healthy retail - ChangeLab Solutions

Comments

Transcription

healthy retail - ChangeLab Solutions
HEALTHY RETAIL
COLLABORATION WORKBOOK
WATER
Forming partnerships among tobacco
control, nutrition, and excessive
alcohol use prevention agencies
Acknowledgments
Written by Phebe Gibson (policy analyst).
Additional writing and research support from Rio Holaday (senior policy analyst),
Christine Fry (vice president of organizational learning), Sabrina Adler (senior
staff attorney), Ian McLaughlin (senior staff attorney), and Ray Leung (senior
staff attorney). Editing and production support from Catalina Baker (manager,
copywriter and editor), and Kim Arroyo Williamson (senior communications
manager). All affiliated with ChangeLab Solutions.
Special thanks to those who participated in key informant interviews and
reviewed drafts.
ChangeLab Solutions is a nonprofit
organization that provides legal
information on matters relating to
public health. The legal information in
this document does not constitute legal
advice or legal representation. For legal
advice, readers should consult a lawyer
in their state.
This publication was supported by
the Grant or Cooperative Agreement
Number 5U38OT000141-02 awarded
to ChangeLab Solutions and funded by
the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention. Its contents are solely the
responsibility of the authors and do not
necessarily represent the official views
of the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention or the Department of Health
and Human Services.
© 2016 ChangeLab Solutions
Key informant interviewees (all interviews conducted between January 2015
and July 2015): Jennifer Aquilante (Philadelphia Department of Public Health),
Carrie Brainard (Mid-Ohio Valley Health Department), Tiffany Bransteitter
(Pennsylvania Department of Health), Linda Bridgeman-Smith (County of
San Diego Health & Human Services Agency), Mary Brush (Massachusetts
Department of Public Health), Rachel Cohen (Massachusetts Department
of Public Health), Sharon Crocco (Colorado Department of Public Health &
Environment), Melissa Damast (Philadelphia Department of Public Health),
Ashley Davis (Ohio Department of Health), Melissa Daugherty (Van Buren
County Hospital), Connie Farakhan (Kansas City MO Health Department), Sarah
Ginnetti (Ohio Department of Health), Karen Girard (Oregon Health Authority),
Nora Gordon (Minneapolis Health Department), Tonia Hagaman (California
Department of Public Health), Janet Heroux (New Jersey Department of Health),
Tonya Holloway (Pennsylvania Department of Health), Suzanne Kelley (Vermont
Department of Health), Tiffany Lein (La Crosse County Health Department),
Irene Linayao-Putman (County of San Diego Health & Human Services Agency),
Mona Mena (Alameda County Public Health Department), Nutrition Education
Obesity Prevention Branch Management Staff (California Department of Public
Health), Aneena Pokkamthanam (County of Los Angeles, Tobacco Control and
Prevention Program), Lori Rhew (North Carolina Department of Health and
Human Services), Christine Riederer (Kansas City MO Health Department),
Patricia Simmons (Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services), Kelli
Stader (Wisconsin Department of Public Health), Karen Stanley (North Carolina
Department of Health and Human Services), and Carol Voss (Iowa Department
of Public Health).
External reviewers: Tiffany Bransteitter (Pennsylvania Department of Health),
Rachel Cohen (Massachusetts Department of Public Health), Sharon Crocco
(Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment), Karen Girard (Oregon
Health Authority), Angela Hadwin (HOPE Collaborative), Tonia Hagaman
(California Department of Public Health), Tonya Holloway (Pennsylvania
Department of Health), Suzanne Kelley (Vermont Department of Health),
Jay Macedo (Sonoma County Department of Health Services), Karen Stanley
(North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services), Nutrition Education
Obesity Prevention Branch Staff (California Department of Public Health),
Tara Weston (Oregon Health Authority), and Sabrina Wu (HOPE Collaborative).
Design & illustration: Karen Parry | Black Graphics
2 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Contents
Introduction4
Workbook overview
5
Strategy 1: Identify Potential Partners
8
Health partners
9
Activity 1.1: Identifying health partners
11
Regulatory and business assistance partners
12
Activity 1.2: Identifying state regulatory partners
13
Activity 1.3: Identifying local regulatory and business assistance partners
15
Strategy 2: Start a Conversation
Activity 2.1: Sample introductory script
16
17
Strategy 3: Learn About Each Other’s Retail-Related Work
19
Activity 3.1: Facilitator’s agenda
20
Activity 3.2: Sharing program goals
21
Activity 3.3: Diving into the details
23
Strategy 4: Brainstorm a Shared Vision
25
Activity 4.1: Conducting a virtual retail assessment
26
Activity 4.2: Conducting an in-person retail assessment
27
Strategy 5: Identify Opportunities for Action
29
Examples30
Activity 5.1: Ideas for action
33
Strategy 6: Continue to Meet, Plan, and Act
34
Case Study: Putting It All Together
36
Bibliography40
3 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Introduction
The retail environment has a significant impact
on the health of communities.
In many places, residents lack access to fruits and vegetables, but
can find tobacco and alcohol all too easily. This has serious health
consequences. In the United States, tobacco use, poor nutrition, and
excessive alcohol use are among the leading causes of preventable
deadly illness, including heart disease, cancer, and chronic lower
respiratory diseases.1 People of color and those with lower incomes
are at very high risk for these conditions.2, 3
Healthy Retail
Companion Pieces
This workbook is a step-by-step guide to
forming a partnership among tobacco
control, nutrition, and excessive alcohol
use prevention programs. It includes case
studies and examples of states and localities
that have launched a comprehensive
approach, as well as sample activities,
scripts, and worksheets. See the following
resources to learn more about the
importance of healthy retail and to begin
developing a comprehensive approach to
the retail environment.
The ideal retail environment makes fruits, vegetables, water, and other
nutritious products more accessible, and tobacco, sugary drinks, nonnutritious foods, and alcohol less accessible.
Public health practitioners in tobacco control, nutrition, and excessive
alcohol use prevention are already working toward this vision, together
with store owners, community members, elected officials, and other
stakeholders. They are changing the mix of foods, beverages, and
tobacco products offered in stores, as well as where items are placed,
how they are promoted, and how much they cost. Practitioners are also
working to limit the number, location, and density of stores that sell
tobacco products, alcohol, or both in states and localities.
HEALTHY RETAIL
PLAYBOOK
This resource presents
innovative strategies in
tobacco control, nutrition,
and excessive alcohol use
prevention in order to create
a retail environment where
it is easier to make healthy
choices than unhealthy ones.
HEALTHY RETAIL
PLAYBOOK
Whole Wheat
WATER
TORTILLAS
But more often than not, these public health practitioners work
separately from each other. As a result, they may be missing out on
opportunities to collaborate. And at times, agencies may even impede
each other’s progress by burdening store owners or community
partners with overlapping requirements and requests. The retail
environment represents an opportunity for practitioners to collaborate
and strengthen their effectiveness.
CONVERSATION STARTER
Why should government agencies
think about the retail environment
comprehensively?
Picture a store nearby that sells tobacco products, foods and beverages,
and, depending on the state, alcohol. The store might be in a big
city, a small town, or along a remote road. Children and teenagers
might stop by the store after school, and adults might pick up a few
groceries there on their way home from work. There’s a good chance
that tobacco and alcohol ads are hanging in the windows, sugary drinks
and energy drinks are prominently displayed in the cooler, and nonnutritious foods are stocked at eye level on the shelves.
The retail environment can have a significant impact on the health
of communities. In many places, residents lack access to fruits and
vegetables, but can find tobacco and alcohol all too easily. This has
serious health consequences. In the United States, tobacco use, poor
nutrition, and excessive alcohol use are among the leading causes of
preventable deadly illness, including cancer, heart disease, and chronic
lower respiratory diseases.1 People of color and those with lower
incomes are at very high risk for these conditions.2,3
It doesn’t have to be this way. Stores can stock and promote nutritious
foods and beverages – such as fruits, vegetables, and water – that
are competitively priced, and limit access to tobacco, non-nutritious
foods and beverages, and, in some states, alcohol. Corner stores, rural
markets, and grocery stores can be more than just convenient places
to shop – they can be healthy community assets.
Sample talking points
JJ
JJ
We work on three of the leading causes of preventable death in the
country. Tobacco use, poor nutrition, lack of physical activity, and
excessive alcohol use are the leading causes of preventable death
in the United States.1 We work on three of those four causes.
