Ward Area Profile Longlevens

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Ward Area Profile Longlevens
Ward Area Profile
Longlevens
Spring 2013
Ward Area Profile: Longlevens
Contents
Section A: Overview
Ward Councillors
Summary
S.W.O.T
Appendix 1: Technical Information
1. Section B: Physical Character
1.1 Location
1.2 Historical Development
1.3 Character of the Area
2. Section C: Demographics
2.1 Population
2.2 Age
2.3 Ethnicity
2.4 Gender
2.5 Housing Tenure
2.6 Profile of Housing Stock
Property Size
Bedrooms
Council Tax
Housing Need
2.7 Energy Efficiency of Stock
Fuel Poverty
3. Section D: Community
3.1 Healthcare
3.2 Libraries
3.3 Places of Worship
3.4 Community Facilities
3.5 Education Facilities
3.6 Leisure Facilities
3.7 Cultural Facilities
3.8 Community Groups and Services
4. Section E: Deprivation
4.1 Deprivation Table
4.2 Headlines
4.3 Children and Young People
4.4 Health and Wellbeing
4.5 Crime
4.6 Car Ownership
1
5. Section F: Economics
5.1 Employment
5.2 Average Household Income
5.3 Educational Achievement
5.4 Retail
5.5 Public Transport
5.6 Cycle ways
5.7 Congestion
6. Section G: Land Use Issues
6.1 Public Open Space
6.2 Green Infrastructure
6.3 Water
6.4 Sustainability
6.5 Conservation Area
7. Section H: Previous Issues
Appendix 1: Technical Information
2
Section A: Overview
Ward Councillors
Councillor Paul James
6 Mainard Square
Longlevens
Gloucester
GL2 0EU
Tel: 01452 384051
[email protected]
Councillor Jim Porter
137 Estcourt Road
Gloucester
GL1 3LW
Mobile 07976838505
[email protected]
Councillor Kathy Williams
12 Woodcote
Longlevens
Gloucester
GL2 9RX
Tel: 01452 307604
[email protected]
Summary
Longlevens is an attractive, safe place to live. It has good housing stock and good access to
facilities. It is well served by its own library, primary schools, university and shops. It has good
levels of open space, community facilities and sports facilities. The people of Longlevens are
among the least deprived in the City. Car ownership is high and unemployment is the lowest in the
City.
Private rented housing stock and affordable housing numbers are among the lowest in the City
making accessing the Longlevens community difficult for people wishing to move to the area.
Potential development opportunities in this mature suburban area are limited to Levens Close and
the Former Bishops College. Any development within Longlevens shall be expected to provide
benefits to the area by addressing the identified weakness on the table below.
3
S.W.O.T.
Strengths
Weaknesses
Low unemployment
Low deprivation
Good quality housing stock
Attractive mature street scene
High levels of provision of open space
and sports provision
Active community groups
High levels of school children achieving
5+ A*-C grades at GCSE
Low levels of crime
High number of community facilities
Opportunities
Lack of quality of park infrastructure and
facilities
Lack of secure fencing to allotments
Anti social behaviour around the local
centre on Cheltenham Road
Low percentage of social rented and
private rented homes – difficult for first
time buyers and those wishing to move to
the area.
High volumes of traffic on Cheltenham
Road and roundabout
Top 11-25% in County for some issues
relating to Children and Young People
(crime against under 20 year olds,
accidents under 5 year olds, children in
need, Lone parent benefit claimants)
Elmbridge Court Roundabout most
congested junction in the County
Threats
Pressure of development to the north –
will sufficient services and infrastructure
be provided?
Physical barrier of A40 restricts growth
and connections to the north.
Provision of secondary schools?
Loss of secondary school site and playing
fields at former Bishops College?
Potential development of Leven Close
pitch? Contributions from this
development to fund play equipment?
Or provide allotments?
Improvements to Green Infrastructure –
Horsbere Brook and Wotton Brook?
Pedestrian cycle connection from Plock
Court to Longford.
Park and ride to be constructed to the
east of Longlevens may ease
congestion on Elmbridge Court
roundabout?
Development of the former Bishop‟s
College?
Improvements the local centre with a
view to designing out opportunities for
crime?
Remove previous designation of cordon
sanitaire designation to the north of
Brionne Way?
Engaging with Children, Young People
and Lone Parents in any development
processes?
Expanding high quality play and sports
facilities
4
Appendix 1: Technical Information
The following data and information was collected to inform the SWOT table and build a clear
picture of the issues and opportunities in the ward.
Section B: Physical Character
1.1 Location
Longlevens is a mature mainly residential area situated to the north of Gloucester. Longlevens is
contained by the A40 to the north, Tewkesbury road to the west and Estcourt Road and
Cheltenham Road to the south.
Figure 1: Location of Longlevens Ward with the City of Gloucester
5
1.2 Historical Development
The first edition Ordnance survey map (1886) shows the area as being predominantly farmland
interspersed with orchards. This predominantly pastoral landscape is dotted with occasional farms
or large country houses. Key elements for the future development of the area are already in place:
a small hamlet focused around Longleavens (the name potentially coming from the field name
„Long Elevens‟) and the three historic routes of Oxstalls Lane, Lane Church Road and Cheltenham
Road (which are likely to be medieval in origin) all survive to the present day.
