www.sustransshop.co.uk/products/5409sustrans-reflective-ankle-band.
Prior to the delivery of Lush Hour Activity Week, you
may also wish to consider the following:
• Press: You may wish to gain press coverage of
Lush Hour Activity Week taking place in your
school. In certain circumstances, Sustrans will be
able to provide some support in this. However,
please find a template press release in Appendix
1 which you can adapt and use to draft your own
press release for the event. The likelihood of
receiving media coverage would also be greatly
increased if pupils involved contact local media
outlets themselves.
• Invitation to local representative: Inviting a local
councillor, council official, MP or Assembly
Member helps to raise awareness of the
importance of encouraging active travel in schools
amongst key decision makers. However, a
suitable event/photo opportunity should be
discussed prior to contact being made. Again, the
likelihood of a local representative attending an
event will be greatly increased if pupils involved
contact them directly.
• Prizes: Prizes can encourage greater participation
by pupils. If your Lush Hour Activity Week is being
• Promotional materials: If you would like to use
Lush Hour promotional materials (Appendix 3)
please contact Sustrans Cymru (Tel: 029 2065
0602) for posters, plasma screen backdrops,
banners and timetables featuring the Lush Hour
brand.
Where specialist equipment is needed to coordinate the activity,
suggestions have been made for stockists previously used by
Sustrans. However, where these stockists are external suppliers,
please note that Sustrans bears no responsibility for the quality of the
goods or services supplied.
2
Please note, these risk assessments are provided as a guide only and
should be reviewed before coordinating the activity at your school,
taking site specific details into consideration and noting any additional
actions to undertake.
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
5
7 Benefits to
Schools of Promoting
Active Travel
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Seven Core Aims for Children and
Young People:
Aim 1 - A flying start in life: The proven
cognitive and physiological benefits
demonstrate how walking, cycling and active
play can contribute towards giving children the
best possible start in life.
Aim 2 - A comprehensive range of
education, training and learning
opportunities: Active travel initiatives offer a
method of school transport that enables young
people to engage with their community whilst
supporting them to achieve their full academic
potential.
Aim 3 - The best possible health, free from
abuse, victimisation and exploitation:
Encouraging the development of habitual
behaviours, such as walking and cycling for
short journeys, is an effective way for young
people to achieve the recommended daily
levels of physical activity.
Aim 4 - Access to play, leisure, sporting and
cultural activities: For children there is no clear
distinction between play and active travel. The
majority of time spent outdoors involves
children moving around the whole of their
outdoor environment and playing en route.
Aim 5 - Ensuring children are listened to,
treated with respect and have their race and
cultural identity recognised: To fully
appreciate children and young people’s specific
needs in terms of travel and transport the
involvement of children and young people is
vital.
Aim 6 - A safe home and community that
supports physical and emotional wellbeing:
People living in walkable, mixed use
neighbourhoods have higher levels of social
capital compared with those living in caroriented suburbs.
Aim 7 - Ensuring no child or young person is
disadvantaged by poverty: Through
supporting educational and health outcomes for
children, active travel initiatives help break the
cycle of poverty.
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Estyn Common Inspection Framework
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Active travel initiatives can support schools to
demonstrate that pupils “have a secure understanding
of how they can become healthy, both through what
they eat and the physical activity they undertake.”
Encouraging pupils to cycle and walk to school
enables the development of positive attitudes towards
physically active pursuits, that research has shown
continue through into adulthood.
School Travel Plans
Writing a School Travel
Plan is the only way
schools can access some
of the funding available for
active travel infrastructure
(such as bicycle storage
facilities), including Safe
Routes in Communities
Funding.
Education for
Sustainable
Development and
Global Citizenship
(ESDGC)
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School Travel Plans should
be designed to reduce car
dependency and increase
levels of walking and
cycling.
Healthy Schools
Two of the seven health
topics required in the
Welsh Network of
Healthy School Schemes
National Quality Award
relate directly to active
travel: Food & Fitness
and Environment.
School Effectiveness
Framework (SEF)
Intervention and Support School: Adopting a whole
school approach and involving
local authority representatives
and external partners in the
delivery of active travel
initiatives will not only
demonstrate tri-level action and
multi-agency engagement but
will also ensure positive
outcomes for pupils involved.
Delivering ESDGC
through active travel
initiatives enables
pupils to see how
actions they take at a
local level (i.e. walking
and cycling to school)
can have positive
impacts globally.
Sustrans’ curriculum
resources (available for
both KS2 and KS3)
involve and engage
young people in their
own learning, assisting
teachers in
demonstrating the
links between their
pupils’ lives and those
of people throughout
the world.
Eco Schools
In the formal review
framework for
schools applying for
their Eco-Schools
Award, transport
policies are
assessed based on
a number of
measures, including
whether schemes
to increase the
number of pupils
walking and cycling
to school have
become “a regular
part of school life”.
Case Studies: School Information
Four schools across Wales trialled the activities outlined in this toolkit and case studies are provided where a
school trialling Lush Hour Activity Week adopted a particularly successful approach. Please find below a brief
introduction to each of the four schools involved.
Tasker Milward Voluntary
Controlled School,
Haverfordwest:
Tasker Milward is an 11-18 mixed
comprehensive school situated in
Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire. It was
the first school to trial Lush Hour Activity
Week and was also the only school that
trialled Lush Hour Activity Week without
having had previous engagement with
the project (the other schools had each
nominated a pupil steering group to help
develop the activities and materials used
in Lush Hour Activity Week. The
activities, which took place during
lunchtimes and breaktimes, were aimed
at pupils in Years 7 -9 only, however
Tasker Milward was also keen to
encourage Year 10 pupils in the
coordination of these activities and used
a PSE day in the weeks leading up to the
event to support Year 10 pupils to adopt
a leadership role. For more information
on this approach please see the Lush
Hour Assembly activity description. The
number of individual participations
(defined as the total number of pupils
engaged in a particular activity, without
deducting for overlap caused by pupils
participating in more than one activity, or
in one activity multiple times) totalled
1,520 over the course of the week (with
an additional 200 participations prior to
Lush Hour Activity Week).
Maesteg Comprehensive School,
Maesteg:
Maesteg Comprehensive School is an
11-18 co-educational school maintained
by Bridgend County Borough Council.
Until September 2008 the school
operated on two sites (Lower and Upper
School) which were two miles apart.
These two sites were combined and, in
September 2008, the new school
opened. Pupils attending Maesteg
School live in Maesteg and its
surrounding districts in the Llynfi Valley.
Lush Hour Activity Week was aimed
primarily at pupils in Years 7 – 9, taking
place during lunch and breaktimes as
well as a number of after school activities
being coordinated. Sixth formers at the
school who had been involved in the
development of the Lush Hour brand
also helped considerably in the
coordination and supervision of activities.
The number of individual participations
totalled 2,586.
Activity Week was formed of breaktime
and lunchtime activities aimed primarily at
pupils in Years 7 – 9, with sixth formers
at the school assisting in the coordination
of activities. Due to the large catchment
area of the school and the inherent
difficulties for some pupils in cycling to
school, ten pool bikes were requested to
be made available by Sustrans over the
course of the week. This approach had
the advantage of enabling all pupils to
take part in activities however it also
meant there was less of an incentive for
pupils to cycle to school. In total, the
number of individual participations was
1,659.
St Cenydd Comprehensive
School, Trecenydd:
Bishop of Llandaff Church in
Wales High School, Cardiff:
The Bishop of Llandaff Church in Wales
High School is a co-educational 11-18
school. The school has a large
catchment area, serving the city of Cardiff
and the Vale of Glamorgan, with a
number of pupils also travelling from the
Bridgend and Pontypridd areas. The
school is currently undergoing major
building works; this construction project
is leading to a loss of onsite car-parking
spaces and as a result the school is keen
to encourage more pupils to cycle and
walk to school to help overcome the
congestion experienced in the
surrounding residential area. Lush Hour
St Cenydd School is an 11-18
Community School in Caerphilly County
Borough. St Cenydd School has been
the beneficiary of significant Safe Routes
in Communities (formerly Safe Routes to
Schools) funding, which will be
completed in 2012. However, the school
currently has no cycle storage facilities.
Lush Hour Activity Week was
coordinated as part of a wider
Sustainability Week in the school. The
project worked only with Year 7 pupils
but was allowed to coordinate activities
during lesson time; as a result all 200
pupils had the opportunity to take part in
a Lush Hour Activity Week in groups of
between 40 and 60 pupils. The one optin activity (the Lush Hour Breakfast)
proved highly popular, with over 120
pupils (out of a possible 200) claiming
their free breakfast for walking or cycling
to school that morning.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
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Activity Descriptions
Lush Hour Breakfast
1hr
No
Yes
100+
6+
No
£
£100+
£
£
£
£
£
£
The most popular of all the activities, this event
offers pupils who have walked and cycled to school
that day a free breakfast.
coordinated on the first day of Lush Hour Activity Week
to allow pupils an opportunity to remember that they
need to walk or cycle to school that day.
Activity Description
A typical breakfast would be cereal bars, yoghurt and
fruit. However, if you would like to provide a hot
breakfast, canteen facilities will need to be available
before school.
Costs Involved
There will be costs incurred by this activity. There are
three options for how these costs could be covered:
• If your Lush Hour Activity Week is being coordinated
by a Sustrans member of staff, there may be funds
available to cover all or part of the costs
• Fundraise for the Lush Hour Breakfast or use school
funds to cover the costs
• Appeal to local businesses (in particular local
supermarkets) to provide the food needed in return for
some promotion at the event (and in local press).
Please find a template that can be used to assist you
in composing this letter in Appendix 4
• Ask pupils attending the breakfast to make a
contribution towards the cost of the food provided
Lush Hour Breakfasts are best run outside in good
weather, however they can be run inside if the weather
is poor. You’ll need a table large enough to seat at least
50 pupils, ideally near the bike shed but certainly in a
prominent position. Balloons or flags can be added if
you want to make it look really special.
The table should be set up and food laid out half an
hour before school starts. Easy-to-eat food that can be
eaten out of a napkin will negate the need to hand out
plates or cutlery.
Time
This is a before school activity. It can be held on any day
of the week, however it is suggested that this is not
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Alternatively, you may be able to coordinate the Lush
Hour Breakfast activity as part of an existing Breakfast
Club at your school.
Support Needed
A minimum of six members of staff/pupil supervisors will
be needed to help assist the event.
Two members of staff/pupil supervisors should be based
at entrances to the school, handing out raffle tickets or
stamping the hands of pupils who have cycled or walked
to school that morning. These hand stamps/raffle tickets
will entitle the pupil to have their free breakfast.
Four members of staff/pupil supervisors will be needed to
help dispense the breakfast (if there is not an existing
Breakfast Club at your school).
Opportunities for Student Leadership
Suggested student group: Healthy Schools Committee
• Would you like to invite parents to attend the breakfast?
• What food should be on offer? Do you want to offer
drinks too?
• Once you have decided on the food offer, would you
like to contact a local shop to ask them to provide some
of the food needed in return for some promotion at the
event (and in the local press)? Please find a template
that can be used to assist you in composing this letter
in Appendix 4.
• What day of the week would you like to hold the
breakfast?
• Would you like to run any activities during the breakfast?
For example, if you hold the breakfast on the last day of
Lush Hour Activity Week, this could also be when the
Lush Hour Raffle takes place (see later in the document
for a description of this activity) or when the
photography competition winner is voted
on/announced.
• Would you like to be responsible for dispensing the
breakfast? This would reduce the number of staff
needed to help coordinate the event.
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all participants
taking part in this activity (see Lush Hour Raffle activity
description for more information)?
For a risk assessment of this activity please see
Appendix 5.
Maesteg Comprehensive School
Maesteg School already offered wrap-around care to
pupils at the school, including both before and after
school activities. The after school service enabled the
Sustrans Project Coordinator to coordinate several outof-hours activities in the early evening; the before school
service (a breakfast club) enabled the Sustrans Project
Coordinator to offer a free cooked breakfast to all pupils
who walked and cycled to school on the last day of Lush
Hour Activity Week, which nearly 100 pupils took
advantage of. An agreement was formed with catering
staff that all pupils with their Lush Hour hand stamp were
entitled to a free breakfast up to the value of £1 (which
was then reimbursed by Sustrans). A partnership was
also formed that week with a local Tesco representative
to offer this breakfast in the future with the store
providing the food for free.
St Cenydd Comprehensive School
In order for pupils to claim their free Lush Hour Breakfast,
they needed to collect at least one raffle ticket over the
course of three days. The school champion based at St
Cenydd Comprehensive School opted to stand at the
school gates himself, handing out raffle tickets each
morning to those pupils who arrived on foot or by bike.
This achieved exceptional results, with 60 pupils claiming
their raffle ticket on day one, 105 pupils on day two and
120 pupils on day three (the day the Lush Hour Breakfast
was held). A table was set up in a courtyard at the school;
yoghurt, fruit juice and a flapjack/cake were offered to
pupils. If pupils had two/more raffle tickets (demonstrating
they had walked or cycled to school two or more days
that week) they were allowed an extra flapjack/cake.
Pupils were then stamped with the Lush Hour hand
stamp once they had collected their breakfast (to avoid
any pupils trying to claim their free breakfast twice!)
“Lush Hour Activity Week ticks so
many boxes for us, including
supporting the school to
demonstrate how we are
contributing towards pupil wellbeing for our Estyn inspection next
year and supporting our application
for an Eco Schools Green Flag
award. But more than that, the
activities were fun for the pupils to
take part in and really helped raise
the profile of the benefits of walking
and cycling to school.”
Andrew Morris,
Lush Hour School Champion, St Cenydd School
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
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Activity Descriptions
Lush Hour Non-Uniform Day
1 day
No
Yes
100+
2
No
£
£0
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
Pupils who have cycled or walked to school are given the
opportunity to not wear school uniform for one day
during Lush Hour Activity Week.
Time
All day. This activity can be held on any day of the week,
however it is suggested that this is not coordinated on
the first day to allow pupils an opportunity to remember
that they need to walk or cycle to school that day in
order to not wear school uniform.
Costs Involved
There are no costs involved in this activity.
