AMCA International InMotion

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AMCA International InMotion
AMCA 0610
9/29/06
1:16 PM
Page 1
A Supplement to HPAC Engineering Magazine
OCTOBER 2006
www.amca.org
In This Issue:
Impact-Resistant Louvers
Circulating Fan Velocity
Profile Applications
Modulating
Characteristics of
Control Dampers
AMCA 0610
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Page 2
Learn from the
Leader in Fan
Engineering
Twin City Fan is proud to introduce its new training facility
and FREE one-day engineering seminar. Sign up today!
Twin City Fan Companies, Ltd. is an industry leading designer and manufacturer of high quality fans
and blowers for all fan applications from heavy industrial to light commercial. Our experienced and
knowledgeable fan engineers want to share their knowledge with you! The first one-day seminar is
scheduled for November 10, so sign up today!
One-Day Fan Engineering Seminar Topics:
-
Fundamentals of Airflow, Fans and Duct Systems
Selecting the Right Fan
Fan System Effects
Fan Sound
Balance and Vibration
Fan Installation, Operation and Maintenance
Training seminars will be conducted at the Twin
City Fan Companies, Ltd. corporate headquarters
in Minneapolis, MN. For more information about
seminar specifics, dates or to sign up for a
seminar, please visit www.twincityfan.com and
click on Engineering Seminars. Don't wait, seating
is limited!!
InMotion_1006_draft4a_curve.indd 1
Many of the seminar concepts will be
reinforced through live demonstrations in
TCF's accredited air and sound laboratory.
Attendees will receive a certificate of
course completion that can be applied for
Professional Development Hours.
www.twincityfan.com
9/1/2006 5:14:44 PM
AMCA 0610
9/29/06
1:17 PM
Page 3
EC-GIANTS
modern miracles in ventilation
EC-GIANTS are the largest external rotor motor with EC technology and completely
integrated drive and control electronics on the market! These air movers range in size from
500-990 millimeters and use as little as 1/3 the energy of standard AC motors! This stateof-the-art technology generates extremely low acoustiAcal noise from advanced drive
electronics and 3-D backward curved impellers or sickle-shaped axial fans. EC-GIANTS are
an excellent choice for rooftop condensers and air handling units. Find out how EC can
work for you, call today!
100 Hyde Road, Farmington, CT 06034 USA • www.ebmpapst.us
Tel: 860 • 674 • 1515 • E-Mail: [email protected] • Fax: 860 • 674 • 8536
AMCA 0610
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AMCA 0610
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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S
F E AT U R E S
6
President’s Message
Welcome to the inaugural issue of InMotion.
By Emery (Pete) Neitzel
Board of Directors
Lee Buddrus, Chairman of the Board
President, Acme Engineering and
Manufacturing Corporation
Emery (Pete) Neitzel, President
Vice President, Engineering & Manufacturing,
Greenheck Fan Corporation
Jo Reinhardt, Vice President
President, Industrial Louvers, Inc.
Gary Benson, Treasurer
President, Mechanovent Corporation
Barbara L. Morrison, Executive Director
AMCA International
Denis Labelle, Director-at-Large
Executive Vice President, T.A. Morrison
Michael Barry, Director
President, Twin City Fan Companies, Ltd.
Arthur LaPointe, Director
Vice President and General Manager, Construction
Specialties Inc.
Robert Van Becelaere, Director
Vice President, Engineering, Ruskin Company
Victor Colwell, Director
Vice President of Sales & Marketing, Loren Cook
C. F. Yang, Director
Managing Director, Kruger Asia
Holding Pte. Ltd.
Michael Almaguer, Director
Vice President, Sales & Marketing, Pottorff
8
AMCA Certified Ratings Program: A Closer Look
9
AMCA Member Directory
12
Impact-Resistant Louvers:
Understanding the New Code Requirements
More research is needed as codes are put into place.
By Vickie J. Lovell
16
Modulating Characteristics of Control Dampers
Determining the correct damper design for the system at-hand.
By Robert Van Becelaere
19
AMCA’s Certified Ratings Program (CRP) Supplements
the LEED Rating System
LEED certifies buildings, but only AMCA’s CRP can assure
the performance of the air system components that go
into those buildings.
By Michael Ivanovich and Emery (Pete) Neitzel
24
Circulating Fan Velocity Profile Applications
Virtual disks incorporating 3D velocity profile data can
substantially reduce computation times from days to hours.
By Richard Aynsley, PhD
27
David Nussbaum Chief Executive Officer
Preston L. Vice Chief Financial Officer and
Corporate Secretary
Colleen Zelina Senior Vice President, Human
Resources and Organizational Effectiveness
Eric Shanfelt Vice President, eMedia Strategy
Certified Ratings Program – A Closer Look
Update on European Directives and Standards
As the development of standards in the European Region
booms, more manufacturers are becoming involved
in the process.
By Ian P. Andrews
30
Ad Index
Joseph A. Fristik Group Publisher, Mechanical
Systems/Construction Group
Michael Ivanovich Editor in Chief, HPAC Engineering
Dave Bosak Art Director
Eileen Callahan Sr. Acct. Manager
Susan Durishin Media Services Manager
Publishing Offices
The Penton Media Building
1300 E. Ninth Street
Cleveland, OH 44114-1503
Phone: 216-696-7000
Fax: 216-696-3432
Website: www.hpac.com
e-Mail: [email protected]
INMOTION
InMotion is published biannually to keep
HVAC professionals abreast of rapidly
changing codes, requirements, laws,
advancements, and best practices in
the air movement and control industry.
October 2006
5
AMCA 0610
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P R E S I D E N T ’S M E S S A G E
InMotion is published specifically for HVAC professionals
who design, specify, purchase, install, commission,
operate, and maintain ventilation systems.
As the 2005-2006 president of the Air Movement and
Control Association (AMCA) International, Inc., I am pleased
to introduce the inaugural edition of our new magazine,
InMotion. InMotion is published specifically for HVAC
professionals who design, specify, purchase, install, commission, operate, and maintain ventilation systems.
Concerns about the world’s energy supplies, health and
safety, environmental issues, etc., are escalating the rate of
change in our industry. Legal claims filed against HVAC professionals are increasing. As such, one of the greatest
challenges facing HVAC professionals is keeping abreast
of rapidly changing international, national, state, and local
codes; indoor and outdoor air quality requirements; energy
efficiency guidelines or laws; health and life safety regulations; seismic and structural requirements; sound and
vibration levels; new research and technology; new equipment; and the list continues on. InMotion’s articles and case
studies, authored by industry experts, will help keep you
abreast of these changes.
Another challenge facing HVAC professionals is selecting
products that perform as stated in a manufacturer’s literature or computer software. With the information technology
explosion, manufacturers are able to globally market their
products and concepts electronically. As such, it is becoming increasingly difficult to assess the accuracy of this
information. Unfounded performance claims and poor-performing products yield buildings with poor air quality,
excessive noise, questionable life safety, and inefficient systems. Therefore, third-party certifications to validate the
data or claims are essential.
AMCA International, Inc., actively promotes standardized
product testing and certification procedures throughout the
world. AMCA’s Certified Ratings Program (CRP) assures
products are tested and rated in conformance with the
appropriate test standards and rating requirements.
Products covered include fans, dampers, louvers, acoustic
6
AMCA International InMotion
attenuators, air curtains, airflow measurement stations,
and other related air system components for the commercial, industrial, and residential markets. AMCA grants
a license to companies to use the Certified Ratings Seal on
products that pass an initial precertification test and ongoing check-tests throughout the life of the certification. A
comprehensive Directory of Certified Products can be found
at www.amca.org.
Additional information regarding AMCA International’s
standards, application publications, membership listing,
industry news, meeting minutes, upcoming events, educational seminars, and more can be found at www.amca.org
as well.
In closing, look to InMotion to keep you abreast of industry trends and AMCA International’s Certified Ratings Seals
to provide assurance that the products you select will meet
your customers’ requirements. I wish to thank those who
contribute to the magazine’s content and trust the information will be of value to our readers.
Regards,
Emery (Pete) Neitzel
2005-2006 President
AMCA International
Vice President of Engineering and Manufacturing,
Greenheck Corporation
AMCA International is a not-for-profit association of the world’s
manufacturers of related air system equipment. For over
80 years, it has led the way in standards development and
application research.
AMCA 0610
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A M C A C E R T I F I E D R AT I N G S P R O G R A M
A Closer Look
O
ne of AMCA International’s most important functions is
managing its Certified Ratings Program. The purpose of
the Certified Ratings Program (CRP) is to give the buyer,
specifier, and end-user of air movement and control equipment assurance that published ratings are reliable and
accurate. At the same time, the program assures manufacturers that competitive ratings are based on standard test
methods and procedures, and are subject to review by
AMCA International as an impartial authority.
AMCA’s Certified Ratings Program (CRP) was developed
in response to a need for validated, published product performance ratings for buyers, specifiers, and users of air
movement and control devices.
The AMCA CRP assures specifiers, contractors, buyers,
and building owners that the manufacturer’s product lines
have been tested and rated in conformance with approved
AMCA test standards and rating requirements. Only after
the product has been tested and the manufacturer’s cataloged ratings have been submitted to and approved by
AMCA International’s staff, can performance seals be displayed in literature and on equipment. Additionally, each
certified / licensed product line is subject to continuing
check-tests every three years in AMCA International’s
Laboratory or one of AMCA International’s Independent
Accredited laboratories.
Over the past 50-plus years, AMCA International has
developed standardized test methods to cover the products
within the AMCA scope. The list of products would include
axial and centrifugal fans, power roof ventilators, ceiling
ventilators, evaporative coolers, air circulation fans, jet tunnel fans, blowers, air curtains, acoustical duct silencers,
dampers, energy recovery ventilators, louvers, positive
pressure ventilators, propeller fans, agricultural fans, and
airflow measurement stations. These standards cover
performance relating to airflow measurement accuracy, air
delivery, pressure, psychrometrics, efficiency, power,
torque, rpm, thrust, sound power levels, velocity uniformity,
outlet velocity, wind-driven rain, water penetration, pressure
drop, air leakage, dynamic closure, and operations.