By 1902 there has been considerable growth in the settlement around Longleavens – with more
detached dwellings extending further north-west along Lane Church Road. Farming during this
time was predominantly pastoral, the parish of Wotton St Mary Without (much covered much of the
Ward) included 2,372 a. of permanent grass compared with 575 a. of arable in 1905.
The Ordinance survey map of 1923 refers to the area as Wotton St Mary Without for the first time.
The area appears largely unchanged with the exception of further dwelling appearing to the southwest of Longlevens.
Holy Trinity parish church in Longlevens was constructed in 1933 and consecrated in 1934,
originating from a mission of Barnwood Church which originally opened in Longlevevns in 1873.
The church was built for the district of Wotton St.Mary Without which was at the time centred on
Longlevens (part of which was later absorbed into the new Civil Parish of Longlevens).
Longslevens (previously called Springfields) also contained several market gardens and orchards
– presumably to serve the growing population of Gloucester.
By 1945 there has been extensive in-filling with terraced houses between Longlevens and the
Cheltenham Road. A thin line of housing along the northern edge of Estcourt Road can also be
seen. A greyhound racing track is visible in the northeast of the ward opposite the football ground
to the south. The greyhound racing track at Longlevens opened in 1933 and closed in 1983.
Further housing can also be seen to the west facing onto the Tewkesbury Road. At this point in
time the majority of the ward was still open field.
By 1956 suburban development had extended throughout the majority of the east of the ward with
new development also extending west along Lane Church Road. About half of the ward still
appears to have been farm land at this time.
The Ward of Longlevens in its current form was added to the administrative area of Gloucester city
in 1967 and the vast majority of the ward had been developed for housing by the mid 1980s.
Despite this, historic routes and field boundaries (some dating to the medieval period) are still
visible in the present street layout.
6
Figure 2: Historic Map of Longlevens circa 1902
1.3 Character of the Area
Figure 3: Map of Longlevens Ward
7
The main routes around the perimeter of Longlevens consist of the Cheltenham Road, Estcourt
Road, Tewskesbury Road and the A40. Each road has a different character.
Cheltenham Road – Situated along the south east edge of the ward, Cheltenham Road consists
predominantly of mature and well kept detached and semi detached properties with front gardens
setting the properties back from the road. The properties generally have large rear garden and are
evenly spaced along the street scene.
Figure 4: Photograph of Cheltenham Road
The A40 - is situated to the north of Longlevens. It is a dual carriageway with four lanes of traffic.
There is no access into Longlevens itself along the length of the A40. Access is achieved via the
Elmbridge Roundabout at the eastern edge of the ward. There is also no direct vehicular access
from the A40 to the north of Longlevens. As such the A40 acts as a physical barrier to the
northern part of the ward and the area beyond.
8
Figure 5: Photograph of A40
Estcourt Road (A38) - Estcourt Road is in part four lanes of traffic, with two additional sub roads.
The road is flanked by residential development consisting predominantly of large detached and
semi detached properties. The properties are accessed from the sub roads. There are mature
trees planted along the main Estcourt Road carriageways and the sub roads. The tree planting
has a positive effect on the character of the area. Estcourt Road is very wide with a typical street
width, between the faces of the houses, of 60m. As such the street feels open and spacious.
Figure 6: Photograph of Estcourt Road
9
Tewkesbury Road - Situated on the western edge of the ward, the Tewkesbury Road is
characterised by a number of detached residential properties. The southern end of the road has a
mature planted screen which forms the rear of the Gambier Parry Garden development. This
development of detached houses was completed in the early 1980s. Access to the facilities at
Plock Court (tennis centre, pitches and open space) is also achieved from the Tewkesbury Road.
Figure 7: Photographs of Tewkesbury Road and Gambier Parry Gardens
Within Longlevens there is a hierarchy of streets. The main streets of Oxstalls Lane, Church
Road, Innsworth lane, and Longford Lane form a cross that meets at a central traffic light control
10
junction. These main streets are similar in width with typically between 32-36m between the faces
of the properties. The roads themselves vary in width from 4.75m – 6.4m in width. With these
widths, on street parking does undoubtedly obstruct the carriageway.
The properties along these main routes are typically mature two storey residential both detached
and semi-detached. There is also access to a number of services from these roads such as
schools, library, newsagents and butchers.
Figure 8: Photograph of Oxstalls Lane/Innsworth Lane/Church Road/ Longford Lane
Behind the main streets are a number of estate developments constructed at various times
between the 40s and late 80s. These areas have a different character to the perimeter streets and
main streets. They are typical of „modern‟ speculative housing development of their time. Many of
the developments are laid out in cul-de-sacs.
Figure 9: Photograph of Estate Developments
11
There is also an area between Cheltenham Road and Oxstalls that consists of 1930s housing,
namely Rydal Road, Grasmere Road, Windermere Road, Wellsprings Road, Kendal Road and
Coniston Road. The housing has a typical 1930s design consisting predominantly of semidetached pairs with a hipped roof and double height bay windows.