Tobacco products, non-nutritious foods and beverages, and alcohol
are widely available and promoted in the retail environment.
Tobacco products, packaged beverages and snacks, and alcohol
are the most common items available at small stores that are
within walking distance of low-income community members.4–8
The availability of these products is associated with a higher
probability of purchase and consumption.9–11
Conversation Starter 1
4 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
|
changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
1
The retail environment refers broadly
to the location, number, density, and
type of stores in a community, along
with the products sold and how they
are promoted, placed, and priced in a
store.
Use the sample talking points to
explain to potential partners in tobacco
control, nutrition, and excessive
alcohol use prevention the importance
of a comprehensive approach to the
retail environment. Add local data or
information where appropriate.
CONVERSATION STARTERS
This set of four one-pagers
introduces the rationale
behind and benefits of a
comprehensive approach
to the retail environment.
They include sample talking
points to make the case for
collaboration to potential
partners.
Workbook overview
What does it do?
This action-oriented workbook guides government staff working
in tobacco control, nutrition, and excessive alcohol use prevention
through the formation of a healthy retail partnership. It answers the
fundamental question: Where do we start? It also provides tools – such
as worksheet templates and discussion prompts – to guide practitioners
through the process. The goal of this workbook is to help public health
practitioners establish a partnership that can serve as a springboard for
collaborative action in the retail environment.
What doesn’t it do?
There is no one-size-fits-all approach that will apply to every location.
This workbook is not designed to prescribe what a partnership should
look like or what actions a group should pursue. The specific goals and
actions a partnership agrees upon will vary depending on the interests
and capacities of those involved.
This workbook is also not a Healthy Retail 101 guide. It focuses on the
process of collaboration, rather than specific tactics to improve the
retail environment. For resources on how the retail environment affects
health and examples of policies to improve the retail environment,
see ChangeLab Solutions’ Health on the Shelf: A Guide to Healthy
Small Food Retailer Certification Programs, Conversation Starters,
and Healthy Retail Playbook.
Who is it for?
The primary intended audience is public health nutrition staff with
experience working on a healthy food retail initiative and interest in
strengthening this work through partnerships with tobacco control and
excessive alcohol use prevention colleagues. Although this workbook
was written with nutrition staff in mind, it can be used by staff from
other programmatic areas. The key strategies outlined are applicable to
public health practitioners working at both the state and local levels.
5 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
COLLABORATION
What’s inside?
A framework for collaboration
This workbook describes six key strategies for forming a healthy retail
partnership. These strategies draw on the experiences of state and
local health departments that are putting this kind of collaboration into
action. They are intended to build on one another.
Strategy 1. Identify potential partners
Strategy 2.Start a conversation
Information was gathered through key
informant interviews with state and
local health department staff across
the country. Rather than provide a
citation to every example obtained
through these interviews, we have
listed the key informants on page 2.
Unless otherwise noted, program
examples come from these interviews.
Strategy 3.Learn about each other’s retail-related work
Strategy 4.Brainstorm a shared vision
Strategy 5.Identify opportunities for action
Strategy 6.Continue to meet, plan, and act
Activities
Each strategy includes an activity template or worksheet that
practitioners can implement. Contact ChangeLab Solutions for editable
versions of the worksheets included in this workbook.
Examples
Although this workbook presents an innovative approach to improving
the retail environment, this kind of collaboration is not without precedent.
A few pioneering states and localities are already forming healthy
retail partnerships, and their experiences are woven throughout this
workbook.
Keep in mind
JJ
JJ
JJ
The strategies in this workbook represent a set of ideas to inspire
action, not a strict prescription. Practitioners are encouraged
to adapt ideas and activities in a way that works best for their
partnership.
A strong collaborative effort is not characterized by a one-time
event, but an ongoing relationship. It is expected that the strategies
and activities described in this workbook will occur over multiple
meetings, and that the learning and planning process will be ongoing.
Building and maintaining a successful partnership requires time and
effort. The assumption throughout this workbook is that there will
be at least one individual championing this idea, bringing together
potential partners, facilitating meetings, and keeping the group
engaged and informed. Over time, participating members can agree
to share this responsibility.
6 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
EXAMPLE
Los Angeles County convenes a
Healthy Retail Environment Workgroup
that meets monthly and includes
partners from its tobacco control,
nutrition, and excessive alcohol use
prevention programs. Although the
workgroup was initiated by the Tobacco
Control and Prevention Program, this
partnership has since become a
priority for all programs. The partners
have developed a shared sense of
ownership over the workgroup’s
functioning, and share responsibilities
by developing meeting agendas
together and taking turns facilitating
meetings.
TOBACCO
CONTROL
NUTRITION
AGENCY
COLLABORATION
EXCESSIVE
ALCOHOL USE
PREVENTION
7 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
STRATEGY
Identify Potential Partners
GOALS
A variety of state and local government agencies interact with retailers.
State health departments may operate healthy corner store programs;
local agencies may conduct compliance checks to ensure retailers are
not selling tobacco and alcohol to underage people. The first step in
forming a partnership between tobacco control, nutrition, and excessive
alcohol use prevention practitioners is identifying these potential
partners.
JJ
JJ
In some places, identifying these partners will be easy. Nutrition
program staff may work across the hall from their tobacco control
colleagues, and may have existing relationships. In others, tobacco
control, nutrition, and excessive alcohol use prevention staff may work
in entirely separate departments and may rarely, if ever, come into
contact with one another.
This section provides examples of potential government partners to
include in a healthy retail collaboration and links to resources to help
you identify equivalent partners in your community. These partners are
separated into two broad categories:
JJ
JJ
Health Partners refer to tobacco control, nutrition, and excessive
alcohol use prevention programs housed within health services,
public health, and substance abuse departments. These partners
bring a health promotion, chronic disease prevention, or injury
prevention lens to their work with retailers. We recommend reaching
out to and seeking buy-in from public health partners first.
Regulatory and Business Assistance Partners refer to other
agencies that interact with retailers for reasons such as issuing
licenses to sell certain products, ensuring compliance with existing
regulations, and providing general business assistance support. While
they may not have an explicit health focus, these partners may
influence, or have an interest in, where and how tobacco, food, and
alcohol products are sold in the retail environment. We recommend
reaching out to these agencies after a core group of health partners
has formed an initial partnership.
1
Understand who else is
working on tobacco control,
nutrition, and excessive
alcohol use prevention issues
in the retail environment
Develop a list of agencies
and individuals that may be
interested in collaborating
NOTE
We have separated partners into these
two general categories based on their
primary roles, but overlaps may exist.
For example, in some localities, the
health department is the entity
responsible for issuing local tobacco
retailer licenses. Keep in mind that
state and local governments vary
widely in their structure. This section
is intended to be a starting point for
identifying potential partners, but
specific agency names, functions, and
responsibilities will be different in
different locations.
8 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 1 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Health partners
Who’s involved at the STATE level?
State tobacco control programs, often housed within
health or public health departments, work on tobacco
retail activities such as reducing illegal sales of tobacco
to minors and restricting the amount and location of
tobacco product displays near cash registers. See the
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids website to look up the
tobacco control program in your state.
Some state public health departments administer
healthy food retail programs and initiatives. These
programs come in many shapes and sizes, but the
common objective is to increase access to nutritious
foods in retail stores. Several federal grant programs
fund these activities. See the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Division of Nutrition,
Physical Activity, and Obesity website for information
about CDC-funded programs and a list of grantees.
Looking up these programs’ awardees can help you
identify potential partners in your state.
SNAP & WIC
ACCEPTED
State agencies administer the federal Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Special
Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants,
and Children (WIC). These programs provide eligible
individuals with money or vouchers to purchase food
and require participating retailers to meet specific
food-stocking requirements. Staff at these agencies
can provide guidance on program requirements and
benefits. The SNAP-Ed program, also administered by
states, funds nutrition education activities. See the U.S.
Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) website for a list
of SNAP-Ed and WIC contacts.
Some state public health departments have staff that
focus on reducing excessive alcohol consumption and
evaluating population-based strategies to prevent it. As
of this writing, two states – New Mexico and Michigan –
have full-time alcohol epidemiologists within the public
health department who study issues such as alcohol
store density and policy options to reduce excessive
alcohol use.* Contact your state public health
department to ask if it has staff who work on the
prevention of alcohol-related harms, and if they include
excessive drinking in their monitoring and surveillance
efforts. More often, states’ alcohol-related efforts focus
on substance abuse and treatment, and these
programs are typically part of a state’s mental health
or substance abuse agency. See the National
Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors’
website for a directory of state agencies that work on
substance abuse prevention.