Support Needed
A minimum of two members of staff/pupil supervisors will
be needed on the morning of the non-school uniform day
to ensure only pupils who have walked or cycled to
school are wearing non-school uniform. Each pupil who
has walked or cycled to school should have their hand
stamped to demonstrate that they have the right to wear
non-school uniform. All other pupils should wear school
uniform on the day.
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Opportunities for Student Leadership
• On what day would you like this activity to take place?
• Should this activity be open to all pupils who have
travelled sustainably to school that day (i.e. allowing
pupils who have taken the bus to school to wear nonuniform)?
• Do you want to set a fancy-dress theme for the pupils
not wearing school uniform?
• Would you like to use this as a fundraising opportunity
to raise money for bike storage facilities at your school?
If so, perhaps consider inviting all pupils at the school
to take part in the non-school uniform day (including
those who have not walked or cycled to school). You
could then ask all pupils for a voluntary contribution
and the money raised can be used to fund the
purchase of equipment such as bicycle shelters or
helmet lockers.
Tasker Milward V.C. School:
Tasker Milward School decided to coordinate a
non-uniform day during Lush Hour Activity Week.
However, instead of offering this as a free activity for
all pupils walking and cycling to school, the school
chose to ask for a contribution from pupils not
wearing school uniform, using the money raised to
purchase cycle storage facilities for the school. The
non-uniform day had a Lush Hour theme; those
pupils who opted to wear their own clothes were
charged £1, however those pupils who wore a
sports-themed costume were charged a reduced
fee of 50p. Over £500 was raised for the school
from coordinating this activity and they are currently
in the process of purchasing the school’s first ever
bike storage facilities.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
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Activity Descriptions
BMX Try Outs
45
mins 1 hour
Yes
No
30+
1+
Yes
£
£100+
£
£
£
Activity Description
Portable BMX ramps are made available for pupils to tryout. The BMX ramps can either be used by themselves
(creating a loop around which 8-10 pupils can cycle) or
can form part of a larger obstacle course (see the Lush
Hour Races for example obstacle course activities).
A popular activity during Lush Hour Activity Week was to
ask pupils to compete against each other; pupils were
asked to perform the following skills using the ramps:
• A controlled jump (or simply to cycle over the ramp in a
controlled fashion if not confident in jumping)
• Come to a complete stop with every part of their bike
still on the ramp
Older pupils, can be asked to judge the contest, giving
pupils a mark out of 10 for each of the skills performed.
Prizes can be given to the pupils who score highest. For
a score sheet that can be used in the judging of this
contest please see Appendix 6.
If using wooden or plastic stand-alone ramps, it is
recommended that this activity takes place on grass,
particularly if it is the first time this activity has been
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Time
This activity is suitable as a lunchtime or after school
activity.
£
£
£
coordinated in your school. Once you are confident in
your pupils’ bike handling skills you may wish to move
the activity to an all-weather surface (where the bikes can
gain greater speed).
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Costs Involved
If this activity is being coordinated by a Sustrans member
of staff, they may be able to provide the portable BMX
ramps needed for this activity. However, if you are
coordinating Lush Hour Activity Week independently
these ramps will either need to be purchased or
constructed:
Should you decide to purchase some portable BMX
ramps, a recommended supplier is Skate Hut
(www.skatehut.co.uk) and, at the time of printing this
toolkit, the most suitable ramps (at a price of £34.95)
could be found here:
www.skatehut.co.uk/acatalog/Rampage_Launch_Ra
mp____29.95.html
However, you could also consider constructing some
BMX ramps, either as a classroom activity or outside of
lesson time. Instructions for the construction of BMX
ramps can be found on the internet. For an overview of
the different types of BMX ramps you can build visit:
www.livestrong.com/article/351125-plans-to-buildbmx-ramps/
For instructions for making BMX ramps from wood:
www.ehow.com/how_5595629_make-bmx-woodramps.html or www.ehow.com/how_5162478_buildbmx-ramps.html
For instructions for making BMX ramps from soil:
www.ehow.com/how_6398398_make-bmx-dirtramp.html
Support Needed
One member of staff is needed to oversee this activity.
In addition, the following equipment will be needed:
• BMX ramps
• Protective gear – which can include elbow pads, knee pads,
wrist guards and helmets. As a school you may decide to
purchase this equipment, or require pupils to bring this from
home. Alternatively you may ask parents to sign a parental
consent form that states that no protective gear will be provided
by the school.
Opportunities for Student Leadership
• What day of the week should this activity be held? Perhaps
consider holding the event on several days of the week but open
the activity to particular Year groups on particular days (e.g. Year
7 pupils on Monday, Year 8 pupils on Tuesday, Year 9 pupils on
Wednesday…)
• Do you want to coordinate a BMX-inspired competition? i.e.
pupils are scored on their ability on the ramps and the winning
pupil gets a prize at the end of the session. If you decide to
coordinate the activity more than once during the week, perhaps
hold the heats on the first four days of the week and then ask
the ‘best’ pupils back on the final day of Lush Hour Activity
Week to perform again in front of an audience
• Are any pupils undertaking their Duke of Edinburgh or Sports
Leadership Award at your school, who could be given the
responsibility of coordinating / refereeing this activity?
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all participants taking
part in this activity?
For a risk assessment of this activity please see Appendix 7.
Maesteg Comprehensive School
At Maesteg School, the BMX ramps proved popular both during
lunchtimes and after school. Sixth formers acted as judges during
the activities, rating the pupils on their bike-handling skills and on
the height and style of their jumps (see Appendix 6 for an
example score sheet). It was clear that a few of the pupils were
already very skilled at using the ramps, but there was a supportive
atmosphere between those who had more experience and those
who were trying the ramps for the first time, which was
commented on by the Head Teacher.
The pupils were keen for similar facilities to be available at school
after Lush Hour Activity Week had taken place. During one of the
after school sessions, they urged the Deputy Head Teacher to
consider building a small-scale BMX park on school grounds. This
idea is currently being considered. If approved, the Deputy Head is
keen for it to be youth-led; both designed and built by the pupils
using the dirt-ramp design outlined in the link above.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
13
Activity Descriptions
Lush Hour Assembly
10 – 15
mins
Yes
No
Activity Description
Assemblies are a very effective way of communicating
with large numbers of pupils and teachers and getting
them involved in the activities taking place throughout
Lush Hour Activity Week.
£
A number of suggestions for what to include in your
assembly can be found in Appendix 8 along with
example PowerPoint slides.
£
£
£
Time
This activity should take place at the same time as
normal assembly. Alternatively, if you decide to
coordinate a longer assembly, you may decide to bring
together classes from a particular Year group during
what might otherwise be a PSE lesson.
Costs Involved
There are no costs involved in this activity. However, you
may wish to provide small prizes (for example reflective
wrist and ankle bands) to pupils for volunteering
responses to any questions you pose during the
assembly.
Support Needed
One member of school/Sustrans staff to deliver the
assembly. Alternatively, you could decide to ask a group
of pupils to coordinate the assembly.
In addition, the following equipment will be needed:
• Laptop and DVD player
• Projector
• Large screen display
• Speakers
If you decide to coordinate one or more of the activities
outlined in the suggested Assembly presentation
(Appendix 8), you may also require the following:
• Skins DVD (or equivalent DVD that demonstrates the
independence gained from walking and cycling) –
Series 3, Episode 6
• Tape/ribbon to wrap around volunteers for SPACE
activity
• Small prizes (see above for suggestions)
• Quiz packs: A4 envelope with the following:
• 2 answer response sheets – with four letter options
(A, B, C, D)
• A3 sheet of plain paper
• Marker pen
14
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
100+
1
No
£
£0
£
Opportunities for Student Leadership
Suggested student group: Eco Schools Committee /
Healthy Schools Committee / School Council
• Would you like to be involved in delivering the
assembly (either in its entirety or the delivery of one
part of the assembly)?
• Take a look at the suggested assembly activities
(Appendix 8): is there a particular theme/activity that
appeals to you most as a group and that will appeal
most to your peers?
• Can you think of other ideas for activities that could
be coordinated during an assembly?
£
Tasker Milward V.C. School
Tasker Milward School wanted to encourage the
involvement of their Year 10 pupils in the delivery of
Lush Hour Activity Week. Engagement with the school
began two weeks prior to the start of Lush Hour Activity
Week, with all Year 10 pupils receiving an hour long
assembly from the Sustrans Project Coordinator before
moving into smaller focus groups to plan additional
Lush Hour activities. Throughout the week, these Year
10 pupils coordinated a number of activities (alongside
those planned by the Sustrans Project Coordinator in
Appendix 9) aimed at encouraging more of their peers
to walk and cycle to school and at raising money to
enable the school to purchase bike storage facilities.
Those pupils who did not coordinate an activity
independently, had the opportunity to assist the
coordination of activities planned by the Sustrans
Project Coordinator.
Activity Descriptions
Lush Hour Olympics
45
mins –
1 hour
No
No
30+
1-8
Yes
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
This activity consists of an hour of cycling and walking
themed races and competitions which help pupils to
learn bike control whilst have fun. These can consist of
any (or all) of the activities listed overleaf.
Time
This activity (or parts of this activity) are suitable for
coordination during lunchtimes. Activities can be
coordinated once or several times during the week.
Costs Involved
With the exception of prizes for winning the races and
potential costs in the purchase of equipment needed (for
details on the purchase of or instructions of how to build
your own BMX Ramps please see the BMX Try Outs
activity description), there are no costs involved in
coordinating this activity.
Support Needed
Several members of staff/pupil supervisors will be needed
to coordinate this event; the number required will depend
on the number of activities coordinated at the same time.
Most events will need only one supervisor, however the
obstacle course will need a number of pupil
supervisors/staff overseeing different areas of the race
and the limbo activity will need two pupil
supervisors/teachers to hold the pole.
A large area will need to be cordoned off for the activity.
Ideally this will be somewhere fairly central in the school
grounds to encourage spectators and to create
excitement about the event.
In addition, the following equipment will be needed:
• A whistle
• Markers and cones
• Clipboards, pens and paper (to record results)
• BMX ramps (for the obstacle course)
• A limbo pole (lightweight)
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
15
Opportunities for Student Leadership
• Which of the races above would you like to feature in
the Lush Hour Olympics?
• Will you coordinate the races at different times
(requiring less support) or all together?
• Are there any other races/activities that you can think
of?
• What day of the week should this activity be held?
Perhaps consider holding the event on several days of
the week but open the activity to particular Year groups
on particular days (e.g. Year 7 pupils on Monday, Year
8 pupils on Tuesday, Year 9 pupils on Wednesday…)
• Do you want to establish a league table, whereby the
winners of the individual events during the week come
together on the final day and race each other?
• Who will be responsible for each of the races?
• Will you allow a ‘practice run’ for pupils taking part
before each competition starts?
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all participants
taking part in this activity?
For a risk assessment of these activities please see
Appendix 7.
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Bishop of Llandaff Church in Wales High School
One of the most popular activities at the Bishop of
Llandaff School was the Lush Hour Obstacle Course. To
complete the obstacle course, pupils had to first carefully
navigate the BMX ramps before moving into the Bike
Slalom which finished with a limbo pole for them to cycle
under. Once safely under the pole, pupils had to turn and
look over their shoulder and call out the number of
fingers being held up by one of the course supervisors.
The competitors then raced each other back to the start
line. For a more detailed description of each of these
activities please see Appendix 11.
Sixth formers acted as supervisors of the course,
including holding the bike limbo, ensuring no cones were
displaced and calling the start and finish of the race.
They were also keen to test out the course before the
competition began! With two lanes in operation, a
championship was held. The winner from each heat
progressed to the next round and the finalists were
awarded a first and second prize.
Activity
Slow Bike Race
Bike Sprints
Description
Ideally this will take place on a racing track. Otherwise two endpoints should be marked out. Introduce
competitors to the purpose of gears “low for slow, high you fly”. See Appendix 10 for a simple method
of explaining how gears work. Pupils are challenged to race each other to the finish line however it is the
slowest one who wins. If a player puts their foot down or moves outside of the boundaries of their lane (if
on a racing track) then they are disqualified.
Ideally this will take place on a racing track. Otherwise, mark out a large circuit. Introduce competitors to
the purpose of gears “low for slow, high you fly”. See Appendix 10 for a simple method of explaining how
gears work. Ask competitors to get into their highest gear and then to cycle very slowly around one
circuit of the track. When the whistle blows, the competitors must pedal as hard as possible and
complete the circuit in the fastest time.
Alternatively, ask riders to line up on the start line and race around a simple circuit (using markers if no
track is available). At the end of each lap, the last rider across the line is eliminated. This is repeated until
only two riders are left to sprint it out to the finish line. NB: Make sure the circuit is wide all the way round
with no ‘bottlenecks’.
Wheelie
Competition
Pupils compete to complete the longest wheelie. Elbow, knee and wrist guards should be used for this
activity as well as helmets.
Coast the Most
Pupils pedal as fast as they can to a point when they must stop pedalling and see how far they can
coast. The pupil who coasts the furthest distance is the winner. Tip: When freewheeling, stand up on the
pedals and try to keep the cranks horizontal. To make this activity harder: Think about adding
obstacles/cones to freewheel around.
Obstacle Course
An obstacle course is created using the BMX ramps / figures of eight / number calls / funnels / slaloms /
brake box (for up to five seconds) / short carry / bike limbo. For a description of each of these obstacles
please see Appendix 11.
NB: You may wish to have a number of supervisors on this route to check that pupils complete each of
the challenges safely and correctly.
Individual / Team
Pursuit
Riders start at opposite ends of a circuit track. They cycle around the circuit, trying to catch the other
rider. The winner is the rider who reaches the other rider first. You can decide to enforce a ‘winner stays
on’ rule or to time the length of time it takes for one of the riders to win. Alternatively, put pupils into
teams and set each of the teams the challenge of catching the other. All riders in a team must finish
together and the time taken to catch the team is on the last rider.
Riders work in pairs, taking it in turns to be the ‘Orbiter’. Riders line up one behind the other at the start
line. The aim is for the ‘Orbiter’ to ride in front of their partners, pass behind them, around and finally in
front of them on their opposite side. When they reach the other side, they tag the next pair in their team.