Product performance is vital to the operation and continued success of the manufacturer. Requiring the AMCA CRP
seal gives specifiers, contractors, and building owners
assurance that manufacturers’ performance ratings are
comparable, and their product lines have been tested and
rated in conformance with AMCA test standards and program requirements.
8
AMCA International InMotion
What to Look for when Specifying or Purchasing Product
AMCA Certified: A product line which is AMCA-certified /
licensed to bear the Certified Ratings Seal means that the
product line has met all of the requirements of the Certified
Ratings Program. This would include signing an agreement
with AMCA, the product line was tested either at an AMCA
Accredited lab, an AMCA Independent Laboratory authorized to perform check and challenge tests, or the AMCA
International Laboratory located in Arlington Heights, IL,
USA. This ensures that all ratings were developed using the
procedures identified in the AMCA Certified Ratings
Program, and the product line will be (or has been) subjected to a check-test at no greater than three-year intervals.
Additionally, the product line catalog has been checked by
AMCA International staff ensuring that the ratings and information are correct.
AMCA International’s Seal is a Registered Trademark®
in Most Industrialized Countries.
Tested in accordance with: Suggests that a manufacturer used one of the AMCA standards to perform a test. It
does not certify anything about the ratings development or
the qualifications of the laboratory. This is not a certification!
AMCA’s standards are readily available to the public, and any
entity could state they have used an AMCA standard to test
their product(s).
Tested at AMCA: Implies that a product was tested at
the AMCA International Laboratory in Arlington Heights, IL,
USA. This is not a certification! Tested at AMCA would
carry the same limitations as “tested in accordance with”
except that it would certainly mean the laboratory results
are reliable.
By specifying AMCA International’s Certified Ratings
Seal, specifiers, designers, contractors, and building owners can be relieved of certain liability problems or legal
entanglements frequently encountered in today’s litigious
climate. You can specify products with confidence by
requesting “Performance ratings shall bear the AMCA
International Certified Ratings Program Seal”. This simple
statement can greatly assist a specifier in demonstrating
that “due diligence” was exercised in selecting equipment
and that reasonable steps were taken to ensure that performance guarantees would be met.
A directory of certified/licensed products listed by
manufacturer name and product type is available at
www.amca.org.
AMCA 0610
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Page 9
AMCA MEMBER DIRECTORY
Members in red participate in AMCA’s CRP
INDIA
ARGENTINA
ICM S.A.
54-11-4-447-1699
BRAZIL
AFC do Brasil Industria
de Ventiladores Ltda
Otam Ventiladores Industriais Ltda.
www.afcbrasil.com
55-11-4523-1000
www.otam.com.br
55-51-3349-6363
www.aeroflo.com
www.alphairfans.com
www.atmosphere.com
www.chemposite.com
www.northernblower.com
www.daltecfans.com
www.delhi-industries.com
www.price-hvac.com
www.lifebreath.com
www.plasticair.com
www.reversomatic.com
(905) 890-6192
(204) 694-6666
(514) 326-1300
(604) 946-7688
(204) 222-4216
(519) 837-1921
(519) 582-2440
(204) 669-4220
(519) 821-1199
(416) 675-4700
(514) 871-9999
(905) 420-0485
(905) 790-8667
(519) 457-1904
(905) 625-9164
(905) 851-6701
www.sheldonsengineering.com
www.tamco.ca
www.coventfans.ca
www.universalfan.com
www.ventexinc.com
www.ventrol.com
www.westvent.com
(905) 564-5072
(800) 561-3449
(450) 441-3233
(613) 393-3267
(905) 857-4700
(514) 354-7776
(403) 250-3348
www.leaderfan.com
www.mkplastics.com
86-10-6788-2566
86-512-5736-6666
86-758-778-7212
86-20-323-87634
86-5125-787-3811
86-22-879-83207
86-21-695-73266
86-21-5038-8680
886-576-2655829
www.variax.com
45-5577-6262
EGYPT
www.hammam-eg.com
20-2-833-1930
FRANCE
Flakt Solyvent-Ventec
www.flaktwoods.com
33-3-8541-7311
www.ruck-ventilatoren.de
www.wittfan.de
49-7930-9211-0
49-4101-7007-0
GERMANY
Ruck-Ventilatoren GmbH
Witt & Sohn AG
INDIA
Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited
C. Doctor India Pvt. Ltd.
Industrial Hygienic Systems
www.cofimco.com
www.comefri.com
www.dynair.it
www.industriecbi.it
www.nicotra.it
www.nicotra.it
www.vortice.it
39-032-196-8311
39-0432-798811
39-030-331-3575
39-039-73941
39-035-873111
39-035-873111
39-2-90699-241
JAPAN
Matsushita Ecology Systems Co., Ltd.
NKG Corporation
81-5688-11735
81-3-5614-7121
KOREA
Bumyang Air Conditioning Co., Ltd.
Dong Yang Air Conditioning Co., Ltd.
Flakt Woods Korea
Gumsung Punglyuk Co., Ltd.
Jin Sung Instrument & Electronic
Sam Kwang Air Tech Corporation
Samwon E & B Co., Ltd.
Sangmi Air Tech
Surjin Air Conditioning Company, Ltd.
Tae-Il Blower Mfg. Co., Ltd.
YooHan Engineering Ltd.
www.bac.co.kr
www.hvacdac.com
www.flaktwoods.com
www.gsfan.co.kr
82-43-530-9213
82-31-359-8944
82-41-589-2001
82-32-811-9500
82-2-948-5432
82-2-2676-2651
82-31-499-0721
82-32-816-3291
82-31-983-4596
82-31-4919001
82-2-2107-3355
www.skat.co.kr
www.sebco.co.kr
www.sangmidamper.com
www.vavterminal.com
www.yheng.co.kr
LEBANON
KBE Establishment for
Air Movement Products
www.kbelebanon.com
961-1-898268
www.bhel.com
www.cdoctorindia.com
www.industrialhygienic.com
ADF Industries Sdn. Bhd.
Gebhardt Ventilatoren Pte Ltd.
Kruvent Industries (M) Sdn. Bhd.
Nicotra Fans & Blowers
Mfg. (M) Sdn. Bhd.
www.gebhardt-singapore.com
www.krugerfan.com
www.nicotra.com
60-4643-3636
60-3-8926-7178
60-3-6188-8293
60-3-896-12588
MEXICO
Airequipos, S.A. de C.V.
Industriales en Balanceo, SA. CV.
Soler y Palau, S.A. de C.V.
Ventas Instalaciones y Servicio, S.A.
www.airequipos.com
52-55-5541-2405
52-55-5718-0003
52-222-223-3900
52-55-5273-3924
www.soler-palau.com
NETHERLANDS
852-2345-0251
86-575-2366261
DENMARK
Hammam Industries & Co.
Cofimco S.R.L.
Comefri S.p.A.
Dynair s.r.l.
Industrie CBI S.p.A.
Nicotra S.p.A.
Twin City Nicotra LLC
Vortice Elettrosociali S.p.A.
MALAYSIA
CHINA
Beijing Kruger Ventilation Co., Ltd. www.krugerfan.com
Greenheck Kunshan Co., Ltd.
www.greenheck.com
Guangdong Deton Company Ltd.
www.detonfan.com
Guangzhou Kruger
www.krugerfan.com
M & E Industries, Ltd.
Kunshan Everbright Ventilation
www.ebfan.com
Equipment Co., Ltd.
Nicotra (Tianjin) Fans
www.nicotra.com
& Blowers Co. Ltd.
Shanghai Kruger Ventilation Co., Ltd. www.krugerfan.com
Shanghai Nautilus General
Equipment Mfg. Co., Ltd.
Wing Hop Electrical Mfg. Co. Ltd.
Zhejiang Shangfeng Industrial
www.shangfeng.org
Holdings Co., Ltd.
Zhejiang Yilida Ventilator Co., Ltd. www.yilida.com
Howden Denmark A/S
www.krugerfan.com
91-44-255-85360
91-120-258-0553
ITALY
CANADA
Aeroflo Inc.
Alphair Ventilating Systems, Inc.
Atmosphere Inc.
Chemposite Inc.
CML Northern Blower Inc.
Daltec Industries Ltd.
Delhi Industries Inc.
E. H. Price Limited
J.P. Environmental Products, Inc.
Leader Fan Industries Limited
M.K. Plastics Corporation
M.W. McGill & Associates Ltd.
National HVAC Products Inc.
Nutech Brands Inc.
Plasticair Inc.
Reversomatic Heating and
Mfg. Limited
Sheldons Engineering Inc.
T.A. Morrison & Co., Inc.
TLT-Covent Fans, Inc.
Universal Fan & Blower Ltd.
Ventex, Inc.
Ventrol Air Handling Systems Inc.
Western Ventilation Products Ltd.
Kruger M & E Industries (India) Pvt. Ltd.
Nadi Airtechnics Private Limited
www.nadiindia.com
Nicotra India Pvt. Ltd.
www.nicotra.com
91-4172-44141
91-33-2215-7120
91-80-2223-8218
Biddle bv
www.biddle.nl
31-512-335555
PHILIPPINES
Fil General Blower Corporation
Kruger M & E Industries Corp.
www.krugerfan.com
Niagara Industrial Equipment Corp. www.niagarafans.com
63-2-361-2659
63-2-862-2891 to 97
63-2-363-7177
SAUDI ARABIA
Al-Wahah Desert Cooler Factory
www.alwahahcooler.com
Arabian Company for
Fans Mfg. Ltd.
Arabian Thermal Aire Industries Co., Ltd. www.ataico.com
Saudi Fan Industries
www.refhouse.com
966-1-495-1882
966-1-464-4399
966-3-341-5857
966-3-882-3515
SINGAPORE
Airtrade Systems Pte. Ltd.
Azen Mfg. Pte. Ltd.
Kruger Ventilation Industries Pte Ltd.
Mecomb Singapore Limited
OLS Mfg. Co. Pte. Ltd.
Wishing Star Limited
www.airtrade.com.sg
www.azenmanufacturing.com
www.krugerfan.com
www.connols-air.com
www.wishingstargroup.com
65-6262-1672
65-6261-0277
65-6861-1577
65-626-19633
65-686-15253
65-6327-1893
October 2006
9
AMCA 0610
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AMCA MEMBER DIRECTORY
SLOVENIA
Hidria d.o.o.
