Wickenburg Concept Paper - The School of Community Resources

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Wickenburg Concept Paper - The School of Community Resources
Preserving and Enhancing
the Wickenburg Ideal:
An Assessment of
Community Needs and Vision
Preserving and Enhancing the Wickenburg Ideal:
An assessment of community needs and vision
Prepared for Trustees of the Wellik Foundation
By:
Richard C. Knopf
Associate Dean for Community Initiatives, Professor,
and Director, Partnership for Community Development
Renae V. Tenney
Program Coordinator, Senior
Partnership for Community Development
Rebecca Van Cleave
Research Technician
Partnership for Community Development
Arizona State University at the West campus
College of Human Services
Partnership for Community Development
P.O. Box 37100
Phoenix, Arizona 85069
A Collaboration Among:
ASU Partnership for Community Development
The Wellik Foundation
October 10, 2006
(Revised November 30, 2006)
**Cover photos courtesy of Wickenburg Chamber of Commerce**
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.1
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Wickenburg Community Assessment…………………………………………………… 1
Table of Contents
2
Executive Summary
3
Introduction
10
Core Findings
12
Implications
39
Appendix A ……………………………………………………………………………….. 50
Wickenburg Vital Signs
51
Appendix B ……………………………………………………………………………….. 90
Key Informant Interview Script
91
Key Informant Interview Findings
100
Appendix C ……………………………………………………………………………….. 128
Focus Group Information
129
Focus Group Script
130
Focus Group Results
131
Appendix D………………………………………………………………………………... 149
Community Asset Map
150
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.2
Preserving and Enhancing the Wickenburg Ideal
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Background
Out of great passion for the community that she called “home,” long-time Wickenburg resident
Viola Wellik created a trust to serve her community in perpetuity. That trust has become the
Wellik Foundation. The Foundation was established to benefit the Wickenburg community
through investments that would ultimately preserve its unique heritage, the positive attributes of
its small town culture/environment, and the community lifestyles that the residents so highly
value.
On behalf of the Foundation, Arizona State University’s Partnership for Community
Development (PCD) conducted a community assessment of Wickenburg during July and August
of 2006. The process included an assessment of the hopes, assets, needs, challenges, and
perceptions of the community today, as well as an assessment of the vision that residents hold for
their future.
Methods
The assessment utilized an Asset-based Community Investment Model, an assessment “best
practice” approach that guaranteed involvement of community residents and organizations from
multiple sectors: social services, business, education, arts and culture, parks and recreation,
government, faith-based communities, hospitality, civic clubs, and residents of all generations.
The process incorporated commonly accepted processes in community assessment -- including
use of focus groups, key informant interviews, visioning and priority setting processes, asset
mapping, and demographic/socio-economic analyses.
In general, the following core questions guided the assessment:
•
•
•
•
•
What do people value about their community?
What is the vision for the community?
What are the challenges facing the community, both now and as it moves into the future?
What needs to be added to the community to reach its ideal?
How might Wellik investments help the community achieve its ideal?
Character of Report
The assessment process resulted in a rich and diverse set of data, reflecting the diversity of hopes
and aspirations of individuals residing within the community. At the same time, the data pointed
to pervasive, broadly held beliefs held by residents about the assets and needs of the Wickenburg
community. This report is organized in a way that simultaneously captures the diversity and
communality of perspective. Appendices were built in a manner that enables the reader to focus
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.3
on diversity. The Body of the report provides an overview of results from a broader, thematic
perspective.
Broad Themes Emerging From the Assessment -- The Wickenburg Vision
Community Points of Pride
The community values the small town atmosphere, with a strong sense of community, the natural
terrain, and its Western heritage. Community members generally take pride in the diversity of
residents, unique attractions, special events, open space setting, low density development,
history, clean environment, climate, and broad-based civic pride.
Community Challenges
The community is concerned that the community “points of pride” are threatened under the
pressures of growth and change. There is general agreement that development pressures, if not
managed well, can undermine the strong sense of community, the predominately unspoiled
natural setting, and the unique expression of the town’s Western traditions. There are also
concerns about threats to the economic sustainability and unique historical roots of the central
business district, the pressures of population growth, regional competition for local resources, an
under-funded educational system, inadequate funding for town infrastructure, threats to public
safety, low wages particularly in the service sector, high cost of living, lack of civic engagement,
inadequate youth programs, and under-developed recreation, education, arts activity and
socialization programs for all community members. Other challenges include drug-use,
annexation issues, economic struggles within the business community, lack of parental
involvement in the schools, inadequate human services, the economic impact of the By-Pass,
inadequate public transportation, and the need to address historic preservation.
The Community Ideal
The ideal Wickenburg would preserve the core values of the community, develop a selfsustaining economic base, follow sound practices in town development and planning, revitalize
the downtown area, expand community facilities, bolster educational support systems, increase
arts and culture opportunities, create attractions to increase tourism, have progressive
infrastructure development, maximize historical preservation, provide greater environmental
protection, provide greater opportunities for youth development, and have a rich array of
community-based education, recreation, socialization, and special events programming for all
generations.
Specific Themes Emerging from the Assessment – A Roadmap for Investment
Thirteen specific themes emerged from synthesis of data generated during the assessment.
These themes could be construed as the “pillars” of strength around which to build a strong
and healthy Wickenburg. As such, they might serve as a roadmap for creating investment
opportunities targeted to maximize progression toward the community ideal.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.4
Theme 1 -- Continuation of Small Town Character. The “small town feel” needs to be
perpetuated in the face of a nearby, rapidly expanding metropolitan area exerting pressures
for economic, political, financial, and even environmental control. Investments could be of
a nature to encourage self-destiny and generation of necessary resources to actualize selfdestiny politically and economically. Specific ideas offered by community residents
include investing in the revitalization of the downtown area, developing new small-town
oriented community attractions for residents and tourists, and supporting the Chamber of
Commerce’s efforts to market the town to provide a financial base for small, locally-owned
businesses.
Theme 2 -- Build Strong Social Inter-Connectivity. Residents value the friendly, highly
relational sense of community – where they feel valued, inter-connected, work on behalf of
others, and receive care and assistance from others during times of need. Investments
could encourage the creation and expansion of social networks where individuals feel
informed, connected, affirmed, cared for, civically engaged, and relevant. Specific ideas
offered by the residents include developing community-wide activities for community
members, working with the current Parent –Teacher Association to increase parent
involvement in the educational system, developing a community volunteer management
organization, and creating a consortium to encourage the exchange of information and
increase communication across all sectors of the community.
Theme 3 -- Strong Environmental Protection. The “Wickenburg Lifestyle” is defined by an
appreciation of the scenic vistas, natural terrain, open space, and opportunities for trail
experiences that weave the community together. Investments could focus on fostering
effective land use planning processes, protecting special environmental preserves,
protecting the landscape and open spaces, creating parklands, partnering with state, county
and federal land management agencies, and building resident awareness of significant
issues in environmental policy and advocacy. Specific ideas offered by community
members include creating additional parks, developing an inter-connected trail system,
partnering with the Town to protect Vulture Peak, supporting a program designed to
educate residents about environmental policy and advocacy, investing in community
beautification projects, and expanding environmental programming at nature preserves.
Theme 4 -- Historic Preservation and Enhancement of Western Heritage. In many ways,
Wickenburg’s rich Old West heritage has become a defining aspect of community life that
creates an identity distinct from other communities of its size. Traditions surrounding this
differentiating heritage (e.g., dude ranches, mining, prospecting, equestrian uses, range,
cattle, public lands management) could be nurtured and amplified, and a new venue of
programming, and public attractions should be encouraged. This not only instills a sense of
community identity within the residents, but creates a base for economic development
directed to channel tourism revenue streams away from other communities. Specific ideas
offered by community members include developing a vocational program with a Western
focus, funding western programming expansion at the Desert Caballeros Western Museum,
supporting the Wickenburg Cultural Organization’s efforts to collect oral histories from
long-time community residents, and developing a Western theme/atmosphere at the
existing rodeo grounds.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.5
Theme 5 -- Economic Development. The community senses the rich interplay between
successful business entrepreneurship, a sound economy, and a meaningful quality of life.
Resident perceptions indicate a clear need for investments that encourage development of a
vital, diversified “Wickenburg Lifestyle”, and a sustainable economic engine. Specific
ideas offered by community members include hiring an economic development specialist,
teaching residents and town staff the leadership and research skills to develop a solid
economic development effort, supporting an educational program for small business
owners, and building an equestrian center to bring revenues/tourism into town.
Theme 6 -- Youth Development. Emanating from every perspective of the community
assessment was the need for increased investments in youth development opportunities.
The general consensus is that while youth enjoy certain assets such as school sports
programs, they have relatively few structured options to fill their non-school time. Specific
ideas offered by community members include supporting a youth leadership training
program; creating a teen council to decide, plan and implement activities in the community
for youth; expanding supervised park, recreation and socialization programming for youth;
expanding after-school programs beyond sports; developing a summer program exploring
employment opportunities in the community; building a teen-focused study/activity area in
the library; and hiring a full-time Youth Director.
Theme 7 -- Expanded Activity Programming for All Ages. Based upon reflections of the
residents, it is clear that investments are needed to substantially expand the parks,
recreation, arts, sports, special events, socializing, and community building activities for all
populations. Investments could be in the form of additional facilities, expanded
programming, and the incubation of processes to engage residents as facilitators, leaders,
mentors, sponsors and teachers in community-oriented programs. Specific ideas offered by
community members include supporting a volunteerism/leadership program to train
community members on organizing and leading recreation/socialization activities for all
ages, partnering with YMCA or Boys and Girls Clubs to build a recreation center, creating
a multi-generational mentoring program matching seniors/retirees with youth for activities,
expansion of library programming and community special events, and investing in park and
recreation programming and facilities.
Theme 8 -- Expansion of Arts, Music and Culture. The community considers its arts and
culture facilities and programming as a major “point of pride” that sets Wickenburg apart
from other small town environments. Residents point to the powerful community building
aspects of venues such as the Del Webb Center for Performing Arts, the Wickenburg
Cultural Organization, and the Desert Caballeros Western Museum. Investments could be
made to expand the venues of these well regarded programs, and to create initiatives that
expand the penetration of these venues’ activities into even more sectors of the population
– such as the disabled, very young children, and seniors. Specific ideas offered by
community members include supporting capital improvements for the Del Webb Center for
Performing Arts, music scholarships through the Wickenburg Cultural Organization, and a
living history exhibit through the Desert Caballeros Western Museum. Additional ideas
involved creating a program to provide underprivileged families with tickets to arts events,
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.6
developing an informational program expressing the importance of the arts in the
community, and expanding arts programming in the local schools.
Theme 9 -- Growth Management. While linked to the need for Environmental Protection, a
myriad of other issues emerge as Wickenburg confronts the pressures for growth – density
of housing units, development of infrastructure (e.g., sewer, water, transportation),
cultivation of appropriate commercial uses, zoning, landscape management, signage
management, façade development, control of decision-making, impact fees, wealth
distribution, tax equity, visual impact management, noise mitigation, and pollution
controls. Decisions made on all of these fronts directly impact the “Wickenburg Lifestyle”
values that residents wish to maintain. Given this, investments could be made in the
development of “best practices” in growth management for small communities, and in
encouraging greater public participation in the growth management processes. Specific
ideas offered by community members include hiring a growth management specialist
within the Town of Wickenburg, importing national best practices in community
involvement and growth management into community decision-making, supporting a
publicity campaign to encourage increased public participation in the growth management
process, and creating a committee to convey information gathered about “smart” growth to
members of the community through public forums.
Theme 10 -- Human Services. The call for expanded capacity in human services for
Wickenburg is not limited to the need to provide better resources for under-resourced
populations. Indeed, the need for effective human service support systems cuts across all
social sectors. And, it benefits the business community by building an attractive, supportive
environment for its workers and customers. Investment opportunities include: expansion
of local Community Action Programs, targeted services to senior citizens, increased
domestic violence intervention services, counseling programs, expanded public safety
services, financial advising services, medical transportation services, and services for the
disabled. Specific ideas offered by the community include creating a consortium of human
service providers to increase communication, create a directory of local providers and their
services, and publicize available services to the community; hiring a domestic violence
advocate through the police department; building an animal shelter for the Humane
Society; investing in renovations at the senior center; creating a counseling services
program at reduced rates; providing transportation options for seniors; and increasing
public safety.
Theme 11 -- Affordable Housing. The lack of affordable housing in Wickenburg impacts
every sector. Families and singles with household earnings at even the national norm are
unable to become home-owners in the current Wickenburg housing market. Affordable
housing is a critical component of a sustainable community. Investments could be in the
form of encouraging multiple party partnerships to create investments in affordable housing
within Wickenburg. Specific ideas offered by the community include working with
developers to bring low cost housing into town, partnering with local mortgage
company/bank to develop a program to assist service worker professionals in locating
within town, supporting Habitat for Humanity financially to build more homes in the area,
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.7
working with state and county agencies to investigate funding opportunities/grants for
developing affordable housing in a rural community.
Theme 12 -- Healthcare. Wickenburg residents generally applaud the increasing
effectiveness of healthcare support systems -- particularly at the local hospital.
Nonetheless, there continues to be a desire for enhancements in this arena. Investments
could support the local hospital (equipment, staff, trauma services), incubate mechanisms
to attract specialty physicians, and facilitate processes to expand assisted living
opportunities and care-giving facilities and programs. Also, investments could provide
more accessible healthcare services for the elderly – including better medical facilities,
pharmaceutical support, transportation, and economic self-sufficiency/financial
management skills. Specific ideas offered by community members include partnering to
bring an assisted living/nursing home opportunity into town; providing an in-town shuttle
service to medical services; expanding services, facilities, and equipment at the
Wickenburg Community Hospital; creating a preventative healthcare program for
uninsured families; and providing educational seminars for seniors on accessing financial
assistance.
Theme 13 -- Education and Schools. As much as pride permeates the community regarding
the quality of schools and educational support systems, there is concern about the
inadequacy of resources available to support state-of-the art education programs. There is
equal concern about the capacity of the community to ensure quality instruction in the face
of inadequate resources to attract, retain, and encourage teachers. There is also concern
about inadequate early childhood education and adult education opportunities – including
access to post-secondary education. Investments could be made in creative ways to
enhance the financial viability of the local school system, ensure autonomous control,
import national “best practices” in education and curriculum, and provide scholarships and
continuing education for Wickenburg school teachers. Specific ideas offered by the
community include creating scholarships to assist teachers in furthering their education,
partnering with community organizations to determine creative solutions for the low salary
structures, hiring additional security guards at the high school, working with a community
college/university to develop higher education/professional development opportunities, and
investing in capital improvements, specialty labs, vocational teaching spaces, and arts
classrooms.
Suggested Investment Principles
Based upon insights from the assessment, five “investment principles” might be worthy of
consideration as investments are made to help the community achieve its ideal.
•
Investments should perpetuate and enhance the “Wickenburg Lifestyle”.
Strategic investments should encourage the continuation of the “small town character”,
build strong social networks, establish strong environmental protection (effective land
use planning and open space enhancement), and preserve and enhance the Western
ambiance and heritage of the town.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.8
•
Investments should recognize the community’s diversity. A healthy investment strategy,
designed to build a strong and vibrant community, simultaneously considers the needs of
all community members. It discovers a way to build strength among all sectors and
populations by developing support systems targeted toward the enhancement of each one.
•
Investments should focus on expansion of program as well as an expansion of facilities
and physical resources. Results of this assessment make it clear that as community
residents imagine an ideal, they are passionate about the need for a balance of capital
investments and programmatic expansion.
•
Investments should focus on the development of process versus the development of
products. The quest of investments should focus on growing the problem-solving
capacity of the community, rather than doing things for the community. This involves
developing self-generating processes within the community that carry programs forward
into the future on a self-sustaining basis, rather than on funding programs that terminate
once the funding terminates.
•
Investments must be accompanied by outcomes evaluation using clear performance
measures. The desired outcomes of investment should be articulated in measurable
terms. These specified outcomes should be developed for each investment to document
the kinds of impacts each project has created in moving the community toward an ideal.
Additionally, project funding must be accompanied by formal mechanisms for process
and outcome evaluation to ensure optimization of return on investment.
Next Steps
Having received the benefit of this assessment, the Wellik Board of Trustees will engage in a
reflective process to review its funding allocation strategies. The ASU Partnership for
Community Development will continue to work closely with the Board to facilitate an action
planning and priority-setting process. Plans are also underway to present the findings of the
Assessment to the community once the Board has completed their deliberations.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.9
INTRODUCTION
Purpose of this report
On June 19, 2006, Arizona State University’s Partnership for Community Development (PCD)
entered into an agreement with the Wellik Foundation to conduct a community needs assessment
of Wickenburg, Arizona. The process, which took place during July and August of 2006,
included an assessment of the hopes, assets, needs, challenges, and perceptions of the community
today, as well as an assessment of the vision that residents hold for their future. This report
provides an overview of the results of the assessment process in the form of summary tables and
comments about major themes that emerged from the data. These themes were compiled and
presented orally at the September 13 Board Meeting, along with a set of recommendations on
how the Board might proceed with its funding allocation decisions. At another Board Meeting
scheduled for November 16, 2006, the PCD will facilitate an action planning process to establish
priority areas for fund distribution. Once the process is completed, a final written report of the
community assessment will be prepared to include information on the process and the Board’s
decisions.
The ASU Partnership for Community Development
The ASU Partnership for Community Development serves as a facilitating agent for building
collaborative relationships among public and private community organizations to address critical
community needs. The PCD’s goal is to help shape a strong and healthy quality of life in all
communities – within metropolitan Phoenix through the entire state, and across the nation.
Through a variety of funding sources (e.g., Arizona Community Foundation, Valley of the Sun
United Way, Stardust Foundation, and Pulte Home Corporation), the Partnership has been
implementing the Asset-Based Community Investment methodology (e.g., Kretzmann &
McKnight 1993 1 ; Green & Haines, 2002 2 ) – a process for empowering community members to
define vision, mobilize resources to accomplish this vision, counter social challenges, and
ultimately, increase their quality of life. Partnership projects focus in scope from microneighborhood development (e.g., Maryvale Village Firestar project) to city-wide needs
assessments (e.g., City of Surprise Human Services Needs Assessment) to regional planning
(e.g., West Valley Scan).
The Asset-based Community Assessment Model
Under the Asset-Based Community Investment model, communities are envisioned as holding a
repertoire of assets. The role of an outside resource (such as the PCD) is to work with the
community to identify these assets as resources for growth. If the outside resource is to be
effective in enhancing life quality, it does not simply introduce programs or inject financial
resources into the community. This serves only to create community reliance on the outside
resource. Once the outside resource is removed, the impacts dissipate. A more effective role of
1
Kretzmann, J.P. and J.L. McKnight. 1993. Building Communities from the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding
and Mobilizing a Community’s Assets. Chicago, IL: ACT Publications.
2
Green, G.P. and A. Haines. 2002 Asset Building & Community Development. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.10
an outside resource is to “empower” that community to establish its own vision of an ideal, and
then to help the community manage its assets to achieve its ideal. The outside resource does so
by helping community residents take stock of the community’s assets, and then to work with the
community to assemble those assets into self-generating processes for producing growth,
overcoming obstacles, and producing desired change.
The Wickenburg Community Assessment
Out of great passion for the community that she called “home,” long-time Wickenburg resident
Viola Wellik created a trust to serve her community in perpetuity. That trust has become the
Wellik Foundation. This foundation was established to benefit the Wickenburg community
through investments that would ultimately preserve its unique heritage, the positive attributes of
its small town culture/environment, and the community lifestyles that the residents so highly
value. As the foundation moves toward regular funding cycles, it becomes clear that criteria are
needed to establish a set of priorities to help guide the distribution of funds into the community
to maximize its impact on the community, and to minimize duplication of services and activities.
In the context of this ultimate goal, the PCD conducted an assessment of Wickenburg during July
and August of 2006. The process included an analysis of the needs, assets, challenges and
visions of the Wickenburg community to use as a basis for defining criteria for the Foundation to
utilize in the distribution of its funds. To do this, the PCD implemented an Asset-based
Community Investment Model that created involvement of community residents and
organizations from multiple sectors: social services, business, education, arts and culture, parks
and recreation, government, faith-based communities, hospitality, civic clubs, and residents of all
ages, family units, and cultures. The process incorporated best practices in community buildingrelated assessment methodologies, including the use of focus groups, key informant interviews,
visioning and priority planning processes, asset mapping, and demographic/socio-economic
analyses.
At its core, the community assessment process is anchored in four methodologies:
1. Community Vital Signs Assessment. A socio-economic profile of the community will be
constructed utilizing available secondary data that describes core indicators of the health
and vitality of the Wickenburg community. Examples of such data include: household
composition, income indicators, health and public safety indicators, and other economic
and life quality indicators. A profile of Wickenburg’s Community Vital Signs is
presented in Appendix A.
2. Key Informant Research. In-depth personal interviews were conducted with strategically
chosen community members. The interviews were guided by a methodologically proven
interview schedule, reproduced as Appendix B. Each interview was one hour to two
hours in duration. Individuals were selected for their unique capacity to interface with
the heart of community needs and aspirations, and ranged in vocation from town
officials, to hair stylists, to human service providers, to business owners, to faith
community leaders, to community volunteers, to school administrators and teachers, to
healthcare providers, to public service providers, and local media. These individuals are
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.11
referred to as “Key Informants” in the community assessment literature. A total of 21
Key Informants were selected for the interviews, and the themes emerging from the
interviews are presented in Tables 1 through 17 (Appendix B).
3. Community Forum Focus Groups. Five community focus groups were conducted in
August – promoted in ways to establish small groups of residents representing the
broader community. The process for creating these focus groups engaged input from
community leaders. Ultimately, three focus groups were held at the Wickenburg
Community Center in a “town hall” format, involving 38 participants. Two focus groups
were targeted to youth, involving 16 participants. The focus group methodology
reflected a classic blend of needs assessment, asset mapping, and community visioning –
organized around four basic questions (Appendix C). Basic themes emerging from the
“town halls” are summarized in Tables 18-21, and themes emerging from the youth
groups are summarized in Tables 22-25 (Appendix C).
4. Community Asset Mapping. An analysis of existing assets within the community was
conducted to identify agencies, organizations and institutions that are in existence to
better the community (e.g., schools, non-profit organizations, government agencies,
businesses, faith communities, parent-teacher organizations, and service clubs). An
inventory of these entities is reproduced as Appendix D.
The information extracted from the community using the above four methodologies will serve as
the basis for the Foundation’s Board to conduct an in-depth analysis of their existing role and
their future investments into Wickenburg. This process, which will begin through a series of
facilitated Board meetings, will result in clearly defining the Foundation’s priorities for fund
distribution and formulating a communication plan to articulate these priorities to community
members and potential grantees.
CORE FINDINGS
Core findings emerging from each of the project’s methodologies are presented below in
executive summary format. Complete details are offered in Appendices A through D.
Methodology 1: Community Vital Signs Assessment
The Community Vital Signs Assessment provides a wide-range of information about the
character of the Wickenburg community. The following insights are a small sampling of the data
gathered during this assessment. The detailed report is provided in Appendix A.
•
Wickenburg is a small, but inherently diverse community.
•
At the last Census, over one-third of the permanent population base of 5,000 is
comprised of senior citizens (sixty years and older). But at the same time, one out of
every five Wickenburg residents is less than twenty years old.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.12
•
One in five households has children under the age of 18 years.
•
While nine out of ten Wickenburg residents is White, one in ten residents has Hispanic
heritage. Well over one in ten residents speak a language other than English at home.
In Maricopa County, one in four individuals has Hispanic heritage, and approximately
one in four individuals speak a language other than English at home.
•
Most Wickenburg families have annual incomes of $40,000 (median family income)
which is below the Maricopa County norm of $51,800.
•
Nearly 7 percent (6.9%) of Wickenburg families live below the federally-designated
poverty line compared to 8% of families county-wide.
•
Of the housing units in Wickenburg, 64.9% are owner-occupied with median monthly
owner costs of $906 and 35.1% are renter-occupied with a median gross rent of $511.
•
The central core of 5,000 residents is surrounded by an estimated additional 3,500
individuals residing in surrounding communities. These individuals provide positive
economic impact for the town of Wickenburg, but at the same time add to the demands
for a range of life quality amenities such as education, recreation services, cultural
opportunities, historical preservation and open space preservation.
•
The base of 5,000 permanent residents swells to over 7,500 individuals as seasonal
residents move into the community during the winter season.
•
Nearly one-third of Wickenburg grandparents serve as primary care-giver for one of
their grandchildren.
•
While nearly sixty percent of individuals 15 years and older are married, ten percent are
widowed, and an additional 13% are currently separated or divorced.
•
While twenty percent of Wickenburg residents over age 25 have at least a bachelor’s
degree, 11% do not possess a high school diploma or equivalent.
•
Ten percent of young children in Wickenburg live with a disability, and forty percent of
Wickenburg’s seniors have a disability.
•
Of the nearly 2,700 housing units in Wickenburg, 13% sit vacant. Over one-third are
renter-occupied.
•
Nearly half of Wickenburg’s population (16 years and older) is in the labor force,
leaving about one-half not in the labor force. Over forty percent of females (16 and
over) are in the work force.
•
Both parents work in nearly 60 percent of households with two parents and at least one
child under 6 years of age.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.13
•
Public transportation is not used as a means for access to work. The average work
commute time is 17.6 minutes.
•
Most of the working population in Wickenburg is distributed among three categories:
(1) managerial or professional, (2) production, transportation and material moving, and
(3) construction, extraction and maintenance.
•
Nearly one in four workers is in the educational, health, and social service professions.
An additional 15% are in arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation and food
services. Another 10% are in construction, and yet another 10% are in the retail trade.
•
Thirteen percent of Wickenburg workers are employed in the public sector.
•
Thirteen percent of families with children 18 years of age and younger live below the
poverty level. In general, 11% of the Wickenburg population lives in poverty in
comparison to 8% of families throughout Maricopa County.
•
One in five Wickenburg residents over two years old are enrolled in a school. There are
nearly 500 town residents in Wickenburg elementary schools (grades 1-8), and
approximately 250 students in high school. Approximately 250 are in pre-school or
kindergarten classes. Local schools carry more enrollment as surrounding communities
are serviced.
•
The Wickenburg school system consists of two elementary schools (Maclennan,
Hassayampa), one middle school (Vulture Peak), and two high schools (Wickenburg
High and Wickenburg Alternative High).
•
The attendance rate at schools within the Wickenburg School District ranges from 9496% with transfer rates ranging from 22-25%.
•
For the 2002/2003 through 2004/2005 school years, state performance standards were
met by Hassayampa Elementary School and Wickenburg Alternative High School, and
exceeded by Vulture Peak Middle School and Wickenburg High School.
•
2004/2005 AIMS Test scores for Wickenburg High School show that 83% of 10th grade
students met or exceeded the standards in Math, 81% in Reading, and 71% in Writing.
Test scores of Vulture Peak eighth graders indicated that 62 % met or exceeded the
standards in Math, 78% in Reading, and 79% in Writing.
•
The Wickenburg Unified School District boundary covers 864 square miles and
provided educational experiences for 1,450 students in the 2004/2005 school year. The
farthest bus stop is 40 miles from school.
•
Sixty-seven percent of teachers in the Wickenburg Unified School District have
obtained their Bachelor’s degrees and 32% have obtained a Master’s degree. Forty-four
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.14
percent of teachers working in the district have ten or more years of teaching
experience.
•
From 1995 to 2005, the total number of criminal citations decreased by 53 citations.
However, crime trends in Wickenburg show an increase in citations for possession of
drug paraphernalia (0.5% of total citations in 1995 to 3.0% in 2005), criminal damage
(3.5% of total citations in 1995 to 10.3% in 2005), and theft (4.0% of total citations in
1995 to 7.5% in 2005). At the same time, trends show a considerable decrease in
citations for possession of alcohol by minors (10.6% of total citations in 1995 to 1.4% in
2005).
•
In 2005, the most frequent civil traffic citations in the Wickenburg community were
given for speeding violations (51.5%), insurance violations (20.7%), and registration
violations (9.1%).
•
In 2005, most criminal citations in Wickenburg were given for assault (16.4%),
criminal damage (10.2%), and allowing dogs to run at large (9.5%).
•
The proposed CANAMEX transportation corridor will include Wickenburg Road, and
carry international traffic between Canada and Mexico.
•
The Wickenburg Bypass, expected to begin construction in 2007, is designed to
diminish traffic congestion within the Town, but will route traffic away from the central
business corridor.
•
In July of 2006, the regional transportation authority Valley Metro created a public
transportation option connecting Wickenburg to metropolitan Phoenix via Peoria’s
Arrowhead Towne Center.
•
The Wickenburg Airport has potential as a regional air transit facility.
•
Over 40% of Wickenburg births in 2004 were to unwed mothers. The Arizona
Department of Health Services reported the same percentage (40%) for births to unwed
mothers throughout Maricopa County.
•
Two percent of birthing mothers in Wickenburg received no prenatal care at all.
•
Over 10 percent of Wickenburg births were of low birth weight (less than 2,500 grams)
in comparison to 7.1% of births throughout Maricopa County.
•
In 2004, Wickenburg lost 116 community members through death, including four under
the age of twenty. The primary cause of death was cardiovascular disease and lung
cancer. Motor vehicle accidents and firearms each caused three deaths.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.15
•
Wickenburg has experienced expansion of the Town’s boundaries. Within a span of 14
years (1987 – 2001), the total land area for the Town of Wickenburg increased by 3,425
acres. In 2001, 73.1% of the 7,003 acres was undeveloped land.
•
By 2025, the population of Wickenburg is expected to exceed 10,500 residents.
•
The Wickenburg Sun has an annual distribution of 4,800 newspapers; 75.6% are
distributed in Wickenburg with 24.3% being delivered to the outlying areas of Yarnell,
Morristown, Congress, Aguila, Wittman, Salome, and Wendon.
•
Two radio stations service the Wickenburg community. KBSZ plays songs that relate to
the area’s Western heritage. The station includes broadcast programs such as live local
chat, public service announcements, and local news. KSWG plays country music and
keeps listeners informed on local news, weather, events, concerts, and promotions.
•
Wickenburg’s air passed the annual National Ambient Air Quality Standards in 1987,
and the Environmental Protection Agency has deemed the water quality as having “less
serious water quality problems,” and having “low vulnerability to stressors”.
•
Elevation is approximately 2,100 feet above sea level. Residents enjoy average
temperature highs of 83 degrees and average lows of 47 degrees.
•
Most Wickenburg households utilize either gas or electricity in their homes: 47.9%
operate on gas with 44.6% using electricity.