Figure 10: Photograph of 1930s Development
12
Section C: Demographics
2.1 Population
Data from the 2011 Census shows that Longlevens has a population of 9532 people forming
approximately 4027 households. This accounts for approximately 8% of the whole population of
the City. This makes Longlevens the 6th largest ward in terms of population in the City.
Figure 11: Population of Gloucester by Ward
2.2 Age
In terms of the age of the population there is a higher than average number of 16-64 year olds
compared to the other ward in Gloucestershire. In this category Longlevens is in 11-25% of wards
across Gloucestershire. All other age brackets are marked as „cool‟ which means that they are
within the normal range. (Source MAIDen)
Figure 12: Age Breakdown
Source: MAIDeN Neighbourhood Profiles 2009
The following chart shows the recently released Census data illustrating population breakdown.
13
Figure 13: Chart showing Population Breakdown Census 2011
Total population : 9,532
900
people per age group
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
Age Group
2.3 Ethnicity
The following table displays the ethnic make up of the city in 2006. The population of Longlevens
consists of 95.5 % White British and 4.5% of Ethnic Minority Groups.
Figure 14: Table of Ethnicity
Source: Gloucestershire County Council - Ethnicity in Gloucestershire 2006 - uses four ethnic groupings:
White British; White Minorities (White Irish/ White Other); BME (“Non-White” Groups: Mixed Race, Asian or
Asian British, Black or Black British, Chinese, Other), and Ethnic Minorities (BME plus White Minorities: in
other words all non-White British people).
14
2.4 Gender
Figure 15: Breakdown of Population Cohorts by Sex
Source: 2010 ONS
500
450
400
350
300
250
males
200
female
150
100
50
0
The data shows that there are slightly more boys than girls between the ages 0-14 years. At the
age group 15-19 years there are a significantly more girls than boys.
There are significantly more women 85+ than older men which does reflect national average life
expectancy.
2.5 Housing Tenure
Longlevens has a high owner occupation rate of 88%. The average for Gloucester is around 67%.
Longlevens has the lowest percentage of social housing in the City, at just 2% compared to the
average of 13%. Longlevens also has a less than average amount of private rented housing with
9% compared to the average of 17%.
Figure 16: Housing tenure
Source: Census 2011
Owned;
Owned
Outright
%
Owned;
Owned
with a
Mortgage
or Loan
Shared
Ownership
(Part
Owned
and Part
15
Social
Rented
Private
Rented
Living
Rent Free
%
%
%
%
Rented)
%
Longlevens
45
43
0
2
9
1
Grange
44
38
1
5
12
1
Hucclecote
43
42
0
3
11
1
Elmbridge
40
45
0
6
9
0
Abbey
34
49
1
4
12
1
Tuffley
34
33
1
24
7
1
Barnwood
30
43
1
13
11
1
Barton and
Tredworth
24
30
1
12
32
2
Kingsholm
and Wotton
23
24
1
16
34
1
Matson and
Robinswood
23
30
0
38
8
1
Moreland
22
40
0
14
23
1
Podsmead
22
26
0
42
9
1
Quedgeley
Fieldcourt
19
46
4
11
19
1
Westgate
19
20
2
19
38
1
Quedgeley
Severn Vale
18
57
1
4
20
1
Gloucester
29
38
1
13
17
1
South West
35
32
1
13
17
1
England
31
33
1
18
17
1
16
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Total Owned Occupied %
Westgate
Tuffley
Quedgeley Severn Vale
Quedgeley Fieldcourt
Podsmead
Moreland
Matson and Robinswood
Longlevens
Kingsholm and Wotton
Hucclecote
Grange
Elmbridge
Barton and Tredworth
Barnwood
Social Rented %
Abbey
Percentage (%)
Figure 17: Table Showing Housing Tenure Split in Longlevens
Private Rented %
Ward
Figure 18: Chart showing housing tenure split by ward in Gloucester (2001)
Private Rented %
9%
Social Rented %
2%
Total Owned
Occupied %
88%
17
2.6 Profile of Housing stock
Property Size
Longlevens has a higher than average percentage of Houses and Bungalows at 96% compared to
the average for Gloucester at 83%. In turn, Longlevens has a lower than average percentage of
Flats at 3% compared to the district average of 16%.
Figure 19: Property Type
Source: Census 2011
House or
Bungalow
%
Flat
%
Caravan or
Mobile Home
Shared
Dwelling
%
%
Longlevens
96
3
0
0
Abbey
95
5
0
0
Elmbridge
93
6
0
0
Hucclecote
92
7
1
0
Barnwood
92
8
0
0
Grange
92
6
3
0
Tuffley
91
9
0
0
Quedgeley
Severn Vale
91
9
0
0
Quedgeley
Fieldcourt
89
9
2
0
Moreland
86
13
0
1
Barton and
Tredworth
80
20
0
1
Podsmead
78
22
0
0
Matson and
Robinswood
77
23
0
0
Kingsholm
and Wotton
52
47
0
1
Westgate
40
57
1
3
Gloucester
83
16
0
0
South West
81
18
1
0
England
78
21
0
0
18
Bedrooms
Longlevens has a lower than average percentage of one and two bedroom properties but a higher
percentage of three and four bedroom properties.