* CDC plans to fund Alcohol Epidemiologists in five additional state health departments in 2017.
9 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 1 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Who’s involved at the LOCAL level?
Local health departments may have tobacco control
programs and may participate in local tobacco control
coalitions. Some local health departments have been
involved in policy activities focused on reducing sales
of tobacco to minors, reducing exposure to tobacco
advertising, and raising cigarette taxes. See the
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids’ directory of state
tobacco control programs; many state websites list
local partners as well.
Some local health departments operate healthy food
retail programs. Local health department staff may
work directly with store owners, or they may fund
other organizations to carry out the program’s
activities, such as training store owners on stocking
and promoting nutritious foods and beverages,
developing health-promoting marketing materials, and
changing the store layout to make nutritious items
more prominent. Several federal grant programs fund
these activities. See the CDC’s Division of Nutrition,
Physical Activity, and Obesity website and Division of
Community Health website for information about
CDC-funded programs and awardees. Looking up these
programs’ awardees can help you identify potential
partners in your state.
SNAP & WIC
ACCEPTED
While the USDA’s SNAP-Ed funds are awarded to states,
states typically sub-grant to local implementing agencies
to carry out nutrition education activities. Local WIC
agencies also offer nutrition education services and
direct WIC program participants to WIC-authorized
retailers. Some healthy retail programs have brought
SNAP-Ed and WIC nutrition educators into participating
stores to lead cooking demonstrations and share
recipe ideas. See the USDA’s SNAP-Ed website, and
click on an individual state name to identify the local
implementing agency. Your state’s WIC contacts can
direct you to local WIC offices.
Local health departments may work on excessive
alcohol use prevention and may participate in local
substance abuse coalitions. Some local health
departments have been involved in implementing
strategies to prevent excessive alcohol use, including
policy efforts to reduce youth exposure to alcohol
advertising. A small percentage have been involved in
efforts to raise alcohol taxes.4 Ask your local health
department if it has staff who work on the prevention
of alcohol-related harms, and if someone can connect
you to local substance abuse coalitions.
10 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 1 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
1.1
Identifying health partners
Use this worksheet to make a list of potential partners within tobacco control, nutrition, and excessive alcohol use
prevention agencies.
Agency Name
Role (e.g., leads
Healthy Corner
Store Program,
WIC Agency)
Contact Name
and Title
Tobacco Control
Nutrition
Excessive Alcohol
Use Prevention
NOTE
While this workbook focuses on increasing collaboration within government, community partnerships are
equally important. Many coalitions, organizations, and individuals in the community have a vested interest
in community health and well-being. Nonprofit organizations, hospitals, faith institutions, substance
abuse and tobacco coalitions, health promotoras, registered dietitians, schools and universities, food
policy councils, local farmers, and small business associations are just some entities with unique
expertise that can strengthen a healthy retail collaboration.
11 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 1 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Contact Phone
and E-mail
Regulatory and business
assistance partners
While we recommend first reaching out to and seeking buy-in from the
key health partners highlighted in the previous section, it’s important
to note that there are many other agencies at both the state and local
levels that affect the retail environment. Once key health partners
have bought into the idea of collaboration, they may find that including
regulatory and business assistance partners can strengthen their
efforts. Coordinating with these agencies can ensure that all groups
working to improve the retail environment are doing so in ways that
complement, rather than hinder, one another.
Who’s involved at the STATE level?
In many states, retailers must obtain a special permit or license in
order to sell tobacco, food, and/or alcohol products. It can be helpful to
identify the agency responsible for issuing these licenses.
More than 40 states and territories require
tobacco retailers to obtain a state license.5 This
database identifies state agencies responsible for
issuing tobacco retailer licenses. In addition, the
U.S. Food and Drug Administration issues contracts
to most state agencies to assist with compliance
check inspections of stores. This list of agencies
that receive this funding is available for review.
Each state issues regulations, referred to as
the Food Code, that set health and sanitation
standards for food establishments. This guide to
the state agencies that issue these regulations is
a helpful overview. Note that enforcement
typically happens at the local level.
Each state has an Alcoholic Beverage Control
(ABC) Board with the authority to regulate the
production, sale, and distribution of alcohol within
its borders, and to set licensing requirements and
enforcement mechanisms. This directory describes
the ABC boards in each state.
12 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 1 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
1.2
Identifying state regulatory partners
Use this worksheet to make a list of state regulatory agencies (if applicable).
Agency Name
Contact Name and Title
Tobacco Control
Nutrition
Excessive Alcohol
Use Prevention
13 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 1 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Contact Phone and E-mail
Who’s involved at the LOCAL level?
A variety of other local agencies – while not specifically dedicated
to tobacco control, nutrition, or excessive alcohol use prevention –
interact with retailers. Some examples are below, but note that these
agencies may have different names and be responsible for different
functions in different localities.
Licensing agencies
Some localities require retailers to obtain a local
license to sell tobacco, food, and/or alcohol. The
agency responsible for issuing the license varies
by location, and may include a business license
and permit department or a health department.
Note that some states limit localities from passing
laws that require local licensing of tobacco and/or
alcohol retailers.
Law enforcement
Law enforcement officers often work in
partnership with tobacco and alcohol programs to
conduct compliance checks to ensure retailers do
not sell tobacco and alcohol products to underage
people. In many areas, liquor laws are enforced by
specialized, independent liquor law enforcement
agencies.
Planning department
Planning departments are often involved in both
long-range planning (such as planning for where,
and under what conditions, retailers can locate)
and short-range planning (such as approving
permits).
Economic development
Economic development departments offer services
to support small businesses and strengthen
economic vitality. Some operate façade
improvement programs, which provide financial
assistance to business owners to improve their
store exteriors, making them more inviting to the
community.
Other inspections
Fire, code enforcement, environmental health, and
building safety departments conduct periodic
inspections to ensure retailers comply with all
health and safety codes.
14 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 1 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
1.3
Identifying local regulatory and
business assistance partners
Use this worksheet to make a list of other local agencies that interact with retailers.
Department Name
What role do they play in
the retail environment?
Contact Name and Title
15 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 1 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Contact Phone and E-mail
STRATEGY
Start a Conversation
Now that you’ve identified potential partners, it’s time to start a
conversation. Reaching out to all potential partners at this stage can be
overwhelming. Instead, focus on engaging a core group of public health
partners to gauge their interest and get initial buy-in. Once this initial
partnership has formed, the group can determine how and when to
bring in additional partners.
2
GOALS
JJ
JJ
JJ
Introduce yourself and initiate
a relationship
Gather preliminary
information about each
program’s work in the retail
environment
Gauge each program’s interest
in continuing the conversation
at an in-person meeting
“Get to know other programs and
potential collaborators from alcohol
or tobacco, and get to know a little
bit more about what they do. Have
informal conversations. Begin to look for
individual partners and key informants,
and build relationships. Identify similar
program needs and talk through ideas for
addressing issues you have in common.”
– State Health Department Staff, CA
(Tobacco Control)6
PO
TE
N TIA
L PA R T
N
S
R
E
16 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 2 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
2.1
Sample introductory script
Contact potential partners individually to have a one-on-one meeting or
phone call. Keep the initial conversation brief and high-level. This script
includes five key topics to cover:
1. Introduce yourself:
My name is [name] and I work in the [program and department name].
2. Identify the common thread in your work:
I’m reaching out because I’d like to learn more about the work you’re
doing in the retail environment. My program has been working on
[describe retail-specific work], and I’ve noticed some common threads
between our programs. The retail environment plays a role in both our
issue areas, and we’re both working to create healthier communities.
3. Learn more about their work:
Can you tell me a little more about how your program interacts
with retailers and the activities you’re working on in the retail
environment?
Ground this introduction in a realworld example, if possible. In California,
the state tobacco control program
funded local health departments to
survey the retail environment. Some
local contacts noticed that nutrition
colleagues were also doing similar
surveys, and that advertisements for
non-nutritious foods and beverages
were as prevalent as those for
tobacco. Highlight these on-theground experiences and observations
in your initial conversation.