This is repeated four times (or as appropriate). The winning team is the team that finishes fastest. If a pair
fails to complete a full orbit / knocks their team mate off in completing their orbit they must return to their
start line and begin their turn again. Tip: riders must talk to each other, the ‘Orbiter’ must not cut in too
close and the rider being ‘orbited’ should not ride too fast.
Orbiter Relay
An alternative race is to challenge each pair to complete as many orbits as possible in a set distance.
Ideally this will take place on a racing track otherwise two endpoints should be marked out. The winning
team is the pair who completes the highest number of orbits in one turn. This activity requires the rider
being ‘orbited’ to cycle very slowly, whilst the ‘Orbiter’ cycles very fast.
A circle is marked out in the playground. Players must cycle around each other within the circle without
touching another bike, putting their feet down or moving outside of the circle boundaries. As play
progresses the circle is made smaller and smaller.
Giant Strides
From a start point, pupils are told to take the ten largest strides possible; the winner is the pupil who
travels the furthest distance.
Bike Limbo
Start by asking each rider to practice the ‘ducking down’ technique with the bar high enough for all the
riders to easily negotiate. Riders then take it in turns to ride in a straight line under the limbo bar. Riders
need to pedal up to the bar but they should freewheel under it. Gradually lower the bar allowing riders
two attempts each at any one height before asking them to sit out.
Saddle Push
Mark out a start and finish line approximately 50 metres apart. Competitors race each other, running
alongside their bikes and only holding onto the saddle to guide their bike. They must not use their
handlebars to steer their bikes.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
17
Activity Descriptions
Bike-Powered Smoothie Maker
15 – 20
mins
Yes
Yes
20+
1
1
£
£200+
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
This is a human-powered smoothie maker; as pupils
pedal the bike, the movement of the wheels powers the
blender to create delicious smoothies. Frozen fruit,
bananas and fruit juice along with other selected
ingredients are piled into the smoothie jug. This is then
placed on a special device on the back of a bike; as the
pupils pedal the bike, the blades in the smoothie maker
are turned and the ingredients are blended together. With
two jugs, two different flavours of smoothie can be made
during the same breaktime.
Recommended recipe:
200g frozen fruit (raspberries, strawberries,
mangoes etc.)
2 bananas
1/2 litre of orange juice
Place all the ingredients into the smoothie jug and
blend. This recipe makes approximately 10 small
cups (or 20 half cups) of fruit smoothie.
Time
This is an activity that is suitable for breaktime or
lunchtime; you could consider setting up the bike in an
area of the canteen so that when pupils arrive to buy
their snacks during breaktime they are also able to see
this activity taking place.
Costs Involved
If your Lush Hour Activity Week is being coordinated by a
member of Sustrans staff, they may be able to provide
the bike-powered smoothie maker (or to hire one on your
behalf). If you are coordinating Lush Hour Activity Week
independently you will need to consider either renting or
buying a smoothie maker in order to coordinate this
activity. One supplier of bike powered smoothie makers is
Rock the Bike, visit http://rockthebike.com/products to
view their list of products available. As an alternative to
buying your own bike powered smoothie maker, some
local community organisations will hire smoothie makers
on a daily basis. Contact Sustrans Cymru (Tel: 029 2065
0602) for further advice.
There is also a cost involved in purchasing the
ingredients for the bike powered smoothie maker
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
(see suggested recipe). However, you may consider
approaching a local supermarket to provide these
ingredients to the school free of charge in return for
promotion at the event. Please see Appendix 12 for
a template that can be used to assist you in
composing this letter.
Support Needed
At least one member of staff/one pupil supervisor
will be needed to coordinate this event. You will also
need plastic cups in order for the pupils to taste the
fruits of their labour!
Opportunities for Student Leadership
Suggested group: Healthy Schools Committee
• Do you want to charge pupils to make their own
smoothie? Or perhaps organise a team of
smoothie-makers who then sell the smoothies
made in order to raise funds for the school?
• Would you like to be involved in coordinating the
activity?
• When would you like the activity to take place?
• What day of the week should this activity be held?
Perhaps consider holding the event on several
days of the week but open the activity to
particular Year groups on particular days (e.g. Year
7 pupils on Monday, Year 8 pupils on Tuesday,
Year 9 pupils on Wednesday…)
• Which smoothie(s) would you like to make? See
opposite page for a recipe suggestion or
alternatively you might like to experiment and think
up one of your own.
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all
participants taking part in this activity?
For a risk assessment of this activity please see
Appendix 13.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
19
Activity Descriptions
Dr. Bike
1 day
Yes
Yes
100+
1
Yes
£
£0 - £140
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
Dr Bike involves inviting bike mechanics to visit your
school to perform basic maintenance and ‘health’ checks
on pupils’ bikes. They can often be invited from a local
bike shop as it is a good way for the bike shop to gain
publicity amongst pupils at the school (Appendix 14).
Common problems including flat tyres, dry chains and
badly aligned gears or brakes can often be fixed quickly
by the onsite mechanic; more troublesome/timeconsuming problems can be identified and pupils can be
advised to visit a local bike shop to have the problems
fixed.
Time
This activity should take place one day during Lush Hour
Activity Week (with the mechanic working on the bikes
throughout the day, including during lesson time). It is
20
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
recommended that the activity does not happen on the
first day of the week as this will allow time to remind
pupils to bring their bikes in for servicing. However, it
should take place early enough in the week so that the
pupils are able to have their bikes repaired in time to
participate in other activities.
Costs Involved
There may be costs incurred by this activity. There are
two options for coordinating Dr Bike at your school:
• Dr Bike is provided by a local bike shop free of charge.
You can use the template letter in Appendix 14 to
assist you in composing a letter of request to your local
bike shop.
• Dr Bike is provided by an external provider at a cost of
approximately £140 for one mechanic for a full day.
Support Needed
If the Dr Bike is being provided by a local bike shop
employee, it is advised that you discuss with them
any support they may require.
In addition, the following equipment will be needed:
• Raffle tickets – this allows pupils to leave their bikes
during lesson time and then to collect them later in
the day. One raffle ticket should be given to the
pupil, the second should be taped to the bike (with
the pupil’s surname written on the back). Note that
these raffle tickers should be a different colour to
the raffle tickets being used for the Lush Hour Raffle
(if both activities are being coordinated) in order to
avoid any confusion.
• Dr Bike will also require a cordoned (preferably
lockable) area to service the bikes in. A lockable
tennis court is an ideal location as the bikes will be
secure but pupils are still able to observe the work
being undertaken by the bike mechanic during
breaktimes and lunchtimes.
Opportunities for Student Leadership
• On which day would you like the activity to take
place?
• How would you like to promote the opportunity to
pupils?
• Would you like to be involved in coordinating the
handling of the bikes (i.e. handing out the raffle
tickets at the beginning of the day and returning the
bikes to the correct owner at the end of the day)?
• Would you like to contact your local bike shop on
behalf of your school? If so, please find a template
letter you could use to assist you in drafting this
letter in Appendix 14.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
21
Activity Descriptions
Treasure Hunt
30 – 45
mins
Yes
No
100+
6
No
£
£0
£
£
£
£
£
£
The most popular walking activity trialled was the
Treasure Hunt.
Activity Description
Pupils are put into teams. The size of these teams
depends on how many pupils wish to take part; if 25 sets
of clues are provided in total, no more than 25
individuals/teams can take part in the race.
All pupils must start the hunt at the same time. The race
begins with the first clue, handed to each person/team
by the hunt supervisor. They must then follow this clue to
find the next. On the back of each clue, the pupils will
find a letter; they should collect all the clues as they travel
around the course. Once they have completed the hunt
they must rearrange the letters to spell a word associated
with active travel (if you decide to use the clues provided
in the template, Appendix 15, this word is FREEDOM).
The first individual/team to complete the hunt, return to
the hunt supervisor and spell the word wins a prize.
Time
This activity is suitable for lunchtime or after school; it is
recommended a minimum of 30 minutes is set aside to
coordinate the hunt.
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Costs Involved
With the exception of prizes (if you decide to offer these),
there are no costs involved in coordinating this activity.
Support Needed
The support needed to coordinate this activity ranges
from one member of staff/a pupil supervisor to six
members of staff/pupil supervisors – see below for
details.
In addition the following equipment will be needed:
• Compasses for the pupils to navigate the course
(optional). If you decide to coordinate the activity
without compasses you should begin the activity by
asking pupils (as a group) to identify which way is
North, South, East and then West
• Trundle wheel – to be used by the supervisor(s) to
measure the course. This should not be offered to
pupils; instead they should be encouraged to learn the
length of a meter before beginning the hunt
• The distance of one metre marked out in masking tape
on the floor at the start of the hunt so that pupils have
the opportunity to learn how long their stride(s) must be
to equal a metre
• 25 sets of clues – please see Appendix 15 for a
template which can be used to create these. The clue
template has been designed so that it is easy to adapt
the hunt to your individual school (direction of travel –
North, South, East and West – and distance – in
meters - to travel in each direction). These templates
can also be used to set several different hunts in the
same school. You should ensure that the start and end
of the competition are in the same place to facilitate
the collection of equipment and distribution of prizes
Opportunities for Student Leadership
• Would you like to offer more than one prize (i.e. 1st,
2nd, 3rd or winner in each Year group)? You may want
to decide this on the day (depending on how many
participants there are).
• What day of the week should this activity be held?
Perhaps consider holding the event on several days of
the week but open the activity to particular Year groups
on particular days (e.g. Year 7 pupils on Monday, Year
8 pupils on Tuesday, Year 9 pupils on Wednesday…) If
you take this approach you may need to change the
course each day (to avoid cheating). You may also
want to record the fastest times so that you are able to
announce an overall winner at the end of the week.
• This activity can be coordinated by hiding the clues in
various locations or by having a pupil representative, in
each of the locations that pupils are directed to, who
distributes the next clues. Which method would you
like to adopt? If it is the first, you will need just one
supervisor, if it is the second you will need six
representatives to hide in different locations around the
school. NB: Based on the outcomes of the pilot
project, it is highly recommended that the clues are
held by pupil representatives in order to prevent clues
being misplaced/scattered
• If you would like to be involved in setting the course
you will need to source the equipment outlined above.
The clues can be adapted to your individual school so
you will need to complete the details for your school on
each of the clues provided (direction of travel – North,
South, East and West – and meters to travel in each
direction). You should ensure that the start and end of
the competition are in the same place to facilitate the
collection of equipment and distribution of prizes.
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all participants
taking part in this activity?
Bishop of Llandaff Church in Wales High School
The treasure hunt often proved to be the most
successful activity in each school during Lush Hour
Activity Week. Where it worked best was with the help of
pupils to hold the clues in various locations around the
school. In the Bishop of Llandaff School, this role was
performed by sixth formers who were able to meet with
the Sustrans Project Coordinator during the lesson
before lunchtime to be given their allocated positions on
the hunt. Sixth formers, being older, were also less likely
to succumb to peer pressure (i.e. telling their friends
where the next clue could be found) or intimidation! The
activity proved so popular, it was coordinated again on
the Friday of Lush Hour Activity Week when nearly
double the number of pupils took part.
“Increasing physical activity has the
potential to improve the physical and
mental health of the nation, reduce
all-cause mortality and improve life
expectancy… Other potential
benefits linked to physical activity in
children and young people include
the acquisition of social skills
(leadership, teamwork and cooperation), better concentration in
school and displacement of antisocial and criminal behaviour.”
Start Active, Stay Active, a report on physical
activity for health from the four home countries’
Chief Medical Officers
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
23
Activity Descriptions
Bike Bands
45
mins –
1 hour
Yes
Yes
8 – 10
1
No
£
£50+
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
Pupils have the opportunity to make man-bands and
bracelets out of old bike tyres – an attractive and
sustainable activity. During the trial of Lush Hour Activity
Week, this proved to be a popular wet weather activity as
it can be easily coordinated indoors.
Please find a suggested process for this activity below:
• Wash the tyres if necessary.
• Cut the wire out of the rim of the tyres. You can use
wire cutters to cut through the wire or alternatively
pierce the side of the tyre with scissors then continue
to cut around the tyre, inside of the wire
• Neaten up the edges of the tyre and then cut into wrist
sized lengths.
Please note: depending on the size of group you will be
working with, you may wish to decide to get to this stage
of the process in advance of the activity.
• Taking your strips of tyre, measure roughly where the
holes need to go to make a (slightly) loose fit on the
pupil. Punch a hole using the punch plier tool (fig.1).
Leave a lip of 1.5cms at one end of the tyre strip where
they will pull to release the bracelet.
• Taking the press studs, select four press stud pieces
(each one is different in shape). Take the two top
pieces (fig. 2) and push the top smooth piece through
the top side of the tyre into the top cup piece
24
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
• Use the cone shaped part of the pliers in the hole on
underside of the bracelet and clamp the top (smooth)
piece to the top cup piece by bending out the part
of the smooth piece that pokes through the tyre strip
(fig. 4)
• Repeat for the bottom two pieces (fig. 5), make sure
the bottom cup is positioned on the top side of the tyre
to fit into the cup of the top piece
• Then cut the lip into a point or a curve depending on
the preference of the pupil (fig. 7)
Time
Due to the time taken to explain the process and make
the bracelets/man bands this activity is recommended as
a lunchtime or after school activity.
Costs Involved
If this activity is being coordinated by a Sustrans member
of staff they may be able to provide the equipment
needed (for equipment list please see below). Otherwise,
this will need to be provided by the school. Suggestions
for suppliers to use are given below, however you may
find some or all of this equipment is available from the
Design and Technology department.
fig 1: Punching holes in the tyre bracelet
fig 2: Top press studs
fig. 3: Feed through hole
fig. 4: Clamping two pieces together
fig. 5: Bottom press studs
fig. 6: Position bottom cup to fit top cup
Support Needed
One member of staff will be needed to coordinate this
activity. The number of pupils that can take part per
supervisor should be restricted to a maximum of eight
pupils. The equipment list below is also suitable for a
group of this size; if more pupils are to take part, it is
recommended equipment is provided in multiples of the
quantities listed below.
