New Concept SBCC Folder - New Concept Information Systems

Comments

Transcription

New Concept SBCC Folder - New Concept Information Systems
Social and Behaviour Change Communication (SBCC) is a research -based,
consultative process that uses communication to promote and facilitate behaviour
change and support the requisite social change for the purpose of improving health
outcomes. To achieve social and behaviour change, SBCC is driven by epidemiological
evidence and client perspectives and needs. SBCC is guided by a comprehensive
ecological theory that incorporates both individual level change and change at broader
environmental and structural levels. Thus, it works at one or more levels: the behaviour
or action of individual, collective actions taken by groups, social and cultural structures,
and the enabling environment. Depending upon the issues and the context, SBCC can
achieve change as a separate intervention, but usually it is part of a comprehensive
change strategy that includes multiple interventions, including communication.
Stimulating
Change!
Through Social & Behaviour Change Communication (SBCC)
New Concept Information Systems Pvt. Ltd.
206, 2nd Floor, LSC
Pocket D & E Market
Sarita Vihar, New Delhi – 110076
Tel: 011 - 64784300
Fax: 011 - 26972743
email: [email protected]
www.newconceptinfo.com
From the innocuous marigold to the conch shell, from the deep sea to the
bees, the birds and their complex abodes, to the intricacies of the human
body, to the incredible geometry of the solar system, all things big and small
in this universe reveal superlative design.
Injecting the rhythm, the balance and harmony displayed in nature into
the human environment remains the quest as well as the challenge of this
millennium.
With over 25 years of collective experience in transformational research and
communication, we at New Concept Information Systems Pvt Ltd (NCIS) are
geared to meet this challenge head on in the social development sector. We
believe that “creativity and collective work transforms”.
This belief has guided us in our SBCC intervention process:
conducting formative research to determine knowledge, attitude,
practices, exposure to media channels, enablers and barriers to effective
communication
designing people-centred communication strategies using the most cost
effective channels of communication
developing, pre-testing and producing communication materials
determining the media mix
building capacities of communicators
Implementing large scale, contextual SBCC interventions
Monitoring, supporting supervision and impact analysis of interventions
We have implemented SBCC interventions in the areas of mother & child
health (MCH), newborn care, HNWASH, tuberculosis, kala-azar, malaria,
immunisation, micronutrients and others. We have worked with a range of
government and non-government clients across several states of India.
SBCC innovations in Kala-azar elimination
Considering the favourable factors for Kala-azar
elimination and new technology and advances in
diagnosis and treatment, the National Roadmap
for Kala-azar Elimination (NRKE) released by the
Government of India on 2nd September 2014,
has provided strategic directions on reducing the
delay between onset of disease and diagnosis and
treatment; with emphasis on early case detection
and complete management.
NCIS was selected as the national communication
agency in a World Bank-assisted project in
2011-13 with National Vector Borne Disease
Control Programme (NVBDCP). As a part of this
assignment, NCIS conducted a formative research
in the three states of Bihar, Jharkhand and West
Bengal; and developed a BCC strategy based
on the findin s he stud reco nised that the
population at risk for Kala-azar was the poorest in
The study recognised that the population
at risk for Kala-azar was the poorest in
the community and concluded
that intensive awareness campaigns
with the involvement of communities
and community health volunteers
would address important barriers in
utilisation of services.
the community with limited access to health care
due to various socio-economic determinants; and
concluded that intensive awareness campaigns
with the involvement of communities and
community health volunteers would address
important barriers in utilisation of services.
he stud also reco nised that ala a ar
elimination will require effective involvement of
health personnel at all levels in the continuum
of care, right from the engagement of ASHAs
at village level to laboratory technicians, medical
officers at the pri ar health centres to specialists
at district hospitals, for earl identification of a
suspected case, diagnosis and treatment, PKDL
and any other complications and last but not the
least, effective implementation of BCC activities
at the community level to improve knowledge,
attitude and practices related to prevention and
treatment of Kala-azar.
In 2014, NCIS was hired as the agency for
implementing BCC activities in the villages of
seven most endemic districts covered by the
Indoor Residual Spray (IRS) round during June-July
2015. NCIS initiated the activities in seven districts,
namely – Vaishali, Saran (Chapra), Muzaffarpur,
Sitamarhi, Araria, Saharsa and Purnea.
More than 3,000 villages were reached and
2,75,000 community members were directly
reached through Group Communication and
IPC sessions.
his inter ention is ein scaled up to
districts
across Bihar, Jharkhand and West Bengal in 2016.