•
Wickenburg recreational facilities include a variety of venues including seven parks,
five ball fields, four tennis courts, three playgrounds, two RV parks, an equestrian arena,
a recreation center, a rodeo arena, and a swimming complex. Parks and playgrounds
occupy 363 acres.
Methodology 2: Key Informant Research
Results of the Key Informant Research are presented in Tables 1 through 17 of Appendix B.
The data provide rich perspective on the assets, needs, challenges and hopes of Wickenburg
residents. The following are general themes that can be extracted from the data, together with
insights of these Key Informants about appropriate Wellik Foundation investments in light of
such assets, needs, challenges and vision.
Wickenburg Points of Pride
Informants were asked to articulate what they value most about Wickenburg, what sets it apart
from other communities, and why they find meaning in living in Wickenburg (Table 1).
Seventeen themes emerged from specific and diverse qualities identified by the Key Informants
as “points of pride.”
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.16
•
By far, the highest valued quality of Wickenburg is the strong sense of community and
small town feel. This theme, reported by 86% of the respondents, was described in a
variety of ways, such as “quiet”, “friendly”, “small town values”, “quaint”, “everyone
helps out”, “first name basis”, “relaxed atmosphere”, “can make a difference”,
“generosity”, “smallness” and the like.
•
Other highly valued qualities were represented by thematic areas including the Western
atmosphere (38%), and the natural terrain, low density housing and open spaces (33%).
Other broadly valued attributes include the diversity of residents (19%), history (14%),
clean environment and climate (14%) and civic engagement (14%).
Community Challenges
Respondents were asked to identify what concerns them the most as Wickenburg moves toward
the future, and what are the major challenges that need to be addressed. Collectively, 29 major
themes emerged from a multitude of concerns identified by the Key Informants. (Table 2).
•
The most pervasive concern (48%) centers on the need to maintain the small town feel in
light of pressures for population growth and development.
•
Well over one-third of the respondents (38%) expressed concern about public safety, and
the capacity of agencies and institutions to respond to increasing threats to public safety.
•
Approximately one-third of the informants cited concerns about low wages particularly
in the service sector, relative to the costs of living (33%), the lack of broad-based civic
engagement (29%), and inadequate youth programs (29%).
•
Other themes mentioned by at least three Key Informants include the challenges of druguse, annexation issues, economic struggles within the business community, lack of
parental involvement in the schools, inadequate human services, the economic impact of
the By-Pass, and the need to address historic preservation.
Community Qualities that Need to Be Preserved
The Informants were asked to identify the qualities of Wickenburg that need to be preserved and
maintained as it moves toward the future. Eighteen themes emerged (Table 3).
•
The most predominant theme is preserving the sense of community and small town feel
(identified by 71% of the respondents).
•
Other frequently mentioned values include historical preservation (in terms of both
buildings and awareness – 33%), the Western traditions and atmosphere (29%), the
downtown retail and services (24%), open space and landscapes (19%), community
special events and attractions (14%), and the clean environment/climate (14%).
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.17
Needed Community Enhancements
To conclude this set of questioning, respondents were asked to imagine an ideal Wickenburg,
and then offer reflections on what is missing, and needs to be added to the community to make it
perfect. Twenty-eight themes emerged (Table 4).
•
The predominant theme is economic and business development. Informants pointed to
the need for developing a self-sustaining economic base (43%).
•
Another dominant theme centered on the need to revitalize the downtown area, from
both an economic and community use perspective (e.g., special events, pedestrian
friendliness (38%).
•
Other frequently mentioned themes include expansion of community facilities (19%),
expansion of educational support systems (19%), designing to increase tourism (19%),
infrastructure development (14%), historical preservation and education (14%) and
youth development programs (14%).
Evaluation of Seven Life Quality Domains
The Informants were led through a process that asked them to reflect upon each of seven possible
life quality domains. These seven domains are: Schools/Education; Parks, Recreation and
Community Centers; Healthcare; Human Services; Arts, Music, and Culture; Environmental
Protection; and Historical Preservation. Each domain was considered in sequence, one at a time.
For each domain, informants were asked to provide answers to three questions: (1) What good
things are going on in this arena?, (2) What are the challenges, issues, or things that need to be
done in this arena?, and (3) Specifically how might the Wellik Foundation make investments in
this arena to enhance Wickenburg? See Appendix B for instrumentation, and Tables 5 through
11 for results.
Schools and Education (including Early Education)
The results for Informant reflections on performance within the Schools and Education domain
are reported in Table 5. Fifteen assets and nineteen forms of challenges were identified. Twenty
possible forms of Wellik investment were also articulated.
Assets
•
Nearly half of the Informants (48%) pointed to the high quality of education in
Wickenburg schools. They cited high test scores and honor awards, the dedication and
quality of teachers, and the diversity of programming.
•
Other frequently mentioned themes include new school facilities (38%), the arts and
music programs offered through the Del Webb Performing Arts Center (29%), the new
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.18
cadre of school administrators (19%), the community commitment to schools and
education (19%), and the relationship between teachers, students and parents (14%).
•
Effective sports programs were mentioned by 10 percent of the Informants.
Challenges
•
A major challenge for the schools lies in low teacher salaries, and the subsequent
challenge of retention of quality teachers. This challenge was cited by over half of the
respondents (52%).
•
Another frequently mentioned challenge (29%) was a theme related to the complexity of
managing a school district with far reaching boundaries. Informants expressed concern
about costs, access, and retention of local control as growth transpires in the rapidly
expanding Phoenix metropolitan portion of the district.
•
Other concerns include inadequate financial bases for education in the community
(24%), the need for adult education including access to higher education (19%), limited
arts programs in the schools (19%), and limited opportunities for life skills training and
vocational education in the schools (14%).
•
Other concerns cited by at least ten percent of the respondents include: the need for
more English Language Learner programs, security guards, affordable housing for
teachers, strong communication with parents, and over-emphasis on sports compared to
other needs, such as art.
Possible Wellik Investments
•
The most dominant recommendation (38%) centered on developing creative
approaches to retain quality teachers in Wickenburg Schools through the expansion of
resources available to them. Some of the suggestions include pay raises, scholarships,
endowments, and financial support for continuing education.
•
Another frequently mentioned investment channel (33%) centered on expanding
school arts programs. This broad reaching theme included expansion of Del Webb
Center offerings in the schools, better school facilities for the arts, increased after
school programs, and better incorporation of the arts into the classroom curriculum.
•
Other themes shared by ten percent of the respondents included purchasing of books,
greater investments in special education, and heightened investments in school safety
and safety awareness education.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.19
Parks, Recreation and Community Centers
The results for Key Informant reflections on performance of Parks, Recreation and Community
Centers in enhancing resident lives are reported in Table 6. Fourteen assets were identified, as
well as fourteen challenges. Seventeen possible forms of Wellik investment were articulated.
Assets
•
Nearly three-quarters of the Informants (71%) credited Wickenburg parks as an asset for
the community. They pointed to the quality of the facilities, the value of tidy, grassy
areas, and the well-maintained character of the parks.
•
Another dominant theme was the value of the community pool (48%). Informants
pointed to the benefits of the recent renovation of the pool, the available swimming
lessons, the swim team, and open swimming activities.
•
Other frequently mentioned assets include the Wickenburg Community Center (24%),
Wickenburg recreation programs (19%), the skate park (19%), and the positive
contributions of the Wickenburg Parks and Recreation Department (14%).
•
Other assets mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents include: sports fields,
youth activities, youth rodeo, library, and rodeo grounds.
Challenges
•
The most frequently reported need reported by the Key Informants is to increase the
number of parks and park facilities in Wickenburg (29%).
•
One out of four Key informants expressed a need for renovation and expansion of the
Wickenburg Community Center (24%).
•
Other frequently reported challenges include: greater opportunities for special event and
display venues (14%), greater recreation and community center program offerings
(14%), expanded hours and programs at the community pool (14%), and inappropriate
behaviors at the skate park (14%).
•
Other challenges cited by at least ten percent of the respondents include: inadequate
funding for the library, inadequate funding for the Town Parks and Recreation
Department, and inadequate programs and activities for youth.
Possible Wellik Investments
•
Nearly one-quarter of the respondents (24%) stated that it would be wise to make
additional investments in the Wickenburg parks system, adding facilities and
landscaping to enhance their drawing power for residents and community events.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.20
•
Other frequently reported themes include expansion of the library and its services
(14%), and the addition of facilities to create gathering spaces for youth, and build a
sense of place within Wickenburg (14%).
•
Other investment channels mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents
include: expansion of services and activities at the community pool, expansion of
recreation programming, and expansion of the Wickenburg Community Center.
Healthcare
The results for Key Informant reflections on performance of Healthcare systems for community
residents are reported in Table 7. Thirteen assets were identified, as well as eighteen challenges.
Thirteen possible forms of Wellik investment were articulated.
Assets
•
Virtually all of the Informants (90%) pointed to the Wickenburg Community Hospital as
a positive asset for the community. They made note of the recent renovations, the
expansion of emergency services and diagnostic testing, the availability of emergency
transport services, the quality of medical professionals, the new Director, the quality of
staff, the fitness center, and the overall continuing enhancements of facilities and
programs.
•
Another frequently mentioned theme (48%) centered specifically on the quality and
availability of physicians within the community.
•
Other frequently mentioned assets included dentists (19%), pharmacies (14%), and the
Del Webb Clinic (14%).
•
Other assets mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents included My Father’s
Retirement Ranch, and the availability of behavioral health services in the community.
Challenges
•
One-third (33%) of the Informants stated the need to continue expansion of services at
the Wickenburg Community Hospital. These needs include: more equipment and staff,
increased capacity to handle trauma, the need for continuing renovations, and added
facilities.
•
One-quarter of the respondents stated the need for specialty physicians and dentists
within Wickenburg (24%), the challenge of providing care-giving services (e.g., nursing
care) in the face of rapidly expanding demand (24%), and the challenge of providing
accessible assisted living venues beyond the high profile facilities that serve a more
regional population (24%).
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.21
•
Other themes mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents include: limited local
acceptance of diverse insurance plans (14%), inadequate medical equipment in town
(10%) and inadequate recruitment for, and retention of, medical professionals (10%).
Possible Wellik Investments
•
The most predominant recommendation (29%) was to provide investments to expand
the capacity of the Wickenburg Community Hospital. Funds could be used to invest in
the physical property, purchase updated medical equipment, and enhance the maternity
and trauma capacities.
•
Another frequently mentioned theme (20%) includes possible investment in the assisted
living/nursing home arenas – perhaps through the facilitation of partnerships to bring
investments together to support facilities and programs.
•
Other themes cited by at least ten percent of the respondents include: gymnasiums,
support for medical transportation systems, and study of healthcare issues unique to the
Wickenburg community.
Human Services
The results for Key Informant reflections on the performance of Human Services (such as
counseling programs, domestic violence services, addictions intervention programs, emergency
assistance programs) within Wickenburg are reported in Table 7. Nineteen assets were
identified, as well as twenty-four challenges. Twenty-three possible forms of Wellik investment
were articulated.
Assets
•
Nearly half of the respondents pointed to the assets affiliated with the existence of two
regional behavioral treatment facilities within the Wickenburg area – the Meadows (48%)
and Remuda Ranch (43%).
•
One in three respondents (33%) cited the local Community Action Program (CAP) office
as a valued community resource.
•
Emerging programs in domestic violence intervention were also cited by one-third (33%)
of the respondents as a community asset in the human services arena.
•
Other frequently mentioned community assets include: the relative positive performance
of safety net services in town (29%), the availability of counseling services (24%), the
pregnancy resource center (19%), the Gate House (19%), the R & R Respite Center
(14%), social service programs at local churches (14%), the Meals on Wheels program
(14%), and the Crisis Center program (14%).
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.22
•
Other assets mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents include, the Wickenburg
Community Services Corporation, Habitat for Humanity, and a small anorexia/bulimia
center in town.
Challenges
•
The most frequently reported challenge (29%) centered on the need for additional
domestic violence prevention and intervention programs.
•
The same number of Informants (29%) also reported the need for general expansion of
human services to keep pace with escalating demand as the population grows.
•
Other community challenges in the human services arena are the need for privacy (14%)
and the need for access through effective transportation (14%).
•
Other challenges cited by at least ten percent of the respondents include: the need for
local access to state and county human service programs; the need for assistance to the
homeless; the need for alternative, less expensive treatment and intervention centers;
inadequate drug intervention programs; and inadequate communication and
coordination among service providers.
Possible Wellik Investments
•
The most dominant recommendation (24%) was to enhance the availability of
counseling services within the community.
•
Other frequently mentioned themes include the need to facilitate communication and
networking among human service providers and with residents about available services
(14%), and the need for increased domestic violence intervention programs and
services.
•
Other themes cited by at least ten percent of the respondents include: assistance for the
homeless, increased resources for the Humane Society, creation of a local food bank,
and expansion of meal services for the home-bound.
Arts, Music, and Culture
The results for Key Informant reflections on the performance of Arts, Music and Culture in
enhancing resident lives are reported in Table 9. Seventeen assets were identified, as well as
seventeen challenges. Fifteen possible forms of Wellik investment were articulated.
Assets
•
Virtually all of the respondents (95%) identified the Del Webb Center for the
Performing Arts as a community asset that is working well. They pointed to the quality
programming, the skills and passion of the staff, the increased participation of
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.23
community residents including youth, the awards, the engagement of volunteers, and the
connections to the arts communities outside of Wickenburg.
•
Another predominately mentioned asset is the Desert Caballeros Western Museum
(67%). The museum is recognized not only for its quality programs, but for its role as
an economic engine for Wickenburg. The respondents gave tribute to the museum for
its engagement of community residents, effective functioning of the board, its youth
programming, and its recognition through awards.
•
The Friends of Music program was cited as a community asset by nearly twenty-five
percent of the Informants (24%).
•
Other frequently mentioned themes include youth education (19%), the work of the
Chamber of Commerce in facilitating community events (19%), the Wickenburg
Cultural Organization for its work in oral histories, historical preservation and
involvement of youth in community affairs (19%), and school programs in arts and
culture (14%).
•
Other assets mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents include: the Saguaro
movie theatre, community support for arts and culture, the high ratio of programming
relative to the population base, and the dance studios.
Challenges
•
The most frequently mentioned (24%) challenge is the need for increased funding of the
Del Webb Center. Funding needs include better benefits for the Director, the need for
expansion of facilities, resources for program diversification and expansion, and
resources to compete with expanding venues of the Phoenix metropolitan area.
•
Other frequently mentioned challenges include: inadequate parental involvement in arts
and culture (14%), and the need for greater philanthropic engagement of the local
community (14%).
Other challenges mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents include:
inadequate resources for arts education, for arts opportunities in general, for arts
sustainability, and for arts in schools. Collectively, these items represent a broad call
for expanded investments in arts and culture within the community.
•
Possible Wellik Investments
•
The most dominant recommendation (29%) centered on developing additional resources
for the Del Webb Center – to expand facilities, equipment, programs, and general
operating support.
•
Other frequently mentioned themes include: support to maximize affordability (and
therefore access to) arts programs (14%), support for the Wickenburg Cultural
Organization (14%), and support for the arts in school settings (14%).
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.24
•
Other themes mentioned by at least 10 percent of the respondents include contributions
to existing arts and cultural organizations, expansion of museum programming, and arts
and culture-related enhancements of Wickenburg streetscapes.
Environmental Protection (including land use, protecting resources, open spaces)
The results for Key Informant reflections on the performance of Environmental Protection
measures in enhancing resident lives are reported in Table 10. Ten assets were identified, as well
as seventeen challenges. Eight possible forms of Wellik investment were articulated.
Assets
•
One in three Informants (33%) pointed to the value assets of open space that generally
defines the Wickenburg community. One in four (24%) cited the asset of effective
planning that is helping to ensure environmental protection as the community grows.
•
Other frequently mentioned assets include the preservation and protection of specific
natural areas (e.g., Hassayampa River Preserve, Box Canyon, and Vulture Peak -- 19%),
control of pollution (clean air and water – 14%), annexation (14%), and trails and
equestrian opportunities (14%).
•
Other assets mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents include construction of
the By-Pass in a way that will reduce flooding.
Challenges
•
The most frequently mentioned challenges include water conservation and supply (24%)
and planning to provide the appropriate balance between housing development and
environmental protection (24%).
•
Other frequently mentioned challenges include: increased pollution (19%), the need for
community beautification (14%), and need for increased parks (14%) and protected
open space within the community (14%).
•
Other challenges mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents include: the need
for enhanced town infrastructure, the challenge of the new By-Pass, the challenges of
density zoning decisions, annexation issues, and the need for an enhanced trail system.
Possible Wellik Investments
•
The most dominant recommendation (24%) centered on the need for developing
additional parks, and enhancing landscape amenities within existing ones.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.25
•
Other suggestions include the desirability of investing in an expanded trail system for
the community (14%) and providing funding for the community’s environmental impact
mitigation efforts (14%).
•
Other recommendations cited by at least ten percent of the respondents include: open
space preservation, density management, and Vulture Peak preservation efforts.
Preserving Wickenburg’s Roots/History
The results for Key Informant reflections on the performance of Historical Preservation efforts in
enhancing resident lives are reported in Table 11. Eighteen assets were identified, as well as
eleven challenges. Ten possible forms of Wellik investment were articulated.
Assets
•
Over half of the Informants (52%) pointed to the Desert Caballeros Western Museum as
a strong community asset for purposes of Historical Preservation.
•
Respondents also pointed to assets provided by the success of specific preservation
efforts, such as The Little Red Schoolhouse, the train depot, the locomotive, and the Old
Wickenburg Inn (43%).
•
Other frequently mentioned assets include the Chamber of Commerce (24%), the
general Western ambiance of the town (24%), Rancho de los Caballeros (14%), and the
Boetto project (14%).
•
Other assets mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents include: local history
books, community special events (e.g., Gold Rush Days, Fiesta Septembre), the
Wickenburg Cultural Organization, and local guest ranches.
Challenges
•
Three major challenges for Historical Preservation include funding for restoration and
maintenance of historical sites (24%), maintaining the Western ambiance of the town
(24%), and new development that detracts from the historical roots of the town (24%).
•
One out of five respondents (19%) cited the need to create more effective agreements
between developers and historical preservation advocates.
•
Other challenges include the need to increase awareness within the community on
historical preservation benefits (14%), the need for greater documentation and oral
histories (14%), and the need to address the rapid population growth that brings about
individuals who don’t know the community’s unique history (14%).
•
Decreased sensitivity to equestrian heritage was a theme cited by ten percent (10%) of
the respondents.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.26
Possible Wellik Investments
•
The most predominant recommendation (24%) centered on the need to fund continued
expansion of the Desert Caballeros Western Museum and its programming.
•
One out of five respondents (19%) pointed to the need to develop additional community
attractions (such as an equestrian center, amphitheater, farmer’s market, or railroad
exhibit).
•
Other themes cited by at least ten percent of the respondents include the need to invest
resources to steer new development toward Historical Preservation efforts, including
maintenance of the Western atmosphere, and the need to invest in historical building
preservation efforts.
Evaluation of the Needs of Wickenburg Youth, Seniors, and Families
Three questions were included in the Key Informant survey to gain perspective on the needs of
three primary populations that define the Wickenburg community: youth (including young
children and teens), seniors, and “everyone else in between” (specifically, families and single
adults). Key informants were asked to consider each population one at a time, and then answer
the following three questions: (1) What good things are going on within this population?, (2)
What are the challenges, issues, or things that need to be addressed when you think of this
population?, and (3) Specifically how might the Wellik Foundation make investments that would
benefit this population? See Appendix B for instrumentation and Tables 12 through 15 for
results.
Wickenburg Youth (including young children and teens)
The results for Key Informant reflections on the assets, challenges and investment opportunities
for youth are reported in Table 12. Fourteen assets were identified, as well as seventeen
challenges. Eleven possible forms of Wellik investment were articulated.
Assets
•
The most frequently mentioned asset pertaining to youth was Wickenburg’s sports
programs, noted by one out of three Key Informants (33%).
•
Other frequently mentioned themes include: church programs and activities (24%),
school programs (24%), non-profit organization programs and activities (19%), arts
programs (19%), the skate park (19%), and the community pool (14%).
•
Other themes mentioned by at least ten percent of the respondents include: community
support for the youth, the library, dance studios and schools, and daycare/preschools.
Challenges
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.27
•
The most frequently mentioned challenge pertaining to youth was inadequate activities
and programs (38%). Respondents expressed a need not only for more activities, but
more meaningful activities – as well as the need for a community-based, non-profit
organization such as a YMCA.
•
Other frequently mentioned themes include: greater parental involvement (19%), better
transportation to and from youth activities (19%), more school-based and after-school
programming (19%), challenges associated with the skate park (14%), drugs (14%), and
inadequate youth-oriented facilities (14%).
Possible Wellik Investments
•
The most frequently mentioned possibility for Wellik investment centered on the need
to develop more spaces for youth activities and programming (29%). Possibilities
include a recreation center, partnering with a non-profit organization (e.g., Boys and
Girls Club, YMCA) to establish a site within Wickenburg, or an equestrian center.
•
Another frequently expressed theme for investment included improved school
programming (including after-school – 19%).
•
Other themes expressed by at least 10 percent of the respondents include: support to
continue ongoing youth programs, enhanced transportation, and increased numbers of
sports programs.
Wickenburg Seniors
The results for Key Informant reflections on the assets, challenges and investment opportunities
for seniors are reported in Table 13. Nineteen assets were identified, as well as fifteen
challenges. Fourteen possible forms of Wellik investment were articulated.
Assets
•
The most frequently reported community asset was the Community Action Program
(CAP) office (38%). The office was noted for its transportation offerings, Meals on
Wheels program, senior activities, and senior center.
•
Other frequently mentioned assets include: quality senior-oriented health care
initiatives (24%), transportation services (e.g. – new bus route to Arrowhead, Red Cross
bus --24%), community involvement and good social networks (24%), volunteer
networks and opportunities (19%), My Father’s Retirement Ranch (19%), R & R
Respite Care (14%), and Wise Owl Center (14%).
•
Other themes expressed by at least 10 percent of the respondents include: the Del Webb
Performing Arts Center, involvement of local churches, and community services for
seniors.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.28
Challenges
•
One out of three Informants (33%) stated that transportation for medical appointments
was a challenge for Wickenburg seniors.
•
Other frequently reported challenges include: limited assisted living care (24%), limited
or non-existent municipal recreation programs for seniors (19%), inadequate educational
opportunities (14%), and expensive health care (14%).
•
Another theme reported by ten percent of the respondents centered on the expense of
placement in the local nursing home.
Possible Wellik Investments
•
The most dominant response (24%) was to partner to increase opportunities for assisted
living accommodations within the Wickenburg area.
•
Another frequently cited theme was to provide investments to enhance transportation
mechanisms for seniors (such as a town shuttle or community van – 19%).
•
Other themes suggested by at least ten percent of the respondents include: increased
support of the CAP office, increasing the affordability of health care (including
prescriptions), construction of new senior-oriented facilities, and providing affordable
nursing home opportunities.
Wickenburg Families (including single adults)
The results for Key Informant reflections on the assets, challenges and investment opportunities
for Wickenburg families and single adults are presented in Table 14. Seventeen assets were
identified, as well as seventeen challenges. Eleven possible forms of Wellik investment were
articulated.
Assets
•
The most frequently mentioned asset pertaining to Wickenburg families include the
town’s special event activities and programs (38%). The ease of opportunity for
resident involvement in such special events was noted.
•
One in four respondents noted the conduciveness of the small town atmosphere for
families (24%).
•
Other themes reported by at least ten percent of the respondents include: the town’s
social life, the availability of programs in churches, and a movie theatre that screens
family-oriented movies.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.29
Challenges
•
One in four Informants stated that shopping opportunities are limited and/or small
businesses are struggling to compete (24%), and that there was an inadequacy of
affordable housing (24%).
•
Other frequently reported themes centered on the inadequacy of family-oriented
activities and programs (19%), and inadequate levels of involvement in community
affairs (14%).
•
Other themes expressed by at least ten percent of the respondents include: an
inadequate employment base, and inadequate levels of affordable childcare.
Possible Wellik Investments
•
The most frequently mentioned possibility for Wellik investment centered on the need
to develop more family-oriented activities and programs for Wickenburg residents
(24%).
•
Of nearly equal importance was the call for more community facilities to house these
activities and programs (19%).
•
Other potential investment areas cited by at least ten percent of the respondents include:
scholarships for education, and resources for the expansion of family-oriented human
service programs.
Consideration of Missed Thematic Areas in the Interviews
The Key Informants were asked to identify themes important to the Wickenburg community that
might not have been captured by the preceding interview questions (see Appendix B). The
results are presented in Table 15. Several noteworthy themes emerged.
•
Nearly one-third of the Key Informants (29%) pointed to challenges and opportunities
within the context of town government as a needed focus for community development.
•
Other themes identified by at least ten percent of the respondents include: the need for
diversity in decision-making and programming, the need for increased public safety
funding, and the need for greater community engagement including voter participation.
A Global View on Funding Priorities
At the end of the Key Informant interviews, respondents were asked to consider all of the themes
that were discussed, and to identify specific programs or projects that they would recommend for
priority funding. The results are summarized in Table 16. All programs or projects identified by
the respondents are listed, and they are organized into six thematic domains. Four general
comments that could not be categorized in this way are entered at the bottom of Table 16.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.30
•
Sixty-six suggestions for funding were offered by the Key Informants, an average of
three suggestions per respondent.
•
The funding domain that generated the most significant number of suggestions was the
human services domain. Over three-quarters (76%) of the Informants offered a funding
suggestion in this domain.
•
In terms of rank order, the next highest numbers of suggestions were offered within the
Historic Preservation domain. Suggestions in this domain were made by 43% of the
Informants.
•
The number of suggestions for Environmental Protection and Education followed closely
behind. Suggestions for each were offered by 38% of the Key Informants.
•
The domain of arts and culture generated suggestions by one-third (33%) of the
respondents.
•
Suggestions for Healthcare were offered by 19% of the respondents.
The Key Informants were also asked to record thematic funding priorities by completing a one
page survey (Appendix B). The survey contained the ten major thematic elements of the
personal interview (Schools/Education; Parks, Recreation and Community Centers; Healthcare;
Human Services; Arts, Music and Culture; Environmental Protection; Historical Preservation;
Youth; Seniors; and Families. The Key Informants were asked to rank the relative importance of
each funding theme on a five-point scale, ranging from “Not Important” to “Extremely
Important”. The results are tabulated in Table 17.
•
All funding themes were ranked relatively high as a priority. All mean scores were above
3.0 on the five-point importance scale.
•
Of the ten possible funding themes, the highest ranked were “Schools/Education” and
“Youth”. Each received a 4.22 mean score on the five-point scale of importance.
•
In terms of rank order, the next highest priorities for the Key Informants were
“Healthcare” and “Parks, Recreation and Community Centers”. Each received a mean
score of approximately 3.82 on the five-point scale.
•
Next in priority ranking was the theme of “Seniors”. This funding theme achieved a 3.72
mean score on the five-point scale.
•
The next tier of priority rankings included “Human Services” and “Historical
Preservation”. Each received a mean score close to 3.65.
•
Next in priority ranking was “Arts, Music and Culture”. This funding theme achieved a
3.58 mean score on the five-point scale.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.31
•
The lowest mean scores were registered for the “Families/Singles” domain and the
“Environmental Protection” domain with a 3.44 mean score and a 3.27 mean score,
respectively. It is important to note that while these themes generated the lowest mean
scores, the magnitude of the mean scores suggest that all domains are considered of
significant importance for investment.
Methodology 3: Community Forum Focus Groups
Results of the Community Forum Focus Group research are presented in Tables 18 through 25 of
Appendix C. Tables 18 through 21 summarize the results of the general population “town halls”
held at the Wickenburg Community Center. Tables 22 through 25 summarize the results of the
focus groups held with Wickenburg youth at Vulture Peak Middle School and Wickenburg High
School.
Four broad questions guided the focus group conversations: (1) What are the community “points
of pride” for Wickenburg today that must be preserved as it moves into the future? (2) As you
think of an ideal Wickenburg community in the year 2020, what are things that need to be added
to the community that are not present today? (3) What challenges within Wickenburg need to be
addressed if Wickenburg is to achieve this ideal? (4) What specific recommendations do you
have for Wellik Foundation investments to help Wickenburg achieve this ideal? The data
provide rich perspective on the assets, challenges and vision of Wickenburg residents. The
following are general themes that can be extracted from the data, including insights that residents
have about appropriate Wellik Foundation investments in light of such assets, challenges and
vision.
Perspectives of Community Residents (Town Hall Focus Groups)
The results for the three Community Resident Focus Groups (Town Halls) are summarized in
Tables 18 through 22. Results are organized by Focus Group Question (Appendix C).
Assets to be Preserved
The “points of pride” that Wickenburg residents wish to preserve as the town moves into the
future are summarized in Table 18. Collectively, participants in the community focus groups
generated 76 community qualities that can be assembled into 18 themes worthy of
preservation.
•
The most richly represented set of qualities can be assembled into a theme entitled “sense
of community”. Nearly 18% of the qualities offered relate to this theme. Residents
clearly value the friendly, caring, small town qualities of Wickenburg.
•
The next most richly represented set of qualities relate to unique Wickenburg attractions
and special events. Fifteen percent of the comments relate to these kinds of unique
community qualities.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.32
•
The sense of history is also regarded as a highly valued quality of community by
residents. Over ten percent (10.3%) of the comments related to the theme of historic
preservation.
•
Residents also applaud the presence of community service clubs, the clean environment,
parks and recreation opportunities, and schools and education. Each of these themes
generated 7.5 percent of the total comments mentioned by participants.
•
Residents also appreciate a healthy small business community and the work of the
Chamber of Commerce (4.7 percent of the comments).
•
They also appreciate the community’s diversity (3.7 percent of comments).
•
Other themes identified as important for preservation include community involvement,
faith communities, quality healthcare, human services, town planning, public safety, the
Community Center, the Western atmosphere, and the Wellik Foundation.
Assets to be Created to Help Wickenburg Achieve its Ideal
During the focus groups, residents were asked to identify qualities that need to be added to
the community to help it reach an ideal. The qualities that residents identified are
summarized in Table 19. Collectively, participants in the community focus groups generated
66 community qualities that can be assembled into 16 themes that should be added to the
community.
•
The most prolific commentary generated by the focus groups centered on the theme of
enhanced support for schools and education. Twenty-one separate ideas were generated,
constituting 25% of the comments made.
•
The next most diverse domain related to the need to expand opportunities in arts and
culture for community residents. Fifteen percent of the comments related to this need.
•
In terms of diversity of qualities, other important themes identified by residents
participating in the focus groups included town development and planning (8 percent of
comments), expanded healthcare (7%), tourism destination development (7%), expansion
of community services (6%), and expanded parks and recreation opportunities (6%).