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
www.hidria.si
386-1-537-56301
www.nicotra.com
www.soler-palau.com
www.zitron.com
34-91-884-6110
34-93-571-9300
34-985-168132
SPAIN
Nicotra España S.A.
Soler & Palau S.A.
Zitron, S.A.
SWEDEN
Systemair AB
www.systemair.com
46-222-44000
TAIWAN
ASLI Mechanical Co. Ltd.
Circle & Cycle Ltd.
Fansys Co., Ltd.
Flowtech Co. Ltd.
Golden Flag Ventilation Ind. Co., Ltd.
Horus Air Moving Co., Ltd.
King Machinery Co., Ltd.
Kruger Ventilation (Taiwan) Co., Ltd.
Lead Fu Industrials Co., Ltd.
Winfan Technology Co., Ltd.
www.asli.com.tw
www.c-cltd.com.tw
www.fansys.com.tw
www.krugerfan.com
www.leadfu-kinki.com.tw
www.frpfan.com.tw
886-2-22902211
886-2-8695-1881
886-3-322-7966
886-2-223-28066
886-4-2389-8928
886-2-2341-7281
886-3-397-2271
886-3-385-9119
886-2-2555-4566
886-3-2120031
THAILAND
Artith Ventilators Ltd., Part.
Kruger Ventilation Industries
(Thailand) Co., Ltd.
Nicotra Mfg. (Thailand) Co., Ltd.
Panasonic Ecology Systems
(Thailand) Co., Ltd.
www.artith.com
www.krugerfan.com
66-2-509-3065
66-34-490164-9
www.nicotra.com
www.panasonic.co.jp
66-2-476-18236
66-2-723-3000
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Dynair Gulf Fzco
Energy Industrial Corp. of UAE
www.dynair.it
www.energyintl.com
971-4-880-3153
(734) 354-2000
UNITED KINGDOM
Elta Fans Ltd.
Flakt Woods, Ltd.
Halifax Fan Ltd.
Howden Technology
Matthews & Yates and MY Int.
Nuaire Ltd.
Vent-Axia Ltd.
www.eltafans.com
www.flaktwoods.com
www.halifax-fan.co.uk
www.howden.com
www.matthews-yates.co.uk
www.nuaire.co.uk
www.vent-axia.com
44-1489-566500
44-1206-544122
44-1484-475123
44-141-885-7300
44-1206-543311
44-29-2085-8287
44-1293-526062
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A.O. Smith-Electrical Product Co.
Acme Engineering and Mfg. Corp.
Adobeair, Inc.
Aerolator
Aerosonics, Inc.
Aerovent, A Twin City Fan Co.
Air Balance
Air Conditioning Products Co.
Air Flow Co., Inc.
Air Monitor Corp.
Air Performance, Inc.
Airline Products Co.
Airmaster Fan Co.
Airolite Co. LLC, The
All-Lite
Alton
American Coolair Corp.
American Fan Co.
American Warming and Ventilating
Architectural Louvers Mfg.
Arrow United
Belco Mfg. Co. Inc.
Berner International Corp.
Big Ass Fan Co.
Breidert Air Products,
Div. of Soler & Palau, Inc.
10
www.aosmith.com
www.acmefan.com
www.adobeair.com
www.aerosonics.com
www.aerovent.com
www.airbalance.com
www.acpshutters.com
www.airmonitor.com
www.airperformance.org
www.airlinelouvers.com
www.airmasterfan.com
www.airolite.com
www.alllite-louvers.com
www.mestek.com
www.coolair.com
www.flaktwoods.com
www.mestek.com
www.archlouvers.com
www.mestek.com
www.belco-mfg.com
www.berner.com
www.bigassfans.com
www.breidert.com
AMCA International InMotion
(937) 667-2431
(918) 682-7791
(602) 257-0060
(919) 882-2410
(573) 796-4151
(763) 551-7500
(859) 538-3400
(734) 326-0050
(630) 628-1138
(707) 544-2706
(334) 588-0070
(800) 547-2635
(517) 764-2300
(740) 373-7676
(817) 509-2300
(214) 638-6010
(904) 389-3646
(513) 874-2400
(419) 865-5000
(888) 568-8371
(570) 746-1888
(254) 933-9000
(724) 658-3551
(859) 233-1271
(904) 731-4711
Broan-NuTone LLC
Captive-Aire Systems, Inc.
Car-Mon Products, Inc.
Carnes Co. Inc.
Carolina Blower Div. of
Bruning & Federle Mfg. Co.
Ceilcote Air Pollution Control
Central Blower Co.
Cesco Products
Champion Cooler Corp.
Chicago Blower Corp.
Cincinnati Fan & Ventilator Co.
Clarage, A Twin City Fan Co.
Cleanpak International
Comefri USA Inc.
Composite Fan Technology,
Div. of Metal Cladding
Construction Specialties, Inc.
Continental Fan Mfg. Inc.
Daniel Mechanical Co.
DF Fan Services, Inc.
Dowco Products Group
Dri-Eaz Products, Inc.
Dynaforce
Dynasonics Systems Inc.
ebm-papst Inc.
www.broan-nutone.com
www.captiveair.com
www.car-mon.com
www.carnes.com
www.bruning-federle.com
(262) 673-4340
(919) 882-2410
(847) 695-9000
(608) 845-6411
(704) 873-7237
www.ceilcoteapc.com
www.centralblower.com
www.cescoproducts.com
www.championcooler.com
www.chicagoblower.com
www.cincinnatifan.com
www.clarage.com
www.cleanpak.com
www.comefri.com
www.metalcladding.com
(440) 243-0700
(626) 330-3182
(859) 538-3450
(501) 562-1094
(630) 858-2600
(513) 573-0600
(205) 581-3267
(503) 557-4500
(270) 881-1444
(716) 434-5513
www.c-sgroup.com
www.continentalfan.com
www.danielmechanical.com
www.dffan.com
www.safeair-dowco.com
www.dri-eaz.com
www.dynaforce.com
www.dynasonics-acoustics.com
(800) 631-7379
(716) 842-0670
(909) 982-1555
(630) 876-1495
(708) 652-9100
(360) 757-7776
(310) 532-1555
(817) 509-2300
www.ebmpapst.us
Ebtron, Inc.
www.ebtron.com
Emerson Ventilation Products
www.emersonvent.com
Energy Labs Inc.
www.energylabs.com
Essick Air Products
www.essickair.com
Euramco Safety Inc.
www.ramfan.com
Fab-Tech Incorporated
www.fabtechinc.com
Fan Am, Inc.
www.fanam.com
Fan Equipment Co., Inc.
www.fanequipment.com
Fantech, Inc.
www.fantech.net
Fiber-Aire, A Twin City Fan Co.
www.fiberaire.com
Flakt Fan Group, Inc.
www.flaktwoods.com
Floaire, Inc.
www.floaire.com
Governair Corp.
www.governair.com
Greenheck Fan Corp.
www.greenheck.com
Harrington Environmental Engineering www.harringtonplastics.com
Hartzell Fan, Inc.
www.hartzellfan.com
Honeywell International
www.honeywell.com
Howden Buffalo Inc.
www.howdenbuffalo.com
Hunter Fan Co.
www.hunterfan.com
I.A.P., Inc.
www.iapfan.com
Illinois Blower, Inc.
www.ibifans.com
Industrial Air Technology Corp.
www.indairtech.com
Industrial Louvers, Inc.
www.industriallouvers.com
Industrial Plastic Fan
www.ipfcolasit.com
Jenco Fan, Div. of Soler & Palau, Inc. www.breidert.com
Kanalflakt Inc.
www.kanalflakt-us.com
KCH Services, Inc.
www.kchservices.com
Kinetics Noise Control, Inc.
www.kineticsnoise.com
(Vibron Products Group)
King Co.
www.mestek.com
Koger/Air Corp.
www.kogerair.com
L & L Louvers, Division of L & L PS, Inc. www.louver1.com
L. J. Wing
www.ljwing.com
Lau Industries, Inc.
www.laufan.com
Leader Industries, Inc.
www.leaderindustries.com
Lloyd Industries
www.firedamper.com
Loren Cook Co.
www.lorencook.com
Louvers & Dampers
MacroAir Technologies
www.louvers-dampers.com
www.macro-air.com
(860) 674-1515
(800) 232-8766
(913) 752-6000
(619) 671-0100
(501) 562-1094
(619) 670-9590
(802) 655-8800
(941) 955-9788
(702) 270-8344
(941) 309-6000
(763) 551-7600
(269) 683-1150
(919) 882-2410
(405) 525-6546
(715) 359-6171
(760) 530-1409
(937) 773-7411
(763) 954-6535
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(763) 972-2981
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(941) 359-3267
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(937) 476-6500
(615) 256-3500
(215) 412-4445
(417) 869-6474
(859) 647-2299
(866) 668-3247
AMCA 0610
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Page 11
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Marley Engineered Products
Mars Sales Co., Inc.
Mechanovent Corp.
Mestek, Inc.
Metal Form Mfg. Co., Inc.
Met-Pro Corp., Duall Division
Moffitt Corp., Inc.
Munters Corp.
Nailor Industries Inc.
NCA Mfg., Inc.
New York Blower Co., The
North East Louvers, Inc.
Paragon Controls, Inc.
Peerless Electric/Madison Mfg. Co.
PennBarry
Perfect Air Control, Inc.
Phelps Fan Inc.
Phoenix Mfg., Inc.
Plymovent Corp.
Pottorff
Powered Aire, Inc.
Quietaire Corp.
Rapid Fan and Blower Inc.
Reliable Products
Robinson Industries, Inc.
Rupp Air Management Systems
www.leadingedge.com
www.marsair.com
www.mechanovent.com
www.mestek.com
www.mfmca.com
www.dualldiv.com
www.moffitthvac.com
www.munters.us
www.nailor.com
www.ncamfg.com
www.nyb.com
www.paragoncontrols.com
www.peerlessblowers.com
www.pennvent.com
www.prefco-hvac.com
www.phelpsfan.com
www.evapcool.com
www.plymovent.com
www.pottorff.com
www.poweredaire.com
www.quietaire.com
www.rapidfan.com
www.reliablelouvers.com
www.robinsonfans.com
www.ruppams.com
Ruskin Co.
www.ruskin.com
Safe-Air of Illinois, Inc.