Strengthening institutional capacity in
delivering SBCC trainings
There is increasing appreciation among
government and NGOs that SBCC strategies
and related skills are equally important alongside
technical knowledge. The health and ICDS
functionaries – primarily the frontline workers
and supervisors – are pivotal when it comes
to communicating on health issues to the
community. Linking the frontline workers with
communication and building their capacities on
effective communication is essential for quality
service delivery. Recognising its importance,
capacity development on social and behaviour
change is one of the pillars of Communication for
Development (C4D) programme of UNICEF.
In case of Routine Immunisation (RI), there is
enough evidence to show that uptake of RI
services also has a lot to do with the quality of
interaction between health workers and caregivers
to ensure completion of the immunisation
schedule. High drop-out rates and the caregivers’
indifferent attitude towards immunisation
services are often due to poor or inadequate
information sharing by healthcare providers.
he strate ic fra e ork for ntensification of
Routine Immunisation (IRI) in India recognises
the importance of strengthening communication
and social mobilisation with IPC through frontline
workers and supervisors (ASHA, AWW, ANM) as
critical in bringing desired change in attitude and
behaviour of families and community. It lays equal
emphasis on institutional capacity building on
technical and communication aspects.
The strategic framework for
Intensification of Routine
Immunisation in India recognises
the importance of strengthening
communication and social
mobilisation with IPC through
frontline workers and supervisors.
In this context, UNICEF engaged New Concept
to review and select SBCC training content
from existing training modules, roll-out an
SBCC training plan on routine immunisation
across nine states for Training of Master Trainers
(ToMTs) at national level and Training of Trainers
(TOTs) at state level, and come up with a long
term vision to establish a ‘social and behaviour
change capacity development hub’ as a goal for
New Concept with initial support from UNICEF.
Under the project New Concept reviewed
the modules developed by UNICEF and other
development partners and prepared a ready to
roll-out SBCC training package for RI. This was
done by a team of experts in communication
and capacity building who have the experience
of facilitating large-scale trainings at the national
and state levels. The content and duration of
each module was optimised considering the time
the trainees – the Field Level Workers (FLW)/
Supervisors, could spare in practical terms,
while making sure that all important issues were
ade uatel co ered in the specified duration
New Concept implemented SBCC trainings
in nine states – Assam, Bihar, Jharkhand,
Chhattisgarh, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh,
Odisha and Madhya Pradesh through a cascade
model. The training teams were sourced through
existing faculty in NIHFW, NHSRC, SIHFW
and relevant ASHA training institutions and
state resources. The trainings were managed,
or anised and financiall supported
respecti e
states, including the logistics, thus strengthening
capacities at state level. 320 master trainers at
state level and 1152 trainers at district level were
trained across nine states in 2014-15.
Furthermore, an SBCC capacity building hub
has been conceptualised and created, catering
to nation-wide training needs – spanning
thematic areas like health, nutrition, child
protection, education, WASH, social welfare,
Panchayati Raj, etc. The hub will be engaged in
developing and creating a repository of training
materials, and building capacity on SBCC for
interested stakeholders pan India. The hub is an
information and training platform that actively
assists the users in accessing credible and/
or certified resources desi ned to help the
build their capacity on SBCC. An E-Hub has also
been envisaged which is an online component
of the SBCC Hub and caters to different user
groups including Government ministries and
departments; Nongovernment organizations;
Development agencies; Corporates (involved in
CSR related activities); and Freelance trainers
and capacity building consultants. New Concept
along with UNICEF is designing an SBCC Hub
E-Newsline.
Empowering women in Odisha through PLA
An analysis of the Odisha Health Sector and
Nutrition Support Programme (OHNSP), showed
the need to move beyond strengthening
government systems and to directly address
the underlying social determinants of Health,
Nutrition, Water and Sanitation (HNWASH);
catalyse community capacity and improve
community management of services.
Accordingly, Phase II of the OHNSP focused
on strengthening demand for various services
from the community. The interventions aimed to
strengthen and leverage “community processes”
for improved HNWASH practices and outcomes,
and the convergence of HNWASH services and
resources at the local level.
The Government of Odisha came up with an
approach to address the maternal, child health
and sanitation problems of the state using the
Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) approach
by leveraging the Mission Shakti women’s SHGs
as carriers of this approach among communities.