•
Other important themes indicated the need to develop expanded youth programs,
expanded human services infrastructure, increased community activities, affordable
housing, increased programs for seniors, better communication and sharing of
information, more open space preservation, and greater historical preservation efforts.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.33
Challenges to be Addressed if Wickenburg is to Achieve its Ideal
During the focus groups, residents were asked to identify challenges within the community
that need to be addressed if it is to reach its ideal. The qualities that residents identified are
summarized in Table 20. Collectively, the participants in the community focus groups
generated 58 community challenges that can be assembled into 18 themes that need to be
addressed.
•
The majority of comments (20.2%) related to the challenges of an over-burdened, underfunded educational environment. Concerns were expressed about the potential erosion of
local control as development on the south end of the school district escalates.
•
Another important set of challenges surrounds town growth issues, and the need for
sound planning initiatives to ameliorate the harmful effects of unmanaged growth.
Twelve percent of the comments related to the theme of town development and planning.
•
In terms of diversity of issues, other important themes include absence of community
involvement and awareness (7.3% of issues), challenges surrounding the local economy
(7.3%), cost of living and affordable housing (6.1%), drugs (6.1%), physical
infrastructure issues (6.1%), inadequate recreation activities (4.9%), the need for more
community recreation facilities (3.7%), environmental challenges (3.7%), and healthcare
needs (3.7%).
•
Other themes identified include: the need to stabilize small business opportunities, greater
parks and recreation opportunities, the challenge of population growth, the need for
preservation, and inadequate public transportation.
Recommendations for Wellik Foundation Investment.
To close out the focus group experience, participants were asked to consider the list of assets,
needed assets, and challenges that they generated (the comments were recorded on flip charts
and posted on walls of the community center as they were completed). After reviewing the
comments, residents were asked to offer recommendations for specific projects and programs
that the Wellik Foundation might fund to help the community achieve its ideal. The specific
projects and programs identified are summarized in Table 21. Collectively, the participants
in the community focus groups generated 24 specific projects or activities that can be
organized into 11 themes for the Foundation to consider for potential funding.
•
The most predominate funding theme relates to the need to empower Wickenburg to deal
with future growth and development. Nearly one quarter of the comments (24%)
pertained to this theme. Comments pertained to the necessity to develop a sound
strategic plan, to guide economic development, and provide the town with appropriate
infrastructure.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.34
•
Another dominate funding theme pertains to providing additional resources for schools
and educational programming. One in five comments (20%) related to this theme.
•
Other funding themes include: expansion of community facilities for art and youth
programs, increased affordable housing, increased attractions for tourism and community
development, using Wellik resources as leverage for revenue generation from other
foundations and agencies, funding scholarship programs, expanding social services,
increasing beautification of the community, expanding healthcare services, and
increasing public safety programs.
Perspectives of Youth (High School and Middle School Focus Groups)
The results for the two Youth Focus Groups (High School and Middle School Youth) are
summarized in Tables 22 through 25. Results are organized by Focus Group Question
(Appendix C).
Assets to be Preserved
The “points of pride” that Wickenburg youth wish to preserve as the town moves into the
future are summarized in Table 22. Collectively, participants in the focus groups generated
25 community qualities that could be assembled into 8 themes worthy of preservation.
•
The most richly represented set of qualities can be assembled into a theme entitled “the
Wickenburg Lifestyle”. Nearly half of the qualities mentioned relate to the theme of
valuing the friendly, caring, small town feel of Wickenburg.
•
The next most richly represented set of qualities relates to the natural terrain and open
space that defines Wickenburg. Over one quarter (27%) of the comments pertain to the
values of the natural environment.
•
Other emerging themes include the feeling of safety, opportunities for participating in
school teams and activities, proximity to the Phoenix metropolitan area, the desirability
of small, locally owned businesses, the diversity of cultures, and the skate park.
Assets to be Created to Help Wickenburg Achieve its Ideal
During the focus groups, youth were asked to identify qualities that need to be added to the
community to help it reach their ideal. The qualities that youth identified are summarized in
Table 23. Collectively, the youth generated 29 community qualities that can be assembled
into 9 themes that should be added to the community.
•
The greatest category of comments centered on the theme of expanded youth programs
and activities. Seventeen specific suggestions were offered, and the comments
represented one-third (33%) of the total comments offered in response to this question.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.35
•
Another important category pertains to the theme of expanded opportunities in schools
and education. Over one quarter (27%) of the comments related to expanding programs
and facilities in this arena.
•
Yet another important category pertains to the theme area of availability of park and
recreation facilities. Twenty percent (20%) of the comments related to this theme.
•
Other community enhancements themes identified as important to the youth include
expanded retail opportunities, availability of spas, an increased number of movie theatre
screens, more relevant library books, a gym, more places of entertainment, and more
greenery in community landscaping.
Challenges to be Addressed if Wickenburg is to Achieve its Ideal.
During the focus groups, residents were asked to identify challenges within the community
that need to be addressed if it is to reach its ideal. The challenges that the youth identified
are summarized in Table 24. Collectively, the participants in the community focus groups
generated 22 community challenges that can be assembled into 8 themes that need to be
addressed.
•
In terms of diversity of challenges, the most dominant theme areas that need to be
addressed by the community are: absence of diverse shopping opportunities (18 percent
of comments), inadequate supply of youth programs and activities (18%), inadequate
park and recreation facilities (18%), challenges in the small business community (15%),
inadequate human services (15%), and under-developed healthcare systems (12%).
•
Other themes identified by the youth include the lack of faith diversity among the
churches, and the disengagement of adults from interests of the youth.
Recommendations for Wellik Foundation Investment.
To close out the focus group experience, the youth were asked to reflect upon the list of
assets, needed assets, and challenges that they generated. Then, they were asked to offer
recommendations for specific projects and programs that the Wellik Foundation might fund
to help Wickenburg grow into their ideal community. The specific projects and programs
identified are summarized in Table 25. Collectively, the participants in the community focus
groups generated 16 projects or activities that can be organized into 6 themes for the
Foundation to consider for potential funding.
•
The predominate themes that emerged related to investments in schools and education
(31 percent of the ideas), investments in youth programs and activities (31 percent of
comments), and expansion of park and recreation facilities (19 percent of comments).
•
Other themes included providing more space for small businesses, providing homeless
shelters and services, and encouraging the creation of more stores for shopping.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.36
Methodology 4: Community Asset Mapping
The Community Asset Mapping process creates an inventory of agencies, organizations and
institutions that are in existence to better the community (e.g., schools, non-profit organizations,
government agencies, businesses, faith communities, parent-teacher organizations, service
clubs). An inventory of these entities is reproduced as Appendix D. The inventory suggests that
Wickenburg is well endowed with many community service institutions for a community of its
size.
•
Over 450 incorporated businesses currently serve the Wickenburg community.
•
Eleven schools and/or educational units (e.g. dance studios) serve the Wickenburg
community.
•
The community is served by eighteen faith communities or faith-based centers.
•
Over fifteen government agencies or programs have operations based within
Wickenburg.
•
Nearly fifty health care physicians, agencies or institutions have operations based within
Wickenburg.
•
Three media outlets, including a newspaper and two radio stations, have operations based
within Wickenburg.
•
Over twenty non-profit and human service organizations have operations based in
Wickenburg.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.37
IMPLICATIONS
The Wickenburg Vision
Wickenburg is a community with cherished traditions, and amazing possibilities. All forms of
community investment must be anchored in the collective vision of its residents, build upon
existing assets (of which there are many), and targeted to empower community members to
shape community building processes that would help them reach their ideal.
This assessment of community assets, needs, challenges and vision is but one source to inform
the Wellik Foundation Board as it establishes funding priorities for the distribution of resources.
Yet, it is an important source, for it provides a glimpse into community needs that is defined by
the community itself.
Importantly, any form of Foundation investment must be contextualized in a clear statement of
community vision. This vision is best articulated in the Wickenburg General Plan (2003). The
vision statement for that plan was developed through a synthesis of citizen-expressed values and
was crafted during the 2001-2002 planning process. It reads:
“The “Back to Wickenburg” quality of life means a community with pride,
lack of pretension, small town atmosphere and a friendly, Old West character that
is highly relational – everyone knows each other and visitors are warmly welcomed.
This Town appreciates its distinctive identity – scenic vistas, natural terrain and
vegetation, quality development with architecture that blends into the environment
– and its separation from metropolitan expansion.
Wickenburg has clean air and water; a balanced population of families,
active retirees and winter visitors; unique shopping and hospitality; an economy
that includes dude ranches and behavioral health care facilities; a good climate;
and, most important, interesting, forward-thinking, caring people.
The vision is to preserve and enhance these attributes as the Town, sure of
itself and the future, becomes even more unique among communities in Arizona and
the nation.” (Wickenburg General Plan, 2003, p. I-32)
The vision expressed by participants in this assessment echo these themes. There is a
passion for preserving the “Wickenburg Lifestyle” – the capacity to enjoy life in a small
town with caring people, beautiful terrain, and a Western heritage. As the community
moves toward its ideal, there is much work to be accomplished – expansion or
enhancement of existing community assets (e.g., schools, museum, Del Webb Performing
Arts Center, hospital, assisted living opportunities, business development, downtown
amenities, town infrastructure, attractions, transportation, parks, trails, recreation programs,
community service programs). And, not unlike other Arizona communities, challenges are
emerging that can potentially run interference with the ideal – rapid population growth,
traffic congestion, competition for locally-based small businesses, drug use, changing
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.38
commitment to civic engagement, and increasing fears of crime and threats to personal
safety.
Five Principles of Investment to Help Wickenburg Achieve its Ideal
Given the complexity of issues surrounding a community in movement toward its ideal, it
is important that community investment initiatives (such as those emanating from the
Wellik Foundation) be anchored in a specific strategy to help the community achieve this
ideal.
Based upon insights from this assessment, five “investment principles” might be worthy of
consideration as investments are made to help the community move toward its ideal.
•
Investments should perpetuate and enhance the “Wickenburg Lifestyle”. This
lifestyle is best encapsulated by the vision statement in the Town of Wickenburg
General Plan, and by features reported in Tables 2, 3, 18, and 22 of this report. The
“Wickenburg Lifestyle” has four major dimensions, each of which should be
encouraged by strategic investments:
o support the continuation of a “small town character” with economic and
social sustainability
o build strong social networks where individuals feel informed, connected,
affirmed, cared for, civically engaged, and relevant
o establish strong environmental protection, effective land use planning, and
open space enhancement
o preserve and enhance the Western ambiance and heritage of the town.
•
Investments should recognize the community’s diversity. Even in the context of the
Town’s corporately held vision, Wickenburg is a community defined by great
diversity in character, population, and needs. High affluence co-mingles with
abject poverty. Permanent residents co-mingle with seasonal residents and shortterm visitors. Families with young children share a vision that might be
differentiated from that of senior citizens, and with that of teens. Some have
aspirations for perpetuating the qualities of the past, and others may have
aspirations for embracing opportunities heretofore not part of the community fabric.
Some see the need for more growth and more density; others see the need for the
opposite. At the core of all these differences rests a common vision for
perpetuating the historic “Wickenburg Lifestyle”. Yet within this context, the
needs and aspirations for these differing groups can be dramatically different. A
healthy investment strategy, designed to build a strong and vibrant community,
simultaneously considers the needs of all community members. It discovers a way
to build strength among all sectors and populations by developing support systems
targeted toward the enhancement of each one. For example, investments in
healthcare systems and human service delivery systems for under-resourced
populations ensure vitality for the whole of the community fabric. Or, investments
in the interests of seasonal residents will strengthen community identity, and
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.39
therefore, social and financial engagement of this population in the whole of the
community.
•
Investments should focus on expansion of program as well as on expansion of
facilities and physical resources. Results of this assessment make it clear that as
community residents imagine an ideal, the ideal includes construction and
expansion of capital including facilities and sites. Yet, it is clear that they are
equally, if not more, passionate about the need for the creation and expansion of
programs, activities and services. This is particularly vivid in the context of the
needs for Wickenburg youth, seniors and lower income populations. The Wellik
portfolio should include a balance of capital investments and programmatic
expansion.
•
Investments should focus on the development of process versus the development of
products. It is clear from this assessment that community residents are a people
proud of their capacity to build a healthy community, and to troubleshoot and solve
community challenges. This is a strong asset of the community. With this in mind,
Foundation investments should seek to mobilize and nurture this asset by providing
resources to enhance community-based problem solving as opposed to providing
resources to solve problems. Following the Asset-Based Community Investment
model, the quest of Foundation investments should focus on growing the problemsolving capacity of the community, rather than doing things for the community.
Thus, rather than allocating resources to establish a local food bank, resources are
allocated to build the social capital required to create and manage a food bank.
Rather than allocating resources to contract out for an economic development plan,
resources could be allocated to teach residents (including town staff) the leadership
and research skills necessary to mount an economic development effort. Or, rather
than allocating resources for recreation and parks programs, resources might be
allocated to increase parental involvement and volunteerism targeted to the creation
of youth programs. Under this model, the focus of investment is on developing
self-generating processes within the community that carry programs forward into
the future on a self-sustaining basis, rather than on funding programs that terminate
once the funding terminates.
•
Investments must be accompanied by outcomes evaluation using clear performance
measures. The desired outcomes of investment should be articulated in measurable
terms. These specified outcomes should be developed for each investment to
document the kinds of impacts each project has created in moving the community
toward an ideal. Additionally, project funding must be accompanied by formal
mechanisms for process and outcome evaluation to ensure optimization of return on
investment.
Community-Identified Investment Themes
While specific investment opportunities are highlighted in the above review, certain themes
emerge as priority arenas for investment based upon a synthesis of insight from community
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.40
vital signs analysis, key informant perspective, focus group transactions, and community
asset analysis. These themes are broad-based, cutting across all population sectors in
importance and impact. They are inter-connected, with success in one domain potentially
capable of feeding success in all other domains. They each are multi-dimensional in
nature, and each have unique social, economic, cultural, and environmental components.
As such, these themes could be construed as the “pillars” of strength around which a strong
and healthy Wickenburg – consistent with the Town vision – can be built. And as such,
they should serve as worthy criteria for decision-making as future foundation investments
are made in the community.
As implied above, the first four themes related to preservation and enhancement of the
“Wickenburg Lifestyle”. The remaining themes have surfaced to reflect the core of
aspirations and needs expressed by community residents during this assessment process.
Each thematic area is discussed and then followed by a sampling of the ideas brought forth
by community members during the assessment. See Tables 5 through 17 of Appendix B
and Tables 18 through 25 of Appendix C.
Theme 1. Continuation of Small Town Character. Investments should be made to retain
the “small town feel” in the face of a rapidly expanding, nearby metropolitan area exerting
pressures for economic, political, financial, and even environmental control over the
community. To perpetuate a sustainable “small town” environment in an era of increasing
global connectivity, fierce competition for resources and rampaging population explosion
requires active intervention. Wellik investments could be of a nature to encourage selfdestiny and generation of necessary resources to actualize self-destiny politically and
economically. And, these investments should be made in a way that creates community
identity through branding, art, and shared activities and public spaces.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
•
Invest in revitalization of downtown area (landscaping, streetlights, public art)
Support the Chamber of Commerce’s efforts to market the town to provide a
financial base for small, locally-owned businesses
Develop new small-town oriented community attractions for residents and tourists
(farmer’s market, railroad exhibit)
Partner financially with Remuda Ranch to build a new administrative facility,
which would free up downtown retail space and maintain small town character
Support pedestrian friendly small town atmosphere downtown (benches, water
fountains, street vendors)
Theme 2. Build Strong Social Inter-Connectivity. Residents value the friendly, highly
relational sense of community – where they feel valued, inter-connected, work on behalf of
others, and receive care and assistance from others during times of need. Investments
could encourage the creation and expansion of social networks where individuals feel
informed, connected, affirmed, cared for, civically engaged, and relevant. In the middle of
affirmations of these values, the community assessment revealed increasing challenges in
parental involvement (e.g., in the schools), low voter turnouts, certain forms of poor
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.41
communication and inadequate information access, and inadequate opportunities for
building community through activities, programs and facilities that encourage interaction.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
•
Develop community activities for community members (community picnics, dances
at community center, movies in the park, dive-in movies at the pool, community
garden)
Work with current Parent –Teacher Association to develop a plan to increase parent
involvement in the association itself and the school system
Fund expansion and/or renovation of Wickenburg Community Center
Create a consortium, including representatives from all sectors of the community
(town government, business, human service agencies, faith community, healthcare
providers, schools, residents) to encourage the exchange of information and
increase communication
Develop a community volunteer management organization
Theme 3. Strong Environmental Protection. The “Wickenburg Lifestyle” is defined by
an appreciation of the scenic vistas, natural terrain, open space, and opportunities for trail
experiences that weave the community together. In face of expanding pressures for
growth, effective land use planning is required to maintain the very character of the
environmental values that attract individuals to Wickenburg. Investments could focus on
fostering effective land use planning processes, protecting special environmental preserves,
protecting the landscape and open spaces, creating parklands, partnering with state, county
and federal land management agencies, and building resident awareness of significant
issues in environmental policy and advocacy.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Create additional parks (with shaded areas) throughout the community
Develop an inter-connected trail system (walking, hiking, horseback riding)
Partner with the Town of Wickenburg to protect Vulture Peak
Support a program designed to education residents about environmental policy and
advocacy
Invest in beautification of community (streetscapes, sidewalks, alley ways, town
entrances and exits)
Expand environmental programming at nature preserves
Theme 4. Historic Preservation and Enhancement of Western Heritage. In many ways,
Wickenburg’s rich Old West heritage has become a defining aspect of community life that
creates an identity distinct from other communities of its size. Traditions surrounding this
differentiating heritage (e.g., dude ranches, prospecting, equestrian uses, range, cattle,
public lands management) should be nurtured and amplified, and a new venue of
programming, and public attractions should be encouraged. This not only instills a sense of
community identity within the residents, but creates a base for economic development
directed to channel tourism revenue streams away from other communities. Investments
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.42
can be in many forms: preservation of historic buildings, facade re-construction, new
historic attractions, museum expansion, historic awareness in the schools, special events
management, and organization of historic advocacy and promotional groups.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
Develop a vocational program that keeps the Western heritage of the community
alive through activities such as making saddles, bending cowboy hats, making
branding irons, and other trades of ranching, mining and the old West.
Fund expansion of the western programming at the Desert Caballeros Western
Museum, including living history exhibit and Boyd Ranch
Support the Wickenburg Cultural Organization’s efforts to collect oral histories
from long-time community residents
Develop a Western theme/atmosphere at the rodeo grounds
Theme 5. Economic Development. Resident perceptions indicate a clear need for
investments that encourage development of a vital, diversified “Wickenburg Lifestyle”, and
sustainable economic engine. There are concerns about the capacity of existing small
businesses to compete with regional alternatives, and of the impact of the impending
Wickenburg By-Pass on local revenue streams. There are concerns that existing economic
infrastructure does not have the capacity to build effective workforce placement and
attractive career paths for Wickenburg youth. There is concern that non-local financial
interests will accompany Town growth, siphoning important revenue streams and potential
business sector commitment away from the needs of the community. The community
senses the rich interplay between successful business entrepreneurship, a sound economy,
and a meaningful quality of life. Investments could focus on the development of small
business entrepreneurship skills through continuing education, technical assistance to the
Chamber of Commerce, partnering with agencies and financial institutions to provide small
business loans, and the import of national best practices in small business development into
the community.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
Fund hiring an economic development specialist
Allocate resources to teach residents and Town staff the leadership and research
skills to develop a solid economic development effort
Support educational programs for small business owners covering business topics,
entrepreneurship, etc.
Build an equestrian center to bring resources/tourism into town
Theme 6. Youth Development. Emanating from every perspective of the community
assessment was the need for increased youth development opportunities. Investments
should focus on expanding youth programs, facilities, gathering spaces, mentorship
programs, leadership training, and workforce development initiatives. The general
consensus is that while youth enjoy certain assets such as school sports programs, they
have relatively few structured options to fill their non-school time. Broadly speaking, an
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.43
investment in the youth will result in a myriad of positive outcomes – including greater
volunteerism, increased civic engagement, reduced crime, reduced addictions, and
expanded economic opportunities.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Support a youth leadership training program
Create a teen council to decide, plan, and implement activities in the community for
youth
Expand after-school programs in the schools beyond sports activities
Expand supervised park, recreation, and socialization programming for youth
Develop a summer program for teens to participate in learning about various
employment opportunities in their community
Sponsor a hands-on business training program in which teens operate the bowling
alley
Build an addition to the library creating a teen-focused study/activity area
Fund a full-time Youth Director
Theme 7. Expanded Activity Programming for All Ages. Based upon reflections of the
residents, it is clear that investments are needed to substantially expand the parks,
recreation, arts, sports, special events, socializing, and community building activities for all
populations – youth, seniors, families, singles, permanent residents, visitors, and seasonal
residents. Residents treasure existing recreation and sports programs, and the longstanding and successful special event venues. Yet more opportunities are needed to enrich
the quality of life. Investments could be in the form of additional facilities, expanded
programming, and the incubation of processes to engage residents as facilitators, leaders,
mentors, sponsors, and teachers in community-oriented programs.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Support a volunteerism/leadership program to train community members on
organizing and leading recreation/socialization activities for all ages
Partner with YMCA or Boys and Girls Clubs to build a recreation center and
provide programming for all ages
Fund an expansion of library programming to include family-oriented activities,
outdoor movies, story-time on Saturdays
Expand community special events programming
Sponsor a monthly, family activity night at the Community Center
Invest in park and recreation programming and facilities.
Create a multi-generational mentoring program that matches seniors/retirees with
youth for activities
Theme 8. Expansion of Arts, Music and Culture. The community considers its arts and
culture facilities and programming as a major “point of pride” that sets Wickenburg apart
from other small town environments. Residents point to the powerful community building
aspects of venues such as the Del Webb Center for Performing Arts, the Wickenburg
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.44
Cultural Organization, the school arts programs, dance studios, Chamber of Commerce
activities, the Desert Caballeros Western Museum, and the Friends of Music program. The
community would like to build upon the foundation of these distinguishing assets, which
have effective leadership. Investments could be made to expand the venues of these wellregarded programs, and to create initiatives that expand the penetration of these venues into
entries into even more sectors of the population – such as the disabled, very young
children, and seniors.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Support capital improvements for the Del Webb Center for Performing Arts (e.g.,
black box theater, expand lobby, hydraulics for the stage, back drops, lights)
Create a program to provide underprivileged families with tickets to arts events for
reduced prices or free of charge
Direct funds for additional/larger music scholarships through the Wickenburg
Cultural Organization
Develop an educational/informational program to share with the community the
importance of arts (incorporate western art to encourage attendance)
Invest in the creation of an arts area downtown (public art, portable stage,
streetscapes)
Fund development of a living history exhibit through the Desert Caballeros Western
Museum
Expand arts programming in the schools
Theme 9. Growth Management. While linked to the need for Environmental Protection, a
myriad of other issues emerge as Wickenburg confronts the pressures for growth – density
of housing units, development of infrastructure (e.g., sewer, water, transportation),
cultivation of appropriate commercial uses, zoning, landscape management, signage
management, facade development, control of decision-making, impact fees, wealth
distribution, tax equity, visual impact management, noise mitigation, pollution controls.
Decisions made on all of these fronts directly impact the “Wickenburg Lifestyle” values
that residents wish to maintain. Given this, investments could be made in the development
of “best practices” in growth management for small communities, and in encouraging
greater public participation in the growth management processes.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
Provide funds for hiring a growth management specialist within the Town of
Wickenburg
Import national best practices in community involvement and growth management
into community decision-making
Develop an informational/educational program designed to bring together personnel
from the Town of Wickenburg and other small communities experiencing explosive
growth to share their “lessons learned”
Support a publicity campaign to encourage increased public participation in the
growth management process
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.45
•
Create a committee/group to convey information gathered about “smart” growth to
members of the community through public forums
Theme 10. Human Services. The call for expanded capacity in human services for
Wickenburg is not limited to the need to provide better resources for under-resourced
populations. Indeed, the need for effective human service support systems cuts across all
social sectors. And, it benefits the business community by building an attractive, supportive
environment for its workers and customers. Investment opportunities include: expansion
of local Community Action Programs, targeted services to senior citizens, increased
domestic violence intervention services, counseling programs, expanded public safety
services, financial advising services, medical transportation services, and services for the
disabled. Again, investments could be made in facilities, programs, and in processes that
encourage greater engagement of citizens, members of civic clubs, and members of faith
communities in the service delivery system.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Support the creation of a consortium of human service providers to increase
communication, create a directory of local providers and their services, and
publicize available services to the community
Fund hiring a domestic violence advocate through the police department
Build an animal shelter for the Humane Society
Invest in renovations and sidewalks at the senior center
Work with local counselors to create a program for counseling services at a reduced
rate
Provide transportation options for seniors
Increase funding for public safety, including police and fire protection
Theme 11. Affordable Housing. The lack of affordable housing in Wickenburg impacts
every sector. Families and singles with household earnings at even the national norm are
unable to become home-owners in the current Wickenburg housing market. Services
worker professionals -- such as school teachers, fire fighters and police – are being forced
to commute from other communities to find affordable housing. This creates not only an
ethical dilemma for the community, but provides the practical challenge of experiencing
high turnover of effective community service personnel. Retail sectors based upon service
and manufacturing sectors are inhibited in growth potential due to the inability to attract –
and retain – quality workers. Affordable housing is a critical component of a sustainable
community. Investments could be in the form of encouraging multiple party partnerships
to create investments in affordable housing within Wickenburg.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
Work with developers to bring sections of low cost housing into town
Partner with local mortgage company/bank to develop a program to assist service
worker professionals in locating within the town
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.46
•
•
Partner with state/county agencies to investigate funding opportunities/grants for
developing affordable housing in a rural community
Support Habitat for Humanity financially to build more homes in the area
Theme 12. Healthcare. Wickenburg residents generally applaud the increasing
effectiveness of healthcare support systems -- particularly at the local hospital.
Nonetheless, there continues to be a desire for enhancements in this arena. Investments
could support the local hospital (equipment, staff, trauma services), incubate mechanisms
to attract specialty physicians, and facilitate processes to expand assisted living
opportunities and care-giving facilities and programs. Also, investments could provide
more accessible healthcare services for the elderly – including better medical facilities,
pharmaceutical support, transportation, and economic self-sufficiency/financial
management skills.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
•
•
Partner to bring an assisted living/nursing home opportunity into town
Provide an in-town shuttle service to medical services
Fund expansion of services, facilities and equipment at the Wickenburg Community
Hospital
Partner with the Wickenburg Community Hospital or Del Webb Clinic to provide a
preventative healthcare program for uninsured families (free immunizations,
physicals, etc.)
Provide educational seminars for seniors on accessing financial assistance for
medications, Medicaid, Medicare, etc.
Theme 13. Education and Schools. As much as pride permeates the community regarding
the quality of schools and educational support systems, there is concern about the
inadequacy of resources available to support state-of-the art education programs. There is
equal concern about the capacity of the community to ensure quality instruction in the face
of inadequate resources to attract, retain, and encourage teachers. There is also concern
about inadequate early childhood education and adult education opportunities – including
access to post-secondary education. Investments could be made in creative ways to
enhance the financial viability of the local school system, ensure autonomous control,
import national “best practices” in education and curriculum, and provide scholarships and
continuing education for Wickenburg school teachers.
Specific ideas for Wellik Foundation support include:
•
•
•
Create scholarships to assist teachers in furthering their education
Partner with community organizations to determine creative solutions for the low
salary structures, including building community awareness campaigns, legislative
and other forms of advocacy, and creative financial models
Partner with community college/university to develop higher education/professional
development opportunities (career development, GED, college classes, adult
education opportunities)
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.47
•
•
•
•
Build arts classrooms at the high school (choir, band, dance, rehearsal space)
Fund hiring additional security guards at the high school
Invest in capital improvements for the school system (buses, books, equipment,
dugouts for the high school baseball field, gathering spaces, picnic tables, lockers)
Invest in specialty labs, classrooms, and vocational teaching spaces
Next Steps
At the September 13 meeting of the Wellik Board of Trustees, the PCD presented general
insights from the Wickenburg Community Assessment. The presentation included a review of
the five suggested “investment principles”, and each of the thirteen emerging “investment
opportunity themes”. In addition, specific examples of potential “projects” that were identified
by participants in the Assessment were highlighted for each funding theme. After the
presentation, the Board discussed the Assessment results and came to consensus on the
importance of reflecting on the Wellik Foundation’s existing funding priority areas while taking
the community’s input into advisement. The Board agreed that this process of reflection should
not be rushed, but carefully analyzed in a series of facilitated sessions, subsequent to the issues
of this report.
The PCD will assist the Board in working through the following discussion points as well as
others yet to be determined by the Board:
•
•
•
•
•
•
What aspects of the Assessment surprised the Board members and why?
Do the Assessment’s findings validate the Foundation’s existing priorities?
What general principles should guide Wellik investments?
Should the existing priorities be modified to better address community concerns and/or
needs?
What are the Board’s desired outcomes for their investments into the community?
What is the Board’s plan for communicating with the Wickenburg community and
interacting with grant seekers?
Ultimately, the Wellik Board of Trustees will take into consideration the findings of this report in
discussions concerning their current role in the Wickenburg community, and their vision for the
Foundation’s future goals and funding priority areas. Through a series of facilitated meetings,
the Board of Trustees will focus on the creation of clearly defined priorities for future fund
distribution, and a plan to communicate these priorities to potential grantees throughout the
community. At the end of this process, the Board of Trustees should reach a state of clarity
regarding their purpose and their investment interests, which will allow them to enhance their
ability to have a positive impact in the community of Wickenburg for future generations.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.48
Appendix A
Community Vital Signs
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.49
WICKENBURG
Community Vital Signs
The Community Vital Signs is a compilation of existing socio-demographic information for
Wickenburg. This section provides a general overview of statistical information for the
community and its residents while providing comparative data for Maricopa County.
Information is provided for Wickenburg proper unless otherwise specified as the Extended
Municipal Planning Area (See pg. 32 of this section for a map). Socio-demographic indicators
discussed include: population, households, economics, education, crime, transportation, health,
growth indicators, media, environment, utilities, and recreation. Maps are also provided at the
end of the section.