In addition the following equipment will be needed:
• Old Tyres: Ask in your local bike shops, they are usually
very grateful to get rid of as many as you can take. In
particular, look for coloured tyres or those with funky
grip patterns. Knobbly tyres look good but are often
too thick for the hole punch tool
• Scissors x2: These should be good quality, sharp
scissors
• Punch Plier Tool x2: Again these should be good
quality, able to punch 5mm holes in rubber. A
recommended supplier is Abbey Saddlery
(www.abbeysaddlery.co.uk) and, at the time of printing
this toolkit, the most suitable tool (at a price of £20)
can be found at the following website:
http://www.abbeysaddlery.co.uk/product_detail.cfm?id
=FS005&attr1=ONE00001
• 15mm Press Studs: These can be purchased from
local markets but can be cheaper when bought from
ebay.co.uk (approx. £15 for 200 studs)
• Press Stud Tool x2: Basic press stud tools are usually
provided with the press studs but you generally have to
use a hammer with these which can be dangerous.
fig. 7: Cut lip to pupil preference
Instead, a recommended supplier is your local
HobbyCraft (www.hobbycraft.co.uk) (approx. £10 each)
Opportunities for Student Leadership
Suggested group: Eco Schools Committee – this activity
promotes the recycling and reuse of materials which fits
well with the Eco Schools agenda.
• You could consider charging pupils to take part or
selling the man bands / bracelets made in order to
raise money for the school
• What day of the week would you like to hold the Bike
Bands activity? Perhaps consider holding the activity
on several days of the week as only a few pupils will be
able to take part each time
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all participants
taking part in this activity?
For a risk assessment of this activity please see
Appendix 16.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
25
Activity Descriptions
Lush Hour Raffle
All
week
No
N/A
2
400+
(per day)
No
£
£ prizes
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
Each time a pupil cycles or walks to school (or takes part
in a Lush Hour Activity) they are handed a raffle ticket.
At the end of the week the raffle is held. All the raffle
tickets from throughout the week will be put into a hat
and tickets pulled out; the more times a pupil has cycled
or walked to school, the higher their chances are of
winning.
Time
This activity will take place every day before school. As
pupils arrive, those that have come by bike or on foot are
handed a raffle ticket.
Costs Involved
There are no costs involved in coordinating this activity.
However, prizes will need to be offered to the holders of
the winning raffle; for suggestions of how to procure
these prizes please see the Introduction to this toolkit.
Support Needed
A minimum of two members of staff/pupil supervisors will
be needed each morning to hand out raffle tickets at the
entrance(s) to the school.
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
In addition, you may wish to consider offering raffle
tickets to each pupil who takes part in a Lush Hour
Activity Week event/activity. If this is the case, each
person responsible for coordinating an appropriate
activity should be provided with raffle tickets to distribute
to pupils taking part.
In addition, the following equipment will be needed:
• Raffle tickets
Opportunities for Student Leadership
• Do you want to encourage cycling more than walking
(or vice versa), if so why not offer a whole strip of raffle
tickets (five in total) to cyclists and just one to pupils
who have walked to school? This would mean that
cyclists will have more chance of winning the raffle than
walkers.
• Do you want to make this raffle open to teachers too?
• Would you like to be involved in coordinating this
activity? You could take a lead on organising which
pupils stand at the school gates (they’ll need to be
there quite early) each day and you can also coordinate
who will award the prizes at the end of the week.
• When would you like to hold the prize draw?
Maesteg Comprehensive School
At Maesteg School staff already supervised the
entrances to the school each morning and
afternoon. This made it considerably easier to
coordinate the distribution of raffle tickets to
pupils who walked and cycled to school each
day. Each supervisor was provided with a book of
raffle tickets and asked to give pupils who walked
to school one raffle ticket and pupils who cycled
to school five raffle tickets. The pupils were told
to keep hold of all their raffle tickets until Friday
when the draw was held. The use of school staff
offered immediate authority, the supervisors were
already known to pupils and consequently pupils
were more willing to take a raffle ticket and would
wait to receive one when a queue had formed. As
a result, Maesteg Comprehensive School had the
highest number of participations in the Lush Hour
Raffle (with over 870 raffle tickets given out over
the course of the week).
The school run is a major
source of congestion; at
08.35am nearly 1 in every 5 cars
in urban areas is taking children
to school.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
27
Activity Descriptions
Film: Street Trials Pro Rider and
‘The Race to School’
15 – 20
mins
Yes
Yes
100+
1
No
£
£0
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
A film of a street trials pro rider is shown in the main hall /
sports hall, allowing pupils the opportunity to see the
amazing feats that can be performed on a bike.
There are several YouTube films of Danny MacAskill (one
of the most respected street trials pro riders in the UK)
available on his website:
http://www.dannymacaskill.co.uk/videos/.
The following video clips are particularly recommended:
• Danny MacAskill – Streets of London (2m25s)
• Danny MacAskill – Way Back Home (7m43s)
• Inspired Bicycles – Danny MacAskill April 2009 (5m37s)
In addition, The Race to School, a short film written and
directed by pupils at the Bishop of Llandaff Church-inWales High School illustrating their views on the
importance of active travel, is available on YouTube on
the following link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZ_fDuDUVr4
28
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Alternatively, please contact Sustrans Cymru (Tel: 029
2065 0602) for a DVD copy of The Race to School.
Time
This collection of films could be shown during
breaktimes. Due to the short length of each film, one
member of staff is needed to select the next video after
each clip has ended.
Costs Involved
There are no costs involved in this activity.
Support Needed
One member of staff to assemble the display equipment
and to supervise the pupils wishing to watch the film.
In addition, the following equipment will be needed:
• Laptop and DVD player
• Projector
• Large screen display
• Speakers
Opportunities for Student Leadership
• What day of the week should this activity be held?
Perhaps consider holding the event on several days
of the week but open the viewing to particular Year
groups on particular days (e.g. Year 7 pupils on
Monday, Year 8 pupils on Tuesday, Year 9 pupils on
Wednesday…) or alternatively, showing a different
film each day
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all
participants attending this activity?
Tasker Milward VC School
Tasker Milward’s school hall (with projection and sound
equipment) incorporated the seating area for the lower
school canteen, providing the ideal location for the
screening of the films. The films were on display each
breaktime, allowing all pupils visiting the canteen to see
some of Danny MacAskill’s spectacular tricks, resulting
in very high participation rates for this activity.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
29
Activity Descriptions
Bike Hockey
45
mins
No
No
20+
1
Yes
£
£0
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
Bike Hockey is a non contact sport. There are times
when unintended contact is made but it is not part of the
sport. The game is about close control on a bike,
balance, braking and acceleration combined with good
hand-eye coordination.
The players must use their hockey sticks to move the ball
around the pitch. A match ends with the first team to get
five goals or after eight minutes and the team with the
greatest number of goals is the winner (prizes awarded).
If after eight minutes it is a draw then you enter sudden
death where the next team to score wins the match.
Bike Hockey can be played on a tarmaced surface, on
short cut grass or on a dry firm surface. Barriers, cones,
lines and fencing can be used to mark the size of the
pitch. The typical pitch might be rectangular and start at
20m by 10m, although it is usually bigger.
There should be a referee to ensure safe and fair play.
Rules are kept to a minimum:
• The most important thing is that no dangerous or
overtly aggressive riding is tolerated
• The next is that if any rider places a foot on the ground
then they must stop participation in the game
immediately, ride to a designated point where they ‘tap
out’. Tapping out means touching a predetermined
point (for example their own goal) with their hockey
stick, they can then return to the game. Riders can
‘rest’ on their sticks during the game, to steady
themselves in a stationary position
• At no point should a rider’s hockey stick make contact
with another rider or their bike. If a rider’s front wheel is
in contact with another bike then it is that rider’s fault. If
the referee considers it serious then a penalty will be
imposed on the rider
• It is for the school to decide if they will enforce the use
of helmets during the game
Time
Players are divided into two teams (of three players or
more). The players need a working bike, with no sharp
edges, stunt pegs or other parts that stick out. The bikes
must have a working brake for the hand that is not
holding the hockey stick and it is best that this is the
back brake. Riders hold a hockey stick in one hand. The
stick is used to strike a ball, usually soft, and when it is
hit between two posts a goal is scored.
The ball is placed in the middle of the court; once the
whistle blows the two teams race each other to the ball,
each looking to hit the ball towards their opposing team’s
goal.
30
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
The reduction in levels of physical activity due to
increased car use affects children’s stamina, alertness at
school and academic performance(5). Physical activity has
also been associated with psychological benefits in
young people by improving their control over symptoms
of anxiety and depression. WHO, 2000, Transport, Environment and Health
5
Bike hockey could be coordinated during either
breaktime or lunchtime. It would be most suitable as a
lunchtime activity due to the time needed to set up and
explain the rules.
This activity could be coordinated several times during
the week and created into a championship. The prize for
winning the championship could be either taking on a
teachers’ team, winning a prize or both!
Costs Involved
There are no costs involved in coordinating this activity.
Support Needed
One member of staff/a pupil supervisor will be needed to
supervise this activity and act as the referee.
In addition, the following equipment will be needed:
• Sport bands to denote teams
• Barriers, cones, lines and fencing to mark out the pitch
• Hockey sticks and a soft ball
• Stopwatch / timer
Opportunities for Student Leadership
Suggested pupil group: School Sports Council or pupils
undertaking their Duke of Edinburgh / Sports Leadership
Award.
• What day of the week would you like to hold bike
hockey?
• Would you like to hold the activity on several days in
the week?
• Would you like to create a bike hockey championship?
• Would you like to get teachers involved i.e. teachers
vs. the winning pupil group (if you decide to create a
bike hockey championship)?
• Are any pupils undertaking their Duke of Edinburgh or
Sports Leadership Award at your school, who could be
given the responsibility of coordinating / refereeing this
activity?
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all participants
taking part in this activity?
For a risk assessment of this activity please see
Appendix 7.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
31
Activity Descriptions
Flag Tag
45
mins
Yes
No
20+
1
Yes
£
£10
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
Flags are attached to team sport bands and one is given
to each player (up to ten players can take part). Flag Tag
can be played on a tarmaced surface, on short cut grass
or on a dry firm surface. Barriers, cones, lines and
fencing can be used to mark the size of the pitch. The
typical pitch might be rectangular and approximately 20m
by 10m.
The players need a working bike, with no sharp edges,
stunt pegs or other parts that stick out. The bikes must
have working brakes. Each player wears a sports band
which has a flag Velcroed onto it. The player must wear
the band diagonally across their back so that the flag is
facing outwards from their back. The object of the game
is to snatch as many flags as possible from the backs of
other players whilst protecting your own flag. If a player’s
flag is taken, they must leave the game and must forfeit
all the flags they have collected to the person who has
‘flag-tagged’ them. The winner is either the last person
left in the game or the player with the most flags after 10
minutes.
32
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Time
Flag Tag could be coordinated during either breaktime or
lunchtime. It would be most suitable as a lunchtime
activity due to the time needed to set up and explain the
rules.
This activity could be coordinated several times during
the week and could be created into a championship i.e.
the winning pupil(s) from each day bought together to
battle it out amongst each other on the final day of Lush
Hour Activity Week.
Costs Involved
There are no costs involved in coordinating this activity.
Support Needed
One member of staff/a pupil supervisor will be needed to
supervise this activity and act as the referee.
In addition, the following equipment will be needed:
• Flag Tag sports bands (with flags attached) – please see
Appendix 17 for a simple guide to making these
• Barriers, cones, lines and fencing to mark out the pitch
• Stopwatch / timer
Opportunities for Student Leadership
Suggested pupil group: School Sports Council or
pupils undertaking their Duke of Edinburgh / Sports
Leadership Award.
• What day of the week would you like to hold Flag Tag?
• Would you like to hold the activity on several days
in the week?
• Would you like to create a Flag Tag championship?
• Would you like to get teachers involved i.e. a
teachers match on the final day of Lush Hour
Activity Week?
• Are any pupils undertaking their Duke of Edinburgh
or Sports Leadership Award at your school, who
could be given the responsibility of coordinating /
refereeing this activity?
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all
participants taking part in this activity?
For a risk assessment of this activity please see
Appendix 7.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
33
Activity Descriptions
Photography Competition
All
week
No
No
100+
1
No
£
£ prizes
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
To emphasise all the lush things you can see on the way
to school if you’re not sat in a car, you could launch a
photography competition. To enter the competition,
pupils need to take a photograph of something that
caught their attention on their way to school and bring it
in. These photographs can then be uploaded onto a
computer at the school or emailed to the school’s email
address. The shortlisted photographs will be printed and
a vote will be held to select a winner.
The only rule is that the pupil has to take the photo on
their route to school.
Time
This activity takes place before and after school. The vote
should take place on the final day so that pupils have an
opportunity to take as many photos as possible, however
34
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
you may wish to close entry to the competition the day
before to allow time to print and display the photos prior
to the vote taking place.
Costs Involved
There will be minimal costs involved in order to have the
photos developed (which can either be done
professionally or using a colour printer at the school).
Support Needed
At least one member of staff/one pupil supervisor will be
needed to coordinate the event.
The following equipment will be needed:
• Voting slips
• A ballot box
• A laptop/computer(s) for pupils to upload their photo
entries on to
Opportunities for Student Leadership
Suggested student group: This is an ideal opportunity
for the school photography club, if one is coordinated
at your school.
• Who would you like to decide the winner of the
competition? You could decide to offer a
head/senior teacher prize (chosen by the
headteacher, an art teacher or a member of the
senior management team) and/or a popular vote
(chosen by the pupils themselves). If you do decide
to coordinate a popular vote, where will you display
the photos to ensure the maximum number of
people vote?
• When would you like to close the competition (see
above for points to consider)?
• How would you like to coordinate the uploading of
the photos onto the computer? Perhaps consider
having two computers in one of the IT rooms put
•
•
•
•
aside for pupils to use. Alternatively, you could
consider coordinating a ‘touring’ laptop. This would
involve one/two pupils being responsible for taking
the laptop around form groups during registration
or around the canteen areas during breaktime.
Regardless of the method adopted, it is very
important that pupils know where to go to upload
their photos and enter the competition.
Would you like to limit the number of entries per
pupil or allow them to enter as many photos as
they like into the competition?
How many photos do you think should be included
in the shortlist (this may depend on how many
entries you receive)?
Would you like to be involved in identifying the
photos that are included on the shortlist?
Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all
participants taking part in this activity?