Figure 20: Numbers of Bedrooms
Source: Census 2011
1 Bedroom
2 Bedrooms
3 Bedrooms
4 Bedrooms
5 or More
Bedrooms
%
%
%
%
%
Abbey
5
22
42
28
3
Barnwood
6
16
46
26
6
Barton and
Tredworth
15
32
42
8
3
Elmbridge
3
18
57
18
4
Grange
4
35
54
5
1
Hucclecote
5
25
49
19
2
Kingsholm and
Wotton
26
32
25
11
5
Longlevens
5
20
51
22
3
Matson and
Robinswood
15
30
46
8
2
Moreland
9
26
52
9
4
Podsmead
20
23
46
7
4
Quedgeley
Fieldcourt
7
33
38
19
3
Quedgeley
Severn Vale
8
30
39
21
2
Tuffley
9
27
48
13
3
Westgate
38
29
19
9
5
Gloucester
11
27
43
15
3
South West
11
27
40
16
5
England
12
28
41
14
5
19
Council Tax
Longlevens has a lower than average percentage of properties in Council Tax Bands A and B but
higher than average percentage in Bands C to F.
Figure 21: Council Tax Bands
Source: Census 2011
Band A
Band B
Band C
Band D
Band E
Band F
Band G
Band H
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
Abbey
5
30
30
23
12
2
0
0
Barnwood
33
17
17
13
17
3
0
0
Barton and
Tredworth
67
29
3
0
0
0
0
0
Elmbridge
8
25
43
12
7
2
1
0
Grange
10
59
29
2
0
0
0
0
Hucclecote
10
15
50
13
10
3
0
0
Kingsholm
and Wotton
41
31
13
7
5
2
1
0
Longlevens
5
12
52
18
11
2
0
0
Matson and
Robinswood
54
23
15
5
2
0
0
0
Moreland
48
37
9
3
1
1
1
0
Podsmead
46
26
16
7
2
2
0
0
Quedgeley
Fieldcourt
13
44
23
12
7
1
0
0
Quedgeley
Severn Vale
9
32
27
20
10
1
0
0
Tuffley
26
30
23
12
5
3
1
0
Gloucester
30
28
24
10
6
2
0
0
South West
18
25
23
16
11
5
3
0
England
25
20
22
15
9
5
4
1
Westgate
20
Housing Need
The Fordham Research Gloucestershire Household Survey of Housing Need (2009) identifies that
there are 4.1% of households in unsuitable housing in the North West region. This includes
Longlevens, Elmbridge, Barnwood, Hucclecote and Abbey ward.
Figure 22: Unsuitable Housing and Housing Need
Summary
Longlevens has a high percentage of houses and bungalows which are privately owned. This has
resulted in a shortage of flats and social housing. Greater focus on developing one and two
bedroom social housing would address the imbalance.
2.7 Energy Efficiency of Housing Stock
A household is deemed to be in Fuel Poverty if they spend more than 10% of their income of
heating their home; the table below shows the percentage of households who are defined as being
in fuel poverty. 4.0% of households in Longlevens are in fuel poverty, which is lower than the local
authority average of 5.5%.
Figure 23 Fuel Poverty
Source: Fuel Poverty Indicators – Centre for Sustainable Energy
Ward
On Full Income (Equivalised)
Longlevens
4.0%
Abbey
4.1%
Hucclecote
4.1%
21
Quedgeley Severn Vale
4.1%
Elmbridge
4.8%
Tuffley
4.9%
Grange
5.0%
Quedgeley Fieldcourt
5.0%
Barnwood
5.2%
Podsmead
5.5%
Matson and Robinswood
5.7%
Kingsholm and Wotton
6.3%
Westgate
7.0%
Moreland
7.2%
Barton and Tredworth
8.9%
Total
5.5%
22
Section D: Community
3.1 Healthcare
There is a GP surgery at:
Dr Foster JE & Partners
Longlevens Surgery
19b Church Road
Longlevens
Gloucester
GL2 0AJ
There is also a surgery just outside of the ward boundary at:
Dr Champion CJ & Partners
16 Cheltenham Road
Gloucester
GL2 0LS
3.2 Libraries
The ward benefits from a library on Church Road, Gloucester, GL2 0AJ. The library is open 10 1pm then 2.30 - 5.30pm Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. It is also open 2 - 7pm on
Wednesdays and 10 - 4pm on Saturdays.
The library offers clubs and groups as well as an internet cafe.
3.3 Places of Worship
Kendal Road Baptist Church
Holy Trinity Church
3.4 Community Facilities
Longlevens has excellent levels of community facilities for the size of its population. The following
information is taken from the Community Facilities Audit Autumn 2012 Version 1.2. It shows that
Longlevens has 13 identified facilities which are available to all members of the community. This is
three times the recommended amount of facilities per 1000 population.
A community facility is defined in the Audit as “Any building available for hire by any member of the
community for the purposes of community activities.”
Uses may include parent and toddler groups, community meetings, community events, worship,
sports teams, keep fit classes, training and adult education, social gatherings, celebrations and the
meeting of any local group or club that is open to all members of the community.
