CFCC 2004-2005 Catalog - College of Central Florida

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CFCC 2004-2005 Catalog - College of Central Florida
Vision Statement
Energetic, purposeful, creative, Central Florida Community College promotes learning in an
open, caring, inclusive environment which encourages individual and community development
inspired by shared values of integrity, service, responsibility and dignity.
Mission Statement
Central Florida Community College offers accessible, affordable, high-quality educational
opportunities. In a climate that nurtures excellence, CFCC provides undergraduate instruction
and awards associate degrees; prepares students for careers requiring professional and
vocational training; encourages student success through a variety of support services; and
promotes the economic, social, and cultural development of the community.
Guiding Principles and Major Directions
To guide the college in the pursuit of its vision, four major directions have been developed.
Each year, a set of college goals is developed for each major direction, and all annual planning
relates to one or more college goals. The college also focuses on three guiding principles.
Guiding Principles:
1. We will partner with those who share our vision for learning and development.
2. We will strive to improve continuously every aspect of the college.
3. We will strive to exceed the expectations of those we serve.
College Directions:
To provide learning opportunities which meet students’ lifelong learning needs.
To provide a caring environment which supports learning and development.
To contribute to the cultural, social, and economic development of our communities.
To value our employees.
Citrus County Campus
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461-9026
(352) 746-6721
FAX: (352) 249-1218
TDD: (352) 249-1201
www.cfcccitrus.com
Ocala Campus
3001 S.W. College Rd. (34474)
P.O. Box 1388
Ocala, FL 34478-1388
(352) 237-2111 or 854-2322
FAX: (352) 237-0510
TDD: (352) 873-5856
Levy County Center
114 Rodgers Blvd.
Chiefland, FL 32626
(352) 493-9533
FAX: (352) 493-9994
TDD: 711 (352) 493-9533 (Voice)
Hampton Center
1501 W. Silver Springs Blvd.
Ocala, FL 34475
(352) 873-5881
FAX: (352) 873-5887
Web Site:
www.GoCFCC.com
CATALOG Series II, Vol. 19
■
2004–2005
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District Board of Trustees
Mari-Elain Ebitz
Citrus County
Robert Hastings
Levy County
Bernard (Bernie) Little, Jr.
Marion County
Carol Runnels
Levy County
Frank Rasbury
Marion County
Frank Stafford
Marion County
Betty Strifler
Citrus County
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Vision Statement....................................................1
Mission Statement .................................................1
Guiding Principles and Major Directions................1
Addresses; Telephone, and FAX
Numbers; Web Site ................................................1
President’s Message..............................................2
Board of Trustees...................................................3
Academic Calendar............................................6–7
Hours of Operation ...........................................8–9
Telephone Directory .............................................10
About CFCC
Accreditation and Memberships .....................11
History.............................................................11
Administration ...........................................11–12
Educational Programs and Services.........12–13
Klein Conference Center.................................13
CFCC University Center .................................13
Citrus County Campus....................................13
Hampton Center..............................................14
Levy County Center ........................................14
Public Policy Institute ......................................14
Satellite Operations
The Appleton Museum of Art .....................14
Important Information......................................15
Admission and Registration
Admission Requirements ...............................19
Residency Information and
Requirements .......................................19–21
All Applicants..............................................21
College Credit Division...............................21
Special Requirements
Audit Students .......................................21
Child Care Students ..............................22
Criminal Justice Students ......................22
Degree-Seeking Students .....................22
International Students .....................22–23
Non-Degree Applicants .........................23
Suspended Students .............................23
Transfer Students.............................23–24
Acceleration Mechanisms
Advanced Placement Students ..................24
Dual Enrollment....................................24–25
Early Admission..........................................25
International Baccalaureate Program.........25
Experiential Learning .................................25
CLEP (College Level
Examination Program)................................26
CFCC Equivalencies for
CLEP Examination ................................27
DANTES Subject Standardized Tests ........28
Credit by Departmental Examination .........29
4
Correspondence and
Extension Courses .....................................29
Credit for A+ Certification...........................29
Credit for Networking + Certification ..........29
Credit for MCSE Certification .....................29
Credit for Armed Service
Educational Experiences............................29
Credit for Correctional Officer
Training School...........................................30
Credit for Police Recruit School .................30
Credit for Certified Professional
Secretary Examination ...............................30
Servicemember’s Opportunity
College .................................................30–31
Admission Procedures ...................................31
Registration ....................................................31
Schedule Change Period ...........................31
Scheduling of Classes..........................31–32
Procedure
Area Vocational Education School ..........32
College Credit Division ..........................32
Withdrawal from College ................................32
Substitutions for Eligible Students With
Disabilities ...................................................32
General Testing Information ............................33
General Information
The Learning Theme.......................................37
Focus: Student Development
Learning Outcomes.....................................37
AIDS and Bloodborne Pathogens ...................37
Drug and Alcohol Policy ............................37–38
Foundation ................................................38–43
Hepatitis B/Meningitis Awareness...................43
Housing ...........................................................43
I.D. Cards ........................................................43
Lost and Found ...............................................43
Parking ............................................................44
Petitions, Grievances and
Academic Review............................................44
Religious Holiday Observance ........................44
Sexual Predators on Campus .........................44
Student Records .......................................44–45
Transcripts .......................................................45
Veterans Information .................................45–46
Academic Information
Academic Requirements
General Education Core.............................49
Associate in Arts Degree Requirements.........50
Education Majors..................................50–51
General Education Course Guide
(including Gordon Rule courses) ..............51–54
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
General Electives ......................................55–56
College Preparatory Program .........................57
Associate in Arts Transfer Guarantees
General Admission .....................................58
Program Admission ..............................58–59
Admission Appeals.....................................59
Articulation Officers ....................................59
Appealing to the Articulation
Coordinating Committee.............................59
Associate in Science and Associate in
Applied Science Degree Requirements ........59–60
Academic Progress
College Credit Division...............................60
Grade Point Deficit.................................60
Academic Warning, Probation and
Suspension............................................60
Academic Dismissal ..............................60
Transferring to CFCC with Deficit
Grade Points..........................................60
Earning Credit While Suspended........60–61
Provisions for Appeal.............................61
Occupational Certificate Students..............61
Veterans .....................................................61
Attendance Policy............................................61
College Level Academic Skills
Test (CLAST).............................................61–62
CLAST Alternative Using
Postsecondary Course Work......................62
Grading System .......................................62–63
Grade Point Average ..................................63
Final Grades...............................................63
Grade Appeal Policy...................................63
Forgiveness Policy................................63–64
Withdrawal..................................................64
Graduation .....................................................64
Graduation Requirements ..........................64
Honors Programs ...........................................64
Honors Recognition .................................64–65
Community of Scholars ..............................65
Financial Information
Fees and Refunds ....................................69–76
Accident Insurance.....................................76
Fee Waivers and Exemptions...............76–77
Refund Policy (CFCC)..........................77–78
Pro Rata Refund Policy ..............................78
Repayment Policy (federal) ........................78
Financial Aid..............................................78–79
Types of Financial Assistance ..............79–81
Satisfactory Academic Progress
for Financial Aid Recipients........................81
College Resources
Programs
CF Institute .................................................85
Continuing Education .................................85
Corporate Training ......................................85
Cultural and Conference Centers...............85
Pathways Centers ......................................85
Cooperative Education .........................86–87
Corporate Training Center ..........................88
Distance Learning ......................................88
Postsecondary Adult Vocational
Programs (PSAV) ...................................88
Tech Prep ...................................................88
Services
Child Care ............................................88–89
Learning Support Center............................89
Learning Support Lab............................89
Writing Center........................................89
Foreign Language Lab ..........................89
Vocational Preparatory Instruction ........89
Student Advising Department .............89–90
Equal Access Services (EAS) ...............90
Food Services ............................................90
Health Services ..........................................90
Job Placement and Co-op Center........90–91
Learning Resources Center .......................91
Center for Civic Education and
Student Leadership Development ..............91
Student Activities .............................91–92
Leadership Development.......................92
Student Activities Center .......................92
Civic Education......................................92
Student Support Services ..........................92
Summer Program ..................................93
Career Assessment Center ...................93
Programs of Study
Refer to special index, pages 97–98
Course Descriptions
Credit Courses ......................................182–235
Cooperative Education Courses ...................236
Postsecondary Adult Vocational
Certificate Program Courses.................238–251
College Directory
Faculty and Staff ...................................254–266
Index......................................................267–269
Maps .....................................................270–271
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
5
COLLEGE CALENDAR
FALL 2004
SPRING 2005
Physical Therapist Assistant
request for application deadline...........................August 2
ADN Part-time Option Application Deadline ........August 2
Practical Nursing
Application Period.........................August 2–November 30
Faculty Planning Days .................................August 12–13
Classes Begin ....................................................August 16
Late Registration
and Schedule Change Period......................August 16–20
Last Date for Refund..........................................August 20
CLAST Registration Deadline .......................September 3
Labor Day Holiday......................................September 6
CLAST Exam Date.............................................October 2
Mini-Mester Begins ............................................October 4
College Planning Day—No Day Classes;
classes after 4:30 p.m. meet ..............................October 5
Last Date to Drop Courses without “F” ............October 21
Graduation Application Deadline......................October 27
No Evening Classes .....................................November 24
Thanksgiving Holiday and Break.......November 25–26
Classes End ...............................................December 3–5
Exam Week ................................................December 6–9
Graduation Ceremony ..................................December 10
Grade Reports to Registrar by 9:00 a.m. .....December 13
Mid-Year Break,
Students and Faculty ..........................December 13–31
Administrative Office Closed ..................December 23–31
New Year’s Holiday ..........................................January 1
Faculty Planning Days....................................January 3–4
Classes Begin ....................................................January 5
Late Registration
and Schedule Change Period ......................January 5–11
Last Date for Refund ........................................January 11
Martin L. King, Jr. Holiday ............................January 17
CLAST Registration Deadline ..........................January 21
College Planning Day—No Day Classes;
classes after 4:30 p.m. meet ..........................February 17
CLAST Exam Date .........................................February 19
Mini-Mester Begins ...............................................March 2
Last Date to Drop Course without “F”.................March 25
Spring Break...........................................March 28–April 3
Graduation Application Deadline .............................April 7
Classes End...........................................................April 29
Exam Week ..........................................................May 2–5
Graduation Ceremony ..............................................May 6
Grade Reports to Registrar by 9:00 a.m..................May 9
AUGUST 2004
SEPTEMBER 2004
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NOVEMBER 2004
OCTOBER 2004
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DECEMBER 2004
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CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE CALENDAR
SUMMER-A 2005
SUMMER-B 2005
CLAST Registration Deadline ..................................May 6
Classes Begin ........................................................May 10
Late Registration
and Schedule Change Period ............................May 9–11
Last Date for Refund ..............................................May 11
Surgical Technology Application Deadline .............May 15
Memorial Day Holiday..........................................May 30
CLAST Exam Date..................................................June 4
Last Date to Drop Courses without “F” ...................June 7
Classes End ..........................................................June 20
Grade Reports to Registrar by Noon ....................June 21
Graduation Application Deadline ............................July 14
Classes Begin .......................................................June 27
Late Registration
and Schedule Change Period ................June 27–June 30
Last Date for Refund .............................................June 30
Independence Day Holiday ...................................July 4
Graduation Application Deadline ............................July 14
Last Date to Drop Courses without “F”...................July 25
Classes End.........................................................August 4
Grade Reports to Registrar by Noon ...................August 5
Graduation Ceremony..........................................August 5
FEBRUARY 2005
JANUARY 2005
S
M
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2 3 4 5
9 10 11 12
16 17 18 19
23 24
30 31 25 26
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MAY 2005
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MARCH 2005
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JULY 2005
JUNE 2005
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APRIL 2005
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AUGUST 2005
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CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
7
HOURS OF OPERATION
Listed below are general hours of operation during the fall and spring terms.
Summer term hours may vary.
Ocala Campus
Citrus County Campus
Administrative Offices
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Evening hours as posted.
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Assessment Center
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Evening hours by appointment only.
Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
Barry University –
University Center
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00–6:00 p.m.
Bookstore
Monday–Thursday, 7:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Special hours as needed during
registration periods.
Cafeteria
8
Monday–Thursday, 7:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
Closed on weekends.
Evenings and summer as announced.
Daily hours posted during registration
and schedule change periods. Hours
posted during other times.
Student lounge and snack bar available
Monday–Friday during college hours.
Cashier
Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.;
Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Hours extended until 7:00 p.m. during
peak registration prior to each term.
Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
College Square
(CFCC Foundation student
residence center)
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
1:00–5:00 p.m.
(352) 237-3334.
Continuing Education,
Building 11
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m–4:30 p.m.
Co-op,
Building 40
Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Call extension 1717 for appointment.
Enrollment Services Center
Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Equal Access Services
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Faculty Members
Monday–Friday; hours on office doors.
Monday–Friday; hours on office doors.
Financial Aid
Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Assistance available at Enrollment
Services Center. (Building L1)
Information Center
Monday–Thursday,
8:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Closed Saturdays and Sundays.
Citrus Welcome Center (Building 2,
Room 112) open Monday–Friday,
8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Closed Saturdays and Sundays.
Job Placement
Building 2-216
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Call extension 1417 for details.
Learning Resources Center
(Library and Media Resources:
books, periodicals, videos)
Monday–Thursday, 7:30 a.m.–9:00 p.m.;
Friday, 7:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.;
Saturday, closed;
Sunday, 1:00–8:00 p.m.
Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–8:30 p.m.
Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Closed Weekends.
Learning Support Center:
VPI Lab and Computer
Resources
Monday–Thursday, 7:30 a.m.–9:00 p.m.
Friday, 7:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Saturday, closed;
Sunday, 1:00–8:00 p.m.
Learning Support Center
Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Closed Weekends.
Public Safety Office
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–10:30 p.m.
24-hour coverage.
24-hour coverage.
Saint Leo University—
University Center
Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.;
Friday by appointment only.
Special arrangements if necessary.
Registration available at Enrollment
Services Center (Building L1).
Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
HOURS OF OPERATION
Listed below are general hours of operation during the fall and spring terms.
Summer term hours may vary.
Ocala Campus
Citrus County Campus
Student Advising office
(call for appointments)
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Evening hours by appointment only.
Switchboard (incoming calls)
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Automated attendant nights and weekends.
Testing Center
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Evenings and weekends as needed.
Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
The Webber Center
Monday–Saturday, 11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Closed Sundays and holidays.
University Center
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.
University of Central Florida –
University Center
Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–6:30 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Levy County Center
Hampton Center
Administrative Offices
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Evening hours as posted.
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Continuing Education
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Counselors/Advisers
Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Call for appointment.
Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Call for appointment.
The Appleton
Museum of Art
Museum
10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m
Brick City Center
for the Arts
Arts Center
Tuesday–Friday, 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Saturday, 11:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
Gallery closed Sundays and Mondays.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
9
PHONE DIRECTORY
(all numbers are in area code 352 unless otherwise noted)
Ocala Campus operator ..........................................................................237-2111
Ocala Campus automated system ..........................................................854-CFCC (2322)
(to reach an extension through the automated system, dial a 4 then the extension number)
Citrus County Campus....746-6721
Levy County Center....493-9533
Hampton Center....873-5881
ENROLLMENT-RELATED AREAS
Cashier—Citrus Campus ....................................................746-6721, ext. 6103
Cashier—Levy Center ........................................................493-9533
Cashier—Ocala Campus ....................................................854-2322, ext. 1213
Continuing Education/Non-Credit Courses ........................873-5804
Continuing Education—Citrus Campus ..............................746-6721, ext. 6110
Counseling—Citrus Campus ..............................................746-6721, ext. 6102
Counseling—Levy Center ..................................................493-9533
Counseling—Ocala Campus ..............................................873-5802
Dual Enrollment/Early Admission ......................................854-2322, ext. 1647
Enrollment Services—Citrus Campus ................................746-6721, ext. 6103
TDD ................................................................................249-1201
Enrollment Services—Levy Center ....................................493-9533
TDD ................................................................................711 (Voice) 493-9533
Enrollment Services—Ocala Campus ................................854-2322, ext. 1310
TDD ................................................................................873-5857
Financial Aid ......................................................................854-2322, ext. 1335
Health Occupations Advisor ..............................................873-5817
Parking Decals—Citrus Campus ........................................746-6721, ext. 6104
Parking Decals—Ocala Campus ........................................873-5841
Student Affairs ....................................................................873-5829
Student Records Office ......................................................854-2322, ext. 1334
Testing—Ocala Campus ....................................................854-2322, ext. 1564
Testing—Citrus Campus ....................................................746-6721, ext. 6168
Transcripts ..........................................................................854-2322, ext. 1334
Workforce Programs Advisor ..............................................873-5802
ACADEMIC/PROGRAM AREAS
Adult High School—Levy Center ........................................493-9533, ext. 2105
Business and Technology ..................................................854-2322, ext. 1593
Commercial Vehicle Driving ................................................873-9793
Communications/Fine Arts..................................................854-2322, ext. 1232
Community of Scholars Program........................................854-2322, ext. 1315
Cooperative Education Courses ........................................854-2322, ext. 1717
Corporate Training Center ..................................................873-5804
Cosmetology/Barbering—Personal Services Institute ........873-5816
Criminal Justice Institute ....................................................873-5838
Distance Learning Courses ................................................854-2322, ext. 1317
Driver Improvement Courses ..............................................873-5844
English as a Second Language (ESOL) ............................854-2322, ext. 1624
GED Testing—Levy Center ................................................493-9533
Health Occupations ............................................................873-5817
Humanities/Social Sciences................................................854-2322, ext. 1292
Math/Science ......................................................................854-2322, ext. 1455
University Center ................................................................873-5866
Wellness Education ............................................................854-2322, ext. 1325
STUDENT/PUBLIC RESOURCES
Athletics/Gym......................................................................873-5807
Bookstore—Citrus Campus ................................................746-6721, ext. 6118
Bookstore—Ocala Campus ................................................861-4412
Box Office (Fine Arts/Theatre CFCC) ................................873-5810
Cafeteria..............................................................................854-2322, ext. 1444
Career Assessment Center ................................................854-2322, ext. 1395
Career Services Network....................................................854-2322, ext. 1430
Child Development Center (Child Care) ............................873-5806
Citrus Assessment/Testing Center......................................746-6721, ext. 6168
College Reach-Out Program—Hampton Center ................854-2322, ext. 1443
Co-Op Center......................................................................854-2322, ext. 1717
Displaced Homemakers Program—Hampton Center ........854-2322, ext. 1681
Educational Opportunity Center—Citrus Campus ..............746-6721, ext. 6147
Educational Opportunity Center—Ocala Campus ..............854-2322, ext. 1316
Equal Access Services—Ocala Campus............................854-2322, ext. 1580
TDD ................................................................................873-5854
Film Series..........................................................................854-2322, ext. 1293
Foundation (scholarships, endowments, etc.) ....................873-5808
Housing—College Square Residence Center ....................237-3334
Information Center ..............................................................873-5800
TDD ................................................................................873-5856
International Education ......................................................854-2322, ext. 1386
Job Placement and Co-op Center ......................................854-2322, ext. 1717
Learning Resources Center (Library)—Citrus Campus......746-6721, ext. 6120
Learning Resources Center (Library)—Ocala Campus......873-5805
Learning Support Center computer lab—Citrus Campus ..746-6721, ext. 6122
Learning Support Center computer lab—Ocala Campus ..854-2322, ext. 1246
Patriot Pals Student Discounts ..........................................854-2322, ext. 1373
Performing Arts Series........................................................854-2322, ext. 1416
Project Eagle ......................................................................854-2322, ext. 1243
Salon—Personal Services Institute ....................................873-5816
Senior Institute ....................................................................873-5804, ext. 1604
Student Activities ................................................................854-2322, ext. 1578
Student Government ..........................................................854-2322, ext. 1578
Student Newspaper—Patriot Press ....................................854-2322, ext. 1385
Student Support Services ..................................................854-2322, ext. 1243
Volunteer Services ..............................................................854-2322, ext. 1570
Webber Exhibit and Conference Center ............................873-5809
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES
Administration and Finance ................................................873-5823
Assistant to the President ..................................................854-2322, ext. 1388
Associate Vice President’s Office ......................................854-2322, ext. 1278
Business Office ..................................................................854-2322, ext. 1783
Citrus County Campus Provost ..........................................249-1209
Computer Services ............................................................854-2322, ext. 1378
Hampton Center Director....................................................873-5826
Human Resources/Personnel ............................................873-5819
Levy County Center Director ..............................................493-9533, ext. 2103
Marketing and Public Relations ..........................................873-5845
Office of Instruction ............................................................873-5840
President’s Office ................................................................873-5835
Public Safety ......................................................................873-5841
Purchasing ..........................................................................873-5815
COLLEGE AFFILIATES/SEPARATE ON-SITE ORGANIZATIONS
Appleton Museum of Art ....................................................236-7100
Barry University On-Site Programs ....................................854-2322, ext. 1805
Brick City Center for the Arts ..............................................840-9521
Central Florida Symphony ..................................................624-3860
CFCC Foundation ..............................................................873-5808
Florida Southern College....................................................291-4417
10
Public Policy Institute ..........................................................854-2322, ext. 1457
RSVP (Retired and Senior Volunteer Program)..................291-4444
Saint Leo University On-Site Programs ..............................854-2322, ext. 1812
University of Central Florida On-Site Programs..................854-2322, ext. 1818
Webster University On-Site Programs ................................861-9330
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
ABOUT CFCC
Accreditation and Memberships
CFCC is accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Ga.;
telephone number: (404) 679-4501) and by the
Florida Department of Education to award
Associate in Arts and Associate in Science
degrees, credit and occupational certificates.
The college holds memberships in the American
Association of Community Colleges, the Florida
Association of Community Colleges, the Alliance of
Community College Innovation, and the Association
of Community College Trustees. Among other
memberships are American Council on International
Education, the National Junior College Athletic
Association, the National League for Nursing and
the Florida Association of Colleges and Universities.
CFCC has been approved by the state of Florida
as an institution in which recipients of General
Scholarship Loans for Preparation of Teachers
(awarded by the state) may take the first two years
of college work. Additionally, the college proudly
participates in the Drug-Free Workplace Program.
The State Department of Education will accept
work taken at the college to satisfy various certification requirements. CFCC is state-approved for
veterans training under Public Law 550, Public
Law 89-358 (Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act
of 1966), and for the education of disabled veterans
and war orphans, and is a Servicemember’s
Opportunity College.
History
Central Florida Junior College was established
in 1957 as a comprehensive, public, community
junior college serving the state of Florida and,
specifically, the counties of Citrus, Levy and Marion.
Instruction began in the fall of 1958 to a group of
320 students in temporary facilities at the Marion
County Vocational School. Central Florida Junior
College and Hampton Junior College merged on
July 1, 1966. Opened in the fall of 1958, Hampton
Junior College was one of the first black, two-year
colleges in the state.
To accurately reflect the character and purpose
of the college, its name was changed to Central
Florida Community College on July 1, 1971.
The Ocala Campus was established on a 60acre tract of land donated by the Atlantic Realty
and Investment Company and the City of Ocala.
The attractive, wooded complex is located on State
Road 200, west of downtown Ocala and east of
Interstate Highway 75.
In 1974, another 60-acre tract adjacent to the
western edge of the campus was added. In 1994, a
20-acre site adjacent to the southern edge of the
campus was obtained from the Marion County
School Board, and the CFCC Foundation, Inc.,
purchased a 17-acre tract immediately north of the
campus to provide a college residence facility
(College Square), and to allow for future expansion.
In 1995, renovation began on the vacated College
Park Elementary School on land adjoining the eastern side of the campus. Later that year, the Public
Service Division and Criminal Justice Institute were
moved to the newly-renovated buildings in 1996,
several Health Occupations Division programs, along
with college support operations, relocated to this site.
The CFCC University Center and the Ewers Century
Center opened in 2002; and the Enterprise Center
opened in 2004. (see map, page 270).
The Bronson Center in Levy County opened in
January 1982 on a 20-acre site a mile and a quarter
east of Bronson on Alternate U.S. Highway 27.
The Levy County Center was relocated in
November 1993 to Chiefland. See page 14 for
more information on the Levy County Center.
The Citrus County Campus opened in the fall
of 1984 at the Lecanto Joint Use Facility. A new
free-standing campus opened in the fall of 1996,
located on 88 acres in Lecanto in central Citrus
County. With continuing growth, the college is able to
offer a variety of courses to students in Citrus County
(see page 271 for location of new facility).
CFCC’s Hampton Center opened in 1996 at
the site of the former Florida State Fire College in
west Ocala, and was completely rebuilt and reopened
in 2004. See page 14 for more information on the
Hampton Center (location map on page 270).
Administration
Dr. Charles R. Dassance assumed the presidency
of the college November 11, 1996. Dr. James H.
Hinson, Jr., was interim president from February 18
to November 9, 1996. Dr. William J. Campion held
the presidency from March 1, 1987, until February
16, 1996, succeeding Dr. Henry E. Goodlett, who in
January of 1966 replaced Dr. Joseph W. Fordyce,
appointed in May of 1960. The District Board of
Trustees named Dr. Goodlett President Emeritus
upon his retirement.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
11
Charles H. Hamblen, Jr., served as acting
president between the resignation of Dr. Kenneth
R. Williams in early 1960 and the appointment
of Dr. Fordyce. Dr. Williams had assumed his
duties on January 1, 1958, soon after the Florida
Legislature established the college.
College operations are governed by the Central
Florida Community College District Board of
Trustees. Members of this board are appointed
by Florida’s governor, and confirmed by the Florida
Senate. The chief administrative officer of the
college is the president, who also serves as
secretary to the District Board of Trustees.
Educational Programs and Services
A wide range of pre-professional (Associate in
Arts degree) electives is available for the student who
plans to transfer to a four-year college or university.
Associate in Science degrees are awarded in
programs designed to educate students for entry
employment in various areas of business and industry.
Courses are designed for those who wish to enter the
world of work and may not be transferable to other
institutions for advanced standing and degrees.
College Credit Certificates are awarded in
specialized programs designed to train students for
entry employment.
Postsecondary Vocational Certificates
verifying proficiency in the occupational area studied
will be awarded to students who successfully
complete objectives of the program. The curriculum
includes programs of study designed to prepare
people for initial employment and offers opportunities for upgrading or retraining of workers in a wide
range of occupational areas. Most of the courses
can be completed in less than one year.
Students needing academic assistance may
take advantage of College Preparatory courses in
the areas of English, mathematics, and reading.
CF Institute integrates non-credit activities and
business and community services at CFCC.
Continuing Education provides a wide range
of Non-Credit activities offered through the
college. Educational and training activities that are
coordinated through Continuing Education include
offerings in insurance, real estate, career and
personal development, computers, recreation,
business, day care and health. In addition, a variety
of workshops, seminars, conferences, and special
programs such as Senior Institute are offered for
professional development and continuing education.
See page 85 for more information.
12
The Corporate Training Center responds to
the immediate needs of the business community by
providing a full range of services designed to
improve employer and employee performance. The
Corporate Training Center acts as a business consultant to the business community and provides
various services such as assessment, business
planning and customized training.
Opportunities to integrate classroom study with
practical experience are found in the Cooperative
Education program. Students may find Cooperative
Education a means of defraying college expenses.
The College encourages students to participate
in civic partnerships by engaging in community life
and the responsibilities of democracy through
Service Learning. Many instructors provide service
learning opportunities as a component of the
instructional requirements. A fundamental purpose
of the service learning initiative is to help create
student awareness of the importance of participating
in one’s community.
Distance Learning is available to students
through online courses and telecourses.
Adult General Education programs provide noncredit instruction for individuals seeking to improve
their academic skills in reading, language and
mathematics skills. Programs include Adult Basic
Education (ABE), General Education Development
(GED), Vocational Preparatory Instruction (VPI),
English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL),
and Family Literacy.
The Florida Department of Health, Bureau of
Emergency Medical Services has designated
CFCC an Emergency Medical Training Center,
offering both Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)
and Paramedic training. The Paramedic program is
accredited by the American Medical Association.
The City of Ocala Fire Department operates a
fire station, complete with an advanced life support
fire rescue unit, on the Ocala Campus. The facility
offers not only protection to the campus and surrounding area, but excellent laboratory facilities for
Fire Science and Paramedic students. Through a
cooperative agreement with the City of Ocala Fire
Department, Munroe Regional Medical Center has
an advanced life support ambulance in service and
responding from this station.
Police recruit training, corrections recruit training,
law enforcement, corrections and correctional
probation seminars, schools and courses are offered
through the college’s Criminal Justice Institute, a
non-profit CFCC organization.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
International Students
The college is committed to providing an
educational environment that includes opportunities
for interaction with and among students of many
cultures. To allow for students from countries
around the world to engage in learning activities,
the college encourages the enrollment of nonimmigrant alien students. International students are
requested to follow the regular admission
procedures and provide evidence of financial
responsibility and English language proficiency
(see page 22).
Central Florida Community College
Foundation, Inc.
To assist the college in providing resources
to supplement state dollars, the Central Florida
Community College Foundation, Inc., provides
private funding solicited from individuals,
organizations and companies in the community.
(see page 38).
CFCC Cultural and Conference Centers
CFCC Cultural and Conference Centers includes
the Webber exhibit gallery and Conference Center,
Brick City Center for the Arts, and the Fine Arts
Auditorium. Through exhibits and programs, these
facilities serve to enhance the cultural and learning
life of the campus and community.
The Webber Center: The 3,900 sq. ft. Webber
Center, located on the college campus, was
completed in summer 1995 and provides a
nucleus of arts and cultural programs for students
and faculty, as well as looking outward to embrace
the ideas that energize our dynamic community.
The Webber Center was built to host Smithsonian
traveling exhibitions, and also presents an annual
calendar of local, state and other national exhibitions.
Its charming, boutique atmosphere features student
art, other gift items, snacks and drinks for sale.
The Webber Conference Center wing was
completed in spring 1999, and is used for receptions,
meetings, banquets and other special events. The
Conference Center is available for rent. Because of
a generous gift from Mrs. Gladys Webber, other
donors and foundation funding, the Foundation
gave the entire facility to the college on April 30,
1998. The Webber Center exhibit hours are Monday
to Saturday, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Brick City Center for the Arts: More than a
gallery, Brick City is a creative center where art,
music and theatre come alive. Brick City Center for
the Arts opened its doors on May 6, 1995 after
extensive planning and renovation of a former
department store in downtown Ocala. The Center
promotes community cultural development that
fosters quality, diversity and vitality of the arts. It
offers art exhibitions, special events, workshops,
and demonstrations. Located at 23 S.W. Broadway
Street in downtown Ocala, Brick City Center for the
Arts is open Monday through Friday from 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Saturdays from 11:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m.
CFCC Fine Arts Auditorium: The 377 seat
Fine Arts Auditorium is integral to the programs
offered through the Fine Arts Department, serving
as a learning facility to theatre, dance and music
programs. Additionally, the CFCC Foundation and
community based organizations use the facility to
present annual performing arts programs that add
value to the campus cultural experience.
Klein Conference Center
The Klein Conference Facility will expand CFCC’s
conference capabilities. Trade shows, conventions,
corporate meetings, membership galas or business
luncheons are just a few of the wide range of events
that can be held in this versatile space. Enhanced
services include the latest audiovisual capabilities
and a fully equipped catering kitchen.
CFCC University Center
The center, located on the Ocala Campus, is the
home for a number of colleges and universities to
offer upper division courses and programs. Barry
University, Florida Southern College, Florida State
University, Saint Leo University, University of Central
Florida, University of Florida and Webster University
are among the partners offering bachelor and
graduate degree programs through the CFCC
University Center.
Citrus County Campus
The Citrus County Campus is located on State
Road 491, approximately two miles south of State
Road 44. Complete admission and registration
activities and guidance counseling are available. All
general education core requirements may be taken
at the Citrus County Campus. Some specific
electives and specialized A.S. degree programs
may need to be completed at the Ocala Campus.
A student lounge, library, learning support center
and testing center are available to students of the
Citrus County Campus. In addition, the campus
houses a bookstore branch that stocks textbooks
and supply needs for courses offered on campus.
The campus also has a Student Activities Board.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
13
Hampton Center
Public Policy Institute
The Hampton Center, located in Ocala at the
intersection of Silver Springs Boulevard and Martin
Luther King, opened in February 1996. A complete
new center opened in 2004 and will focus on health
occupation and community outreach programs.
In addition to three classrooms, the Hampton
Center contains a computer lab, and a community
room for cultural and special events and meetings.
Activities, programs and services provided at the
center include access to education programs, career
assessment, college credit courses, continuing
education courses, health occupational training
opportunities, college outreach programs and
student counseling, information and referral services.
The Hampton Center has served as a strong
influence in the City of Ocala Weed and Seed, and
Front Porch Grant efforts to provide educational
programs and services to residents of West Ocala.
The Public Policy Institute of Marion County,
housed on the Ocala campus, is built on the
traditional democratic principle that citizen involvement and participation is fundamental to a healthy
community. The primary purpose of the Institute is
to study and make recommendations on public policy issues of importance to Marion County.
The Institute also conducts seminars to inform
citizens about community issues. The PPI is
designed to provide an opportunity for citizens to
come together and address community concerns in
a rational, thoughtful manner.
Levy County Center
The Levy County Center in Chiefland, located
in the Providence Mall Shopping Center at the
intersection of U.S. Alt. Highway 19 and U.S.
Highway 27, offers a selection of college credit
courses and a variety of non-credit programs
including Adult General Education. Admission,
assessment, placement and registration services
are available at the center. Academic advisors are
also on hand to guide students through educational
choices in credit and non-credit programs.
In addition to six classrooms, the Levy Center
houses three fully equipped computer labs, a
Career Resource Room, and a Community Room
for meetings, special events, and cultural activities.
Textbooks for Levy County courses are available
for purchase at the beginning of each semester.
The Adult General Education program includes
General Education Development (GED) preparation, Adult Basic Education, English for Speakers
of Other Languages (ESOL), Adult High School,
Vocational Preparatory Instruction (VPI), Family
Literacy, and programs for adults with disabilities.
In addition to programs at the center, classes are
conveniently scheduled throughout Levy County.
The center is also an official GED testing site,
administering the GED tests six times each year.
14
Satellite Operations
The Appleton Museum of Art
The Appleton Museum of Art is located on Silver
Springs Boulevard (State Road 40), approximately
four miles east of downtown Ocala. The museum
displays art and artifacts from ancient Egypt and
Greece to 19th-Century paintings and sculpture. Two
of the major collections are Central American and
African art. Most items on display were collected by
Arthur I. Appleton, who also gave the money for the
first phase of the museum building.
A new wing was added in 1997 to house traveling
exhibits. Funding for the wing came from Edith-Marie
Appleton and was matched by the state.
The Appleton Museum of Art is a major museum
which offers a variety of educational programs
including museum internships. Other educational
activities at the museum include visits and
assignments for art and humanities classes and
specialized courses which focus on specific areas
of the collection. CFCC students are admitted free
with a CFCC I.D. card.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
FOR STUDENTS, EMPLOYEES AND GUESTS
CFCC is an equal access/equal opportunity institution committed to providing educational opportunities
and services without regard to race, color, religion, gender, age, marital status, national origin, or disability.
The college will not discriminate in its employment practices or in the admission and treatment of students.
Recognizing that sexual harassment constitutes discrimination on the basis of gender and violates this policy,
the college will not tolerate such conduct.
Should students, employees, vendors or campus guests have a concern or feel they have experienced
discrimination at CFCC, they should contact one of the following individuals:
Equity Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carol W. Smith
Bldg. 1, Ocala Campus
Ext. 1437
ADA Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kimberley J. Smith
Bldg. 3, Ocala Campus
Ext. 1580
TDD: (352) 873-5854
Copies of policies and procedures relating to the college’s position on equity are available in the
CFCC Board Rule Manual. Copies are available in the Human Resources Office, the Learning Resource
Department and the office of the Chief Student Affairs Officer.
Central Florida Community College, under applicable rules of the Administrative Procedures Act, may
change any of the announcements, information, policies, rules, regulations or procedures set forth in this
catalog. The catalog cannot always reflect new and modified regulations. Statements in this catalog may
not be regarded in the nature of binding obligations on the institution or the state of Florida.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
15
Admission and
Registration
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
ADMISSION
AND
REGISTRATION
17
ADMISSION
REQUIREMENTS
Access to higher education is a concept held in
high esteem at Central Florida Community College.
While emphasizing this concept, college officials
believe that students should view this access as
an opportunity carrying obligations which ensure
realization of their goals.
Admission for college credit studies is open to all
high school graduates. It is essential that each
applicant satisfactorily complete each phase of the
admission process. Most degree programs at CFCC
require an earned high school diploma or satisfactory
completion of a high school equivalency examination.
Most postsecondary certificate programs do not
require a high school diploma. A candidate for
admission is assured that the application will be
reviewed and evaluated in a fair and impartial
manner. No applicant will be refused admission
on the basis of race, age, ethnic background,
religious preference, disability, or gender.
In order to maintain the college ideals of scholarship and demeanor, the right is reserved to deny
admission to applicants for any reason which is
deemed to be in the best interest of the college.
After admission, subsequent registration for
currently enrolled and former students is permitted
when all college obligations have been satisfied.
When limited facilities or programs restrict the
size of enrollment, admission to the college will be
granted in the order in which applications have
been received by the Student Records office.
Exceptions to this rule, e.g. Associate in Science
Degree Nursing (ADN) and certain occupational
programs, are listed elsewhere in this catalog.
Guidelines for eligibility into various programs are
found within program descriptions in the catalog.
Additional admission information may be obtained
from the Student Records office.
RESIDENCY INFORMATION
AND REQUIREMENTS
For the purpose of assessing matriculation and
tuition fees, a student shall be classified as a
resident or non-resident (see Fees and Refunds
section, pages 69–76), based upon Florida Statute
S240.1201. Contact the Student Records office if
you have questions regarding your residency status.
A resident is an applicant (or the parent or legal
guardian of the applicant if under 18 years of age)
who is a U.S. citizen or has been admitted to this
country as an immigrant and must have resided in
Florida for at least one year immediately prior to the
time of entering CFCC. In addition, an applicant
must be able to document that the primary reason
for his or her move to Florida was other than fulltime attendance at a college or university. An
applicant under 18 years of age residing with anyone
other than a natural parent must present a certified
copy of the court order appointing such person as
the legal guardian in order to qualify as a resident.
Florida residency law includes a basic provision
for 12 months’ legal residency prior to the first day
of classes for the term residency is sought. The
following circumstances must be reviewed:
ADMISSION
AND
REGISTRATION
A. Physical presence
B. Intent
C. Dependence/independence
Presumptions or Exceptions (documentation
appropriate to the exception will be required)
A. A person married to a legal Florida resident
may claim the Florida residency of the
spouse, provided that they are domiciled in
Florida and intend to make Florida their home.
B. Active-duty members of the armed services
stationed in Florida (and spouse/dependent
children) or military personnel not stationed
in Florida whose home of record or state of
legal residence certificate, DD Form 2058, is
Florida (and spouse/dependent children).
C. Full-time instructional and administration
personnel employed by the state public
school system, community colleges and
other institutions of higher education (and
spouse/dependent children).
D. Dependent children residing with a legal
resident adult relative, other than the parent,
for at least five years.
E. A dependent child whose parents are
divorced, separated, or otherwise living
apart will be considered a resident for tuition
purposes if either parent is a legal resident of
Florida, regardless of which parent claims
the minor for tax purposes.
F. A person who was enrolled as a Florida
resident for tuition purposes at a Florida
institution of higher education, but who
abandoned Florida residency and then
re-enrolled in Florida within 12 months of
the abandonment.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
19
G. United States citizens living on the Isthmus
of Panama, who have completed 12 consecutive months of college work at the Florida
State University Panama Canal Branch, and
their spouses and dependent children.
H. Southern Regional Education Board’s
Academic Common Market graduate
students attending Florida’s state universities.
I. Full-time employees of state agencies or
political subdivisions of the state when the
student fees are paid by the state agency or
political subdivision for the purpose of jobrelated law enforcement or corrections training.
J. Qualified beneficiaries under the Florida
Pre-Paid Post-Secondary Expense Program
per S.240.551 (7) (a), F.S.
K. McKnight Scholars.
Eligible Non-Citizen Categories
A. Resident aliens, parolees, asylees, refugees,
or other persons married to U.S. citizens, and
temporary permanent residents.
B. Visa categories eligible for in-state status:
A, E, G, H-1, H-4, I, K, L, N, O-1, O-3, R and
NATO 1-7.
Evidence to be Required
The following documentation may be requested,
considered, accepted and/or subsequently recorded
on a checklist as evidence of establishing a legal
residence in Florida. At least one of the following
documents must be dated at least 12 months
before the first day of classes:
A. Proof of purchase of permanent Florida home.
B. Professional/occupational license in Florida.
C. Full-time, non-temporary employment in
Florida.
D. Purchase of Florida real property.
E. Part-time permanent employment in Florida.
F. Proof of membership in Florida organization.
G. Proof of acceptance of permanent employment
in Florida.
H. Family ties in Florida.
I. Florida voter registration.
J. Declaration of Domicile in Florida.
M. Absence of evidence of establishing a legal
residence elsewhere.
N. A qualified beneficiary under the terms of the
Florida Pre-Paid Postsecondary Expense
Program (S.240.551, F.S.).
O. Classification as a Florida resident at another
Florida public college or university.
Appeals
The Chief Financial Aid Officer will review
appeals regarding the admissions classification and
will convey to the applicant the final residency
determination and the reasons.
Reclassification
It is important to understand that living in or
attending school in Florida is not sufficient
evidence to establish residency for tuition
purposes. Students must show that they were in
Florida to maintain a bona fide domicile. The
following hard copy evidence may be accepted as
evidence of establishing legal residence in Florida:
A. For independent students, if appropriate,
obtain parent/student tax returns, affidavits,
employment records, bank accounts, etc.,
and at least one document of legal residency
dated at least 12 months before the first day
of classes of the term for which legal
residency is sought. (See previous list of
acceptable evidence.)
B. For dependent students, if dependent on a
Florida resident parent/legal guardian, obtain
from parent/legal guardian:
1. Proof of dependent status, and
2. At least one document of legal residency
pertaining to the parent/legal guardian
that is dated 12 months before the first
day of classes. (See previous list of
acceptable evidence.)
C. If dependent on out-of-state parent/legal
guardian, student may be reclassified only
under rare circumstances in which the
student’s age and general circumstances
warrant the reclassification (e.g., graduate
student, married, resided in Florida more
than five years). The advice of the Chief
Financial Aid Officer should be sought prior
to reclassifying a student who is dependent
on out-of-state parents.
K. Florida vehicle registration.
L. Florida driver license.
20
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
D. For students seeking reclassification under
an exceptional category, hard copy
documentation appropriate to the particular
category (e.g., marriage certificate, military
orders, teaching contract, etc.) is required.
Appeals
The Chief Financial Aid Officer will review appeals
regarding the reclassification and will convey to
the applicant the final residency determination and
the reasons.
ALL APPLICANTS
Application and Application Fee
All students must submit a completed application, along with a non-refundable, one-time $20
application fee.
Hearing-impaired, dyslexic, visually-impaired,
or specific learning disability applicants are
eligible for reasonable substitution for requirements
for admission to the college, to a program of study,
or graduation. Documentation must be provided
showing that the person's failure to meet
requirements is related to the disability. Details are
available in the Equal Access Services office.
COLLEGE CREDIT DIVISION
All college credit students must be high school
graduates or GED recipients (a non-graduate of
high school who has satisfactorily completed tests
of general educational development), or qualified
Early Admission/Dual Enrollment students (see
pages 24–25).
Graduates of high schools that are not
regionally accredited may be accepted on a
probationary basis for the first 12 credit hours.
Students can be admitted to credit courses
at CFCC under one or more of the following
classifications.
Degree-seeking students can earn either the
Associate in Arts (A.A.), Associate in Science (A.S.) or
Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.).
Non-degree applicants can pursue postsecondary vocational certificate, adult enrichment
or career exploration, teacher certification, renewal
or extension. Courses with a college prep prerequisite are closed to non-degree-seeking students.
Most college credit certificate-seeking students
pursue a one-year program of study.
Transfer students are those who have previously
registered at any other college, regardless of the
amount of time spent or credit earned. They can be
degree-seeking or non-degree-seeking. See special
requirements on pages 23–24.
Returning students are those who have previously applied and paid an application fee, whether
they attended or not. Although a new application
form may be required, there will be no application
fee. Students seeking to return to the ADN
(Associate in Science Degree Nursing) program
must follow procedures outlined. Veterans see
pages 45–46. Students who return to CFCC
who have not been continuously enrolled (defined
as earning one credit hour or more in one of
the three terms comprising an academic year)
will need to complete the program or academic
requirements of the current catalog in effect. Any
full- or part-time student has five calendar years
after he/she returns to complete degree requirements
under the catalog in effect when returning.
International students are those who are
residents of countries other than the United States.
They must be degree-seeking, full-time students
except in special situations where students are
required to obtain an I-20 from the institution.
Regardless of which classification is appropriate,
the student is considered either full-time (enrolled
for 12 or more credits in a regular 16-week
semester) or part-time (enrolled for fewer than 12
credits in a regular 16-week semester). Also, a
student is considered to be a freshman if 29 or
fewer credit hours have been earned, or a
sophomore if more than 29 credit hours have
been earned.
ADMISSION
AND
REGISTRATION
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
See page 33 for information on preadmission testing.
AUDIT Students
A student may register during the Schedule
Change Period (see calendar) for a credit course on
a no-credit (audit) basis. An audit student cannot
change to credit status. Exceptions to the audit
policy require approval of the program facilitator and
will count as an attempt. The audit policy is not
applicable to Health Occupations, Criminal Justice,
Science Labs, and college preparatory and dual
enrollment students. (see Forgiveness and
Withdrawal policies, page 63–64).
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
21
CHILD CARE Students
To comply with Florida state law, Chapter
402.3055, each prospective student must be
fingerprinted and undergo a criminal background
check, reference check and tuberculosis test. The
cost of these procedures is the responsibility of the
student. Information received is confidential and is
required to determine the prospective student’s
ability to work with children.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE Students
See pages 105 and 165.
DEGREE-SEEKING Students
Placement Testing: Degree-seeking applicants
to any university or community college in the Florida
state system must present placement test scores
taken within the last three years as part of the
application process. CFCC accepts any of the three
tests authorized by the state (ACT, SAT or CPT).
CPT is the official placement test for community
colleges in the state of Florida. CFCC regularly
offers CPT on its campus. Placement tests provide
information about the reading, English, and
mathematics skills that are required for success in
college. By assessing ability levels in these areas,
placement tests help determine the most appropriate
English, mathematics, and reading courses students
should take. Scoring below the required cut-off
score indicates the student is not ready for collegelevel work in the specific area. Florida requires
these students to complete non-credit college
preparatory course work prior to entering college
level work in the weak areas.