Probe for whether their department is involved in:
JJ
JJ
JJ
JJ
JJ
JJ
Collecting data about where retailers are located and the kinds of
products they make available
Implementing programs or policies to change the retail
environment (for instance, where certain products are placed and
advertised or how they’re priced)
Licensing tobacco, food, and/or alcohol retailers
Conducting compliance checks to enforce existing policies in
tobacco, food, and/or alcohol retail stores
Consider asking this question in
person. If the partner has a standing
meeting where they discuss retail
work, ask if you can join for five
minutes to introduce yourself, and this
idea, to their team.
Offering incentives, such as funding, business development, legal
services, or other technical assistance to retailers
Funding other organizations to implement any of the above
activities
17 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 2 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
2.1
4. Invite them to continue the conversation:
I’m interested in bringing together programs that work on tobacco
control, nutrition, and excessive alcohol use prevention to start a
discussion about our retail efforts. The purpose is to learn more
about each other’s work, identify areas of overlap, and see if there
are ways we can tap each other’s expertise to advance common goals.
Would you or someone else from your department be interested in
participating?
5. Commit to following up:
Thank you for your time. I’ll send an email with more information and
potential meeting dates.
Government agencies are hierarchical
organizations, and getting buy-in from
leadership is an important factor in
success. Your initial conversations
may be with a staff member who
does not have the authority to
approve this kind of collaborative
effort. While this may be the best
place to start, it’s important to
include someone from the program’s
leadership in the conversation. Make
sure the right leaders understand
the rationale for making connections
with other programs and, if possible,
are involved themselves. Identifying
a champion outside of an individual
program, such as an elected official
or agency director, can also help
secure programmatic buy-in. See
Conversation Starters for talking
points to help get leaders on board.
18 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 2 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
STRATEGY
Learn About Each
Other’s Retail-Related Work
Once you’ve reached out to potential partners one-on-one, convene
an in-person meeting to continue the conversation. Meeting face to face
is more effective than a phone call in helping to build a relationship
and establish trust within a group. Don’t feel stuck if you cannot get
representatives from all three program areas to the table for the first
meeting. Meeting with just one is still an important step toward building
this partnership.
GOALS
JJ
JJ
This section contains three tools to facilitate sharing and learning at
this stage:
Activity 3.1: Facilitator’s agenda
Sample agenda for structuring an initial in-person meeting
JJ
Activity 3.2:Sharing program goals
Sample interactive activity to spark learning and
discussion
Activity 3.3:Diving into the details
Sample worksheet to collect more detailed information
about each program’s activities, goals, and funding
considerations
Keep in mind: The process of learning, sharing, and building relationships with partners from distinct program areas is an iterative process.
It is expected that this will take place over multiple meetings and an
extended period of time.
3
Introduce partners working
on tobacco control, nutrition,
and excessive alcohol use
prevention to one another
Begin to develop a shared
understanding of what each
program does in the retail
environment and how it
approaches this work
Begin to build relationships
with partners from each
program area
“I would say don’t commit up front. It’s
similar to shopping for a new house.
Don’t go out that first day prepared
to buy until you’ve gathered enough
information. Have that initial meeting
with new partners and be very open.
Share where you’re all coming from.
Some natural overlaps and opportunities
might arise, or it might take a little bit
of going back to your programs and
thinking about it.”
– State Health Department Staff, CA (Nutrition)7
19 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 3 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
Facilitator’s agenda
Use this sample agenda to kick off an initial in-person meeting.
1. Meeting opening
a. Highlight the purpose of the meeting
QQ
QQ
“I’ve brought this group together because each of our programs is working to
improve the retail environment.”
“The purpose of this meeting is for us to meet, share, and learn. While we
all have different approaches to working in the retail environment, there
may be opportunities to strengthen our individual efforts through increased
communication and coordination. We might be working in the same stores, asking
the same community partners for assistance, or even doing similar work like store
assessments. We may have resources that you don’t. You may have knowledge
that we don’t.”
b. Set expectations
QQ
QQ
“This meeting is the start of a conversation.”
“It is not expected that this group will come to any agreement or make any
decision about collaborative efforts or goals by the end of this meeting.”
2. Introductions
a. Go around the room and ask each attendee to answer the following questions:
QQ
“What is your name?”
QQ
“What department do you work in, and what is your position?”
QQ
“How long have you worked in that department?”
QQ
“What is one thing your program has accomplished in the past year that you’re
most proud of?” OR “What is one thing your program is currently working on that
you’re most excited about?” (Note: These responses do not have to be specific to
retail. The goal is to get people warmed up by having them share a piece of their
work that motivates and excites them.)
3. Activity and discussion
a. See the sample Activity 3.2 template on the following page
4. Wrap up
a. Before closing the meeting, gauge the group’s interest in continuing the conversation
with the following prompts:
QQ
QQ
“Use one word to describe how you’re feeling about the possibility of working
collaboratively to improve the retail environment.”
“Based on what we’ve shared and learned today, is this group interested in
meeting again to continue this dialogue? Are there other departments that you
feel are critical to include at this stage?”
20 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 3 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
3.1
ACTIVITY
3.2
Sharing program goals
This interactive activity allows individual programs to share information
about their goals and approaches to working in the retail environment.
A group may choose to do this activity in the first meeting or wait until
a subsequent meeting.
Set-up
Before the meeting begins, write the following prompts on large, selfstick chart paper. Each set of five questions represents a station. There
should be a separate station for each distinct program that attends the
meeting. Set up each station in a different part of the room.
Top 3–5 problems
my program is
trying to solve in
the retail
environment are…
1.
It is important for
my program to
solve these
problems because…
FACILITATOR’S NOTE
This activity is designed to help
programs share a lot of new
information in a short amount of
time. Writing and displaying responses
on charts, rather than individual
worksheets, supports group thinking
and strengthens participation.
Charting helps all group members
track and reference information they
have heard.8
2.
3.
We are working
to solve these
problems by…
3 things that we
do really well are…
1.
2.
3.
3 challenges we
face in doing this
work are…
1.
2.
3.
21 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 3 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
3.2
Instructions
15
15
Separate attendees into small groups based on their respective
program areas, and direct each small group to a station.
FACILITATOR’S NOTE
Give the small groups 15 minutes to respond to the prompts
and record their answers directly on the chart paper. Small
group members should respond from the perspective of their
programs.
Use the timing cues provided as a
general guideline. The facilitator may
modify the amount of time allotted to
each step depending on the number
of participants and the length of the
meeting.
When 15 minutes are up, select one small group to present
first. Invite participants from all the groups to gather around
that small group’s station. Give the selected small group five
minutes (approximately one minute per prompt) to summarize
their responses to all five prompts.
10
After the report-out, open the floor for a ten-minute discussion
about what was presented. Invite all participants to ask
follow-up questions and probe for more details.
10
At the end of ten minutes, rotate to a new station and repeat
the process until all small groups have had a chance to report
out and answer questions.
After each small group has presented, have all participants
debrief about what they heard, using the discussion questions
below.
Discussion questions
JJ
JJ
JJ
JJ
JJ
What themes did you notice?
What are some similarities you noticed between your program’s work
and that of another program? What are some differences?
Did you notice any opportunities in which one program’s identified
strength could offset a challenge another program faces?
Did you notice any potential opportunities to share information or
resources or work together?
Did you notice any potential barriers to sharing information or
resources or working together?
22 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 3 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
3.3
Diving into the details
Programs that focus on three different issue areas will likely be
operating under different funding streams, program mandates, and
timelines. These differences affect if, how, and when they might be
able to work together. While it may not be possible to remove any
constraints immediately, the group can benefit from understanding
them. Putting this information on the table can help the group see both
barriers to and opportunities for coordination.
The worksheet on the following page builds on the information shared
in the previous activity. It is intended to be used after a group has met
(perhaps multiple times), established buy-in for the idea of collaboration,
and expressed interest in exploring opportunities in greater detail.
Note that this worksheet provides a template for the kind of
information that is beneficial to share at this stage. The specific
questions can be adapted as needed, and groups may decide to collect
this information in different ways. Here are some ideas:
JJ
JJ
Distribute a paper or electronic version of this worksheet to partners,
and ask each partner to fill it out before the group meets again.
Use these questions to guide a discussion at an in-person meeting,
and assign a note-taker to capture each program’s response in real
time. Be sure to distribute these questions to all participants in
advance, so they can be prepared to share responses.