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
35
Activity Descriptions
Bike Shop and Gadgets Demonstration
45
mins –
1 hour
Yes
Yes
100+
1
No
£
£30+
£
£
£
£
£
36
£
Activity Description
A ‘hands on’ presentation is given to pupils
demonstrating some of the latest gadgets available for
bikes. This would be an appropriate activity for a local
bike shop to coordinate as it gives them an opportunity
to promote the products they have on offer. The gadgets
demonstration could be coordinated on the same day as
the Dr Bike activity (described earlier in the document)
and, as such, could be used as a ‘hook’ to gain the
interest of a bike shop in attending and providing their
services.
coordinate. Pupils will have an opportunity to see an
example of the product at the shop and order it through
the school. A delivery of all of the stock ordered will be
made the following week (or as soon as possible), which
pupils can then collect from a nominated person at the
school.
In addition, if your activity is being coordinated by a
Sustrans member of staff, a temporary bike shop can be
set up on school grounds to allow pupils to take
advantage of the discount Sustrans gains from our
providers Moore Large. The produce available for display
at the shop is listed below, although this can be adapted
for each individual school (given sufficient notice).
However, it is highly recommended that only limited stock
is available to order to ensure the shop is manageable to
Time
The shop is suitable for coordination during breaktimes
and lunchtimes provided that there is sufficient
supervision available.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
If your Lush Hour Activity Week is not being coordinated
by a Sustrans member of staff but you would like to
coordinate a bike shop activity please contact Sustrans
Cymru (Tel: 029 2065 0602).
The gadgets session would ideally be coordinated by the
bike shop on the same day that they provide Dr Bike
support, which will depend on the availability of the bike
shop staff.
Activity
Description
Bike Lock (pg 78)
A big, tough OnGuard lock suitable for bikes of any size or shape.
BMX Helmet
(pg 72)
Something to protect your head and your image! A no-frills BMX-style black helmet that can
be customized with your own selection of stickers.
Sticker Sheets
(pg 137)
A selection of stickers to customise your helmet, bike or anything else you might want.
Grips (pg 17)
‘Bling your bike’ with a selection of brightly coloured grips.
9” Bulb Horn
(pg 13)
Announce your arrival with this old-style horn.
Simple Gloves
(pg 19)
Simple black gloves that will keep your hands toasty during the cold winter months.
Knog Frog Lights
Superbright LED lights which are easy to detach and come in a number of attractive colours.
Valve caps
(pg 142)
‘Bling your bike’ with some novelty valve caps.
Costs Involved
If your event is being coordinated by a Sustrans member
of staff, then there will be no costs involved in either
activity. However if you are coordinating your Lush Hour
Activity Week independently you will need approximately
£30 to purchase examples of the stock outlined above.
Support Needed
The gadget demonstration is best coordinated by a
member of staff from the local bike shop, who will be upto-date on the latest gadgets available for bikes. The
support they require would be best discussed with the
representative attending.
The temporary school shop will need someone to
coordinate the taking of orders and to supervise the
shop. It is recommended that this is a senior pupil or
teacher as there is a significant responsibility required in
the role. Pupils are required to pay for the stock when
placing the order – this should be by cheque and made
payable to the school. The school will then be invoiced
by Sustrans for the final amount.
A secure area will be needed in which to keep the stock
when the shop is not open.
Opportunities for Student Leadership
If your school coordinates an Enterprise Committee the
shop may be something they wish to coordinate.
Alternatively, it could be undertaken as part of a business
studies project, for example examining the impact of
different marketing strategies on sales each day. This
could be expanded further by asking two teams to
compete against eachother to generate the most sales.
• Would you like to offer the gadgets demonstration to
the local bike shop providing the Dr Bike as an
opportunity for them to promote their shop and as a
reward for performing bike maintenance for a day? If
so, ensure that this section is left in the suggested
template letter in Appendix 14.
• Which of the stock outlined above would you like to be
made available in the shop? Is there any stock that you
think would be unsuitable for sale or particularly
unpopular at your school?
• Who will coordinate the distribution of the stock once
the order has been made?
The shop will require examples of the stock available for
pupils to order. If your Lush Hour Activity Week is being
coordinated by a Sustrans member of staff, this stock
will be provided by Sustrans along with order sheets
which will list quantities ordered and the name of the
pupil ordering the stock (so that the items can be easily
distributed when they arrive at the school).
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
37
Activity Descriptions
Puncture Race
45
mins –
1 hour
Yes
Yes
20+
1
No
£
£10+
£
£
£
£
£
£
Activity Description
Pupils are taught how to repair a puncture. Then, using
spare (punctured) inner tubes, they race each other to
find and fix a puncture. The pupil/team that completes
this task in the fastest time wins. During the trial of Lush
Hour Activity Week, this proved to be a popular wet
weather activity.
Instructions for repairing a small puncture by gluing a
patch onto the tube:
• Pump up the tyre to locate the hole and listen for the
hiss of escaping air (if this does not work submerge the
tyre in a bowl of water or a nearby puddle - a stream of
bubbles will indicate where the puncture is)
• Once you’ve spotted the puncture draw a circle round
it with the yellow pencil found in the puncture repair kits
• Lightly roughen the area round the puncture with
sandpaper
• When you are satisfied that the tube is clean, dry and
free of dust get a puncture patch that is the most
appropriate size according to the size and location of
the puncture
• Apply a thin, even coat of rubber solution and allow to
dry (approx. 2 mins)
38
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
• Then press the patch into position - try to position the
centre of the patch right on top of the puncture and
smooth it out from there to avoid trapping any air
• Press the patch down hard, especially round the
edges.
When the pupils feel that they have successfully repaired
their puncture, they should re-inflate it using the pump
provided. If they have repaired the puncture, no air
should escape from the inner tube once it is re-inflated, if
this is not the case they should return to their area and
restart the repair.
Time
Due to the time taken to explain how to repair a puncture
and then to coordinate the race, this activity will take
approximately 30-45 minutes; it is therefore suitable as a
lunchtime activity.
Costs Involved
The only cost involved is from the purchase of puncture
repair kits and the provision of prizes.
Support Needed
At least one member of staff/one pupil supervisor
will be needed to coordinate this event.
In addition, the following equipment will be
needed:
• Inner tubes. Ask in your local bike shops, they
may have some you can take away for free
• Puncture repair kits. If your Lush Hour Activity is
being coordinated by a member of Sustrans
staff these repair kits will be provided.
Otherwise, you can purchase personal repair
kits from the Sustrans website
(www.sustrans.org.uk). At the time of printing
the puncture repair kits could be found at:
http://www.sustransshop.co.uk/products/5642puncture-repair-kit
• Bicycle pump(s)
Opportunities for Student Leadership
• What day of the week should this activity be
held? Perhaps consider holding the event on
several days of the week but open the activity to
particular Year groups on particular days (e.g.
Year 7 pupils on Monday, Year 8 pupils on
Tuesday, Year 9 pupils on Wednesday…)
• Do you want to set up a league table, whereby
the winners of the individual events during the
week come together on the final day and race
each other?
• Would you like to award a raffle ticket to all
participants taking part in this activity?
For a risk assessment of this activity please
see Appendix 16.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
39
Activity Descriptions
Additional Lush Hour Activity Suggestions
Please find below some ideas for more activities that could take place during Lush Hour Activity Week. These were
ideas thought up by our pupil steering groups that didn’t prove so popular in the vote – however you and your school
might think differently!
Activity
40
Description
Sponsored
cycle ride
School-run sponsored cycle ride to raise money for new cycling equipment in the school
e.g. bike shed / pool bikes.
Fashion show
A catwalk show demonstrating how to look good walking or cycling. The outfits could be
designed by pupils during lunchtimes in Lush Hour Activity Week with the fashion show held
on the Friday.
Sponsored Bike
Wash
A sponsored bike-wash to raise money for the school to buy new cycling equipment.
Bike Attack!
Activities for pupils making things out of old bicycle parts.
Beauty and the
Bike
Pupils receive tips and tricks on how to stay looking beautiful whilst riding a bike to school.
Cycle Training
Basic skills lessons for pupils wanting to become more confident on a bike.
Bikes through the
ages
Pupils have the opportunity to try out old bicycles from different periods in history, for
example the penny-farthing, the bone shaker and the Denis Johnson Hobby Horse. A
recommended organisation to speak to regarding this activity is the National Cycle Collection
(http://www.cyclemuseum.org.uk/).
What next?
Pupils meet with their 5x60 officer to find out about after-school clubs they can join in their
local area.
Hear my voice
A letter-writing session for pupils to put their views on walking and cycling to the local
authority / National Assembly for Wales.
Map Out
Session to help pupils find the safest (and shortest) route to school.
Tour of local
cycling and
walking routes
Take a tour of local cycling and walking routes. Families could be invited along too.
Save those petrol
pennies
The AA identifies that driving costs approximately 68p a mile. Ask parents to save up all the
money they would have spent on petrol driving their children to school that week and use
that money to do a fun activity with their family instead.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Evaluating the Impact of
Lush Hour Activity Week
The impact of Lush Hour Activity Week on travel
behaviour was measured during the piloting of this
project. Equally, we are keen for schools undertaking a
similar scheme of activities to let us know what impact it
has had, both those undertaking Lush Hour Activity
Week independently and those undertaking Lush Hour
Activity Week with the support of a Sustrans member of
staff. This evaluation can also help you to demonstrate
outcomes in support of your School Travel Plan, Estyn
Inspections, the Eco Schools Award and may support
funding bids for additional cycling and walking
infrastructure you feel is needed in the school grounds.
Please find a suggested evaluation questionnaire in
Appendix 18 which you may find useful in measuring the
impact of the activities coordinated during Lush Hour
Activity Week. This survey should be completed twice:
• Once prior to Lush Hour Activity Week taking place in
the school
• Once post Lush Hour Activity Week taking place in the
school
The surveys are designed as hands up surveys (the
preferred format in each of the schools we worked with)
with pupils asked to raise their hands for the most
appropriate option and one evaluation form filled out per
class.
We are always interested in hearing what activities other
schools have found to be particularly successful in
influencing travel behaviour. If you have collated your
results and are happy to share them please contact
Sustrans Cymru (Tel: 029 2065 0602).
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
41
Index of Appendices
Appendix
number:
1
Template press release
2
Template letter for use appealing to local businesses to provide prizes for pupils taking part in Lush Hour
Activity Week
3
Suggested Lush Hour promotional materials
4
Template letter for use appealing to local shops to provide some of the food needed for the Lush Hour
Breakfast activity
5
Lush Hour Breakfast Risk Assessment
6
Template score sheet for use during BMX try outs
7
Cycling Activities Risk Assessment
8
Assembly presentation ideas
9
Example timetables from Lush Hour Activity Weeks coordinated during the project trial
10
Simple explanation for how gears work on a bicycle
11
Description of each of the activities on the Lush Hour Obstacle Course
12
Template letter for use appealing to local business to provide fruit / other ingredients for the Bike Powered
Smoothie Maker activity
42
13
Bike Powered Smoothie Maker Risk Assessment
14
Template letter for use inviting a local bike supplier to deliver Dr Bike
15
Template clues for the Lush Hour Treasure Hunt
16
Bike-Bands and Puncture Repair Activities Risk Assessment
17
Instructions for making Flag Tags
18
Pre and post Lush Hour Activity Week questionnaire
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Appendix 1
Template Press Release
Mark your press release either ‘For immediate release’ or ‘Embargoed: Date’
TITLE: <<NAME OF SCHOOL>> Pupils Experience ‘Lush Hour’
PHOTOCALL If you would like to invite your local newspaper(s) to send a photographer to a particular event, fill in the
information below.
Who:
Who is involved in the event
What: What is going to happen
Where: Where exactly is it taking place
When: When exactly is it taking place
This week pupils from <<NAME OF SCHOOL>> in <<NAME OF CITY/TOWN/VILLAGE>> will take part in Lush
Hour Activity Week, a week of competitions, games and events aimed at encouraging more secondary school pupils
to walk and cycle to school.
The school, which sees <<INSERT PERCENTAGE VALUE – either from your School Travel Plan or from the results
of the Pre-Lush Hour Activity Week Questionnaire (Appendix 18)>> percent of its pupils arriving to school by car, is
keen to promote walking and cycling to school and for pupils to experience the educational, health and social benefits
that the more active commute can offer.
Lush Hour Activity Week, developed by UK charity, Sustrans, will be held at <<INSERT SCHOOL NAME>>
to encourage pupils to get to school under their own steam. Over 400* children and young people in <<INSERT
NAME OF SCHOOL>> are expected to take part in the activities under the strap-line Lush Hour: Feel a different
morning rush.
<<INSERT QUOTE FROM SCHOOL – for example a comment from the headteacher explaining why your school is
so keen to coordinate Lush Hour Activity Week. >>
*please note this is an estimated figure based on Lush Hour Activity Weeks previously coordinated by Sustrans.
/ends
For further information please contact:
<<INSERT CONTACT DETAILS>>
NOTES
<<Use this space to insert any notes that journalists may find useful but which do not need to be included in the
press release. >>
Lush Hour Activity Week was designed by a team of 30 pupils from three schools in Wales in 2010. Bishop of
Llandaff High School, Maesteg Comprehensive School and St Cenydd School worked closely with Sustrans to
produce a programme for an action paked week of walking and cycling activities that encourage more secondary
school pupils to walk and cycle to school each day.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
43
Appendix 2
Template Letter (Prizes)
<To be printed on school letter-headed paper>
<Name of addressee>
<Job title, Organisation>
<Address 1>
<Address 2>
<Address 3>
<Address 4>
<Insert date>
<Space for salutation, usually to be handwritten>
Re: Lush Hour Activity Week Appeal
I am writing to ask for your support with our Lush Hour Activity Week due to take place at <<INSERT NAME OF
SCHOOL>> between <<INSERT DATES>>.
Lush Hour Activity Week is a week of activities aimed at encouraging more pupils to cycle and walk to school.
Throughout the week <<INSERT NAME OF SCHOOL>> pupils will be taking part in a week of competitions, games
and events, under the strap-line ‘Lush Hour: Feel a different morning rush’, persuading more of them to experience
the educational, health and social benefits that the more active commute can offer.
<<INSERT SCHOOL NAME>> is appealing to local businesses to provide prizes for pupils taking part in the
activities, with the hope of maximising the number of pupils who will participate. We very much hope you can help us
in raising the number of pupils walking and cycling to school, which will not only bring benefits to the pupils, but also
to the school and the wider community.