Soler & Palau USA
StratoVent
Strobic Air Corp.
SunAir
Super Vacuum Mfg. Co., Inc.
Supreme Fan Products
Swartwout Division
TC Axial, A Twin City Fan Co.
TC Ventco, A Twin City Fan Co.
Tempest Technology Corp.
Temtrol, Inc.
Thermotek
TLT-Babcock, Inc.
Tomkins Industries, Inc.
Trane Co., The
Twin City Fan Companies, Ltd.
U.S. Fan International
Ultratech Industries, Inc.
United Enertech Corp.
United Metal Products
Vanaire
Venco Products
Vent Products Co., Inc.
Viron International
Vostermans Ventilation, Inc.
Ward Industries
Windy City Mfg.
Wonder Metals Corp.
York International E.S.G.
www.safeair-dowco.com
www.solerpalau-usa.com
(800) 452-4179
(310) 532-1555
(219) 326-1767
(413) 568-9571
(602) 233-1211
(989) 725-8184
(904) 241-9944
(210) 651-5018
(281) 590-1172
(972) 276-5002
(630) 794-5700
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(707) 579-1424
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(727) 441-2651
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(609) 395-3500
(817) 509-2300
(724) 588-3305
(713) 228-9421
(718) 786-2080
(800) 624-3914
(724) 452-6121
(919) 882-2410
(816) 761-7476
(708) 652-9100
(904) 731-4711
(919) 882-2410
www.strobicair.com
(215) 723-4700
(919) 882-2410
www.Supervac.com
(970) 667-5146
(972) 680-9126
www.swartwout.com
(816) 761-7476
www.tcaxial.com
(763) 551-7600
www.tcventco.com
(763) 551-7600
www.Tempest-Edge.com
(559) 277-7577
www.temtrol.com
(405) 263-7286
www.thermotek.com
(919) 882-2410
www.tltbabcock.com
(330) 867-8540
www.tomkins.co.uk
(816) 761-7476
www.trane.com
(859) 259-2500
www.tcf.com
(763) 551-7600
www.acmefan.com
(918) 682-7791
www.hamlincos.com
(919) 779-2004
www.unitedenertech.com
(423) 698-7715
www.unitedmetal.com
(480) 968-9550
www.vanaire.com
(502) 491-3553
www.greenheck.com
(715) 359-6171
www.ventproducts.com
(773) 521-1900
www.vironintl.com
(989) 723-8255
www.multifanusa.com
(309) 827-9798
www.wardind.com
(630) 595-7320
www.windycitymanufacturing.com (773) 622-1728
www.wondermetals.com
(800) 366-5877
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(503) 946-4514
VIET NAM
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84-8-790-5856
Members in bold red are bronze sponsors
October 2006
11
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Page 12
I M PA C T- R E S I S TA N T L O U V E R S :
Understanding the New Code
By Vickie J. Lovell
W
hile the new requirements for the 2006
International Building Code are in place, more
research needs to be undertaken.
In less than a four-week period in 1992, two major hurricanes hit the United States, leaving an unprecedented array
of devastation. First, Hurricane Andrew pounded Florida and
Louisiana to become the most expensive natural disaster
in U.S. history, with damage estimates approaching $30
billion. Three weeks later, Hurricane Iniki affected three
Hawaiian Islands, resulting in over $1 billion in damage.
Prior to that year, the only hurricane of equivalent magnitude to hit a modern, populated area was Cyclone Tracey,
which slammed into the suburban Australian city of Darwin
in 1974. Fewer than 5% of the homes in Darwin remained
sufficiently undamaged so as to be continuously habitable.
The losses were attributed exclusively to poor building
performance in extremely high winds. The Australian government immediately began to develop criteria for new
construction methods in residential construction, leading
the international community in the study of building performance in high-wind events.
The devastation from Hurricane Andrew exposed similar
dangerous shortcomings in construction methodology and
inspections in U.S. coastal regions, particularly the vulnerable East Coast. Due to the public outcry, the U.S. experts
looked to the Australian experience and the lessons learned
there as guidelines to hastily develop new U.S. testing and
building code requirements.
Today’s new U.S. building code requirements and the
resulting standards pertaining to impact resistance to windborne debris are largely based on the Australian losses of
small buildings and family dwellings. Larger, commercial
buildings are usually designed to ASCE 7, Minimum Design
Loads for Buildings and Other Structures.
Although structural engineers have been aware of the
effects of wind loads on larger buildings in tropical regions
12
AMCA International InMotion
for many decades, there was a surprisingly small amount of
reliable information available prior to 1993 on how to design
and construct smaller buildings not designed to ASCE 7.
During the post-Andrew decade, the consensus of the
experts was that building performance of smaller buildings,
simply put, could be improved by protecting the exterior
building envelope.
After 1992, the insurance industry, builders, manufacturers, and others invested millions of research dollars into
wind research, collecting post-hurricane field data and
developing computer modeling, trying to better understand
how buildings perform in high-wind events. A great deal
was spent to study the generation and patterns of windborne debris. “Impact resistance” test methods and
specifications were developed to investigate the performance of windows, doors, shutters, and skylights during
impact and cyclic loading in the laboratory.
However, to the knowledge of this author, there has been
little to no independent research that conclusively assesses:
• The risk to a building in the event of internal pressurization of the ventilation system during a high-wind event
• Whether or not impact-resistant louvers have any positive
effects on protecting the structure
• The variables that would affect the extent of the damage
from windborne debris (if any) such as building height,
size of the ventilation opening, wind speed, missile size,
speed, trajectory, etc.
In spite of the obvious research deficiencies pertaining to
ventilation systems, Section 1609.1.2.1 of the 2006 edition
of the International Building Code (2006 IBC) has a new
requirement for the impact testing of louvers that cover the
openings for intake and exhaust ducts in the coastal areas
in hurricane-prone regions.
AMCA 0610
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Page 13
Requirements
When reviewing the specific code
text, it should be noted that IBC
Section 1609.1.2.1 falls under the
larger section, 1609.1.2, Protection of
Openings, which deals primarily with
the protection of glazed (glass) openings in windborne debris regions. This
section of the code deals exclusively
with the protection of glazed
HURRICANE-PRONE AND
WINDBORNE DEBRIS REGIONS DEFINED
The 2006 IBC defines:
Hurricane-prone regions of the
country as areas vulnerable to
hurricanes on the United States
Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of
Mexico coasts where the basic
wind speed is greater than 90
mph (40 m/s), and Hawaii,
Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin
Islands, and American Samoa.
• Windborne debris regions as the
portions of hurricane-prone
regions that are within 1 mile
(1.61 km) of the coastal mean
high-water line where the basic
wind speed is 110 mph (48 m/s)
•
or greater; or portions of hurricane-prone regions where the
basic wind speed is 120 mph (53
m/s) or greater, and all of Hawaii.
The local Authority Having
Jurisdiction (AHJ) along all
coastal areas should be consulted to determine exactly where
the requirements for impactresistant louvers are going to be
enforced. For a wind speed map
depicting the geographic applicability along the U.S. east coastline,
consult Chapter 16 of the IBC
(Figure 1609).
3900 Dr. Greaves Rd., Kansas City, MO 64030
(816) 761-7476 • Fax (816) 765-8955
www.ruskin.com • Email: [email protected]
W
A Closer Look at the Code
R
stated, the requirements for testing
and the enforcement for such requirements were inconsistent and were
largely based on anecdotal evidence
or speculation that louvers should be
impact-resistant.
Based on that widely held view, the
code now requires impact-resistant
louvers in the windborne debris
regions of hurricane-prone areas (for a
definition of these areas, see the
accompanying sidebar).
hen it comes to meeting the engineering demands of indoor always bring in the right amount of outside air per ASHRAE 62.
air quality and energy savings, nothing delivers like the Ruskin
Ruskin’s IAQ50. . . Never too much air. . .
IAQ50. This innovative air measuring damper offers a unique
Never too little. . . ALWAYS JUST RIGHT!
design that incorporates air monitoring into the assembly
To learn more about Ruskin’s energy-saving solutions,
of a high performance, aluminum airfoil blade control damper. or to locate a representative nearest you, visit our website
Utilizing Ruskin’s exclusive control package, the IAQ50 will
at www.ruskin.com or call us at (816) 761-7476.
The code requirement is based on
the logical presumption by the majority
of the participating voting members of
the International Code Council (ICC)
that when a louver in an exterior wall is
either damaged or eliminated by windborne debris during a high-wind event,
the air leakage-rated damper inside the
ventilation duct may be exposed to
damage, which could lead to interior
pressurization of the building.
Prior to approval of this code
change, several jurisdictions in hurricane-prone regions were arbitrarily
requiring testing to the Dade County
(South Florida) Standard PAS 203 or
PAS 201, or the large-missile impact
test only of ASTM E 1996,
Specification for Performance of
Exterior Windows, Glazed Curtain
Wall, Doors and Storm Shutters, to
evaluate the impact resistance of
louvers. For the reasons previously
October 2006
13
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I M PA C T - R E S I S TA N T L O U V E R S :
U N D E R S TA N D I N G T H E N E W C O D E R E Q U I R E M E N T S
assemblies; its technical undertones
are based on the Australian experience with smaller buildings, as well as
the present U.S. hurricane strategy of
protecting the building envelope.
Due to the formatting of this code
section and the location of the louver
requirement within the glazing requirements, it is likely that some code
enforcement or design professionals
will mistakenly interpret the requirement to mean that the requirements
for the impact testing of glazing and
shutters, including the cycling loading
portion of the test, should be applied
even-handedly to louvers. However,
that is incorrect.
The scope of ASTM E 1996 covers
impact testing of exterior building features such as windows, glazed curtain
walls, doors, and storm shutters in
buildings located in geographic regions
that are prone to hurricanes, simulating
impact by both large and small
missiles. For glazed openings and nonporous shutters that protect the
fenestration assembly, the impact testing is followed by a cyclic loading test.
There is no specific provision in the
test standard for testing louvers that
cover ventilation openings – either for
impact or cyclic loading.
In consultation with laboratories
that do such testing, as well as some
of the members of the ASTM committee who developed the test
method and the specification for
impact protection, it was acknowledged that the “large missile” impact
test part of the standard could be
used to evaluate the impact resistance of louvers in the absence of a
standard or specific language within
14
AMCA International InMotion
the existing standard that applies
to louvers.