23
Figure 24: Table showing the number of community facilities by ward
population
facilities facilities Difference to
open to per 000
recommend
all
population 0.44 per 000
percentage of
recommended
0.44 per 000
achieved
ward
1
Abbey
9391
3
0.319
-0.121
73%
2
Barnwood
10102
8
0.792
0.352
180%
3
Barton and Tredworth
11287
8
0.709
0.269
161%
4
Elmbridge
5650
5
0.885
0.445
201%
5
Grange
5621
5
0.890
0.450
202%
6
Hucclecote
8539
8
0.937
0.497
213%
7
Kingsholm and Wotton
7032
7
0.995
0.555
226%
8
Longlevens
9567
13
1.359
0.919
309%
9
Matson and Robinswood
10323
8
0.775
0.335
176%
10
Moreland
10286
4
0.389
-0.051
88%
11
Podsmead
2890
4
1.384
0.944
315%
12
Quedgeley Fieldcourt
9129
6
0.657
0.217
149%
13
Quedgeley Severn Vale
6908
0
0.000
-0.440
0%
14
Tuffley
5751
3
0.522
0.082
119%
15
Westgate
5964
13
2.180
1.740
495%
City Totals
118440
95
0.802
0.362
182%
Figure 25: Chart showing difference to recommended 0.44 facilities per thousand
population
(0=0.44)
Westgate
Tuffley
Quedgeley Severn Vale
Quedgeley Fieldcourt
Podsmead
Moreland
Matson and Robinswood
Longlevens
Kingsholm and Wotton
Hucclecote
Grange
Elmbridge
Barton and Tredworth
Barnwood
Abbey
-1
-0.5
0
0.5
24
1
1.5
2
The identified community facilities are:
Longlevens Village Hall
Longlevens Library
Kendal Road Baptist Church
University of Gloucestershire
Longlevens Community Centre
Holy Trinity Church
Longlevens RFC
Longlevens AFC
Longlevens Junior School
Oxstalls Sports Park, Plock Court
Oxstall Sports (former Bishops College)
Milestones School
The Gala Club
3.5 Education Facilities
Longlevens is served by the following education facilities:
Longlevens Infant School, Paygrove Lane, GL20AX
Longlevens Junior School, Church Road, GL20AL
Milestones School, Longford Lane, GL29EU
University of Gloucestershire, Longlevens Lane, GL2 9HW
3.6 Leisure Facilities
Longlevens is well served by leisure facilities. Longlevens contains Oxstalls Sports Park, Plock
Court. This comprises of Oxstalls Tennis centre which provides indoor and outdoor courts, and all
weather synthetic pitches for football and hockey. There is also a very well established rugby club
and football club situated on Longford Lane. The sports facilities at the former Bishops College off
Estcourt Road are also available to hire.
25
3.7 Cultural Facilities
As previously mentioned, the ward is home to the University of Gloucestershire.
3.8 Community Groups & Services
There is an active Neighbourhood Partnership in Longlevens. More information can be found on
their website www.mylonglevens.co.uk .
There are many community groups operating in Longlevens which are centred around the
community facilities. These groups play a vital positive role within the community.
26
Section E: Deprivation Index
4.1 Deprivation Table
HOT indicates that this locality is amongst the „top 10%‟ (or „bottom 10% marked with *) of
localities in Gloucestershire. WARM indicates that this locality is in the next 25% of localities in
Gloucestershire.
Source MAIDeN
Number
Hot, Warm or
Cool
Health
Social Work assessments 2011
Mental Health assessments 2011
Accident Admissions 2012
Children and Young People
<5
20
525
COOL
COOL
COOL
Accident Admissions of under 5‟s 2012
Accident Admissions of under 17‟s 2012
Children in need 2011
Crime victims under 20 years old 2010-11
Lone parent benefit claimants August 2008
Key stage 4 - Pupils not achieving 5+ A*-C grades inc English * maths
2012
Free School Meals - Pupils eligible 2012
English as an Additional Language – pupils of school age whose first
language is known
Crime
35
95
20
55
30
25
WARM
COOL
COOL
WARM
WARM
COOL
45
1100
COOL
COOL
Victims of crime (all) 2010-11
Anti Social Behaviour Incidents recorded by the Police 2010-11
Theft victims 2010-11
Violence victims 2010-11
Burglary victims 2010-11
Hate Crime/incidents 2010-11
Serious and Fatal Road Traffic Collisions 2007-10
Criminal damage victims 2010-11
Arson recorded by Fire and Rescue 2008-11
Economy
330
230
130
70
45
5
5
55
15
COOL
COOL
COOL
COOL
COOL
COOL
COOL
COOL
COOL
Mean household income 2007 £k*
Working-age benefit claimants Aug 2008
Job seeker claimants Aug 2008
Incapacity Benefit claimants 2008
Lone parent benefit claimants Aug 2008
Carer claimants Aug 2008
Disabled claimants Aug 2008
Households with broadband internet 2008*
34.352
300
55
130
30
30
40
4107
WARM
COOL
WARM
WARM
WARM
WARM
WARM
COOL
27
4.2 Headlines
4.3 Children and Young People
There are no „HOT‟ issues in this category of the deprivation index. Pupils eligible for free school
meals and accident admissions of under 17‟s are among the lowest in the County.