The interventions aimed
to strengthen and leverage
“community processes” for
improved HNWASH practices and
outcomes, and the convergence
of HNWASH services and
resources at the local level.
ha ti ar a
EVALUATE
TOGETHER
c ce
IDENTIFY
PROBLEMS
I
IV
PARTICIPATORY
LEARNING AND
ACTION CYCLE
III
ACT
TOGETHER
The PLA approach, in the present context, is
called Shakti Varta. In Shakti Varta, the PLA
approach is viewed as a capacity-building
process in which women’s group members invite
members, non-group members, adolescent girls,
pregnant women, mothers, as well as men and
frontline service providers for learning, planning,
carrying out and evaluating activities on a
participatory and sustained basis.
ocal o en fro
s are identified and
trained to facilitate PLA meetings using simple
interactive approaches that help start discussions
and stimulate action. Block Finance Coordinators
pro ide support in ensurin financial and
operational guidelines are followed.
NCIS is the support agency on the DFID-funded
project since 2014.
Shakti Varta covers 24,000 villages, covering a
population of more than 17.5 million in the 15 highburden districts.
II
PLAN
STRATEGIES
The strength of Shakti Varta on ground is:
l
l
l
l
7,000 Gram Panchayat (GP) level Facilitators
608 Block Coordinators cum Trainers
152 Block Finance Coordinators
Resource Pool of 30 Master Trainers at
state level
An extensive online Knowledge Management
Portal and a Resource Centre have been set up to
prevent training loss in a cascade mode of training,
provide a real-time dashboard of project progress
and ensure quality of village meetings. Leveraging
the technology innovation in health services,
the portal acts as a platform for concurrent and
interactive capacity building and handholding
support to the facilitators, through automatic
escalation of unresolved queries to the next
higher level shortening the turn-around time. The
initiative ensures consistent and quality services
to the community by building local capacities
and strengthening the hands of frontline service
providers. A concurrent monitoring assessment is
under way.
Changing lives through Group Communication
The Facts for Life Group Communication Initiative
is a comprehensive communication framework
that supports behavioural outcomes critical to
achieving the Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs) by working through relevant government
programmes. The initiative is based on the
premise that infant and child survival can be
ensured by proper preventive and curative
interventions. These can be successfully
implemented through a mix of actions at the
household/community level and a basic package
of primary healthcare that does not rely on
co ple technolo
he initiati e s a ship
intervention in India; Kyunki Jeena Isi Ka Naam
Hai, is an entertainment-education drama serial,
telecast by the national broadcaster Doordarshan.
Rigorously pretested and supported by continuous
research, the serial promotes pro-social change
and encoura es self efficac throu h persuasi e
modelling. It utilises engaging stories to provide
information on critical health, education, equality
and protection issues, and messages which
aid the village level communicators in their
interpersonal and group communication mandates.
NCIS supported UNICEF India as a communication
agency in Phase I of the project which reached
The initiative is based on the premise
that Infant and child survival can be
ensured by proper preventive and curative
interventions. These can be successfully
implemented through a mix of actions
at the household/community level and a
basic package of primary healthcare that
does not rely on complex technology.
112 villages of Lalitpur district in 2009 through
1,000 Group Communication (GC) sessions. The
2nd phase expanded to 4,500 GCs in 261 villages
in 2011. Spurred by the success of Phase I, the
second phase covered 11 themes integral for child
survival, growth and development. The themes
cover the entire gamut of child survival strategy
and are presented in a very interesting manner
through videos, woven as stories around a central
character (Ammaji) guiding and providing advice
for better community action. The Ammaji Kehti
Hai videos were based on the “Kyunki… Jeena Isi
Ka Naam Hai” a popular television serial.
The Group Communication Project reached
around 130,000 community members through
4,500 sessions.
The communication strategy revolved around
four basic principles which were based on
“TESU” (Training, Extending the communication,
Sustainability, and Uniting community members.
Themes in Group Communication
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Personal Hygiene
and Cleanliness
HIV/AIDS
Birth Timing and
Spacing
Safe Pregnancy
and Motherhood
Nutrition and
Growth
6.
Breastfeeding and
Complementary
Feeding
7. Newborn Care
8. Immunisation
9. Diarrhoea
10. Malaria
11. Child Development
and Early Learning
‘Tesu’ is the ndian na e of a e of the forest,
a ri ht oran e red o er that ro s in unches
Social inclusion was an important component
of the project. The sessions were carried out
primarily in those hamlets which had socially
excluded populations.
The GCF sessions have been, in many ways, a
platform to discuss the problems and resolving
them. This brought more accountability from
village representatives and service providers.
Community members pledged to enrol their girl
children in school. They also pledged to spread the
message on HIV and to adopt safe sex pracitices.
Women started utilising services at ICTCs.
A pre- and post-assessment of knowledge
gained through GCs was done for each session.
si nificant increase in kno led e le els
among the participants was observed across the
GC themes.