New degree-seeking students may not register
for classes unless CFCC has placement test scores
on file. CPT sample test question booklets and ACT
and SAT registration packets are available at
CFCC’s Ocala Campus Testing Center (Building 7,
Room 101), as well as at the Citrus County
Campus Counseling office.
Transcripts: Degree-seeking students must be
high school graduates or GED recipients and must
submit an official high school transcript or official
GED test scores. If the student is a college transfer
student, an official transcript from each college or
university previously attended must also be submitted
immediately.
INTERNATIONAL Students
CFCC is authorized by United States federal law
to enroll non-immigrant alien students, provided
they attend CFCC on a full-time basis. English
proficiency is required and all courses are taught in
the English language. CFCC now offers a full-time
22
language program to teach English as a Second
Language (ESL). The courses can be found in
this catalog and are labeled EAP. We currently
offer courses to specifically improve a student’s
skills in grammar, listening and speaking and in
writing. All ESL courses involve weekly lab time
to reinforce skills learned.
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION OFFICE
The International Education office on the Ocala
Campus is maintained to assist international
students in making the transition from their native
lands and educational systems to CFCC. The
staff will gladly assist students with immigration
regulations, health insurance, educational planning,
personal problems, and any other areas of concern.
THE ADMISSIONS POLICY
The applicant must apply for admission and
submit all required admission credentials to the
Student Records office no later than 90 days prior
to the first class day of the term in which he or she
seeks admission. There is a three (3) week
processing time. English language test scores
determine placement into college courses.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS APPLYING FOR
ADMISSION, COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING
Secondary school graduation: A foreign
student must have satisfactorily completed the
secondary school level, which would be required for
university admission in his/her own country.
1. Application and $50.00 non-refundable
application fee (U.S. dollars).
2. Transcripts and proof of graduation:
Certified high school diploma and certified
high school transcripts showing subjects and
grades earned must be provided in English.
Any translation fees are to be paid by the
student. Transcripts from any university outside
the U.S. may be provided if the student wants
to know if any of the credits will transfer to
CFCC. Before the university transcript can be
submitted, it should be sent to an agency that
evaluates foreign credentials. Please contact
the Student Records office if you are
interested in more information about this.
3. TOEFL score requirement: A TOEFL score
of 420 or above on the written test or 110 or
above on the computer test is required for
admission. Only students with scores of 500
or above on the written or 173 or above on
the computer test may enroll in “Academic”
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
or college credit courses. Students scoring
between 420 and 429 on the written (or
110-172 on the computer) will be required to
enroll in ESL (English as a Second Language)
courses first.
4. Financial security: Non-immigrant students
must provide evidence of financial responsibility and have sufficient funds to pay college
matriculation and tuition fees, textbook
costs, and living expenses. Financial aid is
not available to non-immigrants and
CFCC does not offer scholarships to international students. The Confidential Financial Statement and the Financial Support
Information form need to be completed.
Also, a bank letter must be included,
dated within the past three months.
All of this financial information must be
submitted before the student will be
considered for admission. A non-immigrant
student may not be employed while attending
college in the United States unless the
Immigration and Naturalization Service has
granted permission. When you request a
student packet of information, a Confidential
Financial Statement and a Financial Support
Information form will be included.
5. Health and Accident Insurance: International
students on F-1 or J-1 or M-1 visas must
provide proof of medical insurance in
advance of the intended term of enrollment or
secure insurance coverage through CFCC
upon arrival. This insurance coverage must
continue for the entire period of enrollment.
6. When a student is accepted for admission, a
letter of acceptance with a date for a mandatory
orientation and an I-20 will be sent.
The deadline for all required documents is 90
days before classes begin.
NON-DEGREE Applicants
Non-degree applicants are persons who wish to
take selected college courses without intending to
complete an associate degree program. Many
students attend to upgrade employment skills, for
career exploration, teacher recertification, audit, or
for personal objectives. A non-degree applicant
must submit a completed application and a onetime, non-refundable $20 application fee. Transient
students must submit a transient letter showing
good standing from the last institution attended
prior to registering.
A non-degree status student cannot be certified
for financial aid or veterans’ benefits. If a student
wishes to pursue a degree, he or she must contact
the Enrollment Services Center and indicate a
desire to be changed to a degree-seeking status.
Non-degree-seeking students will be allowed to
register for a maximum of nine semester hours
without participating in the placement testing
program and any subsequent college preparatory
instruction. Some courses are closed to non-degreeseeking students.
ADMISSION
AND
REGISTRATION
SUSPENDED Students
A student who has been placed on academic
suspension and is ineligible to return to CFCC or
the previous institution attended must file a petition
for admission to CFCC. The student must schedule
a return from suspension appointment with a
counselor or advisor. See page 44 for petitions
information.
TRANSFER Students
Transfer students must be eligible to return to
the last institution attended for admission to CFCC
through regular procedures. Those who have been
suspended from another institution or who have a
20 or more grade point deficit are required to file a
petition for admission (see page 44 for petitions
information). Students entering with a grade point
deficit of 1–19 will be on academic probation.
Students are strongly advised to have all (an
official copy from each institution) transcripts sent
to the Student Records office at the time they apply
to the college. A high school transcript or proof of
GED is also required. Failure to have all transcripts
on file will prohibit the student from registering the
following semester.
CFCC does not ordinarily accept transfer credits
from institutions not accredited by a regional
accrediting agency. However, each transcript will be
considered on an individual basis. The coursework
accepted must represent collegiate coursework
relevant to the degree, with course content and
level of instruction resulting in student competencies
at least equivalent to those of students enrolled in
CFCC’s degree programs. Students must submit to
the Student Records office, in a timely fashion prior
to the end of their first term of enrollment, official
transcripts from all previously-attended colleges
and universities. The Student Records office will
evaluate these transcripts and mail the student a
printout prior to the end of the first enrollment term,
indicating the accepted transfer courses. Any
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
23
questions regarding transcript evaluation must
be resolved with the Student Records office during
the term in which the transcripts are evaluated.
Transfer students who do not have transcripts
on file showing completion of college prep or college
level English and math will be required to take a
placement test. Students may be subject to
additional fees if the transcript evaluation indicates
that students had previously registered in a course
that they are now repeating.
In Associate in Science degree programs, only
courses applicable to the program are acceptable
for transfer. Students seeking the Associate in
Science degree who possess an Associate in Arts
or higher degree have already satisfied core
requirements as listed on page 49.
In Associate in Arts degree programs, all
academic work (1000- and 2000-level) transfers.
Upper division courses (3000- and 4000-level) do
not transfer. In cases where the content is the
same, the burden of proof is on the student.
Following evaluation of transcripts, a printout
showing courses transferred will be mailed to
the student. Any questions regarding the
evaluation must be resolved during the term in
which the work is evaluated by contacting the
Student Records office.
ACCELERATION
MECHANISMS
College credit may be awarded for prior learning
opportunities and/or acceptable scores through
Advanced Placement (AP), College Level
Examination Program (CLEP), or International
Baccalaureate (IB). Students may not receive credit
by examination for courses in areas where they
have received college credit for more advanced
work. CLEP, AP, or IB credits may not be applied
toward grade forgiveness. Students with official
transcripts of credit earned outside a regionally
accredited classroom, issued directly to the college
from the program in question, may be awarded up
to a maximum of 45 semester hours of credit.
24
Advanced
Placement
Examination
Minimum
Score
Required for
Credit
Course
Number
American
History
3, 4
5
AMH 2010
AMH 2010, AMH 2020
3
6
European
History
3, 4
5
HIS elective
2 HIS electives
3
6
3
Hours
Credit
Mathematics
3, 4 or 5
1 Math elective
Biology
3, 4 or 5
1 Biology elective
3
Chemistry
3, 4 or 5
CHM 1025C
4
Physics
3, 4 or 5
PHY 1053C
4
Languages
3
---1120, ---1121
8
4 or 5
---1120, ---1121, Elective
12
English
Language and
Composition
3, 4
5
ENC 1101
ENC 1101 plus 1
Communications elective
3
Literature and
Composition
3, 4
5
ENC 1102
ENC 1102 plus 1
Communications elective
3
Classics, Virgil
3, 4 or 5
LIT elective
3
Classics, Lyrics
3, 4 or 5
HUM elective
3
Music
3, 4 or 5
MUS elective
3
Art
3, 4 or 5
ART elective
3
Computer
Science
3
COP elective
Psychology
3, 4 or 5
PSY 2012
6
6
3
Advanced Placement (AP)
It is the policy of Central Florida Community
College (CFCC) to grant college credit to a student
who presents a score of 3, 4 or 5 on one or more
of the advanced placement program examinations
of the College Entrance Examination Board. To be
eligible for credit, the examination must be taken
prior to enrollment in college.
AP credit granted by Central Florida Community
College may be transferable to participating Florida
institutions of higher education. It is the responsibility
of the student to contact the institution to which
he/she expects to transfer to determine the acceptability of this credit. CFCC follows the guidelines in
Florida State Board Rule 6A-10.024(8) for awarding
AP credits.
Dual Enrollment
The State Board of Education encourages
colleges and school boards to enter into agreements to offer college courses to selected high
school students who have exhausted their school’s
curriculum and qualify for dual enrollment status.
As provided for by current legislation, colleges may
waive the student’s application, tuition and applicable
fees. CFCC has such agreements with Citrus, Levy
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
and Marion public school districts. Students who
feel they might qualify for the dual enrollment
classes should discuss this possibility with their
high school counselors. High school students can
take dual enrollment courses on some high school
campuses and on the college campus.
Early Admission
Another acceleration opportunity exists in the
college’s early admission program designed for
students who have completed the 11th grade and
wish to attend the college as full-time students
(12 credits or more) during the high school senior
year. All dual enrollment and early admission
candidates must submit an application, appropriate
test scores (CPT, Companion, ACT, SAT), and a
letter of recommendation from the high school.
Once these materials are on file in the college
Student Records office, the application will be
evaluated and the student will be notified officially
of acceptance. Public and approved private school
students are exempt from the $20 application fee
and tuition.
International Baccalaureate Program
CFCC grants college credit to a student who
has received a diploma from the International
Baccalaureate program for higher-level and
subsidiary-level subjects with scores of 4 or above,
up to a maximum of 30 semester hours. For those
students who have the IB Certificate only, college
credit will be awarded for higher-level subjects with
scores of 5 or above. CFCC follows the guidelines
in Florida State Board Rule 6A-10.024(9) for
awarding IB credits.
Experiential Learning
The experiential learning assessment process is
designed to recognize the academic value of learning
through experiences including work experience,
employment-related training programs, seminars,
volunteer work, travel, military service or selfdirected study.
Assessment: Assessment involves the following:
• Written or performance tests.
• Preparation of a portfolio describing learning
and how it was acquired.
• Evaluation of certificates and licenses.
• Interviews with faculty members.
• Review of external agency recommendations.
The program area responsible for the courses
for which credit is requested determines the
method of assessment and the amount of credit
awarded. Not all courses are assessable courses.
Courses being assessed must be offered as a
requirement or an elective in an A.S. or A.A.S.
degree or certificate program at CFCC. General
education courses are not assessable.
Process: After being admitted to the college and
selecting a program with the help of a counselor or
advisor, the student must:
1. Meet with the appropriate program representative to determine if an assessment process
is available for selected courses.
2. Apply for assessment on forms available
from the department or student affairs.
3. Consult with the department, program manager
or designated faculty evaluator to determine
requirements for assessment and fees required.
4. Discuss student responsibilities in the
assessment process, including:
• Meeting with an instructor for an oral or
written exam
• Preparing for a written exam by reviewing
textbooks
• Arranging for an instructor to interview an
employer, as well as a work site visit
• Presenting certificates and licenses for
authentication
• Developing a portfolio of experience
• Providing ACE recommendations for
military training.
5. Pay necessary fees for assessment. It is
possible that academic credit will not be
awarded as requested, but the cost of
assessment remains the same.
Award of Credit: Depending on the amount of
credit requested and the methods of assessment
required, the assessment process time may vary.
When the process is completed, the results are forwarded to the appropriate dean for final review and
verification. The dean will request, by memo, that
the Executive Director of Student Records and
Financial Aid post any awarded credits to the
transcript. Credits awarded are held in escrow until
the student satisfactorily completes 25% of program
coursework (15 credits for the A.A.) at CFCC.
Experiential credit may not be used to meet the
residency requirement of 25% of program course
work required at CFCC for graduation.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
ADMISSION
AND
REGISTRATION
25
This type of credit may not be acceptable for
transfer to other institutions. The receiving
institution would determine transferability.
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Students may earn a maximum of 21 credit
hours from the following general examinations:
natural sciences, mathematics, humanities, social
sciences and history. Additional credits may be
earned through various subject examinations.
CLEP credit may not be used to satisfy any General
Education course that is also Gordon Rule
(regardless of degree program) except math. If a
CLEP exam is taken for one of these courses
(such as Psychology), students may use the credit
as elective credit only. CLEP will still be accepted
for math and science in the General Education areas.
Some colleges and universities do not allow
credit for this program. It is the responsibility of the
student to contact the institution to which he/she
expects to transfer to determine the acceptability of
this credit. CFCC follows the guidelines in Florida
State Board Rule 6A-10.024(7) for awarding CLEP
credits.
Students receiving credit via CLEP for courses
which have Gordon Rule writing requirements
assigned to them as outlined in 6A-10:30, must fulfill
the writing requirement and may be required to take
additional courses.
When a student completes ENC 1102 with a
grade of “A” or “B,” the college will certify the
12,000-word requirement in the Communications
and Fine Arts Division toward the “Gordon Rule” to
that student awarded six hours’ CLEP credit in
English (general college composition or freshman
English). Students presenting CLEP exam scores to
CFCC are required to validate these credits by earning at least nine credit hours in residence at CFCC.
26
Any student who has satisfied CLEP requirements in mathematics and whose high school
transcript shows successful completion of higher
mathematics course work, including college algebra,
trigonometry, and calculus, shall exempt the mathematics requirement.
Beginning July 1, 2002 the following are acceptable test scores.
CLEP
General
Exam
English Exam
(with essay)
Humanities Exam
Mathematics Exam
Natural Sciences
Exam
Social Sciences and
History Exam
CLEP
Score
CFCC
Equivalent
50
ENC 1101,
3 elective credits
6 elective credits
6 elective credits
50
50
50
50
Hours
Credit
6
6
6
3 biological
science credits
3 physical science
credits
3
6 elective credits
6
3
Below are acceptable test scores prior to June
30, 2002.
CLEP
General
Exam
English Exam
(with essay)
Humanities Exam
Mathematics Exam
Natural Sciences
Exam
Social Sciences and
History Exam
CLEP
Score
CFCC
Equivalent
500
ENC 1101,
3 elective credits
6 elective credits
6 elective credits
490
500
490
490
Hours
Credit
6
6
6
3 biological
science credits
3 physical science
credits
3
6 elective credits
6
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
3
CFCC Equivalencies for CLEP Examinations
with exceptions for Bright Future students
CLEP
Subject Exam
Afro-American History*
American
Government
American History*
History of the
United States I
History of the
United States II–
1865 to present
American Literature
Analyzing and
Interpreting Literature
General Biology
General Chemistry
Calculus
College Algebra
College Algebra/
Trigonometry
Information Systems
and Computer
Applications
Freshman Composition
English Literature
French
CLEP
Score
CFCC
Equivalent
Hours
Credit
50
AMH 2091
3
50
49
POS 2041
AMH 2010, AMH 2020
3
6
54
AMH 2010
3
55
50
AMH 2020
AML 2010, AML 2022
3
6
50
50
50
6
6
50
50
2 LIT electives
2 biology electives
Based on subject matter
in clinical year training.
MAC 2311
MAC 1105
50
MAC 1147
N/A
5
3
3
50
50
50
50
52
CGS 1100
ENC 1101, ENC elective
ENL 2011, ENL 2022
FRE 1120
12 hours French elective
3
6
6
3
6
Freshman English
(with essay)
General Chemistry
Introduction to
Psychology
Geology*
50
50
ENC 1101, ENC elective
CHM 1025C
6
4
54
49
3
German Level I
German Level II
50
63
PSY 2012
Geology elective and
physical science elective
GER 1120
GER 2200
CLEP
CLEP
Subject Exam
Score
History of American
Education*
50
Human Growth and
Development
63
Introduction to
Educational
Psychology
50
Principles of
Management
50
Principles of
Accounting
50
Introductory
Business Law
50
Introductory Calculus* 48
Principles of Economics
–Macro
54
Principles of Economics
–Micro
54
Principles of Marketing 50
Introductory
Sociology
54
Spanish Level I
50
Spanish Level II
54
Trigonometry
50
Western Civilization I–
Ancient Near East
to 1648
57
Western Civilization II–
1648 to present
56
CFCC
Equivalent
Hours
Credit
Elective
3
DEP 2004
3
EDP 2002
3
MAN 2021
3
ACG 2021, ACG 2071
6
BUL 2241, BUL 2242
Calculus elective
6
3
ECO 2013
3
ECO 2023
MAR 2011
3
3
SYG 2000, SYG elective
SPN 1120
SPN 2200
MAC 1114
6
6
12
3
WOH 1012
3
WOH 1022
3
ADMISSION
AND
REGISTRATION
6
6
12
Test names, score requirements and credit hours are subject to
change.
*Test discontinued; scores still accepted.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
27
DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST)
The DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs), unlike Advanced Placement, are not built around
curriculum, but rather are designed to test students’ knowledge on a variety of college-level subjects,
regardless of where they may have learned the material. Exams are developed by committees of college
faculty. Norming forms of DSSTs are administered to college-level students who are completing courses for
credit in various subjects. All DANTES tests listed are accepted at Saint Leo University, some as elective
and some for specific class credit. Pre-approval must be obtained for CFCC credit via DANTES testing.
More information about DSSTs, including descriptions of test content and sample examination questions
is available at http://www.getcollegecredit.com/materials.htm.
Dantes #
xx812
xx498
xx511
xx489
xx562
xx508
xx530
xx470
xx543
xx497
xx490
xx471
xx473
xx483
xx494
xx495
xx524
xx531
xx532
Dantes Test Name
Business Mathematics
Criminal Justice
Environment and Humanity
Foundations of Education
Fundamentals of Counseling
Here’s to Your Health
Human Resources Management
Human/Cultural Geography
Introduction To Business
Introduction To Law Enforcement
Lifespan Developmental
Psychology
Money and Banking
Physical Geology
Principles of Financial Accounting
Principles of Physical Science I
Elementary Statistics
Fundamentals of College Algebra
Art of the Western World
Contemporary Western Europe
1946-1990
An Introduction to the
Modern Middle East
Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union
A History of the Vietnam War
The Civil War and Reconstruction
General Anthropology
Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Principles of Finance
Organizational Behavior
Principles of Supervision
xx534
xx536
xx550
xx551
xx500
xx820
xx474
xx496
Business Law II
Microcomputer Applications
Personal Finance
Management Information Systems
Astronomy
Technical Writing
Ethics in America
Introduction to World Religions
xx548
xx519
xx525
xx512
xx450
xx424
xx461
xx465
xx469
28
CFCC Class #
MTB 1103
CCJ 1020
BSC 1050
EDF 2005
xxxxx
HLP 1081/1082
SOP 2602
GEA 2000
GEB 1011
CCJ 1020
Minimum Guaranteed
Guaranteed 3 Credits to
Score Transfer Score Transfer to FL Schools
48
48
YES
49
49
YES
46
46
YES
46
46
YES
45
48
YES
48
48
YES
46
46
YES
48
48
YES
46
46
YES
45
45
YES
DEP 2001/2004
BAN 1501/1004
GLY 2010 C
ACG 2021
xxxxx
STA 2023
MAC 1105
HUM 1021
46
48
46
49
47
48
47
48
51
48
46
49
52
48
xx
xx
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
NO
NO
HUM 1210
48
xx
NO
xxx
xxx
xxx
xxx
ANT 2000
HSC 2140
BAN 1004
xxx
SLS 2261/MNA 2141/
MAN 2021
BUL 2242
CGS 1100
xxx
MNA 2141
xxx
ENC 2210
PHI 2600
REL 2300
48
45
49
47
47
49
46
48
46
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
52
47
46
46
48
46
46
49
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Credit by Departmental Examination
Evidence of proficiency in a subject area qualifies
a student to request a departmental examination in
departments where exams are provided. Students
may not apply for credit by departmental examination
in a course where they have received either an
“A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” “F,” “I” or “W” for work attempted, or
if they have earned credit for an advanced course in
that area. Credits earned will not be included on the
official college transcript until the student has
completed a minimum of 12 credits at CFCC.
1. The student must contact the department
or discipline program facilitator/program
manager in the department where
departmental exams are provided.
2. Based on advice from the departmental
contact, the student must complete the upper
portion of the Credit by Departmental
Exam/Experiential Learning registration form.
3. The dean and the discipline program facilitator
will review student’s request with the student.
If approved, the process for completing the
exam will be explained.
4. The student must take the approved
registration form and payment to the cashier.
A per course fee must be paid prior to the
administration of the exam.
5. Upon registration for the departmental exam
and payment of the fee, the student must
schedule the exam within five working days.
6. The departmental representative will schedule
the exam within 10 working days after being
contacted by the student.
7. The dean will monitor the exam process in
order to verify evidence (passing exam
score) of competency.
8. Upon satisfactory completion of the exam,
the dean forwards, by memo, the results
to the Student Records office. A grade of “S”
will be submitted for passed departmental
exam.
9. Upon receipt of the memo, Student Records
will notify the student the grade has been
received.
10. Credit by departmental exam may not be
attempted a second time for the same course.
Correspondence and Extension Courses
CFCC offers neither correspondence nor
extension courses, although certain correspondence
courses are acceptable for transfer.
ADMISSION
AND
REGISTRATION
Credit for A+ Certification
Students who have recently completed A+
certification are eligible to receive college credit
toward a degree as indicated:
Credit
Hours
CET 1172 A+ Computer Hardware
CGS 2564 PC Management
CET 1171 Introduction to Computer
Technology
4
3
3
Credit for Networking + Certification
Students who have recently completed
Networking + certification are eligible to receive
college credit toward a degree as indicated:
Credit
Hours
CEN 2500 Data Communication and
Networking
4
Credit for MCSE Certification
Students who have recently completed MCSE
certification are eligible to receive college credit
toward a degree as indicated:
Credit
Hours*
CEN 1322 Windows 2000 Network and
1.5
Operating System Essentials
CEN 1305 Supporting Microsoft Windows
3
2000 Professional and Server
CEN 1321 Supporting a Microsoft Windows 3
2000 Network Infrastructure
CEN 2320 Implementing and Administering 3
Microsoft Windows 2000
Directory Services
CEN 1325 Designing a Microsoft Windows 1.5
2000 Directory Services Infrastructure
CEN 2327 Designing a Microsoft Windows
2
2000 Networking Services Infrastructure
CTS 2320 Designing a Microsoft Windows
1
2000 Migration Strategy
*Course titles may be upgraded to cover Windows 2003.
Credit for Armed Services
Educational Experiences
See Servicemember’s Opportunity College on
next page.
11. The “S” grade will appear on the transcript in
the term following completion of 12 credit
hours.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
29
Credit for Correctional Officer Training School
Students who successfully complete Correctional
Officer Training School are eligible to receive college
credit toward a degree as indicated:
Credit
Hours
CCJ 1300
CCJ 1948
Introduction to Corrections
Internship
Total
3
3
6
Credit for Police Recruit School
Students who successfully complete Police
Recruit School are eligible to receive college credit
toward a degree as indicated:
Credit
Hours
CCJ 2230
CCJ 1948
Criminal Law, Evidence and
Procedure
Internship
Total
3
3
6
Credit for Certified Professional
Secretary Examination
The Certified Professional Secretary examination is developed by the Institute for Certifying
Secretaries, a department of Professional Secretaries
International. CFCC offers review classes (pending
necessary class size) for each of the test parts and
administers the examination in November and/or
May of each year.
Applications to take the CPS examination must
be postmarked by September 1 for the November
exam, and may be obtained by writing to
International Association of Administrative
Professionals, 10502 N. W. Ambassador Dr.,
P. O. Box 20404, Kansas City, MO 64195-0404.
College credit is available to those persons who
pass all or portions of the Certified Professional
Secretary examination. Following are examples of
courses in which credit can be received. (Contact
the Business and Technology Division for more
information).
Related Courses
Number Credits
Business Law I
BUL 2241
3
Basic Leadership I/
Supervisory Skills
MNA 2141
3
Business Accounting
APA 1111
3
Office Administration I
OST 2401
3
Business Communications
OST 2335
3
30
Students requesting college credit for all or portions
of the Certified Professional Secretary examination
must meet college admission requirements. Prior
to being awarded any portion of the 18 credits
mentioned above, students must have earned at
least nine credit hours in residence at CFCC.
Servicemember’s Opportunity College
Students may benefit from the college’s special
efforts to aid servicemembers in securing a postsecondary education. The American Association
of Community Colleges has designated Central
Florida Community College as a Servicemember’s
Opportunity College (SOC). Aside from stated and
traditional means of obtaining credit toward most
associate degrees, the following special policies,
procedures, and services are available to activeduty servicemembers, the National Guard, reserves,
new recruits and veterans:
A. Certain credits may be earned by satisfactory
completion of College Level Examinations
(see CLEP, page 26).
B. Credit can be given through relevant validated
military service training, including military
service schools, United States Armed Forces
Institute (USAFI) courses, and acceptable
college-level GED test scores. The recommendation of the American Council on
Education Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services will
be used in evaluating military service training.
C. In recognition of the advanced academic
and technical content of many military
education experiences, CFCC will grant
credit for military education that has been
evaluated and recommended as suitable for
post-secondary credit by the American
Council on Education Guide to the Evaluation
of Educational Experiences in the Armed
Services. After enrollment in the college, a
student may initiate the request for such
credit by providing appropriate documentation
as determined by the college. Recommendations in the A.C.E. Guide are advisory in
nature and are not binding upon the college.
D. Students enrolling in occupational certificate
programs are eligible to satisfy up to 20 percent of the program’s competencies through
military service credit. The competencies will
be awarded after a student satisfactorily
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
completes eight weeks of instruction in the
appropriate occupational program. Transcripts should be submitted to the Student
Records office for evaluation.
ADMISSION PROCEDURES
When submission of the required application
forms has been completed, the student will receive
a letter of acceptance and a notice of dates and
places for orientation and/or scheduling and
registration. Any changes in address, name, marital
status, residency or citizenship should be reported
promptly to the Enrollment Services Center.
REGISTRATION
Registration information, procedures and
deadlines for college credit, occupational, audit,
and continuing education students are published in
the printed class schedule and posted on college
bulletin boards and the Web site as appropriate. In
the case of courses beginning outside the regular
academic terms, posters, flyers, and media
announcements may be used to notify potential
students. Each student, by registering, pledges
acceptance of the rules and regulations of the
college.
Advisement/orientation is required for all
degree-seeking students before their first
semester of enrollment or after a two-year absence
from the college.
First-time CFCC degree-seeking students
may not register without completing a regularlyscheduled advisement/orientation session.
All students who have completed advisement/
orientation and are in good standing may
register online. See the current course schedule
for instructions.
Students may register for a maximum of 18
hours in fall and spring semesters, and 18 hours in
summer (nine hours in Summer-A term and nine in
Summer-B term). Non-degree-seeking and transient students register during General Registration.
Schedule Change Period
Courses may be added or dropped only
during periods indicated in the college academic
calendar. Courses dropped at the student’s
initiative after the initial schedule change period
and before the official withdrawal date will be
recorded with the letter “W” on the student’s
permanent record, unless instructors have
previously dropped the student from class
rolls with “F” grades. Students enrolled in
courses that are not part of the college
calendar, as published in the catalog, should
determine drop deadlines through the college
Student Records office.
Scheduling of Classes
In the interest of economy, the college
reserves the right to cancel classes that fail to
meet minimum enrollment requirements. The
following day codes are used: M–Monday,
T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, H–Thursday,
F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday.
Most daytime credit classes meeting on
Monday/Wednesday/Friday begin on the hour.
Tuesday/Thursday classes are one hour and 15
minutes long. College credit courses are scheduled
to make the greatest number of classes available
for the greatest number of students. For reasons of
efficiency, classes are generally scheduled in the
following manner:
ADMISSION
AND
REGISTRATION
Monday/Wednesday
7:00–7:50 a.m.
8:00–8:50 a.m.
9:00–9:50 a.m.
10:00–10:50 a.m.
11:00–11:50 a.m.
noon–12:50 p.m. Activity Hour
1:00–1:50 p.m. or 1:00–2:15 p.m.
2:00–2:50 p.m. or 2:25–3:40 p.m.
3:00–3:50 p.m. or 3:50–5:05 p.m.
Tuesday/Thursday
8:00–9:15 a.m.
9:25–10:40 a.m.
12:15–1:30 p.m.
1:40–2:55 p.m.
3:05–4:20 p.m.
Friday
7:00–7:50 a.m.
8:00–8:50 a.m.
9:00–9:50 a.m.
10:00–10:50 a.m.
11:00–11:50 a.m.
noon–2:50 p.m.
3:00–5:50 p.m.
Evening (Twilight)
5:30–8:10 p.m.
6:00–8:40 p.m.
7:00–9:40 p.m.
Saturday
8:00–10:40 a.m.
10:50–1:30 p.m.
1:40–4:20 p.m.
Sunday
1:00–5:00 p.m.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
31
In addition to this schedule, ‘‘Mini-Mester’’
classes are often scheduled for the first or final
eight weeks of a term, usually meeting for two and
one-half hours twice a week. “Express Term”
classes, week-long concentrated courses, may
also be offered two times each year.
PROCEDURE
AREA VOCATIONAL EDUCATION SCHOOL
(Occupational Certificate Programs)
A new student seeking an occupational
certificate must:
A. Complete a college application for admission
B. Complete the Test of Adult Basic Education
(TABE); and
C. Pay the appropriate application fee.
After completion of the steps above, if there is
space available in the program, the new applicant
must register through an advisor in the Bryant
Union Building (5), and attend college orientation.
A parking decal is issued by the campus Security
office when fees are paid. Fees can be paid by
mail, at the cashier’s window in the Bryant Union
Building (5) or at the Citrus County Campus or
Levy County Center administrative offices.
COLLEGE CREDIT DIVISION
Returning students: Appointments for registration
assistance are available through the Student
Advising Department. Students who have not
attended CFCC for two (2) years or longer must
resubmit an application (no fee required) and
attend an orientation session. Once the student
has registered, registration fees can be paid by
mail, at the Cashier’s window on the Ocala Campus,
at the Citrus County Campus Enrollment Services
Center, or on the Web, by the date indicated.
Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s
assistance should go to the Enrollment Services
Center first for processing of necessary paperwork.
New degree-seeking students: After the
student’s application has been processed and the
file is complete with placement test scores and
official transcripts, the Student Records office sends
the student an appointment for an orientation and
advisement session. If attending classes primarily
on the Citrus County Campus, call for information.
An advisor or counselor will approve the new
student’s registration and the schedule will be
entered into the computer, reserving seats in the
selected courses. Seats are held provided fees
are paid by the due date. A schedule is then
32
obtained from the advisor or counselor. The
student identification card and a parking decal are
issued by the campus Public Safety office when
fees are paid. Fees can be paid by mail, at the
Cashier’s window on the Ocala Campus, at the
Citrus County Campus Enrollment Services
Center, or on the Web.
Non-degree seeking students: After the
application has been processed the student can
complete the registration process at the Enrollment
Services Center on the Ocala Campus, or at the
Citrus County Campus Enrollment Services
Center. Registration occurs during the General
Registration period.
Audit students: After the application has been
processed the student can complete the registration
process at the Enrollment Services Center on the
Ocala Campus, or at the Citrus County Campus
Enrollment Services Center. Registration occurs
during the General Registration period.
WITHDRAWAL FROM
COLLEGE
A student (credit, occupational, or audit) who
withdraws from all classes must begin official
withdrawal procedures by seeing an advisor or a
counselor. The college calendar gives specific
deadlines for withdrawing from college without
penalty. Audit students may withdraw at any time.
Students who return and enroll in class within two
years are not required to re-apply. Also see page 64.
SUBSTITUTIONS FOR
ELIGIBLE STUDENTS
WITH DISABILITIES
Eligible students with disabilities may be provided
special considerations for reasonable substitution
for any requirement for admission to the institution,
admission to a program of study, or graduation.
Florida State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.041
authorizes reasonable substitution for these
requirements to any person who has a hearing
impairment, visual impairment or a specific learning
disability. Substitutions will only be utilized in cases
where the person’s failure to meet the requirement
is related to the disability and where the failure
to meet the requirement does not constitute a
fundamental alteration in the nature of the program.
For procedures regarding substitutions contact
the Coordinator of Equal Access Services
(352) 854-2322 ext. 1580, TDD (352) 873-5854.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
TESTING INFORMATION
The CFCC testing centers at the Ocala, Citrus
and Levy campuses offer a variety of testing services required for admission and placement into
academic and vocational programs, as well as for
special fields of training. CFCC testing centers offer
many other types of tests to students, to local
industries, and to the general public. Such tests
include: interest inventories, values inventories,
personality inventories, employment development
inventories, career assessment, computer skills
tests, occupational skills tests, aptitude tests,
achievement tests, college major interest tests,
college adjustment scales, academic skills tests,
customers service skills tests, professional employment tests, temperament analysis tests, personnel
tests, and many others.
Details on all testing services such as testing
dates, cost, test duration, re-take policies and other
testing requirements are available in the testing
centers at the three campus locations.
ADMISSION
AND
REGISTRATION
Placement cut scores for degree-seeking, first-time-in-college students began with the
January 1995 term, approved by the State Board of Education (SBE Rule 6A-10.0315, College
Preparatory Testing, Placement and Instruction, as amended).
REQUIRED SCORES FOR EXEMPTION FROM PREPARATORY CLASSES:
Enhanced ACT, American College Testing Program
Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 or higher
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 or higher
Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 or higher
CPT, Computerized or Companion Placement Test, The College Board
Reading Comprehension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 or higher
Sentence Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 or higher
Elementary Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 or higher
SAT, The College Board
Verbal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .440 or higher
Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .440 or higher
REA 0001C
REA 0002C
ENC 0001C
ENC 0010C
MAT 0012C
MAT 0024C
CPT
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 and below
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60–82
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 and below
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60–82
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 and below
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 and below
SAT
REA 0001C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .329 and below
REA 0002C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .330-439
ENC 0001C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .329 and below
ENC 0010C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .330–439
MAT 0012C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .439 and below
MAT 0024C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .439 and below
REA 0001C
REA 0002C
ENC 0001C
ENC 0010C
MAT 0012C
MAT 0024C
ACT
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 and below
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14–17
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 and below
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13–16
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 and below
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 and below
The above information was compiled by the CFCC Testing Center, formulated from test and score requirements in effect at
the date of publication, and is subject to change. It is recommended that students with scores below the minimum on SAT
or ACT take the College CPT for correct placement into college preparatory classes or for exemption.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
33
General
Information
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
GENERAL
INFORMATION
35
THE LEARNING THEME
AT CFCC
In 2002-03, Central Florida Community College
inaugurated an institution-wide learning theme,
Integrity: A Value of Community. The learning
theme study promotes connections among the
segments of the CFCC community-students, faculty,
staff, administration—and with the larger community
of which it is a part.
In exploring an annual theme, the college family
becomes more involved in the holistic nature of
learning, developing an awareness of “learning
across the curriculum” and experiencing first-hand
that knowledge and insight cross departmental
barriers. Involving students in a learning theme
also has the benefit of implementing many of the
Institutional Learning Outcomes including
Communication, Critical Thinking and Problem
Solving, Technical Skills, Math, Interpersonal Skills,
and Self-Direction. Students and staff read a book
in common and organize classroom and campus
events around questions related to the theme.
The themes for the first four years are based
on defining the four values in the college vision
statement—integrity, service, responsibility and
dignity—-and determining what these mean to the
CFCC learning community. “Service” was the
theme for 2003–2004, “Responsibility” will be the
theme for 2004–2005, and “Dignity” for 2005–2006.
FOCUS: STUDENT
DEVELOPMENT
LEARNING OUTCOMES
Major College Direction #1: To provide learning
opportunities which meet students’ lifelong learning
needs.
Major College Direction #2: To provide a
caring environment which supports learning and
development.
In response to these two Major Directions,
Central Florida Community College has become a
student-centered learning institution that provides
opportunities for students to pursue lifelong learning
experiences.
Learning Outcomes
CFCC has identified six major student
development learning objectives and competencies
that describe the student development learning
outcomes for a CFCC graduate. These learning
outcomes can be applied in academic, employment,
social and community contexts and must be crafted
over a lifetime. These learning outcomes and
competencies enable students to set learning
goals and assess learning within and across
academic disciplines and the disciplines of human
inquiry and development.
GENERAL
INFORMATION
I. Student Development Learning Outcomes:
The Student Development Learning Outcomes
are to assist students in the development of:
Communication skills
Self direction and self exploration skills
Critical thinking and problem solving skills
Interpersonal skills
Information technology skills
Wellness skills
AIDS AND
BLOODBORNE
PATHOGENS
Information on the college policy on HIV
and bloodborne pathogens is available in the
Human Resources office, the Learning Resources
Department, on the college Intranet, and the office
of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Copies are
available in the latter office. The Ocala and Citrus
County campuses have counselors well versed on
the subject and available to work with persons who
have AIDS or who have questions about AIDS.
Information shared is kept in strict confidence.
Contact the Student Advising Department for
assistance.
DRUG AND
ALCOHOL POLICY
As a condition of enrollment at the college,
individuals shall certify that they are not engaged
in the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of a controlled substance
—drugs or alcohol—on the institution’s property or
as any part of the institution’s activities. All
campuses and student/employee/alumni activities
associated with the college, whether on or off the
campus, shall be guided by this policy and its
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
37
procedures. In accordance with Board Policy,
alcoholic beverages are not permitted on college
property. Further information about the CFCC
policy on drugs and alcohol is available in the
Student Handbook and the CFCC Board Policy
Manual. Copies of the manual may be reviewed in
the Human Resources office, the Learning
Resources Department, on the college Intranet, and
the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.
FOUNDATION
The Central Florida Community College
Foundation, Inc. is a non-profit, tax-exempt
organization designed to provide additional
resources to the college to help students achieve
the highest possible quality of education. Thanks to
the contributions of many people throughout the
community, and CFCC’s faculty and staff, the
foundation supports the following:
Direct Support: Endowed scholarships,
non-endowed scholarships, endowed chairs,
educational trust funds, faculty/staff mini-grants,
college and high school brain bowls, the
Mr. and Ms. CFCC scholarship pageant, CFCC Film
Series and Athletic Department. The foundation
supports the CFCC Webber Exhibit Center and
provides significant funding for its operational costs.
Friend-Raising: Performing Arts Series,
The Webber Center exhibitions, and the volunteer
organization “Friends of the Foundation.”
Local Scholarship Fund Raising: Taste of
Ocala (February), Taste of Citrus (October), Taste
of Levy (October), and the foundation Dinner
Theater (January).
Affiliations: Central Florida Symphony
Orchestra, Patriot Partners, The Appleton Museum
of Art, and CFCC Retirees and Old-Timers.
Annual membership in the foundation is available
for a gift of $50 or more. Giving categories include:
Visionaries . . . . . $1,000,000 and above
Founders . . . . . . .$500,000 to $999,000
Benefactors . . . . . .$100,000 to $499,000
Platinum . . . . . . . . . .$50,000 and above
Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 and above
Silver . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 and above
Bronze . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,000 and above*
Copper . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000 and above
Patron . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000 and above
Sponsor . . . . . . . . . . . . .$500 and above
Associate . . . . . . . . . . . .Gifts up to $499
*Gifts of $6,000 or more entitle the contributor to
permanent membership in the CFCC Legacy Society.
38
The Legacy Society is the foundation’s special
lifetime membership category. Membership may be
accomplished by annual giving, will provision, trust,
life insurance policy, a gift of real estate or other
collectible items.
See the following pages for listings of current
chairs, endowments, gifts, scholarships and trusts.
For more information, write to the CFCC Foundation
office at P.O. Box 1388, Ocala, FL 34478-1388, or
call (352) 873-5808.
Endowed Memorial Scholarships
Kenneth Alvarez (Criminal Justice)
Martha Appleton
Leo Armstrong (Lake Weir Kiwanis)
Dr. Bea Atkinson
Bertschler Bont Benevolences, Inc. (in memory of
Pauline Bertschler)
Sgt. Hammett L. Bowen, Jr.
Osceola Hinton Bradbury, Jr.
Attie G. Branan (Business Ethics)
Attie Gladin Branan
Lucile B. Branan
Jane G. Brewster Outreach to Vision–Visually
Impaired
Jordan Bucy
Alice H. Bugg
Ruth Clancy
Paige Prator Collins (Book)
Dr. John Dixon Copp (Book)
Levy and Thelma DeLay–Health Occupations
Richard L. Dewey/Bank of America
R.N. “Bert” Dosh
Calvin Dyals–Need Based
Calvin Dyals–Non-Need Based
William P. Eastwood (Book)
Kumar S. Eligeti
Fred Evick (Book)
FAFO/Joel Reichard
First Union Bank/George Mangan
Florida Thorobred Fillies
Ellie Gaboardi
Cornelia I. Gardner (Music)
Grace Episcopal–Ferguson/McGovern
John Connor Graham
Carolyn Griffin-Settles
Carlos L. Griggs (Nursing)
Paula M. Grissom (Supported by Florida Thoroughbred
Breeders’ & Owners’ Association)
Maria F. Heinrich
George Marshall Hitchcock, Jr.
Winston Conrad Johnson
Charles D. Joiner, Jr.
Kiwanis Club of Ocala/Mabel Cannon
Harvey and Julie Klein
Daniel M. Kraus, M.D.
Lillian J. Lavan
Colin Lindsey (Belk Lindsey)
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
N. Broward Lovell
Rudy and Dorothy MacKenzie
George T. McCall
Jacqueline P. McGraw
MCMS Alliance
Marion County Retired Educators
(in memory of Betty D. Butler)
Mittal Family
Holly Dixon Niles
Ocala Rotary Club–John D. Ryder
Arthur Woods O’Steen
Hazel and Jimmy Parrish
Newt Perry
Frank G. Pinkston
Nathaniel Earl Rawls, Sr.
Walter Carl Ray
Ross L. and Minerva B. Reynolds
Robert F. “Bob” Ritterhoff
Jean C. Roscow (in memory of Vice Chancellor
Eugene Stevenson)
Richard B. Salsbury–Music
Dorthy May Sauder
Leon and Jane Howard Schmehl
Gustave Schneider
Holbrook Scott/Ocala Elks
Mont & Josie Shackman
Margie Slaughter
Palma Sue Snyder
Christopher D. Stafford
Jefferson Davis Steagald
Colonel S. Tooey
Leslie C. Turner Family
James and Ethel Wade
Marguerite Whittaker Walker
Gladys M. Webber
Gladys M. Webber–Vocational
Doris Vaughn Wilkerson
J. Leslie Willigar
Virginia R. Wood (in memory of Wesley and
John Wood)
Virginia R. Wood–Criminal Justice (in memory of
Wesley and John Wood)
Virginia R. Wood–Fine Arts (in memory of Wesley
and John Wood)
Gayle Zanetti
Endowed Scholarships
Altrusa International of Citrus, Inc.
Altrusa International of Ocala, Inc.
American Assoc. of University Women–
Citrus County
American Assoc. of University Women–
Ocala/Virginia Anderson
American Assoc. of University Women–
Silver Springs Shores (Book)
American Legion Post 284 (Belleview)–Nursing
AmSouth
T.J. and Flora Andrews
Anonymous Friend (CCF)
Anonymous Friend–Health Occupations (PL)
Anonymous Friend–Horticulture (CF) (Book)
Anonymous Friend (MS)
Athletic Fund
Frank and Rosemary Beeby
Belleview Rotary Club
Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute
Herbert J. and Nancy J. Booth
Mary S. and Croswell Branch
Celebrate 2000
Central Citrus Rotary
Central Florida Electric Co-op Educational Charity
Rose and Manuel Cepeda
Manuel and Rose Cepeda–Health Occupations
CFCC Business Ethics
CFCC Scholarship In Honor of Lynne L. Boele
CFCC Scholarship In Honor of Arthur K. Chete
CFCC Scholarship In Honor of Donald E. Tyler
CFCC Scholarship In Honor of Thomas L. Weaver
CFCC Senior Institute
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
Citrus County Dollars for Scholars–1989
Citrus County Sheriff’s Office
College Square
Community Vocational
Cox Cable Ocala
Crystal River Police Department
Morrey Deen
Dinner Theatre–Culinary Arts
Dinner Theater–Drama and Fine Arts
Dinner Theater–Hospitality Management/Business
Dinner Theater–Speech and Drama
Dinner Theater–Webber Center Co-op
Sally A. Drinkhouse (Book)
Economically & Educationally Disadvantaged
Epsilon Pi Lambda Ocala Chapter
Ronald L. and Phyllis E. Ewers
Express Care of Ocala–Health Occupations
Florida Power Corporation
Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ & Owners’
Association
Friends of the Foundation
Helen and Earl Gehring
Henry E. Goodlett–Vocational
Patricia J. Griffiths CFCC
Sam and Irene Harris
Health Occupations (1989, 1990, 1991)
Humanities/Social Sciences Endowed Student Book
Fay and Ernest Jernigan (Nursing)
Dorothea G. Jerome (Returning Women)
Junior League of Ocala Sustainers
Kings Bay Rotary Club–George Wunsch
Jim and Mary “Biddie” Kirk
Kiwanis Club of Central Ridge, Beverly Hills, Inc.
Kiwanis Club of Dunnellon
LaSociete des 40 Hommes et 8 Chevaux–Voiture
Locale 1580
Levy County Sheriff’s Department
Rep. Dick Locke–Citrus County
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
GENERAL
INFORMATION
39
Rep. Dick Locke–Lake Weir High School
Lockheed Martin
Jim Lowry
Brent and Frances Malever
Gayle L. Manske (Book)
Marion County Dental Association
Marion County Dollars for Scholars–1989
Marion County Master Gardeners Horticultural
Marion County Sheriff’s Office
Marion Regional Manufacturer’s Association
Elmer A. and Marjorie Kerr McBride
Ferne C. McClain (Foreign Language)
Jay G. McKenzie
MCMS and MCMS Alliance–Health Occupations
Bob Menard
Metropolitan Rotary Club of Ocala
Minority Scholarship Fund
Mockingbird Ceramic Association
Markley and Marion Morris
Munroe Regional Medical Center Auxiliary
Nursing Challenge
Ocala Alumnae Chapter Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority, Inc.