“I think your initial meetings should
be really open. Discussions should
just be about information sharing and
brainstorming, without any preconceived
notions of what you’re actually going
to do together. And when you have that
first meeting, you should bring some
basic information about your grants, your
funding, your scope of work, what you
can and can’t do…just be really up front
with partners about your capacity and
what you’re able to do, and share your
program’s goals. You’re coming from
three different perspectives (or more).
Our branch has different goals than other
branches, but if we share our goals and
our deliverables or objectives, there’s
probably some overlap.”
– State Health Department Staff, CA (Nutrition)7
23 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 3 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
3.3
General Program Information
Program Name
What is your program’s mission statement?
What general health outcomes are you working toward?
What retail-specific outcomes are you working toward?
What retail-oriented coalitions or workgroups do you participate in?
Does your program collect data about the retail environment? If so, what kind of information do you collect, and how is it used?
Are you working on retail-related policies? If so, please specify.
Funding Information
How is your retail-related work funded?
What is the timeline for this work?
When will you apply for a new round of funding (if applicable)?
What retail-related activities are included in your workplan?
Who carries out these activities? (e.g., in-house staff or other entities who receive sub-grant funds)
Are there any requirements or restrictions that your retail-related activities are subject to?
Is your retail-related work focused on certain populations and/or geographic regions? If so, please specify.
If you fund other entities (e.g., health departments, community-based organizations) to carry out activities, please list grantees.
Please list additional organizations with whom you frequently partner.
24 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 3 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
STRATEGY
Brainstorm a
Shared Vision
Now that the group has developed a shared understanding of each
partner’s goals and efforts, it can start identifying where these
goals overlap, and begin brainstorming a shared vision. Schedule a
subsequent in-person meeting to conduct this brainstorm as a group.
To jump-start this brainstorm, this section includes an activity to guide
the group through a joint assessment of the retail environment. There
are two variations of this activity: 4.1 and 4.2. They reach the same
outcome. The group should choose the version that would be most
feasible for them to implement.
4
GOALS
JJ
JJ
Engage in a collaborative
exercise to see the retail
environment from each
program’s perspective
Begin to articulate the areas
of overlap between each
program’s goals
Activity 4.1: Conducting a virtual retail assessment
Analyze a set of photos of a store environment
Activity 4.2:Conducting an in-person retail assessment
Coordinate a group visit to a nearby store
This joint assessment – whether through photos or an in-person store
visit – enables the group to see the retail environment through each
partner’s eyes, and to discuss similarities and differences in what
each partner notices. The discussion questions use these concrete
observations (“where are we now?”) as a starting point to discuss a
shared vision for a healthy retail environment (“where would we like
to go?”).
“And maybe give yourself another time
to come back and explore some of those
opportunities for getting into the brass
tacks of, ‘Well, this is an area we all work
in. Could we have shared or collaborative
activities? Here’s some capacity based
on our grant…’ and start to be more
concrete after you’ve had that initial
sharing and contemplation.”
– State Health Department Staff, CA (Nutrition)7
25 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 4 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
Conducting a virtual retail
assessment
Part 1. Store observations
Assess a set of photos that depict a typical retail environment, and
use these observations as the basis for the discussion below. Contact
ChangeLab Solutions for a downloadable set of photos that can be used
for this exercise. Photos can be printed and displayed at the meeting, or
presented in a slideshow format.
Part 2. Discussion
Use the questions below to guide a discussion.
Share observations
What types of things stood out to each participant?
JJ
JJ
JJ
JJ
What are some characteristics about the store that each program
was pleased to see? What was concerning? Why?
Did you notice any similarities in how tobacco, food, and alcohol
products were packaged, displayed, and advertised?
What is something another program mentioned that you would not
have noticed? Are there other common issues your program faces in
the retail environment that did not come up during this activity?
Imagine an ideal healthy retail environment
What would the exterior look like?
JJ
JJ
JJ
What would the interior look like?
What kinds of interactions would each program have with the store
owner?
Define success
By working together, what would we be able to achieve that we
couldn’t do individually?
JJ
JJ
JJ
What do we want to change about how our individual programs
communicate and work with each other?
What do we want to change about how our individual programs
communicate and work with retailers?
JJ
What positive changes do we want community members to notice?
JJ
What positive changes do we want retailers to notice?
26 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 4 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
4.1
LIQUOR • CIGARETTES
SALE
OPEN
ACTIVITY
Conducting an in-person
retail assessment
4.2
LIQUOR • CIGARETTES
SALE
Part 1. Store observations
OPEN
Spend 15 to 30 minutes visiting a nearby store that sells tobacco, food,
and alcohol, and make note of what you observe.
Describe the outside of the store:
What does it look like?_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Is there a sign for the store name?_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Are there advertisements or product signs in the window? If yes, what is being advertised?_____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Describe the inside of the store:
What’s the first thing you notice when walking into the store?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
What types of products are sold at this store (e.g., tobacco, snack food, fresh/frozen fruits or vegetables, alcohol,
other beverages, etc.)?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Where are those products placed (e.g., behind counter at the point-of-sale, at the end caps of aisles)?______________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Are there prices or signs on the products?____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Are there advertisements inside the store? If yes, what is being advertised?________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Does the store accept EBT?_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Does the store participate in WIC?______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
What is the overall condition of the store, and how inviting does it feel?__________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
27 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 4 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
4.2
Part 2. Discussion
Use the questions below to guide a discussion.
Share observations
What types of things stood out to each participant?
JJ
JJ
JJ
JJ
What are some characteristics about the store that each program
was pleased to see? What was concerning? Why?
Did you notice any similarities in how tobacco, food, and alcohol
products were packaged, displayed, and advertised?
What is something another program mentioned that you would not
have noticed? Are there other common issues your program faces in
the retail environment that did not come up during this store tour?
Imagine an ideal healthy retail environment
What would the exterior look like?
JJ
JJ
JJ
What would the interior look like?
What kinds of interactions would each program have with the store
owner?
Define success
By working together, what would we be able to achieve that we
couldn’t do individually?
JJ
JJ
JJ
What do we want to change about how our individual programs
communicate and work with each other?
What do we want to change about how our individual programs
communicate and work with retailers?
JJ
What positive changes do we want community members to notice?
JJ
What positive changes do we want retailers to notice?
This store observation is intended to
jump-start a conversation. It is not
a comprehensive store assessment
or audit. For more information about
conducting a store assessment, see
page 70 of ChangeLab Solutions’
Health on the Shelf: A Guide
to Healthy Small Food Retailer
Certification Programs. The Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention’s
Healthier Food Retail Guide is also a
useful resource.
28 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 4 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
STRATEGY
Identify Opportunities
for Action
By this stage, partners will have met – perhaps multiple times – to
discuss their current work in the retail environment. Throughout the
learning process, groups may notice overlaps the following:
JJ
JJ
JJ
5
GOAL
JJ
WHAT programs work on: Are multiple programs working with youth
coalitions to conduct retail assessments?
Use the information
gathered in the learning and
visioning phase to identify
opportunities to work together
WHO programs fund or partner with: Are multiple programs working
with the same organizations or coalitions?
WHERE programs focus their efforts: Are multiple programs doing
place-based work in the same geographic locations?
As a group, think about how these overlaps represent opportunities
for action, and whether individual efforts can be strengthened by
coordinating with partners. In addition, consider the unique capacities
each partner brings to the table that may benefit the partnership as a
whole. For example, if one program is restricted in doing policy work,
another may be able to take the lead.
This section includes examples of how programs across the country
have found opportunities to collaborate.
Use the worksheet at the end of this section to document ideas for
collaboration.
“The nutrition program has a wonderful
history of successfully working with
retailers…. They’ve been able to do store
events and create places where fresh
produce can be sold, and they help
financially with making some of the
changes in the store environment. On
the tobacco side we’re usually going in
and doing stings or citing retailers who
violate the law.… So they don’t like us
very much. But what we’re good at is
policy. We’re excellent at figuring out
how to use policy as a solution to solve
community problems, and how to move
local policies forward. By collaborating
we can get retailer buy-in, bring them
into the picture in a good way with a
certain level of trust, and try to work
together to come to some sort of policy
solution that can work for everybody.
Tobacco probably wouldn’t be able to
do that without the loop-in from the
nutrition people. So ideally that’s the sort
of joint work we’d like to see, building on
each other’s strengths.”