Academic achievement is also among the best in the County with high numbers of Key Stage 4
Pupils achieving 5 or more A*-C grades at GCSE including English and Maths.
However, the ward does fall higher than the county norm in the categories of: Low birth weight
babies, Accident Admissions of under 5‟s, Children in Need, Crime Victims under 20 years old,
Lone parent benefit claimants. This suggests that while Longlevens is generally a good place to
be a child or young person, there is room for improvement. Children and young people should not
be forgotten in the planning process.
4.4 Health & Wellbeing
The following maps are taken from “Gloucester Healthy Living – Gloucester Area Health Profile
2009-2010 NHS Gloucestershire”.
Figure 26: Gloucester Existing Health Problems
28
The map above shows existing health issues, such as people with angina, those that have suffered
a heart attack, new cases of diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
Figure 27: Gloucester Future Health Problems
The map above shows potential future health problems in the city. This is created by taking into
account the indicators for potential ill-health. These indicators include: high numbers of smokers
and obese people, diet (few people eating sufficient amounts of fruit and vegetables), and where
the consumption of both fast food and sugary drinks is above average
The maps show that there are expected to be significant improvements in health within the ward.
4.5 Crime
There are no „HOT‟ issues identified in this category of the deprivation index. In comparison to the
County as a whole, Longlevens has lower than the „norm‟ in all crime categories except for Young
Offender Interventions recorded between 2007/08. However, even in this category there were less
than 5 Interventions issued. This suggests that Longlevens is a safe place to live with low crime
rates.
Crime data suggests an issue around the area of the „Co-op‟ supermarket, Longlevens Infant
School, Penny Close and the entrance to Greyhound Gardens including the public house. Crime
29
in this area is within the top 25% of the highest crime in the County. The majority of crimes
reported relate to incidents of anti social behaviour.
4.6 Car Ownership
Car ownership in Longlevens is high. This reflects the relative overall prosperity of the area and
also to a degree the geographical location of the ward on the periphery of the city.
Figure 28: Car Ownership
30
In summary the deprivation indices show that Longlevens has few indicators of deprivation. The
following map illustrates the Indices of Deprivation for Gloucester 2010. The map is complied by
looking at income deprivation, employment deprivation, health and disability, education, skills and
training, crime and disorder, barriers to housing services, and living environment. It clearly
identifies that Longlevens has one of the lowest indices of deprivation in Gloucester.
Figure 29: Indices of Deprivation Map
Source: inform Gloucestershire Research & Intelligence
31
Section F: Economics
5.1 Employment
Source: Gloucestershire County Council Unemployment Bulletin November 2012
In November 2012 Longlevens was ranked 38th out 142 wards in the County with regard to
unemployment based on an analysis of claimant counts. The ward has a low claimant rate of 1.3%
which is the lowest rate in the City. This indicates low unemployment.
Figure 30: Analysis of Claimant Count at Gloucester City Ward Level November 2012
Figure 31: Claimant Rates Across Gloucester City Wards – November 2012
Figure 31 shows the claimant rate for Gloucester City district wards. The red line represents the
average claimant rate across the City of 4.1%.
32
Figure 32: Claimant Rate Annual Average 2012
Claimant
Rate
Average
for Year
2012
Rate of
claimant
count
Ward
Jan-12
Feb12
Mar12
Apr12
May12
Jun12
Jul12
Aug12
Sep12
Oct12
Nov12
Dec12
Average
Longlevens
1.4
1.2
1.2
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.2
1.3
1.3
1.1
1.3
1.1
1.3
Abbey
1.8
1.9
1.8
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.5
1.5
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.4
1.6
Hucclecote
1.8
1.9
1.9
1.7
1.7
1.7
1.7
1.7
1.8
1.7
1.8
1.7
1.8
Elmbridge
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.4
2.4
2.4
2.5
2.3
2.3
2.2
2.0
2.3
Quedgeley
Severn Vale
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.0
2.0
2.1
2.1
2.4
2.3
2.3
2.5
2.1
2.2
Grange
2.7
2.9
2.9
2.6
2.6
2.0
2.1
2.3
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
Barnwood
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.5
3.5
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.5
3.3
3.3
3.2
3.4
Quedgeley
Fieldcourt
3.5
3.4
3.2
3.2
3.2
3.1
2.9
3.0
3.1
3.0
2.8
2.6
3.1
Tuffley
4.3
4.5
4.5
4.2
4.2
4.0
4.1
4.1
3.8
3.6
3.6
3.3
4.0
Moreland
5.3
5.6
5.3
5.2
5.2
5.2
5.2
5.1
4.7
4.9
5.2
5.0
5.2
Kingsholm and
Wotton
5.4
5.8
5.4
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.7
5.5
5.4
5.1
5.2
5.0
5.4
Matson and
Robinswood
6.2
6.5
6.5
6.2
6.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.2
6.2
6.5
6.2
Podsmead
6.5
6.9
6.7
6.1
6.1
6.0
6.3
6.4
6.2
6.3
6.5
6.6
6.4
Barton and
Tredworth
7.7
8.3
8.3
8.1
8.1
8.1
8.1
8.5
8.4
8.6
8.6
8.7
8.3
Westgate
8.3
8.7
8.7
9.0
9.0
8.4
8.5
8.4
8.3
8.4
7.8
7.4
8.4
5.2 Average Household Income
The average household income in the 2007 Maiden data was £34,352, which is above the County
„norm‟. The number of working age benefit claimants is well below the County „norm‟. This
suggests that Longlevens is a fairly affluent area.