Population
• In 2000, The Town of Wickenburg had a population of 5,082 which is 13% population
increase since 1990. 1
•
The Wickenburg Extended Municipal Planning Area contributes an additional 3,388
more persons to the total population of this area.1
•
Every autumn the population of Wickenburg increases by 2,500 “snow birds” or
seasonal visitors.1
•
52.9% of Wickenburg’s residents are female and 47.1% are male. 2
Age
Age
Under 5 years
5 to 9 years
10 to 14 years
15 to 19 years
20 to 24 years
25 to 34 years
35 to 44 years
45 to 54 years
55 to 59 years
60 to 64 years
65 to 74 years
75 to 84 years
85 years and over
Total
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Number
Percent
264
272
288
289
213
442
596
617
309
334
753
538
167
5.2
5.4
5.7
5.7
4.2
8.7
11.7
12.1
6.1
6.6
14.8
10.6
3.3
5,082
100.1
•
22.0% of the Wickenburg community is
made up of youth, 19 years old and
younger. 2
•
36.7% of the population is between the
ages of 20 and 54 years old. 2
•
41.4% of the population represents the
individuals 55 years old and over. 2
Maricopa County
The median age is 33.0 years
7.9% is younger than 5 years old
73.0% is 18 years old and over
11.7% is 65 years old and over
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.50
•
80.1% of the residents in Wickenburg are 18 years or older. 2
•
The median age in Wickenburg is 48.4 years old. 2
•
5.2% of the Wickenburg community is younger than 5 years old. 2
•
In the Wickenburg community 77.4% are 21 years or over. 2
•
Seniors 65 years and over represent 28.7% of the Wickenburg community. 2
Race/Ethnicity
Race
Number
Percent
White
American Indian and Alaska
Native
Asian
Black or African American
Native Hawaiian and Other
Pacific Islander
Some Other Race
Two or More Races
4,663
91.8
60
1.2
19
14
0.4
0.3
6
0.1
230
90
4.5
1.8
Total
5,082
100.1
•
98.2% of the residents of
Wickenburg are of one race only. 2
•
The Hispanic or Latino population
(of any race) comprises 11% of
Wickenburg Community. 2
•
85.8% of the population that is not
Hispanic or Latino is considered
White alone. 2
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Ability to speak English
• 87.8% of Wickenburg’s population 5
years and over speak English only at
home. 2
•
Of the 12.2% of the Wickenburg
community that speak a language other
than English at home,
• 10.2% speak Spanish at home,
• 0.9% speak Indo-European
languages at home,
• 0.6% speak Asian and Pacific
Island languages at home and
• 5.6% of the population that
speaks a language other than
English; speak English less than
‘very well’. 2
Maricopa County
77.4% are White
3.7% are Black or African American
2.2% are Asian
1.8% is American Indian and Alaska Native
0.1% is Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific
Islander
11.9% are of some other race
2.9% are of two or more races
24.8% are Hispanic or Latino of any race
Of the population 5 years and over, 24.1%
speak a language other than English at
home
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.51
Grandparents as caregivers
• 31.1% of Wickenburg’s grandparent population is responsible for one or more of their
own grandchildren who are under 18 years of age. 2
Veteran status
• 21.6% of the Wickenburg community are civilian veterans. 2
Marital status
• 18.3% of Wickenburg’s population 15 years and over have never been married and
58.5% of Wickenburg residents 15 years and over are married. 2
•
0.8% of the people living in Wickenburg are married but separated. 2
Educational attainment
Less than 9th grade
9th to 12th grade, no diploma
High school graduate (includes equivalency)
Some college, no degree
Associate degree
Bachelor's degree
Graduate or professional degree
6%
14%
•
10.2% of Wickenburg’s
population 15 years and over is
widowed and 8.3% of the total
population is widowed and
female. 2
•
12.3% of the Wickenburg
community 15 years and over is
divorced and 6.5% of the total
population is divorced and
female. 2
•
Of the 3,713 persons 25 years
and older, 11.1% did not
graduate from high school. 2
9%
11%
5%
Maricopa County
28%
27%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
•
•
80.2% of the population of Wickenburg that is
over 25 years old and over is a high school
graduate or higher. 2
19.9% of the Wickenburg community 25
years old and over has their bachelor’s degree
or higher. 2
Of the population 25 years and over,
82.5% are a high school graduate or
higher
Of the population 25 years and over,
25.9% have a bachelor’s degree or
higher
Of the population 5 years and over,
18% live with a disability
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.52
Disability status
• 9.3% of Wickenburg’s population 5 to 20 years lives with a disability. 2
•
26.7% of the Wickenburg community 21 to 64 years has a disability and of this
population 63.9% are employed. 2
•
40.3% of Wickenburg’s senior population 65 years and over have a disability. 2
Households
•
•
•
•
Wickenburg community is comprised of 61.2% family households and 33.8% non-family
households. 2
Maricopa County
Family households with children under the
age of 18 years are represented in 20.5% of
67.4% are family households
2
all households in Wickenburg.
32.6% are non-family households
Married-couple families make up 49.7% of
all Wickenburg households and married51.6% are married couple families
couple families with children under the age
of 18 years old make up 13.7% of all
10.7% are family households with a
households. 2
female householder and no husband
present
Of all households in the Wickenburg
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
community 8.2% are family households
with a female householder and no husband
present, and 5% are family households with a female householder, no husband present,
and children under the age of 18 years old. 2
Maricopa County
36.2% of all households contain one or more
persons younger than 18 years
•
33.8% of all Wickenburg
households are non-family
households with a single
householder living alone and
18.3% are non-family
households with a single
householder living alone who
is 65 years old or older. 2
•
Of all households, 22.6%
consist of individuals under the
age of 18 years old and 43.7%
consist of individuals under the
age of 65 years old. 2
22% of all households contain one or more
persons 65 years and over
Average household size is 2.67 persons
Average family size is 3.21 persons
9.4% of the housing units are vacant and 4% of the
housing units are for seasonal, recreational, or
occasional use
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.53
•
The average household size in Wickenburg is 2.15 persons and the average family size is
2.72 persons. 2
•
There are 2,691 housing units in the Town of Wickenburg and 87% are occupied. 2
•
13% of the housing units in the Town of Wickenburg are vacant and 6.5% of the housing
units are for seasonal, recreational, or occasional use. 2
Owner-Occupied Households
• Of the housing units in Wickenburg, 64.9%
are owner-occupied and the average
household size for the owner-occupied
housing units is 2.19 persons. 2
•
The median owner-occupied unit value is
$150,000, and the median monthly owner
costs are $906. 2
Maricopa County
67.5% of the households are owneroccupied units, their median value is
129,200 and median monthly owner
costs is $1,095
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Value of Owner-Occupied Housing Units in Wickenburg
Value of Housing Units
Less than $50,000
2.6
$50,000 to $99,999
22.2
25.1
$100,000 to $149,999
24.8
$150,000 to $199,999
$200,000 to $299,999
18.7
$300,000 to $499,999
5.9
0
$500,000 to $999,999
0.7
$1,000,000 or more
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Percent of Owner-Occupied
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.54
Homeowner Mortgage Status and Monthly Costs in Wickenburg
0
Less than $300
3.7
Monthly Costs
$300 to $499
11.1
$500 to $699
19.3
$700 to $999
13.9
$1,000 to $1,499
6.3
$1,500 to $1,999
5.4
$2,000 or more
0
5
10
15
20
25
Percent of Homeowners
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Homeowner Monthly Cost as a Percentage of Household Income in
Wickenburg
Percent of Household Income
Less than 15%
44.8
15% to 19%
12.8
20% to 24%
9.4
25% to 29%
12.5
30% to 34%
5.1
35% or more
13.1
Not Computed
2.3
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
Percent of Homeowners
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.55
Renter-Occupied Households
• Of the housing units in
Maricopa County
Wickenburg, 35.1% are
32.5% of the households are renter-occupied units
renter-occupied, the
and their median gross rent is $666
average household size of
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
the renter-occupied units is
2.08 persons and the median gross rent is $511. 2
Gross Rent for Renter-Occupied Housing Units in Wickenburg
Less than $200
7.7
Rent Amount
$200 to $299
9.7
$300 to $499
28.1
$500 to $749
36.1
$750 to $999
9.6
5
$1,000 to $1,499
$1,500 or more
0
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
Percent of Units
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income in Wickenburg
Less than 15%
15.2
Percent of Income
15% to 19%
16.4
20% to 24%
13.2
25% to 29%
13.9
8.4
30% to 34%
35% or more
27.2
5.6
Not Computed
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Percent of Renters
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.56
Economic
Employment Status
• 48.1% of the population 16 years and over are in the labor force and 1.9% of the
population is unemployed. 2
Maricopa County
64.6% are in the labor force
•
100% of Wickenburg’s labor
force is civilian. 2
•
41.4% of females 16 years and
over are employed. 2
•
All parents work in 56.9% of the
families in Wickenburg with
children under 6 years old. 2
3.0% are unemployed
All parents work in 53.1% of the families
with children under 6 years old.
The average travel time to work is 26.1
minutes
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Commuting to work
•
•
•
0% of the Wickenburg
community uses public
transportation to get to work. 2
5%
4%
Drives alone
Carpools
15%
Walks
5.5% of the Wickenburg
population works at home. 2
Other means
The average travel time to
work is 17.6 minutes. 2
76%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.57
Occupation and Industry
• 73.9% of the working population in Wickenburg is classified as a private wage or salary
employee. 2
•
13.3% of the Wickenburg community is classified as a government worker. 2
10%
Types of Occupations
2%
Management, professional, and related
31%
12%
Service
Sales and office
Construction, extraction, and maintenance
Production, transportation, and material moving
21%
Farming, fishing, and forestry
24%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
•
11.6% of the Wickenburg population is self-employed in businesses that are not
incorporated. 2
•
1.2% of Wickenburg residents are working for a family business and do not receive pay. 2
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.58
Types of Industry in Wickenburg
Percent Employed
0
5
10
15
25
22.8
Educational, health and social services
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation
and food services
14.7
10.8
Construction
9.9
Retail trade
Industry
20
Professional, scientific, management,
administrative, and waste management services
Finance, insurance, real estate, and rental and
leasing
7.1
6.6
6.5
Other services
6.1
Manufacturing
5.2
Public administration
4.5
Transportation and warehousing, and utilities
Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and
mining
3.1
Wholesale trade
1.5
Information
1.3
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.59
Maricopa County
Income
• The median family income in
Wickenburg is $40,051 and the
median household income is
$31,716. 2
•
•
Median family income is $51,827
Median household income is $45,358
The per capita income for
Wickenburg residents is $19,772. 2
The median earnings for full-time,
year-round working males is
$34,219 and $25,417 for full-time,
year-round working females. 2
Per capita income is $22,251
8% of families live below the poverty level
11.7% of individuals live below the poverty
level.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Family Income vs. Household Income
in Wickenburg
30
26.9
20
22.5
14.5
11.9
11.7
10
14.3
Family
14.9
Household
15.1
9.9
12.2
8.9
6.3
5
4.6
3
$75,000 to
$99,999
$50,000 to
$74,999
$35,000 to
$49,999
$25,000 to
$34,999
$15,000 to
$24,999
$10,000 to
$14,999
Less than
$10,000
0
$100,000 to
$149,000
3
1
1
1.7
1.4
$200,000 or
more
15
15.2
$150,000 to
$199,000
Percent of Families/Households
25
Income
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.60
Poverty Status
• The Town of Wickenburg contains 97
families (6.9% of all families) living below
the poverty level. 2
•
22% of all the families with children
younger than 5 years as well as 13% of all
families with children younger than 18 years
are living below the poverty level. 2
•
In the Wickenburg community, 25.7% of the
families with a female householder and no
husband present are living below the
poverty level. 2
•
•
Maricopa County
8% of families live below the
poverty level, 16.2% of families
have children under 5 years and
12.3% of families have children
under 18 years
11.7% of individuals live below the
poverty level, 10.2% of individuals
are 18 years and over and 7.4% of
individuals are 65 years and over
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
71.4% of the families with a female
householder and no husband present that
have children younger than 5 years are
living below the poverty level. 2
National
9.2% of families live below the
poverty level, 13.6% of families
have children under 18 years and
17% of families have children
under 5 years
36.8% of the families with a female
householder and no husband present that
have children younger than 18 years are
living below the poverty level. 2
12.4% of individuals live below the
poverty level, 10.9% of individuals
are 18 years and over and 9.9% of
individuals are 65 years and over
National
Average Poverty Thresholds for 2000
One person – $8,794
Two persons – $11,239
Three persons – 13,738
Four persons – $17,603
Five persons – 20,819
Six persons – $23,528
Seven persons - $26,754
Eight persons - $29,701
Nine persons or more - $35,060
Source U.S. Census Bureau
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
•
In the Wickenburg community, 11.4%
of individuals are living below the
poverty level. 2
•
11.1% of individuals 18 years and over
are living below the poverty level with
5.1% of individuals 65 years and over
living below the poverty level. 2
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.61
Education
For the subsequent section, the following definitions apply.
“Attendance Rate: Percentage of students attending the first 100 days of the academic year.”3
“Transfers Out: The rate at which students transfer out of a particular school relative to the school’s original
enrollment for a given school year.” 3
“Transfers In: The rate at which students transfer into a particular school relative to the school’s original
enrollment for a given school year.” 3
“Stability (s): The rate at which students starting the year at a particular school remain enrolled in that particular
school until the end of a given school year.” 3
“Promotion Rate: Percentage of students promoted to the next grade or who met graduation requirements and
received a traditional diploma at the end of the 2004/2005 school year. Percentage includes students who
left school at age 22 or who had completed school and received a non-traditional diploma.” 3
“Retention Rate: Percentage of students retained at the end of the 2004/2005 year.” 3
“Dropout Rate: Percentage of students counted as withdrawn due to chronic illness, expulsion or dropping out
during the 2004-2005 school year to include activity during the summer 2004. This rate includes students
who were withdrawn after 10 consecutive days or unexcused absences or were coded by the school as
“status unknown.” The Promotion Rate, Retention Rate and Dropout Rate may not add to 100% due to the
inclusion of summer activities in the Dropout Rate but not in the Promotion Rate and Retention Rate.” 3
“Annual Status Unknown: Percent of students unaccounted for by any method during the 2004/2005 school
year.” 3
“Graduation Rate: The graduation rate presented here is a 5 year cohort rate for the class of 2004.” 3
The Wickenburg Unified School District consists of two elementary schools (Maclennan,
Hassayampa), one middle school (Vulture Peak), and two high schools (Wickenburg High and
Wickenburg Alternative High). As of the 2004/2005 school year, the district provided
educational experiences for 1,450 students. District boundaries encompass 864 square miles.
•
The Wickenburg community contains
1,007 persons 3 years old and over that
are enrolled in school, 71 persons are
enrolled in Nursery school or preschool,
65 persons are enrolled in Kindergarten,
480 persons are enrolled in Elementary
school (grades 1-8), 248 persons are
enrolled in High school, and 143 persons
are enrolled in College or Graduate
school.3
Maclennan School
• Maclennan School is designed for
children in pre-kindergarten through 2nd
grades.3
•
Arizona
Number of schools performing in
each category
229 are “Excelling”
254 are “Highly Performing”
770 are “Performing”
494 are “Performing Plus”
130 are “Underperforming”
Total 1877
Source: Arizona Department of Education
There were 226 students attending in the 2003/2004 school year and 16 teachers making
the student-teacher ratio 14:1. 3
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.62
Hassayampa Elementary School
• For the 2004/2005 school year, 267 students were enrolled and 24 were attending under
open enrollment. 3
•
For the 2005/2006 school year, there were a total of 35.10 teachers, 11.5 teacher aides,
and 2 administrators/other professional staff. Of these employees, 22 have a Bachelor’s
degree and 11 have a Master’s degree. 3
AIMS Test Proficiency*
Percent
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
81
71
62
67
81
68 68
76
79
68
64
62
50
37 41
Mathematics
Reading
Writing
Mathematics
3rd Grade
2002/2003
Reading
54
46
53
Writing
5th Grade
2003/2004
2004/2005
Source: Arizona Department of Education
* This graph includes the percent of students that met or exceeded the standards.
•
The school had an attendance rate of 96%, a transfer in rate of 22%, and a transfer out
rate of 9% during the 2004/2005 school year. 3
•
For the 2004/2005 school year, no students were retained at the end of the school year or
dropped out of school. 3
•
The stability rate was 90% and the promotion rate was 98% for the 2004/2005 school
year. 3
•
In 2002, the school received the Arizona Reading First Grant, the Wells Fargo Grant, and
the APS/Phoenix Suns Grant. 3
•
For the 2004/2005 school year, 55% of all students achieved the Honor Roll each quarter.
3
•
For the 2002/2003 through 2004/2005 school years, Hassayampa Elementary School met
the state performance goals and was labeled as “performing”. 3
•
The school had 2 incidents that occurred on school grounds that required local, state or
federal law enforcement to intervene during the 2004/2005 school year. 3
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.63
Vulture Peak Middle School
• 289 students attended Vulture Peak during the 2004/2005 school year and 32 were
attending under open enrollment. 3
AIMS Test Proficiency*
80
70
Percent
60
62
50
52
During the 2005/2006 school year,
there were a total of 23 teachers on
staff, 4.50 teacher aides, and 3
administrators/other professional
staff. Of these employees, 13 had a
Bachelor’s degree and 11 had a
Master’s degree. 3
•
The school had an attendance rate of
95%, a transfer in rate of 24%, and a
transfer out rate of 5% during the
2004/2005 school year. 3
•
The stability rate was 94% and the
promotion rate was 96% during the
same school year. 3
79
78
73
•
56
60
40
30
20
22 23
10
0
Mathematics
Reading
Writing
8th Grade
2002/2003
2003/2004
2004/2005
Source: Arizona Department of Education
* This graph includes the percent of students that met or exceeded the standards.
•
The school had a retention rate of 0% and a dropout rate of 1% during the 2004/2005
school year. 3
•
In 2004, Vulture Peak Middle School was honored with the Drug Prevention Coordinator
of the Year Award. 3
•
From the 2002/2003 to the 2004/2005 school years, Vulture Peak was performing above
the state performance goals and was labeled as “performing plus”. 3
•
The school had 4 incidents that occurred on school grounds that required local, state or
federal law enforcement to intervene during the 2004/2005 school year. 3
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.64
Wickenburg High School
• During the 2004/2005 school year, 603 students were enrolled and 13 were attending
under open enrollment. 3
•
•
During the 2005/2006 school year,
Wickenburg High School employed
a total of 36 teachers, 7 teacher
aides, and 6 administrators/other
professional staff. Of those
employed, 36 had a Bachelor’s
degree and 9 had a Master’s degree. 3
The school had an attendance rate of
95%, a transfer in rate of 23%, and a
transfer out rate of 14%.3
The stability rate was 85% and the
promotion rate was 91% during the
same school year. 3
AIMS Test Proficiency*
Percent
•
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
83
81
67
54
60
66 66
71
44
Mathematics
Reading
Writing
10th Grade
2002/2003
2003/2004
2004/2005
•
The school had a retention rate of
0% and a dropout rate of 5%
during the 2004/2005 school year. 3
•
Wickenburg High School had a graduation rate of 83% for the 2004/2005 school year. 3
•
For the 2002/2003 through the 2003/2004 school years, Wickenburg High School met the
state performance goals and for 2004/2005 they exceeded the state performance goals and
were labeled as “highly performing”. 3
•
The school had 22 incidents that occurred on school grounds that required local, state or
federal law enforcement to intervene during the 2004/2005 school year. 3
Source: Arizona Department of Education
*This graph includes the percent of students that met or
exceeded the standards.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.65
Wickenburg Alternative High School
• During the 2004/2005 school year, 62 students were enrolled and 0 were attending under
open enrollment. 3
•
During the 2005/2006 school year, Wickenburg Alternative High School employed 2.5
teachers and 1 administrator. Of those employed, 1 had a Bachelor’s degree and 3 had a
Master’s degree. 3
•
The percent of students that met or exceeded the AIMS Proficiency Test isn’t currently
available. 3
•
The school had an attendance rate of 94%, a transfer in rate of 250%, and a transfer out
rate of 55%.3
•
The stability rate was 44% and the promotion rate was 55% during the 2004/2005 school
year. 3
•
The school had a retention rate of 1% and a dropout rate of 32% during the 2004/2005
school year. 3
•
The graduation rate is not available. 3
•
In 2003, Wickenburg Alternative High
School was honored with the Culinary
Arts Scholarship, and in 2005, they were
awarded with the Telephone Company
Scholarship and 2 Soroptimist
Scholarships. 3
Arizona
The average graduation rate is 76.8%
18.1% of the public school teachers
have emergency/provisional certificates
33,398 public school teachers have
their bachelor’s degree
•
Students help build houses for Habitat
for Humanity. 3
27,215 teachers have their master’s
degree
•
Through a Service Learning Grant,
students have the opportunity to attend a
Power Leadership Day, and then gain
further opportunities to make public
presentations in the community and the
school board. 3
672 teachers have their doctorate
degree
Source: Arizona Department of Education
•
For the 2003/2004 and the 2004/2005 school years, Wickenburg Alternative High School
met the state performance goals and were labeled as “performing”. 3
•
The school had 0 incidents that occurred on school grounds that required local, state or
federal law enforcement to intervene during the 2004/2005 school year. 3
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.66
Wickenburg Unified District
• There were a total of 1,450 students in the Wickenburg School District for the 2004/2005
school year. 3
Experience
Bachelor’s
Master’s
Doctorate
Other
Totals
3 or fewer years
4 to 6 years
7 to 9 years
10 or more years
29
11
9
23
6
3
1
24
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
36
14
10
47
Totals
72
34
0
1
107
Source: Arizona Department of Education
•
6% of the public elementary and secondary school teachers have Emergency/Provisional
Certificates. 3
•
The school district encompasses 864 square miles and the farthest bus stop is 40 miles
from school. 3
Crime
•
In 2005, most civil traffic citations in the Wickenburg community were given for
speeding violations (51.5%), insurance violations (20.7%), and registration violations
(9.1%).4
•
In 2005, most criminal citations in Wickenburg were given for assault (16.4%), criminal
damage (10.2%), and allowing dogs to run at large (9.5%).4
•
Between 1995 and 2005, trends indicate that the number of citations given for the
possession and consumption of alcohol by minors is dramatically decreasing while
citations for possession of drug paraphernalia are on the rise. 4
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.67
Civil Traffic Citations
1995
1996 1997 1998 1999
2000
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006*
Total
Speeding Violations
Insurance Violations
Registration Violations
Driver’s License Violations
Seat Belt Violation
Fail to Use Child Restraint
Fail to Stop at Stop Sign
Failure to Avoid Accident
No Parking
Failure to Yield
Unsafe Lane Change/Usage
Passing in No Passing Lane
Fail to Stop at Red Light
Improper turn at Intersection
Following Too Close
No Rear License Plate Light
Driving on the Wrong Side of
Roadway
Driving w/out Headlamps
No Tail Lamps
No Rear License Plates
No Eye ProtectionMotorcycle
Fail to Stop for Pedestrian
White Light to Rear of
Vehicle
Fail to Dim Bright Lights
Failure to Transfer Title
Broken Windshield
Obstruct Flow of Traffic
No Helmet-Motorcycle
422
151
39
55
5
3
13
10
13
17
5
5
3
1
8
0
461
236
69
64
78
8
0
6
11
13
0
4
15
0
0
0
779
496
160
140
209
43
38
17
7
4
7
9
6
5
5
0
1125
673
205
158
311
57
55
9
19
8
3
25
11
13
7
0
1243
744
229
190
229
56
21
13
37
14
6
10
16
6
11
16
1619
873
218
202
125
67
41
13
34
16
6
18
15
17
10
44
1719
773
212
186
119
51
27
18
22
24
10
14
9
15
8
8
1147
602
171
160
76
53
29
25
15
12
16
12
7
10
12
6
797
463
136
125
44
21
26
30
10
16
11
5
10
13
8
4
1311
552
187
218
69
14
25
22
8
9
16
9
6
15
14
9
942
380
168
140
35
4
31
31
11
3
22
8
7
14
8
5
843
327
90
134
21
4
13
13
10
9
21
0
9
2
5
1
12408
6270
1884
1772
1321
381
319
207
197
145
123
119
114
111
96
93
0
0
3
5
14
9
4
5
1
6
3
0
50
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
15
0
6
0
8
8
6
10
8
6
5
7
6
3
3
3
1
3
1
2
2
5
8
3
1
1
3
1
3
48
45
41
1
0
2
2
4
11
6
1
1
2
1
1
32
0
0
1
1
1
4
2
5
4
1
4
8
31
1
0
0
3
4
2
1
0
3
9
0
3
26
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
2
7
7
1
0
1
5
11
0
4
1
6
0
1
3
1
2
0
2
2
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
0
1
2
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
24
19
16
13
9
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.68
Civil Traffic Citations
Use Private Property to Avoid
Traffic Control
Unsafe Backing on Highway
Fail to Stop for Emergency
Vehicle
No Face Shield-Motorcycle
No Fenders/Splashguards
Rear Load Projecting >6’
Fail to Display Red Flag on
Load
Total
1995
1996 1997 1998 1999
2000
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006*
Total
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
2
3
0
8
0
0
0
2
1
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
7
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
759
965
1953
2723
2911
3380
3258
2381
1739
2523
1829
1523
25944
1996 1997 1998 1999
2000
Source: Wickenburg Police Department
*This year only contains data through June.
Criminal Citations
1995
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006*
Total
Minor Consumption
Assault
Disorderly Conduct
Allowing Dog to Run at
Large
Minor Possession of Alcohol
Criminal Damage
Trespassing
Open Container
Theft
Shoplifting
Contributing to Minors
Consuming Alcohol on
Highway
Threats
Interfere w/Court Order
19
33
37
56
16
49
10
25
33
71
24
40
45
21
17
24
28
16
33
21
10
26
18
16
16
33
16
12
27
11
9
24
13
7
14
10
328
284
268
34
6
11
15
26
14
31
11
7
5
14
1
175
21
7
8
4
8
5
0
10
5
10
10
4
5
25
43
4
7
12
3
5
13
11
12
7
28
4
5
10
5
8
5
0
3
8
1
1
7
12
4
4
0
4
1
10
7
10
7
6
7
2
6
4
3
8
16
1
2
11
3
7
17
19
3
6
9
15
3
13
7
6
2
15
12
10
11
3
2
0
3
7
3
5
6
3
104
97
97
94
87
85
75
0
2
13
4
20
14
8
7
0
2
2
2
74
5
3
6
7
7
5
5
2
1
2
3
1
6
2
3
4
16
20
6
12
11
5
0
4
69
67
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.69
Criminal Citations
Truancy
False Reporting to Officer
Possession of Drug
Paraphernalia
Disorderly with a Weapon
Excessive Barking
Littering
Loitering
Public Consumption
Use Telephone to Harass
Harassment
Illegal Burning
Indecent Exposure
Unlawful Discharge of
Weapon
Possession of Marijuana
DUI Under the Age of 21
Obstruct Government
Operation
Endangerment
Fail to Ensure Child Attends
School
Hinder Prosecution
Solicitation
No License on Dog
Obtain Prescription Drug by
Fraud
Animal Cruelty
Fecal Matter from Dog in
Public Park
Total
1995
1996 1997 1998 1999
2000
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006*
Total
0
2
3
3
8
5
3
1
15
5
4
5
1
4
7
4
2
3
6
4
0
1
0
4
49
41
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
8
6
5
8
30
4
0
1
2
1
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
4
1
0
0
1
3
1
4
3
1
0
0
2
4
3
1
0
1
0
2
0
5
0
2
2
1
0
0
0
7
2
0
2
1
1
0
0
2
3
3
0
2
2
0
1
0
5
2
2
1
0
0
0
0
2
5
1
1
0
0
2
1
1
0
3
4
1
6
0
1
1
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
26
19
18
14
13
12
10
9
8
0
3
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
1
2
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
7
6
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
N/A
1
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
199
229
221
254
197
157
184
156
206
168
146
81
2198
Source: Wickenburg Police Department
*This year only contains data through June.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.70
Criminal Traffic
Citations
Excessive Speed
Suspended Driver’s License
Fail to Stop for School Bus
Fail/Refusal to Provide ID
DUI
BAC + .08%
Extreme DUI
Fictitious Plates
Expired Out-of-State
Registration
Leave Scene of Accident
Reckless Driving
Permit Unauthorized Driver
to Drive
Littering on Highway
Exhibition of Speed
Failure to Stop for Police
Fail to Report Accident
Non-Current Log Book
Unlawful Use of D/L
Speed in School Zone
Violate Restrictions
Operate Vehicle w/Alcohol
False Log
Fail to Obey Local Laws
Pass Vehicle Stopped for
Pedestrian
Racing on Roadway
Aggressive Driver
Total
1995
1996 1997 1998 1999
2000
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006*
Total
15
49
1
5
18
10
N/A
7
38
79
0
0
51
N/A
N/A
6
91
123
40
3
31
18
N/A
6
256
172
73
8
43
35
N/A
3
255
195
63
55
38
25
13
9
382
179
100
58
12
11
13
7
390
140
175
42
14
6
10
1
269
139
142
37
17
8
13
7
197
121
149
42
22
13
11
7
258
128
69
63
29
18
19
9
185
91
38
50
13
3
11
8
129
68
18
23
11
3
9
4
2465
1484
868
386
299
150
99
74
2
0
0
0
4
9
4
18
7
1
0
2
47
0
0
1
2
2
4
7
6
5
1
4
2
7
1
4
3
5
1
4
3
5
2
2
1
46
26
0
0
0
1
0
1
5
7
2
1
2
1
20
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
7
3
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
2
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
3
2
0
0
0
7
0
1
0
0
4
0
1
1
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
3
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
0
0
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
15
14
10
8
8
8
8
7
4
3
3
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
115
189
325
607
677
792
801
674
582
609
409
277
6057
Source: Wickenburg Police Department
*This year only contains data through June.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.71
Miscellaneous
DR’S
Arrests
Juvenile Arrests
Total
1995
1996 1997 1998 1999
2000
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006*
Total
1872
203
N/A
2173
130
N/A
1507
230
64
1622
240
53
1725
202
72
1795
236
40
2062
235
95
1737
212
59
1679
232
82
1564
203
50
1572
190
52
850
105
28
20158
2418
595
2075
2303
1801
1915
1999
2071
2392
2008
1993
1817
1814
983
23171
1996 1997 1998 1999
2000
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006*
Source: Wickenburg Police Department
*This year only contains data through June.
Municipal Offense
Curfew
No Business License
Unlawful Signs
Total
1995
Total
14
0
0
59
0
0
42
0
0
16
0
0
21
0
0
13
0
0
27
3
3
21
1
0
11
1
0
18
1
0
12
1
0
2
2
0
256
9
3
14
59
42
16
21
13
33
22
12
19
13
4
268
Source: Wickenburg Police Department
*This year only contains data through June.