The intent of this code change was
not to require that louvers comply with
ASTM E 1996 in its entirety; only the
large missile impact test excluding the
cyclic loading, or testing to an
approved impact standard that may be
developed in the future that pertains
specifically to louvers.
As with most engineering questions,
some judgment by the test sponsor
and the laboratory engineers is necessary to set the correct criteria for
testing and evaluation, and such decisions must be documented in the test
report for consideration by the AHJ.
Clearly, the effect of hurricanes
on building ventilation systems is a
subject that begs further exploration.
Since climatologists are predicting a
period of increased hurricane activity
for the next decade or two, it is imperative that such investigation continues.
Time is of the essence. As for the
future of research on the vulnerability
of ventilation systems and the creation
of a louver impact standard that
reflects those conditions, that charge
will likely fall to members of the Air
Movement and Control Association to
develop a standard and further refine
the code requirements that are applicable specifically to louvers.
References
2006 International Building Code, International Code
Council, 4051 Flossmoor Rd., County Club Hills, IL
60478 (www.iccsafe.org).
Vickie J. Lovell is president of InterCode Inc., Delray
Beach, FL. She can be reached at 561/278-0922 or
[email protected]
AMCA 0610
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Page 15
AMCA 0610
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Page 16
MODULATING CHARACTERISTICS OF CONTROL DAMPERS
Determining the Correct Damper
By Robert Van Becelaere
ith the wide variety of dampers that can be used in the design of air-handling units
W
(AHUs), determining which is right for your application can be a daunting task, but it
doesn’t have to be. Here’s a simple rule of thumb I began using 40 years ago: 1,000 fpm Face
Velocity, unless it was used behind a coil or louver, and then it was 500 fpm for that unit.
Has it changed today? The answer is no for built-up units;
but for factory-built units, the design has gone to 1,000 fpm
Face Velocity for the small dampers, and up to 1,500 fpm
Face Velocity for larger units.
As with any “rule,” there are always exceptions (e.g.,
economizers used for 3- to 20-ton rooftop units). These may
have extreme velocities on the fresh air dampers when they
are in the full economizer mode.
Damper Considerations
How do you determine which damper design is right for
you? Let’s take a look at three important considerations.
They are:
• Outside air dampers need to be tested and certified to
AMCA Publication 511 Class IA to meet IECC Code
Requirements.
• Care should be taken when specifying opposed blade
dampers for economizer operation due to the potential of
a drastic pressure increase when both dampers are at
mid-stroke.
• Air measuring stations should be AMCA-Certified to
AMCA Publication 611.
Before we begin, it’s important to understand the two
governing code requirements—ASHRAE 90.1 and IECC
Code Requirements—for outside air dampers. The U.S.
Department of Energy (DOE) has mandated that all states
have an energy code that is equal to, or better than,
ASHRAE 90.1, which states that, for most parts of the
country, the leakage rate on dampers must be no more than
10 cfm/sq. ft. at 1 in. of static pressure. In warm climates,
such as Florida, or very cold climates, such as Minnesota,
the damper leakage must be less than 4 cfm/sq. ft. at 1 in.
of static pressure.
The IECC is more stringent, and states that the damper leakage shall be no more than 3 cfm/sq. ft. at 1 in. of static pressure.
16
AMCA International InMotion
So far, 42 states have adopted the requirements of the IECC.
So, to play it safe, it would be best to design your system so
the dampers have a leakage rate of no more than 3 cfm/sq. ft.
The most accurate method to determine outside airflow into a
system is to measure its rating at the fresh air damper.
AMCA International, which operates a Certified Ratings
Program for dampers and louvers, has established AMCA
Standard 511, which includes a leakage classification of
Class IA to meet the IECC Requirements of 3 cfm/ sq. ft. of
leakage. AMCA Standard 511 also requires manufacturers
to have their products tested every three years to verify that
the damper still meets the leakage requirements.
In addition to leakage, consideration needs to be given to
damper pressure drop. Figure 1 shows dampers in various
positions on an AHU. The pressure drop of the dampers in
each one of the configurations is as follows:
AMCA
Figure
Static
Pressure Drop
at 1,000 fpm
5.3
.018
5.2
.04
Duct on upstream only,
7 diameter upstream
5.5
.20
No duct upstream
or downstream
Description
Duct on both sides,
7 diameter upstream,
10 diameter downstream
As you can see in Figure 1, the pressure drop varies dramatically depending on the application and the testing
requirements to have a run of straight duct before or after
the damper. The worst case is the AMCA Fig. 5.5. If you take
the damper out of the system and test the hole in the AHU,
it would have a pressure drop of .08 in. This would make the
pressure drop of the damper only .12 in. at 1,000 fpm.
AMCA 0610
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Page 17
3900 Dr. Greaves Rd., Kansas City, MO 64030
(816) 761-7476 • Fax (816) 765-8955
www.ruskin.com • Email: [email protected]
R
Design
Figure 2
Figure 1
EX
AMCA
FIG. 5.2
AMCA
FIG 5.3
Airflow
RA
Total
Air
AMCA
FIG. 5.2
FA
Airflow
Total Air
Blade Rotation Ideal
Return Air
Fresh Air
Based on Class 1A leakage rate of 3 CFM/sq. ft. versus a standard leakage of 40 CFM/sq. ft. and energy rate of $0.10/KWH.
If you’re concerned about uniform
airflow, another factor to consider is
the blade linkage design. The two
most common designs are opposed
blades and parallel blades (see Figure 2).
Current data on modulating characteristics of dampers can be found in
ASHRAE Research Report RP 11571.
This is the first documented work on
dampers since the early 1940s, and
it shows how dampers modulate in
different duct configurations.
Blade Rotation Parallel Blades
1
Blade Linkage Design
Total Air
Airflow
Another factor that can influence
leakage and pressure drop is the type
of damper used. There are two basic
types of dampers used in AHUs: air
foil and Triple V design.
The losses of speeding up the
airflow through the damper and
discharging it into a plenum (e.g.,
AMCA Fig. 5.5) are so high that the
savings for air foil blades on pressure
drop is not a factor. However, in AMCA
Fig. 5.3, with duct both upstream and
downstream, the air foil blades will
have 30%-50% less pressure drop in
the application. In addition to less pressure drop, air foil blades also generate
less noise and have stronger blades
versus Triple V groove blades.
T
Blade Rotation Opposed Blades
he new IECC (International Energy Conservation Code) and ASHRAE So turn “on” to energy savings while your
90.1 Energy Standard require new lower leakage rates for outside
building is “off” and let Ruskin start saving
air dampers in buildings. Ruskin is the first to offer AMCA certified low you money today.
leak dampers that meet the new 1A leakage classification. Ruskin’s
To learn more about Ruskin’s energy-saving solutions,
low leak control dampers can save building owners up to $30 per
or to locate a representative nearest you, visit our website at
damper 1 annually by providing tight sealing of outside air openings.
www.ruskin.com or call us at (816) 761-7476.
AMCA
FIG. 5.5
October 2006
17
AMCA 0610
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Page 18
M O D U L AT I N G C H A R A C T E R I S T I C S
Another study conducted for
ASHRAE, GPC 16P2, shows the linear
characteristics of modulating fresh air
and return air dampers. Based on the
results of these tests, it appears as
though parallel-blade dampers give a
more uniform flow when modulated
together. Opposed-blade dampers
starved the system at mid-stroke. The
higher the velocity of airflow, the more
non-linear the curves become.
Fortunately, there are controls that
will help linearize the damper based on
its characteristic curve in the installed
application. To assure uniform airflow
in opposed-blade applications, these
controls should definitely be used.
OF
CONTROL DAMPERS
Controls will also benefit parallel-blade
applications where the pressure drop
of the return air path is different than
that of the fresh air path.
A Proper Balance is Essential
One of the biggest challenges
facing design engineers today is maintaining the correct outside airflow to
meet the requirements of ASHRAE
62. A proper balance is essential if you
want to avoid over ventilating a space,
something that can add expense to
building operations. There is an AMCA
Standard 600 that covers testing of
air measuring stations. There is also
a Certified Rating Program AMCA
Publication 611 for those products that
have a check-testing program to verify
that air measuring stations meet
design specifications.
To be certain you are getting the
accuracy you need, be sure to specify
AMCA Publication 611.
References
ASHRAE RP 1157, Flow Resistance and Modulating
Characteristics of Control Dampers. Van Becelaere, R.;
Saver Jr., H.J.; and Finaish, F.
ASHRAE GPC 16P, Mixing Damper Testing Report, Van
Becelaere, R.
Robert Van Becelaere is vice president of engineering at Ruskin, Grandview, MO. He can be
reached at 816/761-7476 or [email protected]
Delhi Industries
SETTING STANDARDS FOR THE FAN INDUSTRY
DELAIR The easiest to use fan selection software
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Make drive selections
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VISIT WWW.DELHI-INDUSTRIES.COM
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A M C A’ S C E R T I F I E D R AT I N G S P R O G R A M S U P P L E M E N T S
The LEED Rating System
By Michael Ivanovich and Emery (Pete) Neitzel
L
EED certifies buildings, but what about the
mechanical products that go into green buildings?
When architects, engineers, and contractors began to
design and build green buildings, there were no “green”
products. As such, they worked with what was available, and
the emphasis was on energy or water efficiency; emissions
reduction; minimizing waste; and maximizing local resources.
Things are different now. The U.S. Green Building Council’s
(USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) rating system for buildings has put more pressure on
manufacturers to produce green products. For markets such
as interior finishes and furnishings, the green-product market
is well advanced. However, for mechanical-system products,
the green-product market is in its infancy.
According to the latest data available, in 2004, the green
building market was estimated to be around $3.3 billion, or
2% of the $165 billion new-construction market. By 2010,
the green building market is projected to grow to between
$10.2 billion and $20.5 billion.
So what’s an engineer to do? This article examines some
of the issues associated with green building design and
product selection. Toward the end of the article, it makes
recommendations for selecting air movement and control
products that will assure specified performance.