– State Health Department Staff, CA
(Tobacco Control)6
29 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 5 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Examples
Share resources
Pennsylvania’s Healthy Corner Store Initiative
In Pennsylvania, the Department of Health’s Division of Nutrition
and Physical Activity coordinates a statewide Healthy Corner Store
Initiative. But due to the state’s public health infrastructure, the health
department’s county and municipal units only reach about 40 percent
of the state’s population.9 As a result, the healthy corner store initiative
has limited reach into many communities where corner stores are
prevalent. Meanwhile, the Division of Tobacco Prevention and Control
funds six Regional Primary Contractors (RPCs) to spearhead tobacco
control efforts throughout the state. With one RPC in each of the state’s
six regions, RPCs have a statewide reach, strong relationships with local
coalitions, and familiarity with the retail environment. The Division of
Nutrition and Physical Activity realized that, by collaborating with the
tobacco division, they could tap into this extensive RPC network and
expand the reach of their healthy corner store program. RPCs now
receive training and technical assistance on nutrition topics (as well
as tobacco), and they work with community partners to conduct store
assessments and help to make nutrition-related changes in stores.
Y
IMAR
R
P
L
RS
NA
R E G I OO N T R A C T O G
C
ININ
A
R
T
REG
IO
CON NAL PR
T R T R AC TO I M A RY
A I N RS
ING
“We need to collaborate and use partners
to expand our reach. The Division of
Tobacco Prevention and Control is not
just a partner in name. They actually
afford us some of their staff time.
That’s extremely beneficial given the
limited resources that we have in this
department.”
– State Health Department Staff, PA (Nutrition)9
“Our local health departments are all
pretty excited about the opportunity
to work together because they’re on
the ground; they’ll be the staff going
into a store. And even if they’re just
assessing the nutrition environment,
they can’t help but see other unhealthy
or potentially illegal practices, or the
outside placement of alcohol or tobacco
advertising. The staff at the local level
believe they’re being more efficient,
getting more work done, and respecting
the retailer if they’re able to look at the
store environment through multiple
different lenses instead of just one per
visit.”
– State Health Department Staff, CA (Nutrition)7
30 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 5 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Work together to design a healthy retail program
Sonoma County’s Healthy Retail Project
In 2009, the Community Activity and Nutrition Coalition in Sonoma
County, California, inaugurated the Healthy Food Outlet Project (HFOP).
HFOP established health-promoting standards – such as selling a
variety of fresh fruits and vegetables and removing advertisements
promoting foods high in fat and sugar – for participating small
markets and grocery stores to meet. A few years later, a county-level
collaborative team called ANTS (Alcohol, Nutrition, and Tobacco
Stakeholders) was formed. ANTS realized they could join forces with
HFOP by finding ways to integrate alcohol and tobacco marketing,
placement, and law compliance into HFOP standards. Today, this
project recognizes stores that meet standards connected to tobacco
control, nutrition, and excessive alcohol use prevention. To reflect this
comprehensive focus, the founders of HFOP changed the name of the
project to the Healthy Retail Project: Making Healthy Changes for a
Healthier Community to make it more inclusive of tobacco control and
excessive alcohol use prevention partners.
Vermont’s Healthy Retailer Initiative
When the Physical Activity and Nutrition program in Vermont decided
to work in the food retail environment, program staff realized there
was an opportunity to work with the state’s Tobacco Control and
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention (ADAP) programs, both of which
had a history of funding local coalitions to work with retailers. These
programs, along with the Office of Local Health and some external
partners, formed a Healthy Retail Advisory Committee to explore what
could be done. Sixteen local coalitions received funding to survey
community members about their support for changes in the retail
environment; conduct store audits that assessed tobacco, food, and
alcohol availability; and use data from the store audits to implement
healthy changes, such as raising the height of tobacco and alcohol
signage above kids’ eye level. The state programs collaboratively
developed the Healthy Retailers Guidebook, which outlined the evidence
base for working with retailers and provided guidance on assessment,
capacity building, planning, implementation, and evaluation of healthy
retail efforts. The state brought coalitions together for a day-long
training, developed collateral materials – including posters, door clings,
and counter tent cards – to encourage shoppers to make healthier
choices, and created sample press releases and social media posts that
coalitions could tailor to promote participating retailers.
“The HFOP is very retailer-centered: the
retailers decided what healthy changes
they would like to make for their stores,
rather than have HFOP staff telling them
what changes they should make. However,
my alcohol and tobacco colleagues often
say that they view us as regulators and
enforcers in their work with retailers.
By integrating alcohol and tobacco
prevention into the HFOP, our approach
with retailers has been redefined,
allowing tobacco and alcohol prevention
an entrance into this work with retailers,
which was a challenge for them for many
years.”
– Local Health Department Staff,
Sonoma County, CA10
“We started thinking about how we’re all
working with the same coalitions, and
we all have a similar goal: improving the
retail environment. Why don’t we think
about creating a combined intervention
that’s addressing the whole retail
environment in terms of all three of
these program areas? The community
coalitions already had some of these
contacts with retailers. So it became
our role to start creating resources that
would allow them to approach retailers
in a comprehensive way and provide
tools and resources for the coalitions
to look at the whole retail environment
for the different aspects we were all
interested in.”
– State Health Department Staff, VT (Nutrition)11
31 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 5 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Massachusetts’ Mass in Motion Healthy Market Program
Massachusetts’ program works with convenience store owners to make
healthy, affordable food and beverage options available to customers.
The directors of the state’s tobacco control, nutrition, and excessive
alcohol use prevention programs recognized that tobacco and alcohol
availability and advertising should also be considered in the definition
of a healthy market. As a result, the directors formed a joint Healthy
Retail Task Force. At their monthly meetings, the Task Force developed
a healthy retail ranking sheet, a tool that sets tobacco, nutrition, and
alcohol-related standards for stores. A store can earn a bronze-, silver-,
or gold-level rating, depending on the number of standards it meets.
Several communities have been selected to pilot this tool in stores, and
to work with store owners on meeting the standards. The Task Force
continues to meet as needed.
“When we put these rankings and
recommendations together, we spent a
lot of time thinking how it really should
be from a public health standpoint.
What would be an almost ideal corner
store that every child should walk into,
and adults too for that matter? What’s
practical? We spent a lot of time trying
to find that balance. We had staff from
the Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation
and Prevention Programs and the Bureau
of Substance Abuse Services teaming up,
and sharing ideas with people who are
working in the retail field. We asked, ‘In
your experience, could we get a store
owner to do this or are we just reaching
too high?’”
– State Health Department Staff, MA (Nutrition)12
AU D I T
Include other partners in existing retail work
Following Vermont’s Healthy Retailer Initiative mentioned on page 31,
the tobacco control program funded local coalitions to assess the
advertisement, placement, and availability of tobacco products in stores
through conducting observational audits of the retail environment.
Tobacco control program staff invited their nutrition and excessive
alcohol use prevention colleagues to add food and alcohol items to
the audit tool. Combining tobacco, nutrition, and alcohol questions
in a single tool maintained the state’s integrated focus on the retail
environment and benefited the programs by enabling them to collect
data more efficiently.
”… this auditing is done, and now, for
every single tobacco outlet in the state,
we have not just data on tobacco, but
also answers to some nutrition questions
and information about alcohol products.
Each program can do our own data
analysis. For example, the nutrition
program can look at whether the stores
carry lowfat or nonfat dairy products,
and if the dairy products are cheaper
or more expensive than soda… So the
tobacco staff just did it. They had this
contract and they said it would be easy
enough, at no cost to us, to add some
questions, and that we [the nutrition
program] could use the data however
we wanted… So there continue to be
opportunities that come up, in venues of
interest to nutrition, tobacco, and alcohol
prevention, like retail, to collaborate.”
– State Health Department Staff, VT (Nutrition)11
32 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 5 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
ACTIVITY
5.1
Ideas for action
Three ideas for incorporating tobacco control, nutrition, and/or excessive alcohol
use prevention considerations into my program’s existing retail efforts are…
EXAMPLE
“Update retail assessment
1. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ tool to include survey
questions about tobacco
and alcohol.”
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Three things I learned from my tobacco control, nutrition, and/or excessive alcohol
use prevention colleagues that are applicable to my work are…
EXAMPLE
“The tobacco control
1. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ program was talking
to the store owner on
Grand Ave. about the
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ new local tobacco retailer
licensing law. They
brought up healthy food
2. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ during the conversation,
and the store owner
mentioned he’d like more
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
information about selling
nutritious foods.”
3. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Three follow-up questions I have for tobacco control, nutrition, and/or excessive
alcohol use prevention are…
EXAMPLE
“Ask the excessive alcohol
use prevention program
which community
1. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ champions were involved
in the recent ordinance
restricting alcohol
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
retailers from locating
near schools.”
2. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
33 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 5 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
STRATEGY
Continue to Meet,
Plan, and Act
A strong collaborative effort is not characterized by a one-time event,
but an ongoing relationship. Priorities, activities, and needs change over
time. Regular meetings ensure that new information that may affect
the partnership is communicated to all partners in a timely manner.
There is value in tobacco control, nutrition, and excessive alcohol use
prevention programs staying in communication about their retail efforts,
even if there are no immediate opportunities to work together. By
building and maintaining relationships over time, state and local health
departments can be better positioned to seize new opportunities, and
to find opportunities for collaborative action in places they would have
previously overlooked. An existing partnership with a shared vision for
change in the retail environment can attract funders that are interested
in collaborative efforts and are looking for grantees who can hit the
ground running.
Form a task force or workgroup
Schedule regular meetings to keep all partners engaged and informed
about retail efforts. Standing agenda items can include:
JJ
JJ
JJ
6
GOALS
JJ
JJ
Maintain and strengthen the
partnership through continued
communication
Continue to identify
opportunities for collaboration
EXAMPLE
Sonoma County, California, has
formed a county-level collaborative
team called ANTS (Alcohol, Nutrition,
and Tobacco Stakeholders).
These partners are working on
a comprehensive healthy retail
certification policy, and have been
able to leverage this collaborative
work to attract additional funders.
Updates on new activities
Common retail-related technical assistance questions or needs that
are emerging from the field
Collaborative troubleshooting or problem solving in response to
specific retail-related challenges that partners have faced
JJ
Coalition meetings/events/webinars that other partners can join
JJ
Potential funding opportunities
JJ
Opportunities for collaborative action
“Being on the healthy retailer designation
workgroup is really instructive. [You]
see how the different members of that
workgroup think and handle a problem
and how they approach a solution.”
– Local Health Department Staff,
San Diego County, CA (Tobacco)13
Join each other’s coalitions
Ask if your partners have coalitions that you can join, and invite them to
join yours. Get to know their community partners, hear their successes
and concerns, and share your program’s efforts when appropriate.
34 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 6 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Find opportunities to present a united front
and promote each other’s work
If a representative from one program is presenting retail-related policies
at a community meeting, attend the meeting to show your support for
healthy changes to the retail environment. These opportunities allow
the public, decisionmakers, and other potential partners to connect the
dots between individual program efforts, and help to promote the idea
of a comprehensive approach to improving the retail environment.
Write collaborative activities into workplans
One barrier to collaboration is the practical limitations of what groups
are funded to do. Staying in regular communication allows groups to
plan together proactively. Lay the groundwork for future collaborative
work by writing collaborative activites into workplans and grant
proposals as funding opportunities arise.
EXAMPLE
In 2015, representatives from
California’s state-level healthy retail
workgroup co-presented on their
collaborative retail efforts at the
annual California Conference of Local
Directors of Health Education.
EXAMPLE
In 2015, Ohio updated the Request
for Proposal for its Creating Healthy
Communities grant program. For the
first time, local health department
applicants had the option to work on
discouraging tobacco sales in small
stores, in addition to working on
nutrition interventions in the retail
environment.
Fund collaborative activities
Health departments – particularly state health departments – aren’t
just the recipients of grant funds. They are often major funders
themselves, and as a result, they shape how this work unfolds at the
local level. When designing grant programs and developing requests for
proposals, health departments can do the following:
JJ
JJ
Expand the scope of a program’s acceptable or required retailrelated activities to include tobacco control, nutrition, and excessive
alcohol use prevention considerations
Encourage or require grantees to partner with tobacco control,
nutrition, and excessive alcohol use prevention programs in their
funded activities
EXAMPLE
In Vermont, the state tobacco control,
nutrition, and excessive alcohol use
prevention programs worked together
to fund healthy retail efforts in
communities. They worked out an
arrangement in which community
coalitions receiving funding from the
tobacco control, nutrition, or excessive
alcohol use prevention programs to
work on these issues were also
required to work on healthy retail
activities. The nutrition program
funded the healthy retail component
of community coalitions’ work.
“Consistent open communication needs
to occur with partners, not only to build
trust, assure mutual objectives, and
create common motivation… but to
change habits of staying in our siloed
fields, because that really needs to
change for this collaboration to work.
This does not come easily and there
must be an ongoing effort at first until it
becomes routine.”
– Local Health Department Staff,
Sonoma County, CA10
35 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook: Strategy 6 | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
Case Study:
Putting It All Together
This comprehensive approach to working in the retail environment
is new and innovative, but a few pioneering states and localities
have been testing the waters. One of the most ambitious efforts is
the Healthy Stores for a Healthy Community campaign in California.
This case study, developed through key informant interviews with
health department staff in California, highlights how state leadership,
combined with local involvement, can build momentum for healthy
changes in the retail environment.
LIQUOR • CIGARETTE
SALE
OPEN
Background
The California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) has a long history
of initiating campaigns to reduce the availability and promotion of
tobacco products in the retail environment. In 1994, they launched the
Operation Storefront Campaign, which brought statewide attention to
in-store and exterior advertising of tobacco products in locations where
it was likely to be seen by youth. The 2002 STORE (Strategic Tobacco
Retail Effort) Campaign addressed tobacco marketing in the retail
environment and helped build momentum for local tobacco retailer
licensing ordinances and policies banning self-service displays.
Through these experiences, CTCP began noticing parallels between
the marketing and promotion of tobacco products and the marketing
and promotion of non-nutritious foods and alcohol. Many local health
departments funded by CTCP noted these parallels as well. CTCP began
to explore the idea of surveying the retail environment across the state
and capturing data about all three issue areas.
Identify potential partners
CTCP reached out to the following partners to assess their interest:
JJ
JJ
JJ
Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Branch (NEOPB),
California Department of Public Health
Safe and Active Communities Branch, California Department of
Public Health
“And when we all went out and started
looking around in our own communities
and thinking about the retail environment
as a venue and what we could do that
would have an effect, we started noticing
that there are a lot of similarities in how
tobacco, food, and alcohol products are
manufactured, advertised, discounted,
labeled, and sold in stores. And our local
projects were telling us, “Hey we’re going
out and doing this survey in our retail
environment and we’re running into our
nutrition folks. They’re doing a survey on
the same stores.”
Policy and Prevention Services Branch, California Department of
Health Care Services (formerly the Department of Alcohol and
Drug Programs)
36 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
– State Health Department Staff, CA
(Tobacco Control)6
Start a conversation
In 2012, CTCP coordinated a two-day conference to introduce the
idea of the data collection campaign, Healthy Stores for a Healthy
Community. They invited staff from the state’s nutrition and excessive
alcohol use prevention programs to participate. This event marked
the first time partners across tobacco control, nutrition, and excessive
alcohol use prevention came together in a formal way to talk about
their work in the retail environment. After the conference, staff from
each of these programs formed a workgroup to continue the dialogue
and discuss opportunities to collaborate.
Brainstorm a shared vision
The workgroup that had emerged from the conference held regular
meetings and calls, and decided on an integrated campaign goal:
to improve the health of Californians through changes to the retail
environment. Each partner identified program-specific goals aligned
with this vision, and the group assessed areas of overlap among
programs.
Identify opportunities for action
In 2013, CTCP funded 61 local lead agencies (LLAs) (primarily local
health departments) across the state to survey the retail environment.
LLAs assessed tobacco, food, and alcohol. The Healthy Stores for a
Healthy Community campaign yielded baseline data that LLAs used to
inform their tobacco control workplans, and that could be used to help
engage other partners.
CTCP and its partners supported LLAs in implementing the campaign
by doing the following:
JJ
Funding LLAs to conduct store surveys, in partnership with
community-based organizations and youth coalitions.
FF
JJ
More than 7,300 stores in all of the state’s 58 counties were
surveyed.
Providing the tools, training, and technical assistance for LLAs and
their local partners to complete the store assessments.