Petty Offense
1995
1996 1997 1998 1999
2000
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006*
Total
Minor Possession of Tobacco
13
38
41
33
16
4
26
7
10
15
3
2
208
Total
13
38
41
33
16
4
26
7
10
15
3
2
208
Source: Wickenburg Police Department
*This year only contains data through June.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.72
Value (in Dollars)
Stolen and Recovered Property Trends
$500,000.00
$450,000.00
$400,000.00
$350,000.00
$300,000.00
$250,000.00
$200,000.00
$150,000.00
$100,000.00
$50,000.00
$0.00
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
Year
Property Stolen
Property Recovered
Source: Wickenburg Police Department
•
•
•
•
•
•
In 2000, the recovery rate for stolen
property was 20%.4
In 2001, the recovery rate was 64%.4
In 2002, the recovery rate was 14%.4
In 2003, the recovery rate was 41%.4
In 2004, the recovery rate was 58%.4
In 2005, the recovery rate was 32%.4
Arizona
In 2005, the recovery rate for stolen
property was 40%
Source: Arizona Department of Public Safety
Transportation
•
As of July 2006, Valley Metro provides three round trips per weekday between
Arrowhead Towne Center in Glendale and Wickenburg.6
•
The Wickenburg Bypass will cost approximately $200 million for the 24 mile and
is scheduled for completion by 2009. 6
•
The CANAMEX Corridor will run along Wickenburg Road/Vulture Mine Road
to carry international traffic between Canada and Mexico. 6
•
After the development of the CANAMEX Corridor and the Wickenburg Bypass,
the Wickenburg Airport will gain the potential as a regional air transit facility. 6
•
The Wickenburg Airport has 56 locally based aircraft, 53 enclosed hangars, and
12,672 annual takeoffs and landings.7
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.73
Health
•
In 2004, Wickenburg lost 116 of their community members. Of those deaths, 2
were under one year old, 2 were 15-19 years old, 4 were 20 to 44 years old, 13
were 45 to 64 years old and 95 were 65 years old or older. 8
Arizona
Maricopa County
The top two causes of death in 2004 was
Cardiovascular Disease with 32.4% and
Lung Cancer with 6.1%
The top two causes of death in 2004
was Cardiovascular Disease with
32.9% and Lung Cancer with 5.8%
Source: Arizona Department of Health Services
Source: Arizona Department of Health Services
Number of Deaths from Selected Causes
60
48
Number of Persons
50
42
40
35
30 28
20
28
13
10
1
0
4
4
5 4
0
2
0 1
2000*
2001
4
0
2
13
11
9
32 4 3
1
0 1
2002
4
0
2
55
0
3
2003
0
3 22 32
1
2004
Year
Cardiovascular Disease
Motor Vehicle Accidents
Injury by Firearm
Lung Cancer
Assault (Homicide)
Drug-induced Deaths
Breast Cancer
Suicide
Alcohol-induced Deaths
Source: Arizona Department of Health Services
*Injury by Firearm, Drug-induced Deaths, and Alcohol-induced Deaths data is not available.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.74
Number of Deaths by Age Group
Middle Aged
Infants Children Adolescents Young Adults
Adults
<1
1-14
15-19
20-24
45-64
0
0
2
5
13
0
0
0
6
8
0
0
0
5
13
0
0
1
4
27
2
0
2
4
13
Year
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
Elderly
65 +
Totals
104
95
103
97
95
124
109
121
129
116
Totals
2
0
5
24
74
494
599
Mean
0.3%
0%
0.8%
4%
12.4%
82.5%
100%
Source: Arizona Department of Health Services
•
Wickenburg experienced a total of 95 births in 2004; 16% were to mothers 19
years old or younger and 43% were to unwed mothers. 8
•
In 2004, 75% of pregnant
mothers were able to receive
prenatal care in the 1st trimester.
In 2000, 73% received prenatal
care during the 1st trimester. 8
•
In 2004, 95% of mothers had 5
or more visits during their
pregnancy. In 2000, 85% had 5
or more visits during their
pregnancy. 8
45
40
Number of Mothers
•
Selected Characteristics of Newborns and
Mothers
40% of all births were to unwed
mothers
29
25
20
23
21
15
10
15
11
10
10
2002
2003
6
0
2000
2001
2004
Year
Mother 19 years or younger
Maricopa County
11.7% of all births were to mothers 19
or younger
30
5
In 2004, 2.1% of mothers
received no prenatal care at all
during their pregnancy while. In
2000, 1.4% received no prenatal
care during their pregnancy. 8
41
39
35
Unwed Mother
Source: Arizona Department of Health Services
•
In 2004, 9.5% of births were born
with low birth weight, less than
2,500 grams. In 2000, 1.4% of
births were born with low birth
weight. 8
7.1% of all newborns had low birth
weights
Source: Arizona Department of Health Services
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.75
Growth Indicators
• The Town of Wickenburg currently encompasses 13.1 square miles, 27% of
which is developed and 35% is unsuitable for development.1
Wickenburg Municipal Land Area Development
Percent of Acreage
30%
25%
26
Residential
20%
Commerce
15%
10%
3.7
5%
15.3
13
Employment/Industry
2.6
1.8
1.1
0%
1987
7.9
Public
2001
Year
Source: The Town of Wickenburg’s General Plan
•
In 1987, the total land area for Town of Wickenburg was 3,577.7 acres with
55.5% being undeveloped. In 2001, the total land area for Wickenburg was 7,003
acres with 73.1% being undeveloped. 1
2001 Residential Development
14%
Very Low
44.9%
22.4%
Low
Moderate
Multi/MH
18.7%
Source: The Town of Wickenburg’s General Plan
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.76
Residents
Population Projections
14,000
12,000
10,000
8,000
6,000
4,000
2,000
0
2000
2005
2010
2015
2020
2025
Year
Town of Wickenburg
Wickenburg Extended Municipal Planning Area
Source: The Town of Wickenburg’s General Plan
Trends in Building Structures
Number of Structures Built
700
579
600
567
500
448
400
300
200
100
605
297
150
0
1939 or Earlier 1940 to 1959
1960 to 1969
1970 to 1979
1980 to 1989
1990 to 2000*
Year
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
*Information collected through March 2000.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.77
Media
•
The Wickenburg Sun
Total
Distribution
85358/85390
3,630
85332
190
85342
120
85361
115
85362
90
85320
40
85348
10
85357
5
Town
Zip Code
Wickenburg
Congress
Morristown
Wittmann
Yarnell
Aguila
Salome
Wenden
ROP Out of
Market
N/A
& 11
600
Grand Totals
The Town of Wickenburg has
two local radio stations, KSWG
96.3 FM and KBSZ 1250 AM.10
4,800
•
KSWG plays country music and
keeps its listeners informed on
local news, weather, events,
concerts, and promotions.10
•
KBSZ plays songs that relate to
western heritage. The station
includes broadcast programs
such as live local chat, public
service announcements, and
local news.11
Source: The Wickenburg Sun
Environment
Air
• “The Maricopa County Department of Environmental Quality monitored
Wickenburg’s Air Quality during 1997 and 1998. The monitoring station was
located downtown at 155 North Tegner Street. During the monitoring period,
Wickenburg’s air samples did not exceed any of the 24-hour or annual National
Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) employed by the Clean Air Act.” 1
Climate/Temperature
Month
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Annual Average/
Total
Wickenburg’s Annual Weather Trends
Average Temperature (◦F)
Precipitation
Maximum
Minimum
64.3
30.9
1.20
67.8
34.1
1.19
72.9
38.1
1.07
81.3
43.2
0.50
90.1
50.0
0.19
99.9
58.4
0.14
103.4
69.2
1.27
100.9
68.3
1.96
96.0
60.1
1.16
85.6
48.1
0.65
73.6
37.4
0.74
65.5
31.4
1.20
83.4
47.4
11.3
Snowfall
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.2
Source: The Town of Wickenburg’s General Plan
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.78
•
The Town of Wickenburg has an elevation of approximately 2,100 feet above sea
level. 7
Water
• The Hassayampa Watershed was ranked by the Environmental Protection Agency
as having “less serious water quality problems,” and as having “low vulnerability
to stressors.” 1
Utilities
House Heating Fuel Used in Wickenburg
1.4
5.2
0.6, No Fuel Used
0.3, Coal or Coke
Utility Gas
Electricity
Bottled, Tank, or LP Gas
Wood
47.9
No Fuel Used
Coal or Coke
44.6
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Recreation
Wickenburg Recreational Acres/Facilities
Parks
Ball Fields
Ramada’s
Concession Stands
Tennis Courts
Announcing Stands
Playgrounds
RV Parks
Equestrian Arenas
Recreational Centers
Rodeo Arenas
Swimming Pools
Total
7
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
37
•
1.5% of all the houses in the
Wickenburg community lack
complete plumbing facilities and
0.2% lack complete kitchen
facilities. 2
•
4.7% of all the houses in the Town
of Wickenburg lack telephone
services.2
•
Wickenburg residents enjoy 363
acres of parks and playgrounds
within the Town.7
Source: The Town of Wickenburg’s Website
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.79
Maps
1. Downtown Land Use Inset1
2. Extended Municipal Planning Area1
3. Growth Nodes1
4. Land Use Plan1
5. Northwest Area Transportation Study6
6. Parks and Open Space/Circulation Plan1
7. Private Land Ownership1
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.80
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.81
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.82
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.83
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.84
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.85
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.86
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.87
Sources
1. The Town of Wickenburg’s General Plan
2. U.S. Census Bureau
3. Arizona Department of Education
4. The Wickenburg Police Department
5. Arizona Department of Public Safety
6. Maricopa Association of Governments
7. The Town of Wickenburg Website, http://www.ci.wickenburg.az.us/
8. Arizona Department of Health Services
9. The Wickenburg Sun
10. KSWG Radio Station Website, http://www.kswgradio.com/home.asp
11. KBSZ Radio Station Website, http://www.kbsz-am.com/
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.88
Appendix B
Key Informants
• Key Informant Script
• Key Informant Findings
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.89
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Script
Interview Number:
Date of Completion:
Background commentary:
1. Introduce interviewer and context for involvement
2. Ensure confidentiality – only pervasive themes extracted
3. Explain that the Partnership for Community Development at ASU’s West campus
has been contracted by the Wellik Foundation to gather information from
residents to develop an understanding of the “lifestyle” of Wickenburg. To do
this, we are interviewing residents who have a unique perspective of the
community. The hopes, dreams, and challenges identified by these individuals
will then be used to help guide future investments into the community.
We will begin by asking you to tell us about yourself. Please include how long you have
lived in Wickenburg, what brought you here, and how you are currently involved in the
community.
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Help us to understand what is meant by the Wickenburg “lifestyle”. What do you value
about Wickenburg? What sets it apart from other communities? Why do you find
meaning in living in this particular community? Please give us three specific things.
1) ____________________________________________________________
2) ____________________________________________________________
3) ____________________________________________________________
As the community moves toward the future, what concerns you the most? What are the
challenges that need to be addressed? Think of everyone working together to create an
ideal community – what things simply have to be addressed? There are no boundaries
here in thinking about your community. Think about what is happening with the youth,
families, seniors, the environment, businesses, arts, history, culture, faith communities,
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.90
non-profit organizations, and the Wickenburg “lifestyle”. State three specific “pressing
issues” that we need to pay attention to if we are to grow toward this ideal?
1)____________________________________________________________
2)____________________________________________________________
3)____________________________________________________________
As the community moves toward the future, what are the qualities that you treasure here
that simply need to be preserved? Again, there are no boundaries here. What qualities
of living here must be maintained? Think of what is happening with youth, families,
seniors, the environment, businesses, arts, history, culture, and the Wickenburg
“lifestyle”. State three specific things that we need to protect, guard, or retain within the
community.
1)____________________________________________________________
2)____________________________________________________________
3)____________________________________________________________
As the community moves toward the future, what needs to be added to the picture?
Think of an ideal community – say in the year 2020. Think of living in an ideal
Wickenburg, where everything that is needed for a perfect community is present. What is
in that “perfect” community that might not be here today? Again, there are no
boundaries here. Think of what is happening with youth, families, seniors, the
environment, businesses, arts, history, culture, and the Wickenburg “lifestyle”. State
three specific things that need to be added to your community to make it ideal.
1)____________________________________________________________
2)____________________________________________________________
3)____________________________________________________________
Remember that we are here today because we need your help. In the many years that
Violet and George Wellik served the community, they had a dream of helping
Wickenburg become the best it could be. They wanted a strong community, a
community that was different than other communities. The Wellik Foundation carries on
that tradition. In order to allocate its’ dollars well over the coming years, and indeed
generations, it needs some guidance. We are turning to people like you – who know the
community and have its best interests in mind – to share with us the good things going on
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.91
in the community, help us understand what the community issues are, identify the dreams
we are trying to bring to life, and specifically tell us where the Foundation should make
its investments to help Wickenburg become what it wants to be.
Within this context, we have ten different themes we want you to consider – one at a
time. This is your chance to give your input and guidance on where the Foundation’s
funds could be put to work to best help your community. We will give you a theme and
then ask you to provide the first two things that come to mind for three different
questions:
• What are the good things currently happening in this area?
• What are the challenges, issues, or things that need to be done in this area?
• How might the Wellik Foundation invest funding in this area?
Schools/Education (including Early Education)
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in education?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Parks, Recreation, and Community Centers
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.92
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in parks, recreation, and
community centers?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Healthcare
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in healthcare?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.93
Human Services (counseling, domestic violence programs, addictions intervention,
emergency assistance)
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in human services?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Arts, Music and Culture
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.94
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in arts, music, and culture?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Environmental Protection (including land use, protecting resources, open spaces)
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in environmental
protection issues?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Preserving Wickenburg’s Roots, Wickenburg’s History
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.95
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in preserving the roots and
history of Wickenburg?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Youth (young children and teens)
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in Wickenburg’s youth?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Seniors
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.96
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in Wickenburg’s seniors?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Everyone Else In Between (families, single adults)
What are the good things going on in this area? List two things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done? List two
things.
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in families and single
adults?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.97
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Have we missed anything? What might you consider to be an important need that would
certainly be worthy of Wellik Foundation’s investment?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
We are near the end. Here is a list of the themes we have covered today. We want to get
a sense of how you would prioritize the issues. Here is your chance to be “Foundation
Director of the Day”. Pretend that you have control over Wellik Foundation funds – just
for today. Please read through and consider each theme, and then rate how important
each area should be as the Wellik Foundation prioritizes its investments over the next
several years. (Administer Survey).
This is our last question. As the Director of the Wellik Foundation, the best interests of
the community are close to your heart. You can give away only three grants. Thinking
of all the areas we discussed today, what specific programs or projects (or themes) would
you support funding?
1)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
2)______________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
3)______________________________________________________________________
This completes our interview. On behalf of the ASU Partnership for Community
Development and the Wellik Foundation, we thank you for your input. This information
will be synthesized into a community assessment report without any reference to
individuals’ names. The report will be used to help guide future investments into the
Wickenburg community.
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.98
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 1.
What do you value about Wickenburg?
What sets it apart from other communities?
Why do you find meaning in living in this particular community?
Sense of community/Small town feel - quiet, friendly, volunteerism, smallness, small town
values, quaint, not crowded, feeling of community and family, first name basis, everyone
knows each other, laid back, everyone helps out, slower pace, people know of people and
about people, cash checks without I.D., relaxed atmosphere, casual dress is acceptable, can
make a difference, families pull together for others in crisis, generosity
Western atmosphere
Natural terrain/Open space - rural area, homes with lots of acreage
Diversity - Hispanic influence
History - preservation, mining heritage, Hispanic/Spanish sheep herders' influences
Climate/Environment - cool, clean air, clean water, beautiful sky
Community involvement - dedicated core group
Strong business community - support for local businesses, big town benefits
School - important to community
Community activities/attraction - Gold Rush Days, guest ranches
Seasonal residents/visitors - busy winters, quiet summers, retirement town
Acceptance of newcomers
Arts/Culture
Recreation
Clean town
Safe community
Location - close enough to big city to enjoy their amenities
N
%
18
86%
8
7
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
38%
33%
19%
14%
14%
14%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.99
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 2.
As the community moves toward the future, what concerns you the most?
What are the challenges that need to be addressed?
Maintaining small town feel - population growth, increasing traffic, developers eroding sense
of community, newcomers don't understand the history/roots of the community
Safety - adequate police/fire protection, false sense of safety, crime increasing, bad characters
around town
Cost of living/Affordable housing - work in town but have to live outside of town
Civic/Community involvement - core group does most of the work, replacing them is a
challenge, attracting younger volunteers, get others involved, newcomers don't take the time to
be involved
Youth programs/facilities - need better communication of opportunities, not a lot of
opportunities, center, no place for them to excel
Drugs - everyone is in denial, kids are taking drugs, police aren't doing enough, meth, increase
of drug use or awareness of drug use
Annexation - include and tax surrounding areas that use our facilities, other towns coming
closer, need to preserve area of town, need to expand boundaries
Business community - not cohesive, lack of variety of retail, hard to survive
Parent involvement
Schools - facilities, district boundaries, growth of district, staff/teacher
Human services - group home, services for disabled, Meals on Wheels, senior services,
assisted living for elderly
Bypass
Historic preservation - buildings, Vulture Peak, have lost many landmarks already, conflict of
importance
Attracting tourism - downtown revitalization
Lack of downtown business space - Remuda takes up too much parking and business space
Adult Education - lack of adult opportunities, parental classes
Youth education - lack of youth opportunities
Low teacher salary - teacher turnover
Town Infrastructure - sewers, water, increasing demand
Employment opportunities - low paying
Funding opportunities for nonprofits, future generations aren’t as generous
Low town acceptance
Town services - roads, garbage, paved roads
Transportation - No Canamex Trail
Healthcare - elderly
Recreation
Arts/Culture - not a lot of opportunities
Ability to keep the younger generations in Wickenburg - return to town, keep it alive
Less immigration
N
%
10
48%
8
38%
7
33%
6
29%
6
29%
4
19%
4
19%
3
3
3
14%
14%
14%
3
14%
3
14%
3
14%
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.100
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 3.
As the community moves toward the future, what are the qualities that you treasure here that
simply need to be preserved?
What qualities of living here must be maintained?
Small town feel - everyone knows their neighbor, attitudes, values, lifestyle, sense of pride,
know community contacts, low traffic density, family friendly, quality of people
Town history/historical preservation - awareness, buildings
Western atmosphere
Downtown
Open spaces - land, between us and cities
Art/Culture - Del Webb Performing Arts Center, Museum
Community activities/attractions - Gold Rush Days, guest ranches
Climate/Environment - clean air
Safety - low crime
Acceptance of newcomers - everyone is welcome, move in and easily fit in
Recreation - horse trails, hiking trails
Local businesses
NOT the western atmosphere
Parks
Cost of living/Affordable housing
Accessibility of town resources
Amenities
Tourism
N
%
15
71%
7
6
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
33%
29%
24%
19%
19%
14%
14%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.101
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 4.
As the community moves toward the future, what needs to be added to the picture?
Think of the ideal community, what is needed for Wickenburg
to be perfect?
Business development - westside of town, lofts over stores downtown, commercial along
Highway 89, shopping center (like Surprise), amenities (like Carefree or Fountain Hills),
planning/vision for town's future, self-sustaining economy, Wal-mart
Downtown - revitalize, pedestrian friendly, more retail, event bridge, nightlife, community
events
Community facilities - museum expansion, community center, library expansion
Educational opportunities - community college, prepare for college
Tourism - modern and western updates
Infrastructure - downtown buildings, paved streets
History - preservation, education
Youth programs/facilities - place to hangout
Beautification - streetscape
Transportation - Phoenix connection
Affordable housing
Stronger educational system - increase teachers' salary, live in and be a part of the community,
attract highly qualified teachers
Community involvement
Human services - disabled care, group home, horseback riding for disabled/Wings of Grace,
nursing/assisted living
Nothing - Wickenburg is perfect
Healthcare
Focus on community needs - government
Non-western development - outside of the downtown area
Community garden/Local farmers' market
Respect for diversity
Utilizing seniors' knowledge and abilities - childcare providers
Technology
Equestrian lifestyle
Family activities
Senior activities
Quality schools
Strong churches
Low taxes
Stronger political influence
Parental involvement
N
%
9
43%
8
38%
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
19%
19%
19%
14%
14%
14%
10%
10%
10%
2
10%
2
10%
2
10%
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.102
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 5. Schools/Education
What are the good things going on in this area?
N
%
10
48%
8
38%
6
29%
4
19%
4
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
19%
14%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
1
5%
1
1
5%
5%
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
N
%
Low teacher salaries/high teacher turnover - retaining high quality teachers very difficult
School district boundaries - include children not residing in town, votes and funding will
come from Surprise, competition between Wickenburg and Surprise for control, too large,
need for more schools, fear Wickenburg residents won't drive school board decisions, growth
in southern region of the district
Budget - government funding too low, lack of facility use monies, not enough money to
educate children, can't buy books, low administration pay
Building connections with higher education - ASU interns, need community college, adult
education opportunities
Limited arts programs - very basic, need to be ongoing, incorporate into classrooms, develop
band program, need dance team
Limited course offerings - life skills classes, drivers' education, vocational classes
English Language Learner students - large percent of students, growing population
Safety - need more security guards at high school
Affordable housing - most students, teachers, staff aren't living in town
Need stronger administration - increase communication with parents
Focusing funding on education instead of sports - arts confined to one room at the high
school while sports funding increases
Lack of community involvement
Dividing funding between activities - football gets too much
11
52%
6
29%
5
24%
4
19%
4
19%
3
2
2
2
2
14%
10%
10%
10%
10%
2
10%
1
1
5%
5%
High quality education - high number of honors students per capita, money/investments for
kids, high quality teachers, passionate/caring teachers, "highly performing", good staff, high
AIMS test scores, small class sizes, offer lots of programs
New facilities - high school, campuses, alternative schools, anticipating and staying ahead of
growth
Arts/Music programs - Webb Center (free arts education, performance space to high school)
Administration - new superintendent with innovative ideas and positive attitude, new high
school and middle school principals,
Community commitment/support - scholarships to universities, pride in schools
Relationship/Communication between teachers, students, parents - parent involvement
Sports programs/teams - baseball and football in semi-finals
Technology - some schools have high speed internet
School District - dedicated people
Real estate taxes
Efforts to preserve old high school
Safety
High quality private school - Wickenburg Christian Academy - great administrators, teachers,
preschool
None provided
Don't know
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.103
Keeping up with technology - not all schools have high speed internet
High school graduates aren't college ready
New teachers - right out of college, need mentors to assist them
Special Education - population growing
Lack of parental involvement
Obtaining quality teachers
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in education?
Raise teacher pay - according to expertise and on-going education, scholarships to increase
their income, scholarships for obtaining Master's degrees, form an endowment and use the
interest for helping teachers,
Arts programs - matching funds raised by the kids, incorporated into classroom curriculum,
incorporate children into more performances at Webb Center, after school programs, proper
arts classrooms for choir, band, dance, rehearsal space
None provided
Books
Extracurricular activities - interacting with the community, partner with community agencies
Special education
Safety - awareness education programs/assemblies (domestic violence, bullies, drug
awareness), additional security guards at high school
History programs
Tutoring
Whatever is most needed
Equipment
Community college courses
School activities - help to equalize funding for activities
Vocational programs
Capital improvements - paving parking lots, ground cover over the hill near the football field
Transportation - need more buses
School facilities - funding for higher quality, technologically equipped schools
Affordable housing
Support Wickenburg Christian Academy
Engage the children and require them to work for whatever the Foundation gives them
Adult education opportunities
1
1
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
N
%
8
38%
7
33%
3
2
2
2
14%
10%
10%
10%
2
10%
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.104
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 6. Parks, Recreation, and Community Centers
What are the good things going on in this area?
Parks - picnic ramada, playground equipment, clean, tidy, grassy, well maintained
Pool - renovation, swim team, open swim, free swimming lessons
Community Center - booked
Programs - always full, are great, summer programs for youth and adults
Skate park
Parks and Rec Dept - programs, staff, GED program, University of Phx classes brought to town
Sports fields - soccer, baseball, bring baseball tournaments to town
Youth activities - karate, Little League, football
Rodeo - youth
Library - staff is great
Rodeo grounds
Trails - maintenance
On-going projects
Gym
In-town facilities
Webb Center
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
N
%
15
10
5
4
4
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
71%
48%
24%
19%
19%
14%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
N
%
6
29%
5
5
24%
24%
3
14%
3
14%
3
3
2
14%
14%
10%
Parks - infrastructure, more green space, maintenance, larger parks needed in town, build parks out of
town, turn vacant lots into grassy areas
Community Center - needs updating, renovation/expansion
Don't know
Venues - current venues always booked, hard to schedule new opportunities, build fairgrounds/venue for
larger events/fundraisers
Program offerings - could be enhanced, add adult education opportunities, better communication with the
public about opportunities, need summer sports
Usability of pool - need extended hours, more staff, hurt by budget cuts
Drugs - in skate park, run off the little kids
Library - expansion or annex, hurt by budget cuts
Parks and Rec Dept - funding for additional staff, vision for keeping up with maintenance/expansion
costs
Youth activities - supervised activities, meeting place for teens, full-time Youth Director
Vandalism
Facilities - better facilities needed outside of town with grass
Limited resources
Running out of space
Take better care of town property - sewer treatment plant is eyesore in town
2
10%
2
1
1
1
1
1
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in parks, recreation and community centers?
N
%
Parks - add gazebos for outdoor concerts, show movies on the library's side wall in the park, make parks
5
24%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.105
more user friendly, add more parks with trees and grass, encourage maintenance
Library - extend hours, expand building, more staff, more youth programs, add teen study area with bean
bag chairs
None provided
Facilities - use for youth and community programs, create a sense of value, add more facilities
Pool - extend hours, provide more activities, lessons, classes for all ages
Recreation program - increase summer and year round activities, program offerings for people with
disabilities (swimming program)
Community Center - expansion, larger stage
Equestrian Park - covered arena, event parking, named Wellik Arena
Golf club
Trails - designated hiking/horseback trails
Mentor program - hire people to mentor youth
Church sports league
Youth Director - funds to hire
Skate Park - enhancements including cover, misters, safety/awareness, making more family friendly
place
Dance team/program in the high school
Pedestrian/Event bridge - electrical power, moveable stages, sound system
Amphitheater
Rodeo grounds - establish western theme
Don't know
3
14%
3
3
2
14%
14%
10%
2
10%
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
1
5%
1
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.106
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 7. Healthcare
What are the good things going on in this area?
Hospital - recent renovations, diagnostic testing, emergency services, draws highly trained
medical professionals, fitness center, physical therapy, improving reputation, gaining
community acceptance, ambulance and helicopter services, increasing services, new Director,
good staff
Doctors - new specialists, staying in town, good doctors, family physicians, good number in
town
Dentists - 8 or 9 in town
Pharmacies - Osco, Safeway, Basha's
Del Webb Clinic - 3 doctors in clinic, nice facility
My Father's Retirement Ranch - home for elderly, keeps families in town, provides extended
care to mobile seniors
Behavioral health services - Remuda Ranch, The Meadows
Transportation - trips provided to Phx for dialysis and other medical appointments
Nursing home
Location - close to major healthcare services in Surprise/Phx
Good for economy - Remuda Ranch (largest employer, gives back to the community), medical
personnel and families moving into town and bringing resources into town
Crisis prevention - domestic violence program provides referrals for shelter and services
Home for mentally challenged men
None provided
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
Hospital - more equipment and staff, not able to handle traumas, doesn't provide long-term care,
concern with ability to provide high quality care 24/7, keeping facilities current, adding facilities
as needed, no pool in fitness center, doesn't take a lot of insurances
Specialty doctors - ob/gyn, dermatologist, orthodontists, pediatricians, not available in town
Healthcare services - limited, nursing care, maintaining and keeping up with growth
Assisted living/nursing home/retirement home - My Father's Retirement Ranch is not for us
Insurance - few insurances are accepted in town, issue for businesses and individuals
Medical equipment - old, not enough, too expensive
Recruitment/retention of medical professionals
Communication/education on services provided
Gym - expensive to join
Repayment process
Technology - resources to expand with growth
Transportation - to healthcare facilities, to Phx for medical appointments, taxi cabs are using tax
payers' money to transport people to Phx for healthcare
Affordability of healthcare
None
Medical community - not invested or involved in the community
Affordable housing
N
%
19
90%
10
48%
4
3
3
19%
14%
14%
2
10%
2
1
1
1
10%
5%
5%
5%
1
5%
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
N
%
7
33%
5
5
5
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
24%
24%
24%
14%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
1
5%
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.107
Remuda Ranch - corporate office occupy all retail space downtown causing problems for
retailers and parking issues, need a new building and parking elsewhere
Ambulance - Lifeline won't respond to everyone's call
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in healthcare?
Hospital - connect the streets, maternity ward and staff, trauma center/services, building
projects, keep updated medical equipment,
Assisted living/nursing home - bring partners together to bring services to town, group
home/facility for Alzheimer's patients
Don't know
None provided
Gym - make less expensive, more gyms
Transportation - to Phx for medical services
Study for health problems/fund research - dialog with healthcare community to determine where
needs are
Services and capital improvements - for good of the community and its future
Where it is needed most
Healthcare facilities - additional facilities
Domestic violence/crisis prevention - help with efforts
Healthcare for uninsured - families without insurance, preventative medicine for children, free
immunizations
Recruitment of doctors - supplementary stipends
Affordable housing - provide land
Medication assistance for seniors
Ambulance services - less expensive
1
5%
1
5%
N
%
6
29%
4
19%
3
3
2
2
14%
14%
10%
10%
2
10%
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
1
5%
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.108
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 8. Human Services (counseling, domestic violence programs, addictions intervention, emergency assistance)
What are the good things going on in this area?
N
%
Meadows - drug, alcohol, other rehab
Remuda Ranch - major employer in town, center for anorexia/bulimia, faith-based, equestrian
CAP Office/Wise Owl Center - meal program, food stamps, commodities program, back to
school drives, Christmas clothing drive, community outreach, transient relief fund
Domestic violence programs - being discussed, small group working on a program, would like
a hotline, nonprofit recently established
Human Services - adequate for size of town, lot of funding goes to these services for a small
community, good safety net, impressed with number of organizations in town, multiple rehab
centers in town
Counseling - lot of availability, private practices, churches
Pregnancy Resource Center - pre-natal care
Gate House - works with troubled teens
R & R Respite Center - day center for Alzheimer's, dementia patients
Churches - provide many services, St. Vincent de Paul, counseling, domestic violence
Meals on Wheels
Crisis Center/prevention program - counseling
Wickenburg Community Services Corporation - Lifeline program, endowment, school drive
Habitat for Humanity
Smaller anorexia/bulimia center
Economy - bolstered by large amount of medical personnel employed in town
Recognizing that we have problems like everyone else and starting to address them
Don't know
Groups - lot in town, Le Leche League, Moms of Preschoolers, etc.