The Grassroots of Green Buildings
The green building market began to form as a cohesive
entity in the late 1980s when indoor air quality (IAQ),
energy efficiency, renewable energy, materials use/re-use,
water conservation, and moisture control began to be treated in an integrated fashion. Air-system design, specification,
installation, operations, and maintenance were critical components of green buildings from the beginning.
Then, in the early ‘90s, the USGBC emerged when a team
of farsighted, market-savvy individuals saw the economic
potential for green buildings, and formed a dues-paying
alliance. In relatively short order, the USGBC became the
vanguard of the green buildings movement and, with the
development of LEED, ultimately launched the green building market into mainstream America.
LEED, as a rating system, is comprised of prerequisites
for site, energy, and indoor and outdoor air and water quality. After prerequisites are met, additional points are earned
by voluntarily investing in optional measures specified in
each LEED section. Documentation is submitted to thirdparty contractors, who determine if the building meets
LEED threshold levels for Certified, Silver, Gold, or Platinum
certification. The certification level is emblazoned on a
plaque and installed on or within the building.
LEEDing Indicators
The growth of the LEED rating system mirrors the growth
of the green building market. USGBC’s LEED for new construction rating system (LEED NC) was launched in 2000. At
that time, 13 projects achieved certification. Approximately
five years later, 337 buildings worldwide achieved certification. During that time, additional rating systems were
launched for existing buildings, commercial interiors, and
core-and-shell spec buildings.
The popularity of the program is growing; a LEEDcertified building exists in every state, and many
federal agencies, states, and cities have adopted LEED
NC as a requirement for their government buildings. While
many professionals have mixed feelings about LEED, there
is no question that LEED helped establish a common vernacular for talking about green buildings. With more than
23,000 LEED-accredited professionals today, the number of
engineers, architects, consultants, and product representatives who talk “green building language” is growing.
Given the media attention afforded the USGBC and
LEED, the number of certified green buildings represents a
very small fraction of America’s real estate portfolio.
However, many construction projects use the freely available LEED guidelines, associated guidebooks, and expertise
to achieve a green building, even though LEED certification
is not pursued. While the traceability of these buildings is
lost, their contributions toward a greener real estate portfolio cannot be ignored. As energy costs increase and people
demand healthier buildings, the number of buildings constructed to LEED parameters will continue to grow.
Green is as Green Does
A green LEED building must be designed and constructed
to operate at LEED performance levels, be adaptive to
changing occupancies, and, ultimately, take into account
deconstruction and recycling. Achieving and maintaining
LEED performance levels are shared responsibilities of the
engineering community from both design and operations perspectives. Energy consumption, power generation, IAQ,
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A M C A’ S C E R T I F I E D R AT I N G S P R O G R A M S U P P L E M E N T S
acoustical quality, water consumption,
psychrometric “comfort,” and emissions are all measurable performance
responsibilities that mechanical and
plumbing engineers must assume.
These responsibilities are carried forth
when deciding upon system design
(e.g., centralized vs. decentralized air
conditioning), right-sizing prime-moving
and ancillary equipment, specifying
controls and control sequences, and
overseeing designs through installation,
commissioning, and early occupancy.
When operations personnel take
over a green building, they must operate
the building according to its design
intent and perform regular maintenance and service in accordance with
LEED principles. For example, they
must maintain high levels of energy
efficiency and low levels of emissions,
and ensure that water conservation
efforts are taking place. For these
reasons, field commissioning got a
substantial boost when LEED required
minimal levels of commissioning as a
prerequisite and gave additional points
for higher levels of commissioning.
One of the tenets of LEED certification
is that operating staff be empowered
THE
L E E D R AT I N G S Y S T E M
with documentation and training to
ensure that a building can be operated
and maintained in accordance with
design intent.
What’s a Green HVAC Product?
As mentioned earlier, LEED is a rating
system for buildings – not the construction, electrical, or mechanical products
that go into them. Bob Zimmerman said
it well in his article, “Certified Green?”,
published in the July 2005 issue of
Building Operating Management:
Green product certifications and
labels complement the USGBC’s
EQUIPMENT COVERED
AMCA International is a not-for-profit association
dedicated to the certification of performance ratings on
air system components for industrial, commercial, and
residential markets.
The different types of equipment covered by the
AMCA Certified Ratings Program (CRP) include:
• Acoustical Duct Silencers
• Air Curtain Units
• Airflow Measurement Stations
• Blowers
• Circulating Fans
• Dampers
• Evaporative Coolers
• Fans
• Louvers
• Positive Pressure Ventilators
• Shutters
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AMCA International InMotion
Air system components can have their performance ratings certified for one or more criteria that are appropriate
for the equipment, including:
• Air Leakage
• Air Leakage – Air Performance
• Air Performance
• Air Performance – Wind-Driven Rain
• Airflow Measurement Station – Air Performance
• CFM/Watt – Air Performance
• Positive Pressure Ventilators – Air Performance
• Prefabricated Silencer – Sound and Air Performance
• Sound and Air Performance
• Water Penetration and Air Performance
• Water Penetration – Air Performance – Wind-Driven Rain
• Wind-Driven Rain
For more information, go to www.amca.org.
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H
listings for commercial or industrialscale air-handling fans.
Until there is a green-product database for HVAC products with sufficient
breadth to fulfill the full gamut of
equipment that goes into non-residential
buildings, the mechanical community
will have to make do. Along these
lines, guidance is provided by David
Sellers, P.E., in his article, “HVAC
and Plumbing Products for Green
Buildings,” in HPAC Engineering’s
May 2004 issue:
With some facilities, such as hospitals, schools, and high rises, internal
functions may change, but the shell and
fundamental structure remain the same
through many renovation cycles. Taking
this into consideration when selecting
and installing fundamental machinery
for HVAC and plumbing systems can
open the door to several life-cycleenhancing opportunities, including:
• Selecting fans and air-handling units
at low face velocities.
• Conservatively sizing pipe and duct
mains from a pressure-drop standpoint.
• Configuring distribution pumps for
optimized performance at multiple
operating points.
• Utilizing high-quality equipment to
ensure precise, reliable performance and longevity.
• Providing for service and maintenance needs.
Some of these measures will save
energy in the near term and provide
flexibility over the long term. Others will
guarantee that an investment (finances
and resources) in machinery will pay
dividends over time. If the implementation of these measures is properly
planned and executed, any first-cost
penalties will pale in comparison with
the life-cycle savings achieved.
VAC rules are pretty simple when it comes to louver performance: So while the weather remains unpredictable, feel secure utilizing
Bring air in and leave water out. At Ruskin, by establishing the USA’s wind-driven tested louvers on your next project. Stop rain from
entering the building with Ruskin’s EME series louvers!
first Wind-Driven Rain test set-up, we were able to produce our
To learn more about Ruskin rain control solutions,
industry’s first Extruded Moisture Eliminator (EME) louver. While
initially developed to combat water forces during hurricanes, Ruskin’s or to locate a representative nearest you, visit our website
at www.ruskin.com or call us at (816) 761-7476.
EME louvers are designed to capture horizontal rain in any storm.
LEED rating system as tools for
facilitating a market shift to more environmentally responsible buildings.
While LEED looks at whole-building
green design, the green product certifications and labels look at the specific
characteristics of the individual products. LEED is the most recognizable
rating system for whole-building green
design, whereas each green certification or label has its own criteria.
Product-certifying organizations
include Green Seal (www.greenseal.org),
the U.S. EPA’s Energy Star program
(www.energystar.gov), and Green
Guard (www.greenguard.com). Green
Seal is for cleaning supplies; Green
Guard covers low-emitting interior
products; and Energy Star, while helpful
for many electronics and appliances,
does not go beyond small-commercial
air conditioners or mechanical equipment. For identifying green products
such as large fans for commercial
building projects, none of these organizations provide significant help.
There are green-product information
sources and databases that provide
buyers of mechanical products guidance on selecting and specifying
products for green buildings. Some of
these are “pay to play” databases,
whereby entry into the database is
available to those companies that pay
to list their products.
Of these, Greenspec (www.greenspec.com), a pay-for-access service,
offers a wide variety of products for
the HVAC community and has a strong
relationship with the USGBC. The
presentation of Greenspec’s annual
“Top 10 Green Building Products”
awards is a popular event at the annual Greenbuild conference hosted by
the USGBC. However, Greenspec is
limited. It does not currently have any
3900 Dr. Greaves Rd., Kansas City, MO 64030
(816) 761-7476 • Fax (816) 765-8955
www.ruskin.com • Email: [email protected]
R
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A M C A’ S C E R T I F I E D R AT I N G S P R O G R A M S U P P L E M E N T S
That said, it’s critical for the equipment, ultimately procured, to perform
in accordance with expectations that
are set when the equipment was
selected. If the product has not been
independently certified to perform as
rated, how can anyone be assured that
it will perform as expected? Sellers’
point about utilizing high-quality equipment to ensure precise, reliable
performance can be met by specifying
AMCA-licensed products.
AMCA International’s Certified
Ratings Program
Currently, AMCA International has
the world’s only international Certified
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AMCA International InMotion
Ratings Program (CRP) for air system
components. This program ensures
that a product line has been tested and
rated in conformance with AMCA
International’s test standards and
rating requirements. The purpose is to
give the buyers, specifiers, and users
of air movement and control equipment assurance that published ratings
are reliable and accurate.
Participation in AMCA International’s
CRP is voluntary and open to
AMCA members and non-members.
Manufacturers submit units for testing
at an AMCA independent laboratory.
Trained laboratory technicians conduct
tests in accordance with AMCA or rec-
THE
L E E D R AT I N G S Y S T E M
ognized test standards, many of which
are International Standards. Once test
requirements are met, manufacturers’
published ratings are verified for accuracy. Catalogs containing the approved
ratings are reviewed and approved by
AMCA’s engineering staff before 1) the
ratings are published, 2) the Certified
Rating Seal can be used, and 3) the
catalogs are distributed to the public.
Ratings are subject, at all times, to
review by AMCA International as an
impartial authority. AMCA-licensed
products are revisited (check-tested)
every three years to ensure that manufacturers maintain the tolerances
necessary to achieve published ratings
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over time. All licensed products are
open to challenge testing, allowing
competing manufacturers or any third
party to question or verify a product’s
performance. Failure to pass a check
test requires immediate corrective
action to be taken within a specified
time. Inability to meet original performance requires restatement of published
performance or loss of certification.