Ocala Electric Utility
Ocala High School Alumni
Ocala Junior Woman’s Club
Optimist Club of Ocala Foreign Language
Ocala Police Department
Ocala Regional Medical Center Auxiliary
Ocala Royal Dames for Cancer Research
Ocala/Silver Springs Rotary Club
Ocala Women’s Network
OTOW Theater Group
Diane F. Palmer
Carol Cepeda Pauw
Performing Arts Series
Mary Elizabeth Perkins-Smith
Pilot Club of Ocala
Pioneer Garden Club–Horticulture
James A. and Liguoria A. Renaker
Marion and Virginia Roche
Rotary Club of Inverness
Scottish Society
Seven Rivers Medical and Educational Foundation
Clarice Womack Share
Silver Springs Shores
Don and Rae Marie Smith (Heldon Ranch)
Russ and Louise Smith (Book)
Sparr Volunteer Fire Department
Springs Masonic Lodge–Shields/Heimlich
Sprint
Norman and Betty D. Straus
Frank and Betty Strifler
SunTrust–North Central Florida
Taste of Citrus (ongoing since 1990)
Taste of Ocala (ongoing since 1989)
Robert W. and Lorna A. VanHoose
Albert O. and Alice W. Waldon
George H. and Rebecca W. Wenzel
40
West Central Florida Chapter of the American
Ex-Prisoners of War (Miriam Flanagan)
Elisabeth G. Williams
H.S. Wilson Family
Woman’s Club of Ocala
Women of Sugarmill Woods
To Be Endowed Memorial Scholarships
Doyle E. Banks
Bernhard Bruns and Carolle A. VanDyke-Bruns
Tyler Everett Colia
Robert and Oleta Collins
Paul T. Conklin
Leila Cushman
Darryl E. Edwards Minority
Sydney Marvin Follin
Glenn E. Heflin
Frank Howell
Kingdom of the Sun Chapter (MOAA) (Vivian J. Ince
Memorial)
Otis A. Knight
William L. Lumpkin
Gloria L. Ogles
William “Bill” Whisenhunt
Robert S. Wormser/E-One (BHS)
Enrico and Carmela Zollo (Book)
To Be Endowed Scholarships
African American Student Union
Henry and Linda Allcott
Herbert J. and Nancy J. Booth–Music
CFCC Alumni
CFCC Botanical Garden
CFCC Co-op
College Republicans
Juanita P. Cunningham
FACC (CFCC Chapter)
Financial Women’s International, Inc.
Follett Company
Jane Fontaine
Blanche Grant (Book)
Charles H. Hamblen
Richard and Diana Lawrence
Richard and Diana Lawrence–Vocational
Levy County Dollars for Scholars
M&S Bank
Marion County Horse Fever
Marion Dunn Lodge
Clark Maxwell/AITF
Ocala Ale House
Ocala National Bank
One America, One Community Minority
Casius and Gwynn Pealer
Phi Theta Kappa (Kappa Nu Chapter)
Psi Beta
Maria Ramirez International Student
Helen Janice Smith
Van Staton–Belk Lindsey
Cliff and Joan Stearns
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Student Nurses’ Association
SunTrust Bank–Nature Coast
Taste of Levy (ongoing since 2001)
Barbara Geiss Trow
WCJB-TV20 Diversified Broadcasting
Educational Trusts
Anonymous CFCC Horticultural Trust
Citrus Memorial Hospital
Live Oak Scholarship Trust
Munroe Regional Medical Center
Seven Rivers Community Hospital
Other Endowments
Commercial Credit Learning Resource Center
Gabor Agency, Inc. Annual Employee Recognition
Other Scholarships
Robert H. Hood Estate
Harvey and Julie Klein
Foundation Funded Scholarships
Area High Schools Outstanding Student
CFCC Foundation Vocational
Citrus County Fair Association (Miss Citrus County)
College Brain Bowl
College Square
High School Brain Bowl
Marion County Young Women
Mr. and Ms. CFCC Scholarship Pageant
Ocala Women of Promise
Student Assistant
Women and Family Center
Endowed Chairs
Excellence in the Teaching and Learning Environment
Attie G. Branan–Any Discipline
Attie G. Branan–Occupational Programs
Lee F. and Attie G. Branan–Business
Dorothea G. Jerome–Any Discipline
Sarala Ramkrishna Karve–Any Discipline
Munroe Regional Medical Center–
Health Occupations
Munroe Regional Medical Center–Math
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour B. Robinson–Any
Discipline #1
Frank Webber–Any Discipline
Gladys M. Webber–Any Discipline
Excellence in the State-of-the-Art Learning Environment
Bank of America–Humanities/Social Sciences
Attie G. Branan–Communications
Citrus Memorial Hospital–Health Occupations (2)
Dorothea G. Jerome–Citrus Campus Library
Dorothea G. Jerome–Ocala Campus Library
Dorothea G. Jerome–Science
Markley and Marion Morris–Ocala Campus Library
Ocala Regional Medical Center–Health Occupations (2)
Richard B. Salsbury–Fine Arts
Richard B. Salsbury–Music
Richard B. Salsbury–Music and Fine Arts
SunTrust Bank, North Central Florida–Business
Excellence in the Cultural Environment
Arthur Dustin Beaman
Dorothea G. Jerome–Citrus Campus
Dorothea G. Jerome–Exhibit Center
Dorothy G. Lee/College Park–Exhibit Center
Performing Arts Series
Richard B. Salsbury–Exhibit Center (2)
Frank and Gladys Webber
Frank M. Webber–Exhibit Center
Gladys M. Webber–Exhibit Center (5)
GENERAL
INFORMATION
Excellence in the Educational Environment
CFCC Faculty/Staff/Trustees/Foundation–Learning
Environment (2)
Edna Sims Green–Learning Environment
New Initiative Endowment
Herbert J. and Nancy J. Booth–Music
CFCC Foundation New Initiative–Administrative,
Career, Professional
Marion County Dental Association
John and Phyllis Sharpe–Workforce/Continuing
Education Programs
To Be Endowed Chairs
Excellence in the Teaching and Learning Environment
Diane F. Palmer–Biological Sciences
Liguoria A. Renaker–Communications
Liguoria A. Renaker–Humanities
Liguoria A. Renaker–Mathematics
Liguoria A. Renaker–Physical Science
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour B. Robinson–Any
Discipline #2
Excellence in the State-of-the-Art Learning Environment
An Anonymous Friend–Engineering
An Anonymous Friend–Instrumental Music
Attie G. Branan (Undesignated)
C. Farris Bryant–Public Policy Institute
CFCC Citrus Campus Library
CFCC Computer Services–Undesignated
Citrus Memorial Hospital–Health Occupations #3
Jonathan S. and Susan E. Dean–Vocal Music
David B. and Carol J. Hays–Math/Science
T.M. “Tom” Kilgore–Nursing/Health Occupations
Seven Rivers Community Hospital–
Health Occupations
John, Phyllis and Richard Sharpe–Criminal Justice
Norman and Betty Straus–Health Occupations (3)
James and Keitha Voight–Physical Education
Excellence in the Cultural Environment
Central Florida Symphony
Webber Center (Exhibit Center Donation Box)
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
41
New Initiative Endowment
Charles R. and Sara R. Dassance
Equine Studies
General Endowment Fund
Kaplan Women’s History Collection
Helen B. King and Walter J. Driggers III–Library
Eddie and Lillian O’Brien–Business
To Be Designated
Florida Thoroughbred Charities
Sharon and Jerry Glassman
Dorothea G. Jerome
Ashish Karve–Greatest Need
Poorti Karve–Greatest Need
J. Carter Perkins, Jr.–Greatest Need
Federal Endowment Challenge Chairs
AmSouth–Business
Seymour and Nancy Robinson–Biological Science
Federal Endowment Challenge Scholarships
(Marion County)
American Association of University Women–
Silver Springs Shores
Bessie Mae Anderson Memorial
Bank of America
Cameron Brown Memorial
R.N. “Bert” Dosh Memorial
Mary Jane Dudley Memorial
Florida Power Corporation
Friends of the Foundation
Ocala National Bank
Ocala/Silver Springs Rotary Club
Robert F. “Bob” Ritterhoff Memorial
Richard B. Salsbury Memorial
Signature Brands LLC
Silver Springs Shores
Sprint
Taste of Ocala 1996
Taste of Ocala 1997
West Florida Natural Gas Company
Federal Endowment Challenge Scholarships
(Citrus County)
First Federal Savings of Citrus
Dorothea G. Jerome (Returning Women)
Frank Reed Memorial
Seven Rivers Community Hospital
SunTrust Bank–Nature Coast
Taste of Citrus 1996
Federal Endowment Challenge Scholarships
(Other Gifts)
Citrus County General Scholarships
Levy County General Scholarships
Marion County General Scholarships
Performing Arts Series
Undesignated (Including Mrs. Attie G. Branan, Dr.
N.R. and Sudha Karve, and Star-Banner Gifts)
42
Special Collections, Learning
Resource Center
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Allen–Classical and Folk Music
Collection
Scott Brown Memorial–Wisdom Traditions
Samuel Eff–Radio Transcription Record Collection
Hartigan Collection–Equine Books (1986)
Edward Jones Co.–Wall Street Room
Warren and Judith Kaplan–Film Library
Judith and Warren Kaplan–Women’s History Collection
Congressman Kenneth H. “Buddy” MacKay–
Book Collection
Wann and Mary Robinson–Wall Street Room
Ronald J. Salamone–Law Books
Gifts of Real Estate
Mr. and Mrs. Donald N. Denson–Regal Parks Property
Mr. and Mrs. Donald N. Denson–Little Lake Bonable
Property
Vivian Erwin–Mobile Home and Lot (Life Estate)
Patricia R. Gannett–Rental Property
Cecil Goff and Ruth Robbins–Ohio Commercial
Lease Property
Jon M. and Kay Osborne Kurtz–Palm Cay Lot
Mrs. Gayle L. Manske–Silver Springs Shores
Property
Larry and Denise Myford–Williamsburg Timeshare
Richard J. O’Brien–Forest Acres Lot
William B. Ray and Family–The Ray Preserve
(Orange Lake)
Ms. Frances Rosenfeld–Belleview Ridge Estates Lot
Phyllis and John Sharpe–Pinderosa (Levy County)
Mark E. Snyder–Silver Springs Shores Lot
Jean Weil and Leeanna Miller–Rainbow Lakes Estates
Lot
H. S. Wilson Family–Cedar Key Property (Levy County)
In-Kind Gifts
Mr. and Mrs. Scotty J. Andrews–Lexmark Printer
Attie G. Branan–Grand Piano and The CFCC Webber
Center Panels
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred R. Brandt–Elizabethan White Oak
Table and Buffet
Devon Self Storage–Rental of Storage Unit
Double J Tree–Ligustrum Trees
Environmental Assessment Consultants–Gerald Ergle,
EAC and Irving H. Zahn, EAC–Environmental
Audit Services for Enterprise Center
Dr. Robert Feldman
Jon M. and Kay Osborne Kurtz–Automotive
Technology Equipment and Ligustrum Trees
Lisa and Frederick Mueller–Dental Equipment
Leon Schmehl–Art Collection
Mr. and Mrs. Tom P. Scott–Hammond Commodore
Organ
Gladys M. Webber–Grand Piano
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
The CFCC Foundation has accepted donations from
generous donors to the following departments:
Learning Resource Center
Science
Music
Business
Vocational
Fine Arts
The CFCC Webber Center
Lifetime Members
Attie Gladin Branan (in memory of James H. Gladin
and Lois M. Gladin)
Commercial Credit (Travelers Insurance, Parent
Company)
Tim and Betty Gall
The Kaplan Family (Warren, Judith, Ron and Elissa)–
Conference Room
Dr. N.R. and Sudha Karve
Quilter’s Rule International, Inc.
Liguoria Renaker (in memory of James A. Renaker)–
Gift Shop and Furniture
Richard Salsbury
The Honorable Cliff Stearns
SunTrust Bank–North Central Florida
Carolle A. VanDyke-Bruns (in memory of Richard M.
“Dick” VanDyke)
Gladys M. Webber (in memory of Frank Webber)–
Webber Conference Center and Exhibit Center
Lobby
HEPATITIS B/MENINGITIS
AWARENESS
Florida law now requires that a post-secondary
institution shall provide detailed information
concerning the risks associated with meningococcal
meningitis and hepatitis B and the availability, effectiveness, and known contraindications of any
required or recommended vaccine to every student,
or to the student’s parent if the student is a minor,
who has been accepted for admission. Meningitis
is a serious disease that affects the brain and spinal
cord. Because bacterial meningitis is a grave illness and can rapidly progress to death, it requires
early diagnosis and treatment. This is often difficult
because the symptoms closely resemble those of
the flu and the highest incidence of meningitis
occurs during late winter and early spring (flu season). When not fatal, bacterial meningitis can lead
to permanent disabilities such as hearing loss, brain
damage, or loss of limbs. Hepatitis B is a serious
infectious disease caused by a virus that attacks
the liver. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause
life-long infection that leads to cirrhosis (scarring) of
the liver, liver cancer, or liver failure. There is no
cure for hepatitis B, but the infection can be prevented by vaccination. Each year, about 200,000
people are infected with the virus and 5,000 die.
Although there have been no reported cases of
meningitis or hepatitis B at our college in recent
years, we are taking the proactive step towards
informing and protecting our students.
HOUSING
Convenient housing is provided adjacent to the
Ocala Campus through the CFCC Foundation, Inc.
College Square, a 48-unit, 192-bedroom student
residence center, is directly across from the Ocala
Campus on Airport Road. Inquiries may be made
by contacting the on-site housing office or the
Enrollment Services Center in Bryant Union Building
(5). College-sponsored housing is unusual among
community colleges, but the CFCC administration
believes that a quality residential environment can
add a positive dimension to student educational and
personal development.
GENERAL
INFORMATION
I.D. CARDS
All credit students are entitled to photo
identification cards that allow attendance at campus
activities, use of the Learning Resources Center,
and the Learning Support Center. Photo I.D. cards
are required when selling textbooks back to the
bookstore. Ocala Campus students should report to
the campus Public Safety office to have a photograph
taken and a card made. Citrus County Campus
students should report to the Welcome Center to
have a card made. Hours are Monday–Friday,
8:30–11 a.m., and 1:00–2:30 p.m. on Wednesday
and Thursday. Levy County Center students should
inquire at the center business office for information
on photo scheduling.
LOST AND FOUND
Lost and found items are stored in the Public
Safety office at the Ocala Campus, the Welcome
Center at the Citrus Campus, and the lobby at Levy
Center. Items will be held for sixty (60) days after
the beginning of the semester following the semester
in which the item was received. Sixty (60) days after
the start of each semester (fall, spring, and summer
A/B), unclaimed items will be donated or discarded
as appropriate. To reclaim an item, the party claiming
ownership must provide a picture ID and properly
identify the item.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
43
PARKING
Traffic and parking regulations have been
established to maximize safety and parking
convenience. All vehicles brought on campus by
students or employees must be properly registered
with the Public Safety Department. This can be
accomplished at the Public Safety building on the
Ocala Campus and at the Enrollment Services
Center on the Citrus County Campus. A copy of the
regulations and information on available parking
areas is provided. All vehicles parked on campus
without a current parking decal or special parking
permit properly displayed will be ticketed, booted or
towed at the owner’s risk and expense. See page
70 for information on fines and penalties for violation
of traffic and parking regulations.
PETITIONS,
GRIEVANCES and
ACADEMIC REVIEW
In cases of unusual circumstances where
specific regulations do not seem to be in the best
interest of a student’s academic program, provision
for review has been established through a faculty
committee on student petitions. This committee has
the authority to review matters pertaining to
academic progress and to recommend exceptions
concerning any academic regulation if such
exception seems to be in the best interest of the
student and of the college.
Petition forms pertinent to academic progress
and/or academic regulations are available in the
Enrollment Services Center on both the Ocala and
Citrus County campuses and the administrative office
at the Levy County Center. These forms are to be
used by any student who, after discussion with the
assigned advisor or counselor, believes that special
circumstances govern the situation.
The college has established and published in
the FOCUS a policy for hearing and settling of
student grievances. Any student who feels he or
she has been discriminated against on the basis of
gender, race, color, religion, age, marital status,
or disability in the application of any policy or
procedure of Central Florida Community College
should contact the office of the Vice President for
Student Affairs to file a letter of grievance.
44
RELIGIOUS HOLIDAY
OBSERVANCE
In compliance with federal, state and District
Board of Trustees rules, which provide that there
shall be no discrimination in the treatment of
students and employees on the basis of religion,
the college makes reasonable accommodation for
religious observance. Such accommodation shall
apply to admissions, registration, class attendance
and activities, scheduling of examinations and
official ceremonies, and work assignments.
SEXUAL PREDATORS
ON CAMPUS
Federal and State law requires a person
designated as a “sexual predator or offender” to
register with the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE).
The FDLE then is required to notify the local law
enforcement agency where the registrant resides,
attends or is employed by an institution of higher
learning.
Information regarding sexual predators or
offenders attending or employed by an institution
of higher learning may be obtained from the local
law enforcement agency with jurisdiction for the
particular campus or by calling FDLE hotline
(1-888-FL-PREDATOR) or (1-888-357-7332),
or by visiting the FDLE Web site at
www.fdle.state.fl.us/sexual_predators
STUDENT RECORDS
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
passed in 1974 by the United States Congress
relates to accessibility and confidentiality of student
records. Provisions of the act classify the following
as ‘‘directory information’’ that will be released to
the general public upon request, unless the student
has specifically requested that some or all of the
information not be released: name, address, date
of birth, major field of study, participation in officiallyorganized activities and sports, weight and height
of athletic team members, dates of attendance,
degrees and awards received, and most recent
previous educational institution attended.
A student must submit to the Student
Records office a written notice stating which of
the above items is not to be released to the
general public. All other information not listed above
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
that relates directly to the student cannot be
released without the student’s written permission.
Under the law, access to student records without
the student’s permission is granted under the
following circumstances: to teachers, administrators
and the like in the same institution; to other
institutions in which the student intends to enroll;
to the Comptroller General of the United States;
in connection with a student’s application for, or
receipt of, financial aid; to organizations such as
Educational Testing Service or the College Entrance
Examination Board involved in testing programs
and student aid; to accrediting organizations; in
compliance with judicial order or pursuant to any
lawfully-issued subpoena. Students are notified by
registered mail prior to records being released
through the action of any lawfully-issued subpoena
duces tecum.
The Executive Director of Student Records and
Financial Aid can provide additional information on
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
(Buckley Amendment).
TRANSCRIPTS
Students must make written requests and pay
a $3.00 transcript fee to have official transcripts
issued by the college. Requests should be made at
the Enrollment Services offices, Ocala or Citrus
Campuses. Mailed requests are also honored. The
transcript request form may be downloaded from
www.GoCFCC.com.
VETERANS
INFORMATION
First-time students who will be receiving VA
educational benefits should apply at the nearest VA
office. For a first-time application, the veteran will
need a copy of his or her DD-214 (separation
paper), or Notice of Basic Eligibility (NOBE) if
active in the reserves, and transcripts of previous
college education and/or occupational training.
Application forms and information are available in
the Enrollment Services Center.
Note: Allow a minimum of six to eight weeks for
the VA application or any paperwork to be processed
by the VA regional office from the time the
paperwork is submitted by the veteran to the VA
regional office. Important: Veterans will not be
certified without a counseling appointment to
approve their schedule each term.
Deferments
In accordance with Florida law and college policy,
any eligible veteran or dependent wishing to pursue
an approved program within the meaning of VA
Chapter 30, 35 or 106 will have, upon request, 60
days after the first day of classes to pay registration fees. During summer terms, the deadline for
payment of VA deferred fees will be 10 days before
the last day of scheduled classes. One deferment
per academic year is allowed. Veterans with out-ofstate residence can only defer a maximum of $600.
VA students are reminded that they must pay
their VA deferred fees by the due date, regardless
of whether they have started receiving their money
from VA.
Under Public Law 94.502, veterans cannot be
certified to the VA by CFCC in any program in
which Chapter 30 and Chapter 35 (dependents)
VA recipients comprise more than 85 percent of
the enrollment in the program. Chapter 35 VA
students are included in the 85:15 percent ratio
computation; however, they can be certified to the
VA in any approved program, regardless of the
percentage of veterans in that program.
GENERAL
INFORMATION
Standards of Progress
The concept of unsatisfactory progress includes
those VA students not progressing at a rate that
will permit graduation within the approved length of
the course, based on the time paid for by the VA.
This provision may be waived if there is a VA finding
of mitigating or extenuating circumstances. Students
placed on VA probation for unsatisfactory progress
will be so notified, in writing, by the college Veterans
Affairs office. If, after one term or its equivalent, the
student fails to achieve satisfactory progress, VA
education benefits will be terminated. The college
notifies both the student and the VA regional office
in Atlanta when this occurs. Once a VA student is
dismissed for unsatisfactory progress, he or she
cannot receive further educational benefits from
the VA until approved by the school and VA.
Grades
The VA prohibits payment of educational benefits for a course in which a student receives a
non-punitive grade (“W,” “I,” “N” or “X”), and these
grades cannot be used in computing graduation
requirements. This includes any course from
which the student withdraws, unless there is a
VA finding of mitigating circumstances that
caused the withdrawal. Mitigating circumstances
can be considered if the student can demonstrate
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
45
good faith in pursuit of the course up to the point of
withdrawal or completion and if the student submits
evidence that he or she applied for tutorial aid and
consulted a counselor in an attempt to remedy the
unsatisfactory work before withdrawal or completion.
Only classes that apply to the degree or program will be certified to the VA. Minimum training
time requirements for veterans are listed below:
Training Time Requirements
Fall/Spring
Full time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 or more credit hours
3/4 time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .From 9 to 11 credit hours
1/2 time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .From 6 to 8 credit hours
Less than half time . . . . . . . . . . .From 1 to 5 credit hours
Summer
Each term (A, B, C) within the summer semester is
treated separately for payment purposes. Example:
Term A
Term B
Term C
Only
Only
Only
Full time . . . . . .4 . . . . . . . .4 . . . . . . . .8+ credit hours
3/4 time . . . . . .3 . . . . . . . .3 . . . . . . . .6–7 credit hours
1/2 time . . . . . .2 . . . . . . . .2 . . . . . . . .4–5 credit hours
See VA representative for less than half time
or other enrollment variations.
Reminder: Any enrollment break of 30 or more
days could result in an interruption of benefits.
Unsatisfactory Attendance in
Vocational Programs
VA students in vocational programs will be
monitored on a monthly basis for attendance. The
VA will be notified of unsatisfactory attendance at
the point during a term that a vocational veteran
student accumulates three unexcused absences.
The veteran student may not be recertified for
veteran benefits until 30 days of satisfactory
attendance (no more than two unexcused absences
in the 30-day period) has elapsed. Any non-college
degree veteran student who is terminated from
receiving VA educational benefits will be notified in
writing by CFCC.
Note: All VA students are required to present
their registration forms (class schedules) to the
CFCC Enrollment Services Center before they can
be certified to the VA regional office for educational
benefits. These schedules must be signed by a
counselor or advisor for all A.A./A.S. degreeseeking students. It is necessary to schedule
an appointment with the Student Advising
Department, in advance, for this process to
be completed.
46
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Academic
Information
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
47
ACADEMIC
REQUIREMENTS
General Education Core:
A Statement of Purpose
The CFCC General Education basic core will
consist of the following components which address
student achievement of learning outcomes: written
communications, social sciences, natural science,
humanities and mathematics. In addition, students
are expected to complete college advisement/
orientations, and to achieve skills in basic computer use. The purpose of the common core is to
expose all degree-seeking students to a diversity of
disciplines while meeting the institutional learning
outcomes to provide for the following:
a. Minimum level of adult literacy.
b. Foundation for advanced study.
c. Inquiry and scholarship through the
improvement of basic and critical
thinking skills.
d. Increased knowledge and appreciation of
human experiences and achievements in
the arts and sciences.
e. Better understanding of individuals and their
cultures, both in America and abroad.
CFCC INSTITUTIONAL
LEARNING OUTCOMES
CFCC is committed to the development of
individuals within the traditions of our democratic
society. Through the richness of cumulative learning
experiences, individually and collectively, we become
participants in a dynamic learning community. The
college promotes positive changes in the way
students approach problems, make judgments,
communicate ideas, interact with others, accept
responsibility for their actions, and dedicate their
efforts to the service of others. Growth in these
cognitive, affective, and ethical abilities is measured
by success in the following institutional learning
outcomes: critical thinking and problem solving,
self-direction, interpersonal skills, communications,
mathematics, and computer and information skills.
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
GENERAL EDUCATION COMMON CORE
I. A Common Core consists of 15 credit hours of courses from the following disciplines which addresses
the Institutional Learning Outcomes: written communications, social sciences, humanities,
mathematics and natural sciences. All degree seeking students must successfully complete the
common core.
II. Requirements for the General Education Common Core.
Discipline
Course
Credits
Written Communications
Freshman Composition Skills I (ENC 1101)
3 credits
Social Sciences*
A. Introduction to Social Sciences (ISS 1010)
and Introduction to Humanities (HUM 1021).
B. World Civilizations I (WOH 1012) and either
Introduction to Humanities (HUM 1021) or
Introduction to Humanities: Since the
Renaissance (HUM 1230).
C. World Civilizations II (WOH 1022) and either
Introduction to Humanities (HUM 1021) or
Introduction to Humanities: To the
Renaissance (HUM 1210).
Any approved course beyond college
preparatory level
Any biological or physical science
3 credits
Humanities*
Mathematics
Natural Sciences**
Institutional Learning
Outcomes Addressed
Communications,
Technical Skills
Communications,
Interpersonal Skills,
Self-Direction
3 credits
Communications,
Critical Thinking,
Self-Direction
3 credits
Math, Problem Solving
3 credits
Problem Solving,
Critical Thinking, Math,
Technical Skills
Total: 15 credits
*Select Option A, B or C to meet the six hour social sciences/humanities requirement. Humanities and social science
may be taken in any order. One is not a prerequisite for the other.
**At least one hour of science lab courses should be included for A.A. degree seeking students, either in the General
Education “Common Core” or from the General Education course requirements.
NOTE: Any honors section of Core Courses will be accepted.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
49
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS
DEGREE
REQUIREMENTS
(For students planning to transfer to a four-year
institution after completing two years at CFCC)
Since August 1, 1989, universities in the state of
Florida have required that all undergraduate transfer students admitted have two high school
academic units in a single foreign language or
the equivalent. The equivalent is interpreted as
8–10 semester hours of the same foreign language
taken at college level.
In addition to the General Education common
core requirements noted previously, Associate in
Arts (A.A.) students must:
A. Complete at least 60 credit hours, all of
which must be transferable academic work
exclusive of occupational courses and wellness/fitness courses, unless required in program. (15 credits General Education Common
Core, 21 or 22 credits General Education
Requirements, 24 credits General Education
electives).
B. Achieve a grade point average of at least
2.0 (“C”) on all college work and at CFCC.
C. Complete at least 15 semester hours in
residence at CFCC.
D. Take and pass the state’s College Level
Academic Skills Test (CLAST), if required, or
qualify for an exemption. Passing scores
are: Reading, 295; English Language
Skills, 295; Mathematics, 295; Essay, 6.
See pages 61 and 62 for important
information.
E. To satisfy SBE Rule 6A-10.30 (the ‘‘Gordon
Rule’’), complete with a grade of “C” or
better a total of 24,000 words in designated
‘‘Gordon Rule’’ classes (marked in this
catalog with a ✒ in the Course Descriptions
section and as G-4000 words or G-6000
words). Students must complete 12,000
words in the communications area: ENC
1101–Freshman Composition Skills I (6,000
words), ENC 1102–Freshman Composition
Skills II (6,000 words). The other 12,000
words will come from designated classes
(4,000 words each) from the humanities,
social sciences/behavioral sciences, and
Wellness.
50
F. To satisfy SBE Rule 6A-10.30 (the ‘‘Gordon
Rule’’), complete six semester credit hours
of mathematics at the level of College
Algebra–MAC 1105 or Liberal Arts Mathematics–MGF 1106 or higher. This rule is met
when students complete, with a grade of “C”
or better, six or more hours from the courses listed in the mathematics section of the
General Education Course Requirements.
G. Basic knowledge of computers must be
demonstrated in all appropriate courses.
Basic computer skills are attained in regular
coursework. However, entering students
are strongly encouraged to acquire basic
computer skills by taking a computer
course such as CGS 1100–Microcomputer
Applications. This course may be a required
prerequisite for some university programs.
H. Complete 24 hours of elective courses,
which include the required prerequisites for
majors at the university. See Enrollment
Services for articulation sheets for each
University. Elective courses should be
determined by the the student’s major and
the requirements of the four-year institution
to which the student plans to transfer. It is
recommended that the student complete
eight semester hours in a foreign language,
American Sign Language, or appropriate
CLEP exam, if the student has not completed
two years of the same foreign language in
high school. Students seeking admission to
the Florida State University System must
have completed two years of foreign language
at the high school level or two courses (eight
credit hours) at the college level. Students
enrolled in foreign language courses at
CFCC must earn a grade of “C” or better
before advancing to the next level.
Note: American Sign Language may satisfy the
entrance requirement, but not the exit requirement,
for most universities. Check with Enrollment
Services to determine acceptability for the college
you plan to attend.
Education Majors*
Students planning to major in education in the
State University System must complete, as a prerequisite for admission, ACT or SAT and three
education courses:
EDF 2005–Introduction to Education
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
EDG 2701–Introduction to Multicultural
Education: Teaching Diverse Populations
EME 2040–Introduction to Educational
Technology
An additional six hours of courses with an
international or diversity focus is also required.
The courses meeting this international/diversity
requirement for this and other majors are:
Gordon Rule/General Education/
Diversity Courses
(all Gordon Rule 4,000)
ANT 2000
Introduction to Anthropology
CGS 1062
Honors, Computers in Society
ECO 2013
Principles of Economics–Macro
ENL 2011
English Literature I
ENL 2022
English Literature II
ENL 2000
Honors English Literature
GEA 2000
World Geography
FIL 2400
Film: The History and Aesthetics
of Cinema
HIS 2955
Studies Abroad in Civilization
HUM 2310
Mythology in Religion, Art,
Literature and Music
HUM 2310H
Honors Mythological Symbolism in
Art, Philosophy and Religion
HUM 2418
Islamic Civilization
HUM 2520
Music in the Humanities
HUM 2930
Spanish Culture and Civilization
LIT 2110
World Literature I
LIT 2120
World Literature II
LIT 2330
Introduction to Children’s
Literature
REL 2300
Comparative Religions
WOH 1012H Honors World Civilizations I
WOH 1022H Honors World Civilizations II
WST 2010
Introduction to Women’s Studies
Academic Discipline
Institutional Learning
Outcomes
Communications
6 credit hours
Select: ENC 1102
and one other
course
Communications,
Technical Skills
*Students interested in an education major should
contact the teacher education advisor at the CFCC
University Center, ext. 4-1575.
General Diversity Electives (Non-Gordon Rule)
AMH 2091
Introduction to African-American
History
AMH 2090
History of American Women
ANT 2100
Introduction to Archaeology
ANT 2310
American Indian Cultures
INR 2002
International Relations
LAH 2020
Introduction to Latin American
Civilization
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
General Education
Course Requirement
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
In addition to the “Common Core” courses,
each A.A. degree seeking student MUST complete the following requirements (21–22 credits).
A.A. degree seeking students must select
courses from the General Education Course
Requirements. Each course addresses institutional
competencies and outcomes, and satisfies the
Florida State Board of Education standards to
meet the Gordon Rule requirements for writing and
mathematics. These courses must be passed with
a grade of “C” or better.
The following courses meet the Gordon Rule
requirement, with the exception of SPC 2600–
Effective Speaking, SPC 2601–Advanced
Effective Speaking, SPC 2594–Forensics,
THE 1925–Play Production, TPP 2100–Acting I,
RTV 2300–Introduction to Broadcast Newswriting,
RTV 2261L–Advanced Broadcast Newswriting and
Production, and natural science courses.
Courses
ENC 1102
MMC 1101
SPC 2594
SPC 2600
SPC 2601
THE 1925
TPP 2100
RTV 2261L
RTV 2300
Freshman Composition Skills II (6,000 words)
Writing For Mass Communications (4,000 words)
Forensics Speech
Effective Speaking
Advanced Effective Speaking
Play Production
Acting I
Advanced Broadcast Newswriting and Production
Introduction to Broadcast Newswriting
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
51
52
Academic Discipline
Institutional Learning
Outcomes
Social Sciences
3 credit hours total
Select one course
Communications,
Interpersonal Skills,
Self-direction
Academic Discipline
Institutional Learning
Outcomes
Humanities
3 credit hours
Select one course
Communications,
Critical Thinking,
Self-Direction
Courses
ANT 2000
CCJ 2010
ECO 2013
EDF 2005
GEA 2000
HIS 2955
POS 2041
PSY 2012
PSY 2012H
SLS 2261
SYG 2000
WST 2010
Introduction to Anthropology (4,000 words)
Criminology (4,000 words)
Principles of Economics — Macro (4,000 words)
Introduction to Education (4,000 words)
World Geography (4,000 words)
Studies Abroad in Civilization (4,000 words)
American National Government (4,000 words)
General Psychology (4,000 words)
Honors General Psychology (4,000 words)
Leadership Development (4,000 words)
Introductory Sociology (4,000 words)
Introduction to Women’s Studies (4,000 words)
Courses
AML 2010
Survey of American Literature I
(17th–19th Centuries) (4,000 words)
AML 2012H Honors Survey of American Literature (4,000 words)
AML 2022
Survey of American Literature II
(19th–20th Centuries) (4,000 words)
ARH 2050
The History of Art I (4,000 words)
ARH 2051
The History of Art II (4,000 words)
ENL 2000
Honors English Literature (4,000 words)
ENL 2011
English Literature I (4,000 words)
ENL 2022
English Literature II (4,000 words)
FIL 2400
Film: The History and Aesthetics of Cinema
(4,000 words)
HIS 2955
Studies Abroad in Civilization (4,000 words)
HUM 2310 Mythology in Religion, Art, Literature and Music
(4,000 words)
HUM 2310H Honors Mythological Symbolism in Art,
Philosophy and Religion (4,000 words)
HUM 2418 Islamic Civilization (4,000 words)
HUM 2450 American Humanities (4,000 words)
HUM 2532 Western Ideologies: Renaissance–20th Century
(4,000 words)
HUM 2532H Honors Western Ideologies (4,000 words)
HUM 2930 Spanish Culture and Civilization (4,000 words)
LIT 2090
Introduction to Contemporary Literature
(4,000 words)
LIT 2110
World Literature I (4,000 words)
LIT 2120
World Literature II (4,000 words)
LIT 2330
Introduction to Children’s Literature (4,000 words)
MUL 1010
Music Appreciation (4,000 words)
PHI 1100
Introduction to Logic (4,000 words)
PHI 2010
Introduction to Philosophy (4,000 words)
PHI 2631
Ethics in Business (4,000 words)
REL 2300
Comparative Religions (4,000 words)
REL 2300H Honors Comparative Religions (4,000 words)
THE 1000
Introduction to Theater (4,000 words)
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Academic Discipline
Institutional Learning
Outcomes
Mathematics
3 credit hours
Select one course
Math, Problem Solving
Academic Discipline
Institutional Learning
Outcomes
Courses
MAC 1105
MAC 1140
MAC 1114
MAC 1147
MAC 2233
MAC 2311
MAC 2312
MAC 2313
MAP 2302
MGF 1106
MGF 1107
MTG 2204
STA 2023
College Algebra
Pre-Calculus Algebra
Trigonometry
Pre-Calculus Algebra/Trigonometry
Calculus for Business and Social Science
Calculus I with Analytic Geometry
Calculus II with Analytic Geometry
Calculus III with Analytic Geometry
Elementary Differential Equations
Mathematics for Liberal Arts I
Mathematics for Liberal Arts II
Elements of Geometry
Statistical Methods
Courses
Natural Science
3–4 credit hours
Select one biological
or physical science
course to fulfill this
requirement. At least
one hour of a lab
course should be
included either in the
General Education
“Common Core” or here.
Part A: Biological
Science or
select one course if
not met in the
common core
Problem Solving, Critical
Thinking, Technical Skills
Math
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
BOT 1010C
BOT 1011C
BSC 1020
BSC 1020L
BSC 1010C
BSC 1011C
BSC 1037C
Botany with Lab
Plant Diversity
Biology and the Human Experience
Biology and the Human Experience Lab
General Biology I with Lab
General Biology II with Lab
Honors Biology, Biotechnology and Bioethics
with Lab (4,000 words)
BSC 1050
Living in the Environment
BSC 1050L Living in the Environment Lab
BSC 1051C Environmental Stewardship with Lab
BSC 1080
Basic Anatomy and Physiology
BSC 2085C Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab
BSC 2086C Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab
GLY 1102
Darwin and Dinosaurs
MCB 2010C Microbiology I with Lab
OCB 2630
Introduction to Marine Ecology
OCE 1001
Introduction to Oceanography
PCB 1431C Florida Waters Part 1
PCB 1432C Florida Waters Part 2
PCB 1433C Florida Waters Part 3
PCB 1434C Florida Waters Part 4
PCB 1440C Florida’s Landscape Part 1
PCB 1448C Florida’s Landscape Part 2
PCB 1449C Florida’s Landscape Part 3
PCB 1450C Florida’s Landscape Part 4
PCB 2033C Introductory Ecology
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
53
Academic Discipline
Institutional Learning
Outcomes
Part B: Physical
Science
Select one course if
not met in the
common core
Problem Solving, Critical
Thinking, Technical Skills,
Math
Courses
BSC 1050
BSC 1050L
BSC 1051C
CHM 1020C
CHM 1025C
CHM 1033C
CHM 2045C
CHM 2046C
CHM 2210C
CHM 2211C
GLY 1103
GLY 2010C
MET 1010C
OCE 1001
PCB 1431C
PCB 1432C
PCB 1433C
PCB 1434C
PCB 1440C
PCB 1448C
PCB 1449C
PCB 1450C
PHY 1020
PHY 1020L
PHY 1053C
PHY 1054C
PHY 2048C
PHY 2049C
PSC 1101
54
Academic Discipline
Institutional Learning
Outcomes
Wellness
Education
3 credit hours
Problem Solving, Critical
Thinking, Communications,
Interpersonal Skills,
Self-Direction
Living in the Environment
Living in the Environment Lab
Environmental Stewardship with Lab
Chemistry for Non-Majors with Lab
Introductory Chemistry with Lab
Chemistry for Health-Related Fields with Lab
General Chemistry I with Qualitative Analysis
with Lab
General Chemistry II with Qualitative Analysis
with Lab
Organic Chemistry I with Lab
Organic Chemistry II with Lab
Darwin and Dinosaurs
Geology with Lab
Introduction to Meteorology
Introduction to Oceanography
Florida Waters Part 1
Florida Waters Part 2
Florida Waters Part 3
Florida Waters Part 4
Florida’s Landscape Part 1
Florida’s Landscape Part 2
Florida’s Landscape Part 3
Florida’s Landscape Part 4
Elementary Physics for Non-Science Majors
Elementary Physics for Non-Science Majors Lab
General Physics I with Lab
General Physics II with Lab
General Physics with Calculus I with Lab
General Physics with Calculus II with Lab
Earth Science
Courses
HLP 1081
Personal Wellness Appraisal and Improvement
(4,000 words)
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
General Electives
In addition to the “Common Core” courses, and the
“General Education Course Requirements,” each
A.A. degree seeking student MUST complete the
following “General Electives” requirements (24
credits).
General Electives (Gordon Rule)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Creative Writing
Technical Writing
___
___
___
General Electives (Non-Gordon Rule)
The following courses may be used to satisfy
the requirement for 24 elective hours. Gordon Rule
courses from the General Education listings may
also be used as electives, according to your
planned major at a university.
___
___
___
CRW 2000
ENC 2210
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Art (Non-Gordon Rule)
ARH 2051
Art History II
ART 1201C
Basic Design I
ART 1300C
Freehand Drawing I
ART 1510C
Painting I
ART 2110C
Ceramics I
ART 2111C
Ceramics II
ART 2202C
Basic Design II
ART 2301C
Freehand Drawing II
ART 2520C
Painting II
ART 2701C
Sculpture I
ART 2702C
Sculpture II
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Business (Non-Gordon Rule)
ACG 2021
Financial Accounting
ACG 2071
Managerial Accounting
BUL 2241
Business Law I
BUL 2242
Business Law II
ECO 2023
Principles of Economics—Micro
GEB 1011
Introduction to Business
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
MAR 2011
Principles of Marketing
MNA 2141
Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills
OST 1100
Keyboarding I
OST 2335
Business Communications
Child Development and Education (Non-Gordon Rule)
___ EEC 2200
Curriculum in Childhood Education
___ EEC 1931
Child Care Seminar
___ EEC 2001
Early Childhood Education
___ EEC 1000
Introduction to Child Development
and Education
___ EEC 1603
Child Guidance
___ EEC 2401
Home and Community
___ EEC 1921
Pre-School Workshop
___ EEC 1940
Educational Field Experience
___ EEC 1907
Observing and Recording Behavior
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Communications (Non-Gordon Rule)
ARH 2051
The History of Art II
FRE 1120
Elementary French I
FRE 1121
Elementary French II
JOU 2100
Introduction to Journalism and
Newspaper Production
MMC 1000
Survey of Communications
MMC 1101
Writing for Mass Communications
RTV 2300
Introduction to Broadcast
Newswriting
RUS 1120
Elementary Russian I
RUS 1121
Elementary Russian II
SPA 1612
Introduction to American Sign
Language I
SPA 1613
Introduction to American Sign
Language II
SPN 1120
Elementary Spanish I
SPN 1121
Elementary Spanish II
SPN 2200
Intermediate Spanish I
SPN 2201
Intermediate Spanish II
THE 1925
Play Production
THE 2925
Production and Performance
THE 2927
Advanced Play Production
TPA 2077
Scene Painting
TPA 2212
Sound Production for the Theater
TPA 2220
Stage Lighting
TPP 2100
Acting I
RTV 2261L
Advanced Broadcast Newswriting
and Production
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
Computer and Information Science (Non-Gordon Rule)
___ CEN 2509
Data Communication and Networking
___ CGS 1062
Computers in Society—Honors
___ CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
___ CGS 2103
Advanced Computer Applications
___ CGS 2540
Database Management Systems
___ OST 1100
Keyboarding I
___ COP 1332
Programming Visual Basic
___ COP 1224
Programming in C++
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Criminal Justice (Non-Gordon Rule)
CCJ 1020
Introduction to Criminal Justice
System
CJC 1000
Introduction to Corrections
CCJ 1500
Juvenile Delinquency
CCJ 2010
Criminology
CCJ 2013
Criminal Victimization
CCJ 2111
Theory and Practice of Law
Enforcement
CJL 2130
Criminal Law, Evidence and
Procedures
CCJ 2320
Community-Based Corrections
CCJ 2940
Practical Applications in Corrections
CCJ 2941
Practical Applications in Law
Enforcement
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
55
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Humanities (Non-Gordon Rule)
ARH 2051
The History of Art II
HUM 2520
Music in the Humanities
IDS 1307
Interdisciplinary Studies: Math,
Science, and the Arts
MUL 1691
Historical Survey of American
Musical Theater
PHI 1100
Introduction to Logic
PHH 2403
Survey of Modern Philosophy
PHI 2600
Introduction to Ethics
REL 2210
Old Testament
REL 2240
New Testament
THE 2925
Production and Performance
THE 2927
Advanced Play Production
TPA 2070
Scene Painting
TPA 2220
Stage Lighting
TPA 2260
Sound Production for the Theater
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Music (Non-Gordon Rule)
DAA 1000
Introduction to Dance
DAA 1680
Patriot Dance Ensemble
MUE 2040
Introduction to Music Education
MUN 1100
Pep Band
MUN 1270
Concert Band
MUN 1310
Variations Show Choir
MUN 1340
Patriot Singers
MUN 1420
Woodwind Ensemble
MUN 1430
Brass Ensemble
MUN 1492
Handbell Ensemble
MUN 1710
Jazz Band
MUN 1770
Variations Band
MUT 1121
Music Theory I
MUT 1122
Music Theory II
MUT 2126
Music Theory III
MUT 2127
Music Theory IV
MVK 1111
Class Piano I
MVK 2121
Class Piano II
MVV 1111
Class Voice
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
56
Social Sciences (Non-Gordon Rule)
AMH 2010
U.S. History to 1877
AMH 2020
U.S. History Since 1877
AMH 2070
History of Florida
AMH 2090
History of American Women
AMH 2091
Introduction to AfricanAmerican History
ANT 2100
Introduction to Archaeology
ANT 2310
American Indian Cultures
DEP 2001
Developmental Psychology: Infant
and Childhood
DEP 2004
Human Growth and Development
EDG 2701
Introduction to Multicultural Education:
Teaching Diverse Populations
EME 2040
Introduction to Educational
Technology
EDP 2002
Educational Psychology
HIS 2935
Seminar in History
INR 2002
International Relations
ISS 2936
Honors Colloquium
LAH 2020
Introduction to Latin American
Civilization
MUE 2040
Introduction to Music Education
MUE 2450
Woodwind Techniques
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
MUE 2460
PCO 2710
POS 2112
SLS 1501
SLS 1715
SOP 2602
SOW 1031
SYG 2430
Brass Techniques
Applied Psychology
State and Local Government
College and Career Success
Peer Education Leadership
Applied Human Relations
Introduction to Social Work
Marriage and the Family
Mathematics (Non-Gordon Rule)
___ MAT 1033
Intermediate Algebra
___ MAE 2801
Mathematics For Educators
See courses in General Education section above.
Natural Sciences (Non-Gordon Rule)
See courses in General Education section above.
Wellness/Fitness (Non-Gordon Rule)
The following courses may be taken only if required for
student’s particular field of study. They do not meet the
wellness requirement in the CFCC core requirement.
Note: These courses do not count toward the wellness
requirement.