Senior center
10
9
48%
43%
7
33%
7
33%
6
29%
5
4
4
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
24%
19%
19%
14%
14%
14%
14%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
N
%
6
29%
6
29%
3
14%
3
14%
2
10%
2
10%
2
10%
2
10%
Domestic violence - need safe house/shelter, expensive to provide, education, domestic
violence advocate through police department
Services - need to be on-going, brought into schools, more education on consequences, no high
school programs/services, poor quality, need levels of service, no facility for immediate needs,
bringing needed services to town, for Hispanic population, limited physical space, maintaining
as population grows
Privacy - everyone knows each other so people have to go to Phx for services to keep their
privacy, shame to family when others in community find out
Transportation - to Phx, in town for seniors
State/county services - no vocational training, no rehab for disadvantaged or disabled people,
many county services located in Phx
Homeless - need bus route to stop in town to take transients to Phx, transient relief fund needs
for support
Humane Society - needs land for animal shelter, struggling financially
Treatment centers (Gate House, Remuda Ranch, Meadows) - too expensive for locals, take up
retail space
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.109
Drugs
Communication - for providers to work together, minimize duplication, publicizing services
Community awareness of needs of mentally/physically challenged population
Nursing home facility - one in town was closed, seniors must leave community for assisted
living homes 40 miles away
Pregnancy Resource Center - Director
Nutrition for underprivileged families
Public safety - police and fire dept is understaffed
Habitat for Humanity - needs more support
Assistance for poor
Housing assistance - USDA, Maricopa County, first-time homeowners
Volunteers - utilize individuals at treatment centers to volunteer with other programs
Support for grandparents raising grandkids
Funding - many organizations seeking finite resources
Community involvement - people to run/start programs
Senior Center - needs renovations
Don't know
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in human services?
Counselors - provide incentives to bring them to town to provide services, counselors who
accept walk-ins, provide marriage counseling, counseling for elderly, more services
None provided
Communication - increase communication between providers and public, better networking
between the high school and providers, create director of providers and services
Domestic violence programs - help create program, safe house/shelter, domestic violence
advocate
Homeless assistance - feeding homeless
Build Humane Society - land for animal shelter
Build local food bank
Services - provide meals on weekends, provide to meet community's needs
Re-establish nursing home
Support groups - coping, divorce, domestic violence
Classes - parenting
Education
Interaction with youth
Programs for long-term investments
Create responsibility in people
Wickenburg Community Services Corporation - fund medical Lifeline program
Programs on special topics affecting the community
Training - special interests, vocational
Don't know
Facilities - provide facilities for services in town including elderly and hospice services
CAP Office - support programs
Senior center - renovation
Pregnancy Resource Center - support programs
2
2
1
10%
10%
5%
1
5%
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
N
%
5
24%
5
24%
3
14%
3
14%
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.110
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 9. Arts, Music and Culture
What are the good things going on in this area?
Webb Center - arts education, performing arts, Camp Imagination, good programs, good variety, great
acts, good ticket sales, supported by Sun City residents, has kept kids in school with interests in
theater, Arts Organization of the Year by the Arts and Cultural Council of Greater Phx, utilizes
volunteers, number of children attending is increasing, passionate staff
Museum - economic engine, educational programs, exhibits in art and history, supported by highincome residents, board with professional background, Governors' Tourism Arts Award, utilizes
volunteers, programs for kids
Friends of Music - 8 free programs per year on Sunday afternoons
Youth education - chamber orchestra teaches children to play instruments, Camp Imagination,
museum
Chamber of Commerce - heritage events, Gold Rush Days, cultural events, facilitating
Wickenburg Cultural Organization - exposes children to music through classical music CDs, music
lessons/camps, small scholarships for music education, oral histories of people who went to school in
little red schoolhouse
School programs - arts, music, theater
Saguaro movie theater - events, movies
Community support
Arts/Culture - great for small town, great assets to the town
Dance studios
Downtown - bronze statues being installed
Acts in local restaurants
Hassayampa River Preserve
Community Leaders - strongest leaders are from the arts community, very involved at every level
Volunteers - high number in arts community
Arts Community - try to work together to compliment each other instead of competing for same
patrons
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
Webb Center - benefits for the Director, expansion, need artist rooms, competition from other venues
in Phx, local support and attendance is low, wider variety of performances, bring performances of
more interest to younger crowd
Don't know
Community/Local involvement - parents don't see the need for arts and aren't taking their children to
arts/cultural events
Funding - for arts organizations, small number of residents are philanthropic
Arts education - more opportunities, on-going sponsorship for art clubs
Availability of arts - expand opportunities for public, of interest to teens
Arts' sustainability - keeping arts at high level of quality, maintaining into the future
Arts in schools - start programs for younger age group, first programs cut, arts represented in school
programs
History in art - preserve town's history through art in public places
Downtown arts - pedestrian safety, making downtown ready to attract people after the bypass is
N
%
20
95%
14
67%
5
24%
4
19%
4
19%
4
19%
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
14%
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
1
5%
N
%
5
24%
5
24%
3
14%
3
2
2
2
14%
10%
10%
10%
2
10%
1
1
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.111
complete
Highlighting a local artist
Movie theater - only one with one screen
Dances - need more
Amphitheater
Museum - annex for expanding museum programming
Stage - replacing old stage used for heritage events and by nonprofits
Chamber of Commerce - capital improvements, sidewalk replacement
None provided
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in arts, music and culture?
Webb Center - new stage, back drops, lights, whatever they need, support programs, help with
operating budget, bring theme-based show, expansion to include separate band, choir, theater rooms
and staff offices
Affordability of arts - make attending arts more affordable, special program for underprivileged
None provided
Wickenburg Cultural Organization - for music scholarships, little red schoolhouse
Arts in school - High school Drama Club, after school programs in the arts, field trips for youth
Contribute to existing arts/music group/organizations
Museum - expand programming
Don't know
Public areas/Streetscapes - alley way
Downtown - renovation
Something for everyone
Maintain balance with other needs
Cultural awareness classes
Amphitheater - tell Wickenburg's story with music/drama lead by kids
Equipment - upgrade and keep modern
Workshops/sponsoring programs
Chamber of Commerce
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
N
%
6
29%
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
19%
14%
14%
14%
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.112
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 10. Environmental Protection (including land use, protecting resources, open spaces)
What are the good things going on in this area?
N
%
Open space
Development - planned, protection against certain types, space between houses, town
council, planning department
Natural areas - Hassayampa River Preserve, Box Canyon, Vulture Peak
Annexation
Environment - good water, good air, good weather, good water supply, no high polluters
Recreation - active trails committee, hiking trails, horseback riding trails, equestrian areas
Don't know
Bypass - protect against flooding
Parks - ball fields
None provided
Golf courses
Beautification - downtown streetscapes
Recycling program
Humane Society
7
33%
5
24%
4
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
19%
14%
14%
14%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
N
%
Water - conservation, supply
Density - need balance between growth and land use, better planning
Pollution - from weekend/increased traffic, clean up river, keeping polluting industries
out, air
Beautification - green space, to the river, streetscape
Parks - need more, activities for all ages, shuffle boards, ball fields, more space for sports,
shaded areas
Open space - within town
Town infrastructure - sewers are inadequate
Don't know
Bypass - of no use to town, need to be ready for less visitors
Zoning - industrial area, residential should be 33% low, 33% mid and 33% high income
Annexation - Vulture Peak, Rancho de los Caballeros
Trail system - preservation, integration, public access, ATV, horse, walking
Rodeo grounds - need repair
Developers - do it for the money, destroy area, influence government
Flooding - add dam to Box Canyon
Water erosion
Traffic congestion
Downtown development
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in environmental protection
issues?
5
5
24%
24%
4
19%
3
14%
3
14%
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
14%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
N
%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.113
Don't know
5
24%
Parks - throughout community, add shaded areas
4
19%
Trail system - walking, hiking, horseback riding, open access to trails, build, maintain
Environmental impact - decrease pollution, development of non/low-polluting businesses,
fund low environmental impact projects, clean desert
None provided
3
14%
3
14%
3
14%
Open space
2
10%
Density - preserve land within our growth (like Tucson)
2
10%
Vulture Peak - preserve, park project
2
10%
Town infrastructure - sewer lines out west, replace septic tanks with sewer lines
1
5%
Recreation - for entire community
1
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.114
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 11. Preserving Wickenburg's Roots/History
What are the good things going on in this area?
N
%
Museum
Buildings - little red schoolhouse, downtown, Old Wickenburg Inn, town hall, train depot,
locomotive
New development - architecture, building codes, power lines are underground,
streetscapes
Chamber of Commerce
11
52%
9
43%
6
29%
5
24%
Western atmosphere - friendly, lifestyle
5
24%
Rancho de los Caballeros
3
14%
Boetto project
3
14%
Books
2
10%
Community Activities - Gold Rush Days, Fiesta Septembre
2
10%
Wickenburg Cultural Organization
2
10%
None provided
2
10%
Guest ranches - rodeo
2
10%
Historical Society
1
5%
Western themes
1
5%
Recreation - horseback riding, walking, hiking trails
1
5%
Hassayampa River Preserve
1
5%
Vulture Mine
1
5%
DeVore Foundation sculptures
1
5%
Little treasures - jail tree, wishing well
1
5%
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
N
%
Funding - maintenance, restoration, downtown area
Keeping the western atmosphere - lifestyle, feel
New development - keeping western look, planning, zoning
Agreement - developers, Henry Wickenburg's house
Awareness/interest
Documenting - writing it down, registering historic buildings, oral histories
Population growth - newcomers don't know our history
Don't know
Horse heritage - no horseback riding downtown anymore, decreasing interest
None provided
Hispanic historical preservation
Open space - decreasing
Historical landmarks - preservation
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in preserving the roots and history
of Wickenburg?
5
5
5
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
24%
24%
24%
19%
14%
14%
14%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
N
%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.115
Funding - museum expansion, on going, restoration
None provided
Community Attractions - equestrian center, amphitheater, farmers' market, railroad exhibit
New development - keep in western style, planning
Building preservation
Beautification - town entrances and exits, open space
Schools - teach local history, field trips
Community involvement
Downtown - keep western
Recreation - walking, hiking, horseback riding trails
Boetto property
Don't know
5
5
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
24%
24%
19%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.116
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 12. Youth (young children and teens)
What are the good things going on in this area?
N
%
7
33%
5
24%
5
24%
4
19%
4
19%
Skate park
4
19%
Pool
3
14%
Community support
2
10%
Library
2
10%
Dance - studios, schools
2
10%
Childcare - daycare, preschools
2
10%
Science facility
1
5%
Decreased teenage pregnancy
1
5%
Smart youth
1
5%
None provided
1
5%
Don't know
1
5%
Parent involvement
1
5%
N
%
8
38%
4
4
19%
19%
4
19%
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
14%
14%
14%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Sports - soccer, Little League, tournaments, swim team, basketball, softball, football, at
Sunset Park
Church programs/activities - First Southern Baptist, Community Alliance, Assembly of
God, Young Life, Salvation Army, camp
School - programs, open gym night, police presence on campus
Activities/programs - Girls Scouts, Boy Scouts, Rainbow Girls, year around, a lot, saddle
club, rodeo club, horseback riding, summer camps
Art programs - Webb Center, plays, orchestra
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
Activities/programs - limited resources, not enough, need Boys and Girls Club, more
meaningful activities, maintenance, need YMCA
Parent involvement - need to be an example
Transportation - to activities/programs
School programs - not enough, need during school breaks, need programs to challenge
gifted children, need to recognize smart kids, need DARE, need pastors on campus too
Skate park - isn't used much, closes early, drugs
Drugs - meth, need education in school
Facilities - pool hall, roller rink, bowling alley, some place to hang out, especially at night
Art - drawing isn't supported like other art forms
Community programs - not enough
Latch-key children - too many, both parents work
Sport programs - not enough
Youth leadership - not enough
Adult leaders/Mentors - not enough
Church programs/activities - Young Life
Business - not many focused on youth
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.117
None provided
Surrounding towns don't participate in school and community programs/activities
Youth involvement - getting them and keeping them involved
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in Wickenburg's youth?
Facilities - equestrian center, some place to hang out, Boy and Girls Club, YMCA,
recreation center
Schools - improve gifted program, encourage kids to stay in school, teach kids to think
faster, after school programs, DARE officer
None provided
Programs - ongoing
Community resources - increase, community bus
Sports - more programs, increase funding
Adult leaders/Mentors
Art - murals
Education - real life
Human services - new crisis center, counseling programs
Activities/Programs - camps
Scholarship
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
N
%
6
29%
4
19%
4
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
19%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.118
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 13. Seniors
What are the good things going on in this area?
CAP office - Meals on Wheels, transportation, activities, senior center
Health care - hospital, good doctor care, Lifeline Medical Response Program
Transportation - bus to Arrowhead and Del Webb, Red Cross bus
Community involvement - good social networks
Volunteering - lots of opportunities, museum
My Father's Retirement Ranch
R & R Respite Care
Wise Owl Center
Webb Center
Church involvement
Friends of Music
Don't know
Community services
Education - lots of opportunities
Work well with youth
Rotary - gives money to seniors
Newspaper
Golf course
VFW
Lions
None provided
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
Transportation - to doctor appointments
Assisted living care - limited, expensive
Activities/Programs - sit at home, nothing to do, isolated, hobby clubs, programs to exercise
mind, mobility, sight, etc.; Park and Recreation Department doesn't have any programs
Education - activate minds, no programs
Healthcare - expensive
None provided
Nursing home - expensive
Don't know
Awareness - no awareness of needs
Social gathering places
Meals on Wheels - need to be on-going, funding
Affordable housing
Safety - predators taking advantage of the elderly
Parking
N
%
8
5
5
5
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
38%
24%
24%
24%
19%
19%
14%
14%
14%
10%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
N
%
7
5
33%
24%
4
19%
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
14%
14%
14%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.119
Sidewalks needed across railroad tracks by the CAP office
Shopping
Diversity - affluent and population needing assistance
Community involvement - will not pass bond elections, pay taxes or support schools
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
N
%
Assisted living - everyday needs, in home care
5
24%
None provided
5
24%
Transportation - provide vans, for activities and healthcare, in town shuttle
4
19%
Don't know
2
10%
CAP office - support, it never receives funds, Meals on Wheels
2
10%
Healthcare - make medicine/prescriptions affordable
2
10%
New facilities - senior center with a gym, library, computer lab, hobby room, nursing home
2
10%
New nursing home - affordable
2
10%
Education - health, computer
1
5%
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in Wickenburg's seniors?
Community involvement - develop sense of community
1
5%
Recreation - walking trails
1
5%
Parks - with shuffle boards, shaded areas, checker boards benches, etc.
1
5%
Community awareness - for senior needs
1
5%
Wise Owl Center - funding
1
5%
Build sidewalks across railroad tracks to senior center
1
5%
Activities/Programs
1
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.120
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 14. Everyone Else in Between (families, single adults)
What are the good things going on in this area?
N
%
Activities/Programs - involvement, big turnouts, Chamber helps a lot, festivals, Gun Club,
lots to do
Small town atmosphere - family atmosphere, we look out for each other, lifestyle
None provided
Social life - bars, golf course, plenty of places to socialize
Churches - lots
Theater - family oriented movies
Everything
Youth programs
Sports - softball league
Town businesses
Don't know
R & R Respite Care
Recreation
Schools
Wellness Center
Healthcare
Library
Museum
Economy - construction industry provides good jobs
8
38%
5
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
24%
14%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
What are the challenges, issues, or the things that need to be done?
N
%
5
24%
5
24%
4
19%
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
14%
10%
10%
10%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Businesses - shopping facilities, expensive to keep up with city requests (tin roofs),
compete with Phoenix, keeping them
Affordable housing/Cost of living - standardize housing isn't livable, providing clothing
and food
Activities/Programs - putt putt golf, roller skating rink, that teach moral and ethical values,
bowling alley, water park, for young singles especially at night, socializing
Community involvement - too much apathy, gossip, finding people to run programs
None provided
Employment - job security, low wages
Affordable childcare
Youth focus needed
Recreation - fitness trails, horse riding trails
Parks - dog park
Keeping professionals in town - doctors, lawyers, educators
Human services - marriage counselors, counselors
Handicap improvements - downtown
Finding family time
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.121
Drugs
Diversity - Hispanic population growth, community interaction
Communication - what is available
Beautification
Specifically, how might the Wellik Foundation invest in Wickenburg's families and
single adults?
Don't know
None provided
Activities/Programs - to build stronger families, putt putt, golf course, roller skating rink
Facilities - equestrian center, recreation center, family oriented facility, to benefit the
majority, YMCA, Boys and Girls Club
Education - scholarships
Human services - build a crisis center, provide marriage and family counseling
Library
Downtown - parking
Recreation - fitness trails, horse riding trails, horseback riding for people who don't have
horses
Businesses - promote small businesses
Parks - more ball fields, more ramadas
Affordable housing
Communication - use town's TV channel for public announcements, community calendar,
school board meetings, town council meetings
Community TV - use the town's TV channel to show camp's final show, annual talent
show, high school musicals, etc.
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
N
%
5
5
4
24%
24%
19%
3
14%
2
2
1
1
10%
10%
5%
5%
1
5%
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
1
5%
1
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.122
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 15.
Have we missed anything?
Don't Know
Town government/Politics - there are weird political and financial issues here, city hall
needs new representation, need new city manager, need more representation of minorities,
local government has lack of education on what town government is charged with doing,
especially when newly elected take office, planning department has done excellent job of
bringing in quality developments, hire economic development specialist, town council
ignores low income people
None Provided
Diversity - need multi-cultural, multi-generational education/look, we can't all be white
males, need more representation of minorities
Public safety - funding for full-time Fire Department, more emergency services, more
police services
Voter turnout is low, people need to be involved
Funding - invest large amounts into one or a few projects, not a little here and there or to
organizations that have fundraising sectors that raise their money
State/County services - provides bad services, bad issues with building permits, countymaintained roads
Programs to support transients
Chamber does an excellent job of marketing the town with limited resources
It is who you know, not what you know.
More churches than bars in town
More support of charities in Wickenburg than other communities - many retirees, many
mid- and high-end income families
Support local media, especially the radio station
N
%
7
33%
6
29%
4
19%
2
10%
2
10%
2
10%
1
5%
1
5%
1
1
1
1
5%
5%
5%
5%
1
5%
1
5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.123
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Key Informant Interview Findings
Table 16.
Thinking of all areas we discussed today, what specific programs or projects would you
support funding?
N
%
4
19%
16
76%
7
33%
Healthcare
Health Programs
Healthcare - keeping updated equipment, maintaining quality
Hospital - equipment, future additions, supporting growth of hospital
Healthcare
Human Services
CAP office
Youth Programs
Parks Program
Youth - scholarships to encourage and invest in them
Build a crisis center
Give land to churches for community development, they do a better with families
Provide family counseling, training and education
Provide more activities for youth
Solve the chronic hunger problem
Disabilities help in any way
CAP office
Rec programs for youth
Move and update community center
Youth Center - YMCA, Boys and Girls Club
Programs for 14-21 yrs old
Youth Center - YMCA type program for supervised youth activities
Human Services
Parks and Rec - rodeo grounds, Vulture Peak park area and trail system
Library expansion
Teen rec center
Youth
Pregnancy Resource Center
Supervised programs/activities for teens
Arts/Culture
Equestrian Center - state of the art
Arts Program, including supporting salary and benefits
Amphitheater
Arts and Culture
Build event center at Fairgrounds
Arts and Culture - capital funding or sustainability within the arts organization
Webb Center expansion/arts classrooms
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.124
Environmental Protection, including Land Use Planning
Downtown streetscape improvements
City infrastructure, sewer lines
Make parks more user friendly for all ages
Protect the boundaries
Provide affordable housing
Increase commercial/municipal
Big stuff, a reason for people to visit
Affordable housing
Downtown streetscapes
8
38%
8
38%
9
43%
2
10%
Education
Education for everyone, all ages
Teacher scholarships for the good ones
School Resource Officer
Education
Education - arts after school programming including transportation
Schools - improve quality of teachers, raise teacher salaries or create incentives for
teachers
Education
Wickenburg Christian Academy
Historic Preservation
Museum expansion
Living History Center
Preserve Wickenburg's history
Preserving history
Preserve our history and small town atmosphere
Preserve historical heritage
Changes to downtown in preparation for bypass
Boetto Park - Henry Wickenburg's house and grave
Boyd's Ranch - ranch given to museum for programs
Historical preservation
Historic preservation - Boetto Park, Henry Wickenburg tunnel
General
Town supported projects - expansion of library, senior center/respite center (program
dollars and staff), trails program
Go to those in charge of organizations and actually speak to them, get background
information through communication into the community
Budgets for police and fire - support growth in coordination with annexation, matching
grants for fire trucks
Programs with organizations - Chamber, Webb Center, museum, historic district,
airport, parks, rodeo grounds
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.125
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Funding Priority Ranking Findings
Table 17. Priority Ranking Survey Findings
Themes:
Ranking:
Not
Important
Somewhat
Important
Moderately
Highly
Important Important
Extremely
Important
Mean
Score
Schools/Education
1
3
5
9
4.22
Parks, Recreation, and Community Centers
0
5
10
2
3.82
Healthcare
2
4
7
5
3.83
Human Services
1
8
5
4
3.66
Arts, Music and Culture
3
5
5
4
3.58
Environmental Protection
5
5
6
2
3.27
Historical Preservation
3
4
6
4
3.64
Youth
1
3
5
9
4.22
Seniors
2
5
7
4
3.72
Everyone Else In Between
4
6
4
4
3.44
Appendix C
Focus Groups
• Focus Group Information
• Focus Group Script
• Focus Group Findings
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Focus Group Dates and Locations
Focus Group
Number
Date
1
8/15/2006
2
8/15/2006
3
8/22/2006
Wickenburg High School
8
4
8/22/2006
Vulture Peak Middle School
8
5
8/29/2006
Wickenburg Community
Center
14
Location
Wickenburg Community
Center
Wickenburg Community
Center
# Attending
18
6
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.128
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Focus Group Script
1. What are the community “points of pride” for Wickenburg today that must be
preserved as it moves into the future?
2.
As you think of an ideal Wickenburg community in the year 2020, what are things
that need to be added to the community that are not present today?
3. What challenges within Wickenburg need to be addressed if Wickenburg is to
achieve this ideal?
4. What specific recommendations do you have for Wellik Foundation investments to
help Wickenburg achieve this ideal?
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.129
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Community Focus Group Results
Table 18.
Points of Pride
Themes
Sense of Community
Community Attractions/Events
Historic Preservation
Community Service Clubs
N
Supportive, we all help each other
5
Everyone knows each other
3
Friendly
3
Sense of community
2
Cops who care
1
Family oriented
1
Good kids/youth
1
Laid back
1
Lifestyle
1
Open door
1
Total
19
Western Museum
4
Webb Center
3
Gold Rush Days
2
Rodeos/equestrian events
2
Bluegrass Festival
1
Community Christmas Tree
1
Fiesta Septembre
1
Fine arts
1
Holiday celebrations
1
Total
16
Kept traditions like the Gold Rush Days
2
Little Red Schoolhouse
2
Trail systems - horse trails
2
Downtown buildings/architecture
1
Rodeo grounds
1
The theater
1
Vulture Peak
1
Western feel/culture
1
Total
11
Cowboy Poets Society
1
Elks
1
Friends of Music
1
Habitat for Humanity
1
%
17.8%
15.0%
10.3%
7.5%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.130
Environment
Parks and Recreation
Schools/Education
Businesses/Economy
Diversity
Community Involvement
Faith Communities
Lions - eye glasses
1
Rotary
1
Soroptimists
1
VFW
1
Total
8
Clean air
2
Hassayampa River Reserve
2
Keep the beauty of the land
2
Beautification of town landscaping
1
Clean water
1
Total
Park and Recreation Dept. does a lot for kids, Steve
McKay
Trail systems - horse
8
2
Parks - great maintenance
1
Ramada
1
Sunset Park
1
Swimming pool
1
Total
8
School system
2
High school has a beautiful facility
1
PTA
1
7.5%
2
Small class sizes in K-8
1
Smart - top math scores
1
Sports - football
1
Support
1
Total
8
Small friendly, small town business
2
Anita's Restaurant - brings people into the community
1
Chamber of Commerce
1
Good opportunities
1
Total
5
Diversity
2
Culturally distinct, wonderful mix
1
Interesting mix of visitors
1
Total
4
Volunteerism, lots of volunteers
2
People giving back to the community
1
Total
3
Churches
2
Community Alliance Church
1
Total
3
7.5%
7.5%
4.7%
3.7%
2.8%
2.8%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.131
Healthcare
Human Services
Town Planning
Safety
Community Facilities
Wellik Foundation
Western Atmosphere
Grand Total
Hospital
2
Fitness Center
1
Total
3
CAP office
1
Mary Ackly - started social services
1
Respite Care
1
Total
3
Bypass, downtown revitalization
1
Low traffic congestion
1
Preserving our space/land
1
Total
3
Low crime
2
Total
2
Community Center
1
Total
1
Funded airport, community center, and other amenities
1
Total
1
Western flavor, rural
1
Total
1
107
2.8%
2.8%
2.8%
1.9%
0.9%
0.9%
0.9%
100.1%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.132
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Community Focus Group Results
Table 19.
Ideal Community/Things to be added
Themes
N
Facilities - a sense of pride, increased arts facilities, more athletic
facilities for K-12
Develop professional learning communities for youth and adults help in career goals, GED/college classes
Utilize retired individuals and integrate them into school
system/programs, roundtables to tap into expertise of retired residents
Higher education opportunities
Math/Science exploration program in schools
Education/Schools
Arts/Culture
Town Development/Planning
%
3
2
2
1
1
Community college
1
Mentorship in the school system
Further enhancement of school culture - blending of outlying
elementary schools
Enhance safety/security at schools
1
1
Picnic tables
1
Programs - increased arts programs
1
Transportation - more activity buses
1
Increase teacher/administration salaries/packages
1
Expansion of food programs for needy children
1
Courses - more course offerings
1
Use football field for arts - concerts
1
Incorporate arts into core curriculum in classrooms
1
Total
Webb Center - black box theater nearby, showcase for
paintings/writings/drawings, add onto lobby
Portable stage - Bluegrass Festival, cowboy poetry, take into parks
Viable, dynamic arts area downtown - encouraging young artists to
perform, painters, sculptures
Museum programming
21
1
24.7%
3
2
1
1
Increase arts facilities in schools
1
Use football field for concerts
1
Sustain/substantiate arts in community for the future
1
Incorporate arts into core curriculum in classrooms
1
Need volunteers and interested society
1
Industrial arts program
1
Total
13
Event bridge
1
Streetscape program
1
Keep downtown vibrant
1
15.3%
8.2%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.133
Healthcare
Tourism
Community Services
Parks/Recreation
Economic Development
Youth Activities
Human Services
Community Activities
Affordable Housing
Healthy infrastructure/smart growth
1
Parking
1
Nice Post Office with parking
1
Smart annexation
1
Total
7
Home health facilities/agencies, in home care
2
Long-term care for elderly
2
Specialty health providers - pediatrician, obstetrician
2
Total
6
Make Wickenburg a destination
2
Spot to attract tourists to spend time in town
2
Help downtown businesses
1
Bring people from bypass into town, otherwise town won't survive
1
Total
Library - expand to include more services for youth and people with
disabilities, summer education programs, programs for teaching
English, more staff, additional computers for people with disabilities
Transportation - especially for seniors
6
4
Total
5
Gazebo, movies in the library park
2
More recreational services
1
Roller blading/skating area in park
1
Dog park
1
Total
5
Diversify job market - more manufacturers and employers
1
More businesses open during summer months - restaurants
1
Build a major equestrian center to bring people into community
1
Clean industry into town
1
Total
4
Teen center/youth center - YMCA, healthy options for youth
3
More youth activities
1
Total
4
Human Society - building, lot, funding
2
CAP office - continue services
Wickenburg Community Services - more funding to help people in
need
Total
1
1
Farmers' market
1
Spot for community to spend time together
1
Putt putt golf - for all ages
1
Total
Program/extra help to move middle income households into the
community (teachers, fire, police, etc.)
3
1
7.1%
7.1%
5.9%
5.9%
4.7%
4.7%
5.0%
4
1
3.5%
2.4%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.134
Seniors
Communication
Natural Terrain/Open Space
Historical Preservation
Grand Total
Affordable housing
1
Total
Pay attention to seniors - build sidewalks so they can get to senior
center
Transportation - especially for seniors
2
1
Total
2
Increase access and sharing of information
1
Total
1
1
Preserve open spaces
1
Total
Keep western heritage alive through teaching western vocational
courses - saddle making, cowboy hat bending, etc.
Total
1
1
2.4%
1.2%
1.0%
1.0%
1
85
99.9%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.135
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Community Focus Group Results
Table 20.
Challenges
Themes
N
District 700 sq miles, schools being built south of town,
fear of loosing control of the school board
Education system
School/Education
Town Development/Planning
Safety
Community Involvement
Economic Issues
%
4
3
Driver's education
1
Educational opportunities after high school
1
Cost of pre-school
1
Youth activities
1
Not enough funds
1
Teachers' pay
2
Adult education opportunities
1
Autonomy
2
Total
17
Bypass controversy
1
Keep downtown viable, attractive
2
Annexation
1
Encroachment of other towns
1
Bigger picture
1
Downtown is mostly office space now
1
Density - housing, development
2
No tract housing
1
Total
10
More police officers/more coverage
2
Under staffed police and fire
1
Funding
1
Citizen's patrol
1
Total
7
People don't listen, set in their ways, conflicting views
2
Seniors not involved with youth
Information board, match resources with community
needs
Utilize seniors gifts/services/experiences, get them
involved
Total
1
1
20.2%
11.9%
8.3%
7.1%
2
6
Jobs
1
Tax effect on small businesses
2
Jobs for young people
1
7.1%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.136
Cost of Living/Affordable
Housing
Drugs
Town Infrastructure
Community Activities
Community Facilities
Environment
Healthcare
Parent Involvement
Business
Parks and Recreation
Population Growth
Preservation
Work incentives
1
Keep taxes low
1
Total
6
Gas prices - big difference around town
1
Increasing house prices, affordable housing
3
Cost of living
1
Total
5
Drugs
5
Total
5
Infrastructure
1
Sewers, capacity
3
No septic systems, replace them
1
Total
5
Youth need something to do
2
Summer activities
1
Athletic programs
1
Total
4
Need a teen center, Boys and Girls Club
1
Recording, art, dance studio
1
Total
3
Hassayampa Preserve
1
Water reserves
2
Total
3
Pediatrician care
1
Affordable medication
1
Medicaid
1
Total
3
not involved in schools
2
not involved in youth activities
1
Total
3
Small business
1
Rent keeps increasing
1
Total
2
Recreation for people with disabilities
1
Recreational opportunities for young people
1
Total
2
Population growth
1
Lost of snow birds
1
Total
2
Preserving what we treasure
1
Total
1
5.9%
5.9%
5.9%
4.7%
3.5%
3.5%
3.5%
3.5%
2.3%
2.3%
2.3%
1.1%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.137
Transportation
Grand Total
To doctor offices
1
Total
1
84
1.1%
100.1%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.138
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Community Focus Group Results
Table 21
Wellik Foundation
Themes
N
Hire someone for economic development, before bypass
is built
Government needs
Town Development/Planning
Schools/Education
Community Facilities
Affordable Housing
Attractions/Tourism
Funding Programs
Community Involvement
Community Services
Environmental Protection
Healthcare
%
2
1
Infrastructure development
1
Low density housing, not tract housing
1
Strategic plan for future development
1
Total
6
Community college
1
Improve security/safety
1
Resources, books
1
Support school system
1
Teacher's salaries
1
Total
5
Expand art facilities
1
YMCA
1
Youth center
1
Total
3
Affordable housing
2
Total
2
Equestrian center - on Flying E property
1
Tours
1
Total
Matching - The Wellik Foundation could fund those
businesses that fund the community, to stimulate other
sources, matching funds
Scholarships/fund master teacher program
2
1
Total
2
Get seniors involved, volunteering
1
Total
1
Coordinate senior services, CAP office
1
Total
1
Beautification of community
1
Total
1
Healthcare
1
Total
1
1
24.0%
20.0%
12.0%
8.0%
8.0%
8.0%
4.0%
4.0%
4.0%
4.0%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.139
Town Service
Grand Total
Fire
1
Police
1
Total
1
25
4.0%
100.0%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.140
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Youth Focus Group Results
Table 22.