An independent participant satisfaction survey
commissioned by UNICEF following three rounds
of implementation of BCC intervention showed
that the group sessions have facilitated group
cohesiveness and action; while videos have
increased kno led e, dialo ue, confidence and
initiated change. It was found that 63% of those
who participated in the group communication
sessions had discussed the messages within the
group, and 34%reported taking action on one or
the other message.
Communicating the vision of a healthy child
The Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS)
programme was conceived by the Government of
India many decades ago as a massive communitybased outreach programme. The programme
is seen as an opportunity where women in the
community can be empowered to act so that they
can improve their own situation as well as that of
their children.
The United Nations World Food Programme
(WFP) has been supporting the ICDS. Recognising
that along with nutrition supplement support,
a comprehensive approach to human resource
development is essential for strengthening ICDS,
the WFP in collaboration with state departments
set in motion various initiatives in different states.
In Rajasthan, the work started with an action
research undertaken in 1990-92 in four districts
(Udaipur, Chittorgarh, Dungarpur and Banswara).
This study which has been documented in a
booklet entitled, “Starting Right”, revealed the
barriers to community participation and the
existing childcare practices in the four southern
districts of Rajasthan. The second phase of
intervention was initiated in 1994, in the district
of Banswara. Conducted as a campaign, this
phase had the twin objective of early initiation of
complementary feeding and increasing community
participation in ICDS. The emphasis was on
building the trust and faith between service
providers and the women in the community so
that together they could commit their efforts
to change the situation at the village level. This
experience has been documented in the booklet
titled “Shared Commitment”.
During these years, the Department of Women
and Child Development, the WFP and the team
from New Concept Information Systems worked
The emphasis was on building trust
and faith between service providers
and women in the community so
that together they could commit
their efforts to change the situation
at the village level.
Jan
Jagaran
Jatha
DS
TOWAR
A District Initiative for Communicating
the Vision of A Healthy Child
ru
Hajo So
e
n of th
tatio Soru
ajo
umen
l
Doc oject H
rviva
pr
ild Su DS:
g Ch
ovin
ugh IC ive,
pr
ro
m
th
at
“I
iti
rict In than”
A Distra, Rajas
wa
Bans
World Food Programme
fo’o
[kkn~;
dk;ZØ
e
vkbZ-lh-
Mh-,l
leqnk;
esa efgy
LokLF;
kvksa ,o
,o
a cPpksa
djus
ds lkF
okyksa d a iks"k.k laca/
k
kh eqnn~
s ekxnZ
ksa i
’ku
Z ds
fy, ç j dk;Z
f’k{k.k
ifq Lrd
k
gktks
lks#
ifj;kst
uk] cka
vU; jkT
lokM+
;ksa ds
k ¼jktL
vuqHkok
Fkku½
vkSj
sa ij vk/
kkfjr
together to facilitate the participatory processes
in the district. In the third phase of the project
(1997-2002), the emphasis was on getting the
district officials to think, plan and act on the
critical issue of child survival. The idea was to get
the district to widely propagate the concept of
the healthy child – Hajo Soru in Vagdi (the local
dialect). This experience was documented in a
publication called “Towards Hajo Soru”.
Communication is a vital factor in promoting
holistic child development that needs to be
integrated at all levels in child development
planning and delivery system. Realising the
positive impact that the literacy campaign had in
the district, the district officials decided to use the
campaign approach to take the concept of Hajo
Soru to every corner of the district. As Banswara
has a rich local folklore and media, it was decided
to spread the message of Hajo Soru through Jan
Jagran Jathas (people’s awareness campaigns).
The Jatha’s experience was documented in a
publication titled “Jan Jagran Jatha – A District
Initiative for Communicating the Vision of a
Healthy Child”.
Social and Behaviour Change Communication (SBCC) is a research -based,
consultative process that uses communication to promote and facilitate behaviour
change and support the requisite social change for the purpose of improving health
outcomes. To achieve social and behaviour change, SBCC is driven by epidemiological
evidence and client perspectives and needs. SBCC is guided by a comprehensive
ecological theory that incorporates both individual level change and change at broader
environmental and structural levels. Thus, it works at one or more levels: the behaviour
or action of individual, collective actions taken by groups, social and cultural structures,
and the enabling environment. Depending upon the issues and the context, SBCC can
achieve change as a separate intervention, but usually it is part of a comprehensive
change strategy that includes multiple interventions, including communication.
Stimulating
Change!
Through Social & Behaviour Change Communication (SBCC)
New Concept Information Systems Pvt. Ltd.
206, 2nd Floor, LSC
Pocket D & E Market
Sarita Vihar, New Delhi – 110076
Tel: 011 - 64784300
Fax: 011 - 26972743
email: [email protected]
www.newconceptinfo.com