___ HSC 2100
Personal Health (Hygiene)
___ HSC 2140
Drugs in Society
___ HSC 2400
First Aid
___ HUN 1201
Basic Nutrition
___ PEL 1011
Team Sports I
___ PEL 1012
Team Sports II
___ PEL 1211
Softball
___ PEL 1212
Fastpitch Softball
___ PEL 1441
Racquetball
___ PEL 1442
Intermediate Racquetball
___ PEL 2013
Team Sports III
___ PEL 2014
Team Sports IV
___ PEL 2121
Golf
___ PEL 2216
Baseball Fundamentals
___ PEL 2341
Beginning Tennis
___ PEL 2342
Intermediate Tennis
___ PEM 1101
Weight Training and Physical
Conditioning
___ PEM 1141
Aerobics I
___ PEM 1142
Aerobics II
___ PEM 1953
Varsity Cheerleading
___ PEM 2131
Weight Training
___ PEN 1121
Beginning Swimming
___ PEN 1122
Intermediate Swimming
___ PEO 1004
Contemporary Coaching Concepts
___ PEO 2013
Sports Officiating
___ PEO 2621
Basketball Fundamentals
___ PEO 2624
Basketball Coaching Concepts
___ PEQ 2121
Aquatics
___ PET 1000
Introduction to Physical Education
___ PET 2622C
Care and Prevention of Athletic
Injuries
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
College Preparatory Program
The college preparatory program is oriented
toward individual differences in students, rather
than to academic conformity to the subject matter.
It was developed on the premise that the student in
this program needs simultaneous assistance in
basic academic skills (reading, mathematics,
grammar and composition), personal enrichment,
and adjustment to self and society. The program
provides this assistance through college preparatory
courses drawn from the areas of English, reading,
and mathematics, as well as through individualized
workshops in counseling and communications.
College preparatory students are assigned college
preparatory classes as indicated by placement
scores. The three areas of college preparatory
instruction are mathematics, English (writing), and
reading. Students who are assigned college prep
instruction may take a limited number of collegelevel courses in each curriculum area as follows:
A. A student assigned to college prep
mathematics may not register for any
college-level mathematics course until the
college prep requirement in mathematics is
successfully completed. Additionally, no
course with a mathematics prerequisite or
corequisite may be taken.
B. A student assigned to college prep English
or reading may not register for college-level
English (ENC 1101, Freshman Composition
Skills I) until the college prep requirement
has been successfully completed. In addition,
no course which has ENC 1101 as a prerequisite or corequisite may be taken.
C. A student assigned to college prep reading
may not take any college-level reading
course or ENC 1101 until the college prep
requirement has been successfully completed.
In addition, no course which has ENC 1101
as a prerequisite or corequisite may be taken.
D. ENC 0001C and ENC 0010C (college prep
English) and REA 0001C and REA 0002C
(college prep reading) form the second or
advanced level in the ESL (English as a
Second Language) program. A student
participating in the ESL program may not
take college level courses, except as noted
in item B above.
All students required to enroll in a college
preparatory course may elect to seek an alternative
source for remedial instruction. The alternatives
may include but not be limited to a private provider,
Continuing Education, or the Learning Support
Center. A student who tests into any college
preparatory course or who selects an alternative
method of instruction is entitled to enroll in up to 12
credits of college-level courses in skill areas other
than those for which the student is being remediated.
After 12 hours of enrollment, a student is prohibited
from enrolling in additional college-level courses
until the student scores above the cut-score on all
sections of the common placement test (CPT).
Students enrolled in a college preparatory
course may take the common placement test
(CPT) once every 30 days, after the completion of
their current term of enrollment or at any time
between terms. Students who attain scores that
qualify for entry into regular college credit courses
will be allowed to register for such courses their
subsequent term of enrollment at CFCC.
Students are required to present passing scores
on a common placement test to show that basic
computation and/or communication skills have
been met.
State law, House Bill 1545, requires CFCC to
charge full cost of instruction on the third attempt
of a college preparatory course taken at CFCC,
since fall 1997, in English, reading, or mathematics.
However, due to financial hardship and/or extenuating
circumstances, a student may be able to qualify for
an exception to the increased fee. An exception
based on extenuating circumstances may be used
only once for each course.
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
College Preparatory Courses
College preparatory courses do not meet the
General Education requirements and are nontransferable electives. They cannot be used to
meet the 60 hour graduation requirement. College
credit is not given for these courses. Students must
continually enroll in required preparatory courses
until all requirements are completed.
___
EAP 0280C
___
EAP 0300C
___
EAP 0360C
____
___
___
___
___
___
ENC 0001C
ENC 0010C
MAT 0012C
MAT 0024C
REA 0001C
REA 0002C
English as a Second Language
Combined Skills
English as a Second Language
Speech/Listening
English as a Second Language
Grammar/Structure
College Prep English I
College Prep English II
Integrated Arithmetic and Algebra
College Prep Algebra
College Prep Reading I
College Prep Reading II
NOTE: Students required to take two or three courses in
prep areas will be required to enroll in College and Career
Success (SLS 1501).
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
57
Associate in Arts
Transfer Guarantees
Community college Associate in Arts graduates
are guaranteed certain rights under the statewide
articulation agreement (Rule 6A-10.024). The
articulation agreement governs the transfer of
students from Florida public community colleges
into the State University System. The agreement
addresses GENERAL ADMISSION to the State
University System and PROGRAM ADMISSION
to selected programs at a university.
General Admission
Guarantees:
The articulation agreement designates the
Associate in Arts degree as the transfer degree.
In doing so, the agreement guarantees that:
A. Community college A.A. degree holders will
be granted admission to a university within
the State University System, but not necessarily to the university or program of choice.
B. Upon transferring to a state university, A.A.
degree graduates will be awarded 60 credit
hours toward the baccalaureate degree.
Program Admission
General
The universities determine the courses and
prerequisites that must be taken in order to receive
a baccalaureate degree for a chosen program.
Although all credit earned toward an A.A. degree
will transfer to a university, not all credit may satisfy
the program prerequisites or the course requirements
for a baccalaureate degree. Therefore, it is important
to know the program requirements and to take as
many of these courses as possible at the community
college while completing the A.A. degree.
C. Generally, the university catalog in effect the
year the A.A. degree student first enrolled at
the community college will remain in effect
for the student’s entire program, provided
the student maintains continuous enrollment
as defined in that catalog and completes the
program within the university’s specified time
frame. Note: Certain changes in law may
affect the catalog.
Limited Access
Because of demand or limited resources, most
of the universities have programs that are called
limited access programs. Admission to limited
access programs is granted on a competitive basis.
Consequently, limited access programs have
additional admission requirements that are more
restrictive than the universities’ general admission
requirements. These requirements include one
or more of the following: minimum grade point
averages, test scores, prerequisite courses, auditions
and portfolios.
D. Once a student has completed the general
education requirements and this is so noted
on the transcript, regardless of whether an
A.A. degree is awarded, no other state
university or community college to which the
student may transfer can require additional
courses to the general education requirements.
Guarantees
Neither Associate in Arts graduates nor native
university students are guaranteed admission to
limited access programs. However, the articulation
agreement does provide certain guarantees,
including that:
E. When transferring among institutions participating in the Statewide Course Numbering
System, a receiving institution must accept
all courses taken at the transfer institution if
the same course with the same course
number is offered at the receiving institution.
F. Credits earned through articulated acceleration mechanisms, such as dual
enrollment, International Baccalaureate,
early admission, advanced placement, and
58
credit by examination, that are earned within
the A.A. degree at the community college,
will be transferable to the state university.
Students without an A.A. degree who are seeking
admission to a state university do not have all the
protection provided by the articulation agreement
and may be denied admission or lose credit when
transferring. In most cases, students without an
A.A. degree will have to meet freshman admissions
standards.
A. The community college student will have
the same opportunity to enroll in a university
limited access program as the native
university student.
B. Selection and enrollment criteria for a
university limited access program must be
established and published in catalogs,
counseling manuals, and other appropriate
publications. Changes in program enrollment
criteria must be given with sufficient advance
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
notice for prospective students to adjust their
programs to meet the new criteria.
Should any of these guarantees be denied, the
student has the right to file an appeal. Each state
university and community college has established
appeal procedures. These procedures must be
published in the university catalog. As a general
rule, if a student is denied admission to a university
or a program at the university and wants to appeal,
the appeal must be initiated at the university
admissions office.
Admission Appeals
If a student is accepted into a university, but is
denied admission to a program, the university must
state the reasons for the denial. This is usually
done in a letter from the dean of the college,
school or department. Any request for further
clarification should include:
A. A copy of the letter of denial.
B. A copy of the student’s transcripts.
C. A copy of the page(s) from the counseling
manual or catalog outlining the program
requirements.
D. A signed statement requesting a review of
the denial.
Students should keep a copy of all correspondence
and a log of all telephone contacts. A copy of all of
the above information should be forwarded to the
university admissions office and the university
articulation officer.
Articulation Officers
The university articulation officer is responsible
for assisting the community college student seeking
admission to a university. If assistance is needed
with an appeal request or if it appears that a
department is not complying with the statewide
articulation agreement, the university articulation
officer should be contacted. Articulation officers at
the community colleges are also responsible for
assisting in the transfer of students to universities
and can advise students in the interpretation of
the articulation agreement and appealing an
admissions decision.
Appealing to the Articulation
Coordinating Committee
If the denial is upheld at the university level and
there is still a question of potential violation of the
articulation agreement, the student may request
a hearing before the Articulation Coordinating
Committee (Florida Education Center, Tallahassee,
Florida, 32399-0400). All of the avenues available
to the student at the institutional level should be
pursued prior to appealing to the Articulation
Coordinating Committee. The student should keep
a copy of all correspondence and a log of all
telephone contacts. The procedures for filing such
an appeal with the Articulation Coordinating
Committee are as follows:
A. The student submits a statement of the
problem, a copy of the letter of denial from the
university, a copy of the transcript in question,
a copy of the page(s) from the catalog or
counseling manual, and a request to have a
hearing before the Articulation Coordinating
Committee for purposes of adjudication.
B. All student appeals and policy concerns
are reviewed by the Articulation Appeals
Subcommittee, which then forwards its
recommendation(s) to the Articulation
Coordinating Committee. Issues not resolved
by the subcommittee are sent to the full
committee for resolution.
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
C. The Articulation Coordinating Committee
and Articulation Appeals Subcommittee may
request the appearance of representatives
or statements from the receiving or sending
institution to provide additional information
or clarification on the issue.
D. A decision letter on the disposition of an
appeal is written by the chair of the
Articulation Coordinating Committee to the
division deans, and copies are simultaneously sent to all persons involved, including
the student. The decision of the Articulation
Coordinating Committee shall be final.
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE
AND ASSOCIATE OF
APPLIED SCIENCE
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
In addition to common core requirements noted
on page 49, Associate in Science (A.S.) degree
students must:
A. Complete the specified number of hours of
credit in an approved course of study as
outlined for the program.
B. Achieve a grade point average of at least
2.0 (“C”).
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
59
C. Complete at least 25 percent of semester
hours in residence at CFCC and attend
during the semester the degree is earned.
ACADEMIC PROGRESS
COLLEGE CREDIT DIVISION
A student’s standing at Central Florida
Community College will be determined by the
relationship of hours attempted to grade points
earned. To be considered in good standing and
continue successfully toward a degree, a student
must earn the grade points necessary to maintain
a 2.0 (“C”) cumulative grade point average while
at CFCC.
Grade Point Deficit
A grade point deficit is the difference between
the grade points needed for a “C” average and the
grade points earned on hours attempted. The
following examples demonstrate this concept.
It should be noted that a student can go from a
position of good standing to academic warning,
probation, or suspension within one term.
New Student in FIRST Term
Grade
A
B
C
D
Grade
Points
4
3
2
1
x
x
x
x
Attempted
Hours
3
3
3
3
12
=
=
=
=
=
Total
Grade
Points
12
9
6
3
30
A “C” average (equal to 2 grade points per credit hour)
must be maintained to remain in good standing. Total
credits attempted, multiplied by 2, will establish the minimum number of grade points needed. From the grade
record listed above on 12 credit hours, 12 x 2 (for a “C”
average) = 24 grade points. Since 30 grade points were
earned, this student is in good standing.
Same Student in SECOND Term
Grade
C
D
F
F
Grade
Points
2
1
0
0
x
x
x
x
Attempted
Hours
4
3
4
4
15
=
=
=
=
=
Total
Grade
Points
8
3
0
0
11
This student earned 11 grade points in the second
term. Added to the 30 points from the first term, the student has earned 41 grade points. For the 27 credit hours
attempted (12 + 15 = 27), the student would need 54
grade points (27 x 2) to maintain a “C” average. Therefore,
this student has a 13 grade point deficit (54 - 41 = 13) and
will be placed on academic probation.
60
Academic Warning, Probation
and Suspension
Students with less than a 2.0 GPA shall be
placed on academic warning if they have a grade
point deficit of nine or less.
Students with less than a 2.0 GPA shall be
placed on academic probation if they have a
grade point deficit of 10 or more but less than 20.
These students must schedule an appointment
with an advisor or counselor for advisement and
registration.
Students with a grade point deficit of 20 or
more shall be suspended for a minimum of one
full semester and then must petition the college
for readmittance. Call the Student Advising
department for assistance.
Academic Dismissal
Students returning after suspension will be
on probation. Any student who is suspended a
subsequent time will be dismissed from the college.
Such a student is not eligible to be readmitted to
the college for a minimum of one full calendar year.
The student may then petition the college for possible readmission. Favorable action is dependent
upon clear written evidence of factors that indicate
promise of successful performance.
Students returning from suspension or dismissal
who earn a semester GPA of 2.0 or above will not
be suspended for that particular term, even though
they may have an overall deficit of more than 20
grade points. Their performance shows promise
and, if continued, will result in good academic
standing. Under these circumstances, such a
student will continue on academic probation.
Transferring to CFCC with
Deficit Grade Points
All transfer students will be evaluated by these
standards of progress, using the same criteria
used for non-transfer students. Transfer students
entering with deficit grade points will be assigned
to the appropriate category, e.g., academic warning
or probation. They will return to good standing
when sufficient grade points have been earned to
achieve a “C” average.
Earning Credit While Suspended
A student while under suspension from another
institution may not enroll at CFCC, and a student
while under suspension from CFCC may not earn
credits toward a degree from this institution by taking
courses at another institution.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Standards of Progress Summary
Academic Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–9 grade point deficit
Academic Probation . . . . . . . . . .10–19 grade point deficit
Academic Suspension . . . . .20 or more grade point deficit
Provisions for Appeal
Any student who feels there were extraordinary
circumstances that led to a 20 or more grade point
deficit may appeal his or her suspension status to the
Student Petitions and Academic Review Committee.
A student (credit, occupational or audit) who
withdraws from all classes must begin official
withdrawal procedures by contacting a counselor or
advisor. The college calendar gives specific deadlines for withdrawing from college without penalty.
OCCUPATIONAL
CERTIFICATE STUDENTS
A student’s academic standing is determined
by the same method as outlined in the section
under College Credit Division. Program instructors
may authorize a student to re-enroll for one
additional term if the student is suspended after
only one term. Failure to achieve satisfactory
progress during the term of re-enrollment will
result in permanent suspension.
VETERANS
See section on Veterans, pages 45–46, for
specific information.
ATTENDANCE POLICY
Regular, punctual class attendance is the
responsibility of every student who enrolls at
Central Florida Community College. Likewise, the
institution is committed to enforcing the attendance
policy in an effort to assist students in achieving
their educational objectives. The documentation of
student absences will begin the first class day,
regardless of when the student registers. When a
student has a legitimate reason for being absent,
the instructor has the option of permitting the
student to make up work missed and may require
an explanation for absence.
The college reserves the right to evaluate
individual cases of non-attendance. In general,
students are graded on the basis of intellectual
effort and performance. Class participation is a
significant measure of performance, and nonattendance can adversely affect a student’s grade.
Attendance at authorized off-campus student
activities (such as student organization meetings or
athletic events) is permitted to count toward class
attendance or approved absence on the instructor’s
class records. Students must give advance notice
of the intended absence, within guidelines set
by the individual instructor, in order to have the
opportunity to prepare assignments and make up
or avoid missing tests. Faculty members are
expected to establish non-punitive policies toward
attendance at such college-sponsored, off-campus
student activities such as student organization
meetings or athletic events.
If conflicts exist between a student’s regularlyscheduled class and another activity (including the
requirements of other classes), the student’s
regularly-scheduled class should receive priority.
Instructors understand that students may be given
extra credit for such events, but no student will be
penalized for non-attendance.
If a student accumulates so many absences
that further enrollment in a course appears to be
of little value, the instructor may drop the student
from the course.
Students enrolled in occupational certificate
programs are permitted two unexcused absences
within any attendance month. Students who exceed
this number of unexcused absences may be placed
on probation and, if additional unexcused absences
occur, dropped from the program. The instructor
determines whether or not an absence is excused,
considering such factors as sickness, accidents and
other contingencies beyond the control of the student.
Students enrolling in certain technical programs,
e.g., nursing, criminal justice, and cosmetology, are
expected to meet specific guidelines.
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
COLLEGE LEVEL
ACADEMIC SKILLS TEST
(CLAST)
The College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST)
measures the following skill areas: essay writing,
mathematics, English language skills and reading.
CFCC expects all A.A. degree students to take
CLAST as soon as they have earned 18 semester
credit hours (excluding any college prep courses),
and have completed ENC 1101, any college level
math course higher than MAT 1033 (see page 56).
CFCC also makes CLAST available for A.S. degree
students who plan eventually to transfer to a
university in the Florida state system.
CLAST is offered three times a year—in the fall,
winter, and summer terms—on the Ocala and
Citrus County campuses. Required pre-registrations
may be done by calling the Testing Center at the
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
61
Ocala campus or the Counseling Office at the
Citrus campus.
There is a one-time $25 charge for first-time
takers and CLAST exemptions. CLAST is offered
three times annually: the first Saturday in October
(unless that is a holiday, in which case the test will
be given the last Saturday in September), the third
Saturday in February, and the first Saturday in June.
Registration closes at 4:30 p.m. Friday, four weeks
prior to the test. Registration information appears
throughout the year on CFCC bulletin boards. CLAST
dates scheduled as the catalog went to press were:
Registration Deadline . . . . . . . . . . . . .Test Date
May 7, 2004 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .June 5, 2004
September 3, 2004 . . . . . . . . . . .October 2, 2004
All CLAST-takers are required to present two
forms of identification, one of which must have a
photo. Also, students must bring their CLAST
admission ticket, Social Security number, two
ballpoint pens, and two sharpened No. 2 pencils.
Free sample booklets are available in the Testing
Center, Building 7, Room 100, Ocala Campus, and
the Welcome Center at the Citrus County Campus.
Approximate test time is five hours, including 70
minutes’ administration time. Students may retest
as often as necessary, but must meet regular
registration deadlines. Only students who failed one
or more subtests may retest. Students may retake
only the subtests they failed. CFCC students
needing to retake the mathematics, English language
skills, and/or reading subtests may now use the
CAT-CLAST (Computer Assisted Testing) in the
college’s Testing Center, Building 7, Room 101.
Essay retesting is available only on regular CLAST
dates. The college does not grant retesting requests
until students have satisfied an approved review
process. Students receive twice the original amount
of time for any subtests they retake.
Note: Beginning January 1, 1996, any student
fulfilling one or more of the listed requirements
before completing his or her Associate in Arts
degree or a baccalaureate degree may exempt
from the CLAST. Education Majors may not exempt.
1. Achieves a score that meets or exceeds a
minimum score on the SAT or ACT.
2. Achieves a passing score on the College
Placement Test and a cumulative grade
point average of 2.5 or above, on a 4.0
scale, in postsecondary-level course work
identified by the Postsecondary Education
Planning Commission (F.S. 240.107).
62
CLAST ALTERNATIVE USING POST
SECONDARY COURSE WORK
Communication
Exemption from the three communication
sections of the CLAST can be achieved by obtaining
a 2.5 grade point average in two courses (a minimum
of six semester hours) from the following courses:
ENC 1101–English I, and
ENC 1102–English II or other equivalent
college-level English course
Computation
Exemption from the computation section of the
CLAST can be achieved by earning a 2.5 grade
point average (a minimum of six semester hours)
in any two of the following: MAC 1105–College
Algebra, or any other MAC course with the last
three digits higher than 105*; MGF 1106–Liberal
Arts Math I; or any other MGF course with the last
three digits higher than 106*; or STA 2023–
Elementary Statistics.
*Note: The first digit in the Common Course
Numbering system is assigned by the institution
and does not indicate content of the course.
GRADING SYSTEM
Instructors must announce, in writing, at the
beginning of each term, specific grading policies
for each class. At the end of each term final grades
are assigned and recorded on the student’s permanent record card. Grades assigned at CFCC are:
Grade
A
B
C
D
F
I
S
U
W
X
N
NG
Interpretation
Grade Point Value
Excellent (90–100) . . . . . . . . . 4 grade points per
semester hour
Good (80–89) . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 grade points per
semester hour
Fair (70–79) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 grade points per
semester hour
Poor (60–69) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 grade point per
semester hour
Failure (Below 60) . . . . . . . . . . . No grade points
Incomplete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No grade points
Satisfactory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No grade points
Unsatisfactory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No grade points
Withdrew from Course . . . . . . . . No grade points
Audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No grade points
No Grade
(College Prep only) . . . . . . . . . . . No grade points
No Grade (Labs) . . . . . . . . . . . . .No grade points
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
The grading policy for all divisions, with the
exception of Health Occupations, Criminal Justice
Institute and the ADN program, will adhere to the
following scale:
A
B
C
D
F
100%–90%
89%–80%
79%–70%
69%–60%
Below 60%
The Health Occupations Division will use the
following scales, depending on program:
A
B
C
D
F
A
B
C
D
F
100%–92%
91%–84%
83%–75%
74%–68%
Below 68%
or
100%–94%
93%–87%
86%–80%
79%–70%
Below 70%
The Criminal Justice Institute will use the
following grading scale:
A
B
C
F
100%–93%
92%–86%
85%–80%
Below 80%
The ADN and PN programs will use the following
grading scale:
A
B
C
D
F
100%–90%
89%–80%
79%–75%
74%–65%
Below 65%
Students registered in college prep courses who
receive “N” grades must repeat the same course
and complete it with a grade of “C” or better, or
achieve a passing score on the CPT before they
can register for other courses.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)
Students are responsible for computing their
own GPA. The grade report should be carefully
checked, and, if discrepancies exist, the office of
Student Records should be notified immediately.
To determine GPA, compute the total number of
grade points earned and divide by the total number
of credit hours attempted. Example:
Course
Number
Grade
ENC 1101
HUM 1021
BSC 1010C
BUL 2241
Total
A
C
F
W
Course
Credit
Credit
Earned
Credit
for GPA
Grade
Points
3
3
4
3
13
3
3
0
0
6
3
3
4
0
10
12
6
0
0
18
Grade points divided by “Credit for GPA” = GPA
18 ÷ 10 = 1.8
FINAL GRADES
Final grade reports are available on the Web at
the end of each term. Only grades issued at the
end of a term are placed on a student’s permanent
record. Final grade reports include an accumulative
grade point average.
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
GRADE APPEAL POLICY
A grade awarded in a course at the college is
based on the instructor’s professional judgment
about the degree to which students achieve the
learning objectives for the course. If a student
believes a grade has been awarded in error, or
unfairly, the student will first discuss the matter with
the instructor.
In the event the matter cannot be resolved
between the student and the instructor, the student
may discuss the matter with the instructor’s
supervisor, who will try to resolve the issue. If a
resolution cannot be reached at that level, the
student may discuss the matter with the Chief
Academic officer. The Chief Academic Officer will
review the matter and determine if the student’s
concern is sufficient to warrant a full review. If
further review is warranted, a Grade Appeal
Committee (3 faculty and 2 students) will be
appointed by the President to consider the matter.
The committee will make a recommendation to the
Chief Academic Officer. The decision of the Chief
Academic Officer shall be final.
FORGIVENESS POLICY
The forgiveness policy permits a student to
repeat a course in an attempt to improve a grade of
“D” or “F” earned in the course. Only the last grade
earned in a repeated course will be computed into
the student’s grade point average (GPA). On the
transcript a “T” shows the initial attempt and an “R”
indicates the last attempt. The student will be limited
to three attempts (two repeats) per course, with a
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
63
grade being given for the third attempt. Withdrawals
and audits count as attempts after drop/add.
Withdrawals will not be used to increase GPA.
A. The student will be limited to repeats of
courses where “D” and “F” grades were
earned.
B. The student will be limited to two repeats
per course.
C. If the student plans to transfer to another
institution, he or she must check with that
institution regarding acceptance of
“forgiveness” courses in the computation
of the student’s GPA.
D. The student should check with the
Financial Aid office about the possible
consequences of repeating a course in
regard to financial aid.
E. The third attempt of any course is charged
at the full cost of instruction.
WITHDRAWAL
A. The student can withdraw from any course
by “midpoint” in the semester. Withdrawals
after that date will be granted only through
established institutional procedures. (Check
the appropriate dates in the college calendar
in the front of this catalog.)
B. The student will be permitted a maximum of
three attempts (including attempts made
under the forgiveness policy) per course.
Upon the third attempt, the student will not
be allowed to withdraw, but will instead
receive a grade for that course.
GRADUATION
Graduation Requirements
Students should be aware of the graduation
requirements. These include the core curriculum,
payment of all fees, and any work required in
special programs. It is the student’s responsibility to
determine the courses necessary for transfer to
any upper division college or university and to
meet any prerequisite courses required by those
upper division programs. Students must see an
advisor/counselor for a graduation check.
A. File an application for graduation with the
Student Records office before the published
deadline and pay the one-time, non-refundable graduation fee.
64
B. Fulfill all obligations, financial and other, to
the college.
C. All graduates are encouraged to attend the
graduation ceremony.
D. For subsequent graduations, prospective
graduates must still apply to graduate,
though no additional graduation fee is required.
E. The CLAST measures achievement in
communication and mathematics skills at
the level of college sophomores. It includes
four subtests: essay writing, English
language skills, reading and mathematics.
Students seeking the Associate in Arts
degree must pass all four subtests or be
exempted in order to receive the degree or
to be admitted to upper division status at a
university in the state system.
HONORS PROGRAMS
Honors courses are offered currently in the
following areas of study: communications, science/
technology, social sciences and humanities, as well
as the Leadership Development course and a onecredit Honors Colloquium.
HONORS
RECOGNITION
The President’s List and the Dean’s List
recognize students for outstanding scholastic
work. These lists are produced at the end of each
term—fall semester, spring semester, and
summer semester. Students who carried 12 or
more credit hours of academic work, excluding
college prep hours, or 12 vocational credits, and
attained a grade point average of 4.0 for the
semester will be placed on the President’s List.
Students who carried 12 or more credit hours of
academic work, excluding college prep credit
hours, or 12 vocational credits, and attained a
grade point average of 3.3 for the semester, with
no grade lower than a “C,” will be placed on the
Dean’s List. Students meeting these
requirements in a combination of both summer
terms will be eligible for these honors.
Phi Theta Kappa is an international honor
society. Psi Beta is a national psychology honor
society. Sigma Delta Mu is a national Spanish
honor society. Contacts for information are
described in the Student Handbook Focus.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Graduates who have earned a 3.5 overall GPA
in all work taken at CFCC and an overall 3.5 GPA
on all college work attempted will be graduated
with honors. Honor graduates are recognized at
graduation ceremonies and have the notation
‘‘Graduated with Honors’’ on their permanent records.
COMMUNITY OF SCHOLARS
The Community of Scholars, CFCC’s honors
program, offers exceptionally able students the
challenge and opportunity to enhance their academic
talents and careers. Through its curriculum of
enriched studies, the Community of Scholars
emphasizes three goals: to recognize excellence in
scholarship, to reward distinguished achievement,
and to direct intellectual curiosity toward continued
accomplishment.
The Community of Scholars focuses attention
on these areas of study: language and literature,
humanities, history, science and technology.
These honors seminars are currently offered:
ENL 2000–Honors English Literature I
AML 2012–Honors American Literature
BSC 1037C–Honors Biology, Biotechnology
and Bioethics with Lab
CGS 1162–Honors Computers in Society
WOH 1012H–Honors World Civilizations I
WOH 1022H–Honors World Civilizations II
HUM 1021H–Honors Introduction to the
Humanities
HUM 2310H–Honors Mythological Symbolism in
Art, Philosophy and Religion
HUM 2532H–Honors Western Ideologies
REL 2300H–Honors Comparative Religions
In addition, SLS 2261–Leadership Development
is required for all “Track I” participants.
All highly-motivated students who plan to work
toward an Associate in Arts degree from CFCC
should seek admission to the Community of
Scholars program. The following guidelines are
used to identify those students who should benefit
most from enriched studies in the honors program.
It should be noted, however, that no single criterion
in the following list is absolute: i.e., a SAT score of
1050 might prove acceptable for a student with
demonstrated successes in other areas.
A. A composite score of 25 on the ACT or a
total of 1,100 on the SAT.
B. A high school grade point average of at
least 3.7 (on a 4.0 scale) or ranking in the
top 10 percent of their graduating class or a
minimum 3.3 grade point average at CFCC.
C. Outstanding scores on CFCC placement
tests, such as the ACT, SAT and/or CPT.
D. Demonstration of special talents or abilities
through portfolios, projects, papers, awards,
auditions, etc.
The Community of Scholars issues formal
invitations to graduating high school seniors meeting selective admission requirements. The two-year
program requires completion of 18 credit hours in
honors courses while maintaining a minimum
cumulative grade point average of 3.3 Scholarships
for four terms are awarded to as many as 30
selected students yearly.
Since 1990, the Community of Scholars program
has also invited outstanding CFCC scholars into a
second track, designed to include students who
did not come to CFCC directly from high school.
These students must earn a minimum of 12 honors
credits. “Track 2” students may become eligible
for partial tuition scholarships after their first term
in the program. For more information on the
Community of Scholars, contact the Director of
the Honors Institute.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
65
Financial
Information
FINANCIAL
INFORMATION
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
67
FEES AND REFUNDS
College fees and tuition assessments are based
on the applicant’s residence. Fees may be paid
by cash, check, money order or credit card and
must be paid on or before the dates indicated on
the student’s schedule, which is 10 business days
from the date of registration. Exceptions include
special courses with registration and payment
dates to be established by the Director of
Admissions and Records, veteran fee deferments
and Florida National Guard fee waivers.
Students who have submitted a Free Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or are eligible for
Bright Futures may have their tuition and fees
deferred at the time of registration however, if
financial aid is denied or the award does not cover
a student’s financial obligation, the student will
be responsible for payment of the outstanding
obligation. All debts incurred due to denial or
insufficient coverage must be satisfied no later
than 60 days after the start of the term.
Student financial responsibilities include library
fines and book replacement costs, traffic fines,
returned checks, student loan repayment, and
return of borrowed college equipment. Unless
all fees and other financial responsibilities have
been satisfied, a student may not register for a
subsequent term, official transcripts of the student’s
record will not be made, and, in some cases, the
student may be prohibited from attending classes
in the current term.
The student fees listed on this page are in
effect at the date of printing of this catalog.
They are subject to change by action of the
Florida Legislature and the college District
Board of Trustees. Each term the college will
have available, prior to registration a listing of
current student fees.
Returned checks must be paid within seven (7)
days from receipt of the notice. The full amount of
the returned check plus a service charge of $20.00
or an amount up to five percent of the face amount
of the check, whichever is greater, will be due.
If the returned check is not paid within the time
specified, it will be given to the State Attorney’s
office for collection.
Note: See Course Schedules each term for
update on fees.
General College Fees
Credit Programs
Advanced and Professional
Postsecondary and Vocational
College Preparatory
Matriculation
Tuition
Financial Aid
Student Activity
Capital Improvement
Totals per credit hour
Resident
$49.20
N/A
2.46
4.92
1.00
$57.58
NonResident
$49.20
147.60
9.84
4.92
4.00
$215.56
Resident
$44.40
N/A
4.44
2.22
NonResident
$44.40
132.90
17.73
8.87
$51.06
$203.90
Resident
$21.90
N/A
2.19
1.10
$25.19
NonResident
$21.90
66.00
8.79
4.40
$101.09
Non-Credit Programs
Postsecondary Adult Vocational
Vocational Preparatory
Matriculation
Tuition
Financial Aid
Capital Improvement
Totals per vocational
credit hour
FINANCIAL
INFORMATION
Adult Education
Adult Basic and Secondary
Matriculation
Tuition
Financial Aid
Capital Improvement
Totals per credit hour
The President is authorized to approve fees for
continuing workforce education programs, recreation
and lifelong learning programs on a course-bycourse basis. For continuing workforce education
courses, the President will establish fees that equal
at least 50% of the total annual cost of the supplemental vocational program. The fees for recreation
and lifelong learning programs will generate at
least the direct cost of instruction. The President
will annually report to the District Board of Trustees
the amount of fees collected and the accumulated
cost of the respective programs.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
69
Special Fees and Charges
General Fees:
Admission Application Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
International Education Application Fee . . . . .$50.00
Transcript Fee (each request) . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.00
Credit by examination/Experiential
Learning (Departmental Exam) . . . . . . . .$100.00
Parking Decal (additional and replacement) . . .$2.00
ID Card Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
Graduation Application Fee
(includes cap and gown) . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30.00
Pre-Admission Background Check Healthcare,
Law Enforcement/Corrections . . . . . . . . .$50.001
(Child Care students; fee established by HRS)
Telecourse Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22.00
Processing Fee for Florida State Fire
College Course Evaluations . . . . . . . . . .$100.00
Fines and Penalties
Returned check charge - greater of $20 or
5% of face amount of check
Parking and other citations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
Vehicle Immobilization Device (boot) . . . . . .$25.00
Towing—Charges determined by tow truck operator
Community Library Borrowers ID Card . . . . .$5.00
Lost/Damaged Library Materials – Replacement costs
Instructional Fees and Materials Supplies (estimated)
Criminal Justice Institute Supplies
(estimated) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$450.002
Law Enforcement Students (estimated) . . .$107.002
Corrections Students (estimated) . . . . . . . .$87.002
Occupational Materials and Supplies
(sold at bookstore except for
Health Occupations’ Skills Kits–
not sold at bookstore) . . . . . . . . . . . .Price Varies
Tools & Tool Box for Automotive Technology
(Varies according to
quality, etc.) . . . . . . . . . . . .Estimated at $450.00
Culinary Equipment Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Varied
Cosmetology Equipment Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . .Varied
Nursing Skills, Surgical Technology,
Physical Therapy Assistant
Nursing Pins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Varied
University Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Vocational Preparatory Students (VPI) . . .No charge
Adult Education Students (GED) . . . . . . .No charge
Students enrolled at other colleges with
valid ID (except for currently enrolled
University Center students) . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
Others (computer use only) . . . . . . . . . . . . .$50.00
Child Development Center and Lab
Customer Service Charges (per month per child)
Child Care Center Registration Fee . .$40.00 annually
FT Students (Pre-School Child) . . . . . .$70.00/week
CFCC Employees for Pre-School
Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$70.00/week
CFCC Child Care Providers
for Pre-School Child . . . . . . . . . . . .$50.00/week
All others for Pre-School Children . . . .$80.00/week
FT Students (Infant/Toddler) . . . . . . . . .$75.00/week
CFCC Employees for Infant/Toddler
(under 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$75.00/week
CFCC Child Care Providers for
Infant/Toddler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55.00/week
All others for Infant/Toddler . . . . . . . . .$95.00/week
Child Care Late Fee
(assessed second Friday
of the Month) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
Commercial Vehicle Driving License Testing Fees
Exam Type
Class “A” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$185.00
“A” Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$185.00
“A” Subtest
Pre-trip Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85.00
Basic Control Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85.00
Driving Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85.00
Class “B” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$160.00
“B” P-Endorsement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$160.00
“B” Subtest
Pre-trip Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85.00
Basic Control Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85.00
Driving Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85.00
“B” Restriction Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85.00
Class “C” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85.00
___________________
Payable before registration; subject to change without notice.
Subject to change without notice.
1
Learning Support Center
CFCC Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
70
2
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Other Fees Related to Continuing Education/
Corporate Training Classes
CPR Card (after satisfactory completion
of course) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
CPR card replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
Certificates (for any courses that
certificates are issued) . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Certificate replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7.00
Assessment and Testing Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . .Varies3
ACT–American College Test . . . . . . . . . . . . .$26.00
Apticom
One Stop Customers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30.50
CFCC Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$41.00
BERS–Behavioral and Emotional
Rating Scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
BEST–Barriers To Success Employment Inventory
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
CS–Careerscope
One Stop Customers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30.50
CFCC Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$41.00
CAS–College Adjustment Scale . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
CAT CLAST–Computer Adaptive Testing (retesting)
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
CDS–Career Decision Scale
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
CDS–Cognitive Distortion Scale . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
CEI–The Career Exploration Inventory
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
CELT–Comp. English Language Test for
Learners of English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
Choices
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
CLAST–College Level Academic Skills Test
(Students who fail to attend scheduled test will
forfeit fee and fee must be repaid for test)
Students (first-time) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30.00
CLAST–Teacher Certification
First time and re-takes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30.00
CLEP–College Level
Examination Program . . . . . . . . .$50.00 CLEP fee
$15.00 CFCC fee
(non-refundable CFCC fee per test in
addition to CLEP fees)
COMIT–College Major Interest Test
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
CP–Computer Prep . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00 per test
CPT–Computerized Placement or Companion Test
1st time student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
Retakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
High school students at local high schools .$10.00
CSSI–Customer Service Skills Inventory . . . .$10.00
CTI–Career Thoughts Inventory
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6.00
DANTES—Defense Activity for Nontraditional
Education Support . . . . . . . . .$40.00 to DANTES
$25.00 to CFCC
(non-refundable CFCC fee per test in
addition to DANTES fees)
DMI–Defense Mechanism Inventory . . . . . . .$10.00
EAPI–Employee Assistance
Program Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
EL–Electest . . . . . .Varies, depending on occupation
for which test is given.
ELT–Electrontest . . .Varies, depending on occupation
for which test is given.
F-BAT–Florida Basic Abilities Test . . . . . . . . .$35.00
FIT–Flanagan Industrial Tests . .Varies, depending on
occupation for which test is given.
GED–General Educational . . . . . .Full battery $50.00
Development Tests
Writing Skills $11.00
(Administered at Levy
Social Science $10.00
Campus only)
Science $10.00
Literature and Arts $10.00
Mathematics $10.00
GOE–Guide for Occupational Exploration Inventory
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12.00
HSDS–Holland Self-Directed Search
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
IAS–Interpersonal Adjective Scale . . . . . . . . .$10.00
IM–Intuitive Mechanics Test . . .Varies, depending on
(Weights and Pulleys)
occupation for which
test is given.
JOB O A–Job-O Career Test
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
JSS–Job Stress Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
K-BIT–Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test . . . . . .$15.00
LISRES–Life Stressors and Social
Resources Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12.00
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
FINANCIAL
INFORMATION
71
LSI–Leisure/Work Search Inventory
Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .No charge
Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
MAQ–Multidimensional Anxiety Questionnaire . .$10.00
MMT–Mechanical Movements Varies, depending on
Test
occupation for which
test is given.
MT–Mectest . . . . . .Varies, depending on occupation
for which test is given.
NEO PI-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
PAI–Personality Assessment Inventory . . . . .$15.00
PET–Professional Employment Test . . . . . . .$15.00
PSB-PTA–Psychological Services Bureau . . .$10.00
Health Occupations Aptitude Test
Proctoring–Special Testing— . . . . . . .$25.00 for each
Correspondence and from
test proctored
other colleges
T.A.B.E.–Test of Adult Basic Education
1st time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
Retakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00 each
T.A.B.E. WR–Test of Adult Basic Education . .$10.00
Work Related . . . . . . . . . . . .Retakes $5.00 each
T.A.B.E WR PS–Test of Adult Basic Education . .$10.00
Work Related Problem Solving . .Retakes $5.00 each
Teamwork–KSA Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
TJTA–Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis . .$10.00
TMC–Tests of Mechanical . . . . .Varies, depending on
Concepts
occupation for which
tests is given.
TONI 3–Test of Nonverbal Intelligence . . . . .$15.00
TPT–The Press Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
TSCS:2–Tennessee Self-Concept Scale . . . . .$10.00
VISTAS–Vocational Interest, Temperament
and Aptitude System . . . .$15.00 per work sample
WPT–Wonderlic Personnel Test . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
WRAT3–Wide Range Achievement Test 3 . . .$12.00
___________________
Payable before registration; subject to change without notice.
Subject to change without notice.
3
Various testing fees will be charged to students as required for
entrance to the College.
1
2
72
Continuing Education Fees
The President is authorized to approve fees for
recreation and lifelong learning programs on a
course-by-course basis. The fees for recreation and
lifelong learning programs will generate at least the
direct cost of instruction.
Laboratory Fees
COURSE
NUMBER
ACG1949
ACG2021
ACG2071
ACG2100
ACG2360
ACG2450
ACG2949
ACR0000
ACR0001
ACR0002
ACR0100C
ACR0106
ACR0202
ACR0303
ACR0600
ACR0930L
AER0110C
AER0231
AER0250
AER0310C
AER0310K
AER0311C
AER0410C
AER0450
AER0522
AER0523
AER0610
AER0930
AER1005
AER1101
AER1110
AER1122
AER1451
AER1611
AER2251
AER2260
AER2316
AER2520
AER2521
AMH2010T
AMH2020T
ANT2000T
TITLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .LAB FEE
ACCOUNTING CO-OP 1 . . . . .$15.00
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING . . .$25.00
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING .$25.00
INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING .$10.00
COST ACCOUNTING . . . . . . .$10.00
INTEGRATED ACCOUNTING . .$25.00
ACCOUNTING CO-OP 2 . . . . .$15.00
INTRO TO HVAC . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
REFRIG. FUNDAMTENTALS . .$15.00
INTERMEDIATE HVAC . . . . . .$15.00
APPLIED ELECTRICITY . . . . .$15.00
ELECTRICITY II . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
REFRIG. FUNDAMENTALS II . .$15.00
A/C REFRIG. REPAIR . . . . . . .$15.00
A/C & HEAT FUNDAMENTALS .$15.00
SKILL DEV. LAB A/C & HEA . .$15.00
ENGINE REPAIR . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
MANUAL TRANSMISSION . . .$15.00
AUTOM TRANSMIS/TRANSAX .$15.00
AUTO ELEC. SYSTEMS I . . . .$15.00
AUTO ELEC. SYSTEMS I . . . .$15.00
ADVANCED AUTO ELECTRICAL .$15.00
BRAKE SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . .$15.00
STEERING SYSPN & ALIGNMT .$15.00
ENGINE PERFORMANCE I . . .$15.00
ENGINE PERFORMANCE II . . .$15.00
A/C ADN HEATING SYSTEMS .$15.00
AUTO TECHNOLOGY SKL LAB .$15.00
AUTOMOTIVE FUNDAMENTALS .$15.00
AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL
SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
ENGINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
BRAKE SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . .$15.00
STEERING & SUSPENSION . .$15.00
AIR CONDITIONING & HEAT . .$15.00
ADVANCED AUTO TRANSMISS .$15.00
CLUTCH & TRANSMISSIONS .$15.00
AUTOMOTIVE ELECT SYS 2 . .$15.00
FUEL & EMISS CONT SYSTEM .$15.00
DRIVEABILITY & DIAGNOSIS .$15.00
US HISTORY TO 1877: TV . . .$22.00
US HISTORY SINCE 1877: TV .$22.00
ANTHROPOLOGY: TV . . . . . . .$22.00
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
ARC2461
ARR0001
ARR0121
ARR0122
ARR0124L
ARR0125L
ARR0126L
ARR0292
ARR0293
ARR0330
ART1500C
ART2750C
ART2751C
ART2202C
ART2501C
ART2701C
ART2702C
BOT1010C
BOT1011C
BSC1020L
BSC1010C
BSC1011C
BSC1030C
BSC1050L
BSC1051C
BSC2085C
BSC2086C
CCJ1949
CDA1522
CEN1322
CEN1305
CEN1321
CEN1325
CEN2320
CEN2327
CEN2503
CEN2509
CET1171
CET1172
CET1949
CET2949
MATERIALS & METHODS
OF CONSTRUCTION . . . . . . .$25.00
INTRO TO AUTO REPAIR . . . .$15.00
AUTO REFINISHING . . . . . . . .$15.00
AUTO REFINISHING II . . . . . .$15.00
SKILL DEVELOPMENT LAB . .$15.00
SKILL DEVELOPMENT LAB . .$15.00
REP. & REFIN. SKL DEV LA . .$15.00
AUTO REPAIR II . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
AUTO REPAIR III . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
UNIBODY & FRAME . . . . . . . .$15.00
PAINTING I . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
CERAMICS 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
CERAMICS 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
BASIC DESIGN II . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
PAINTING II . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
SCULPTURE 1 . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
SCULPTURE 2 . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
BOTANY W/LAB . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
PLANT DIVERSITY . . . . . . . . .$20.00
BIOLOGY & HUMAN EXP. LAB .$20.00
GENERAL BIOLOGY 1 W/LAB .$20.00
GENERAL BIOLOGY 2 W/LAB .$20.00
HON BIOL BIOTECH/BIOETHI .$20.00
LIVING IN THE ENVIR LAB . . .$20.00
ENVIRONMENTAL
STEWARDSHIP . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
HUM ANAT. & PHYS. 1 W/LAB .$30.00
HUM ANT. & PHYS. 2 W/LAB .$30.00
CRIMINAL JUSTICE CO-OP 1 .$15.00
NETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES .$20.00
MCSE NET & OPER.