AMCA International maintains an
up-to-date listing of licensed products
at www.amca.org. Additionally, the
website contains a rich database of
information on system design and
product application for commercial,
industrial, and agricultural buildings.
Specifying products that bear the
AMCA Certified Rating Seal is a
credible way to ensure accurate and
dependable equipment that performs
to published ratings as required by
green building designers.
fans, louvers, and dampers, AMCA’s
Certified Ratings Program (CRP) provides a database of third-party-tested
products and independently reviewed
rating documentation that designers
and specifiers can use to at least provide reasonably assured performance.
Conclusion
The green building market is growing and as such, so is the need for
green products that go into them.
Currently, no green-product database
or certification organization exists that
can meet the needs for many, if not
most, of the mechanical-system products going into these green buildings.
For air-system components, such as
Michael Ivanovich is the editor-in-chief of
Heating/Piping/Air Conditioning (HPAC) Engineering,
and manager of events of the Engineering Green
Buildings Conference and Expo. He can be reached at
[email protected]
Emery (Pete) Neitzel is the vice president of engineering
and manufacturing at Greenheck Corp., and the 20052006 preesident of AMCA International. He can be
reached at [email protected]
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C I R C U L AT I N G F A N V E L O C I T Y
Profile Applications
By Richard Aynsley, PhD
T
he introduction of a virtual disk incorporating
measured 3D velocity profile data can substantially
reduce computation times from days to hours.
There has been widespread application of computational
fluid dynamics (CFD) in research and development of fans in
recent years. This activity is typically in 3D, although some
initial development work is done in 2D to reduce computation run times.
In studies of airflow in large spaces from large, industrial
circulator fans, the run times for 3D computations can be
several days on a high-end, dual-processor PC. This can be
reduced dramatically without loss of accuracy by substituting a 3D velocity profile measured close to the fan blades.
Data from this velocity profile can be used to create a virtual disk in the CFD model. This virtual disk replaces the full
3D CFD modeling of the fan blades, which represents the
majority of computation time.
It is important to measure 3D velocity profiles for this
technique so that all three X, Y, and Z components of
velocity are obtained. This will ensure that important swirl
characteristics of the airflow from the fan are included in
the modeling. These velocity profile measurements are
typically measured at a distance of about three blade chord
widths downstream from a fan. Measurements in that location avoid the complex flow adjacent to the blades but are
close enough to the blades to minimize the influences of
entrainment into the jet and the geometry, and obstructions in large spaces.
Velocity profiles can also be used to establish airflow rate
associated with the principal jet from circulator fans. This is
discussed later in this article.
Airflow in a Distribution Center
Initial attempts to model airflow using CFDesign software
for 3D CFD of air flow analysis from 24-ft./diam. industrial
ceiling fans were unsuccessful, crashing after four days.
The total domain around the fan was 90-ft./diam. and 20-ft.
deep, with the fan 6-ft. below the ceiling. A secondary,
transitional domain 15-ft./diam. and 1.5-ft. deep was used to
speed convergence, with the local domain around the fan
set at 25.5-ft./diam. and 8-in. deep.
24
AMCA International InMotion
Figure 1. CFD model of airflow envelope for an 8-ft./diam. ceiling fan.
We found that a single-blade passage would not work for
an approximation. On a smaller, 8-ft./diam. fan, we needed
at least 700 iterations, equivalent to 38 revolutions of the 10
fan blades, to establish a stable flow pattern.
The largest 10-blade fan successfully modeled in 3D CFD
was a single fan, which was 8-ft. in diameter (see Figure 1).
Run times for this airflow simulation, using 514,947 nodes
with 700 iterations, were more than four days on a fully configured Dell Precision computer with dual Intel Xeon 3.00
GHz processors.
By adopting a virtual disk approach, based on measured
3D velocity profile data, airflow from three, 14-ft./diam. fans
at full speed (71 rpm) in a distribution center was successfully modeled (see Figure 2). Run times for this
configuration, with 81,642 nodes and 1,000 iterations, were
reduced to about eight hours. Note that it is essential to calibrate CFD input data to ensure that CFD output correlates
adequately with physical measurements of airflow.
In Figure 2, the highest velocity is at the floor and not at
the fan. The static pressure below the fan, between the
racks, is increased by the fan. While the main flow is down
the aisle away from the fan (not shown in this view), this
section shows air escaping at high velocity through the narrow space under the rack.
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Airflow Rate from Circulating Fans
Determining Total Airflow
Unlike ducted fans, airflow rate from
unducted air-circulating fans is difficult
to define (see Figure 3). There is the
principal jet from the fan with its axial,
tangential (swirl), and radial velocity
components. There is also substantial
airflow created by entrainment at the
perimeter of the principal airflow jet.
Local airflow close to the blades
includes a strong vortex ring, established by the tips of the fan blades.
While all this airflow mixes or circulates air, measuring all resulting air
movement in the entire space due to a
circulating fan is not practical. The
main function of a circulator fan is to
circulate and mix air movement within
a space to ensure uniform conditions
throughout a space. During winter,
fans at low speed mix hotter air that
accumulates near the ceiling level with
other air in a space, resulting in considerable savings in heating costs. During
summer, circulator fans are operated
at higher speeds to provide physiological cooling of up to 12F or more to
workers near the floor level.
Buoyancy was not considered in the
CFD models, as the principal interest
is in established destratified flow patterns. When stratified, there is less
than a 2F difference in temperature
between the floor and ceiling. The initial buoyancy force on cubic foot of air
under the roof, at say 98F when
moved into air near the floor level at
68F, is about 0.006 lbf/ft3—not a big
deal compared to the momentum
forces in the order of 3.5 lbf/ft3 developed by the fan.
Predicting airflow patterns in large
industrial buildings is complex due
to the many obstructions to airflow
encountered in such spaces. This is
why CFD modeling is employed.
Measuring the airflow rate in the
principal jet from an air circulating fan
can be achieved by integrating the X,
Y, and Z air velocity vectors at a number of radial positions close to the
delivery side of the fan blades using a
crossed-wire, or crossed-fiber, thermal
anemometer. Three fan blade chord
widths are suggested as a suitable distance downstream from the fan for
measurements (see Figure 4). To
determine the total airflow rate from
the fan, at least 10 equally spaced
measurement positions are needed
between below the center of the fan
out to below the tips of the fan blades.
(Note: At first glance, it may appear
that area distribution was not used in
Figure 4; it is, by integrating the circular rings between each measurement
station, as indicated in Figure 6.)
The appropriate time over which
velocities are averaged can be determined by taking a long time history of
velocity (e.g., 10 minutes). The mean
and standard deviation of this time history of velocity are determined, and
then the time history is truncated, by
say 10%, and the mean and standard
deviation are recalculated. This is
repeated until a noticeable change, for
example 5%, is detected in the standard deviation. This indicates that
averaging times for measuring velocity
vectors should be longer than this
time period.
• The Vx velocity vector (m/s or fpm)
is the tangential (swirl) velocity
measured tangentially to the rotation of the fan blades. This is
measured in a plane parallel to the
plane of fan rotation.
Figure 2. Air circulation from an industrial ceiling fan in
a distribution center with high racks.
Figure 3. Characteristic airflow from circulating fans.1
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C I R C U L AT I N G F A N V E L O C I T Y P R O F I L E A P P L I C AT I O N S
The Vy velocity vector (m/s or fpm)
is the radial velocity measured in the
radial direction from the center of
the fan, measured in a plane parallel
to the plane of fan rotation.
• The Vz velocity vector (m/s or fpm)
is the axial velocity measured in
planes parallel to the axis of rotation
of the fan. Some circulating fans
have reverse airflow back through
the fan near the fan hub. Such
reverse flow is not normally included in the computation of the airflow
rate for the principal airflow jet.
The resultant velocity vector (m/s or
fpm) is obtained from the Vx, Vy, and
Vz velocity vectors. This is done by
resolving the Vx and Vy vectors in the
plane parallel to the fan rotation [Rvxy
= (Vx2 + Vy2)0.5]. Similarly, the Vz axial
velocity vector is resolved with the
Rvxy vector [Rvxyz = (Rvxy2 + Vz2)0.5]
to determine the resultant velocity vector for all three Vx, Vy, and Vz velocity
vector components (see Figure 5).
These resultant velocity vectors are
integrated to obtain the airflow rate
(m3/s or cfm), by summing the average
of adjacent Rvxyz velocity vectors and
multiplying by the area of the circular
ring between the measuring positions
(see Figure 6). It is important to know
the value of the radial, and particularly
the tangential (swirl) velocity vectors if
CFD modeling of the airflow from the
fan is envisaged.
This procedure can be simplified for
an approximate estimate of the jet airflow rate by measuring only the axial
Vz velocity vectors off the fan. This
method ignores the tangential (swirl)
and radial velocity components, which
•
Reverse flow sometimes
occurs near the fan hub
3 blade
chord
widths
10 equally spaced velocity
measurement positions
Figure 4. View of circulator fan indicating the suggested
measurement stations of three fan blade chord widths
downstream of the fan.
Vz Axial
Resultant Velocity
Rvxyz
Vx Radial
Vy Tangential
Rvxyz
Figure 5. Diagram showing resolution of Vx, Vy, and Vz
into resultant velocity vector Rvxyz.
2 4 6 8 10
Area = R288 – R27
Velocity = V7 + V8
10
2
Flowrate = Σ Vn + Vn-1 X Arean-(n-1)
N=2 2
Figure 6. View of circulator fan indicating the procedure
for integrating 3D velocity traverse data to estimate
airflow rate.
26
AMCA International InMotion
tend to be 10% or less than the axial
velocity vectors.
Conclusions
By using the velocity profile, how
accurate was the solution compared
to laboratory test data? The speed of
the fans was adjusted on-site for
winter destrat operation so that air
velocities at head height did not
exceed 50 ft./min. in order to avoid
draft complaints. In the longitudinal
CFD simulation section through the
fan, speeds at head height 5.5 ft. fell
within the 46.2 fpm and 61.6 fpm CFD
colored velocity scale. Closer point-bypoint examination at approximately 5.5
ft. above floor level gave speeds of 49
fpm to 53 fpm.