If you are able to provide any prizes, we would, of course, acknowledge your generosity throughout the week and in
any press coverage we receive.
If you have any questions please do contact me.
<Space for closing, usually to be handwritten>
<Name>
<Job Title>
<Direct contact information>
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Appendix 3
Lush Hour Promotional Materials
The following Lush Hour branded marketing materials are available. Each set of materials can be tailored to fit the
needs of your individual school as indicated below:
Bilingual Plasma Screen Backdrop:
If you wish to use this plasma screen
backdrop, please provide us with the dates
your Lush Hour Activity Week will take place.
Bilingual Lush Hour Hand Stamp:
If you wish to create your own Lush Hour
hand stamps during your Activity Week please
contact us to receive an electronic copy of the
Lush Hour logo.
Bilingual A4 Timetable:
If you would like to use this timetable, please
provide us with details of the activities that
will take place throughout the week (in
English and/or Welsh as appropriate).
Bilingual A3 Poster:
If you would like to use this A3 poster to
promote your event, please provide us with
the dates your Lush Hour Activity Week will
take place.
Please contact Sustrans Cymru (Tel: 029 2065 0602)
for more information on how you can receive
adapted materials for your schools.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
45
Appendix 4
Template Letter (Lush Hour Breakfast)
<To be printed on school letter-headed paper>
<Name of addressee>
<Job title, Organisation>
<Address 1>
<Address 2>
<Address 3>
<Address 4>
<Insert date>
<Space for salutation, usually to be handwritten>
Re: Lush Hour Activity Week Appeal
I am writing to ask for your support with our Lush Hour Activity Week due to take place at <<INSERT NAME OF
SCHOOL>> between <<INSERT DATES>>.
Lush Hour Activity Week is a week of activities aimed at encouraging more pupils to cycle and walk to school.
Throughout the week <<INSERT NAME OF SCHOOL>> pupils will be taking part in a week of competitions, games
and events, under the strap-line ‘Lush Hour: Feel a different morning rush’, persuading more of them to experience
the educational, health and social benefits that the more active commute can offer.
One of these activities is the Lush Hour Breakfast, a free breakfast which is given to all pupils who walk and cycle to
school that morning. <<INSERT SCHOOL NAME>> is appealing to local businesses to donate food for pupils taking
part in the Lush Hour Breakfast activity, with the hope of maximising the number of pupils who will participate.
Specifically, we would like to request your help in providing the following items: <<LIST FOOD ITEMS>>. We very
much hope you can help us in raising the number of pupils walking and cycling to school, which will not only bring
benefits to the pupils, but also to the school and the wider community.
If you are able to provide any support, we would, of course, acknowledge your generosity throughout the week and in
any press coverage we receive.
If you have any questions please do contact me.
<Space for closing, usually to be handwritten>
<Name>
<Job Title>
<Direct contact information>
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Appendix 5
Lush Hour Breakfast Risk Assessment
RISK ASSESSMENT (SPECIFIC)
Ref No. (To be completed by: Manager)
Office, site, event, project, location, etc:
Lush Hour Activity Week – Lush Hour Breakfast
List the relevant ‘Generic Risk Assessments’:
RA25
Assessor(s):
Liz Thorne
Additional references:
Date of assessment:
30/03/2011
Planned review date:
Significant variations to and/or activities not covered by
the relevant ‘Generic Risk Assessments’:
Lush Hour Breakfast – for a full description of the activity
please refer to Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit.
Part 1: Specific/additional control measures.
Hazard: Food Allergy
Ref: RA1
Hazard: Adverse Weather Conditions
Ref: RA2
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participating staff, parents and pupils.
Legal references
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participating staff, parents and pupils.
Legal references
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Individual has an allergic reaction to food resulting in
anaphylactic shock with potentially fatal consequences.
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Participating in Lush Hour Breakfast Event
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Not all food can be guaranteed free from nuts or other
allergens. Fresh fruit will be available to eat. Water will be
available to drink.
- Pupils and staff will be responsible for notifying the event
organiser of their allergy.
- Location of Epipen or other medication will be known to all
staff at the event.
- Food that may contain nuts or other allergens will be
marked as such.
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Potential exposure, sunburn, dehydration, cold, shock,
sickness, accident.
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Being outside not properly prepared for the weather.
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Pupils will only be outside for a short period of time whilst
eating their breakfast.
- Assess weather conditions on the day.
- Take children into the school if weather is inappropriate.
- Should the weather prove potentially dangerous (very high
winds or storm conditions), the event will be cancelled.
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
2
Risk
2
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
3
Risk
3
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
47
Hazard: Fall/Collision with other cyclists
Ref: RA3
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participating staff, parents and pupils.
Legal references
Persons exposed to the hazard
Children
Legal references
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Broken limbs, cuts, scrapes, grazes, head injury, shock,
serious trauma, internal injuries.
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- A fall sustained following loss of control of the bike through
the condition of the surface, punctures, volume of bicycles,
whilst negotiating obstacles or not judging the
braking/terrain accurately.
- A collision with another rider, a pedestrian, a structure,
tree/bush, vehicle.
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Pupils will be encouraged to push their bike across the
playground to where the bikes are being stored.
- Pupils and teachers will act as marshals to ensure that
bikes are parked safely and in the correct area.
- The path to the bike storage will be checked by staff.
- Parents are responsible for ensuring their child cycles safely
to school.
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Inappropriate comments and behaviour.
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Non school staff working with pupils.
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Ensure any parent volunteers or other guests are not left
alone with only one child.
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
2
Severity
1
Risk
2
Part 2: Approval.
Hazard: Bikes being stacked in an unsafe way
Ref: RA7
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participating cyclists.
Legal references
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Broken limbs, crushed by bicycles
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Stacking bikes in the in the cycle storage areas – this only
applies if thereare significantly more bikes than usual and
the capacity of the cycle storage is exceeded.
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Have a marshal ensuring the bicycles are stacked safely.
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
3
Risk
3
48
Hazard: Risk of adults behaving inappropriately
Ref: RA6
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
3
Risk
3
This specific risk assessment has been reviewed and is approved.
Approved by:
Jane Lorimer, Deputy Director, Sustrans Cymru
Date approved:
11/04/2011
Part 3: Review.
This specific risk assessment (including, as necessary, the relevant
‘Generic Risk Assessments’, and any updates/revisions) has been
reviewed and the following additional actions are to be implemented:
Date
Review findings and/or further planned actions
Owner
Timing
Date completed
Part 4: Documentation.
List any supporting documents, photographs, plans, etc attached to
the report:
Appendix 6
Template Score Sheet for BMX Try Outs
BMX Try Outs
Ask pupils to perform the following skills:
• A controlled jump (or simply to cycle over the ramp if pupil is less confident)
• A complete stop with every part of their bike still on the ramp
Award each pupil a score out of 10. The pupil(s) with the highest score win(s).
Pupil Name (Year)
Jump (/10)
Standstill (/10)
TOTAL SCORE (/20)
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
49
Appendix 7
Cycling Activities Risk Assessment
RISK ASSESSMENT (SPECIFIC)
Ref No. (To be completed by: Manager)
Office, site, event, project, location, etc:
This Risk Assessment is designed for use when coordinating
the following activities:
• Bike Hockey;
• Flag Tag;
• BMX Trials;
• Lush Hour Races;
• Lush Hour Obstacle Course
List the relevant ‘Generic Risk Assessments’:
RA:26-02 Fall/ collisions
RA:26-04 Poor health and fitness
RA:26-06 Un-roadworthy bikes & equipment
RA:26-07 Adverse weather & climate
Assessor(s):
Liz Thorne
Additional references:
Date of assessment:
30/03/2011
Planned review date:
Significant variations to and/or activities not covered by
the relevant ‘Generic Risk Assessments’:
These activities will be run in an enclosed area at the school,
with a minimum of one adult supervisor.
As these are playground based sessions, the wearing of
helmets has been left to the discretion of parents and high viz
jackets are not required. However, safety clothing will be
available and participants undertaking activities on the BMX
ramps will be required to wear the following:
• Knee pads
• Wrist guards
• Elbow pads
For a detailed outline of the content of each of the sessions
please see the Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit.
Specifically, this risk assessment relates to the following
activities:
• Bike Hockey;
• Flag Tag;
• BMX Trials;
• Lush Hour Races
• Lush Hour Obstacle Course
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Part 1: Specific/additional control measures.
Hazard: Fall/collision
Ref: GFJ 02-01
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participants
Legal references
MHSWR
Potential injuries, damage, etc
As in RA:26-02 (Minor – cutes, grazes, bumps, sprains, shock.
Major – fractures, serious trauma)
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Fall, as a result of loss of control or stability. Resulting from
conditions of school playground
- Fall at slow speed whilst negotiating obstacles or not
judging braking properly
- Collision: with other participants or spectators
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Keep groups to a maximum of 10 participants per adult
supervisor
- Constant evaluation of the conditions and space being used
both prior to and during the skills sessions
- No pedestrians or vehicles allowed onto course
- Provide briefing and safety instructions before the start of
each session
- Ongoing dynamic risk assessment to be undertaken by
supervisors.
- Section of the playground being used to be clearly
cordoned off from other playground users.
- Safety clothing – including knee pads, elbow pads and wrist
guards – to be available for activities involving BMX ramps
where a fall/collision may be more likely to happen.
- Participants given a clear statement of the rules (particularly
with regards to Bike Hockey and Flag Tag) which state that
collision with other bikes is forbidden; this is further
discouraged with the use of forfeits within the game. Any
participant seen to continually ignore these rules will be
disqualified.
- Minor consequences – can be treated on spot or by First
Aiders
- Major consequences – make person safe and immediately
call for medical help
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
N/A
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
2
Severity
2
Risk
4
Hazard: Poor health & fitness
Ref: GFJ 02-04
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participants
Legal references
MHSWR
Potential injuries, damage, etc
As in RA: 24/04 (onset of acute conditions, tiredness or
exacerbation of existing chronic condition)
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Medical condition – which may be aggravated by physical
exertion (e.g. asthma)
- Tiredness – Exhaustion and increased likelihood of accident
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- In advance of the session staff members will be asked to
identify any participants with the above medical conditions
and to provide further details on medication
- Supervisors will monitor the well-being of participants and
set the pace of the session to accommodate participant
needs and capabilities
- If any participant shows signs of medical condition or
tiredness, participant should be stopped for immediate
assessment and be treated if necessary
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
N/A
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
2
Risk
2
Hazard: Adverse weather & climate
Ref: GFJ 02-05
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participants
Legal references
MHSWR
Potential injuries, damage, etc
As in RA: 26-07 (e.g. sun/cold/rain/wind/poor visibility)
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- This is not a major issue as the sessions are short (the
longest session takes place over lunchtime – 50 mins)
- Potential exposure, sunburn, dehydration, cold, shock,
sickness, accident
- Rain may cause dangerous cycling conditions – inefficient
brakes, slips, poor visibility
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Assessment of weather conditions on the day by
supervisors
- Ensure participants wear appropriate clothing and footwear
- Should the weather prove unfavourable and potentially
dangerous the session will be cancelled by supervisor
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
N/A
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
2
Risk
2
Part 2: Approval.
This specific risk assessment has been reviewed and is approved.
Approved by:
Jane Lorimer, Deputy Director, Sustrans Cymru
Date approved:
11/04/2011
Part 3: Review.
This specific risk assessment (including, as necessary, the relevant
‘Generic Risk Assessments’, and any updates/revisions) has been
reviewed and the following additional actions are to be implemented:
Date
Review findings and/or further planned actions
Owner
Timing
Date completed
Part 4: Documentation.
List any supporting documents, photographs, plans, etc attached to
the report:
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
51
Appendix 8
Assembly Presentation Ideas
This is a script used to give an hour-long assembly on the benefits of walking and cycling to school and to introduce
Lush Hour Activity Week. The writing in italics is a selection of ideas of how to coordinate this assembly. The plain
script provides ideas for what you can say; both can be adapted to fit the needs of both your school and your pupils.
Depending on the length of assembly you are able to give you may wish to decide to omit certain aspects, for
example a ten-fifteen minute assembly would allow enough time to introduce the benefits of walking and cycling to
school and conduct one of the activities (the quiz or car-space themed activity) but not both. The suggested script
below has been divided into sections to support you to do this. The same assembly can be repeated throughout the
week to different Year groups or you could decide to give different age groups different assemblies. Small prizes can
be awarded to pupils for volunteering answers, for example reflective wrist and ankle bands, in order to encourage
greater participation.
Suggested slides to be used in the presentation are provided below. For an electronic copy of the presentation please
contact Sustrans Cymru (Tel: 029 2065 0602).
Start of Assembly – Film Clip
I started each assembly with a short clip from Skins
(episode 6, series 3) which shows two of the
characters setting off on a bike ride to escape
problems they are facing at home. The clip features at
about 25 minutes into this episode. I showed pupils
this particular clip for two reasons; firstly it’s a popular
drama amongst teenagers (particularly Years 9 and
above), secondly it demonstrates one of the chief
benefits for this age group that walking and cycling
offers: independence. However, you can decide to
show any clip that you feel demonstrates this benefit.
[Sustrans makes smarter travel choices possible,
desirable and inevitable. We’re a leading UK charity
enabling people to travel by foot, bike or public
transport for more of the journeys we make every day.
We work with families, communities, policy-makers and
partner organisations so that people are able to choose
healthier, cleaner and cheaper journeys, with better
places and spaces to move through and live in.]
Slide 2 – Mission statement
Once you have shown the clip, open the following
question up to the assembly for responses:
Why do you think I have shown you this clip? (Take
responses).
Introduction to Sustrans
Slide 1 – Sustrans logo
Read out the mission statement (above) but use this
opportunity to ask the group more questions.
Sustrans makes smarter travel choices possible,
desirable and inevitable.
• What do we mean by smarter travel choices? Take
reponses (more environmentally friendly, healthier, often
cheaper and sometimes faster).