SYSTEM ESSENTIALS . . . . . .$20.00
MCSE PROFESSIONAL AND
SERVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
MCSE NETWORK
INFRASTRUCTURE . . . . . . . .$20.00
MCSE DESIGNING
DIRECTORY SERVICES . . . . .$20.00
MCSE IMPLEMENTING &
ADMINISTERING DIRECTORY
SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
MCSE DESIGNING NETWORK
SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
WEB SERVER TECHNOLOGY .$25.00
DATA COMM. & NETWKNG . .$25.00
INTRO TO COMPUTER
TECHNOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
A+ HARDWARE . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
COMPUTER ENGINEERING
TECH. CO-OP I . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
COMPUTER ENGINEERING
TECH. CO-OP II . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
CET2173
CET2496
CGS1100
CGS1991
CGS2103
CGS2540
CGS2557
CGS2564
CGS2831
CGS2871
CGS2930
CGS2935
CGS2991
CHM1020C
CHM1025C
CHM1033C
CHM2045C
CHM2046C
CHM2210C
CHM2211C
CIT1949
CIT2949
CJD0741C
CJD0750C
CJD0752C
CJD0770C
CJD0771C
CJD0772C
CJD0773C
CJK0005
CJK0010
CJK0015
CJK0020
CJK0030
CJK0040
CJK0050
CJK0060
CJK0070
CJK0075
CJK0080
CJK0085
CJK0090
COP1224
COP1949
COP2250
A+ PERIPHERALS &
TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . .$25.00
NETWARE SERVICE &
SUPPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
MICROCOMPUTER
APPLICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
WEB PROGRAMMING I . . . . .$25.00
COMPUTER APPL. BUSINESS .$25.00
DATABASE MGMT SYSTEMS .$25.00
INTRO TO INTERNET
TECHNOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
PC MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . .$20.00
WEB SERVER TECHNOLOGY .$25.00
MULTIMEDIA COMP APPL . . .$25.00
SPECIAL TOPICS . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
WEB GRAPHICS . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
WEB PROGRAMMING II . . . . .$25.00
CHEMISTRY NON-SCI W/LAB .$20.00
INTRO CHEMISTRY W/LAB . .$30.00
CHEMISTRY/HEALTH-RELATED .$30.00
CHEMISTRY 1/QUAL ANALYSI .$30.00
CHEM 2/QUAL ANALYSIS . . . .$30.00
ORGANIC CHEM 1 W/LAB . . .$30.00
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II . . . .$30.00
COMPUTER INFORMATION
TECH. CO-OP I . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
COMPUTER INFORMATION
TECH. CO-OP II . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS .$4.00
INTERPERSONAL SKILLS 2 . . .$1.00
CORRECTIONS OPERATIONS . .$1.00
LEGAL 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.00
LEGAL 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.00
COMMUNICATIONS . . . . . . . . .$1.00
IPC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.00
INTRODUCTION TO LAW
ENFORCEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.00
HUMAN ISSUES . . . . . . . . . . .$1.00
COMMUNICATIONS . . . . . . . . .$1.00
VEHICLE OPERATIONS . . . . . .$86.00
FIRST RESPONDER . . . . . . . .$35.00
WEAPONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$91.00
DEFENSIVE TACTICS . . . . . . .$26.00
PATROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.00
INVESTIGATIONS . . . . . . . . . . .$1.00
INVESTIGATING OFFENSES . . .$2.00
TRAFFIC STOPS . . . . . . . . . . .$1.00
TRAFFIC CRASH
INVESTIGATION . . . . . . . . . . .$13.00
TACTICAL APPLICATIONS . . . .$1.00
PROGRAMMING IN C++ . . .$25.00
INTERNET SERVICES TECH.
CO-OP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
JAVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
FINANCIAL
INFORMATION
73
COP2332
COP2701
COS0001
COS0080
COS0500
CSP0012
CSP0300
CTS2320
DEA0800L
DEA0850L
DEP2001T
DES1100L
DES1200L
DES1502
DES1800L
DES1830C
EDE1949
EEC2301
EET1084
EET1949
EGS1110
EME2040
EMS1119L
EMS1431
EMS2611L
EMS2612L
EMS2613L
EMS2615L
EMS2619L
EMS2614L
EMS2628L
EMS2645
EMS2656
EMS2658
ENC0010C
PROGRAMMING VISUAL BASIC .$25.00
DATA DRIVEN WEBSITE . . . . .$25.00
INTRODUCTION TO
COSMETOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . .$9.95
COSMETOLOGY LAB . . . . . . .$12.00
INTRODUCTION TO
BARBERING . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.95
NAIL SPECIALTY . . . . . . . . . . .$9.95
FACIAL & MAKE-UP . . . . . . . .$9.95
MCSE MANAGING
NETWORK ENVIRON. . . . . . . .$20.00
CLINIC PRACTICE I . . . . . . . .$72.45
CLINIC PRACTICE II . . . . . . . .$75.00
DEV PSYCH: CHILDHOOD-TV .$22.00
DENTAL MATERIALS LAB . . .$41.00
DENTAL RADIOLOGY LAB . . .$38.00
DENTAL OFFICE
MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
INTRO TO CLINICAL
PROCEDURES I . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
EXPANDED FUNCTIONS/LAB .$20.00
EDUCATION CO-OP 1 . . . . . .$15.00
INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES .$60.00
SURVEY OF ELECTRONICS . .$25.00
ELEC. ENG. CO-OP 1 . . . . . . .$15.00
ENGINEERING GRAPHICS . . .$15.00
INTRODUCTION TO
EDUCATIONAL TECH.
(CLASSROOM SECTIONS ONLY) .$15.00
FUND EMT SKILLS LAB . . . . .$15.00
EMT FIELD EXPERIENCE . . . .$27.45
FUNDAMENTALS SKILLS LAB .$24.95
AIRWAY MGMT LAB . . . . . . .$15.00
PATIENT ASSESSMENT LAB .$15.00
MED EMERG SKILLS LAB I . .$15.00
MED EMERG SKILLS LAB II . .$15.00
TRAUMA EMERG SKILLS LAB .$15.00
PARAMEDIC OB/GYN
NEONATAL EMERGENCY
SKILLS LAB . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
PARAMEDIC CLINICAL EXER. II .$32.50
PARAMEDIC CLINIC I . . . . . .$127.50
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 3 . . . .$25.00
COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH II
(ACADEMIC SYSTEMS
INTERACTIVE ENGLISH
SECTIONS ONLY) . . . . . . . . . .$51.00
ENC1101T
ENC1101
COMP SKILLS 1 TELECOURSE .$22.00
FRESHMAN COMPOSITION I
(ACADEMIC SYSTEMS
INTERACTIVE ENGLISH
SECTIONS ONLY) . . . . . . . . . . .$51.00
ENC1102T
ETD1949
74
FRESHMAN COMP SKILLS 2:T .$22.00
DRAFT/DESIGN CO-OP . . . . .$15.00
ETD2320C
ETD2350C
ETD2461
ETD2530C
ETD2538
ETD2949
EVS1949
EVS2691L
FFP2130
FSS1949
GCO1400C
GEA2000T
GLY2010C
GLY2010T
GRA2830
HEV0182
HFT1949
HFT2949
HIM1800
HIM1949
HIM2232
HIM2253
HIM2260
HIM2949
HLP1081T
HSC2400
HUM1021T
HUS1948
HUS1949
MAC1105
COMP AIDED DRAFTNG/DESIG .$25.00
ADV. CADD INDUST. TRACK . .$25.00
MECHANICAL SYSTEM
DRAFTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
BEGINNING CADD ARCHIT . . .$25.00
ADVANCED C.A.D.D. ARCHIT .$25.00
DRAFTING & DESIGN CO-OP .$15.00
ENVIRONMENTAL SCI.
CO-OP 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
SAMPLING & ANALYSIS LAB .$20.00
COMPANY OFFICER (CITRUS) .$10.00
CULINARY ARTS CO-OP . . . .$15.00
TURFGRASS FOR GOLF . . . . .$15.00
WORLD GEOGRAPHY:TV . . . .$22.00
GEOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
PHYS.GEOLOGY TELECOURSE .$22.00
MULTI-MEDIA GRAPHICS . . . .$25.00
PRESCHOOL LAB ASSESS . .$60.00
HOSPITALITY COOP . . . . . . .$15.00
HOSP/TOURISM
INTERNSHIP 2 . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
INTRO TO HIM . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
PRACTICUM 1: ACUTE CARE .$15.00
ICD-9-CM CODING . . . . . . . .$20.00
CPT CODING . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
MEDICAL BILLING &
REIMBURSEMENT . . . . . . . . .$20.00
PRACTICUM II: ALT. CARE . . .$15.00
PERSONAL WELLNESS: TV .$22.00
FIRST AID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
INTRO HUMANITIES . . . . . . .$22.00
SOCIAL SERVICE CO-OP 1 . . .$15.00
SOCIAL SERVICE CO-OP 2 . . .$15.00
COLLEGE ALGEBRA
(ACADEMIC SYSTEMS
INTERACTIVE MATHEMATICS
SECTIONS ONLY) . . . . . . . . . . .$56.00
MAN1948
MAN1949
MAR1949
MAR2949
MAT0012C
MANAGEMENT CO-OP 1 . . . .$15.00
MANAGEMENT CO-OP 2 . . . .$15.00
MARKETING CO-OP EXP 1 . . .$15.00
MARKETING CO-OP 1 . . . . . .$15.00
COLLEGE PREP ARITHMETIC
& ALGEBRA (ACADEMIC SYS.
INTERACTIVE MATHEMATICS
SECTIONS ONLY) . . . . . . . . . . .$56.00
MAT0024C
COLLEGE PREP ALGEBRA
(ACADEMIC SYS. INTERACTIVE
MATHEMATICS SECTIONS ONLY) $56.00
MAT1033
INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA
(ACADEMIC SYS. INTERACTIVE
MATHEMATICS SECTIONS ONLY) $56.00
MCB2010C
MET1010C
MMC1949
MICROBIOLOGY . . . . . . . . . .$30.00
INTRODUCTION TO METEOROL .$20.00
COMMUNICATION CO-OP 1 . .$15.00
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
MVB1111
MVB1211-2221
MVB1212-2222
MVB1213-2223
MVB1214-2224
MVB1215-2225
MVB1311-2321
MVB1312-2322
MVB1313-2323
MVB1314-2324
MVB1315-2325
MVB2321
MVK1111
MVK1211-2221
MVK1311-2321
MVK2121
MVK2221
MVK2321
MVO1210-2220
MVO1310-2320
MVP1211-2221
MVP1311-2321
MVV1111
MVV1211-2221
MVV1311-2321
MVV2221
MVV2321
MVW1211-2221
MVW1311-2321
MVW1212-2222
MVW1312-2322
MVW1213-2223
MVW1313-2323
MVW1214-2224
MVW1314-2324
MVW1215-2225
MVW1315-2325
NUR1004C
NUR1024C
NUR1210C
NUR1730C
NUR1733C
NUR2713C
NUR2732C
NUR2734C
NUR2751C
OCE1001T
ORH0001
ORH0022
SECOND. FRESHMAN
TRUMPET . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
TRUMPET . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
HORN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
TROMBONE . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
BARITONE HORN . . . . . . . .$120.00
TUBA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
TRUMPET . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
HORN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
TROMBONE . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
BARITONE HORN . . . . . . . .$240.00
TUBA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
PRINCIPAL SOP TRUMPET . .$240.00
CLASS PIANO 1 . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
PIANO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
PIANO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
CLASS PIANO 2 . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
SECONDARY SOPHMORE
PIANO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
PRINCIPAL SOPHMORE
PIANO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
OTHER INSTRUMENTS . . . .$120.00
OTHER INSTRUMENTS . . . .$240.00
PERCUSSION . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
PERCUSSION . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
CLASS VOICE . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
VOICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
VOICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
SOPHMORE SECONDARY
VOICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
PRINCIPAL SOPH VOICE . . .$240.00
FLUTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
FLUTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
OBOE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
OBOE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
CLARINET . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
CLARINET . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
BASSOON . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
BASSOON . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
SAXOPHONE . . . . . . . . . . . .$120.00
SAXOPHONE . . . . . . . . . . . .$240.00
BRIDGE NURSING . . . . . . . .$177.95
NURSING 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$177.95
NURSING IIA . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45.00
NURSING 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45.00
NURSINGIIB . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22.45
NURSING IVA . . . . . . . . . . . .$77.45
NURSING 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$57.45
NURSING 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55.00
NURSING IIIA . . . . . . . . . . . .$47.50
OCEANOGRAPHY:
TELECOURSE . . . . . . . . . . . .$22.00
INTRO TO HORTICULTURE . . .$15.00
PLANT PROPAGATION PRACT. .$15.00
ORH0103
ORH0220
ORH0230
ORH0251
ORH0262
ORH0515
ORH0517
ORH0800
ORH0873
ORH1000C
ORH1020C
ORH1021L
ORH1113C
ORH1260L
ORH1510
ORH1601C
ORH1851L
ORH1872C
ORH1949
ORH2832C
OST1100
OST1110
OST1949
OST2316
OST2355
OST2401
OST2402
OST2601
OST2611
OST2612
OST2613
PCB2033L
PEL1011
PEL1012
PEL1111
PEL1112
PEL1211
PEL1321
PEL1441
PEL1442
PEL2121
PEL2341
PEL2342
PEST IDENTIFICATION . . . . . .$15.00
TURFGRASS ID & MAINT FOR .$15.00
GROUNDS MAINTENANCE . . .$15.00
NURSERY OPERATIONS
& MGM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
FLORAL GREENHOUSE APPL. $15.00
HERBACEOUS LANDSCAPE
MATERIALS . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
WOODY ORN ID/GOLF & LAND .$15.00
INTRO TO LANDSCAPING DES .$15.00
INTERIORSCAPE DES. & MAI . .$15.00
INTRO TO ENVIRONMENTAL
HORTICULTURE . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
HOUSEHOLD PLANTS . . . . . .$15.00
PROPAGAT NUR PLT LAB . . .$15.00
PEST & DISEASE CONTROL . .$15.00
GREENHOUSE OPERATION
LAB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
ORNAM'L PLANT IDENTIFICN .$15.00
RETAIL/WHOLESALE
NURSERY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
LANDSCP. DES. MAINT. LAB .$15.00
INTERIOR LANDSCAPING . . .$15.00
ORNAMENTAL HORT.CO-OP . .$15.00
ADVANCED LANDSCAPE
DESIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
PROF KEYBOARDING 1 . . . . .$25.00
PROF KEYBOARDING 2 . . . . .$25.00
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION
CO-OP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
ADVANCED WORD . . . . . . . .$25.00
INTRODUCTION TO
RECORD MGMT. . . . . . . . . . .$25.00
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION I . .$25.00
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION II . .$25.00
MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION
AND VOICE RECOGNITION
SOFTWARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION 1 .$25.00
MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION 2 .$25.00
MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION 3 .$25.00
INTRO ECOLOGY
LABORATORY . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
TEAM SPORTS 1 . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
TEAM SPORTS 2 . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
BOWLING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
INTERMEDIATE BOWLING . . . .$5.00
SOFTBALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
VOLLEYBALL . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
RACQUETBALL . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
INTERMEDIATE RACQUETBALL .$5.00
GOLF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
BEGINNING TENNIS . . . . . . . . .$5.00
INTERMEDIATE TENNIS . . . . . .$5.00
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
FINANCIAL
INFORMATION
75
PEM1101
PEM1141
PEM1142
PEM1953
PEN1121
PEN1122
PEQ2121
PET1000
PET1949
PET2622C
PGY1401C
PHT1000
PHT1130L
PHT1210C
PHT1212C
PHT2810L
PHY1020L
PHY1053C
PHY1054C
PHY2048C
PHY2049C
PLA1949
PMT0102
PMT0111
PMT0121
PMT0131
PMT0134
PMT0161
PMT0930L
POS2041T
PRN0000C
PRN0381C
PRN0382C
PSY1949
PSY2012T
PSY2949
SLS0341
SPN1120T
SPN1121T
STS0003
STS0810
STS0820
SYG2000T
SYG2430T
TRA0081
TRA0081L
WOH1012T
WOH1022T
76
WEIGHT TRNG/PHYS. CONDIT .$5.00
AEROBICS 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
AEROBICS 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
VARSITY CHEERLEADING . . . .$5.00
BEGINNING SWIMMING . . . . . .$5.00
INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING . . .$5.00
AQUATICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
INTRO TO PHYSICAL EDUCAT .$5.00
RECREATION TECH. CO-OP . .$15.00
CARE & PREVENT ATHL INJ .$10.00
PHOTOGRAPHY 1 . . . . . . . . .$30.00
INTRO PHYSICAL THERAPY . .$24.95
DATA COLLECTION SKILLS
FOR THE PTA . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00
THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES 1 .$48.00
THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES II .$17.00
CLINICAL PRACTICE 2 . . . . . .$24.95
PHYSICS: NON-SCIENCE LAB .$20.00
GENERAL PHYSICS I . . . . . . .$20.00
GENERAL PHYSICS 2 W/LAB .$20.00
GEN PHYSICS W/CALCULUS I .$20.00
GEN PHYSICS W/CALCULUS 2 .$20.00
LEGAL ASSISTING CO-OP 1 .$15.00
INTRODUCTION TO WELDING .$15.00
OXYACETYLENE WELDING . . .$15.00
SHIELD METAL ARC WELDING .$15.00
TIG WELDING . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
MIG WELDING . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
PIPE WELDING . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
WELDING DEV. LAB . . . . . . . .$15.00
AMER NAT'L GOVERNMENT . .$22.00
PRACT NURSING
FUNDAMENTALS . . . . . . . . .$157.45
PN MEDICAL SURG. NURS. 1 .$60.00
PN MEDICAL SURG. NURS. 2 .$84.95
PSYCHOLOGY CO-OP EXP 1 .$15.00
GEN. PSYCHOLOGY . . . . . . . .$22.00
PSYCHOLOGY CO-OP EX 2 . .$15.00
SUCCESSFUL EMPLOYMENT
TECHNIQUES . . . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
ELEMENTARY SPANISH I . . . .$22.00
ELEMENTARY SPANISH 2 . . .$22.00
INTRO. TO SURGICAL TECH. .$39.95
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY I . .$30.00
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY II . .$30.00
INTRO SOCIOLOGY . . . . . . . .$22.00
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY . . . .$22.00
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE
DRIV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,297.01
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE
DRIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$950.00
WORLD CIVILIZATION 1 . . . .$22.00
WORLD CIVILIZATION 2 . . . . .$22.00
Special Short Courses, Seminars,
Institutes and Workshops
Fees for these activities are charged to cover
direct costs, which vary, depending on individual
estimates and are authorized by the college president.
Notes:
1. No laboratory fees will be refunded after the
drop/add period.
2. No refunds will be issued after 20 days past
the close of the term.
Total fees collected annually must at least equal
the full cost of providing such programs. Fees
collected in excess of the total cost may be
transferred to other instructional programs.
Accident Insurance
Students enrolled in postsecondary, adult
vocational (PSAV) certificate programs may be
requested to carry accident insurance at an
estimated cost of between $12.50 and $18.50 per
year. The college does not provide insurance.
Fee Waivers and Exemptions
The college president is authorized to grant
student fee exemptions from all fees adopted by
the State Board of Community Colleges and the
community college District Board of Trustees, as
allowed by law.
As recommended by the college president,
homeless students enrolled in non-credit courses
are exempt from the payment of registration,
matriculation and laboratory fees for instruction.
Students enrolled in approved apprenticeship
programs are exempt from the payment of matriculation, registration and laboratory fees for instruction.
Florida State Employee Tuition
and Fee Waivers
Per Section 1009.265, Florida Statues:
Effective spring term 2003, Central Florida
Community College will waive tuition and fees for
state employees to enroll for up to six (6) credit
hours of courses per term on a space-available
basis. (Please note that state employees may
enroll in more than six (6) credit hours per term,
but are responsible for any hours over six (6) credit
hours.) For purposes of this section, employees of
the State include employees of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of state government,
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
except for persons employed by a state university.
Guidelines:
• Employment status must be full time.
• Employment verification must include
documentation that employee’s agency is
approved for the waiver.
• State employees are responsible for paying
admission application fees.
• State employees must complete all admissions
requirements, including the Application for
Admission, placement testing, and transcripts,
etc.
• State employees must register in person
during the drop/add period. Registration is for
classes on a space available basis only and
cannot occur prior to drop/add (no deferments,
no reimbursements).
• Tuition will be waived for a maximum of six (6)
credits, (lab fees are not covered). Waiver is
for college credit courses including postsecondary adult vocational courses (vocational
credit); it is not applicable to non-credit
(continuing education) courses, or adult
education courses. Courses to which the fee
waiver is to be applied must be indicated on
the waiver form.
• Courses must be taken for a grade; they may
not be taken as audit.
• Employment verification must be provided
each term. If verification is not provided student
will be responsible for tuition and fees. Fees
will be assessed at the resident rate.
• Tuition waiver is for the current term of
registration only. It is not retroactive.
Procedure:
• State employee must complete all admission
requirements prior to registering for class(es).
• Once the employee is admitted to CFCC, or if
the employee is a current student, he/she may
register for classes, on a space available
basis, during the add/drop period (first week
of classes).
• State employee must complete the application
form and submit it, along with the original letter
of employment verification, to the Student
Financial Aid office. The Student Financial Aid
office will file the original letter.
• The Financial Aid office will immediately post
the fee waiver.
• The State employee then completes the
registration process which includes registering
for the course(s) during the Drop/Add period
and going to the Cashier's window for validation
of the fee waiver and payment of any fees not
covered by the fee waiver.
Refund Policy (CFCC)
For credit and vocational education classes,
petitions for refunds and withdrawal from the college
are available in the offices of Admissions, Counseling,
the Vice President for Student Affairs, and the Citrus
county campus administrative offices. It is the student’s
responsibility to initiate official withdrawal, and the
official date of withdrawal will be determined by the
date the completed form is returned to the office of
the Vice President for Student Affairs. Regardless
of when the refund is applied for, no refund will be
processed before 30 days have elapsed from the
date of the refund form, or two weeks after the end
of the Add/Drop Date, whichever is the greater time
period.
Credit, occupational and audit students
who officially withdraw and complete a proper
refund petition through the office of the Vice
President for Student Affairs will receive refunds
according to the following schedule:
100 percent: When official drop notification is
received and approved prior to the end of the
published drop/add period.
Up to 100 percent: The refund will be affected
by the portion of the term completed. When a
student drops a course due to circumstances
determined by the college to be exceptional and
beyond the control of the student, which may
include but not be limited to:
FINANCIAL
INFORMATION
A. Illness of the student of such severity or
duration, as confirmed in writing by a physician, to preclude completion of the course(s).
B. Death of the student or the student’s parent,
spouse, child or sibling.
C. Involuntary call to active military duty.
D. A situation where the college is in error.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
77
E. A change of a course or section(s) initiated
by the college because of cancellation, time
or location.
F. Other circumstances that may be approved
upon timely filing with complete documentation with the division of Student Affairs.
For continuing education and corporate training
classes, students must request a refund by the
second scheduled class meeting to receive a full
refund. The refund request must be made in writing.
No refund is available after the second class meeting,
or for non-credit courses bearing fees of $5 or less,
or for non-credit workshops, seminars or clinics.
Pro-Rata Refunds
Campus-based programs will be refunded
using pro-rated formula to comply with federal
regulations defined in Reauthorization of the
Higher Education Act.
Guarantee
Any graduate of a CFCC associate degree
program in technical studies judged by his or her
employer as lacking in identified program competencies normally expected of a job entry-level
employee will be provided further training of up
to 16 semester credit hours without charge.
Withdrawals and Repayment
of Title IV Funds
When a student who receives a net disbursement of Title IV funds ceases attendance prior to
the 60 percent point in the payment period, CFCC
will determine whether the student must repay a
portion of the net disbursement. A statutory prorata schedule will be used to determine the percentage of Title IV funds the student has earned at
the time of withdrawal. Federal Work Study funds
are excluded in the calculation.
If a student withdraws after completing at least
60 percent of the term, it is assumed that the
student’s living expenses up to the time of withdrawal
exceeded the amount of the funds disbursed and
the student does not owe a repayment. However, if
the disbursement was greater than the student’s
expenses up to the withdrawal date, the student
must repay the excess amount or a portion of the
excess amount as applicable.
The percentage formula is: total number of
calendar days completed in the payment period
divided by the total number of calendar days in the
payment period equals the percentage of Title IV
funds earned.
78
The institution must return the lesser of the
amount of Title IV funds that the student does not
earn or the amount of institutional charges (tuition
and fees) that the student incurred for the payment
period multiplied by the percentage of funds that
was not earned.
The student (or parent, if a Federal Direct PLUS
loan) must return or repay the remaining unearned
Title IV program grant or loan funds. The student’s
grant repayment is reduced by half when he or she,
rather than the institution, must return grant funds.
CFCC will notify the student, in writing, of the amount
owed, procedure for repayment and consequences
of non-payment within the allotted time frame.
Order of return of Title IV funds. Unearned
funds returned by the school or student are credited
to outstanding Title IV loan balances for the student
or made on the student’s behalf. Funds must be
credited to outstanding balances in the following order:
Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan
Subsidized Federal Direct Loan
Federal Direct PLUS Loan
Remaining funds. If excess funds remain after
repaying all outstanding loan amounts, then the
remaining amount is credited to grant programs in
the following order:
Federal Pell grant
Federal SEOG
Other Title IV assistance
Detailed information on repayments is available
in the Financial Aid office.
State law, House Bill 1545, requires CFCC to
charge full cost of instruction for a student to
repeat, for the third time, a college preparatory
course in English, reading, or mathematics. However, due to financial hardship and/or extenuating circumstances, a student may be able to qualify for an
exception
to the increased fee. An exception based on
extenuating circumstances may be used only once
for each course.
FINANCIAL AID
The primary purpose of the financial aid program at Central Florida Community College is to
provide assistance to students who do not have
sufficient resources to meet the cost of attending
school. Aid is awarded on the basis of the student’s
financial need and should be viewed as a supplement to the financial efforts of the student and the
student’s family.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2003–2004
To be given full consideration, financial aid
applications should be filed prior to May 1 of each
calendar year for the following academic year;
however, students may apply as early as January.
Student consumer information and all application
forms are available in the Enrollment Services Center,
as well as at the Citrus County Campus and Levy
County Center. All applicants must also be accepted
for admission and have all required documents on
file in the Student Records office (diplomas, GED
certificates, academic transcripts).
No application will be processed until all required
documents and information are in the student’s
folder. The following forms are the primary ones
that are required for the processing of each financial
aid application:
A. Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA): The FAFSA or renewal FAFSA
supplies the basis for determining a student’s
need for financial assistance. Students
should list CFCC as the college of first
choice (Code 001471). The FAFSA may be
transmitted electronically by using FAFSA on
the Web (apply online at www.fafsa.ed.gov).
B. Student Aid Report (SAR): This is the eligibility document for the Federal Pell Grant
program and should be received by the
student two to four weeks after the FAFSA or
Renewal FAFSA is submitted. The student
should retain the SAR for his or her records.
C. Financial Aid Transcript (FAT): Information
will be collected via the National Student
Loan Data System. However, if there are
discrepancies, a transcript will be requested
by CFCC. The student may need to follow up
with the prior school if the requested information
is not received in a timely manner.
D. Other Documents: Students selected for
verification are required to submit additional
documents as requested by the Financial
Aid office.
Students must apply for financial assistance each
calendar year for the next academic year. Financial
aid awards are based on the availability of funds at
the institution, the enrollment status of the student
(priority is given to students enrolled full time), the
student’s financial need for the appropriate year, and
whether or not the student is meeting the Standards
of Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid
Recipients at Central Florida Community College.
(A copy of the Standards of Satisfactory Academic
Progress is available in the Enrollment Services
Center). Students who are enrolled in a vocational
program and do not have a high school diploma or
GED and who are applying for federal or state
financial assistance must pass the Test of Adult
Basic Education (TABE). For detailed information,
contact the Enrollment Services Center in Bryant
Union Building (5), Ocala Campus, or the Financial
Aid office.
TYPES OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
BLIND SERVICES AND
VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION
A program through the Division of Blind Services
provides assistance to students with visual handicaps
who qualify as clients of the division.
A program through Vocational Rehabilitation
provides limited assistance to disabled persons. A
recipient must be 16 years of age or older, have a
good scholastic record, and be taking courses that
prepare the student to earn a living. Referrals are made
through the Financial Aid office, the Student Advising
Department or Equal Access Services. Students may
also apply at local Vocational Rehabilitation offices.
GENERAL
INFORMATION
LOANS
CFCC Emergency Short Term Loan–is a
non-interest-bearing loan from funds established
by CFCC and local donors. Loan must be repaid
within the term during which the funds are borrowed.
A co-signer may be required before a loan is made
from this program. Local donors to this fund include
Vernon Arnette, Beta Sigma Phi, CFCC Women’s
Club, C.F. Cunningham Memorial, Delta Sigma
Theta (Annie Moore Hampton Memorial), Marion
County Legal Secretaries, Women’s Auxiliary to the
Marion County Medical Society, Marion County
Pharmaceutical Association, Ocala-Silver Springs
Rotary Club and Soroptomist Club.
Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate
Students (PLUS)–is a federally-funded loan that is
provided to parents of a dependent student
through the U.S. Department of Education. Interest
rate is variable and repayment begins within 60
days after the last disbursement. Applications are
available in the Enrollment Services Center.
Federal Direct Stafford Loan (subsidized)–is
a federally-funded loan that is provided to students
through the U.S. Department of Education. Interest
rate is variable and repayment begins six months
after the student is no longer enrolled at least halftime. Applications and information on loan limits
are available in the Enrollment Services Center.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
79
Federal Direct Stafford Loan (unsubsidized)–
is the same as Federal Direct Stafford (subsidized),
except it is not need-based and the borrower is
responsible for paying all interest. Information is
available in the Enrollment Services Center.
GRANTS
Federal Pell Grant–is a non-repayable form of
federal assistance that is available to students who
have not earned a bachelor’s or professional degree.
Eligibility is determined by the federal processor.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity
Grant (FSEOG)–is a non-repayable federal grant
for students who demonstrate exceptional financial
need. Priority is given to those students who are
enrolled as full-time students.
Florida Student Assistance Grant (FSAG)–
is a non-repayable state grant available to Florida
residents who are full-time, degree seeking
students attending eligible institutions in the state
of Florida and who demonstrate financial need.
Students must apply prior to May 1 each year.
Student’s with documented disabilities for whom
part-time enrollment is a necessary accommodation
may receive the FSAG. Contact the Equal Access
Services Coordinator for further information.
Notice to non-Florida residents: additional
financial aid may be available to you through your
permanent state of residence. Contact your state’s
department of education for financial aid information.
EMPLOYMENT
College Work Study Program–is an
institutionally-funded employment opportunity for
students enrolled in at least a half-time basis.
Students do not necessarily require demonstrated
financial need, but all students must complete a
FAFSA prior to placement in this program.
Federal Work Study–is a federally-funded
employment program for students who have a
demonstrated financial need. Students must be
enrolled in at least a half-time basis. Students work
an average of 14 hours a week in a position on
campus.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The 2001 Florida State Legislature passed
legislation that requires all students who receive a
CFCC Talent Grant, Academic Scholarship or
Athletic Scholarship to complete a Free Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for the academic
year in which the scholarship is awarded.
Talent Grants: Central Florida Community
College and the CFCC Foundation provide a
80
number of talent grants each year for participation
in campus activities. A student must enroll full time
in order to receive a scholarship. Talent Grant
recipients are recommended to the Financial Aid
office by the appropriate dean, director or program
facilitator. Talent Grants are provided in the following
areas: athletics, cheerleading, drama, music, publications, activity board, Brain Bowl, gospel choir
and forensics.
Ben Mathis Scholarships: CFCC has established scholarships for presentation each year to
the highest-ranking graduating African-American
student attending CFCC from each of the public
and private high schools in Citrus, Levy and Marion
counties. A student must enroll full time in order to
receive a scholarship. Initial recipients must have a
minimum cumulative high school grade point average
(GPA) of 2.8 and be recommended by the principal
of the high school. To be considered for renewal of
the scholarship, a student must maintain a minimum
cumulative CFCC grade point average of 2.5. Each
scholarship is awarded over a four-term period.
CFCC Academic Distinction Scholarships:
CFCC has established scholarships for annual
presentation to three seniors in each high school
in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties. Each scholarship is awarded over a four-term period. The student
must enroll full time in order to receive the scholarship. Initial recipients must have a 3.3 GPA to qualify.
To be eligible for renewal, a student must maintain
a cumulative CFCC grade point average of 3.0
or higher.
Community of Scholars: See Honors Programs,
pages 64 and 65.
CFCC Foundation High School Scholarship:
The CFCC Foundation, Inc., has established
scholarships for presentation annually to a
graduating senior in each public and private high
school in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties. Initial
recipients must have a minimum cumulative high
school grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 and be
recommended by the appropriate official at the
high school. To be considered for renewal of the
scholarship, a student must maintain a cumulative
CFCC grade point average of 2.5 or higher.
College Square Housing Scholarships:
The college and the CFCC Foundation provide
housing scholarship opportunities. Eligible
students must have a 2.5 GPA in either high
school or college. Many scholarships are awarded
on the basis of financial need, while many others
are based on an honors GPA. Students may
contact the Enrollment Services Center, or
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
College Square office, (352) 237-3334, for more
detailed information.
Other Scholarship Opportunities: At various
times throughout the year, agencies, foundations
(see pages 38–43), individuals or community groups
may notify the Financial Aid office of scholarships
that they are offering to CFCC students.
Students are able to apply for these scholarships
by completing a scholarship application available in
the Enrollment Services Center and online. The
application will be kept on file and matched to
specific scholarships as they are made available.
Reference materials with information about
scholarship funds are available in the Enrollment
Services Center on the Ocala campus, and on the
CFCC Web page.
Florida Prepaid Tuition Plan: Students who
participate in the Florida Prepaid Tuition Plan must
present valid Florida Prepaid Identification Cards
for the appropriate academic year each time they
register for classes. The cards must be signed.
Participants are responsible for amounts not
covered by the plan. A chart specifying the amounts
covered by the program is available in the
Enrollment Services Center upon request.
Satisfactory Academic Progress
for Financial Aid Applicants
Federal, state and college regulations require
that students maintain satisfactory academic
progress in order to receive financial assistance.
Standards of satisfactory academic progress at
Central Florida Community College consist of
three components:
A. Financial aid recipients must maintain a
minimum cumulative grade point average
(GPA) of 2.0 in all courses attempted.
B. Financial aid recipients must successfully
complete 67 percent of all college courses
attempted, regardless of when and where the
courses were taken and whether financial
assistance was received or not. Successful
completion of a course is defined as having
earned a grade of “A,” “B,” “C,” “D” or “S.”
Students enrolled in a vocational or certificate
program will be evaluated at the end of each
semester during the academic year.
Financial Aid Suspension
Failure to meet the standards of academic
progress may result in a financial aid recipient
being placed on financial aid suspension.
Financial aid applicants on financial aid
suspension will not be allowed to receive federal or
state financial assistance until they have returned
to satisfactory academic progress.
Students on financial aid suspension may
continue to enroll and attend classes so long as
tuition and all other charges are paid.
Students are responsible for requesting reinstatement to financial aid eligibility once they have
again attained satisfactory academic progress.
Any student placed on financial aid suspension
has the right to appeal the suspension. To appeal:
A. Complete the appeal form located in the
Enrollment Services Center. Appeals must be
submitted within 30 days of the suspension
notice.
GENERAL
INFORMATION
B. Appeals will be granted for extenuating
circumstances only: the death of a close
relative of the student, an injury or illness of
the student or close family member, or other
special circumstances that affect the student’s
academic performance.
The Financial Aid office will notify each student,
in writing, of the decision. Students notified of
decisions in their favor are placed on financial aid
probation for one semester. At the end of the
semester, upon request, students’ academic
records are reviewed and students are returned to
satisfactory progress or placed on financial aid
suspension. The financial aid suspension will
remain in place for appeals that are not granted.
Students may appeal the decision of the Financial Aid Director by submitting a written request to
the Financial Aid Committee.
Students on financial aid appeal status are
ineligible for federal loans at CFCC.
C. Financial aid recipients must complete their
degree or certificate within 96 attempted
credit hours.
Financial aid recipients are evaluated once at the
beginning of each academic year or at the time the
financial assistance is awarded, whichever is later.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
81
College
Resources
COLLEGE
RESOURCES
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
83
PROGRAMS
CF Institute
CFCC’s CF Institute is comprised of four areas
that focus on meeting corporate and community
learning needs — Continuing Education, Corporate
Training, CFCC Cultural and Conference Centers
and Pathways Center for 55 plus residents.
Continuing Education
Continuing Education presents exciting
programs that provide short-term career training,
ongoing continuing education requirements for
many professions, and personal development.
Short-term career training includes a wide variety
of areas such as security guard, child care, patient
care technician, construction worker and equine
groom. Classes for continuing education units focus
on real estate, insurance, child care and healthcare.
In addition to targeted career training, the department
offers a wide range of computer and skills building
classes for career and personal development.
Classes include everything from motorcycle safety
to driver improvement to foreign languages.
In addition to ongoing classes, the department
hosts special programs and events such as the
Early Childhood Conference, Kids on Kampus and
numerous health, safety and fire conferences.
For those wanting to learn from home or office
by way of a computer, dozens of online class
offerings are available in cooperation with the
college’s national ACT Center.
Classes are available on the Ocala and Citrus
County campuses, Levy County and Hampton
Centers, and at off-campus facilities. For additional
information, call (352) 873-5804 or (352) 854-2322,
extension 1468, or visit the Enrollment Services
Center located in the Bryant Union Building (5),
Room 101 on the Ocala campus or Building L-2 on
the Citrus County campus.
Corporate Training
The CFCC Corporate Training Center specializes
in customized training for area businesses. Programs
are conducted on campus or at the work site at a
time that is convenient to the employer. The center
was founded in 1997 to provide workforce training
to meet the immediate needs of business and
industry. Major training areas include leadership
and supervision, team building, quality and customer
service, information technology, and trade and
industrial. In addition to specialized training offerings,
the center provides a full range of services to improve
workforce performance. Services include job
assessments, strategic planning, group facilitation,
corporate coaching, conference planning and state
training grant assistance.
To find out more about The Corporate Training
Center call (352) 873-5833.
Cultural and Conference Centers
CFCC’s cultural and conference centers include
The Webber Center, Brick City Center for the Arts,
the Fine Arts Auditorium and the new Klein
Conference Center. The new Ewers Century
Center contains an additional 400-seat conference
facility. The centers provide meeting, event and
performance space for campus and community
users. In addition, unique cultural programs are
scheduled at The Webber Center and the Brick
City Center for the Arts to compliment the annual
schedule of exhibits. Through the classes, students
can learn art methods, writing skills, culinary tips,
cultural history and dance techniques.
For information on upcoming classes and
events at The Webber Center call (352) 873-5809.
For programs at Brick City Center for the Arts,
located in downtown Ocala, call (352) 840-9521.
Pathways Centers
The Senior Institute, Retired Senior Volunteer
Program, and Pathways to Living, Learning and
Serving work together to promote learning and
community service. The CFCC Senior Institute
founded in 1991, provides continuing education,
learning opportunities, quality leisure time and
social interaction for residents 55 and older. On Top
of the World Communities, Inc. has provided an
outreach office for CFCC programs at Colonnades
On Top of the World.
In addition to the Institute, CFCC sponsors the
Retired Senior Volunteer Program. The program
serves over 80 non-profit agencies with over 1,000
volunteers annually. In order to assist residents
in making mid-life changes, CFCC is piloting a
personal life-planning tool that focuses on five
areas: significant service, choice careers, lifelong
learning, wellness, and friends and fun. The college
has recruited volunteers to be trained facilitators.
They are supported by a Web resource site that
links community resources from volunteer opportunities and career openings to wellness programming.
For those wanting further assistance, the college
provides in-depth assessment services, a selfpaced learning lab, and a myriad of courses to
move people toward their personal goals as they
reach retirement age.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE
RESOURCES
85
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
PROGRAM
Cooperative Education is a planned academic
program designed to provide degree-seeking
students on-the-job experience related to their major
field of study and career objective. Employment
placements are available in business, industrial,
governmental and educational organizations.
Students will work in their co-op placement
either part time or full time. Both the Cooperative
Education Coordinator and the Faculty Facilitator
in the student’s chosen discipline work with the
student to locate a job, either paid or volunteer,
that offers an appropriate training experience.
The Cooperative Education office reserves the
right to accept or refuse students for co-op
placement. A student who is receiving Vocational
Rehabilitation funding must provide his or her
medical limitations and work release statements.
To be eligible to participate in cooperative education, students must meet the following requirements:
A. Have completed 12 hours of college credit
and the necessary prerequisites for specific
major (see program chart, next page).
B. Have a minimum 2.0 grade point average (GPA)
overall and be in good academic standing.
C. Meet with the program coordinator and obtain
his or her signature on the Co-op Agreement
form. (This form is available in all program
coordinator offices and the Co-op office).
D. Work with the Co-op office to find a placement
with an employer.
E. Interview with the employer and receive his or
her signature on the agreement form. (Other
appropriate co-op information will be given to
the student to share with the employer.)
F. Register for the appropriate co-op course
through the Co-op office. Note: Only the
co-op representative can register
students for a co-op course. One cannot
register for co-op online or through the
Counseling Department.
G. Purchase the Co-op Training Manual (the
required text for co-op) in the college
bookstore.
H. Complete requirements of the manual,
employment and semester.
86
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
General Co-op Programs
For specific information, contact the Cooperative Education office in Building 2, Room 216C or call
(352) 854-2322, extension 4-1717.
Faculty
Facilitator
Vern Allen
Nancy Abshier
Dava Tobey
Lori Kielty-Ocala
Tony Gil-Lecanto
Debbie Towns
Co-op
Program
A.A. A.S.
Accounting Co-op
✓
✓
ACG 1949
Pre-req: (Required) ACG 2021, ACG 2071
(Recommended) ACG 2100
All college prep requirements
Office Administration Co-op
✓
OST 1949
Pre-req.: OST 2401 and OST 1110
(Includes Legal Assisting, Medical Office
Administration, Medical Records Transcription,
Dental Office Management)
Communication Co-op
✓
MMC 1949
Computer Information Technology
✓
✓
Co-op 1 and 2
CIT 1949 and CIT 2949
Pre-req.: CGS 1100, CET 1172, CET 2173,
OST 1711
Computer Engineering Technology
Co-op 1 and 2
CET 1949 and CET 2949
Pre-req.: CGS 1100, CET 1172, CET 2173,
OST 1711
Sally Douglass
Internet Services Technology Co-op 1 and 2
COP 1949 and COP 2949
Bobbie Day-McCain Criminal Justice Co-op
CCJ 1949
Pre-req.: Should be 2nd year student...
See faculty facilitator for approval.
TBA
Drafting and Design Co-op
ETD 1949 and ETD 2949
Bonnie Vorwerk
Education Co-op
EDE 1949
Pre-req. preferred and Co-req.
(Required) EDF 2005
Steve MacKenzie
Environmental Sciences Co-op
EVS 1949 and EVS 2949
Carol Wahle Smith Legal Assistant Co-op
PLA 1949
Pre-req.: ENC 1101, PLA 1003, PLA 1104
Chuck Hiatt
Management Co-op 1 and 2
MAN 1948 and MAN 1949
Pre-req.: ECO 2013 or ECO 2023, ACG 2021,
GEB 1011 and two of the four courses below:
ENC 1101, MAN 2021, MAR 2011, ACG 2071
Chuck Hiatt
Marketing Co-op Exp. 1
Mar 1949
Pre-req: MAR 2011
Pat Fleming
Recreation Tech Co-op
PET 1949 and PET 2949
Suzanne Garrett
Health Information Management Co-op
HIM 1949 and HIM 2949
Pre-req.: Must have “C” or better in HIM 1800
(for HIM 1949) and HIM 2201 (for HIM 2949)
De Underwood
Hospitality and Tourism Co-op 1 and 2
HFT 1949 and HFT 2949
De Underwood
Culinary Arts Co-op
FSS 1949
Karla Wilson
Psychology Co-op
PSY 1949
Pre-req.: PSY 2012 and DEP 2004
Social Services Co-op 1 and 2
HUS 1948 and HUS 1949
Rev. 11/24/03
E-mail
Address
[email protected]
Building/Room Phone
Number
Extension
40/201
1563
[email protected]
40/201
1387
[email protected]
4/107
1719
[email protected]
40/201
1383
✓
✓
[email protected]
[email protected]
L3/208K
40/201
6126
1554
✓
✓
[email protected]
40/201
1683
✓
✓
[email protected]
31/108D
1384
✓
TBA
40/201
1674
[email protected]
8/106
1621
✓
[email protected]
2/104A
1556
✓
[email protected]
40/201
1437
✓
✓
[email protected]
40/201
1299
✓
✓
[email protected]
40/201
1299
✓
[email protected]
2/216F
1348
✓
[email protected]
40/201
1466
✓
[email protected]
11/110
1424
✓
[email protected]
11/110
1424
[email protected]
8/106G
1691
✓
✓
✓
COLLEGE
RESOURCES
✓
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
87
CORPORATE TRAINING CENTER
The Corporate Training Center responds to the
immediate needs of the business community by
providing a full range of services designed to
improve employer and employee performance. The
Corporate Training Center acts as a business consultant to the business community and provides the
following services:
Assessment
Needs Analysis
Skills Assessment
Pre-employment Assessments
Training Gap Analysis
Business Planning
Strategic Planning
Problem Solving
Quality Initiatives
Customized Training
Basic Skills
Communication Skills
Leadership and Management Skills
Computer Applications
Technical Skills
The mission of the Corporate Training Center is
to create a more efficient and productive workforce
through customized training that meets the evolving
needs of business and industry.
DISTANCE LEARNING
Distance Learning responds to the needs and
goals of students for flexible, accessible programs
and classes. Among the formats used at CFCC for
distance learning are online classes and telecourses,
which allow the student to complete course
requirements predominantly away from the campus
through the use of technology. Some on-campus
meetings may be necessary depending upon the
course. Log on to www.GoCFCC.com for complete
information on distance learning.
For all distance learning classes, academic
support, learning resources, student services and
technical support are available for students.
Contact the distance learning help desk at
[email protected] or (352) 854-2322, extension 1317.
Online Courses: Online courses are distributed
through the Internet and are suited for students
with time or place challenges to meet the
schedules of a course in a regular classroom.
Students who enroll in an online class must
have access to a computer with Internet access,
have the ability to send and receive e-mail and
88
to use other computer conferencing software,
to work independently with minimal directives
and to attend class meetings as scheduled for
testing and review.
Telecourses: Telecourses take advantage of
videotape formats for the distribution of course
material. This distance learning format also
requires the ability to work independently as
class meetings for tests and review are
infrequently scheduled. Videotapes are provided
through the Learning Resources Center for use
during the term in which the course is taken.
For a current list of distance learning opportunities,
visit the college’s Web site at www.GoCFCC.com
POSTSECONDARY ADULT
VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS (PSAV)
Area Vocational Education School programs are
open to high school completers, persons who have
left high school prior to graduation, and dual enrollment
students. All students enrolled in an occupational
program of more than 180 clock hours must be tested.
CFCC uses the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE).
TECH PREP
Tech Prep is a collaborative educational program
with Citrus, Levy and Marion county schools in which
students begin their technical or applied science
courses in high school and advance to higher level
courses at CFCC. Current programs of study include
accounting, automotive technology, business and
office systems, child development, computer and
information technology, criminal justice, culinary
arts, drafting, environmental horticulture technology,
health information management, various health
occupations, hospitality, legal assisting, and
marketing. Students who have graduated from an
approved and articulated Tech Prep course of
study may be eligible to receive college credits
and/or advanced standing in specific programs of
study toward an Associate in Science or Associate
in Applied Science degree.
SERVICES
CHILD CARE
Students are eligible to enroll their children in
the Child Care Center’s program Ocala Campus
pre-school for one year at a time, with priority for
day care given to full-time students. Evening
services are available, provided sufficient demand
exists. See page 70 for fees, and contact the
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Child Development Center office for complete
admission policies.