More recent data from 2010 shows the estimated gross income per household has increased to
£38,071. This is above the UK average.
33
Figure 33: Average Gross Household Income by ward in Gloucester 2010
5.3 Educational Achievement
In 2012, 74.25% of pupils living in the ward achieved of 5 or more GCSEs grades A*-C including
English and maths. This is well above the UK national average of 58.2% and the highest result for
the City overall.
84.15% of pupils achieved 5 or more GCSEs grades A*-C. This is well above the UK national
average of 68.4%.
Figure 34: Educational Attainment at GCSE Across the City
34
The following map shows deprivation in terms of education, skills and training. Longlevens has low
deprivation in these areas.
Figure 35: Indices of Deprivation 2010 – Education, Skills and Training
5.4 Retail
There are a number of retail units situated in three main locations. The table below
outlines the units in each area:
Figure 36: Retail units
Retail
Cross roads – Longford Lane/Church Road
Two units – butchers and newsagent
Oxstalls Drive/Oxstalls Way
Six units - Take away, estate agents, computer
shop, IT service, hairdressers, engineering
supply shop.
Local centre (designated in the City of
Ten units – including Coop supermarket,
Gloucester Local Plan 2002). Cheltenham Road pharmacy, petrol filing station, Tesco express,
and Old Cheltenham Road
two takeaway restaurants, estate agents
Parade at Oxstalls Lane and Oxstalls Way
Five units including - Car sales garage, Chip
Junction
Shop, Newsagents and Off License.
35
5.5 Public Transport
Longlevens is very well served by public transport. The number 6, 10, 94, 94X, 94U, 97, 98, 241,
353, and 853 bus services all operate within the area. This links the ward to the City centre and
Cheltenham.
5.6 Cycle Ways
Part of the National Cycle Network route 41 runs along Estcourt Road, behind the University of
Gloucestershire, Oxstalls Lane, Rydal Road, Windermere Road, Cheltenham Road and then
across into Elmbridge.
The Gloucester Cycle Map 2011 identifies the majority of roads in Longlevens as being „quiet
roads‟, with exception of the Cheltenham Road, Oxstalls Lane, Church Road, Longford Lane,
Brionne Way and Innsworth Lane which are busier. The roads that form the perimeter of the ward
are listed as „busy roads with fast traffic‟ requiring increased cycling experiences. These roads are
Estcourt road (A38), Tewkesbury Road (A38) and the A40.
5.7 Congestion
The main routes around Longlevens have high traffic flows typical of their „A‟ road status. The A40
has between 20,000 and 50,000 vehicles per day (source: Gloucestershire Traffic Flow Diagrams,
Gloucestershire County Council 2010). The Cheltenham Road roundabout is a local congestion
point as it is where five busy roads converge.
Estcourt Road and parts of the Cheltenham Road have 15,000 to 20,000 vehicles per day.
The County Council are proposing a Park and Ride facility to the south east of the Cheltenham
Road roundabout outside of the ward boundary.
36
Section G: Land Use Index
6.1 Public Open Space
Source: Gloucester City Open Space Strategy Draft for Consultation May 2012.
The open spaces in the ward were mainly created as part of housing development, to provide
space for formal and informal recreation, or as routes for watercourses or buffers to the busy A40
ring road. Plock Court is a very large open space and is the city‟s largest sports ground. Open
space is generally clustered to the north and west of the ward, with limited open space to the south
and east.
Figure 37: Table of Open Spaces
Open Space Types
Type
A
Parks and gardens
B
Informal green space
C
Allotments
D
Countryside and natural spaces
E
Green infrastructure
F
Civic spaces
G
Cemeteries
H
Spaces for children and young people
I
Amenity Green Space
J
Sports provision
Longlevens open spaces are a mainly maintained as short mown grass with associated trees,
shrubs and hedgerows. There are three large and popular allotments sites in the ward.
In total the ward has 50.36ha of open space, a provision of 5.26ha per1000 population, which is
well in excess of the proposed open space standard of 2.8ha per 1000. However, the Plock Court
Playing Field is also a city-wide facility, which serves the greater Gloucester catchment area.
There are a range of formal sports pitches provided in the ward, which are used by both local clubs
and teams from across the city. There are also a number of private playing fields and outdoor
facilities in the ward. Some of these are accessible to residents and are included in the sports
pitch calculation below.
Sports provision is 3.51ha per 1000, which is well in excess of the proposed standard for playing
pitch provision of 1.6ha per 1000, but as stated above, also serves the wider city population.
There are three play areas in the ward, which equate to 0.02ha per 1000, which falls seriously
short of the FiT benchmark standard for formal play provision of 0.25ha per 1000.
Figure 38: Map of Public Open Spaces
Opportunities for improved provision
Longlevens meets the council‟s adopted standard for open space quantity, but some sites fall well
short of the expected standard in terms of quality of park infrastructure and facilities. Distribution
of spaces in the ward is also a little uneven.