Points of Pride
Themes
Lifestyle
Natural Terrain/Open Space
Safety
School/Education
Location
Businesses
Diversity
Parks/Recreation
N
Different from big cities, unique
3
Small town feel
2
You know everyone
Everyone is close by, everything is close - can walk
anywhere
Stay small
2
2
Lots of space between neighbors
1
Quiet
1
NOT western atmosphere
1
Fun
1
Not a number
1
Total
15
Can see the stars
2
Open spaces
2
ATV friendly
1
Great scenery
1
Enjoy the outdoors
1
Appreciate the environment
1
Lots of nature
1
Total
9
Not much to worry about, safe
2
Safer drivers
1
Total
More opportunities for participating in various activities,
equal chances
Not super competitive to get on teams
3
1
Total
2
Phx is close for stuff that isn't here
1
Total
1
Small, local businesses
1
Total
1
Get to know different cultures
1
Total
1
Skate Park
1
Total
1
%
1
1
45.5%
27.3%
9.1%
6.1%
3.0%
3.0%
3.0%
3.0%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.141
Grand Total
33
99.9%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.142
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Youth Focus Group Results
Table 23.
Ideal Community/2020
Themes
Youth Activities
School/Education
Parks/Recreation
Shopping
Businesses
N
More activities - bowling alley, more screens at movie
theater, roller rink, arcade, fun stuff,
Place to hang out with friends
YMCA/Recreation Center - arcade, basketball, tennis,
weight room, racquetball court, gyms
Something to do at night - dance club for teens
%
6
2
5
1
More dances
1
Activities in community center
1
Indoor activities - too hot outside
1
Total
17
Lockers
2
Color guard
More class offerings - photography, more foreign
languages, P.E. offered to all grades
Teachers - more involved in community/after school
activities, stay longer than 1-2 yrs, get high quality
teachers, pay teachers better, more experienced (new
teachers not always experienced enough to explain
things in different ways), more interactive teaching
Dugouts for high school baseball field
Shortcut road between middle school and high school
- quicker to drop off siblings
Newer, nicer middle school
1
33.3%
2
5
27.5%
1
1
1
Parent involvement - lots of parents help out
1
Total
14
Pool - extend hours, good pool
Parks - better maintenance, basketball court lights
don't work, extend hours at parks, new park for
walking
Skate Park - bigger skate park, not enough room for
small kids
Bike park with ramps
2
4
3
19.6%
1
Total
10
Clothing stores
1
Mall - but small town mall
1
Wal-mart
1
Total
3
Spa
1
5.9%
3.9%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.143
Community Activities
Community Services/Facilities
Entertainment
Town/Community Beautification
Grand Total
Day spa
1
Total
2
Movie theater - more screens, more theaters
2
Total
2
Library - more books of interest to teens
1
Gym - downtown
1
Total
1
More entertainment places
1
Total
1
More green landscaping
1
Total
1
51
3.9%
2.0%
2.0%
2.0%
100.1%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.144
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Youth Focus Group Results
Table 24.
Challenges
Themes
Shopping
Youth Activities
Parks/Recreation
Businesses/Restaurants
Human Services
Healthcare
Churches
N
Need more stores - have to shop in Phx (costs of gas
and travel time), need a Petco, mall, Wal-mart
Too many dollar stores
5
1
Total
6
Bowling
1
Arcade
Need computers somewhere besides the library, in a
cool place where kids can hang out
Need YMCA
Nothing to do on weekends - leads to drinking, drugs,
smoking, parties in the desert
Teens have no where to hang out
1
Total
Pool - nasty, don't want to get in it, need separate
pool for babies; need slide, cool pool stuff, diving
board; not big enough, not open long enough hours
Skate park - where druggies hang out
Total
Older business owners are cranky towards kids Movie theater owners don't like kids and kick them
out of the theater, Bowling alley owners turned it into
more of a bar and it had bad food before closing
Restaurants - no Peter Piper Pizza or Chuck E.
Cheese
Small businesses are put out of business by big
businesses
Total
%
17.6%
1
1
17.6%
1
1
6
5
1
18.0%
6
3
1
14.7%
1
5
Need big soup kitchen
1
Need food bank
1
Need a few showers for homeless
Need shelter for young moms who are kicked out of
their houses
Teen pregnancy - 5 girls pregnant in high school
1
1
14.7%
1
Total
Bad hospital - most people go to Phx for hospital
services, provides limited services
Need orthodontist
5
3
Total
4
Too many churches - all Christian
1
1
11.8%
2.9%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.145
Adults/Seniors
Grand Total
Total
Older people are scared of younger kids - don't want
to deal with kids
Total
1
1
3.0%
1
34
100%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.146
Wickenburg Community Assessment
Youth Focus Group Results
Table 25.
Wellik Foundation Investments
Themes
N
Increase teacher pay - only for quality/trained
teachers, school should evaluate them, hold to high
standards to receive incentive pay
More extracurricular activities
Schools/Education
Youth Activities
Parks/Recreation
Businesses
Human Services
Shopping
Grand Total
%
1
1
More variety of electives
1
Lockers
1
More open gym hours at the high school
1
Total
5
Bowling alley with arcade
Big recreation/entertainment area - like Jillian's' in
Phx
More opportunities for teens
1
1
Arcade
1
Skating rink
1
Total
Parks - redesign the park, add more stuff, bigger
skate park area
Recreation center with family activities
5
1
ATV trails
1
Total
3
More space for small businesses
1
Total
1
Homeless shelter/services
1
Total
1
More stores for shopping
1
Total
1
1
1
16
31.3%
31.3%
18.8%
6.3%
6.3%
6.3%
100.0%
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.147
Appendix D
Community Asset Mapping
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.148
Community Resource Map
City of Wickenburg
Businesses
Name
Address
City/State
1
115 N. Tegner St.
115 N. Tegner St.
2
A & J Locksmith
P.O. Box 1478
3
A Cut Above Hair Studio
4
A H Construction
5
A J Iron Works
410 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
6
Accurate Oxygen & Med
Supplies
2050 W. Wickenburg
7
Ace Hardware
160 E. Yavapai St.
8
Ace Rental Ctr & Repairs
275 N. Tegner St.
9
Active Life Mobile Homes
N/A
10
Advance Step Inc.
2350 W. Val Vista Dr.
11
Advance Step Inc.
543 W. Apache St.
12
Agnew Automotive Inc.
13
ALCO Discount Store
14
All Care Respiratory Svc.
15
All Tile & Design Inc.
16
Americ Inn
17
18
American Family
Insurance
American National
Insurance Co.
901 W. Wickenburg
Way # 1
32817 Luray Rd.
885 W. Wickenburg
Way
2031 W. Wickenburg
Way
350 N. Tegner St.
897 W. Wickenburg
Way # H
850 E. Wickenburg
Way
261 N. Frontier St.
579 W. Wickenburg
Way # 3
19
Amigas Salon
205 N. Frontier St.
20
An Antique Store
272 E. Wickenburg
Way
21
Anita's Cocina
57 N. Valentine St.
22
APS
125 E. Apache St.
23
Arizona Auto Tech
30306 US Highway 60
89
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Zip
Code
Phone Number
85390
(928) 668-0500
85358
(928) 684-0427
85390
(928) 684-0503
85390
(928) 684-7322
85390
(928) 684-3036
85390
(928) 684-0143
85390
(928) 684-5488
85390
(928) 684-1300
85390
(928) 684-3545
85390
(928) 684-0072
85390
(928) 684-0072
85390
(928) 684-5042
85390
(928) 684-2231
85390
(928) 684-0715
85390
(928) 684-0040
85390
(928) 684-5461
85390
(928) 668-1477
85390
(928) 684-5115
85390
(928) 684-8777
85390
(928) 684-3357
85390
(928) 684-5777
85390
(928) 684-5471
85390
(928) 684-2053
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.149
24
25
Arizona Electronic Homes
Inc.
Arizona Computer
Solution
55407 N. Vulture Mine
Rd.
521 W. Wickenburg
Way
51449 US Highway 60
89 # A
26
Ark Exterminating
27
Art Barber Excavating
784 N. Tegner St.
28
Art Barber Excavating
N. Rincon Rd.
29
Attevy Flowers'n Things
30
Aunt Jeni's Child Care
31
Aunt Jeni's Child Care
32
Auric Resources Intl.
33
Aztec Mobile Home & RV
Park
34
Azteca Glass West
35
B & D Rentals/Welding
Supplies
36
B & S Discount Sales
37
B'Ann's Skin Caare
38
B-N Fabricators
39
Badowski & White
40
Bank of America
41
Bar S Animal Clinic
42
Bashas'
275 N. Tegner St.
43
Beal, Jorja
510 N. Tegner St.
44
45
Bear Cat Manufacturing
Inc.
Ben's Saddlery & Shoe
Repair
46
Benner Nawman
47
Best Western Inn
48
BND Network Systems
49
Bob Nuth & Assoc.
50
Bobbette's Perfect 10
854 W. Wickenburg
Way
30341 Highway 60 # A
51020 N. US Highway
89
1020 W. Wickenburg
Way # E9
401 E. Wickenburg
Way
243 N. Frontier St.
30249 US Highway 60
89
642 W. Wickenburg
Way
320 Cavaness Ave.
3450 N. Sabin Brown
Rd.
510 W. Savage St.
1980 W. Wickenburg
Way
51025 US Highway 60
89
3650 N. Sabin Brown
Rd.
174 N. Tegner St.
3450 N. Sabin Brown
Rd.
293 E. Wickenburg
Way
P.O. Box 616
300 N. Tegner St.
472 E. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-5494
85390
(928) 684-3110
85390
(928) 684-3749
85390
(928) 684-7158
85390
(928) 684-1445
85390
(928) 684-5345
85390
(928) 688-0410
85390
(928) 688-0133
85390
(928) 684-0325
85390
(928) 684-2481
85390
(928) 684-1700
85390
(928) 684-5926
85390
(928) 684-3761
85390
(928) 684-8978
85390
(928) 583-1851
85390
(928) 684-5532
85390
(928) 684-2829
85390
(928) 684-7846
85390
(928) 684-2831
85390
(928) 684-0075
85390
(928) 684-7851
85390
(928) 684-2683
85390
(928) 684-2813
85390
(928) 684-5445
85390
(928) 684-0498
85390
(928) 684-2833
85390
(928) 684-3573
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.150
51
Brackney Inc.
N/A
52
Bradshaw Vista
Apartments
53
Brenda's Beauty Salon
54
Bromm Auto Group
55
Brooks Air Conditioning
56
Brooks Hardwood Floors
57
Burger King
58
Cable America Corp
59
Cactus Patch Green
Houses
60
Cahn, Gail
61
Campbell's Drilling Inc.
656 Constellation Rd.
62
Cancado Construction
21675 W. Date Creek
Rd.
63
Canyon State Air
Conditioning
64
Capri Motel
65
Carioca Minute Mart
66
Carriage House Jewerlers
67
Cary's Pizza
68
Cellular Zone
69
Charley's Steak House
70
Chase
71
Checker Auto Parts
72
Chicago First Mortgage
73
Chicken Noodle Café
74
Chips Away
75
Choice Auto Glass
76
Cigarettes Priced To Go
960 W. Wickenburg
Way
77
Cinco J Beauty & Barber
Shop
275 E. Yavapai St.
560 Penn Ln.
2107 W. Wickenburg
Way
555 E. Wickenburg
Way
52420 US Highway 60
89
P.O. Box 20847
524 E. Wickenburg
Way
1020 W. Wickenburg
Way # 6
1237 W. Wickenburg
Way
836 S. Saguaro Dr.
N/A
521 W. Wickenburg
Way # A
447 W. Wickenburg
Way
164 N. Tegner St.
1020 W. Wickenburg
Way # 2
10 S. Kerkes St.
1187 W. Wickenburg
Way
800 W. Wickenburg
Way
990 N Tegner St.
N/A
2021 W. Wickenburg
Way
50050 US Highway 60
89
917 Yaqui Dr.
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-3255
85390
(928) 684-0446
85390
(928) 684-7374
85390
(928) 684-5436
85390
(928) 684-9534
85358
(928) 684-2400
85390
(928) 684-7193
85390
(928) 684-2838
85390
(928) 684-9139
85390
(928) 684-9006
85390
(928) 684-7546
85390
(928) 684-9604
85390
(928) 684-1400
85390
(928) 684-7232
85390
(928) 684-5245
85390
(928) 684-2202
85390
(928) 684-0589
85390
(928) 684-0471
85390
(928) 684-2413
85390
(928) 684-5414
85390
(928) 684-0180
85390
(928) 684-3627
85390
(928) 684-2294
85390
(928) 684-5250
85390
(928) 684-0994
85390
(928) 684-1160
85390
(928) 684-7333
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.151
78
Circle G Real Estate
Brokerage
79
Circle K
80
Circle K
81
Civil Defense Hdqrs.
82
CJQ Investments
83
Clean Earth Disposal
84
Clip Joint
85
CMC Trucking
86
Codi's Fancy Fingers
320 Cavaness Ave.
87
Cole Accounting Svc.
893 W. Wickenburg
Way # G
88
Combined Benefits
89
Compuguide
90
91
Computer Services Dave
& Di
Computer Services Dave
& Di's
51845b N. Forepaugh
Peak Rd.
104 E. Wickenburg
Way
410 W. Wickenburg
Way
155 N. Tegner St.
1665 S. Maguire Dr.
80 Palm Dr.
130 W. Wickenburg
Way
12 S. Tegner St.
P.O. Box 1475
N/A
P.O. Box 2124
51402 N. Mockingbird
Rd.
2050 W. Wickenburg
Way
893 W. Wickenburg
Way # D
92
Contract Locks
93
Copper State Cycles
94
Corbet Realty
139 N. Frontier St.
Coronado Glen
Apartments
Coronado Glen
Apartments
180 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
601 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
1855 W. Wickenburg
Way
495 E. Wickenburg
Way
901 W. Wickenburg
Way
95
96
97
Country Club Park
98
County Kitchen
99
Country Puppy Dog
Groom Saloon
100
Cowboy Café
686 N. Tegner St.
101
Cowgirl Salvage
30358 Grand Ave.
102
Craig Motor Crafts
12 S. Tegner St.
103
Creations in Thread
670 N. Tegner St. # 2
104
Crissman Construction
Inc.
581 W. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-5988
85390
(928) 684-5031
85390
(928) 684-5382
85390
(928) 684-5451
85390
(928) 684-9154
85390
(928) 684-6100
85390
(928) 684-5008
85390
(928) 684-7862
85390
(928) 684-8978
85390
(928) 684-2336
85390
(928) 684-3545
85390
(928) 684-3490
85390
(928) 684-2042
85390
(928) 684-2776
85390
(928) 684-1100
85390
(928) 684-3718
85390
(928) 684-3911
85390
(928) 684-3016
85390
(928) 684-3016
85390
(928) 684-2110
85390
(928) 684-3882
85390
(928) 668-1141
85390
(928) 684-2807
85390
(928) 684-6112
85390
(928) 684-7862
85390
(928) 684-7936
85390
(928) 684-5216
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.152
105
Curves
628 W. Wickenburg
Way
106
Cuts By Kelly Rae
320 Cavaness Ave.
107
Cuttin Up Barber Shop
34 E. Yavapai St.
D. W. Echeverria
Construction
Dalley Brother's Masonry
Inc.
2290 W. Wickenburg
Way
110
Dancer's Hill
90 S. Washington St.
112
Danny's Jewelry
108
109
N/A
164 N. Tegner St.
Date Creek Plumbing &
Electric
Dave & Di's Computer
Store
Dave & Di's Computer
Store
David's Deset Chapel
Funeral
Day & Night Portable
Restroom
51402 N. Mockingbird
Rd.
118
Day & Night Septic Svc.
893 W. Wickenburg
Way
119
De Vries Custom
Coachworks
120
Decorables Inc.
4020 Industrial Park
Dr. # 5
121
Denny's
1010 N. Tegner St.
113
114
115
116
117
122
123
Desert Concepts
Landscape
Desert Cypress Trailer
Ranch
4020 Industrial Way #
108
3600 W. Welleck Rd.
325 W. Yavapai St.
51816 Kellis Rd.
176 N. Washington St.
N/A
610 Jack Burden Rd. #
1
51402 N. Mockingbird
Rd.
124
Desert Horizon Realty
125
Desert Retreat
126
Desert Sun Realty
127
Desert View Satellite
128
Diamond-Back Fence Co.
P.O. Box 673
129
Diamondback Mining Inc.
1125 W. Yucca Dr.
130
Dollar General
825 N. Tegner St.
131
Domino's Pizza
472 W. Wickenburg
Way
132
Don's Mobile Home Svc.
51814 Ocotillo Dr.
360 N. Jackson St.
858 W. Wickenburg
Way
605 W. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-5400
85390
(928) 684-8978
85390
(928) 684-7552
85390
(928) 684-3804
85390
(928) 684-7727
85390
(928) 684-1072
85390
(928) 684-5823
85390
(928) 427-4684
85390
(928) 684-2776
85390
(928) 684-2776
85390
(928) 684-0710
85390
(928) 684-2293
85390
(928) 684-0709
85390
(928) 684-5676
85390
(928) 684-4455
85390
(928) 684-0240
85390
(928) 684-1448
85390
(928) 684-2153
85390
(928) 684-5695
85390
(928) 684-3572
85390
(928) 684-7855
85390
(928) 684-0603
85358
(928) 685-4089
85358
(928) 684-1511
85390
(928) 684-3057
85390
(928) 684-3030
85390
(928) 684-5025
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.153
133
134
135
Double D. Western World
Double J. Court Self
Storage
Down To Earth
Contracting Inc.
136
Dunkel Electric Inc.
137
Echeverria Construction
138
Edward Jones
139
El Chorrito Mexican Stuff
140
El Ranchero Restaurant
141
142
143
Electrolysis By Leslie At
Codi
Elms Cindy Rd. Conslnt
Ntrtnst
Elms Cindy Rd. Conslnt
Ntrtnst
955 W. Wickenburg
Way
500 W. Wickenburg
Way
80 Palm Dr.
100 W. Palo Verde Dr.
280 E. Wickenburg
Way
581 W. Wickenburg
Way # A
30331 US Highway 60
89
683 W. Wickenburg
Way
320 Cavaness Ave.
30520 Constellation
Rd.
780 Constellation Rd.
34352 W. Dove Valley
Rd.
472 W. Wickenburg
Way
30341 US Highway 60
89
30341 US Highway 60
89
162 E. Wickenburg
Way
200 W. Wickenburg
Way
144
Especial Animal Care
145
Evolve Yoga Meditation
Ctr.
146
Excel Air Conditioning
147
Excel Sheet Metal
148
Express One Mortgage
Corp
149
Family Dollar Store
150
Farmers Insurance Group
167 N. Frontier St.
151
Filiberto's Mexican Food
530 E. Wickenburg
Way
152
Fireside Cowboy Supper
Club
50607 W. Grand Ave.
153
First American Title Co.
472 E. Wickenburg
Way
154
First Heating & Cooling
Inc.
350 W. Savage St.
155
Flower Barn
400 N. Tegner St.
156
Flying E. Dude Ranch
2801 W. Wickenburg
Way
157
Flying M. Air
Wickenburg Airport
158
Fraser's Hill LTD
159
Fred Downing Spiritual
Conslnt
55 N. Frontier St.
2501 W. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-5821
85390
(928) 684-2471
85390
(928) 684-2740
85390
(928) 684-5596
85390
(928) 684-2934
85390
(928) 684-7072
85390
(928) 684-0435
85390
(928) 684-5121
85390
(928) 684-8978
85390
(928) 684-5054
85390
(928) 684-5054
85390
(928) 738-3819
85390
(928) 684-5995
85390
(928) 684-7914
85390
(928) 684-7914
85390
(928) 684-5800
85390
(928) 684-4983
85390
(928) 684-7958
85390
(928) 684-3515
85390
(928) 684-3200
85390
(928) 684-1283
85390
(928) 684-2918
85390
(928) 684-0550
85390
(928) 684-2690
85390
(928) 231-0196
85390
(928) 684-7000
85390
(928) 684-2326
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.154
160
Fredenburgh Photoscenics
295 N. Mariposa Dr.
161
French Travel Express
1090 W. Sunrise Trl.
162
Fresh Coat Painting
163
Frontier Acounting Svc.
164
Fuelco
165
G. C. Svc.
1125 N. tegner St # 28
166
G. Lazy B. Bobile Home
Park
167
G. P. Mechanical
50847 US Highway 60
89
51402 N. Mockingbird
Rd.
168
Gantrex Corp
169
Ginny's Vitamin Village
170
Gold Nugget
171
Gold Ribbon Computers
172
Goldberg & Osborne
173
Good Water & Ice
174
Grand Sitting Adventrues
175
Grantham Custom Fence
176
Gretchen Beyers Realty
Exctvs
510 N. Tegner St.
178
Gun Trader
36 E. Yavapai St.
179
H & R Block Tax Svc.
136 N. Frontier St.
180
Hacienda Hair
211 N. Frontier St.
181
Hair By Katie
182
Hair Design By Linda
183
Hair Etc.
184
Hair Safari Beauty Salon
185
186
187
Hanson Aggregates of
Arizona
Hassayampa Child Dev.
Ctr.
Hassayampa Village Apts
N/A
125 E. Apache St.
Phoenix Hwy
P.O. Box 20099
662 W. Wickenburg
Way # B
222 E. Wickenburg
Way
N/A
30 E. Yavapai St.
2021 W. Wickenburg
Way
30382 US Highway 60
89 # 14
55423 US Highway 89
93
899 W. Wickenburg
Way
1020 W. Wickenburg
Way # 3
975 W. Wickenburg
Way
581 W. Wickenburg
Way
44605 Grand Ave.
148 Coconino St.
545 Penn Ln.
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-3035
85390
(928) 684-1090
85390
(928) 232-9665
85390
(928) 684-2247
85390
(928) 684-3414
85390
(928) 684-1500
85390
(928) 684-5422
85390
(928) 684-4998
85358
(928) 684-2815
85390
(928) 684-5371
85390
(928) 684-0648
85390
(928) 684-0193
85390
(928) 684-3323
85390
(928) 684-1416
85390
(928) 684-3201
85390
(928) 684-8766
85390
(928) 684-0789
85390
(928) 684-2149
85390
(928) 684-7453
85390
(928) 684-8990
85390
(928) 684-3361
85390
(928) 684-6132
85358
(928) 684-2241
85390
(928) 684-5438
85390
(928) 684-3402
85390
(928) 684-2246
85390
(928) 684-3733
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.155
188
Healing Hands Massage
Therapy
189
Health Works
1765 N. Aguila Dr.
190
Herb's Glass
670 N. Tegner St. #
670
191
Herman & Assoc.
192
193
Hershkowitz Brothers
Constr
Hershkowitz Brothers Lug
& Tug
N/A
125 E. Apache St.
P.O. Box 114
Phoenix Hwy 60
194
High Desert Electric
2050 W. Wickenburg
Way
195
High Desert Flooring
52730 Grand Ave.
196
High Desert Television
Svc.
197
Home Solutions Furniture
685 W. Wickenburg
Way
198
Honorable John C. Henry
155 N. Tegner St. # D
199
Hopkins Fence Co.
200
Horseshoe Café
201
Horspitality RV Park &
Stable
202
House Berlin
203
House N'Pets & Plants Etc.
N/A
204
Howard Express
N/A
205
Human Factors Engrng
206
Ila's Other Place
207
In Situform technologies
Inc.
51235 N. 296th Ave.
208
J & J Svc. Inc.
914 W. Wickenburg
Way
209
J.C. Janitorial
590 E. Apache St.
210
J.C.'s Lock Svc.
211
Jack In The Box
212
JDK Drywall
213
JDK Drywall & Insulation
214
Jeb Construction
21165 E. El Grande Trl
30341 US Highway 60
89 # D
207 E. Wickenburg
Way
51802 US Highway 60
89
169 E. Wickenburg
Way
1320 W. Roadrunner
Rdg.
2050 W. Wickenburg
Way # 6
50050 US Highway 60
89
37770 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
147 S. Frontier St.
18330 W. Moonlight
Mesa Rd.
340 W. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-9414
85390
(928) 684-2108
85390
(928) 684-2217
85390
(928) 684-5630
85358
(928) 671-1063
85390
(928) 684-5688
85390
(928) 684-7800
85390
(928) 684-5353
85390
(928) 684-2554
85390
(928) 668-1100
85390
(928) 506-1554
85390
(928) 684-2684
85390
(928) 684-7377
85390
(928) 684-2519
85390
(928) 684-5044
85390
(928) 684-5104
85390
(928) 671-1118
85390
(928) 684-9606
85390
(928) 684-2511
85390
(928) 684-4909
85390
(928) 668-0377
85390
(928) 684-2023
85390
(928) 684-5250
85390
(928) 684-2998
85390
(928) 684-2659
85390
(928) 684-2190
85390
(928) 684-0132
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.156
215
Johnson True Value
Lumber
216
Johnson's Dry Goods Co.
217
Jones Auto Ctr.
218
K & R Financial
219
K.C.'s
220
Kachina Beauty Salon
221
Kaleidoscope Productions
222
Kaley's
223
Kay El Bar Gst Ranch Inc.
224
Kay El Bar Gst Ranch
225
Keller & Hickey
226
KFC
227
Kokopelli Plaza
Apartments
228
Kriel, Pat
229
Kropf Craft
3 Wellik Dr.
230
Kropf Craft
3500 N. Sabin Brown
Rd.
231
KSSL
232
KWIK Print
10 S. Kerkes St.
233
KWIK Print
221 E. Apache St.
234
L & M Construction
235
La Cabana Bar
236
237
238
Laboratory Corp of
America
Laboratory Corp of
America
Larry Houser Heating &
Cooling
239
Laundromat Express
240
Legacy Home Mortgage
241
Lemon Tree
188 E. Yavapai St.
72 N. Tegner St.
781 W. Wickenburg
Way
162 E. Wickenburg
Way
2350 W. Val Vista Dr.
659 W. Wickenburg
Way
11482 Grand Ave.
2050 W. Wickenburg
Way # B
655 El Recreo Dr.
Rincon Rd.
692 W. Wickenburg
Way
515 E. Wickenburg
Way
278 S. Tegner St.
N/A
N/A
56006 N. Vulture Mine
Rd.
132 E. Wickenburg
Way
490 W. Bralliar Rd.
55635 N. Vulture Mine
Rd.
355 Cottonwood Ln.
130 E. Yavapai St.
130 E. Yavapai St. # 1
850 E. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-5439
85390
(928) 684-2212
85390
(928) 684-5481
85390
(928) 684-0212
85390
(928) 684-0388
85390
(928) 684-7637
85390
(928) 684-7728
85390
(928) 684-1004
85390
(928) 684-2976
85390
(928) 684-7593
85390
(928) 684-7833
85390
(928) 684-7396
85390
(928) 684-0131
85390
(928) 684-7736
85390
(928) 684-3014
85390
(928) 684-3014
85390
(928) 684-0685
85390
(928) 684-5951
85390
(928) 684-7229
85390
(928) 684-2547
85390
(928) 684-7671
85390
(928) 684-1379
85390
(928) 668-0150
85390
(928) 684-4465
85390
(928) 684-2003
85390
(928) 684-1336
85390
(928) 684-5461
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.157
893 W. Wickenburg
Way
573 W. Wickenburg
Way
1551 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
242
Little Mama's Leather
243
Log Wagon Inn
244
Los Caballeros Golf Club
245
Los Viajeros Inn
246
Lynn Mulligan Trucking
247
Lytle, Jim DVM
P.O. Box 1473
248
M W Health Co.
32405 Kenrick Dr.
249
Malcolm Cabinet Works
47447 U S Highway
60-89
250
Mangold Auction & Real
Est.
35820 S. Joshua Pl.
251
March Hare
252
Masters Plumbing &
Piping
253
Mc Arther & Mc Guire
254
Mc Coy, Robert D.
255
Mc Donald's
256
Mc Keever's Ace
Hardware
257
Mc Millin Air
258
Mecca Restaurant &
Cantina
259
Mei Electric
260
Meridian Bank
261
Metro Alliance
262
Miner's Creek
263
Morning Star Karate
264
265
Mountain View Barber
Shop
Nancy's Furniture New &
Used
1000 N. Tegner St.
N/A
170 W. Wickenburg
Way
1235 W. Wickenburg
Way
830 N. Tegner St.
2001 W. Wickenburg
Way # 1
370 E. Wickenburg
Way
160 E. Yavapai St.
40 1/2 S Mesquite St.