Ask the group what they think Sustrans the charity
does, take responses and award prizes (as appropriate)
before moving to the slide which gives our mission
statement:
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
We’re a leading UK charity enabling people to travel by
foot, bike or public transport for more of the journeys
we make everyday. We work with families,
communities, policy-makers and partner organisations
so that people are able to choose healthier, cleaner and
cheaper journeys, with better places and spaces to
move through and live in.
In practice, Sustrans predominantly does two things:
• Firstly, Sustrans builds the National Cycle Network,
which now spans over 12,600 miles across the UK
• Secondly, Sustrans coordinates a number of
behaviour-change projects that look to encourage
people to make smarter travel choices. Not necessarily
to get rid of the car altogether, but perhaps not to use
it quite as frequently as we currently do. In particular,
encouraging people to walk or cycle rather than go by
car for those short journeys where going by bike or on
foot can be faster, cheaper, healthier and better for the
environment.
soon rise to 18), you can enter full-time employment,
have sex, play the National Lottery, join a trade union,
apply for a passport and pay tax and National
Insurance).
Slide 4 – Things you can do at 16
Independence
But back to that television clip. What did we say the
bikes allowed them to do? Take responses (escape).
At what age are we fully independent, an adult? 18?
What can you do at 18? Take responses as
appropriate (buy alcohol without a meal, gamble in a
betting shop or casino, be tried in an adult court, serve
on a jury, join the armed forces, get married, or leave
home, and buy a pet without parental consent).
So not fully independent, but getting there, But do you
really want to wait until then to have even a little bit of
independence? Wouldn’t it be nice to do stuff on your
own, by yourself, or just with friends and without your
parents sometimes?
Well maybe you can….
Slide 3 – Things you can do at 18
So what’s cycling and walking got to do with being
independent? Well…
Who here can legally drive a car? Ask pupils to put
their hands up (no-one).
And who here can legally ride a scooter or a moped?
Ask pupils to put their hands up (no one).
But you can’t adopt or foster a child, or stand as a
candidate in an election, or take out a mortgage to buy
your own home or drink alcohol in many American
states. For those things you need to be at least 21, in
some cases 25.
So do we not become fully independent until we are
25? Do we need to rely on our parents/carers or at
least ask their permission for every last thing we do
until we are 25?! I think parents would be as unhappy
as you, if that was the case.
At the other extreme; the age of criminal responsibility
(i.e. expected to know right from wrong and be
punished if you break the law) is just 10 (8 in Scotland).
And you can start work – albeit within strict limits of
when, where, what – at the age of 13.
You can’t drive a car or motorbike until you’re 17, and
even then you’re unlikely to pass your test before
you’re 18. You can’t even ride a scooter until you’re 16.
Might manage it before you leave school, if you’re lucky
but cycling and walking is accessible to most of us –
quick show of hands, who owns a bike? Keep your
hands up… and who owns a leg (or a leg equivalent)?
You can cycle and walk to school on your own, at a
time that suits you, by the route that suits you. If you
cycle or walk to school you’ll have more flexibility in the
time you go home, allowing you the freedom to go to
an after school club, or for tea at a friend’s house or to
take part in loads of other activities. Of course I’d
advise that you let your parents know what you’re
doing, but you won’t have to ask them to take you, you
won’t be restricted to their timetables and you won’t
have to fit in with their plans. Cycling and walking offer
you the chance to be more independent.
Maybe we can’t be considered independent until we
leave school at 16. What can you do at 16? Take
responses as appropriate (you can leave education
(correct at time of printing this toolkit, although may
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
53
Environmental Benefits - Space
There are lots of other reasons to cycle and walk too;
It’s good for the environment, now we all know about
the importance of reducing our carbon footprint and
I’m not going to drone on about that or the fact that
transport is responsible for consuming so much of the
82 million gallons of oil the world uses each day.
Instead, I want to think about it in a different way:
SPACE and the impact of cars on our physical
environment.
We’ve got 20 in our car now. Do you think there’s room
for more?
Yes, there is a lot more room. But we’re running out of
time and this was just a quick experiment. In actual
fact, you can fit up to 50 people in the space this car
takes up on the road.
Slide 6
Slide 5 – Family car
But as we said earlier, this size of car can usually only
fit up to 5 people.
Slide 7
Point to screen. This is a fairly standard family car,
right? Now looking at this car, how many people can
normally fit in this car? Typically the first answer is either
five or seven.
Can I get four volunteers up on stage? Okay – now
make a square the size of an average family car – I
guess at about 4 x 2.5 meters.
Happy with that?
Once they’re happy, wrap tape/ribbon around the four
volunteers and ask them to hold it at about waist
height.
Now stay very, very still
How many people do you usually see in a car though?
Take responses (one).
Slide 8
Now how many people did we say normally fit into this
size of car (‘five or seven’). Can I have (five/seven)
volunteers up on stage please?
Select volunteers and ask them to stand in your ‘car’
(i.e. the space indicated by the tape-holding
volunteers).
What do you notice amount the amount of room left in
our car? (There’s lots of space left).
Shall we double it? (Yes).
Okay another five people please. Select volunteers and
ask them to stand in your ‘car’.
What do you think? More again? (Yes)
OK another 10. Select volunteers and ask them to
stand in your ‘car’.
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
That’s right. A lot of the time each car only has one
person in it. This is a really inefficient, selfish use of
road space.
What do you think happens on our roads because so
many people use the space so inefficiently? Take
responses (traffic jams).
Slide 12 – Car park
Slide 9 - Cars
Because cars take up so much space we need big
roads and somewhere to put the cars at the end of
their journey (car parks).
That’s right. Traffic jams.
Another experiment looking at the impact of cars on our
environment looked at this fact in a bit more detail.
What fraction of the average town in the UK do you
think is taken up by cars and roads? Take responses.
So, this is how much space 35 cars take up on the
road.
The answer is one third. We’ve pretty much thrown
away one third of our space because people are so
reliant on cars to get to work, or school or wherever
else they’re going.
Slide 10 - People sat spaced out on road
What would you rather have here? Take responses.
Right, something a bit more imaginative than a car
park.
Additional Benefits of Cycling and
Walking to School
Cycling and walking has lots of other benefits too.
Can anybody tell me some of them? Take responses.
Exactly – loads of other ideas, but here are the three
main benefits.
This is how much space is taken up by 35 people
driving their cars!
Slide 13 - Benefits
Slide 11 - People sat in bus formation
Now imagine all those people were on a bus and look
how much space is saved.
Improves your health and fitness; makes you more
alert and ready to learn (just what every teenager
yearns of); and it’s sociable (perhaps a bit more
appealing to you lot)
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
55
And there’s another benefit too – to demonstrate this
one I’m just going to show a short film that was written
by a group of pupils Sustrans worked with – they wrote
the story and then directed and filmed it themselves.
<<Show film ‘The Race to School’,
available on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZ_fDuDUVr4>>
Lush Hour Quiz
1
A
2
D
3
A
4
C
5
A
And now, I’m going to check that you’ve all being
paying attention. When I say go, I want you to get into
teams of ten people. Allow time for pupils to get into
teams.
Now I’d like you to nominate one person to come up
here and collect a brown envelope.
When the volunteers come up to the front, hand them
the equipment needed (two A4 sheets of paper with
four letter options (‘a’ ‘b’ ‘c’ and ‘d’), an A3 sheet of
plain paper and a marker pen). When the pupils come
up stress that they cannot open the envelope until you
tell them to do so, or they will have points deducted at
the end of the quiz.
Inside the envelope you will find two laminates with four
letter options ‘a’ ‘b’ ‘c’ and ‘d’
You will also find an A3 sheet of plain paper and a big
marker pen. When I say you can open your envelopes
you should open them up, check you’ve got everything
and then between you think up a quiz team name (no
swear words please) and write this in massive letters on
the A3 sheet of paper. You’ve got one minute from
when I say go.
Go. Allow one minute.
Now let’s see them. Write down the team names with
space next to each one for their response and whether
or not they were right.
Right, I’ve now got ten questions for you – some will be
based on the presentation you’ve seen – others will be
things I think you might know and others will be a
complete surprise!
I’ll read each question out. You’ll then time to confer in
your groups before I ask you to hold up the letter that
responds to the correct answer. The more correct
answers you get, the more points you get.
Read the questions from the screen. After each
question allow the groups to confer before holding up
their answer (‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’ or ‘d’). Each correct answer
earns the team one point. The team at the end with the
most points wins (you may decide to have a prize
available for the winning team). If there is a tie between
two or more teams, ask the tie breaker question.
The answers to the questions (Slides 14 – 24) are as
follows:
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
6
A
Tie Breaker: 12,600 miles
Introduction – Lush Hour Activity Week
Please note, the slides provided in this section of the
presentation are examples only and relate to other Lush
Hour Activity Weeks that have taken place. These will
need to be adapted to your own Lush Hour Activity Week
if you decide to deliver this section of the presentation.
So, why do you think we’re discussing the benefits of
walking and cycling to school today? Take responses.
7
C
8
C
Slide 25 – Lush Hour
That’s right, this week is a special week, because this
week there will be a lot of different activities that you can
take part in, and they’re all taking place under the strapline ‘Lush Hour: Feel a different morning rush.’ They’re all
walking and cycling themed, and we’ll be offering a lot of
bribes… sorry prizes… to those who sign up to take part.
Slide 26 – Timetable
9
D
We’d like as many of you as possible to take part in
these activities. Talk through some of the different
activities that you think will appeal to this age group.
10
D
That brings me to the end of the presentation, thanks so
much for your attention and your participation and I hope
to see a lot of you again and again and again over the
next few days.
END
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
57
Appendix 9
Example Lush Hour Activity Week Timetables
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Appendix 10
Explanation for how gears work on a bicycle
“Low for slow, high you fly”
Explaining how gears work can often result in a very technical description being given to people
who aren’t perhaps that technical. This information sheet provides a simple outline for how to
explain gears in a way that can be easily understood by children and young people of all ages.
1
2
3
4
5
Ask all pupils to stand in a line, holding their bikes to one side by the handlebars.
Ask them to look at the place on their bike where they can change gears – the gear
shifter (NB: some bikes do not have gears).
Ask each pupil to look at their gear shifter (specify that this should be their right hand
gear shifter if they have two) and to call out the highest number on their gear shifter
(usually this is ‘seven’ or ‘eight’).
Ask pupils if the number seven is higher or lower than the number one (‘higher’).
With this in mind, ask pupils if seven (or the highest number on their gear shifter) is a
high gear or a low gear? (‘a high gear’)
6
Ask pupils if one is the highest gear or the lowest gear (it’s the ‘lowest’ gear).
7
Tell them the mnemonic “low for slow, high you fly”
8
9
10
Now that they have heard the mnemonic, ask them whether they think they should
be in a high gear to go fast or a low gear (it’s ‘a high gear’). So what gear should they
be in when they’re cycling slowly? (‘A low gear’).
Ask them, if they’re racing downhill, going home for their tea should they be in a high
gear or a low gear (‘a high gear’). And what number would that be on their gear
shifter (‘a high number’ or ‘seven’ or ‘eight’)?
And if they’re struggling up a big hill, should they be in a high gear or a low gear? (‘A
low gear’)? And what number would that be on their gear shifter (‘a low number’ or
‘one’ or ‘two’)?
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
61
Appendix 11
Description of Lush Hour Obstacle Course
Activities
Please find below a more detailed description of the activities suggested within the Lush Hour Obstacle Course
activity. The obstacles have been designed for this activity to give cyclists the opportunity to learn and practise skills
they will need when navigating their local area by bike.
BMX ramps:
Place the BMX Ramps in lanes, the competitors must ride (or
jump) over the ramps without falling off. If they fall off they must
repeat the obstacle again.
Equipment needed:
One set of BMX ramps per lane.
Figures of eight:
Cones are set a minimum of two meters apart. Bikes are asked
to ride to the right of the first cone, moving to the left of the
Funnels:
The obstacle course lanes are funnelled into one lane, which
cyclists must negotiate carefully in order to avoid colliding with
other cyclists or being knocked off of their bike. To set up, use
cones to mark out lanes converging together, e.g. four lanes
become one lane, before moving out to become four lanes again
before the competitors face the next obstacle. If cyclists collide or
fall off their bicycle, they must repeat the obstacle again.
Equipment needed:
Cones to set out clearly the convergence of lanes.
second cone, circling around the second cone and passing back
to the right of the first cone, around the first cone and onto the
next obstacle. If cyclists hit any of the cones or fall off their bike
they must repeat the obstacle again.
Equipment needed:
Two cones per lane.
Number calls:
One person stands to the side of the obstacle course. As the
competitors cycle past, they hold up any number of fingers. The
Slaloms:
Place a line of five cones no less than one meter apart in each
lane. Cyclists must negotiate the slalom, passing on the right of
the first cone, then on the left of the second cone, then on the
right of the third cone, and so on until they reach the end of the
cones. If they knock a cone over or do not complete the slalom
correctly then they must repeat the obstacle again.
Equipment needed:
Five cones per lane.
competitor must turn and look back over their shoulder in order
to see the number of fingers being held up. They must call out
the correct number of fingers before turning back and continuing
the obstacle course. If they call out an incorrect number, they
must repeat the obstacle again.
Equipment needed:
One supervisor to hold up their fingers.
Bike limbo:
Two supervisors hold a lightweight pole or ribbon at
Brake box (for up to ten seconds):
Mark out a square using cones. Each cyclist must ride into the
square and remain stationary on their bike in the marked square
(with neither foot touching the ground) for a period of time (either
five or ten seconds). If either foot touches the ground or they
move out of the marked area, competitors must repeat the
obstacle.
Equipment needed:
Four cones per lane.
approximately chest height. Cyclists must cycle under the pole
without touching it. Please note: To avoid injury, supervisors
should be ready to raise the pole or release the ribbon if a cyclist
looks like they will be unable to ride under safely. If a competitor
fails to complete the limbo without the supervisors raising the
pole or releasing the ribbon, they must repeat the obstacle.
Equipment needed:
A lightweight pole or a length of ribbon. Two supervisors will be
needed to hold the pole/ribbon. Please note: Only one bike limbo
is needed per course, cyclists should negotiate with other
competitors, if necessary, to allow one another to pass through
safely.
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Short carry/Jump offs (to step over obstacles):
Place a gym bench across the course. Competitors must
dismount from their bicycle and lift their bike over the obstacle
before continuing on the course. Cyclists must remain in their
lane during this obstacle; if they move out of their lane they must
repeat the obstacle.