LEARNING SUPPORT CENTER
Available at both the Ocala and Citrus County
campuses, the Learning Support Center aids
students in academic (including college prep) and
occupational (including A.S. degree and certificate)
programs by offering student success-oriented
services.
The center is comprised of the Learning Support
Lab, Writing Center, Foreign Language Lab, Equal
Access Services (EAS), and Vocational Preparatory
Instruction (VPI). The center is open daily, with lab
hours including evenings and weekends (see page
8). There is no charge to registered CFCC students
for all the services the Learning Support Center
offers. Students with a valid college ID from any
other college or university pay a $10.00 fee per
semester. Non-students pay $50.00 per semester.
Learning Support Lab
The Learning Support Lab in Building 3,
Room 101, Ocala Campus, offers tutorial assistance
and/or instructional materials for core credit classes.
Students receive help in courses from arithmetic to
statistics, accounting to economics, biology to
physics, psychology to logic, and grammar to
literature. Students can participate in individual
and/or small group tutoring or use study skills
videos, workbooks and answer keys. A wide variety
of software is available for instructional use, Internet
access, tutorials, and MS Office. Online tutoring is
now available.
Writing Center
The Writing Center has been established to
provide students with assistance in drafting,
proofreading, and writing papers for any course
that requires writing, particularly Gordon Rule
classes. Staffed by tutors specializing in grammar
and composition, and by professors from the
English Department, the Writing Center will assist
students with their grammar and writing needs.
Foreign Language Lab
The Foreign Language Lab assists students
enrolled in Spanish, French, and English as a
Second Language courses. Twenty computers with
specialized tutorial software are available. Individual
and group tutoring in Spanish is also available.
Vocational Preparatory Instruction (VPI)
The VPI laboratory is a service to CFCC’s
occupational (A.S. degree and certificate programs)
and pre-occupational students. VPI enables
students to acquire the state-required minimal
basic skills to successfully complete the occupational
program of their choice. All instruction at the VPI
lab is individualized. Based on a student’s own
abilities, learning prescriptions are written to provide
necessary skills for success in occupational
selection. Students progress at their own rates
and according to their specific learning styles.
Additionally, for occupational students, VPI
coordinates the required state testing in reading,
math, and/or language. This testing is mandated
for all students once they have entered into an
occupational program consisting of 250 clock hours
or more. Once a student has had an initial test
and/or orientation, computerized tutorial programs,
morning and evening classes, and a wide variety of
other resources facilitate the learning process.
STUDENT ADVISING DEPARTMENT
Counseling support and information services are
available for all students through the Student Advising
Department. This department’s major role is to promote
and reinforce students’ independence and success in
their total development while attending CFCC.
Students needing academic advisement or
transfer information should call the Student Advising
Department at (352) 237-2111 or 854-2322,
extension 1310, to make an appointment. The Citrus
counseling office may be reached at (352) 249-1202.
Students who need special assistance with
adjustment to college life, career counseling,
intervention services and other college and/or
community resource information may contact the
Student Advising Department. Students may also
receive assistance with a question or problem
concerning advisement, registration or their academic
progress. Questions or requests for assistance in
transferring to a four-year institution should be
directed to the Student Advising Department.
A variety of student support services is available
through the Counseling Department on the Citrus
County Campus, including (but not limited to)
academic advisement, testing, career exploration,
academic support and personal counseling referrals.
Advisors/counselors help students adjust
programs to meet entrance requirements of fouryear colleges. It is the student’s responsibility to
determine specific entrance requirements and to
take appropriate CFCC courses to fulfill them.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE
RESOURCES
89
Students planning to transfer to four-year institutions should begin early in the freshman year to
work with a counselor in planning their course work
to include prerequisites for transfer and any other
admission requirements.
Representatives of four-year institutions visit the
CFCC Ocala Campus throughout the year, and
personal visits to other colleges can be arranged.
Advisors/counselors encourage students to
seek their assistance in solving academic and
career concerns. Upon request, counselors will
conduct small group sessions in such special
interest areas as study skills, value clarification and
career exploration. Career counseling, including a
Career Exploration Packet, is available through the
Assessment Center.
Equal Access Services (EAS)
Equal Access Services works with students and
faculty to facilitate the process of reasonable
accommodation for students with documented
disabilities. Students who identify themselves to
Equal Access Services and provide documentation
from a licensed or certified professional may
request accommodations. This includes potential
students, new, transfer, or currently enrolled students.
To ensure an effective accommodations process,
students must make their requests in a timely fashion.
Accommodations are made on a case-by-case
basis and may relate to physical access, auxiliary
learning aids, or programmatic and classroom
academic adjustments. Auxiliary learning aids may
include American Sign Language interpreters,
scribes, audiotape textbooks from Recordings for
the Blind and Dyslexic, CCTV, and various adaptive
hardware and software including large screen
monitors and computers with enlarging software,
screen reading software, and dictation software.
Academic adjustments may consist of testing
modifications and/or course substitution. EAS
students may also visit the Assessment Center for
free career assessment.
The office of Equal Access Services, located
within the Learning Support Center, provides these
services with supplemental assistance offered
through Student Support Services and Educational
Opportunity Center programs (see page 92) for
qualified participants. EAS also makes referrals to
community agencies and/or private services for
testing and evaluation.
90
FOOD SERVICES
Food services on the Ocala Campus range from
complete buffet meals to short-order selections.
Soft drinks and snacks are also available in vending
machines in selected locations on both the Ocala
and Citrus County campuses. No food or drink is
permitted in classrooms or auditoriums.
HEALTH SERVICES
Serious illness, accident or need of emergency
medical attention should be reported immediately
to the Security office on the Ocala Campus or the
Administration office at the Citrus County Campus.
Use the nearest campus telephone and dial 1261 if
not near the Security office on the Ocala Campus
when an emergency arises, or call 911 (emergency
number) if no response at 1261. On the Citrus
County Campus, dial 911 if not near the Administration office when an emergency arises.
CFCC, while having no obligation to do so,
attempts to secure medical aid for students. No health
facility is maintained on campus, however, several
emergency facilities are located near the Ocala
Campus. Students on the Ocala Campus are referred
to one of these facilities unless they request otherwise.
Citrus County Campus students are referred to Citrus
Memorial Hospital in Inverness unless they request
otherwise in writing. Registration implies understanding
of and consent for this procedure.
When applying, the student is asked to provide
certain pertinent health information, and students
with chronic health problems are advised to make
their special needs known to the Coordinator of
Equal Access Services and security personnel on
the Ocala Campus, or the Counseling office on the
Citrus County Campus.
JOB PLACEMENT AND
CO-OP CENTER
The Job Placement and Co-op center helps
CFCC students and graduates with job information
and placement. Services include:
A. Off-campus job referrals at
www.CFJobFinder.com
B. Extensive career resource library of books
and multimedia materials on:
Career planning
Occupations
Resume writing service
Interviewing skills
Employer information
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
C. On-campus interviewing with employers.
D. Resume referral service.
E. Job Fairs each term.
Jobs and co-op opportunities are available through
the Job Placement and Co-op center to students
and graduates. Through CFCC’s computerized
job listing bank (www.CFJobFinder.com), Patriot
Placement students can find current local, state
and national job referrals.
Any student or graduate desiring to use the services
of the Job Placement and Cooperative Education
Center may visit the Job Placement and Co-op center
located upstairs in Building 2 or call (352) 854-2322,
extension 1606 for an appointment. Services are also
available on the Citrus County Campus.
LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER
The Library/Learning Resources Centers on the
Ocala and Citrus campuses are modern library
facilities equipped with a variety of materials and
resources. The LRCs contain a collection of print,
audio, video, DVD, and electronic resources, including
the Internet, that supports students in learning.
The entire library staff is focused on providing quality
service to CFCC students, faculty, and staff, as well
as members of the community, while fulfilling their
information and academic needs.
All students have access to a collection of more
than 65,000 books, more than 300 magazine and
journal titles, and more than 2,000 videotapes at
the Ocala Campus; plus more than 9,000 items at
the Citrus County Campus. Inter-campus delivery
means that students can pick materials up at either
campus and return them to either campus. In
addition to a book collection that supports CFCC’s
academic programs, the Ocala LRC has three Special
Collections: Women’s History, Wisdom Traditions,
and the Hartigan Equine Collection; the Citrus LRC
has the Walker Environmental Collection.
Information about these holdings can be accessed
through LINCCWeb (www.linccweb.org). Through
this Web site, students can also access more than
60 electronic databases, several of them full-text,
and 1,300 e-books. CFCC students also have access
to the resources of the 27 other Florida community
college libraries and the 10 state university libraries.
Items can be obtained directly from any of these
libraries through a reciprocal borrowing program or
students can make use of the LRC’s InterLibrary
Loan service to have materials delivered to CFCC.
In addition, reserve materials for classes at the Levy
County Center can be accessed at the Luther
Callaway Public Library in Chiefland. The Ocala
LRC has special monitors available to those who
need to access the catalogs in larger print.
If you have any questions about these or other
services, just ask a Reference Librarian. The
librarians will help you find information quickly and
efficiently, and will show you how to use the
equipment and resources.
The Ocala LRC media service area hosts
teleconferences, video conferences, maintains the
closed circuit TV system, and creates videos and
photographs to support college activities.
The staff at the Circulation Desk checks out
books and other materials, including reserve
materials. CFCC students can check out up to 20
books at a time. Additional information on loan
periods, etc., may be found in printed material
available in the LRC and at the LRC Web page,
(www.cf.edu/resources/lrc/lrc.htm). The Learning
Resources Center on the Ocala Campus is open 70
hours a week, including four weeknights and Sundays
during the fall and spring semesters, and the Citrus
LRC is open 58 hours a week, including evenings,
during this same period.
THE CENTER FOR
CIVIC EDUCATION AND STUDENT
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
Helping you get involved in your campus and
community!
The purpose of campus and community involvement is to practice and develop the skills needed for
achieving a successful life and career. There are
many ways to get involved. We can help you find
the one that's best for you.
Get involved in your campus:
COLLEGE
RESOURCES
Student Activities
Student clubs and organizations exist on campus
to promote the social, physical and educational
well-being of students. CFCC student organizations
give you a chance to pursue your interests while
developing new friendships and skills for the future.
All clubs are open to any CFCC students. If you
don’t see something you are interested in, start
your own club! Organizations may require tryouts
and/or an interview process.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
91
African American Student Union (AASU)
Brain Bowl
Campus Christian Ministries (CCM)
CFCC Band
Cheerleaders
Forensics (Debate Team)
Gospel Choir
Hispanic American Association (HACER)
Imprints
In The Write Mind
International Club
Musegetas
Patriot Dance Ensemble
Patriot Press
Peer Mentors
Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society
Psychological Rehab. Ed. Program (PREP)
Realizing Our Cause (ROC)
Rotaract
Social Dance
Student Activities Board
Student Nurses Association (SNA)
Theatre/Drama
Variations/Patriot Singers
Women’s Basketball
Men’s Basketball
Women’s Softball
Women’s Tennis
Men’s Baseball
Leadership Development
CFCC is committed to enhancing student
leadership skills. We offer a comprehensive
leadership development program consisting of
programs, seminars and retreats focused on all
aspects of leadership. Recent topics have included
leadership style development, public speaking
skills, stress management and an etiquette dinner.
Topics are chosen each fall based on student input.
Student Activities Center
Meet old friends and make new ones in the
“Club Hub.” Play a game, work with club members,
or just visit with friends. When scheduled meetings
are not being held, the Club Hub is a place for
students to spend their down time.
Get involved in your community:
Civic Education
Civic education can be identified as a structured
way for engaging students in learning opportunities
that teach the knowledge, understanding, and
competencies required for active participation in
civic and community life. Engaging in civic affairs
92
and embracing the responsibilities of community
citizenship can enhance your academic learning
and your career preparation. The Center for Civic
Education and Student Leadership Development
has a database of volunteer opportunities to match
your interests and needs. We coordinate monthly
special projects and participate in state and national
volunteer programs. We hold a volunteer fair every
fall where community organizations have information
about their volunteer needs and programs. Stop by
and visit for more information, or look us up on the
Web at http://www.cfcc.cc.fl.us/volunteer/.
STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES
Student Support Services (SSS) is one of the TRIO
programs funded through the U.S. Department of
Education. At CFCC, the SSS program provides a
variety of supportive services to at least 200 students
annually who meet the following eligibility criteria:
A. Low income: come from a family whose
taxable income does not exceed levels set
forth by federal government regulations,
and/or
B. First generation: come from a family in
which neither parent/guardian graduated
from a four-year college or university, or
C. Disabled: have documented physical and/or
learning disabilities.
The overall purpose of the program is to
increase the retention, graduation and transfer
rates of this student population. Services provided
to participants include, but are not limited to:
✓ Academic advisement/registration assistance
✓ Career guidance
✓ Personal counseling
✓ Peer tutors/mentors
✓ Financial aid/scholarship advisement
✓ Transfer advisement
✓ Free trips to state universities
✓ Social/cultural activities
✓ Assistance for students with physical and
learning disabilities
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Student Support Services
Summer Program
The Student Support Services program conducts
a summer “bridge” program to assist students who
have not passed all sections of the college entrance
exam (SAT, ACT, or CPT). Although the program
may change its format over time, the following
description remains constant. It is a four to six
week program that provides students with the
following:
• Instruction in reading, English and math/
algebra skills
• Supplemental instruction and/or tutoring
• Assistance with financial aid and scholarships
• “Ropes challenge” type activities
• Leadership development
• Study skills (time management, note-taking,
test-taking, etc.)
• Academic advisement/registration assistance
• Career exploration
• Campus and community resources
• Campus tour
• Basic technology skill development
To learn more, stop by the SSS office in Building
2, Room 205 or call the office at (352) 854-2322,
extension 1761.
Job Matching: A database and other resources
are available to track current and future highdemand career fields. The client is able to preview
the employment outlook in a particular field(s) of
interest on a local, regional, state, and national level,
as well as identify which employers are hiring for
specific careers now and in the future. Information
about related positions is also available.
CFCC Career Assessment Center
Helping students and members of the general
public discover which careers are most appropriate
for them and how to plan their education accordingly, and assisting employers in selecting the best
candidates for jobs are the primary purposes of the
CFCC Career Assessment Center.
Potential clients of the Career Assessment
Center include students, those desiring to change
or start new careers, retirees who want to re-enter
the workforce, the disabled, homemakers entering
or re-entering the workforce, and local companies
and industries.
Assessment: A wide variety of evaluative tools
is available, from computer software to mechanical
devices. These tools measure abilities, aptitudes,
interests, and educational development to determine
which occupational fields are best suited to the test
taker. Also, these tools are used for employers in
applicant or employee selection and promotion.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE
RESOURCES
93
Programs
of Study
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
95
Associate in Arts Degree
The Associate in Arts degree is designed primarily to meet the requirements for a student to
transfer to the junior level of a college or university
to continue work toward a bachelor’s degree.
Students should also be aware of the various,
specific requirements for the Associate in Arts
degree imposed by state regulations and/or law.
These requirements include courses that develop
reading, writing and computational skills, the exit
test requirement (College Level Academic Skills
Test), and, in some instances, a foreign language
requirement. These requirements are listed on
pages 51–54 of this catalog. Also see CLAST,
pages 61–62. See the Student Advising Department for articulation sheets.
96
Associate in Science Degree,
Associate in Applied Science
Degree, College Credit
Certificate, and
Postsecondary Adult
Vocational Certificate
Programs
All programs are open to students who qualify
legally and academically. In many cases, experience has shown that a student should have
additional qualifications or that some students
should not enter certain programs. Examples
of limiting factors in some career fields include
(but are not limited to) conviction of a felony and
physical or mental disorders (even if controlled by
medication). Students are responsible for consulting
with program managers, counselors and other
experts in their chosen career fields early and
regularly to be fully informed.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Associate in Science
Degree Programs
Radiation Therapy In Cooperation With
Hillsborough Community College . . . . . . . . .133
Accounting Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Recreation Technology—
Physical Education Technician Option . . . . .134
Automotive Service Management
Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Veterinary Technology—In Cooperation
With St. Pete College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
Business Administration—
Career Ladder Model A.S. to B.S. . . . . . . . .101
Computer Engineering Technology . . . . .102–103
Computer Information Technology . . . . . . . . . .104
Criminal Justice Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Culinary Arts Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Drafting and Design Technology—
Architectural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Drafting and Design Technology—
Mechanical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Associate in Applied Science
Degree Programs
Business Administration—Industrial Option . . .138
Business Administration—
Management Specialization . . . . . . . . . . . .139
Business Administration—
Marketing Specialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Hospitality and Tourism Management . . . . . . .141
Early Childhood Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Emergency Medical Services . . . . . . . . .111–112
College Credit
Certificate Programs
Environmental Horticulture Technology . . . . . .113
Accounting Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Environmental Horticulture Technology–
Landscape Design Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Business Administration—
Business Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Equine Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Business Administration—
Finance Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
Elementary Education Assisting . . . . . . . . . . .110
Fire Science Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Health Information Technology . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Human Services—Social Services
Specialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Internet Services Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Legal Assisting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121–122
Nursing–Licensed Practical Nurse to Associate
Degree Nurse Bridge Program . . . . . . .123–124
Office Administration—
Legal Office Specialization . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Office Administration—
Medical Office Administration . . . . . . . . . . .126
Office Administration—
Medical Records Transcription . . . . . . .127–128
Business Administration—
Small Business/Entrepreneurship . . . . . . . .147
Business Management—
Marketing Specialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Emergency Medical Technician (Basic) . . . . . .149
Equine Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
Food and Beverage Management . . . . . . . . . .151
Information Technology Analyst . . . . . . . . . . . .152
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
Legal Office Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Office Administration—
Health Records Coding Option . . . . . . . . . .154
Office Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Office Software Applications Management . . .156
Paramedic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157–158
Office Administration—Office Management . . .129
Office Administration—
Office Software Applications . . . . . . . . . . . .130
Physical Therapist Assistant . . . . . . . . . .131–132
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
97
Postsecondary Adult
Vocational Certificate
Programs
Automotive Collision Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Automotive Service Technology . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Barbering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Commercial Heating and Air Conditioning
Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Commercial Vehicle Driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Corrections Stand Alone Academy . . . . . . . . .165
Cosmetology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Dental Assisting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167–168
Early Childhood Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Facial Specialty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
Food Management, Production and Services . .171
Law Enforcement Stand Alone Academy . . . . .172
Nail Specialty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173
Nursery Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Practical Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
Surgical Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Applied Welding Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
98
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2210
The Accounting Technology program prepares individuals for employment as accounting paraprofessionals
in advanced professional accounting occupations that require analysis, theory, and design of accounting
procedures and applications. The program content provides training in the principles, procedures, and
theories of organizing, maintaining, and auditing business and financial transactions and the preparation
of accompanying financial records and reports for internal and external use.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
ACG 2021
Financial Accounting
BUL 2241
Business Law I
GEB 1011
Introduction to Business
OST 2335
Business Communications
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
ACG 2071
Managerial Accounting
ECO 2023
Principles of Economics-Micro
ACG 2100
Intermediate Accounting
TAX 2000
Federal Income Tax I
TAX 2010
Federal Income Tax II
CGS 2103
Advanced Computer Applications
ACG 2360
Cost Accounting
ACG 2450
Integrated Accounting
ACG 1949
Co-op Work Experience2
ACO 1807
Payroll Accounting
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
____
46
Credit Hours
3
____
3
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
Program Electives
Business Elective1
Total Credit Hours
64
1
Recommended Electives: BUL 2242-Business Law II, FIN 2100-Personal Finance, GEB 2350-International Business,
MNA 2141-Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills, OST 1100-Professional Keyboarding I, SBM 2000-Small Business Management,
SPC 2600-Effective Speaking.
2
Co-op Prerequisites: ACG 2021, ACG 2071.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
99
A.S. Degree Program in
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY
(68 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2282
The two-year Automotive Service Management Technology program is designed to prepare students
for employment as automotive/light truck technicians at area dealerships, independent garages or other
automotive repair facilities. Instruction is provided in the diagnosis, repair, and service of engines, fuel
emissions systems, brakes, drive trains, steering and suspension systems, transmissions, electrical systems,
electronic engine controls, and automotive computer control systems. The program also includes instruction
in safe and efficient work practices, troubleshooting skills, and service and maintenance of automobiles.
Students will also be instructed in techniques to develop the “people” skills essential for job success.
Classroom instruction and shop experiences will be the primary delivery systems. The program manager
may require additional courses or make substitutions required to meet the needs of students.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
PHY 1020
Physics for Non-Science Majors or
Any Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
Credits
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
____
18
Credit Hours
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
4
____
42
Credit Hours
3
5
____
8
Program Core Courses
AER 1005
Automotive Fundamentals
AER 1110
Engines
AER 2260
Clutch and Transmissions
AER 1101
Auto Electrical Systems
AER 2520
Fuel and Emissions Control Systems
AER 1611
Air Conditioning and Heating
AER 1122
Brake Systems
AER 1451
Steering and Suspension
AER 2316
Automotive Electrical Systems II
AER 2521
Drivability and Diagnosis
AER 2251
Advanced Automatic Transmissions
Program Electives
Elective1
Electives
Total Credit Hours
1
100
Recommended Elective: AER 1949-Automotive Technology Co-op.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
68
A.S. Degree Program in
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION–
CAREER LADDER MODEL A.S. TO B.S.3
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2156
This program will help students develop managerial know-how and become valuable assets to any
company. Instruction in this program provides a balanced curriculum of general education and business
related subjects. The A.S. to B.S. model provides students the opportunity for a seamless transfer to
a bachelor’s degree program. Students wishing to transfer any credits from this program to another institution
or related area program must accept the responsibility for approval in advance to the transfer institution.
Please note Business Administration A.A.S. options pages 138–140.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
PSY 2012
General Psychology
MAC 1105
College Algebra
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
PHI 2631
Ethics and Business
MAC 2233
Calculus
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
ACG 2021
Financial Accounting
BUL 2241
Business Law I
GEB 1011
Introduction to Business
ENC 1102
Freshman Composition Skills II
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
ACG 2071
Managerial Accounting
ECO 2023
Principles of Economics-Micro
CGS 2103
Advanced Computer Applications
ECO 2013
Principles of Economics-Macro
MAR 2011
Principles of Marketing
MAN 1948
Co-op Work Experience2
STA 2023
Elementary Statistics
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
18
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
45
Credit Hours
1
____
1
Program Electives
Business Electives1
Total Credit Hours
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
64
Recommended Electives: ACG 2100-Intermediate Accounting, ACG 2360-Cost Accounting, CGS 2871-Multimedia Computer
Applications, COP 1224-Programming in C++, COP 1332-Programming Visual Basic, FIN 2100-Personal Finance,
GEB 2350-International Business, MNA 2141-Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills, OST 1100-Keyboarding, OST 2335-Business
Communications, SBM 2000-Small Business Management, TAX 2000-Federal Income Tax I, TAX 2010-Federal Income Tax II.
2
Co-op Prerequisites: ACG 2021, ECO 2013 or ECO 2023, GEB 1011 and two of the following four: ENC 1101, MAN 2021,
MAR 2011, ACG 2071.
3
This is a new degree program that transfers to the State University System in Business Administration. This degree leads to a
B.S. in Business Administration.
1
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
101
A.S. Degree Program in
COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
(68 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2266
The purpose of the Computer Engineering Technology Degree is to train students who wish to work
in the computer network and engineering technology fields, which are dominated by Novell and Microsoft
systems. These programs will help students prepare for rewarding careers in the engineering technology field
and also offers students the opportunity to earn an A.S. degree, as well as certification ratings for Microsoft
Certificate Systems Engineer (MCSE). (There are additional costs for courses within the 15 credit
hour MCSE.)
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MAC 1105
College Algebra or
MGF 1106
Liberal Arts Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
CGS 2564
PC Management
ENC 2210
Technical Communications
CET 1171
Introduction to Computer Technology
CET 1172
A+ Computer Hardware
EET 1084
Survey of Electronics
CET 2173
A+ Peripherals and Troubleshooting
CGS 2871
Multimedia Applications
COP 1332
Programming Visual Basic
CEN 2500
Data Communication and Networking
CET 1949
Co-op Work Experience*
CGS 2930
Special Topics in Computers (A+)
CGS 2930
Special Topics in Computers (Routers)
Credit Hours
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
4
3
4
3
3
4
3
1
1
____
38
*Co-op Prerequisites: CGS 1100, CET 1172, CET 2173, CGS 2564.
Program Electives
Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) Core Option
A MCSE is qualified to effectively plan, implement, maintain, and support information systems with
Microsoft Windows 2000 and the Microsoft Back Office integrated family of server software. (New students
should complete a CFCC application and submit to administration, at least two weeks in advance of
orientation, dates to receive an invitation to attend orientation. Students must register and pay for all
courses shown for that section.)
102
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Days
Section One:
CEN 1322
CEN 1305
CEN 1321
CEN 2320
Days
Section Two:
CEN 1325
CEN 2327
CTS 2320
Microsoft Windows 2000 Networking and Operating Systems Essentials
Supporting Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional and Server
Supporting a Microsoft Windows 2000 Network Infrastructure
Implementing and Administering Microsoft Windows 2000 Directory Services
Designing a Microsoft Windows 2000 Directory Services Infrastructure
Designing a Microsoft Windows 2000 Networking Services Infrastructure
Designing a Microsoft Windows 2000 Migration Strategy
____
Credit Hours
15
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
103
A.S. Degree Program in
COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
(63 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2257
The Computer Information Technology program trains individuals for employment in a wide variety of
computer positions in business, industry, and government. It provides basic skills in hardware configuration,
troubleshooting and repair, as well as extensive exposure to a full range of software applications for personal
computers including word processing, spreadsheets, database programs, graphics, networking and
multimedia. Graduates of this program can expect to be employed as microcomputer technicians,
microcomputer coordinators, help-station agents, computer-training coordinators and in other positions.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics or
MGF 1106
Liberal Arts Math I
Biological or Physical Science
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
CET 1171
Introduction to Computer Technology
CGS 2564
PC Management
ENC 2210
Technical Communications or
OST 2335
Business Communications
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding I or
Business Elective
CGS 2103
Advanced Computer Applications
COP 1332
Programming Visual Basic
CET 1172
A+ Computer Hardware
CGS 2540
Database Management Systems
CGS 2871
Multimedia Computer Applications
COP 1224
Programming in C++ or
CGS 1991
Web Programming I
CEN 2500
Data Communication and Networking
CET 2173
A+ Peripherals and Troubleshooting
EET 1084
Survey of Electronics
CIT 1949
Co-op Work Experience*
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
4
4
3
3
____
48
63
*Co-op Prerequisites: CGS 1100, CET 1172, CET 2173.
1
Recommended Electives: CGS 2557-Internet Technology, GEB 2935-Survey of Electronic Business, CGS 2930-Special Topics in
Computers, OST 2717-Advanced Word, SBM 2000-Small Business Management, SPC 2600-Effective Speaking.
104
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2277
The Associate in Science degree in Criminal Justice Technology program prepares men and women for
various positions in law enforcement and corrections agencies at the local, state and federal levels and for
related jobs in private industry. The program includes a combination of theoretical, practical and supportive
courses. Individuals already employed in the criminal justice area can increase their skills and prepare for
supervisory positions.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences
*MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
HLP 1082
Wellness Applications
BSC 1020
Biology and the Human Experience
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities
Credits
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
____
20
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
27
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
2
____
17
Program Core Courses
CCJ 1500
Juvenile Delinquency
CCJ 1020
Introduction to Criminal Justice System
CJC 1000
Introduction to Corrections
****CJE 2601
Introduction to Criminal Investigation
CJL 2130
Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures
CCJ 2111
Theory and Practice of Law Enforcement
**CCJ 1949
Internship
CCJ 2010
Criminology
CCJ 2013
Criminal Victimization
Program Electives
PSY 2012
General Psychology
PHI 2600
Introduction to Ethics
ENC 1102
Freshman Composition Skills II
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
***Elective
Total Credit Hours
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
64
*For those students taking advantage of the Criminal Justice Articulation Agreement at UCF, they must take MGF 1106 Liberal Arts
Math I.
**In-service law enforcement students will take CCJ 2941; in-service corrections students will take CCJ 2940.
***Suggested elective: EEC 1603.
****For information on an A.S. to B.S. program with participating colleges/universities, please contact the Criminal Justice
Department.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
105
A.S. Degree Program in
CULINARY ARTS MANAGEMENT
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2287
This program of study prepares students to assume the responsibilities of a middle manager or
supervisor in a variety of food service and restaurant operations. Attention is focused on major industry
segments, business practices, and current trends. Detailed consideration will be given each component of
the food service system: marketing and menu planning, food preparation, service, controls, and quality
assurance. This program of study can be completed in two years, and covers both practice and theory.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics or
MGF 1106
Liberal Arts Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
3
HFT 1000
Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism
3
BUL 2241
Business Law I
3
MNA 2141
Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills
3
FSS 1115
Basic Food Preparation
3
FSS 1120
Food Purchasing
3
FSS 2940
Advanced Hospitality Management Seminar (permission of Instructor)
2
HFT 1212
Safety and Sanitation Management
3
FSS 2500
Food and Beverage Cost Controls (pre-req. MTB 1103)
3
FSS 2100
Menu Planning and Analysis (pre-req. FSS 1115, MTB 1103)
3
FSS 2251
Beverage Management (pre-req. MTB 1103)
3
FSS 1202
Food Production I (pre-req. FSS 1115)
3
FSS 1246
Food Specialties I (pre-req. FSS 1115)
3
FSS 2221
Food Production II (pre-req. FSS 1202)
3
FSS 2248
Food Specialties II (pre-req. FSS 1246)
3
FSS 1949
Internship I
3
____
Credit Hours
47
Program Electives
Business Electives1
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
Recommended Electives: ACO 1807-Payroll Accounting, FIN 2100-Personal Finance, HFT 1541-Customer Service,
CGS 2103-Advanced Computer Applications, OST 2401-Office Administration I.
1
106
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
2
____
2
64
A.S. Degree Program in
DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGY–
ARCHITECTURAL
(62 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2279
The Drafting and Design Technology program prepares students for employment as designers and
draftspersons within the architectural industry. The program provides supplemental training for individuals
previously or currently enrolled in these occupations. Available classes also prepare students planning to
transfer to a university to pursue a bachelor’s degree in architecture. The program provides instruction in
architectural office practices used in the production of detailed drawings and related information required to
produce construction documents for the construction of buildings. Emphasis is placed on an understanding
of architecture through learning computer-aided drafting. The program also includes classes that develop
the students’ communication skills, leadership skills and math skills.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
Science (PHY 1020 recommended)
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
MAC 1105
College Algebra
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
ENC 2210
Technical Communications or
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
EGS 1110
Engineering Graphics
ETD 2320C
Computer Aided Drafting
ETD 2350C
Advanced Computer Aided Drafting and Design
ARC 1511
Architectural Communications
ETD 2355C
Three-Dimensional Modeling
ARC 2171
Architectural Drafting (Beginning)
ARC 2172
Architectural Drafting (Advanced)
BCN 1250
Architectural Drafting Principles
ARC 2461
Materials and Methods of Construction
ETD 1949
Co-op Work Experience
ETD 2949
Co-op Work Experience
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
38
Credit Hours
9
____
9
Program Electives
Technical Electives1
Total Credit Hours
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
62
1
Recommended Electives: ART 1201-Basic Design I, ART 1300-Freehand Drawing I, PHY 1020-Elementary Physics for Non-Science
Majors, MAC 1140-Pre-Calculus, MAC 2233-Calculus for Business and Social Sciences, OST 2335-Business Communications,
ETI 1110-Introduction to Quality Control.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
107
A.S. Degree Program in
DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGY–MECHANICAL
(62 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2270
The Drafting and Design Technology program prepares students for employment as mechanical drafters/
designers or provides supplemental training for those previously or currently employed in these occupations.
The program provides instruction in drafting office practices to assist in preparation of engineering plans,
layouts and detailed drawings, preparation of charts, graphs and diagrams, and the use of mechanical
handbooks applicable to industrial design and drafting. Emphasis is given to computer-aided drafting and
design through a variety of CADD courses and relevant laboratory work. The program also includes
communication skills, leadership skills, and math skills.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
Science Elective (PHY 1020 recommended)
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
MAT 1033
Intermediate Algebra
MAC 1105
College Algebra
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
ENC 2210
Technical Communications or
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
ETI 1411
Manufacturing Processes I
EGS 1110
Engineering Graphics
ETD 2320C
Computer Aided Drafting
ETD 2701
Industrial Drafting
ETD 2350C
Advanced Computer Aided Drafting and Design
ETD 2461
Mechanical Systems Drafting
ETD 2355C
Three-Dimensional Modeling
ARC 2171
Architectural Drafting I
ETD 1949
Co-op Work Experience
ETI 1110
Introduction to Quality Control
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
18
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
36
Credit Hours
8
____
8
Program Electives
Technical Electives1
Total Credit Hours
62
1
Recommended Electives: ARC 2172-Architectural Drafting II, EET 1084-Survey of Electronics, CGS 2871-Multimedia Computer
Applications, CGS 2564-PC Management.
108
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
(63 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2259
The Child Development and Education program is designed to prepare individuals for employment in the
early childhood field. This program combines theoretical, practical and supportive courses. Students will
practice acceptable early childhood techniques with children in the on-campus laboratory pre-school. With
careful planning, A.S. degree candidates may also complete sufficient additional hours to qualify for the
Associate in Arts degree. For information on this option, consult the Counseling Department.
To comply with Florida state law, Chapter 402.3055, each prospective student must be fingerprinted
and undergo a criminal background check, reference check and tuberculosis test. Information received is
confidential and is required to determine the prospective student’s eligibility to work with children.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
HLP 1081
Wellness Applications
BSC 1020
Biology and the Human Experience
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities
Credits
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
____
21
Program Core Courses
EEC 1931
Child Care Seminar
EEC 2001
Early Childhood Education
CHD 1440C
Child Care Practicum I
EEC 1000
Introduction to Child Development and Education
EEC 1603
Child Guidance
EEC 2301
Instructional Practices
EEC 2200
Curriculum in Childhood Education
CHD 1441C
Child Care Practicum II
EEC 1921
Pre-School Workshop
CHD 1339
Learning Through Play
EEX 2010
Survey of Disabling Conditions
EEC 1940
Educational Field Experience
EEC 1907
Observing and Recording Behavior
EEC 2401
Home and Community (3)
Credit Hours
2
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
39
Program Electives
Elective1
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
3
____
3
63
109
A.S. Degree Program in
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ASSISTING
(63 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2291
The Elementary Education Assisting program is designed to prepare students for employment positions
that support teaching activities that occur in the classroom. It has been developed and is in response to
new state legislation that all public school teacher assistants/aides have either an A.A., A.S. or 60 credit
hours of coursework. This combination of coursework should give current and potential teacher aides/
assistants the skills needed to be successful working with elementary age students.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics*
Any Biological or Physical Science
Credits
3
3
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
HLP 1081
Personal Wellness Appraisal and Improvement
SLS 1501
College and Career Success
EDF 2005
Introduction to Education
LIT 2330
Introduction to Children’s Literature
EDG 2701
Introduction to Multicultural Education: Teaching Diverse Populations
EDP 2002
Educational Psychology
RED 1010
Introduction to Reading Education
EDE 1501
Classroom Management
EDE 1949
Field Experience I
EDE 2949
Field Experience II
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
Credit Hours
Program Electives**
Elective
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
____
36
12
____
12
63
*MTB 1103 does not fulfill the Gordon Rule math for an A.A. Recommend substituting MGF 1107 (prerequisite of MAT 1033 which can
be used as an elective).
**Suggest electives for A.S.: EEX 1603, EEC 1907-Observing and Recording Behavior.
**Suggest electives for A.A.: Any physical or biological science with laboratory, ENC 1102-Freshman Composition Skills II,
MTG 2204-Elements of Geometry, MAE 2801-Mathematics for Educators.
110
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
(73 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2234
Emergency Medical Services is an Associate Degree in Science program that encompasses two
occupational opportunities, Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and Paramedic, as part of the A.S.
degree in Emergency Medical Services. This program can be done in units, EMT/Paramedic with general
education units as the completion.
The EMT unit requires one semester and this prepares the student for certification and employment in
accordance with the Department of Transportation curriculum and the State of Florida EMS/Department of
Health rules and regulations.
The Paramedic unit is three consecutive semesters. This part of the EMS A.S. Degree is accredited
by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs for EMT-Paramedic of the American Medical
Association and meets the standards of the 1998 EMT/Paramedic National Curriculum from U.S. Department
of Transportation. In order to progress into the Paramedic unit of the A.S. program a candidate must be a
licensed EMT in the State of Florida.
All general education classes may be taken concurrent with EMT and Paramedic classes or after the
Paramedic unit of this A.S. program is completed. Paramedic courses must be taken in sequence.
Application data is distributed at information sessions. These are held on a scheduled basis. Call CFCC,
(352) 873-5817, for dates and times of information sessions. Program application/information packets are
available in Building 35-104.
The program policies including attendance, grading, clinical behaviors and readmission guidelines are
found in the student handbook that each student receives once admitted to the EMT program.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MAC 1105
College Algebra
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Elective
PSY 2012
General Psychology
HLP 1081
Personal Wellness
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
EMT program
Prerequisite-admission to program:
EMS 1119
Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Technology
EMS 1119L
Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Technology Skills Lab
EMS 1431
EMT Hospital/Field Experience
EMS 1354C
Emergency Field Operations
Credit Hours
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Credits
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
____
20
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
6
2
2
1
____
11
111
Paramedic program
Prerequisite: Admission to program and current EMT certificate from State of Florida.
Semester One
BSC 0084
EMS 2610
EMS 2611
EMS 2612
EMS 2613
EMS 2611L
EMS 2612L
EMS 2613L
EMS 2656
Semester Two
EMS 2615
EMS 2619
EMS 2628
EMS 2615L
EMS 2619L
EMS 2628L
EMS 2630
EMS 2645
Semester Three
EMS 2614
EMS 2614L
EMS 2618
EMS 2658
Anatomy and Physiology for Health Occupations Certificate Programs
3
Introduction to Paramedic
2
Paramedic Fundamentals
2
Airway Management and Ventilation
1
Paramedic Patient Assessment
1
Fundamentals Skills Lab
2
Airway Management and Ventilation Lab
1
Patient Assessment Lab
1
Paramedic Clinical Experience I
4
____
First Semester Total
17
Medical Emergencies I
3
Medical Emergencies II
3
Paramedic OB/GYN/Neonatal Emergencies
1
Medical Emergencies Skills Lab I
2
Medical Emergencies Skills Lab II
1
Paramedic OB/GYN/Neonatal Emergencies Lab
1
Behavioral Emergencies
1
Paramedic Clinical Experience II
4
____
Second Semester Total 16
Trauma Emergencies
Trauma Emergencies Skills Lab
EMS Operations
Paramedic Clinical Experience III
Third Semester Total
Total Credit Hours
2
1
1
5
____
9
42
Sequence of courses represents fall as first semester. There is a slightly different sequence for
students who begin in the spring.
Note:
• When more qualified students apply than can be accepted, those not accepted to the program are
placed on a waiting list and will be admitted to future classes.
• Federal criminal background check is required for admission. Persons who have a felony history are not
eligible for admission to any CFCC Health Occupations program, including Emergency Medical Services.
• Upon acceptance into the program, a medical examination and proof of immunizations are required.
• All students are responsible for their own health/hospitalization insurance. Professional liability insurance
is included in tuition fees.
• It is necessary that students have reliable transportation to the assigned hospitals and clinical facilities.
• All students are required to have CPR certification before class begins.
The student must be prepared to pay additional fees and purchase uniforms as mandated by program of learning.
1
112
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
ENVIRONMENTAL HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY
(60 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2260
The Ornamental Horticulture Technology program prepares students for employment as greenhouse
production managers, nursery managers, production superintendents and landscape designers. The
program articulates with Lake City Community College allowing students to transfer into the Golf
Course Operations Program.
The content includes, but is not limited to, instruction that prepares individuals to supervise or manage
the production and use of decorative plants, plant materials and associated services. Subject matter also
includes plant nutrition, plant classification and identification, propagation, hydroponics, pest control, irrigation,
marketing, equipment management, cultural and environmental management of nursery and greenhouse
facilities, business management, employability and human relations skills. Laboratory and horticultural land
laboratory activities are an integral part of this program and include the use of horticultural equipment,
management and maintenance of growing structures, chemical application and landscape maintenance
and installation.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
Science Elective1
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities
Credits
3
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
____
18
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
2
3
2
3
3
3
2
3
____
33
Program Core Courses
ORH 1000C
Introduction to Environmental Horticulture
ORH 1510
Ornamental Plant Identification
ORH 1113C
Pest and Disease Control
ORH 1851
Landscape Design and Maintenance
ORH 1851L
Landscape Design and Maintenance Laboratory
ORH 1021
Plant Propagation
ORH 1021L
Plant Propagation Laboratory
ORH 1020C
Household Plants
ORH 1872C
Interior Landscaping
ORH 1260
Greenhouse Operations
ORH 1260L
Greenhouse Operations Laboratory
ORH 1601C
Retail and Wholesale Nurseries
Program Electives
SBM 2000
Small Business Management or
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
Electives2
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
3
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
6
____
9
60
Recommended Elective: BOT 1010C-Botany with lab or BOT 1011C-Plant Diversity.
1
Recommended Elective: ORH 1949-Environmental Horticulture Co-op or CGS 1100-Microcomputer Applications.
2
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
113
A.S. Degree Program in
ENVIRONMENTAL HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY–
LANDSCAPE DESIGN OPTION
(60 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2269
The Ornamental Horticulture Technology program prepares students for employment as greenhouse
production managers, nursery managers, production superintendents and landscape designers. The
program articulates with Lake City Community College allowing students to transfer into the Golf
Course Operations program.
The content includes, but is not limited to, instruction that prepares individuals to supervise or manage
the production and use of decorative plants, plant materials and associated services. Subject matter also
includes plant nutrition, plant classification and identification, propagation, hydroponics, pest control,
irrigation, marketing, equipment management, cultural and environmental management of nursery and
greenhouse facilities, business management, employability and human relations skills. Laboratory and
horticultural land laboratory activities are an integral part of this program and include the use of horticultural
equipment, management and maintenance of growing structures, chemical application and landscape
maintenance and installation.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
Science Elective1
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities
Credits
3
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
____
18
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
____
34
Program Core Courses
ORH 1000C
Introduction to Environmental Horticulture
ORH 1510
Ornamental Plant Identification
ORH 1113C
Pest and Disease Control
ORH 1851
Landscape Design and Maintenance
ORH 1851L
Landscape Design and Maintenance Laboratory
ORH 2832C
Advanced Landscape Design
ORH 1020C
Household Plants
ORH 1872C
Interior Landscaping
ORH 1260
Greenhouse Operations2
ORH 1260L
Greenhouse Operations Laboratory2
ORH 1601C
Retail and Wholesale Nurseries
GCO 1400C
Turfgrasses for Golf and Landscaping
Program Electives
SBM 2000
Small Business Management or
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
Electives3
3
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
Recommended Elective: BOT 1010C-Botany with Lab or BOT 1011C-Plant Diversity.
2
ORH 1021 and ORH 1021L can be substituted.
3
Recommended Elective: ORH 1949-Environmental Horticulture Co-op or CGS 1100-Microcomputer Applications.
1
114
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
5
____
8
60
A.S. Degree Program in
EQUINE STUDIES
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2292
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment in the following occupations:
supervisory and management positions such as general manager – large or small farm operations, assistant
farm manager, farm department manager, broodmare/foal manager, yearling manager in a variety of equine
enterprises, or to provide supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in the equine
industry.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics or
MAC 1147*
Precalculus Algebra/Trigonometry (*for A.A. degree)
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
ANS 1230
Survey of Equine
ANS 1239
Equine Anatomy and Physiology
AGR 2300
Horse Handling and Safety
ANS 1112
Equine Computer Skills
AEB 1931
Equine Practicum I
ANS 1315
Equine Reproduction
ANS 1240
Equine Health Care I
AEB 2234
Equine Business Management
ANS 2232
Equine Behavior and Psychology
ANS 1949
Co-Op/Internship I
ANS 2235
Equine Health Care II
ANS 2237
Equine Health Care III
ENC 2210
Technical communications or
ENC 1102*
Freshman Composition Skills II (*for A.A. degree)
ANS 2949
Co-Op/Internship II
ANS 2405
Equine Nutrition
AEB 1932
Equine Practicum II
ANS 1930
Special Topics — Equine Studies
Elective
Credit Hours
1
Total Credit Hours
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
1
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
____
49
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
64
Recommended Elective: CGS 1100-Microcomputer Applications, GEB 2350-Introduction to International Business, APA 1111Business Accounting, SPN 1120-Elementary Spanish I.
1
*For A.A. degree
Note: Course numbers subject to change.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
115
A.S. Degree Program in
FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
(60 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2272
The Fire Science Technology program is offered for individuals who are already in the fire service field
and are seeking to advance. This program will provide the training and courses required for certification as
Fire Officer I and II and will prepare the graduate for a variety of technical and supervisory positions within
the fire service.