Improvements in provision should therefore concentrate on expanded high quality play and sports
facilities and ensuring optimum maintenance and usage of sports pitches on existing sites.
Further improving the allotment sites in terms of secure fencing etc is also desirable.
6.2 Green Infrastructure
Figure 39: Map of Natural Environment Features
Plock Court open space is an identified Landscape Conservation Area. A Site of Nature
Conservation Interest is also identified off Brionne Way in the north of the ward.
Under the emerging Green Infrastructure Plan, a number of areas have been identified for potential
improvements. The main focus for these improvements is Horsbare Brook and Wotton Brook.
The Green Infrastructure Plan also identifies a proposed SusTrans cycle track along Windermere
Road, Paygrove Lane, across the Cheltenham Road into Elmbridge, and connections to Innsworth
and Cheltenham Road East.
A new pedestrian cycle bridge is also being suggested to connect Plock Court to Longford in the
emerging Green Infrastructure Plan
6.3 Water
To the east of the ward lies Horsbere Brook which is an important green corridor and wildlife
corridor.
Figure 40: Photograph of Horsbere Brook
To the west is Wotton Brook which is an important existing green corridor.
Figure 41: Photograph of Wotton Brook
6.4 Sustainability
There are a number of solar PV and solar hot water systems on private dwellings
Oxstalls tennis centre has a 10kw solar PV array. The old Oxstalls school has a 5kw wind turbine
sited in its grounds. The universities Oxstalls campus has numerous energy and water saving
features including a hollow concrete super structure that has air circulated through it to take
advantage of embodied heat and coolness. It also has a 63kw solar PV system on its sports
centre which is the largest array in the City.
6.5 Conservation Area
There are no Conservation Areas in the ward. The ward does have two Areas of Principle
Archaeological Interest:
Kingsholm (Roman Fort and Saxon Settlement)
Northern By-pass (Historic Landscape)
Section H: Previous Issues
7.1 City Plan and City Vision Issues and Options Consultation Summer 2011
Longlevens Neighbourhood Partnership Meeting 14thJuly 2011
Raised the issue of parking in streets in residential areas
Raised the issue of volume of traffic using local streets
Objections to having a site in Longlevens in the City Plan
Would prefer community facilities to more houses and would like to build the community
facilities if land was made available
7.2 Local Development Framework Sites Allocation Document Preferred Options
Consultation 2006
This consultation identified at Policy SAD25 that Land at Leven Close be allocated for 15 dwellings
and that land at Paygrove Lane be allocated for a Community Park, 16 letters of objection, 8 letters
of support and 6 comments were received on the proposed policy.
The objections raised the following points;
Leven Close is an oasis for wildlife and existing trees and hedges should be retained
Proposal involves the loss of a green field site
Proposal would result in increased traffic in close proximity to the Infant & Junior Schools
Lack of infrastructure to support new dwellings
Neighbourhood Park would result in more traffic in the area and impact on immediate
neighbours
No need for an additional Neighbourhood Park – there is a very large park in Greyhound
Gardens and the Infant School and local community already use this land
Leven Close should be kept as an open space
Leven Close is a Greenfield site and there are other more sequentially preferable brown
field sites in the City which should be developed first.
Flooding and drainage is a problem in the area – more housing will exacerbate this issue
A neighbourhood park would encourage antisocial behavior by youths including smoking,
drinking and drug taking
Proposals would result in a loss of existing trees
No details on point of access for land at Leven Close
The letters of support raise the following points;
Prefer a Neighbourhood Park to new housing on Paygrove Lane, the site could connect
well to Greyhound Gardens with pedestrian and cycle access providing links to the Infants
School.
Neighbourhood Park should be managed for youth football/rugby and cricket for the local
community
Density on Leven Close should be increased to between 30-50 dwellings per Ha
The letters of comment raise the following points;
The Leven Close site is one of the remaining green spaces in Longelvens.
The Neighbourhood Park may well be subject to abuse by local youths – it will need to be
well managed
The County Council should consider the use of land at Leven Close for allotments as this
would alleviate the burden on local drainage and would provide a local socially acceptable
use of the site.
Any Neighbouirhood Park should be suitably lit to safeguard against vandalism , theft,
burglary and anti social behavior.
7.3 Second Deposit Gloucester City Local Plan Allocations 2002
Figure 42: Extract from the Local Plan Proposals Map 2002
The following areas were identified in the Local Plan 2001. They include Private Playing Fields
(PPF), Cordon Sanitaire, Housing Commitment, Site of Nature Conservation Interest, Flood Plain,
Landscape Conservation Area, Local Centre, Public Open Space, Land Reserved for future Open
Space, Allotments, Area of Principal Archaeological Interest, Cycle Route.
The area marked as cordon sanitaire was developed for housing in 2003/4 under planning
permission 02/01133/FUL. The cordon sanitaire is an area around Longford Sewage Treatment
Works located to the north in Tewkesbury Borough. The treatment works is now closed as such it
may be appropriate to remove the designation.
7.4 Extant Major Permissions
There are no outstanding major developments in the area that have the benefit of planning
permission.

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