Equipment needed:
Gym benches to place across all lanes in the obstacle course
(Please note: One gym bench may cross more than one lane).
Appendix 12
Template Letter (Smoothie Maker)
<To be printed on school letter-headed paper>
<Name of addressee>
<Job title, Organisation>
<Address 1>
<Address 2>
<Address 3>
<Address 4>
<Insert date>
<Space for salutation, usually to be handwritten>
Re: Lush Hour Activity Week Appeal
I am writing to ask for your support with our Lush Hour Activity Week due to take place at <<INSERT NAME OF
SCHOOL>> between <<INSERT DATES>>.
Lush Hour Activity Week is a week of activities aimed at encouraging more pupils to cycle and walk to school.
Throughout the week <<INSERT NAME OF SCHOOL>> pupils will be taking part in a week of competitions, games
and events, under the strap-line ‘Lush Hour: Feel a different morning rush’, persuading more of them to experience
the educational, health and social benefits that the more active commute can offer.
One of these activities is the Bike Powered Smoothie Maker, a smoothie maker powered only through pupils
pedalling; fruit, juice and ice are piled into a smoothie jug and pupils have to pedal until they are blended together.
<<INSERT NAME OF SCHOOL>> is appealing to local businesses to donate some ingredients for pupils taking part
in the Bike Powered Smoothie Maker activity, with the hope of maximising the number of pupils who are able
participate. We very much hope you can help us in raising the number of pupils walking and cycling to school, which
will not only bring benefits to the pupils, but also to the school and the wider community.
If you are able to support us, we would, of course, acknowledge your generosity throughout the week and in any
press coverage we receive.
If you have any questions please do contact me.
<Space for closing, usually to be handwritten>
<Name>
<Job Title>
<Direct contact information>
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
63
Appendix 13
Risk Assessment for Bike Powered
Smoothie Maker activity
RISK ASSESSMENT (SPECIFIC)
Ref No. (To be completed by: Manager)
Office, site, event, project, location, etc:
Bike Powered Smoothie Maker Activity
List the relevant ‘Generic Risk Assessments’:
RA 25
Assessor(s):
Liz Thorne
Additional references:
Date of assessment:
30/03/2011
Planned review date:
Significant variations to and/or activities not covered by
the relevant ‘Generic Risk Assessments’:
For a full description of the activity please refer to Lush Hour
Activity Week Toolkit.
Part 1: Specific/additional control measures.
Hazard: Fall/collision
Ref: GFJ 02-01
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participating staff, pupils and teachers
Legal references
MHSWR
Potential injuries, damage, etc
As in RA:26-02 (Minor – cutes, grazes, bumps, sprains, shock.
Major – fractures, serious trauma)
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Fall, as a result of loss of control or stability, from bike.
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- One participant allowed to use the smoothie maker at any
one time and spectators kept at a safe distance so that they
cannot distract or interfere with the participant.
- Ensure saddle at correct height before participant begins
activity and to check pupils are wearing appropriate clothing.
- Bike is supervised at all times and supervisor to ensure the
bike powered smoothie maker is set up correctly before use.
- Minor consequences – can be treated on spot or by First
Aiders
- Major consequences – make person safe and immediately
call for medical help
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
N/A
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
2
Risk
2
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Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Hazard: Injury from knives or Blender Parts
Ref:
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participating staff, pupils and teachers
Legal references
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Cuts and lacerations
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Chopping/preparing, using knives and other cooking utensils
- Using and cleaning blender
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Supervise children closely and use knives that aren’t sharp
- Provide instruction on how to safely use equipment
- Minor consequences – can be treated on spot or by First
Aiders
- Major consequences – make person safe and immediately
call for medical help
- Supervisor responsible for cleaning blender after the activity
has taken place
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
2
Severity
1
Risk
2
Hazard: Food Allergy
Ref: RA1
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participating staff, parents and pupils
Legal references
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Individual has an allergic reaction to food resulting in
anaphylactic shock with potentially fatal consequences.
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Participating in Bike Powered Smoothie Maker activity.
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Not all food can be guaranteed free from nuts or other
allergens.
- Pupils and staff will be responsible for notifying the supervisor
of their allergy.
- Location of Epipen or other medication will be known to all
staff at the event.
- Food that may contain nuts or other allergens will be marked
as such.
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
3
Risk
3
Hazard: Poor health & fitness
Ref: GFJ 02-04
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participating staff, pupils and teachers
Legal references
MHSWR
Potential injuries, damage, etc
As in RA: 24/04 (onset of acute conditions, tiredness or
exacerbation of existing chronic condition)
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Medical condition – which may be aggravated by physical
exertion (e.g. asthma)
- Tiredness – Exhaustion and increased likelihood of accident
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- In advance of the session staff members will be asked to
identify any participants with the above medical conditions
and to provide further details on medication
- Supervisors will monitor the well-being of participants
throughout activity
- If any participant shows signs of medical condition or
tiredness, participant should be stopped for immediate
assessment and be treated if necessary
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
N/A
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
2
Risk
2
Part 2: Approval.
This specific risk assessment has been reviewed and is approved.
Approved by:
Jane Lorimer, Deputy Director, Sustrans Cymru
Date approved:
11/04/2011
Part 3: Review.
This specific risk assessment (including, as necessary, the relevant
‘Generic Risk Assessments’, and any updates/revisions) has been
reviewed and the following additional actions are to be implemented:
Date
Review findings and/or further planned actions
Owner
Timing
Date completed
Part 4: Documentation.
List any supporting documents, photographs, plans, etc attached to
the report:
Hazard: Preparing food
Ref: 25-09
Persons exposed to the hazard
Participating staff, pupils and teachers
Legal references
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Food poisoning
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Food going off or inadequately cooked causing sickness &
diarrhoea
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Keep food fresh and chilled. Ensure food is fresh and used as
soon as possible after purchase. Seek local authority
environmental health guidance if in doubt about food safety.
- Ensure food and packaging is in good condition, is within its
use by date and has not been in contact with other foods.
- Bike is supervised at all times and supervisor to ensure the
bike powered smoothie maker is set up correctly before use.
- Wash hands before food preparation and eating.
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
1
Risk
1
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
65
Appendix 14
Template Letter (Dr. Bike)
<To be printed on school letter-headed paper>
<Name of addressee>
<Job title, Organisation>
<Address 1>
<Address 2>
<Address 3>
<Address 4>
<Insert date>
<Space for salutation, usually to be handwritten>
Re: Lush Hour Activity Week Appeal
I am writing to ask for your support with our Lush Hour Activity Week due to take place at <<INSERT NAME OF
SCHOOL>> between <<INSERT DATES>>.
Lush Hour Activity Week is a week of activities aimed at encouraging more pupils to cycle and walk to school.
Throughout the week <<INSERT NAME OF SCHOOL>> pupils will be taking part in a week of competitions, games
and events, under the strap-line ‘Lush Hour: Feel a different morning rush’, persuading more of them to experience
the educational, health and social benefits that the more active commute can offer.
One of the activities that we would like to offer pupils is Dr Bike. As I am sure you’re aware, the concept of Dr Bike is
to perform basic maintenance and ‘health’ checks on pupils’ bikes. Common problems including flat tyres, dry chains
and badly aligned gears or brakes are identified and fixed on school grounds, whereas more troublesome/timeconsuming problems can be identified and pupils can be advised to visit your bike shop outside of school hours to
have the problems fixed.
We would like to appeal to <<INSERT BIKE SHOP NAME>> to provide a member of staff for a day to provide this
Dr Bike service. If you are able to support us, we would, of course, acknowledge your generosity throughout the
week and in any press coverage we receive.
Optional Extra Paragraph:
If you are able to provide support for our Dr Bike activity, I would also be more than happy to arrange for you
to visit again, during one of the lunchtimes in Lush Hour Activity Week, to promote some of the cycling
gadgets that you have available for sale in your shop to pupils at our school.
We very much hope you can help us in raising the number of pupils walking and cycling to school, which will not only
bring benefits to the pupils, but also to the school and the wider community.
If you have any questions please do contact me.
<Space for closing, usually to be handwritten>
<Name>
<Job Title>
<Direct contact information>
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Appendix 15
Treasure Hunt Clues Template
Print the following clues using a double sided-printer.
Cut along the dotted lines and input the distances and directions as appropriate.
Clue 1:
Facing . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres forward.
Face . . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres forward.
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Find next clue.
Clue 2:
Facing . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres forward.
Face . . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres backward.
Face . . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres forward.
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Find next clue.
Clue 3:
Clue 4:
Facing . . . . . . . . . . .
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Find next clue.
walk
walk
walk
walk
Facing . . . . . . . . . . .
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Find next clue.
walk
walk
walk
walk
walk
....
....
....
....
metres
metres
metres
metres
forward.
forward.
forward.
forward.
....
....
....
....
....
metres
metres
metres
metres
metres
forward.
forward.
forward.
forward.
forward.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
67
D
E
R
O
68
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Clue 5:
Facing . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres forward.
Face . . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres backward.
Face . . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres forward.
Face . . . . . . . . . . . .
Find next clue.
Clue 6:
Facing . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres
Face . . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres
Face . . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres
Face . . . . . . . . . . . . walk . . . . metres
Come and collect your final letter!
forward.
forward.
forward.
forward.
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
69
M
F
E
70
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
Appendix 16
Bike-Bands and Puncture Repair Activities
Risk Assessment
RISK ASSESSMENT (SPECIFIC)
Ref No. (To be completed by: Manager)
Office, site, event, project, location, etc:
Bike Bands and Puncture Repairs Workshop Activities
List the relevant ‘Generic Risk Assessments’:
RA 27: Bike Storage and Maintenance Workshop
Assessor(s):
Liz Thorne
Additional references:
Sustrans Risk Assessment and Health & Safety Standards:
‘Office Issue’ (Ref: RA01)
Management of Health & Safety in offices’ (Ref: H&S/STD/01)
‘Lone worker’ (Ref: H&S/STD/07)
Date of assessment:
30/03/2011
Planned review date:
Significant variations to and/or activities not covered by
the relevant ‘Generic Risk Assessments’:
For full description of the Bike Bands and Puncture Repair
activities see Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit.
Part 1: Specific/additional control measures.
Hazard: Injury whilst making Bike Band
Ref: 27-03
Persons exposed to the hazard
Staff, volunteers and participants
Legal references
PUWER, MHO, COSHH
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Minor to medium (grazes, cuts, lacerations, trapped fingers, eye
injuries, musculoskeletal strains)
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- Bike band making workshop
- Puncture repair workshop
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- Competence / supervision of activity coordinator.
- Activity Coordinator to ensure that tools are kept in good
condition
- Proper storage to be implemented for tools – activity leader
to keep and provide as required
- The correct tools should be used for the job in hand – avoid
tools that could be used as knives/blades. Where no other
tool is appropriate, ensure there is no possibility of them
being lost or stolen
- Basic training in use of tools provided / use of tools
supervised
- Do not use power tools
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
1
Risk
1
Hazard: Use of substances hazardous to health
Ref: 27-04
Persons exposed to the hazard
All staff, volunteers and members of the public
Legal references
COSHH
Potential injuries, damage, etc
Skin (dermatitis), respiratory and/or eye irritation.
Part 1: Activities giving rise to Health & Safety risks
- See Office Issue (Ref: RA01)
- Puncture repair workshop - use of rubber glue to seal
puncture patches
Part 2: Control measures to be implemented
- See Office Issue (Ref: RA01)
- Provide and use non-latex gloves
- Water wash for eyes
- Adopt good personal hygiene (i.e. don’t put fingers in
mouth or rub eyes)
- Wash hands before eating or smoking
- Ensure all substances stored in labelled container
- Ensure that all substances are used stored and disposed of
in accordance with the manufacturers instructions provided.
COSHH sheets (MSDSs) required for any hazardous
substances:
Oils / lubricants / degreasers used in small quantities only –
see previous controls
Part 3: Residual risk with the above control measures in
place
Probability
1
Severity
2
Risk
2
Part 2: Approval.
This specific risk assessment has been reviewed and is approved.
Approved by:
Jane Lorimer, Deputy Director, Sustrans Cymru
Date approved:
11/04/2011
Part 3: Review.
This specific risk assessment (including, as necessary, the relevant
‘Generic Risk Assessments’, and any updates/revisions) has been
reviewed and the following additional actions are to be implemented:
Date
Review findings and/or further planned actions
Owner
Timing
Date completed
Part 4: Documentation.
List any supporting documents, photographs, plans, etc attached to
the report:
Lush Hour Activity Week Toolkit 2011
71
Appendix 17
Instructions for Making Flag-Tags
fig. 1
fig. 2
fig. 3
Take a sports band (fig. 1) and apply sticky-backed Velcro to each side (hooks one side, loops the other – fig. 2 & 3).
fig. 4
fig. 5
The flags used in these instructions are sailing ‘protest flags with velcro’ (fig. 4 & 5). At the time of printing, these
were available from the Marine Superstore (http://www.marinesuperstore.com/) at the following website:
http://www.marinesuperstore.com/posit/shop/index.php?selectedpartno=99212681
However, strips of material with Velcro patches sewn onto them would work equally well.
fig. 6
fig. 7
Attach the flag loosely to the sports band using the Velcro provided (fig. 6 & 7).
72
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Appendix 18
Pre- and Post- Lush Hour Activity Week
Questionnaire
LUSH HOUR ACTIVITY WEEK
HANDS UP SURVEY
1
Do you cycle to school?
a Never
b Everyday
c Once or twice a week
d Once or twice a term
e Once or twice a year
2
Do you walk to school?
a Never
b Everyday
c Once or twice a week
d Once or twice a term
e Once or twice a year
3
Do you travel to school by car?
a Never
b Everyday
c Once or twice a week
d Once or twice a term
e Once or twice a year
4
How did you travel to school today?
a Car
b Walk
c Bus
d Cycle
e Train/Other
5
How often do you ride your bike or go for a walk (as a leisure activity),
excluding the times when you cycle to and from school?
a Never
b Everyday
c Once or twice a week
d Once or twice a year
6
Is
a
b
c
there a bicycle at home you can regularly use?
Yes, I own a bicycle
Yes, I can borrow a bicycle
No
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