This program is conducted in coordination with the Florida State Fire College and the program core
courses are conducted at their campus. Prospective students are advised to consult with the Fire Science
Technology Program Advisor prior to enrolling as this program has special requirements and enrollment
procedures. For more information call (352) 854-2322, ext. 1633.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
MTB 1103
Business Math
(or any higher level college math)
Physical or Biological Science Elective
Credits
3
3
3
One of the following sets:
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities and
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance and
WOH 1012
World Civilization I or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance and
WOH 1022
World Civilization II
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
OST 2335
Business Communications
FFP 1505
Fire Prevention Practices
FFP 1540
Private Fire Protection Systems
FFP 2810
Fire Fighting Tactics and Strategy I
FFP 2720
Company Officer
FFP 2780
Fire Department Administration
FFP 2120
Building Construction for the Fire Service
FFP 1740
Fire Service Course Delivery
FFP 2811
Fire Fighting Tactics and Strategy II
FFP 2700
Ethical and Legal Issues for the Fire Service
FFP 2741
Fire Service Course Design
FFP 2610
Fire Investigations—Origins and Causes
FFP 2111
Fire Chemistry
Fire Elective
FFP 2706
Public Information Officer or
FFP 1793
Fire and Life Safety Educator—Level I
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
116
3
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
3
____
45
60
A.S. Degree Program in
HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
(67 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2233
The Health Information Technology program is an Associate in Science degree designed to prepare
the graduate to work with and manage health related information in a variety of settings. Professional
responsibilities include the collecting, storing, processing, retrieving, analyzing, disseminating and
communicating of information related to reimbursement, research, planning, delivery, and evaluation of
health care services. The Health Information Technology program is pending accreditation by the
Commission on the Accreditation of Allied Health Educational Programs in cooperation with The Council on
Accreditation of the American Health Information Association. When the program receives accreditation,
students will be eligible to apply to write the national qualifying examine for certification as a registered
Health Information Technician.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
BSC 1080L
Basic Anatomy and Physiology
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
HIM 2214
Health Care Statistics
HSC 2531
Medical Terminology
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
HIM 2232
ICD-9-CM Coding
HIM 2253
CPT Coding
HIM 2260
Medical Billing and Reimbursement
HIM 2012
Legal Aspects of Medical Records
HIM 1430
Concepts of Disease
HIM 1800
Introduction to Health Information Management
HIM 2949
Practicum II — Alternate Care Settings
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
HIM 2201
Comparative Health Records
HIM 2211
Health Information Systems
HIM 2510
HIM Management Principles
HIM 2442
Pharmacology for HIM Professionals
HIM 2283
Advanced Coding
HIM 1949
Practicum I–Acute Care Settings
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Credits
3
3
3
4
3
____
16
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
51
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
67
117
A.S. Degree Program in
HUMAN SERVICES–
SOCIAL SERVICES SPECIALIZATION
(65 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2290
The Associate in Science degree Human Services–Social Services Specialization program prepares
students for careers at social service agencies, mental health facilities, alcohol/substance abuse programs,
shelters, and children’s service agencies. The program can provide supplemental training for persons
previously or currently employed in these occupations. The program also includes field work to prepare
students for actual employment.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities
MGF 1106
Mathematics for Liberal Arts I
HLP 1081
Personal Wellness Appraisal and Improvement
Credits
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
____
18
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
4
3
3
____
47
Program Core Courses
SYG 2000
Introductory Sociology
PSY 2012
General Psychology
ENC 1102
Freshman Composition Skills II
REL 2300
Comparative Religions
MGF 1107
Mathematics for Liberal Arts II
Any Physical Science
SOW 1031
Introduction to Social Work
SYG 2430
Marriage and the Family
SOP 2602
Applied Human Relations
DEP 2004
Human Growth and Development
POS 2112
State and Local Government
BSC 1020
Biology and the Human Experience
BSC 1020L
Biology and the Human Experience Laboratory
HUS 1948
Co-op Experience I
HUS 1949
Co-op Experience II
PSY 2930
Special Topics: Psychology
Total Credit Hours
118
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
65
A.S. Degree Program in
INTERNET SERVICES TECHNOLOGY
(63 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2288
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment as Internet/Intranet technicians,
Web technicians, Internet/Intranet administrators, Web administrators, Internet/Intranet developers, Web
site developers, Internet/Intranet masters, Web masters, Internet support specialists, Web page designers,
Web database administrators, Internet managers, Web technicians, Web site developers, Web managers,
and Web architects. It also provides supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in
these occupations.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CET 1171
Introduction to Computer Technology or
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
CGS 2557
Internet Technology
CET 1172
A+ Computer Hardware
CGS 2564
PC Management
CEN 2500
Data Communication and Networking
CGS 2831
Web Server Technology
CGS 1991
Web Programming I
CGS 2821
Web Programming II
CGS 2872
Web Graphics
COP 2250
Java Programming or
COP 2701
Database Driven Web
ENC 2210
Technical Communications
CGS 2540
Database Management
GEB 2935
Survey of Electronic Business
COP 1332
Programming Visual Basic or
COP 1224
Programming in C++
COP 1949
Co-op Work Experience*
CGS 2930
Special Topics
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
3
1
____
48
63
*Co-op Prerequisites: CET 1172, CGS 2564, CGS 1991, CGS 2872.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
119
A.S. Degree Program in
LEGAL ASSISTING
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2278
The Legal Assisting program is designed to prepare individuals for employment in law-related areas.
While legal assistants, also known as paralegals, typically are found in law firms, they also are utilized by
government agencies, insurance companies, bank trust departments, corporations, and the court system.
Dedicated, motivated students will graduate with an Associate in Science degree in Legal Assisting and
with qualifications to sit for the Certified Legal Assistant Exam administered by the National Association of
Legal Assistants.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
PLA 1003
Introduction to Legal Technology
BUL 2241
Business Law I
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding I
OST 2335
Business Communications
OST 1110
Professional Keyboarding II or
OST 2401
Office Administration I
BUL 2242
Business Law II5
PLA 2273
Torts1
PLA 1104
Legal Research and Writing I1
PLA 2610
Real Estate Law and Property Transactions1
PLA 2201
Litigation Procedures1
PLA 2600
Wills, Trusts and Probate Administration1
PLA 2114
Legal Research and Writing II2
PLA 2803
Laws of Family Relations1
CJL 2130
Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures
PLA 1949
Co-op Work Experience3
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
45
Credit Hours
4
____
4
Program Electives
Business electives6
Total Credit Hours
64
Prequisite: PLA 1003.
Prerequisites: PLA 1003 and PLA 1104.
3
Co-op Prerequisites: ENC 1101, PLA 1003, PLA 1104.
4
Prerequisite: OST 1100.
5
Prequisite: BUL 2241.
6
Recommended Electives: OST 2355-Record Management, CGS 1100-Microcomputer Applications, OST 2717-Advanced Word,
OST 2402-Office Administration II–Work Simulation, ACO 1807-Payroll Accounting, CET 1171-Introducton to Computer Technology,
ACG 2021-Financial Accounting, ACG 2071-Managerial Accounting, CGS 1100-Microcomputer Applications.
1
2
120
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. to B.S. Degree Program in
NURSING
(72 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2003
The Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program prepares graduates to provide nursing care to individuals
and groups with commonly occurring health problems in institutional and community settings. Upon completion
of the program, graduates are eligible to apply to take the NCLEX-RN to become registered nurses. The ADN
program is approved by the Florida Board of Nursing and accredited by the National League for Nursing
Accreditation Commission, 61 Broadway, NY, NY 10006, (212) 363-5555. This is a limited access program.
Application data are distributed at required information sessions. These are held on a scheduled basis.
Call CFCC, (352) 873-5817, for dates and times of information sessions.
The program policies including attendance, grading, progression, clinical behaviors, and readmission
guidelines are found in the student handbook that each student obtains once admitted to the ADN program.
Course Number and Title
General Education*
HUN 1201
Nutrition
PSY 2012
General Psychology
MCB 2010C
Microbiology
BSC 2085C
Anatomy and Physiology I
MAC 1105
College Algebra or
STA 2023
Elementary Statistics
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
BSC 2086C
Anatomy and Physiology II
DEP 2004
Human Growth and Development
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities, or equivalent
Credits
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
4
3
3
____
30
72
*Some students may need preparatory study before taking these courses. See individual courses for criteria.
Preparatory courses are not part of the nursing curriculum.
The Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program may be completed through either the full-time or the parttime option. In the full-time option, nursing courses are completed over four semesters. The student may take
specific general education courses with the nursing courses. In the part-time option, the student takes fewer
nursing credits per semester, but takes nursing courses over seven semesters. In the part-time option, students
take all nursing curriculum general education courses before beginning Nursing I. Students are admitted to
the part-time program in the summer and take Introduction to Pharmacology and Socialization into Nursing I
in the fall semester along with general education courses. Part-time students take Nursing I in the spring
semester. They then take the fewer credit part-time nursing courses each subsequent semester, including
summers, for the next five semester. See the comparison of nursing courses for full- and part-time options.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
121
FULL-TIME PROGRAM
PART-TIME PROGRAM
Fall semester with general education courses.
NUR 1820
Socialization I
1 credit
NUR 1142
Pharmacology
2 credits
First Clinical Semester — Spring
NUR 1024C Nursing I
7 credits
1
First Clinical Semester — Spring*
NUR 1820
Socialization I
1 credit
NUR 1142
Pharmacology
2 credits
NUR 1024C Nursing I
7 credits
Total Credits 10
Total Credits
7
Second Clinical Semester — Fall
NUR 1730C Nursing II
9 credits
NUR 1823
Socialization II
2 credits
Total Credits 11
Second Clinical Semester — Summer
NUR 1210C Nursing II A
5 credits
Third Clinical Semester — Spring
NUR 2732C Nursing III
9 credits
NUR 1830
Socialization III
2 credits
Total Credits 11
Third Clinical Semester — Fall
NUR 1733C Nursing II B
NUR 1823
Socialization II
Total Credits
Fourth Semester — Fall
NUR 2734C Nursing IV
Fourth Clinical Semester — Spring
NUR 2751C Nursing III A
5 credits
NUR 1830
Socialization III
2 credits
Total Credits 7
Total Credits
10 credits
10
Total Credits
Fifth Semester — Summer
NUR 2752C Nursing III B
Total Credits
*The full-time program also begins First Clinical
Semester in fall.
5
5 credits
2 credits
7
5 credits
5
Sixth Semester — Fall
NUR 2713C Nursing IV A
8 credits
Total Credits 8
1
Students in the part-time program begin
Nursing I in spring semester only. Students
must have completed all general education
courses (pre- and corequisites).
NOTE:
• The required general education course sequencing is explained at the information session.
• When more qualified students apply than can be accepted, those not accepted to the program are
admitted to future classes.
• Before applying to the program a professional level CPR card is required.
• Federal criminal background check is required for admission. Persons who have a felony history are not
eligible for admission to any CFCC Health Occupations program, including Nursing.
• Upon acceptance into the program, a medical examination documenting sound physical and mental
health, and proof of immunization are required.
• All students are responsible for their own health/hospitalization insurance. Professional liability insurance
is included in tuition fees.
• It is necessary that students have reliable transportation to the assigned hospitals and clinical facilities,
which are located in Citrus, Marion, and Levy counties.
122
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE TO ASSOCIATE
DEGREE NURSE BRIDGE PROGRAM
(60 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2004
The Bridge option is designed to build upon the LPN’s education to facilitate career mobility to Associate
Degree Nursing. The program prepares graduates to provide nursing care to individuals and groups with
commonly occurring health problems in institutional and community settings. Upon completion of the program, graduates are eligible to apply to take the NCLEX-RN to become registered nurses. The program is
approved by the Florida Board of Nursing and accredited by the National League for Nursing Accreditation
Commission, 61 Broadway, NY, NY 10006, (212) 363-5555. This is a limited access program.
Application data are distributed at required information sessions. These are held on a scheduled basis.
Call CFCC, (352) 873-5817, for dates and times of information sessions.
The program policies including attendance, grading, progression, clinical behaviors, and readmission
guidelines are found in the student handbook that each student obtains once admitted to the program.
Course Number and Title
General Education*
HUN 1201
Nutrition
PSY 2012
General Psychology
MCB 2010C
Microbiology
BSC 2085C
Anatomy and Physiology I
MAC 1105
College Algebra or
STA 2023
Elementary Statistics
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
BSC 2086C
Anatomy and Physiology II
DEP 2004
Human Growth and Development
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities, or equivalent
Credits
3
3
4
4
3
Credit Hours
3
4
3
3
____
30
Credit Hours
7
2
9
2
10
____
30
Program Core Courses
NUR 1004C
Bridge Nursing with Laboratory
NUR 1800
Socialization into Nursing for Bridge Nursing
NUR 2732C
Nursing III with Laboratory
NUR 1830
Socialization into Nursing III
NUR 2734C
Nursing IV with Laboratory
Total Credit Hours
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
60
*Some students may need preparatory study before taking these courses. See individual courses for criteria.
Preparatory courses are not part of the nursing curriculum.
NOTE:
• The required general education course sequencing is explained at the information session.
• When more qualified students apply than can be accepted, those not accepted to the program are
admitted to future classes.
• Before applying to the program a professional level CPR card is required.
• Federal criminal background check is required for admission. Persons who have a felony history are not
eligible for admission to any CFCC Health Occupations program, including LPN–ADN Bridge.
• Upon acceptance into the program, a medical examination documenting sound physical and mental
health, and proof of immunization are required.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
123
• All students are responsible for their own health/hospitalization insurance. Professional liability insurance
is included in tuition fees.
• It is necessary that students have reliable transportation to the assigned hospitals and clinical facilities,
which are located in Citrus, Marion, and Levy counties.
124
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION–
LEGAL OFFICE SPECIALIZATION
(63 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2250
The Office Administration program is a two-year Associate in Science degree program featuring several
options. The program goal is to prepare students for entry into specialized office careers and to provide
competencies for enhancing promotion in the office environment. The program is also designed to provide
supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in office careers. The Legal Office
Specialization prepares individuals for office positions where knowledge of legal terminology and related
communications is essential. Training includes emphasis on specialized skills in keyboarding, transcribing
and word processing, as well as legal office procedures, accounting and business law.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
PLA 1003
Introduction to Legal Technology
BUL 2241
Business Law I
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding I
OST 2335
Business Communications
OST 2355
Introduction to Records Management
OST 1110
Professional Keyboarding II
APA 1111
Business Accounting
OST 2601
Machine Transcription and Voice Recognition Software Technology
OST 2717
Advanced Word
OST 2401
Office Administration I
CGS 2871
Multimedia Business Applications or
CET 1171
Introduction to Computer Technology
OST 2402
Office Administration II–Work Simulation
OST 1949
Co-op Work Experience2
Credit Hours
Program Electives
Business Electives1
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
3
3
____
42
6
____
6
63
1
Recommended Electives: CGS 2103-Advanced Computer Applications, ACG 2071-Managerial Accounting, PHI 2631-Ethics and
Business, MAR 2011-Principles of Marketing, BUL 2242-Business Law II, ACO 1807-Payroll Accounting, PLA 2201-Litigation Procedures,
PLA 2610-Wills, Trusts and Probate, PLA 2610-Real Estate Law and Property, CGS 2557-Internet Technology, GEB 2935-Survey of
Electronic Business, ECO 2013-Principles of Economics–Macro, ECO 2023-Principles of Economics–Micro, GEB 2350-Introduction to
International Business, PLA 1104-Legal Research and Writing, PLA 2273-Torts, PLA 2803-Laws of Family Relations.
Co-op Prerequisites: OST 2401, PLA 1003.
2
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
125
A.S. Degree Program in
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION–
MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION
(63 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2247
The Office Administration program is a two-year Associate in Science degree program featuring several
options. The program goal is to prepare students for entry into specialized office careers and to provide
competencies for enhancing promotion in the office environment. The program is also designed to provide
supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in office careers. Students having acquired
skills in office systems technology prior to entering CFCC may earn credit through exemption testing. The
Medical Office Administration prepares individuals for office and medical facility settings requiring knowledge
of medical terminology related to secretarial duties. Training includes emphasis on specialized skills in
keyboarding, transcribing and word processing, as well as medical office procedures, accounting and
microcomputer applications.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science Elective
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding I
OST 1110
Professional Keyboarding II
HSC 2531
Medical Terminology
OST 2335
Business Communications
OST 2355
Introduction to Records Management
OST 2717
Advanced Word
OST 2401
Office Administration I
OST 2402
Office Administration II–Work Simulation
APA 1111
Business Accounting
HIM 2260
Medical Billing and Reimbursement
OST 2601
Machine Transcription and Voice Recognition Software Technology
CGS 2871
Multimedia Computer Applications or
CET 1171
Introduction to Computer Technology
OST 2611
Medical Transcription
OST 1949
Co-op Work Experience2
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
____
45
Credit Hours
3
____
3
Program Electives
Business Electives1
Total Credit Hours
63
Recommended Electives: CGS 2103-Advanced Computer Applications, ACG 2021-Financial Accounting, PHI 2631-Ethics and
Business, MAR 2011-Principles of Marketing, BUL 2241-Business Law I, HIM 2012-Legal Aspects of Medical Records, CGS 2557Internet Technology, GEB 2935-Survey of Electronic Business, ECO 2013-Principles of Economics–Macro, ECO 2023-Principles of
Economics–Micro, GEB 2350-Introduction to International Business, ACO 1807-Payroll Accounting, HFT 1541-Customer Service.
1
Co-op Prerequisites: HSC 2531, OST 2401.
2
126
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION–
MEDICAL RECORDS TRANSCRIPTION
(63 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2248
The Office Administration program is a two-year Associate in Science degree program featuring several
options. The program goal is to prepare students for entry into specialized office careers and to provide
competencies for enhancing promotion in the office environment. The program is also designed to provide
supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in office careers. Students having
acquired skills in office administration prior to entering CFCC may earn credit through exemption testing.
The Medical Records Transcription option prepares individuals for hospital and medical office positions
requiring extensive vocabulary and knowledge of medical, anatomical and surgical terminology, as well as
excellent skills in transcription/word processing. Training includes basic skill development in a variety of areas
including keyboarding, accounting, communication and microcomputer applications. Special emphasis is
given to training in word processing, transcription, medical records and medical vocabulary development.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
BSC 1080
Basic Anatomy and Physiology or Equivalent
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding I
OST 1110
Professional Keyboarding II
OST 2335
Business Communications
OST 2401
Office Administration I
OST 2717
Advanced Word
OST 2402
Office Administration II–Work Simulation
HSC 2531
Medical Terminology
OST 2611
Medical Transcription I
OST 2355
Introduction to Records Management
APA 1111
Business Accounting
OST 2612
Medical Transcription II
OST 2613
Medical Transcription III
HIM 2260
Medical Billing and Reimbursement
OST 1949
Co-op Work Experience2
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
45
Credit Hours
3
____
3
Program Electives
Business Electives1
Total Credit Hours
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
63
127
1
Recommended Electives: CGS 2103-Advanced Computer Applications, ACG 2071-Managerial Accounting, PHI 2631-Ethics and
Business, MAR 2011-Principles of Marketing, BUL 2241-Business Law I, HIM 2012-Legal Aspects of Medical Records, CET 1171Introduction to Computer Technology, CGS 2564-Database Management, CGS 2557-Internet Technology, ECO 2013-Principles of
Economics–Macro, ECO 2023-Principles of Economics-Micro, GEB 2350-Introduction to International Business, ACO 1807-Payroll
Accounting, CGS 2871-Multimedia Computer Applications, GEB 2935-Survey of Electronic Business.
Co-op Prerequisites: OST 2612, OST 2401.
2
128
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION–OFFICE MANAGEMENT
(63 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2249
The Office Administration program is a two-year Associate in Science degree program featuring several
options. The program goal is to prepare students for entry into specialized office careers and to provide
competencies for enhancing promotion in persons previously or currently employed in office careers.
Students having acquired skills in office administration prior to entering CFCC may earn credit through
credit exemption testing. The Office Management option prepares individuals to assume management or
administrative-level positions in business, industry and government. Preparation includes intensive training
in keyboarding and word processing, as well as office procedures, accounting, management, business
communication and microcomputer applications.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding I
APA 1111
Business Accounting
OST 1110
Professional Keyboarding II
OST 2335
Business Communications
OST 2355
Introduction to Records Management
MAN 2021
Principles of Management or
MNA 2141
Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills
OST 2601
Machine Transcription and Voice Recognition Software Technology
OST 2717
Advanced Word
OST 2401
Office Administration I
OST 2402
Office Administration II–Work Simulation
CGS 2871
Multimedia Applications
CET 1171
Introduction to Computer Technology
OST 1949
Co-op Work Experience2
Credit Hours
Program Electives
Business Electives1
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
42
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
6
____
6
63
1
Recommended Electives: CGS 2103-Advanced Computer Applications, ACG 2021-Financial Accounting, PHI 2631-Ethics and
Business, MAR 2011-Principles of Marketing, BUL 2241-Business Law I, HIM 2012-Legal Aspects of Medical Records, ACO 1807Payroll Accounting, CGS 2557-Internet Technology, GEB 2935-Survey of Electronic Business, ECO 2013-Principles of Economics–
Macro, ECO 2023-Principles of Economics–Micro, GEB 2350-Introduction to International Business, OST 2611-Medical Transcription I.
Co-op Prerequisites: OST 2401, OST 1110.
2
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
129
A.S. Degree Program in
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION–
OFFICE SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS
(63 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2289
The Office Administration program is a two-year Associate in Science degree program featuring several
options. The program goal is to prepare students for entry into specialized office careers and to provide
competencies for enhancing promotion in persons previously or currently employed in office careers. Students
having acquired skills in office administration prior to entering CFCC may earn credit through credit
exemption testing. The Office Software Applications program prepares individuals to assume management
or administrative-level positions in business, industry and government. Preparation includes intensive training
in keyboarding, as well as office procedures, accounting, management and microcomputer applications.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding I
OST 1110
Professional Keyboarding II
APA 1111
Business Accounting
OST 2335
Business Communications
OST 2601
Machine Transcription and Voice Recognition Software Technology
OST 2401
Office Administration I
OST 2402
Office Administration II–Work Simulation
OST 2717
Advanced Word
CGS 2871
Multimedia Applications
OST 2355
Introduction to Records Management
CGS 2540
Database Management
CET 1171
Introduction to Computer Technology
CGS 2103
Advanced Computer Technology
CGS 2557
Internet Technology
OST 1949
Co-op Work Experience
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
130
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
48
63
A.S. Degree Program in
PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT
(74 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2232
The Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) works under the supervision of the physical therapist. PTAs are
directly involved in patient treatment, performing such duties as applying physical agents and designing
and carrying out exercise programs. They provide direct patient care of individuals who experience
temporary or permanent disability due to pain, injury, disease or birth defects.
The Physical Therapist Assistant program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical
Therapy Education. The PTA program graduate must take and pass a state-administered national examination in order to become licensed and eligible to practice.
Please note that completion of the PTA program does not guarantee entry into a physical therapy program.
The PTA course work (technical phase) does not transfer to most physical therapy schools.
This is a limited access program with deadlines to apply. Application data is distributed at the
required information sessions. These are held on a scheduled basis. Call CFCC, (352) 873-5817, for dates
and times of information sessions.
The program policies including attendance, grading, clinical behaviors and readmission guidelines are
found in the student handbook that each student obtains once admitted to the PTA program. Both general
education and program core courses may be taken either part-time or full-time.
Course Number and Title
General Education
BSC 2085C
Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
PSY 2012
General Psychology
PHT 2342
Medical Terminology for the Physical Therapist Assistant
Free Elective
BSC 2086C
Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics or
MAT 1033
Intermediate Algebra or higher level math
DEP 2004
Human Growth and Development
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilization I or
WOH 1022
World Civilization II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
PHT 1000
Introduction to Physical Therapy
PHT 1014
Documentation for the Physical Therapist Assistant
PHT 1130L
Data Collection Skills for the PTA
PHT 1175C
Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology
PHT 1210C
Therapeutic Modalities with Lab
PHT 1225C
Therapeutic Procedures with Lab
PHT 1300
Survey of Pathological Deficits
PHT 1212C
Therapeutic Modalities II with Lab
PHT 1801
Clinical Practice I
PHT 2227C
Disabilities and Therapeutic Procedures II with Lab
PHT 2162C
Rehabilitation Procedures with Lab
PHT 2931
Trends in Physical Therapy
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Credits
4
3
3
2
3
4
3
3
3
3
____
31
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
1
1
2
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
1
131
PHT 2810
PHT 2820
Clinical Practice II
Clinical Practice III
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
5
5
____
43
74
Note:
• Federal criminal background check is required for admission. Persons who have a felony history are not
eligible for admission to any CFCC Health Occupations program, including Physical Therapist Assistant.
• When more qualified students apply than can be accepted, those not accepted to the program are
admitted to future classes.
• Upon acceptance into the program, a medical examination and proof of immunization are required.
• All students are responsible for their own health/hospitalization insurance. Professional liability insurance
is included in tuition fees.
• It is necessary that students have reliable transportation to the assigned hospitals and clinical facilities.
132
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
RADIATION THERAPY IN COOPERATION
WITH HILLSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE
(13 Credit Hours)*
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
1120
Some courses and assigned clinicals in Radiation Therapy are available at Central Florida Community
College. The program is a cooperative effort between CFCC and Hillsborough Community College. For
detailed information, please contact Health Occupations at (352) 854-2322, extension 4-1313. This is a
selective admission program. Applications are available in CFCC’s Health Occupations office.
The following general education courses, which are part of the program, are available at CFCC and
must be taken before admission to this program.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
BSC 2085C
Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab
MAC 1105
College Algebra or
MGF 1106
Math for Liberal Arts
PSY 2012
General Psychology
Credits
3
4
3
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
3
____
13
13
*Note: Remainder of program will be completed at Hillsborough Community College.
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
133
A.S. Degree Program in
RECREATION TECHNOLOGY–
PHYSICAL EDUCATION TECHNICIAN OPTION
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2280
The Recreation Technology program prepares students for employment as recreation workers or
recreation facility attendants. This program would also be beneficial for persons previously or currently
employed in the above-mentioned occupations. All Recreation Technology students must take:
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1021H
Honors Introduction to the Humanities
MAT 1033
Intermediate Algebra or
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
HLP 1081
Personal Wellness Appraisal and Improvement
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
SOP 2602
Applied Human Relations
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
PSY 2012
General Psychology
PHI 2600
Introduction to Ethics
HSC 2140
Drugs and Society
HSC 2400
First Aid
BSC 1020
Biology and the Human Experience
BSC 1020L
Biology and the Human Experience Laboratory
DEP 2004
Human Growth and Development
Team Sports Elective
Wellness/Fitness Activity Courses
Wellness/Fitness Elective1
General Electives2
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
5
3
10
____
49
64
Recommended Electives: PET 2622C-Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries or PET 1000-Introduction to Physical Education.
1
Recommended Electives: EDF 2005-Introduction to Education or SOP 2602-Applied Human Relations and MNA 2141-Basic
Leadership/Supervisory Skills or CHD 1339-Learning Through Play or EEC 1000-Introduction to Child Development and Education or
SLS 1508-Athletic and Academic Skills Management.
2
134
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.S. Degree Program in
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY–
IN COOPERATION WITH ST. PETE COLLEGE
(22 Credit Hours)*
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
2271
This specialized program is in partnership with St. Pete College. Students will enroll at CFCC, complete
their general education courses, and then enroll in a totally distance learning program. All core
courses are online and students must work at least part-time for a veterinarian. This is a selective
admission program. For more information about the selection process, please contact St. Pete College at
(727) 341-3653 or visit the Web site at www.spjc.edu/hec/vettech/vtl.html.
The following general education courses, which are part of the program, are available at CFCC and
must be taken before admission to this program.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance or
HUM 1021H
Honors Introduction to the Humanities
MAC 1105
College Algebra or
MGF 1106
Mathematics for Liberal Arts I
BSC 1010C
General Biology I with Laboratory
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
Credits
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
____
22
22
*Note: Remainder of program will be completed at St. Pete College. Information on Vet Tech
Web site: http://www.spcollege.edu/hec/vettech/vt1.html.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
135
ASSOCIATE IN
APPLIED
SCIENCE
PROGRAMS
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
137
A.A.S. Degree Program in
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION–
INDUSTRIAL OPTION
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
3229
The Business Administration program trains individuals to assume management or supervisory roles in
business, industry and government. It provides basic skills in a variety of fields commonly needed in
management positions, including communications, management, accounting, computer usage and marketing.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
ACG 2021
Financial Accounting
GEB 1011
Introduction to Business
OST 2335
Business Communications
MNA 2141
Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills or
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
ACG 2071
Managerial Accounting
ECO 2023
Principles of Economics-Micro
CGS 2103
Advanced Computer Applications
ECO 2013
Principles of Economics-Macro or
GEB 2350
International Business
MAR 2011
Principles of Marketing
ETI 1110
Introduction to Quality Control
ETI 1411
Manufacturing Processes
ETI 1930
Special Topics–Industrial
EGS 1110
Engineering Graphics
MAN 1948
Co-op Work Experience2
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
2
3
3
____
44
Credit Hours
5
____
5
Program Electives
Business Electives1
Total Credit Hours
64
1
Recommended Electives: BUL 2241-Business Law I, CGS 2871-Multimedia Computer Applications, FIN 2100-Personal Finance,
OST 1100-Keyboarding, SPC 2600-Effective Speaking.
2
Co-op Prerequisites: ACG 2021-Principles of Management, ECO 2013-Principles of Economics-Macro or ECO 2023-Principles of
Economics-Micro, GEB 1011-Introduction to Business and 2 of the 4: ENC 1101-Freshman Composition Skills I, MAN 2021-Principles
of Management, MAR 2011-Principles of Marketing, ACG 2071-Managerial Accounting.
138
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.A.S. Degree Program in
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION–
MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
3256
The Business Administration program trains individuals to assume management or supervisory roles in
business, industry and government. It provides basic skills in a variety of fields commonly needed in
management positions, including communications, management, accounting, computer usage and marketing.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
ACG 2021
Financial Accounting
GEB 1011
Introduction to Business
OST 2335
Business Communications
MAN 2021
Principles of Management or
MNA 2141
Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills
ACG 2071
Managerial Accounting
ECO 2023
Principles of Economics-Micro
CGS 2103
Advanced Computer Applications
ECO 2013
Principles of Economics-Macro or
GEB 2350
International Business
MAR 2011
Principles of Marketing
BUL 2241
Business Law I
MAN 2300
Human Resource Management or
HFT 1541
Customer Service
GEB 2935
Survey of Electronic Business
MAN 1948
Co-op Work Experience2
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
____
42
Credit Hours
7
____
7
Program Electives
Business Electives1
Total Credit Hours
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
64
1
Recommended Electives: FIN 2100-Personal Finance, GEB 2350-Introduction to International Business, MAC 2233-Business
Calculus, OST 1100-Professional Keyboarding I, SPC 2600-Effective Speaking.
2
Co-op Prerequisites: ACG 2021, ECO 2013 or ECO 2023, GEB 1011 and two of the following four: ENC 1101, MAN 2021,
MAR 2011, ACG 2071.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
139
A.A.S. Degree Program in
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION–
MARKETING SPECIALIZATION
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
3241
The Marketing Management program provides a solid foundation in effective marketing procedures
appropriate for both domestic and global marketing activities. The program emphasizes applied marketing
techniques through the use of case studies, simulations, role-playing, research and cooperative education.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
ACG 2021
Financial Accounting
BUL 2241
Business Law I
MAN 2021
Principles of Management or
SBM2000
Small Business Management
ACG 2071
Managerial Accounting
ECO 2023
Principles of Economics-Micro
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
MAR 2011
Principles of Marketing
MNA 2141
Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills
MKA 2021
Salesmanship
GEB 2935
Survey of Electronic Business
CGS 2557
Internet Technology
GEB 2350
Introduction to International Business
OST 2335
Business Communications
MAR 1949
Co-op Work Experience
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
45
Credit Hours
4
____
4
Program Electives
Business Electives1
Total Credit Hours
64
1
Recommended Electives: PHI 2631-Ethics and Business, ACG 2100-Intermediate Accounting, MAC 2233-Business Calculus,
CGS 2103-Advanced Computer Applications, MAN 2300-Human Resources Management, CET 1171-Introduction to Computer Technology,
OST 1100-Keyboarding, FIN 2100-Personal Finance, HFT 1541-Customer Service.
140
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
A.A.S. Degree Program in
HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT
(64 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
3286
The Hospitality and Tourism Management program prepares students for employment in the hospitality
industry in positions such as manager, motel manager, recreation establishment manager and resort
manager, and provides supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in these
occupations.
Course Number and Title
General Education
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
ISS 1010
Introduction to the Social Sciences or
WOH 1012
World Civilizations I or
WOH 1022
World Civilizations II
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
Biological or Physical Science
HUM 1021
Introduction to the Humanities or
HUM 1210
Introduction to the Humanities: To the Renaissance or
HUM 1230
Introduction to the Humanities: Since the Renaissance
Credit Hours
Program Core Courses
HFT 1000
Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism
HFT 1541
Customer Service
HFT 1410
Front Office Management
BUL 2241
Business Law I
HFT 1949
Hospitality and Tourism Co-op I
MNA 2141
Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills
HFT 1250
Hotel/Motel Operations
HFT 1212
Safety and Sanitation Management
HFT 1500
Hospitality Sales, Marketing and Advertising
HFT 1434
Club Operations Management
HFT 2750
Management of Conventions and Group Business
FSS 2500
Food and Beverage Cost Controls
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
APA 1111
Business Accounting
HFT 2949
Hospitality and Tourism Co-op II
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
____
15
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
____
46
Credit Hours
3
____
3
Program Electives
Culinary Electives1
Total Credit Hours
64
Recommended Electives: FSS 1115-Basic Food Preparation, FSS 2251-Beverage Management.
1
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
141
COLLEGE
CREDIT
CERTIFICATE
PROGRAMS
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
143
College Credit Certificate Program in
ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS
(27 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6245
Accounting Applications is a one-year college credit certificate of achievement designed to prepare
students for entry-level employment in an office environment where skills in using accounting and office
procedures are required. This certificate provides training for students with limited time to prepare for the
job market who can devote daily, concentrated effort toward a career goal.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I or
OST 2335
Business Communications
ACG 2450
Integrated Software Applications (Quickbooks)
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
ACG 2021
Financial Accounting
GEB 1011
Introduction to Business
ACG 2071
Managerial Accounting
ACG 2100
Intermediate Accounting
TAX 2000
Federal Income Tax I
Credits
3
Total Credit Hours
144
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
27
College Credit Certificate Program in
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
(24 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6241
The Business Management program is designed to prepare students for effective management of a
small business as either employee or owner. They will gain proficiency in the management and operational
skills necessary to be self-employed entrepreneurs or effective middle management staff.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
CGS1100
Microcomputer Applications
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
OST 2335
Business Communications
BUL 2241
Business Law I
APA 1111
Business Accounting
ECO 2023
Principles of Economics—Micro or
GEB 2350
Introduction to International Business
SBM 2000
Small Business Management or
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
HFT 1541
Customer Service
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
3
____
24
24
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
145
College Credit Certificate Program in
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—
FINANCE MANAGEMENT
(24 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6269
The program will provide students with the business knowledge, skills and expertise needed for entrylevel positions in financial institutions.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I or
OST 2335
Business Communications
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
MAN 2021
Principles of Management or
MNA 2141
Basic Leadership/Supervisory Skills
ACG 2021
Financial Accounting or
APA 1111
Business Accounting
FIN 2100
Personal Finance
HFT 1541
Customer Service
Business Elective
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credit Hours
Recommended Electives: ACG 2450-Integrated Accounting, MAN 2300-Human Resources Management.
1
146
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
3
3
3
____
24
College Credit Certificate Program in
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—
SMALL BUSINESS/ENTREPRENEURSHIP
(Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6270
This program is designed to prepare the student with entry-level current and future small business
ownership or entrepreneurship management skills. The program provides the student with basic computer,
business and financial skills.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
OST 2335
Business Communications
APA 1111
Business Accounting
GEB 1011
Introduction to Business
FIN 2100
Personal Finance
GEB 2935
Survey of Electronic Business
HFT 1541
Customer Service
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
SBM 2000
Small Business Management
Credits
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
24
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
147
College Credit Certificate Program in
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT—
MARKETING SPECIALIZATION
(Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6246
This program instructs students in the areas of planning, organizing, directing and controlling of a
business, with emphasis on selected theories of management and decision making, and the knowledge
and understanding necessary for managing people and functions.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I or
OST 2335
Business Communications
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
HFT 1541
Customer Service
MAR 2011
Principles of Marketing
GEB 1011
Introduction to Business
SPC 2600
Effective Speaking
Credits
3
Total Credit Hours
148
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
24
College Credit Certificate Program in
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (BASIC)
(11 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6237
This one-term program provides training to prepare the student for certification and employment as an
Emergency Medical Technician in accordance with the U.S. Department of Transportation curriculum and
state of Florida EMS/Department of Health rules and regulations. This is a limited access program.
The Emergency Medical Technician program must be completed within one year (two consecutive semesters: fall/spring or spring/fall).
Application data is distributed at required information sessions. These are held on a scheduled basis.
Call CFCC, (352) 873-5817, for dates and times of information sessions.
The program policies including attendance, grading, clinical behaviors and readmission guidelines are
found in the student handbook that each student receives once admitted to the EMT program.
See page 111 for information on EMS degree.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
EMS 1119
Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Technology
EMS 1119L
Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Technology Skills Lab
EMS 1431
EMT Hospital/Field Experience
EMS 1354C
Emergency Field Operations
Total Credit Hours
Credits
6
2
2
1
____
11
Note:
• When more qualified students apply than can be accepted, those not accepted to the program are
admitted to future classes.
• Federal criminal background check is required for admission. Persons who have a felony history are not
eligible for admission to any CFCC Health Occupations program, including Emergency Medical Technician
(Basic).
• Upon acceptance into the program, a medical examination and proof of immunizations.
• All students are responsible for their own health/hospitalization insurance. Professional liability insurance
is included in tuition fees.
• It is necessary that students have reliable transportation to the assigned hospitals and clinical facilities.
• All students are required to have CPR certification before class begins.
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
The student must be prepared to pay additional fees and purchase uniforms as mandated by program of learning.
1
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
149
College Credit Certificate Program in
EQUINE ASSISTANT MANAGER
(24 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment in the following occupations:
supervisory and management positions such as general manager — large or small farm operations, assistant farm manager, farm department manager, broodmare/foal manager, yearling manager in a variety of
equine enterprises, or to provide supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in the
equine industry.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ANS 1230
Survey of Equine
ANS 1239
Equine Anatomy and Physiology
AGR 2300
Horse Handling and Safety
ANS 1112
Equine Computer Skills
AEB 1931
Equine Practicum I
ANS 1315
Equine Reproduction
ANS 1240
Equine Health Care I
AEB 2234
Equine Business Management
ANS 2232
Equine Behavior and Psychology
ANS 1930
Special Topics— Equine Studies
Credits
Total Credit Hours
Note: Course numbers subject to change.
150
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
1
3
3
1
2
3
3
3
3
2
____
24
College Credit Certificate Program in
FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT
(30 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6248
This certificate is designed to prepare students for employment as supervisors and managers in the
food and beverage sector of the hospitality industry. These courses will apply toward the A.A.S. degree in
Hospitality and Tourism Management.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
HFT 1000
Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism
HFT 1212
Safety and Sanitation Management
FSS 1120
Food Purchasing
HFT 1949
Internship I
HFT 1500
Hospitality Sales, Marketing and Advertising
FSS 2500
Food and Beverage Cost Controls
FSS 2100
Menu Planning and Analysis
FSS 2251
Beverage Management
HFT 1541
Customer Service
FSS 2940
Advanced Hospitality Management Seminar
Credits
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
30
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
151
College Credit Certificate Program in
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ANALYST
(27 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6249
Students completing this certificate will have entry-level skills necessary for employment as help-desk
assistant and other computer support positions. It provides basic skills in software applications and is a
certificate with the A.S. degree program, Computer Information Technology.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
CET 1171
Introduction to Computer Technology
CGS 2103
Advanced Computer Applications
CGS 2540
Database Management Systems
CGS 2564
PC Management
CGS 2871
Multimedia Applications
CET 1172
A+ Computer Hardware
CET 2173
A+ Peripherals and Troubleshooting
CGS 2930
Special Topics
Credits
Total Credit Hours
152
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
1
____
27
College Credit Certificate Program in
LEGAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT
(27 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6264
The Legal Office Management program prepares students to support management by facilitating and
producing correspondence and records, maintaining office budgets, planning, and filing and maintaining
documents.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I or
OST 2335
Business Communications
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
CGS 1101
Microcomputer Applications
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding I
OST 1110
Professional Keyboarding II
BUL 2241
Business Law I
OST 2335
Business Communications
OST 2601
Machine Transcription and Voice Recognition Software Technology
PLA 1003
Introduction to Legal Technology
Total Credit Hours
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
27
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
153
College Credit Certificate Program in
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION–
HEALTH RECORDS CODING OPTION
(33 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6242
The Health Records Coding program is a one-year college credit certificate program designed to prepare
students for entry-level employment where skills in reviewing health care documentation and properly
assigning ICD-9-CM and/or CPT codes are required. In this medical records option, special emphasis is
given to training in health information fundamentals, anatomy and physiology, terminology, disease
processes, computer applications, coding principles, and a coding application practicum. Graduates
passing the specific national certification exam through the American Health Information Management
Association are eligible to receive the designated Certified Coding Associate (CCA), the Certified Coding
Specialist (CCS), or the Certified Coding Specialist-Physician-Based (CCS-P).
Coders are employed in various setting, including physician offices, hospitals, clinics, nursing facilities,
home health agencies, cancer registries, government agencies, insurance companies, independent coding
services and managed care. Salaries of coders are determined by type of facility, experience, and locale.
The pay scale for non-credentialed coders in North Central Florida ranges from $9 to $13 per hour.
Credentialed coders may earn from $11 to $16, depending on experience.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
HIM 1430
Concepts of Disease
HIM 2012
Legal Aspects of Medical Records
HSC 2531
Medical Terminology
BSC 1080
Basic Anatomy and Physiology
HIM 2232
ICD-9-CM Coding
HIM 2253
CPT Coding
HIM 2260
Medical Billing and Reimbursement
HIM 1800
Health Information Management I
HIM 2442
Pharmacology for HIM Professionals
HIM 2283
Advanced Coding-d
Credits
Credit Hours
Total Credit Hours
154
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
33
33
College Credit Certificate Program in
OFFICE MANAGEMENT
(27 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6240
The Office Management program is a one-year college credit certificate program designed to prepare
students for entry-level employment in an office environment where skills in using modern office procedures
and equipment are required. This program provides intensive training for students with limited time to prepare
for the job market who can devote daily, concentrated effort toward a career goal. Students having acquired
skills in office systems technology prior to entering CFCC may earn credit through exemption testing.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
CGS 1100
Microcomputer Applications
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
OST 2335
Business Communications
APA 1111
Business Accounting
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding
OST 2601
Machine Transcription and Voice Recognition Software Technology
OST 1110
Professional Keyboarding II
OST 2401
Office Administration I or
MAN 2021
Principles of Management
Total Credit Hours
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
27
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
155
College Credit Certificate Program in
OFFICE SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS MANAGEMENT
(27 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6263
The Office Software Applications Management program prepares students to support management by
facilitating and producing correspondence and records, maintaining office budgets, planning, and filing and
maintaining documents.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ENC 1101
Freshman Composition Skills I
MTB 1103
Business Mathematics
CGS 1101
Microcomputer Applications
OST 1100
Professional Keyboarding I
OST 1110
Professional Keyboarding II
APA 1111
Business Accounting
OST 2335
Business Communications
OST 2717
Advanced Word
CGS 2871
Multimedia Computer Applications or
CGS 2103
Advanced Computer Applications
Credits
Total Credit Hours
156
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
27
College Credit Certificate Program in
PARAMEDIC
(42 Credit Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
6232
The three-term Paramedic program provides training to prepare students in accordance with U.S.
Department of Transportation curriculum and state of Florida EMS guidelines. The Paramedic program is
accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs for the EMT-Paramedic of the American
Medical Association. A student seeking admission to the Paramedic program must be a Florida-certified
EMT. This is a limited access program.
Application data is distributed at required information sessions. These are held on a scheduled basis.
Call CFCC, (352) 873-5817, for dates and times of information sessions.
The program policies including attendance, grading, clinical behaviors and readmission guidelines are
found in the student handbook that each student obtains once admitted to the Paramedic program.
See page 111 for information on EMS degree.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
First Semester
BSC 0084
EMS 2610
EMS 2611
EMS 2612
EMS 2613
EMS 2611L
EMS 2612L
EMS 2613L
EMS 2656
Credits
Anatomy and Physiology for Health Occupations Certificate Programs
3
Introduction to Paramedic
2
Paramedic Fundamentals
2
Airway Management and Ventilation
1
Paramedic Patient Assessment
1
Fundamentals Skills Lab
2
Airway Management and Ventilation Lab
1
Paramedic Patient Assessment Lab
1
Paramedic Clinical Experience I
4
____
First Semester Total
17
Second Semester
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first semester Paramedic classes.
EMS 2615
Medical Emergencies I
3
EMS 2619
Medical Emergencies II
3
EMS 2628
Paramedic OB/GYN/Neonatal Emergencies
1
EMS 2615L
Medical Emergencies Skills Lab I
2
EMS 2619L
Medical Emergencies Skills Lab II
1
EMS 2628L
Paramedic OB/GYN/Neonatal Emergencies Lab
1
EMS 2630
Behavioral Emergencies
1
EMS 2645
Paramedic Clinical Experience II
4
____
Second Semester Total 16
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
Third Semester
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first and second semester Paramedic classes.
EMS 2614
Trauma Emergencies
2
EMS 2614L
Trauma Emergencies Skills Lab
1
EMS 2618
EMS Operations
1
EMS 2658
Paramedic Clinical Experience III
5
____
Third Semester Total
9
Total Credit Hours
42
Sequence of courses represents fall as first semester. There is a slightly different sequence for students
who begin in the spring.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
157
Note:
• When more qualified students apply than can be accepted, those not accepted to the program are
admitted to future classes.
• Federal criminal background check is required for admission. Persons who have a felony history are not
eligible for admission to any CFCC Health Occupations program, including Paramedic.
• Upon acceptance into the program, a medical examination and proof of immunizations are required.
• All students are responsible for their own health/hospitalization insurance. Professional liability insurance
is included in tuition fees.
• It is necessary that students have reliable transportation to the assigned hospitals and clinical facilities.
• All students are required to have CPR certification before class begins.
The student must be prepared to pay additional fees and purchase uniforms as mandated by program of learning.
1
158
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
POSTSECONDARY
ADULT
VOCATIONAL
CERTIFICATE
PROGRAMS
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
159
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR
(1,400 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7263
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment as automobile body repairers,
automotive painters, automobile body repairer helpers, and automotive painter helpers, or to provide
supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in these occupations.
The content of the program includes, but is not limited to: communication skills; leadership skills; human
relations and employability skills; safe and efficient work practices; basic trade skills; refinishing skills; sheet
metal repair skills; frame and unibody squaring and aligning; use of fillers, paint systems and undercoats;
related welding skills; related mechanical skills; trim-hardware maintenance; glass servicing; and other
miscellaneous repairs.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ARR 0001
Introduction to Auto Collision Repair
ARR 0121
Automotive Body Refinishing
ARR 0122
Automotive Body Refinishing II
ARR 0330
Unibody and Frame Straightening
ARR 0292
Automotive Body Repair II
ARR 0125L
Repair and Refinishing Skill Development Lab
ARR 0293
Automotive Body Repair III
ARR 0949
Co-op Work Experience or
ARR 0126L
Repair and Refinishing Skill Development Lab
Credits
3
6
6
6
6
3
6
Credit Hours
160
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
10
____
46
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TECHNOLOGY
(1,800 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7264
This program is designed to prepare students for employment in the automotive and automotive-related
career fields. This program also provides supplemental training for persons previously or currently
employed as automotive technicians.