162 E. Wickenburg
Way
N/A
2001 W. Wickenburg
Way
2050 W. Wickenburg
Way # 3
30331 W. Grand Ave.
472 E. Wickenburg
Way
2050 W. Wickenburg
Way # 5
2027 W. Wickenburg
Way
457 W. Wickenburg
Way
266
NAPA Auto Parts
267
Napoles Landscaping
30331 Grand Ave.
268
New Frontier
430 E. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-3244
85390
(928) 684-2531
85390
(928) 684-2704
85390
(928) 684-7099
85390
(928) 684-5190
85358
(928) 684-2872
85390
(928) 684-0071
85390
(928) 684-2568
85390
(928) 684-1111
85390
(928) 684-0223
85390
(928) 684-8824
85390
(928) 684-5416
85390
(928) 684-5354
85358
(928) 684-2972
85390
(928) 684-1300
85390
(928) 684-5375
85390
(928) 684-0760
85390
(928) 684-0107
85390
(928) 684-7881
85390
(928) 684-2222
85390
(928) 684-7014
85390
(928) 684-2099
85390
(928) 684-0134
85390
(928) 684-7005
85390
(928) 252-5218
85390
(928) 684-1236
85390
(928) 684-3024
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.158
515 W. Wickenburg
Way
1141 W. Wickenburg
Way
955 W. Wickenburg
Way
269
New Life Svc. Co.
270
Noel's Paint Place
271
O W Saddles
272
Old Livery Mercantile
273
Old Nursery Coffee Co.
1235 W. Wickenburg
Way
274
Orkin Exterminating Co.
55 N. Frontier St.
275
Osco Drug
276
Out West Lending
277
Owl Tree Inn
278
Padua Hills Apartment
279
Palm Drive Trailer Ranch
280
Paradise Tanning
281
PECO
104 N. Tegner St.
2033 W. Wickenburg
Way
18000 US Highway 89
93
32415 W. Palo Verde
Dr.
460 S. West Rd.
550 Palm Dr.
160 W. Wickenburg
Way
70 E. Apache St.
Performance Web
Solutions Inc.
Peterson Agency Real
Estate
178 E. Wickenburg
Way
284
Pioneer Towing
1155 N. Tegner St.
285
Pollay Electric Inc.
520 N. Frontier St.
286
Pollman-Voehl Agency
287
Pony Espresso
233 E. Wickenburg
Way
288
Popovich Ironworks
84 N. Valentine St.
289
Qorri's Restaurant
282
283
290
291
Quarter-Horse Rancho
Antiques
R J Brinkman Drywall
Contract
565 S. Lincoln St.
172 N. Washington St.
651 W. Wickenburg
Way
30220 US Highway 60
89
980 W. Wickenburg
Way
579 W. Wickenburg
Way
565 Constellation Rd.
#B
292
R T Mead Surveyors
293
R W Turner & Sons Pump
294
Radio Shack
275 N. Tegner St. # 4
295
Rancher Bar
910 W. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-2877
85390
(928) 668-1200
85390
(928) 684-6850
85390
(928) 684-3298
85390
(928) 684-0288
85390
(928) 684-4413
85390
(928) 684-7841
85390
(928) 668-1155
85390
(928) 684-1197
85390
(928) 684-7034
85390
(928) 684-2376
85390
(928) 684-1132
85390
(928) 684-7155
85390
(928) 684-0790
85390
(928) 684-5129
85390
(928) 684-0678
85390
(928) 684-2191
85390
(928) 684-5492
85390
(928) 684-0208
85390
(928) 684-4918
85390
(928) 684-2002
85390
(928) 684-3747
85390
(928) 684-9144
85390
(928) 684-5046
85390
(928) 684-3471
85390
(928) 684-7071
85390
(928) 684-5957
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.159
111 E. Wickenburg
Way
56550 Rancho Casitas
Rd.
1551 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
296
Rancho Bar 7
297
Rancho Casitas
298
Rancho De Los Caballeros
299
Rancho Vista Apartments
300
Randy's Automotive
301
Rathco Painting &
Sandblasting
302
Raylynn Homes Inc.
303
Realty ExecutivesWickenburg
510 N. Tegner St.
304
Refried Bean
144 N. Tegner St.
305
REL Paint & Co. Inc.
879 W. Wickenburg
Way
306
Remuda Cornerstone
Bookstore
48 N. Tegner St.
307
Renderings
308
Rick's Carpet Svc.
309
Ricke Builders Inc.
310
Riggs Enterprises
311
River Rentals
312
Roadrunner Video
313
Rollin Hogan RV Park
314
Roxannes Beauty Salon
315
Rustiques
316
Ryan's Painting &
Decorating
317
Ryan's Painting Inc.
318
S & S Construction
319
S & S Construction
272 N. Cucuracha St.
320
S J Ricke Homes
56624 N. 337th Ave.
321
Safeway
322
Sallee-Leavitt Insurance
475 Penn Ln.
980 W. Wickenburg
Way
N/A
56511 US Highway 89
93 # 5
30220 US Highway 60
89
50807 1/2 US
Highway 60 89
540 S. West Rd.
790 Constellation Rd.
48228 W. US Highway
60
703 W. Wickenburg
Way
51011 N. US Highway
60
579 W. Wickenburg
Way
30358 US Highway 60
89 # A
170 W. Wickenburg
Way
858 W. Wickenburg
Way
20455 W. Coyote
Gulch
1999 W.Wickenburg
Way
2019 W. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-2492
85390
(928) 684-2628
85390
(928) 684-5484
85390
(928) 684-7183
85390
(928) 684-0833
85390
(928) 684-2788
85390
(928) 684-2296
85390
(928) 684-7653
85390
(928) 684-5977
85390
(928) 684-2576
85390
(928) 684-4242
85390
(928) 684-0112
85390
(928) 684-7465
85358
(928) 684-1215
85390
(928) 684-7728
85390
(928) 684-8888
85390
(928) 684-7940
85390
(928) 684-0542
85390
(928) 684-1333
85390
(928) 668-1070
85390
(928) 684-2635
85390
(928) 684-2635
85390
(928) 684-4941
85390
(928) 684-7500
85390
(928) 684-7352
85390
(928) 684-2999
85390
(928) 684-2121
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.160
323
Salsa
124 N. Tegner St.
324
Sangini's Pizza & Subs
325
Scherz Custom Gunworks
326
Schuch Heavy
Construction
327
Screamers Drive In
328
Screenmobile
329
Security Title Agency
201 N. Frontier St.
330
Senior Living-Retirmnt
Housing
460 S. West Rd.
331
Shell
530 E. Wickenburg
Way
332
Shell Gasoline Diesel &
Food
30216 Phoenix Hwy
333
Shoppers-News
334
Sickles Sanitation Svc.
335
Sigler Plumbing &
Supplies Inc.
53412 N. Industrial
Rd.
2050 W. Wickenburg
Way
336
Simpson RV Park
503 S. Tegner St.
337
Site Environment
338
Sizzling Wok
339
Smoker Friendly
340
Snyder Mini Storage
262 N. Frontier St.
341
Sonja Green Real Estate
Brkrg
342
Soroptimist Thrift Shop
162 E. Wickenburg
Way
74 W. Wickenburg
Way
343
Southwest Development
Inc.
570 S. Lincoln St.
344
Southwest Gas
500 N. Tegner St.
345
Squash Blossom Nursery
346
Stagecoach Realty
24 N. Oxbow Dr.
347
State Farm Insurance
37 N. Jefferson St.
348
Steve's Alternator Repair
543 W. Apache St.
349
Stewart Hardware
107 E. Wickenburg
Way
20 E. Yavapai St.
2050 W. Wickenburg
Way
1151 W. Wickenburg
Way
735 W. LA Golondrina
Dr.
180 N. Washiington St.
1237 W. Wickenburg
Way
621 W. Wickenburg
Way
240 E. Wickenburg
Way
1235 W. Wickenburg
Way
2050 W. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-7262
85390
(928) 684-7828
85390
(928) 684-2012
85390
(928) 684-3094
85390
(928) 684-9056
85390
(928) 684-8742
85390
(928) 684-7615
85390
(928) 684-7034
85390
(928) 684-3708
85390
(928) 684-3414
85390
(928) 684-7218
85390
(928) 684-0303
85390
(928) 684-9659
85390
(928) 684-5502
85390
(928) 684-9139
85390
(928) 684-3977
85390
(928) 668-0123
85390
(928) 684-3008
85390
(928) 684-5771
85390
(928) 684-7932
85390
(928) 684-1811
85390
(928) 684-1192
85390
(928) 684-7966
85390
(928) 684-2472
85390
(928) 684-2868
85390
(928) 684-3428
85390
(928) 684-2944
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.161
540 W. Wickenburg
Way
443 W. Wickenburg
Way
443 W. Wickenburg
Way
350
Stockmen's Bank
351
Stotz's Service Ctr.
352
Stotz's Towing
353
Stuckert Door Svc.
2125 W. Yucca Dr.
Subway Sandwiches &
Salads
Sun Mountain
Development
412 E. Wickenburg
Way
354
355
460 W. Bralliar Rd.
880 W. Wickenburg
Way
689 W. Wickenburg
Way
356
Sun Tire & Auto Ctr.
357
Sundown Printing
358
Sunnyside Auto Detailing
359
Suntel Communication
Svc.
360
Super 8 Motel
975 N. Tegner St.
361
Susanne & Co.
172 N. Washington St.
362
Swimpro Inc.
1320 W. Roadrunner
Rdg.
363
T J Jones & Sons Drywall
364
Taco Bell
365
Tan Appraisal Svc.
366
Tastee Freez
367
Tina's Tots Daycare
368
Tom Hogue Construction
369
Trader J's
370
Transnation Title
Insurance
371
Transportation Dept
372
Transportation Dept
373
Travel Masters
374
Triad Steel Svc. Inc.
375
Turner Construction
376
Twin Wheels Café
59 N. Jefferson St.
671 Constellation Rd.
N/A
528 E. Wickenburg
Way
521 W. Wickenburg
Way
512 E. Wickenburg
Way
160 W. Wickenburg
Way
56511 US Highway 89
93 # 7
247 E. Wickenburg
Way
186 N. Tegner St.
472 E. Wickenburg
Way # 104
600 E. Wickenburg
Way # B
515 W. Wickenburg
Way
4020 Industrial Way #
109
1000 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
172 E. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-0177
85390
(928) 684-9077
85390
(928) 684-2052
85390
(928) 684-1224
85390
(928) 684-3300
85390
(928) 684-1280
85390
(928) 684-5927
85390
(928) 684-7871
85390
(928) 684-2271
85390
(928) 684-9505
85390
(928) 684-0808
85390
(928) 668-1148
85390
(928) 684-0191
85390
(928) 684-0087
85390
(928) 684-9113
85390
(928) 684-3492
85390
(928) 684-7569
85390
(928) 684-0585
85390
(928) 684-0501
85390
(928) 684-2381
85390
(928) 684-5426
85390
(928) 684-9549
85390
(928) 684-2131
85390
(928) 684-2877
85390
(928) 684-7151
85390
(928) 684-2036
85390
(928) 684-5331
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.162
377
U S Approvals
378
U-Haul Co.
379
380
United Country-All
Arizona Re
United State Pipe &
Foundry
35925 S. Heritage Ct.
443 W. Wickenburg
Way
162 E. Wickenburg
Way
55405 N. Coyote Xing
381
Universal Drilling Inc.
382
US Bank
383
Valle Vista Trailer Park
384
Valleywide Termite
Control
385
Vance Appliances
386
Vegetable Village
387
Vicki's Grooming Shop
388
VIP Airport Express
389
Vulture Mine Gen Store
390
Wagon Inn Log
391
Water Transfer
845 N. Tegner St.
392
Wells Fargo Bank
275 N. Tegner St.
393
394
395
396
397
398
West USA Realty
Wickenburg
Western Air ConditioningHtg
Western Garden
Apartments
Western Hill RV Park
Western Laundry
Unlimited
Western Laundry
Unlimited
32949 Bonita Dr.
1999 W. Wickenburg
Way
760 N. Tegner St.
N/A
335 W. Wickenburg
Way
703 W. Wickenburg
Way
Phoenix Hwy
525 Constellation Rd.
37770 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
573 W. Wickenburg
Way
579 W. Wickenburg
Way # 1
N/A
90 W. Yavapai St. # 12
1145 N .Tegner St. #
21
144 N. Frontier St.
340 W. Wickenburg
Way
30210 US Highway 60
89
399
Western States Petroleum
400
Western States Petroleum
Inc.
30216 W. Highway 60
401
Western Trails Photo
345 E. Via Tortuga Dr.
402
Westerner Motel
680 W. Wickenburg
Way
403
Westhaven Apartments
540 S. West Rd. # 24
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-0855
85390
(928) 684-1408
85390
(928) 684-5771
85358
(928) 668-0368
85358
(928) 684-2886
85390
(928) 668-0137
85390
(928) 684-5573
85390
(928) 684-1550
85390
(928) 684-9691
85390
(928) 684-5359
85390
(928) 684-3367
85390
(928) 684-0925
85390
(928) 684-6855
85390
(928) 684-1548
85390
(928) 684-5015
85390
(928) 684-7372
85390
(928) 684-3306
85390
(928) 684-0107
85390
(928) 684-2083
85390
(928) 684-5271
85390
(928) 684-4976
85390
(928) 684-5581
85390
(928) 684-3414
85390
(928) 684-3100
85390
(928) 684-7385
85390
(928) 684-2493
85390
(928) 684-7949
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.163
404
Weston Concrete &
Material Inc.
405
Westpark
406
What's Your Sign
407
408
409
Wickenburg Foot & Ankle
Specs.
Wickenburg
Administrative Ofc.
Wickenburg Aero Svc.
510 N. Tegner St. # 3
2501 W. Wickenburg
Way
891 W. Wickenburg
Way # D
1175 W. Wickenburg
Way # 2
155 N. Tegner St.
3420 W. Wickenburg
Way
565 N. Country Club
Dr.
Wickenburg Airport
Express
Wickenburg Aspahalt &
Paving
Wickenburg Aspahalt &
Paving
47609 U S Hwy 60-89
413
Wickenburg Cabinet Co.
3620 Industrial Way
414
Wickenburg Civil Defence
415
Wickenburg Computers
Inc.
416
Wickenburg Corbet Realty
417
Wickenburg Country Club
410
411
412
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
Wickenburg Decorating
Ctr. Inc.
Wickenburg Exxon-Quik
Lube
Wickenburg Farmers'
Market
Wickenburg Fiduciary
Svc.
Wickenburg Floor
Covering
340 W. Wickenburg
Way
155 N. Tegner St.
N/A
139 N. Frontier St.
1420 W. Country Club
Dr.
185 E. Wickenburg
Way
340 E. Wickenburg
Way
662 W. Wickenburg
Way
1020 W. Wickenburg
Way
236 N. Washington St.
Wickenburg Funeral Home
187 Adams St.
Wickenburg Home &
Hearth
Wickenburg Home &
Hearth
Wickenburg Landscape &
Irrgtn.
Wickenburg Maintenance
Shop
Wickenburg Municipal
Cemetery
Wickenburg Municipal
Cemetery
1235 W. Wickenburg
Way
1325 W. Wickenburg
Way
51020 US Highway 60
89 # B
Wickenburg Oil Co.
500 Coney Orosco Dr.
N/A
155 N. Tegner St.
1115 W. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-5112
85390
(928) 684-2210
85390
(928) 684-3012
85390
(928) 684-7227
85390
(928) 684-5451
85390
(928) 684-8889
85390
(928) 684-2888
85390
(928) 684-7051
85390
(928) 684-3434
85390
(928) 684-3808
85390
(928) 684-5411
85390
(928) 684-3810
85390
(928) 684-5000
85390
(928) 684-2011
85390
(928) 684-5702
85390
(928) 684-2137
85358
(928) 684-8822
85390
(928) 684-3137
85390
(928) 684-3837
85390
(928) 684-2081
85390
(928) 684-7990
85390
(928) 684-8824
85390
(928) 684-7165
85390
(928) 684-2761
85390
(928) 684-5411
85390
(928) 684-5451
85390
(928) 684-2213
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.164
431
Wickenburg Pest Control
710 Buena Vis
432
Wickenburg Pony Express
P.O. Box 3157
433
434
Wickenburg Property
Management
Wickenburg Pump &
Supply
626 W. Wickenburg
Way
1385 N. tegner St. # E
51420 US Highway 60
89
280 W. Wickenburg
Way
1020 W. Wickenburg
Way
565 N. Country Club
Dr.
435
Wickenburg Station
436
Wickenburg Superwash
437
Wickenburg Tax Svc.
438
Wickenburg Taxi
439
Wickenburg Tire & Auto
1175 N. Tegner St.
Wickenburg Veterinary
Clinic
Wickenburg Welding &
Supply
1127 W. Wickenburg
Way
3620 N. Sabin Brown
Rd.
51020 US Highway 60
89 # B
1145 W. Wickenburg
Way
580 W. Wickenburg
Way
440
441
442
Wolfe, Bill
443
Woody's Car Wash
444
Woody's Enterprises LTD
445
Woody's Food Stores
446
Woody's Petroleum
447
Wright Exterminating Co.
448
Xtra Cash Advance
449
Yoga Syz.
450
You Knead Massage
188555 Hartland Way
451
Your Secretary
2015 W. Wickenburg
Way # A
452
Yvonne's Hair Designs
453
Zeller, Bill
1075 N. Tegner St.
76 N. Washington St.
N/A
412 E. Wickenburg
Way # A
2015 W. Wickenburg
Way
275 N. Tegner St.
725 Kellis Rd.
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-2728
85358
(928) 684-0402
85390
(928) 684-3041
85390
(928) 684-2444
85358
(928) 684-9653
85390
(928) 684-5347
85390
(928) 684-3137
85390
(928) 684-2888
85390
(928) 684-2821
85390
(928) 684-7866
85390
(928) 668-0333
85390
(928) 684-7165
85358
(928) 684-7532
85390
(928) 684-7868
85390
(928) 684-3276
85390
(928) 684-7878
85390
(928) 684-5544
85390
(928) 684-1122
85390
(928) 684-4939
85390
(928) 684-1135
85390
(928) 684-5466
85390
(928) 684-2847
85390
(928) 684-2701
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.165
Community Resource Map
City of Wickenburg
Education
Name
Address
City/State
1
Hart Education Crt.
479 Villa Sereno Dr.
2
Hassayampa Upper
Elementary
251 S. Tegner St.
3
In Step School of Dance
4
5
6
7
8
Mac Kay piano & Organ
Lessons
Mac Lennan Elementary
School
Schools Public Trnsprtn
Dept.
Vulture Peak Middle
School
Wickenberg Chrisitan
Academy
9
Wickenburg Head Start
10
Wickenburg High School
11
Wickenburg Unified School
District
340 W. Wickenburg
Way
638 N. Via Corte Dr.
260 W. Yavapai St.
251 S. Tegner St.
920 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
260 W. Yavapai St.
180 W. Yavapai St.
1090 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
40 W. Yavapai St.
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Zip
Code
Phone Number
85390
(928) 684-5973
85390
(928) 684-6750
85390
(928) 684-0812
85390
(928) 684-2310
85390
(928) 684-5300
85390
(928) 684-6766
85390
(928) 684-6700
85390
(928) 684-5916
85390
(928) 684-2774
85390
(928) 684-6600
85390
(928) 668-5350
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.166
Community Resource Map
City of Wickenburg
Faith Communities
Name
1
Berean Mennonite Church
2
Calvary Baptist Church
3
Church of Christ
4
5
Church of Jesus Christ of
Lds.
Community Alliance
Church
Address
440 America St.
930 N. Tegner St.
395 S. Mariposa Dr.
Wipple & Lazy Fox Rd.
905 S. Yucca Dr.
6
Faith Baptist Church
71 N. Jefferson St.
7
First Presbyterian Church
180 N. Adams St.
8
9
10
11
12
13
First Southern Baptist
Church
Gospel Outreach Christian
Church
Jehovah's Witnesses
Mount Hope Assembly of
God
Mountain View Christian
Church
Mountain View Christian
Church
14
Potters House
15
Redeemer Lutheran Church
16
17
18
Seventh-Day Adventist
Church
St. Alban's Episcopal
Church
Wickenburg Foursquare
Church
City/State
360 W. Yavapai St.
505 W. Wickenburg
Way
590 Kellis Rd.
550 Penn Ln.
240 S. Mesquite St.
340 W. Wickenburg
Way
Apache St. & Adams
St.
450 Rose Ln.
970 N. Tegner St.
357 W. Yavapai St.
885 America St.
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Zip
Code
Phone Number
85390
(928) 684-5579
85390
(928) 684-7373
85390
(928) 684-8804
85390
(928) 684-2446
85390
(928) 684-3525
85390
(928) 684-0236
85390
(928) 684-2836
85390
(928) 684-2756
85390
(928) 684-5227
85390
(928) 684-7368
85390
(928) 684-7767
85390
(928) 684-3995
85390
(928) 684-3995
85390
(928) 684-7479
85390
(928) 684-2729
85390
(928) 684-7419
85390
(928) 684-2133
85390
(928) 684-3904
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.167
Community Resource Map
City of Wickenburg
Government
Name
Address
City/State
1
Hassayampa River Preserve
49614 US Highway 60
89
2
Justice Court
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
3
4
Maricopa Community
Action
Maricopa County JusticePeace
155 N. Tegner St.
255 N. Washington St.
155 N. Tegner St. # D
5
Maricopa County Sheriff
6
Public Safety Dept.
7
US Post Office
1642 Whipple St.
8
US Post Office
2029 W. Wickenburg
Way
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
Wickenburg Chamber of
Commerce
Wickenburg Community
Center
Wickenburg Community
Development/Planning
Department
Wickenburg Community
Service Department
Wickenburg Economic
Development Department
Wickenburg Finance
Department
Wickenburg Fire
Department
Wickenburg Human
Resources Department
Wickenburg Managers
Office
Wickenburg Municipal
Airport
Wickenburg Police
Department
Wickenburg Public Works
Department
Wickenburg Sewer
Treatment
155 N. Tegner St. # C
60 N. Grant St.
216 N. Frontier St.
120 N .Valentine St.
Wickenburg,
AZ
155 N. Tegner St.
155 N. Tegner St.
155 N. Tegner St.
155 N. Tegner St.
155 N. Tegner St.
155 N. Tegner St.
155 N. Tegner St.
3410 W. Wickenburg
Way
155 N. Tegner St.
500 Coney Orosco Dr.
1006 S. Tegner St.
22
Wickenburg Town Clerk
155 N. Tegner St.
23
Wickenburg Town Court
155 N. Tegner St.
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
Zip
Code
Phone
Number
85390
(928) 684-2772
85390
(928) 684-2401
85390
(928) 684-7894
85390
(928) 506-1554
85390
(928) 684-5411
85390
(928) 684-2495
85390
(928) 000-1111
85390
(928) 684-2138
85390
(923) 684-5479
85390
(928) 684-7656
85390
(928) 684-5451
85390
(928) 684-5451
85390
(923) 684-5451
85390
(923) 684-5451
85390
(928) 684-7702
85390
(923) 684-5451
85390
(923) 684-5451
85390
(928) 684-5690
85390
(928) 684-5411
85390
(923) 684-2761
85390
(928) 684-5873
85390
(928) 684-5451
85390
(928) 684-5451
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.168
24
Wickenburg Utilities &
Svc.
155 N. Tegner St.
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-5451
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.169
Community Resource Map
City of Wickenburg
Health Care
Name
Address
City/State
981 W. Wickenburg
Way #B
1175 W. Wickenburg
Way # 2
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
1
A Cener of Natural Healing
2
Acupunture Health Care
3
American Eye Institute
4
American Eye Institute
5
Ameriserve International
Inc.
6
Arizona Eye Institute
500 W. Savage St.
7
Arrowhead Eye Ctr.
1175 W. Wickenburg
Way # 4
8
Arrowhead Eye Ctr.
490 W. Bralliar Rd.
9
Artisan Dental Clinic
821 W. Wickenburg
Way
10
Bangart, Daniel DPM
520 Rose Ln.
11
Bradshaw Mountain
Diagnostic
12
Browne, Pearl H. MD
13
Del E. Webb Wellness Ctr.
14
Edward F Kirk DDS PC
15
Jones, Troy C. DDS
16
Karp, Steven J. DO
17
Life Line Ambulance Svc.
18
Mazziotti, Frank H. DC
19
Melde, Richard MD
20
Miller Clinic LTD
21
Morris, Patrick DC
22
Noninvasive Vascular
Solutions
901 W. Wickenburg
Way # 5
1175 W. Wickenburg
Way # 4
23
Northwest Physicians
490 W. Bralliar Rd.
25 W. Yavapai St.
636 W. Wickenburg
Way
162 E. Wickenburg
Way # 10
579 W. Wickenburg
Way # 8
466 W. Wickenburg
Way
520 Rose Ln.
1175 W. Wickenburg
Way # 1
821 W. Wickenburg
Way
36075 S. Rincon Rd.
N/A
130 N. Washington St.
520 Rose Ln.
500 W. Savage St.
Zip
Code
Phone Number
85390
(928) 684-3381
85390
(928) 684-5991
85390
(928) 684-2881
85390
(928) 684-2883
85390
(928) 684-0053
85390
(928) 684-2020
85390
(928) 684-0432
85390
(928) 684-0432
85390
(928) 684-5432
85390
(928) 684-0219
85390
(928) 684-0332
85390
(928) 684-9555
85390
(928) 684-5529
85390
(928) 684-5475
85390
(928) 684-1000
85390
(928) 684-9594
85390
(928) 684-7911
85390
(928) 684-7733
85390
(928) 668-0222
85390
(928) 684-2425
85390
(928) 684-3296
85390
(928) 684-7255
85390
(928) 684-2874
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.170
1175 W. Wickenburg
Way
37955 S. Camino
Blanco Rd.
24
NVS Medical
25
Offner Family Chiropractic
26
Regional Medical Ctr.
520 Rose Ln.
27
Remuda Treatment Ctr.
53636 N. Lazy Fox Dr.
28
Remuda Treatment Ctr.
56851 N. Vulture Mine
Rd.
29
Schrolucke, John OD
30
Sun Health Corp.
31
Sun Health Del E. Webb
Health
32
Tadano, William K. DDS
33
Trueblood, Craig A. DDS
34
35
36
37
Wickenburg Family Care
Ctr.
Wickenburg Family
Dentistry
Wickenburg Regional
Health Ctr.
Wickenburg Tri-City
Behavioral
25 Yavapai St.
1395 W. Wickenburg
Way
1395 W. Wickenburg
Way
375 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
375 S. Vulture Mine
Rd.
466 W. Wickenburg
Way
130 E. Yavapai St. # 3
520 Rose Ln.
400 Palm Dr.
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-9643
85390
(928) 684-1691
85390
(928) 684-5421
85390
(928) 684-3547
85390
(928) 684-0927
85390
(928) 684-2880
85390
(928) 668-5400
85390
(928) 684-5428
85390
(928) 684-0004
85390
(928) 684-7520
85390
(928) 684-9555
85390
(928) 684-0600
85390
(928) 684-5421
85390
(928) 684-9692
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.171
Community Resource Map
City of Wickenburg
Media
Name
1
KBSZ
2
KSWG
3
Wickenburg Sun & Shopper
News
Address
City/State
340 W. Wickenburg
Way # B
801 W. Wickenburg
Way
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
180 N. Washington St.
Zip
Code
Phone Number
85390
(928) 668-1250
85390
(928) 254-6644
85390
(928) 684-5454
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.172
Community Resource Map
City of Wickenburg
Non-profit & Human Services
Name
Address
City/State
1
Adult Care Svc
2
Alocoholics Anonymous
108 S. Washington St.
3
Alzheimer's Association
1028 E. McDowell Rd.
4
American Legion
176 N. Frontier St.
5
Brozik, Karen
315 W. Apache St.
6
Childhelp USA
34801 US Highway 89
7
Danker, Claudia L.
315 W. Apache St.
8
Del E. Webb Foundation
101 S. Saguaro Dr.
9
Desert Caballeros
10
Detwiler-Zapp, Diane
315 W. Apache St.
11
Elks Lodge
122 N. Frontier St.
12
Friends of Music
P.O. Box 2078
13
Froelicher, Kari
315 W. Apache St.
14
Gatehouse
145 W. Wickenburg
Way
15
Gate House Academy
90 S. Washington St.
16
Habitat For Humanity
370 W. Center St.
17
18
Humane SocietyWickenburg
Karen Vergamini
Counseling
158 W. Yavapai St.
2025 W. Gold Dust Ln.
P.O. Box 147
315 W. Apache St.
19
Meadows
1655 N. Tegner St.
20
Meadows
553 W. Wickenburg
Way
21
22
My Father's Retirement
Ranch
Nature Conservancy of
Arizona
23
Public Pool
24
R & R Respite Care
400 N. Jefferson St.
49614 US Highway 60
89
Chestnut St.
246 N. Washington St.
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
Zip
Code
Phone Number
85390
(928) 684-3616
85390
(928) 684-4441
85006
(602) 528-0545
85390
(928) 684-7762
85390
(928) 684-0800
85390
(928) 684-6300
85390
(928) 684-0800
85390
(928) 684-7223
85390
(928) 684-0240
85390
(928) 684-0800
85390
(928) 684-7714
85358
(928) 684-2694
85390
(928) 684-0800
85390
(928) 668-1470
85390
(928) 668-1470
85390
(928) 684-2220
85358
(928) 684-8801
85390
(928) 684-3660
85390
(928) 684-3926
85390
(928) 684-4001
85390
(928) 684-5925
85390
(928) 684-2772
85390
(928) 684-5113
85390
(928) 684-3480
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.173
25
Remuda Ranch Ctr. For
Anorexia
26
Rose, Linda Marie
27
Rosewood Women's Ctr.
28
Rotary Club
29
30
31
32
33
34
Sure Ride Transportation
Svc.
Wickenburg Chamber of
Commerce
Wickenburg Community
Action
Wickenburg Cultural
Organization
Wickenburg Historical
Preservation Society
Wickenburg Pregnancy
Resource
35
Wickenburg Public Library
36
Wickenburg Public Pool
37
Wickenburg Volunteer Fire
Dept.
38
Wise Owl Nutritional Crt.
39
Young Life Wickenburg
1 E. Apache St.
315 W. Apache St.
36075 S. Rincon Rd.
351 N. Lincoln St.
216 N. Frontier St.
255 N. Washington St.
P.O. Box 2687
P.O. Box 1341
778 W. Wickenburg
Way # B
164 E. Apache St.
Coffinger Park
734 W. Wickenburg
Way
255 N. Washington St.
73 S. Tegner St.
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
Wickenburg,
AZ
85390
(928) 684-3913
85390
(928) 684-0800
85390
(928) 684-9594
85390
85390
(928) 684-0116
85390
(928) 684-5479
85390
(928) 684-7894
85358
(928) 684-7473
85358
(928) 684-5129
85390
(928) 668-1450
85390
(928) 684-2665
85390
(928) 684-3266
85390
(928) 684-7702
85390
(928) 684-7894
85390
(928) 684-7360
Wickenburg Community Assessment, p.174

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