FF
CTCP tasked the Stanford Prevention Research Center (SPRC)
with designing a survey that could be completed using a mobile
device. The survey included questions about the availability,
accessibility, and promotion of tobacco, food, and alcohol products,
and the questions were developed with input from nutrition and
excessive alcohol use prevention partners.
37 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
”We thought there must be a better
way to coordinate efforts and think
about how to do some of this work
collaboratively, rather than everybody
trying to approach the same city council
with three different policies that have
to do with the retail environment. Then
we started having conversations here at
the state level with our sister programs
and saying, ‘Would you be interested
in trying to figure out some ways we
could collaborate and work together?
And given the fact that we all have
different funding streams and different
requirements, would you be willing to
explore what could be done?’ ”
– State Health Department Staff, CA
(Tobacco Control)6
FF
FF
JJ
Follow-up webinars, in-person trainings, and written materials
were provided to LLA staff members, who were able to relay this
information to local partners. In addition, the Tobacco Control
Evaluation Center, an evaluation project run out of the University
of California, Davis, assisted with data collection and analysis,
proactively monitored the incoming data, and set up a hotline to
field technical assistance calls from LLAs on demand.
Analyzing the data and creating outreach tools.
FF
FF
FF
JJ
In May 2013, more than 200 individuals participated in an
in-person training in Sacramento, where they learned how
to operate the mobile survey tool as well as how to carry
out broader strategies for conducting the store assessments.
Nutrition and excessive alcohol use prevention partners
participated on speaking panels and funded their local
implementing agencies to attend.
Store data collected through the mobile application was
automatically transferred to the survey database, and CTCP
collaborated with nutrition and excessive alcohol use prevention
partners to conduct local, regional, and state-level analyses.
CTCP summarized local data into customized data fact sheets and
maps for each LLA jurisdiction.
Customizable media outreach templates, which each county could
tailor to highlight their own particular data and problem areas,
were created.
Spreading the word.
FF
FF
Local health departments released the results of this survey
to the public through a series of 14 coordinated press events
throughout the state. Media outlets across the state ran a total of
260 local news stories on the survey results, drawing particular
attention to tobacco products being placed next to candy, the
availability of low-cost and candy-flavored tobacco products, and
the proximity of tobacco, non-nutritious food, and alcohol retailers
to schools and other youth-sensitive areas.
Nutrition and excessive alcohol use prevention partners did
outreach to their local entities to connect the healthy retail
campaign to their funded retail work.
The baseline data collected through the survey prompted several LLAs
to collaborate with nutrition and excessive alcohol use prevention
partners to achieve the retail objectives in their workplans. This data
was also shared with nutrition and excessive alcohol use prevention
colleagues, many of whom are incorporating collaborative retail
activities into their workplans.
38 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
KEY FINDINGS14
Of the more than 7,300 stores
surveyed in California:
71%
had exterior advertising for
non-nutritious products, while only
12% had exterior advertising for
nutritious products
65%
sold tobacco products, sugary drinks,
or alcohol near candy at the checkout
75%
of stores that sold flavored
tobacco products at the
checkout were near schools
55%
of stores that sold sugary drinks at
the checkout were near schools
36%
had alcohol ads near candy or
toys or below three feet
Additional survey information – including
regional and county-level data – is available
at the Healthy Stores for a Healthy
Community website. The website provides
policymakers, public health practitioners,
and community members quick and easy
access to data that can inform their retail
education and policy efforts.14
Continue to meet, plan, and act
CTCP continues to convene a workgroup of state-level programs, and
the partnership has expanded to include the Sexually Transmitted
Diseases (STD) Control Branch. The STD Control Branch is interested
in increasing access to condoms in stores, an important strategy
for reducing the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases.
CTCP also convenes a larger workgroup of key partners, including
some locally funded tobacco control projects. State-level partners
from nutrition, excessive alcohol use prevention, and sexual health
participate in these regular phone calls.
State partners continue to support this work at the local level. For
example, CTCP coordinated a series of webinars to deepen local health
departments’ understanding of the connections between tobacco, food,
and alcohol in the retail environment. In these webinars, state nutrition
and excessive alcohol use prevention programs were invited to share
their missions, historical mandates, funding streams, cultures, and
subject matter expertise. In addition, several counties that had already
formed collaborative partnerships with tobacco control, nutrition, and
excessive alcohol use prevention colleagues shared their experiences
and lessons learned.
The Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Branch holds an annual
forum for its local implementing agencies, which includes a retailfocused session. The branch is creating a fact sheet to support their
locally funded grantees.
A significant outcome of this statewide effort is the local action that it
sparked. Several local health departments now have active partnerships
that focus on healthy retail changes in their communities:
JJ
JJ
Los Angeles County hosted a regional healthy retail forum, and
convenes a Healthy Retail Environment Workgroup that meets
monthly. The group created a catalog of existing retail projects in all
three issue areas, and was surprised to see how much overlap there
was. They are currently creating a GIS map to see which stores each
program is targeting.
Sonoma County’s partnership is called ANTS (Alcohol, Nutrition,
and Tobacco Stakeholders). The team is exploring a healthy retailer
certification policy, which would require participating food retailers
to maintain minimum health-promoting standards and practices
that relate to tobacco, nutrition, and alcohol. The policy would also
provide incentives to qualifying retailers.
As this work moves forward, the state-level workgroup is pulling
together leadership at the state health department to come up with a
joint policy platform. The platform will articulate each program’s policy
goals and define how these programs can work together.
“Despite there being some areas where
we knew there was overlap, especially
in the retail environment, we still were
operating pretty much in our own silos
based on funding streams, political
difficulty in combining efforts in the
policy realm, etc. We knew that we all
held pieces of the retail puzzle, and
so we slowly started dipping our toes
into the world of collaborative effort,
but in all honesty, we were not putting
too much time into making that a
reality – until the CA State Tobacco
Control Program initiated their Healthy
Stores for a Healthy Community retail
campaign. That provided the jump-start
we needed, while at the same time
allowing full administrative support for
our combined efforts.”
39 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail
– Local Health Department,
Sonoma County, CA10
Bibliography
1
Mokdad A, Marks J, Stroup D, Gerberding J. Actual causes of death in the United States, 2000.
Journal of the American Medical Association. 2004;291:1238-45. Abstract available at:
http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=198357.
2 Adler NE, Newman K. Socioeconomic disparities in health: pathways and policies. Health Affairs.
2002 Mar 1;21(2):60-76. Available at: http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/21/2/60.full.
3 US Department of Health and Human Services. (2013). NHLBI factbook, fiscal year 2012. 2013;
33-34, 38. Available at: www.nhlbi.nih.gov/files/docs/factbook/FactBook2012.pdf.
4 National Association of County & City Health Officials. 2013 National Profile of Local Health
Departments. 2014 Jan. http://archived.naccho.org/topics/infrastructure/profile/upload/2013national-profile-of-local-healthdepartments-report.pdf.
5 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation
(STATE) System – Custom Reports. http://nccd.cdc.gov/STATESystem/rdPage.aspx?rdReport=OSH_
State.CustomReports.
6 Tonia Hagaman. California Tobacco Control Program. California Department of Public Health.
Personal Interview. March 5, 2015.
7 Nutrition Education Obesity Prevention Branch Management Staff. California Department of Public
Health. Personal Interview. February 26, 2015.
8 Kaner S, Lind L, Toldi C, Fisk S, Berger D. Facilitator’s Guide to Participatory Decision-Making.
San Francisco, Ca: Jossey-Bass; 2014.
9 Tiffany Bransteitter and Tonya Holloway. Pennsylvania Department of Health. Personal Interview.
January 27, 2015.
10 Newman-Fields D, Ronshausen D, Swedberg E, Macedo J. The Impact of Cross-System Collaboration
in the Retail Environment. Presented at: Tools to Begin the Dialogue Between Alcohol, Nutrition,
and Tobacco Programs; September 2014.
11 Suzanne Kelley. Vermont Department of Health. Personal Interview. February 17, 2015.
12 Mary Brush and Rachel Cohen. Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Personal Interview.
January 27, 2015.
13 Irene Linayao-Putman. County of San Diego Health & Human Services Agency. CA. Personal
Interview. March 2, 2015.
14 Healthy Stores for a Healthy Community. Regional Data. 2014.
www.healthystoreshealthycommunity.com/documents/main/Regional%20Data.pdf.
40 Healthy Retail Collaboration Workbook | changelabsolutions.org/healthy-retail

Similar documents