While 3D CFD modeling of airflow in
large industrial spaces from large
circulating fans can be useful, computation times can be several days. In
some cases, even after thousands of
iterations of the calculations, convergence cannot be reached or the
computer crashes. The introduction of
a virtual disk incorporating measured
3D velocity profile data can substantially reduce computation times from
days to hours.
References
1) Smith, V. April 1960. “Air Circulator Fans: A Design
Method and Experimental Studies.” Report ARL/A
119. Dept. of Supply, Australian Defence Scientific
Service, Aeronautical Research Laboratories,
Melbourne.
Richard Aynsley, Ph.D., is director of research and development at Big Ass Fans, Lexington, KY. He is chair of the
review committee for ANSI/AMCA Standard 230-99. He
can be reached at 859/233-1271 or
[email protected]
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U P D AT E O N
European Directives and Standards
By Ian P. Andrews
flurry of activity in the European Region has
A
more manufacturers becoming involved with the
development of standards.
There are generally three types of standards: international, regional (including European), and national. Many
standards are developed in Europe to support various
European directives. These directives emanate from the
European Commission and have tremendous impact on the
manufacturing community. Let’s take a look at how they
affect the ventilation industry in particular.
Ever-Changing Requirements
The first directive to impact the European arena—the
Low Voltage Directive (LVD)—was introduced over three
decades ago. Issued under the Treaty of Rome in the early
1970s, its goal was to open the European market; what was
fit for one country, would fit for all—or at least that was the
intent. The LVD sought to ensure that all electrical products
up to 1,000 volts were “safe” in use.
Since then, there have been many new directives; most,
but not all, have intended to protect people and the environment. Manufacturers have had to ensure that their products
and processes comply with all these directives, and at the
same time, keep up with the ever-changing requirements
and regulations. In addition to the LVD, other examples
include the:
• Machinery Directive
• Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive
• ATEX (Explosive Atmospheres) Directive
• Packaging Directive
Many more new directives that will impact our industry
are fast approaching. These include the:
• Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive
• Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive
• Energy Performance of Buildings Directive
The Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD), in
particular, will have far-reaching repercussions for the
European ventilation industry. There is an entire library of
new standards being produced in support of this directive.
Various national building regulations (codes) are already referencing new requirements that will result from this
directive and also are anticipating requirements of some of
the new standards. Indeed, the recently revised Building
Regulations for England and Wales now requires fans to
comply with certain performance requirements. These
requirements include not only air movement, but also
power consumption, as measured according to various new
harmonized European Standards.
The European Standards body CEN Technical Committee
TC156—Ventilation in Buildings is producing numerous
additional new standards. Those that are likely to have the
greatest impact under this directive include:
• prEN13779, Performance requirements for ventilation
and room conditioning systems
October 2006
27
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U P D AT E
•
•
•
•
•
ON
Page 28
EUROPEAN DIRECTIVES
prEN15239, Energy performance of
buildings—Guidelines for inspection
of ventilation systems
prEN15240, Energy performance of
buildings—Guidelines for inspection
of air-conditioning systems
prEN15241, Calculation methods for
energy losses due to ventilation and
infiltration in commercial buildings
prEN15242, Calculation methods for
the determination of airflow rates in
buildings including infiltration
prEN15243, Calculation of room
temperatures and of load and
energy for buildings with room
conditioning systems
AND
S TA N D A R D S
prEN15251, Indoor environmental
parameters for assessment of
energy performance of buildings
addressing indoor air quality,
thermal environment, lighting,
and acoustics.
These standards are all being developed on the “fast track” and are likely
to be issued for final vote before the
end of the year. At that stage, all
European countries will have the
opportunity to vote either to adopt
them or not. If accepted, all European
nations will be required to withdraw
any conflicting standards.
•
Your Single Source for All Your HVAC Needs
VENTILATION & ENERGY RECOVERY
The EPBD places certain requirements on the various national member
states, one of which requires buildings
to be regularly inspected and issued a
certificate. In public buildings, this certificate will need to be displayed in a
prominent place. The inspection will
report on the efficiency of the many
systems that serve the building.
Residential buildings are included, as
well as commercial.
Influencing the Process
Many manufacturers believe that
since the directives and standards
impact them so heavily, they need to
Carnes offers a complete
line of Ventilation & Energy
Recovery products to fit
your EVERY need.
For more information visit us on the web at: www.carnes.com or give us a call at 608.845.6411
28
AMCA International InMotion
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Page 29
be in a position to influence the
development and content of the documents. The best way to do this is
through relevant trade associations.
These associations have a better ability to influence the government groups
that help develop the directives.
Manufacturers can be directly
involved in the process; however,
it is not a straightforward task.
Representatives from the many countries within Europe—each with their
own agenda—all compete to have
their positions known. The manufacturing delegates, therefore, need to be
technically competent and politically
astute in order to ensure that their
interests are taken into sufficient consideration.
These protocols are not unique to
the European arena—the processes
involved are very similar during the
production of International Standards.
Regional differences can provide even
greater obstacles to reaching a consensus when producing International
Standards.
Due to all the activity taking place
with directives and standards in Europe,
there has been an upsurge of activity
coming from many of the trade associations. The April 2006 meeting of the
AMCA European Region, held in
Karlsruhe, Germany, drew more attendees than it has in the last several years.
Additionally, membership in the
AMCA European Region is growing.
More manufacturers are realizing they
need to be involved in developing
standards to ensure that those standards will benefit both the industry
and society at large.
Ian P. Andrews, chairman of the AMCA European
Region, is an independent consultant working with the
ventilation industry. He can be reached at +44 1903
744067 or [email protected]
October 2006
29
AMCA 0610
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ACmaxx: The new generation of AC fan technology
ebm-papst’s new ACmaxx technology is extremely
versatile and can be used from
85 – 265 v, 50 & 60 Hz for the
worldwide voltages. With up to
75% lower power consumption, the
ACmaxx allows for a cost savings
of at least 50% over standard AC
fans! The ACmaxx will revolutionize
the way you think about AC.
www.ebmpapst.us
Hartzell Fan’s full-line product catalog
is now available on CD.
This CD catalog also includes the Industrial
Fan Guide and Fan Engineering Data. To
request your copy, go to
Hartzell Fan’s homepage at
www.hartzellfan.com and
click on the CD catalog link
in the Latest News and
Announcements section.
Ruskin’s Air Measuring Solutions
Ruskin’s complete line of air measuring and IAQ products are
designed with the latest code requirements in mind. Among
Ruskin’s new products is a patented controller that combines
indoor air quality with economizer functionality. The controller,
when combined with one of our air measuring and control products, is one of the innovative ideas that
contribute to meeting code requirements.
From code-driven total monitoring and control of outside air to simple measurement
of the airflow at various points within the
system, Ruskin has products that fit your
specific applications. Visit our website at
www.ruskin.com, or call 816-761-7476.
List of Advertisers
Acme Engineering
& Manufacturing Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
American Fan Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 30
Atmosphere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Berner International Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Carnes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Delhi Industries, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
EBM Papst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Greenheck Fan Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BC
Hartzell Fan, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Industrial Louvers, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Kinetics Noise Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Loren Cook Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
New York Blower Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IBC
Ruskin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13, 17, 21
T. A. Morrison and Company, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Twin City Fan and Blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IFC
Advertising Sales Offices: 1300 E. 9th Streeet, Cleveland, OH, 44114
Joe Dahlheimer
Ph: (216) 931-9279
[email protected]
Tom W. Corcoran
Ph: (610) 696-1820
[email protected]
Wayne Bayliss
Ph: (949) 857-1334
[email protected]
30
AMCA International InMotion
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COMPLETE SELECTION OF
AIR-MOVING EQUIPMENT
The New York Blower Company offers
thousands of different types, models, and
sizes of air-moving equipment. Contact
your nyb representative for assistance in
identifying the best fan for your application.
AIR-HANDLING
[AXIAL]
For the ideal handling of clean
to moderately dirty airstreams.
Commercial and industrial HVAC,
drying and cooling systems, fume
extraction, and process-heat
removal are typical applications.
FIBERGLASS
REINFORCED
PLASTIC [FRP]
Choice of performance and duty for
corrosive gas streams. Applications
include chemical process, wastewater
treatment, laboratory hood exhaust,
and tank aeration.
CUSTOM PRODUCTS
DUST/MATERIAL
HANDLING
Wide range of duty available
with unique fan lines capable
of handling light dust to heavy
material. Typical applications
include dust-collection and
high-pressure process along
with material-conveying.
AIR-HANDLING
[CENTRIFUGAL]
Designed for clean to moderately
dirty gas streams. Commercial
and industrial HVAC, process
cooling, light material-conveying,
heat removal, and dryer exhaust
are just a few of the numerous
sample applications
Designed for unique applications. Variety of configurations,
temperatures, flows, and pressures. Wide range of
modifications and
accessories are
available to
meet the most
demanding
specifications.
ELECTRONIC
CATALOG
Order our windows-based
fan-selection disk including
complete product literature.
ROOF VENTILATORS
Including both hooded and upblast ventilators,
propeller fans, and centrifugal roof exhausters.
These units are ideal for industrial, commercial,
and institutional applications.
HEATING
PRODUCTS
Industrial-duty steam
unit heaters with steam
heating coils are available
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process-heat transfer.
PROCESS/FAN
COMPONENTS
Plug fans, plenum fans, wheels, inlet cones,
and housings for a wide variety of OEM
applications. Process/fan components are
used in air-handling units, ovens, dryers,
freezer tunnels, and filtration systems.
THE NEW YORK BLOWER COMPANY
®
7660 QUINCY STREET—WILLOWBROOK, ILLINOIS 60527-5530
PHONE: [630] 794-5700 • FAX: [630] 794-5776 • E-MAIL: [email protected]
Visit us on the Web: http://www.nyb.com
THE BEST FANS STILL KEEP COMING FROM NEW YORK BLOWER!
AMCA 0610
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Page 32
Our
FANS &
VENTILATORS:
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niche
CENTRIFUGAL
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ENERGY
RECOVERY
VENTILATORS:
Greenheck offers
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is...
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DAMPERS &
LOUVERS:
Choose from the
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A N Y B U I L D I N G P R O J E C T — A N Y V E N T I L AT I O N R E Q U I R E M E N T — A N Y W H E R E — A N Y T I M E

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