The program follows the recommended instructional objectives set forth by NATEF/ASE. It also helps
prepare the student to take the national ASE Certification Exam.
The program content includes courses in the following automotive areas: Engine Repair, Brake
Systems, Steering-Suspension and Alignment, Electrical-Electronic Systems, Manual and Automatic
Transmissions/Transaxles, Drive Lines, Air Conditioning/Heating Systems, and Engine Performance
Diagnosis/Troubleshooting. The program content also includes training in communications, leadership,
human relations, employability skills and safe, efficient work practices.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
SLS 0341
Successful Employment Techniques
AER 0410C
Brake Systems
AER 0930
Automotive Skill Development Lab or
AER 0949
Automotive Cooperative Education
AER 0450
Steering/Suspension and Alignment
AER 0310C
Automotive Electrical/Electronic Systems I
AER 0610
Air Conditioning and Heating Systems
AER 0522
Engine Performance I
AER 0311C
Automotive Electrical/Electronic Systems II
AER 0523
Engine Performance II
AER 0110C
Engine Repair
AER 0231
Manual Transmission/Drive Lines
AER 0250
Automatic Transmissions/Transaxles
Credits
3
3
27
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
60
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
161
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
BARBERING
(1,200 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7268
The course is comprised of 1,200 hours of instruction (theory and practical). The sequential program
utilizes a competency based system of learning centered around the student’s strengths, needs, and
learning style. Upon completion of the objectives, students are eligible to take the State Licensure Board
Examination. A certificate will be awarded upon successful completion. Students are eligible to graduate
with vocational honors. This program is offered in the evening.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
COS 0080
Barbering/Cosmetology Lab (2)1
COS 0081
Barbering/Cosmetology Lab
COS 0082
Barbering/Cosmetology Lab
COS 0320
Shaves, Beards, Mustache Trim
COS 0400
Hair Design
COS 0500
Introduction to Barbering
COS 0644
Chemical Hair Restructuring
COS 0700
Hair Color and Bleach
COS 0870
Salon Management
CSP 0006
Diseases/Disorders of Skin
Credits
Credit Hours
COS 0080 must be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.
1
162
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
6
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
____
40
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
COMMERCIAL HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING TECHNOLOGY
(1,350 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7262
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment as air conditioning, heating and
refrigeration mechanics, servicers, installers and helpers, and it provides supplemental training for
individuals previously or currently employed in these occupations.
The content of the program includes, but is not limited to: communication skills; leadership skills; human
relations and employability skills; safe, efficient work practices; planning, installing, testing and servicing of
air conditioning, refrigeration and heating systems and components; servicing, installing, and troubleshooting
electrical and mechanical components; testing, diagramming and solving problems in air conditioning,
refrigeration and heating equipment; record keeping; basic supervisory skills; use and care of hand
tools, power tools, specialized tools and equipment; and use of current industry standards, practices
and techniques.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ACR 0000
Introduction to Air Conditioning
ACR 0001
HVAC Fundamentals
ACR 0100C
Applied Electricity I
ACR 0930L
Air Conditioning Skills Lab
ACR 0303
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Controls and Repair
ACR 0106
Applied Electricity II
ACR 0002
Intermediate Air Conditioning
ACR 0930L
Air Conditioning and Heating Skill Lab
ACR 0202
HVAC Mechanical Fundamentals and Testing
ARC 0600
A/C, Heating and Refrigeration Design and Installation
ACR 0949
Co-op Work Experience
ACR 0949
Co-op Work Experience
ACR 0949
Co-op Work Experience
Credit Hours
Credits
4
4
4
3
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
45
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
163
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE DRIVING
(320 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7270
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment as tractor trailer/truck drivers. This
program also provides supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in these occupations.
The course content includes operation of large semi-truck tractor vehicles, loading and unloading cargo,
reporting delays or accidents on the road, verifying load against shipping papers, record keeping, and federal
and state motor carrier and safety regulations.
Special Note: Students entering this program must exhibit a safe driving record, be at least 21 years of
age, and comply with state and federal licensing requirements. Applicants must pass the Florida Department
of Transportation physical and drug screening.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
TRA 0081 Commercial Vehicle Driving
Credits
Credit Hours
164
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
11
____
11
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
CORRECTIONS STAND ALONE ACADEMY
(530 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7239
This program is designed for students who seek certification as corrections officers. Graduates will be
eligible to sit for the state’s certification examination.
ADMISSION CRITERIA
To apply for admission into the Corrections or Law Enforcement certificate program, each applicant must:
A. Be at least 19 years of age prior to completing the program.
B. Be a citizen of the United States.
C. Be a high school graduate or its equivalent.
D. Not have been convicted of any felony or of a misdemeanor involving perjury or false statement.
E. Have an honorable discharge from the military (if applicable).
F. Be of good moral character.
G. Pass a background investigation.
H. Pass a physical examination by a licensed physician.
I. Be in good academic standing at Central Florida Community College.
In addition, the applicant must submit:
A. A copy of scores on the Test for Adult Basic Education (TABE), Level A, and F-BAT.
B. A completed/signed Central Florida Community College Criminal Justice Institute Applicant Questionnaire.
Note: All the above information must be submitted as a package.
Admission to the program will be based on the following:
A. Oral interview.
B. Completed questionnaire
C. Medical examination.
D. Background investigation.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
CJD 0770
Corrections Legal I
CJD 0771
Corrections Legal II
CJD 0772
Corrections Communications
CJD 0773
Corrections Interpersonal Skills I
CJK 0050
Criminal Justice Defensive Tactics
CJK 0040
Criminal Justice Weapons
CJD 0752
Corrections Operations
CJD 0750
Corrections Interpersonal Skills II
CJD 0741
Corrections Emergency Preparedness
CJK 0030
Criminal Justice Medical First Responder
Credits
Credit Hours
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
1
1
1
2
4
2
2
2
1
2
____
18
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
165
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
COSMETOLOGY
(1,200 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7267
Cosmetology involves the study of the hair, skin and nails for aesthetic reasons. The program provides
both theoretical and practical training. Students will practice on mannequins and clients of the Personal
Services Institute to develop and refine the skills used in cosmetology. Instruction is given in the fundamental knowledge behind the skills. Upon completion of the Cosmetology program, graduates may apply to the
Florida Licensure Board. Upon passing the examination, graduates may work as licensed cosmetologists.
This program has day and evening options.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
COS 0001
Introduction to Cosmetology
COS 0080
Barbering/Cosmetology Lab (2)1
COS 0081
Barbering/Cosmetology Lab
COS 0082
Barbering/Cosmetology Lab
COS 0400
Hair Design
COS 0644
Chemical Hair Restructuring
COS 0700
Hair Color and Bleach
COS 0870
Salon Management
CSP 0006
Diseases/Disorders of Skin
CSP 0010
Manicure and Pedicure
Credits
Credit Hours
COS 0080 must be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.
1
166
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
4
6
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
4
____
40
Postsecondary Adult Vocational in
DENTAL ASSISTING
(1,230 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7223
The Dental Assisting program is designed to train individuals to perform as efficient dental professionals
in a dental health environment. Students will gain exposure in various areas such as dental radiography,
dental materials, chairside assisting and more. Upon completion of the program, students are eligible to sit
for the Dental Assisting National Board. The Dental Assisting program is 1,230 contact hours and is in the
process of accreditation by the American Dental Association Commission on Accreditation. This is a limited
access program. Application data is distributed at the free information sessions. These are held on a
regular basis. Call CFCC, (352) 873-5817 for dates and time of the information sessions.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
Clock Hours
Term I
DES 1021
DES 1030
DEA 0805L
DEA 0800L
BSC 0084
DES 1800
DES 1800L
DES 0500C
DEA 1135
DES 1502
Head/Neck, Dental Anatomy
Histology/Embryology
Dental Clinic Seminar
Clinic Practice I
Basic Anatomy and Physiology
Introduction to Clinical Procedures
Introduction to Clinical Procedures Lab
Dental Psychology and Communication
Dental Microbiology
Dental Office Management
45
15
15
60
45
45
60
15
15
45
____
Semester Clock Hours 360
Term II
DES 1200
DES 1200L
DES 1100
DES 1100L
DEA 0029
DEA 0850L
Dental Radiology
Dental Radiology Lab
Dental Materials
Dental Materials Lab
Dental Specialties
Clinic Practice II
30
45
30
45
15
210
____
Semester Clock Hours 375
Term III
DES 1830C
DES 1044
DES 1840
DES 1600
DES 1051
DEA 0851
DEA 0851L
Expanded Functions/Lab
Oral Pathology
Preventive Dentistry
Dental Office Emergencies
Dental Pharmacology
Clinic III Seminar
Clinic Practice III
75
45
30
15
30
15
285
____
Semester Clock Hours 495
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
Total Program Clock Hours 1,230
Note:
• When more qualified students apply than can be accepted, those not accepted to the program are
admitted to future classes.
• Federal criminal background check is required for admission. Persons who have a felony history are not
eligible for admission to any CFCC Health Occupations program, including Dental Assisting.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
167
• Upon acceptance into the program, a medical examination and proof of immunizations are required.
• All students are responsible for their own health/hospitalization insurance. Professional liability insurance
is included in tuition fees.
• It is necessary that students have reliable transportation to the assigned dental offices.
• All students are required to have CPR certification before class begins.
• The student must be prepared to pay additional fees and purchase uniforms as mandated by program
of learning.
168
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
(810 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7243
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for initial employment in the field of Early Childhood
Education. Graduates may find employment as pre-school teachers, childcare workers, nannies and teacher
assistants.
The student will receive a CDA equivalency certificate and prepare a resource file that will allow them to
seek CDA National Certification. The program content includes appropriate practice, child growth and
development, safe and healthy environments, nutrition, program planning, exceptional education, home and
family, preparing a resource file and learning centers.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
HEV 0115
Child Development Seminar
HEV 0111
Child Growth and Development
HEV 0141
Guidance and Discipline
HEV 0182*
Pre-School Laboratory Assessment
HEV 0183*
Child Care Practicum I
HEV 0151
Curriculum for Young Children
HEV 0154
Portfolio Development for CDA
HEV 0172
Observing and Recording Behavior
HEV 0163
Family and Communities
HEV 0184*
Child Care Practicum II
Credits
Credit Hours
2
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
____
20
*Internship Classes in Guided Workplace Learning.
Student will attend 7 vocational credit hours internship in order to complete the 480-hour
requirement for the CDA.
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
169
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
FACIAL SPECIALTY
(260 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7278
The purpose of this program is to prepare a person for employment in positions such as aesthetician, skin
care specialist, and assistant in a dermatology office environment. This program can provide a State of
Florida registration for facial specialty. In combination with nail specialty registration, a person is eligible for
Florida State full specialty registration.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
CSP 0006
Diseases/Disorders of Skin
COS 0870
Salon Management
CSP 0300
Facials and Make-up
Credits
Credit Hours
170
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
4
2
3
____
9
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
FOOD MANAGEMENT, PRODUCTION AND SERVICES
(1,050 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7257
The program is a cluster of courses consisting of food and beverage preparation, kitchen and dining room
helper, and baker’s and cook’s assistant instruction. It is designed to provide multiple completion points and
prepares students for employment as food and beverage preparers, kitchen and dining room helpers, and
baker’s and cook’s assistants. The first completion point is food and beverage preparer, followed by a kitchen
and dining room helper and, finally, the baker’s and cook’s assistant component.
Students learn sanitation and safety, proper receiving and storage of goods, care of facilities and equipment,
as well as responsibilities and skills in the dining room service area. Students will be provided instruction in
the preparation of salads and dressings, soups and sauces, starches and entrees, baked goods and desserts.
Students may continue their education for an Associate in Science degree in restaurant or culinary management.
Students enrolled in this program may be required to enroll in basic skills training. This will be determined
by their scores on the state mandated Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE). Prospective students should be
advised by a counselor or program chair prior to enrolling.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
VPI 0100
Vocational Prep I
VPI 0200
Vocational Prep II
VPI 0300
Vocational Prep III
Hours
FSS
FSS
FSS
FSS
FSS
FSS
FSS
150
150
150
150
150
150
150
____
1,050
0252
0253
0254
0255
0256
0257
0258
Food
Food
Food
Food
Food
Food
Food
Preparation Worker I
Preparation Worker II
Preparation Worker III
Preparation Worker IV
Preparation Worker V
Service and Restaurant Manager I
Service and Restaurant Manager II
Total Contact Hours
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
171
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
LAW ENFORCEMENT STAND ALONE ACADEMY
(744 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7251
This program is designed for students who seek certification as law enforcement officers. Graduates
will be eligible to sit for the state’s certification examination.
ADMISSION CRITERIA
To apply for admission into the Corrections or Law Enforcement certificate program, each applicant must:
A. Be at least 19 years of age prior to completing the program.
B. Be a citizen of the United States.
C. Be a high school graduate or its equivalent.
D. Not have been convicted of any felony or of a misdemeanor involving perjury or false statement.
E. Have an honorable discharge from the military (if applicable).
F. Be of good moral character.
G. Pass a background investigation.
H. Pass a physical examination by a licensed physician.
I. Be in good academic standing at Central Florida Community College.
In addition, the applicant must submit:
A. A copy of scores on the TABE (Test for Adult Basic Education, Level A), and F-BAT.
B. A completed/signed Central Florida Community College Criminal Justice Institute Applicant Questionnaire.
Note: All the above information must be submitted as a package.
Admission to the program will be based on the following:
A. Oral interview.
B. Completed questionnaire
C. Medical examination.
D. Background investigation.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
CJK 0005
Introduction to Law Enforcement
CJK 0010
Human Issues
CJK 0015
Communications
CJK 0020
Vehicle Operation
CJK 0030
Medical First Responder
CJK 0040
Firearms
CJK 0050
Defensive Tactics
CJK 0060
Patrol
CJK 0070
Investigations
CJK 0075
Investigating Offenses
CJK 0080
Traffic Stops
CJK 0085
Traffic Crash Investigation
CJK 0090
Tactical Applications
Credits
Credit Hours
172
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
2
2
2
1
2
3
3
2
2
1
2
1
2
____
25
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
NAIL SPECIALTY
(240 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7277
The Nail Specialty course covers the study of the hands, arms and nails for aesthetic reasons, manicuring,
pedicuring, nail anatomy, nail wrap, nail disorders and diseases, sculptured nails, nail art, fundamentals of
massages, Florida law, salon management, employability skills, and principles of entrepreneurship. Students
are required to complete 240 hours and required services. Graduates of this course may apply for a State
of Florida registration upon successful completion of the course.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
CSP 0012
Cosmetology Nail Specialty
COS 0082
Cosmetology/Barbering Lab III
Credits
Credit Hours
4
4
____
8
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
173
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
NURSERY OPERATIONS
(900 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7260
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment as horticultural specialty growers,
supervisors, disease and insect control specialists, turfgrass specialists, horticultural workers, landscape
designers and grounds maintenance personnel, and provides supplemental training for persons previously
or currently employed in these occupations.
The content includes, but is not limited to, instruction that prepares individuals to produce, process and
market plants, shrubs, trees and turfgrass used principally for ornamental, recreational and aesthetic
purposes. Subject matter includes fertilization, landscape design, irrigation, harvesting and marketing of
greenhouse and nursery plant materials, mechanics, facility maintenance, pest control and plant
identification, as well as leadership, communication, employability and human relations skills.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
ORH 0001
Introduction to Plant Sciences for Environmental Horticulture
ORH 0517
Woody Ornamental Identification for Golf and Landscape
ORH 0103
Principles of Pest Identification and Control for Golf and Landscape
ORH 0022
Plant Propagation Practices
ORH 0230
Grounds Maintenance
ORH 0220
Turfgrass Identification and Maintenance for Golf and Landscape
ORH 0251
Nursery Operations and Management
ORH 0262
Floriculture Production for Greenhouse Applications
ORH 0515
Herbaceous Landscape Materials for Golf and Landscape
ORH 0873
Interiorscape Design and Maintenance
ORH 0800
Introduction to Landscape Design Skills
Credit Hours
174
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
2
2
3
____
30
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
PRACTICAL NURSING
(1,350 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7230
The Practical Nursing program focuses on the implementation of nursing skills with clients experiencing
common, well-defined health problems in the acute or chronic stages. The program is one year or 1,350
hours in length. It is approved by the Florida Board of Nursing and accredited by the National League for
Nursing Accreditation Commission, 61 Broadway, NY, NY 10006, (212) 393-5555. The program begins in
January of each year. Upon completion of the requirements of the program, graduates are eligible to apply
to take the state licensing examination (NCLEX-PN) enabling them to practice as Licensed Practical Nurses.
This is a limited access program with applications accepted August 1 to November 30. Application
data are distributed at required information sessions. These are held on a scheduled basis. Call CFCC,
(352) 873-5817, for dates and times of information sessions.
The program policies including attendance, grading, progression, clinical behaviors, and readmission
guidelines are found in the student handbook that each student obtains once admitted to the Practical
Nursing program.
Course Number and Title
Hours
Program Courses
BSC 0084
Anatomy and Physiology for Health Occupations Certificate Programs
45
PRN 0040
Personal, Family and Community Health
30
PRN 0020
Human Growth and Development through the Life Span
30
PRN 0070
Nutrition for PN’s
30
PRN 0050
Gerontological Nursing
30
PRN 0000C
Fundamentals for PN’s
300
PRN 0100C
Maternal Nursing
75
PRN 0110C
Pediatric Nursing
75
PRN 0030
Pharmacology I for PN’s
30
PRN 0031
Pharmacology II for PN’s
30
PRN 0381C
Medical Surgical Nursing I
180
PRN 0382C
Medical Surgical Nursing II
465
PRN 0010
Vocational Relations
30
____
Total Hours
1,350
Note:
• When more qualified students apply than can be accepted, those not accepted into the next class are
admitted to future classes.
• Before applying to the program a professional level CPR card is required.
• Federal criminal background check is required for admission. Persons who have a felony history are not
eligible for admission to any CFCC Health Occupations program, including Practical Nursing.
• Upon acceptance into the program, a medical examination documenting sound physical and mental
health, and proof of immunization is required.
• All students are responsible for their own health/hospitalization insurance. Professional liability insurance
is included in tuition fees.
• It is necessary that students have reliable transportation to the assigned hospitals and clinical facilities,
which are located in Marion and Levy counties.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
PROGRAMS
OF STUDY
175
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
(1,300 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7224
This program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
(CAAHEP). The Surgical Technology program prepares the individual to assume the role of surgical
technician/surgical technologist who works with the surgical team delivering patient care before, during and
after surgery. It is an 11-month program. The program begins in August and ends in July. Upon completion
of the program, the graduate is eligible to sit for the national certification examination. After successful
completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Surgical Technologist.
This is a limited access program with firm deadline to apply. Application data is distributed at
required information sessions. These are held on a scheduled basis. Call CFCC, (352) 873-5817, for dates
and times of information sessions.
The program policies including attendance, grading, clinical behaviors and readmission guidelines are found
in the student handbook that each student obtains once admitted to the Surgical Technology program.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
STS 0003
Introduction to Surgical Technology
STS 0810
Surgical Technology I
STS 0820
Surgical Technology II
Hours
Total Hours
510
520
270
____
1,300
Note:
• Federal criminal background check is required for admission. Persons who have a felony history are not
eligible for admission to any CFCC Health Occupations program, including Surgical Technology.
• When more qualified students apply than can be accepted, those not accepted to the program are
placed on a wait list.
• Upon acceptance into the program, a medical examination and proof of immunization are required.
• Accident insurance is included in lab fee. Professional liability insurance is included in tuition fees.
• It is necessary that students have reliable transportation to the assigned hospitals and clinical facilities.
176
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate in
APPLIED WELDING TECHNOLOGIES
(1,170 Clock Hours)
CFCC PROGRAM CODE:
7281
The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment as welders and flame cutters, tack
welders, welder assemblers, arc cutters, arc welders, combination welders and production line welders,
and provides supplemental training for individuals previously or currently employed in these occupations.
The content of this program includes, but is not limited to, communication skills, leadership skills, human
relations and employability skills, and safe and efficient work practices. Also included are the use of gases
and/or welding processes to assemble parts according to diagrams, blueprints or written specifications.
Course Number and Title
Program Courses
PMT 0102
Introduction to Welding
PMT 0111
Oxyacetelyne Welding
PMT 0121
Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)
PMT 0121
Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)
PMT 0134
Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)
PMT 0930L
Welding Skill Development Lab
PMT 0131
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)
PMT 0131
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)
PMT 0161
Pipe Welding
PMT 0161
Pipe Welding
PMT 0161
Pipe Welding
PMT 0930L
Welding Skill Development Lab
Credits
Credit Hours
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
4
4
4
4
4
2
3
3
3
3
3
2
____
39
177
Course
Descriptions
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
179
Courses in this catalog are listed in alpha-numeric
order. Following is a list of the courses usually
offered. The college reserves the right to determine
minimum enrollments in all courses. The term
“credit” as used in references to courses is equal to
one semester hour. Further, it means credit toward a
degree from CFCC and not necessarily credit
transferable to another institution.
COURSE CLASSIFICATION
All credit courses offered by CFCC are designated
in one of the following four classifications:
College preparatory: Those courses that are
offered for students who need review of basic skills
prior to enrolling in the college-level courses.
Occupational: Those courses that are offered
primarily for Associate in Science degree-seeking
students who do not plan to transfer to a college or
university.
Parallel: Those courses that are considered to
be of college level and parallel to those courses one
would expect to take at any college or university.
Dual: Those courses that can be used for an
A.S. degree or that generally transfer to colleges
and universities if they are appropriate for a
particular major.
“Gordon Rule” classes are marked G-4000 or
G-6000 and with ✒ in the course description.
College preparatory courses do not count
toward either an A.A. or an A.S. degree and
receive institutional credit only. They may be
used in calculating full-time status for athletic team
participation, financial aid and veterans benefits.
Occupational courses may not count toward
the A.A. degree. They count in full toward the
appropriate A.S. degree.
Parallel courses count toward the A.A.
degree and should transfer readily to any college
or university.
Dual courses count toward the A.A. degree
as part of the 60 hours only if they are appropriate
for the student’s major. Students should consult
with a counselor prior to enrolling in a designated
dual course.
Students are cautioned against taking excessive
electives or courses out of their major field of study
at the expense of required prerequisites.
Terms courses are offered:
180
FLORIDA’S STATEWIDE
COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM
Courses in this catalog are identified by prefixes
and numbers that were assigned by Florida’s
Statewide Course Numbering System. This common
numbering system is used by all public postsecondary institutions in Florida and by 26 participating
non-public institutions. The major purpose of this
system is to facilitate the transfer of courses
between participating institutions.
Each participating institution controls the title,
credit, and content of its own courses and recommends the first digit of the course number to
indicate the level at which students normally take
the course. Course prefixes and the last three digits
of the course numbers are assigned by members
of faculty discipline committees appointed for that
purpose by the Florida Department of Education in
Tallahassee. Individuals nominated to serve on
these committees are selected to maintain a
representative balance as to type of institution and
discipline field or specialization.
The course prefix and each digit in the course
number have meaning in the Statewide Course
Numbering System (SCNS). The list of course
prefixes and numbers, along with their generic titles,
is referred to as the “SCNS taxonomy.” (See the
example on page 181.)
General Rule for Course Equivalencies
Equivalent courses at different institutions are
identified by the same prefixes and same last three
digits of the course number and are guaranteed to
be transferable between the participating institutions
that offer the course, with a few exceptions.
(Exceptions are listed below.) For example, a survey
course in social problems is offered by 31 different
postsecondary institutions. Each institution uses
“SYG _010” to identify its social problems course.
The level code is the first digit and represents the
year in which students normally take the course at
a specific institution. In the SCNS taxonomy, “SYG”
means “Sociology, General,” the century digit “0”
represents “Entry-Level General Sociology,” the
decade digit “1” represents “Survey Course,” and
the unit digit “0” represents “Social Problems.”
F = Fall
W = Winter
S = Summer
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
In science and other areas, a “C” or “L” after the
course number is known as a lab indicator. The “C”
represents a combined lecture and laboratory
course that meets in the same place at the same
time. The “L” represents a laboratory course or the
laboratory part of a course, having the same prefix
and course number without a lab indicator, which
meets at a different time or place.
Transfer of any successfully completed course
from one institution to another is guaranteed in
cases where the course to be transferred is
equivalent to one offered by the receiving institution.
Equivalencies are established by the same prefix
and last three digits and comparable faculty
credentials at both institutions. For example, SYG
1010 is offered at a community college. The same
course is offered at a state university as SYG 2010.
A student who has successfully complete SYG 1010
at the community college is guaranteed to receive
transfer credit for SYG 2010 at the state university if
the student transfers. The student cannot be
required to take SYG 2010 again since SYG 1010 is
equivalent to SYG 2010. Transfer credit must be
awarded for successfully completed equivalent
courses and used by the receiving institution to
determine satisfaction of requirements by transfer
students on the same basis as credit awarded to
the native students. It is the prerogative of the
receiving institution, however, to offer transfer credit
for courses successfully completed which have not
been designated as equivalent.
The Course Prefix
The course prefix is a three-letter designator for
a major division of an academic discipline, subject
matter area, or sub-category of knowledge. The
prefix is not intended to identify the department in
which a course is offered. Rather, the content of a
course determines the assigned prefix used to
identify the course.
Authority for Acceptance
of Equivalent Courses
State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.024(19),
Florida Administrative Code, reads:
“When a student transfers among postsecondary
institutions that are fully accredited by a regional or
national accrediting agency recognized by the
United States Department of Education and that
Prefix
SYG
Sociology,
General
Level Code
(first digit)
1
Freshman level
at this
institution
Century Digit
(second digit)
0
Entry-level
General
Sociology
participate in the common course designation and
numbering system, the receiving institution shall
award credit for courses satisfactorily completed at
the previous participating institutions when the
courses are judged by the appropriate common
course designation and numbering system faculty
task forces to be academically equivalent to
courses offered at the receiving institution, including
equivalency of faculty credentials, regardless of the
public or nonpublic control of the previous
institution. The award of credit may be limited to
courses that are entered in the course numbering
system. Credits so awarded shall satisfy institutional
requirements on the same basis as credits awarded
to native students.”
Exceptions to the
General Rule for Equivalency
The following courses are exceptions to the
general rule for course equivalencies and may not
be transferable. Transferability is at the discretion of
the receiving institution:
A. Courses in the 900–999 series (e.g., ART
2905).
B. Internships, practical, clinical experiences,
and study abroad courses.
C. Performance or studio courses in Art,
Dance, Theater and Music.
D. Skills courses in Criminal Justice.
E. Graduate courses.
F. Courses not offered by the receiving
institution.
College preparatory and vocational preparatory
courses may not be used to meet degree
requirements and are not transferable.
Questions about the Statewide Course
Numbering System and appeals regarding course
credit transfer decisions should be directed to:
The Office for Instruction, or the Florida
Department of Education, Statewide Course
Numbering System, 1454 Turlington Building,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400. Special reports
and technical information may be requested by
calling telephone number (850) 488-6402 or
Suncom 278-6402.
Decade Digit
(third digit)
1
Survey Course
Unit Digit
(fourth digit)
0
Social
Problems
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
Lab Code
No laboratory
component in
this course
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
181
ACG 2021 F, W, S, (offered online F, W)
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: CGS 1100.
This course approaches accounting as an information
or decision support system. Emphasis is placed on
the analysis of business transactions and the
evaluation of their effect on the operation of the
enterprise. The method of instruction emphasizes
“how to do it” and “why it is done and what it means.”
ACG 2071 F, W, S (offered online F, W)
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: ACG 2021 and CGS 1100.
This course uses accounting information for planning,
control and decision making. Includes principles of
product costing, budgeting techniques and capital
decisions.
ACG 2100 F
INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACG 2021.
This course is an in-depth examination of financial
accounting and reporting. Specific points of emphasis
are accounting procedures and financial statement
presentation of cash, short-term investments,
receivables, inventories, fixed assets, and long-term
investments in equity securities.
ACG 2360 W
COST ACCOUNTING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ACG 2071.
A course designed to teach the principles of cost
accounting and the uses of cost data in planning and
controlling operations. Topics covered include
accounting for product costs, transfer pricing, capital
management and cost analysis for management
decision making.
ACG 2450 F
INTEGRATED ACCOUNTING (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is an introduction to computerized
integrated accounting procedures found in
microcomputer office environments. Software used by
the student will handle the general ledger, accounts
payable, accounts receivable, financial statements,
purchase order and sales order processing, inventory,
fixed assets and payroll.
ACO 1807 F
PAYROLL ACCOUNTING (1).
1 hour per week.
The purpose of this course is to train the student to
complete many payroll activities of any business.
Topics covered are payroll and personnel records,
federal payroll laws, payroll accounting systems,
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payroll operations and preparation of payroll records
such as payroll registers, individual earnings records
and federal, state and local payroll tax forms.
AEB 1931
EQUINE PRACTICUM I (3).
3 hours per week.
This course will provide the student with supervised,
practical experience in several of the equine studies
departments. Emphasis will be placed on providing
opportunities for the student to relate classroom theory
to the actual functions. Emphasis is on the unique
regulatory requirements and record keeping practices
of equine studies. This course will also enable the
student to further develop critical thinking and problem
solving skills in realistic situations.
AEB 1932
EQUINE PRACTICUM II (3).
3 hours per week.
This course will provide the student with supervised,
practical experience in several of the equine studies
departments. Emphasis will be placed on providing
opportunities for the student to relate classroom theory
to the actual functions. Emphasis is on the unique
regulatory requirements and record keeping practices
of equine studies. This course will also enable the
student to further develop critical thinking and problem
solving skills in realistic situations.
AEB 2234
EQUINE BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
This course reviews management practices essential
to the planning and operation of commercial horse
farms.
AER 1005 F
AUTOMOTIVE FUNDAMENTALS (3).
45 contact hours. 3 credit hours.
This course will introduce the student to the various
systems of the automotive vehicles and will acquaint
the student with shop practices, safety, service
manuals, pay structures, tools, warranties and
personal relations necessary for success in the
automotive business. The student will be trained in
minor repair procedures, including lubrication, wheel
and tire service, exhaust system service and new car
pre-delivery services.
AER 1110 F
ENGINES (4).
8 contact hours: 4 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.
This course is designed to provide instruction in the
repair, diagnosis, and tuning of engines in both
classroom and laboratory conditions.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
AER 1101 W
AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS I (4).
8 contact hours: 4 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours
(CBE).
This course is designed to teach entry-level skills in
mechanics. Topics include engine electrical systems,
starting systems, charging systems, accessory
systems, basic emission controls, and an introduction
to computer control systems. Both lecture and shop
experiences will be provided.
AER 1122 F
BRAKE SYSTEMS (4).
8 contact hours: 4 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours
(CBE).
This course is designed to teach job entry skills in the
theory, operation and repair of brake systems including both drum and disc brakes. Also presented will be
an introduction to anti-lock brake systems. Instruction
will combine both lecture and shop experience.
AER 1451 F
STEERING AND SUSPENSION (4).
8 contact hours: 4 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours
(CBE).
This course is designed to teach entry-level skills in
the service and repair of steering and suspension
systems, power steering, wheels and tires. Both
lecture and shop experience will be provided.
AER 1611 W
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING (4).
8 contact hours: 4 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours
(CBE).
This course is designed to teach entry-level skills in
the theory, service, and repair of automotive heating
and air conditioning systems. It will include both
classroom lecture and shop experience.
AER 2251 S
ADVANCED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS (4).
8 contact hours: 4 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.
Prerequisite: AER 2260.
This course is an advanced study of automotive
automatic transmissions. Students are expected to
have a basic knowledge of electrical systems, engine
operation, fuel systems, drivability diagnosis, and
automatic transmission operation prior to enrolling.
This course will concentrate on the automatic
transmission as used in today’s vehicles, including
instruction in overdrive transmission and lock-up
torque converters, electronic shift controls, and allwheel drive systems.
AER 2260 S
CLUTCH AND TRANSMISSIONS (4).
8 contact hours: 4 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours
(CBE).
This course seeks to develop entry-level skills in the
theory and repair of clutches, manual and automatic
transmission, and transaxles. Also included are final
drive and differential assemblies. Instruction will
combine lecture and shop experience.
AER 2316 S
AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS II (3).
6 contact hours: 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.
Prerequisite: AER 1101.
This course is an advanced study of automotive
electrical and electronic systems. Students are
expected to have a basic knowledge of electrical
systems, engine operation, fuel systems and
drivability diagnosis prior to enrolling. The course
will concentrate on electronic vehicle controls
including fuel injection, feedback systems, climate
controls, and other computer controlled systems.
Parts of the General Motors Specialized Electronics
Training (SET) course will be used.
AER 2520 F
FUEL AND EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEMS (4).
8 contact hours: 4 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.
Prerequisite: AER 1100 or consent of instructor.
This course is designed to teach entry-level skills in
fuel and emission control systems. Also included are
computer control and fuel injection. Both lecture and
shop experience will be utilized.
AER 2521 F
DRIVABILITY AND DIAGNOSIS (4).
8 contact hours: 4 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.
Prerequisites: AER 2520 and AER 1101.
This course is designed to teach job entry skills in the
diagnosis and repair of drivability problems. Topics
covered include engine performance and electrical
and computer system operations. Emphasis is placed
on manufacturers’ diagnostic charts and advanced
diagnostic equipment. Use of scanners on both
carburetor and fuel injected vehicles will be addressed.
AGR 2300
HORSE HANDLING AND SAFETY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course introduces the student to the normal
behavior of the horse and emphasizes the proper way
to handle the horse in a variety of situations. Topics
include breeds, gaits, hoof care, restraints, bandaging
and basic horse husbandry.
AMH 2010 F, W
UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1877 (3).
3 hours per week.
An interpretive survey of U.S. history that includes the
discovery of America, the adoption and growth of the
Constitution, the Civil War and Reconstruction. This
course may be available online or by television.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
183
AMH 2020 F, W
UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1877 (3).
3 hours per week.
An interpretive survey of U.S. history since the end of the
Civil War and Reconstruction; major topics include the
Economic Revolution, Imperialism and America’s rise
as a world power, World War I, the Great Depression, the
New Deal, World War II and its aftermath to modern times.
This course may be available online or by television.
AMH 2070 F, W
HISTORY OF FLORIDA (3).
3 hours per week.
The course includes studies relating to explorations,
Native Americans, imperial conflict, cultural heritages,
Andrew Jackson, early statehood, tourism, agriculture,
industry and contemporary problems.
AMH 2090 W
HISTORY OF AMERICAN WOMEN (3).
3 hours per week.
A survey of women’s contributions to American history.
Women’s legal and political status will be included, as
well as an overview of the changing psychological and
sociological factors impacting their position in
American society.
AMH 2091 F
INTRODUCTION TO
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY (3).
3 hours per week.
An exploration of major developments in black history
from African origins through the slavery experience,
freedom, the fight for equality, and the contemporary
status of blacks.
AML 2010 F
SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I
(17th–19th centuries) (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent. May be taken
for credit without AML 2022.
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
An introductory survey of American literature from
the 17th century through the 19th century, including
poetry, fiction, nonfictional prose, and drama by
major authors such as Poe, Hawthorne, Melville,
Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson and Whitman. ✒
AML 2012 F
HONORS SURVEY OF
AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent and
admission to the Community of Scholars program
or permission of instructor. May be taken for credit
without AML 2022.
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
This course is designed for students capable of
intensive study and discussion of a variety of
representative selections from American literature
184
including poetry, fiction and non-fictional prose by
major authors (such as Bradstreet, Poe, Melville,
Emerson and Thoreau) from the beginning years of
America through the nineteenth century. Selective
admission. ✒
AML 2022 W
SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II
(19th–20th centuries) (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent. May be taken
for credit without AML 2010.
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
A continuation of AML 2010, this course is an introductory
survey of American literature from the 19th century
through the present, including poetry, fiction, nonfictional
prose and drama by major authors such as Twain, James,
Oates, Faulkner, Frost, Plath, Tan and Erdrich. ✒
ANS 1112
EQUINE COMPUTER SKILLS (1).
1 hour per week.
The purpose of this course is to train students in
equine management software. This software will assist
in all levels of managing information for an equine
operation: horse inventory, breeding, health records,
billing and accounts receivable.
ANS 1230
SURVEY OF EQUINE (1).
1 hour per week.
This course will provide an overview of the equine
industry. Topics include conformation and selection of
stock, safety and equipment management, dental and
hoof care, nutrition, vet care, etc. Field trips to local
farms are included.
ANS 1239
EQUINE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course covers the normal anatomy and common
anatomical disorders of the horse. Emphasis is placed
on the bony structure and muscular-tendon relationship
as they relate to biomechanics. The practical application
of conformation and clinical disorders is stressed.
ANS 1240
EQUINE HEALTH CARE I (3).
3 hours per week.
This course will cover the common infectious diseases
of the horse and their prevention. Some of the topics
covered in this course will be: current vaccination
protocols, disease control measures and prevention,
and minor treatment procedures. Also, the use of health
certificates, EIA forms and state laws regarding horses.
ANS 1315
EQUINE REPRODUCTION (3).
3 hours per week.
This course covers the theory and practices associated
with efficient equine reproduction, including mare and
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
stallion care and basic principles of genetic selection.
Instruction will include classroom learning and visits to
local horse farms.
ANS 1930
SPECIAL TOPICS — EQUINE STUDIES (2).
2 hours per week.
The primary purpose of this course is to present
current issues related to the equine industry, which are
not covered in the core courses of the curriculum. The
course contains topics such as: legislative changes
(i.e., insurance requirements), personnel relations,
legal issues, animal rights, Spanish for the Equine
Industry, etc.
ANS 2232
EQUINE BEHAVIOR AND PSYCHOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course will cover the history, evaluation, and
development of the horse, including an in-depth study
of the horse’s psyche. Attention will be focused on
imprinting, bonding, fright and flight, as well as
restraint in herd and hand activities. Behavior of the
horse including the affects of the senses — hearing,
smell, sight and touch will be stressed. The behavior
of the normal and abnormal horse will be studied from
birth through elder age.
ANS 2235
EQUINE HEALTH CARE II (3).
3 hours per week.
This course will cover metabolic diseases and noninfectious conditions of the horse, foreign diseases
which impact horses worldwide, bone and joint
maladies as related to performance situations, the
propensity for certain diseases or conditions as related
to age, environmental conditions related to housing,
geography and use of blood analysis.
ANS 2237
EQUINE HEALTH CARE III (3).
3 hours per week.
This course will cover the use and effect of drugs,
medications and nitroceuticals in equine therapeutic
situations. Care of the horse in emergency situations,
including first aid, disaster effects, transportation
accidents and the proper administration of common
pharmaceuticals used in the equine industry will be
discussed. This course will also describe the variety of
internal and external parasites, which affect the horse.
ANS 2405
EQUINE NUTRITION (3).
3 hours per week.
This course studies equine nutrition and its
application, including concentrates, hays, forage, and
supplements. Topics include basic nutrition and
digestive anatomy, common feeds and supplements,
nutritional needs in specific situations, and ration
balancing. Upon completion, students should be able
to explain feeding practices and critique rations for
classifications of horses.
ANT 2000 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
An investigation of the history of human adaptation to
the environment and the use of tools, weapons and
artifacts, with emphasis on the comparative study of
the systems and lifeways of diverse cultures. This
course may be available online or by television. ✒
ANT 2100 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
An introduction to archaeology including the history
and development of archaeology as a discipline,
archaeological site survey and excavation procedures,
and the evolution of human cultures from the Paleolithic
Era through the development of complex societies.
Case studies are drawn from both Old World and New
World cultures.
ANT 2310 W
AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURES (3).
3 hours per week.
An overview of American Indian cultures, their
prehistory, language, customs and lifeways. The
course will also address the formation of state societies,
the impact of European contact, and modern issues.
APA 1111 F, W
BUSINESS ACCOUNTING (3).
3 hours per week.
A study of the sole proprietorship form of business
organization, with emphasis on the accounting cycle,
adjusting and closing procedures, preparing
accounting statements, payroll accounting, and the
use of special journals and subsidiary ledgers.
ARC 1511 F
ARCHITECTURAL COMMUNICATIONS (2).
2 hours per week.
Exercises in freehand drawing, sketching, linear
perspective, and scale modeling will be used to
enhance the student’s awareness of the architectural
environment. This will be accomplished by observing
forms in nature, building forms and abstract elements
in composition.
ARC 2171 W, F
ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING I (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ETD 2320C.
Introduction to the Architectural Desktop, an overlay
to AutoCAD. Basic CAD commands acquired in
ETD 2320C are utilized in conjunction with the more
advanced techniques of Architectural Desktop.
Emphasis is placed on the development of a layering
system to support the creation of all working drawings
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COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
185
within the same drawing file. Introduction to reading
and interpreting a set of residential working drawings.
ARC 2172 W, F
ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ARC 2171.
Specialized computer aided drafting utilizing the
Architectural Desktop overlay to AutoCAD. Emphasis is
placed on the production of actual working drawings
involving residential and commercial structures. Basic
CAD commands acquired in ETD 2530C are utilized in
conjunction with more advanced techniques to
produce a full set of working drawings.
ARC 2461 F
MATERIALS AND METHODS
OF CONSTRUCTION (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
This course is an introduction to the materials and
methods commonly used in construction. Topics will
include wood framing, masonry, concrete and steel
construction. Projects will consist of hands-on
experience and field trips to construction sites.
ARH 2050 F, W
THE HISTORY OF ART I
(Pre-history–1500 A.D.) (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Corequisite: ENC 1101.
A study of the art and architecture of ancient civilization
through the early Renaissance. The art of the major
historical periods, especially Western art, will be
examined through major artists and their contribution
to their own society and to Western culture itself. ✒
ARH 2051 W
THE HISTORY OF ART II
(1500 A.D.–20th century) (3).
3 hours per week.
May be taken for credit without ART 2050.
A study of the art and architecture of the High
Renaissance through the first half of the 19th century.
ART 1201C F
BASIC DESIGN I (3).
6 hours per week.
Study and employment of basic principles of twodimensional design and color theory as elements used
in creative composition in the visual arts. No previous
art training is required.
ART 1300C F, W
FREEHAND DRAWING I (3).
6 hours per week.
Freehand Drawing I is an introductory-level course for
the student with no prior college-level drawing
instruction. This course emphasizes skill building and
technique in the use of various drawing media, including
graphite, ink and conte as students render surface
186
characteristics of materials, still lifes, object studies,
landscapes, portraiture and the human figure. May be
repeated for credit. No previous art training required.
ART 1500C F, W
PAINTING I (3).
6 hours per week.
A course designed to acquaint the student with a
working knowledge of the elements of composition,
color theory and various painting techniques through
the creation of paintings rendered in oils or acrylics.
No particular skill or previous training in art is required.
May be repeated for credit.
ART 2202C W
BASIC DESIGN II (3).
6 hours per week.
Study and employment of basic principles of threedimensional design as used in the creative composition
in the visual arts. Students will experiment with the
manipulation of a variety of materials to create effective
use of three-dimensional space. No previous training is
required. Recommended completion before ART
2701C-p (Sculpture I).
ART 2301C W
FREEHAND DRAWING II (3).
6 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ART 1300C.
A continuation of ART 1300C, this course emphasizes
individual exploration in advanced graphite pencil
techniques and interpretation of subject matter, as
well as gives an introduction to the use of color in the
drawing medium through the single and mixed media
approaches to colored pencil, nupastel, watercolor, and
inks. Drawing of the human figure will be stressed. May
be repeated for credit.
ART 2501C F, W
PAINTING II (3).
6 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ART 1500C.
Continuation of ART 1500C, emphasizing individual
exploration into painting techniques and interpretation
of subject matter. May be repeated for credit.
ART 2701C F
SCULPTURE I (3).
3 hours per week.
An introduction to fundamental processes used in
sculpture, aesthetic problems in sculptural form and
composition. Practical work in plaster, clay, and other
materials. May be repeated for credit.
ART 2702C F
SCULPTURE II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ART 2701C or equivalent.
A continuation of ART 2701C with emphasis on the
sophisticated techniques and principles in the
production of complex sculptures. Students will
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
investigate assemblage, mixed media and modular
approaches to sculptural problems. May be repeated
for credit.
ART 2750C F, W
CERAMICS I (3).
3 hours per week.
An introduction to hand building processes and wheel
throwing techniques used in forming clay into pottery
or art objects, and a study of the basic elements of
design pertaining to such objects. May be repeated for
credit.
ART 2751C F
CERAMICS II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ART 2750C or equivalent.
Continuation of ART 2750C, providing additional
training and experience in the use of studio equipment,
in the creation of artistic forms and designs in clay,
and in the development of a personal style in clay.
May be repeated for credit.
BCN 1250 W
ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING PRINCIPLES (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: EGS 1110.
The class introduces students to basic architecture
design and drafting principles. Class discussions will
cover highlights in architectural history through the
production of construction documents for a
construction project. The class will use a simple
building as a vehicle to discuss many of the topics. In
addition to class discussions, students will be required
to perform weekly reading and activities outside the
classroom.
BOT 1010C (upon request only)
BOTANY WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
An introductory course in plant biology. It is designed
for science majors and pre-professionals, but is also
appropriate for the general student as it assumes no
prior science background. Emphasis is placed on
structure and function of plant cells, tissues and
organs. Photosynthesis, respiration, transport, growth,
development, and the basic chemistry needed to
discuss these topics are studied. The role of plants in
agriculture, drugs and medicine is discussed.
BOT 1011C (upon request only)
PLANT DIVERSITY (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
A course for science majors and pre-professionals, but
also is appropriate for the general student with a
minimum of previous exposure to life science. This
course emphasizes the study of major plant groups,
their structure, life histories and classification, and their
distribution, ecology, economic importance and uses.
BSC 1010C F, W, S
GENERAL BIOLOGY I WITH LABORATORY (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
The molecular basis of biology, the architecture of
cells, organization in biological systems, adaptations
by which living systems obtain and utilize energy,
classical, modern, and human genetics are discussed.
The first course in college biology.
BSC 1011C F, W
GENERAL BIOLOGY II WITH LABORATORY (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
The origin and evolution of life, the origin of species,
viruses and bacteria, algae and fungi, the plant kingdom,
the animal kingdom and ecology are discussed. No
previous college training in science is presumed.
BSC 1020 F, W, S
BIOLOGY AND THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE (3).
3 hours per week.
This course examines the nature of living organisms
with an emphasis on humankind. It examines the
structure and function of cells, tissues and organ
systems. It surveys human biology, including anatomy
and physiology, human inheritance, disease and
nutrition, and emphasizes the implications and
applications to current issues and their bioethical
interpretations.
BSC 1020L F, W, S
BIOLOGY AND THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE
LABORATORY (1).
2 contact hours per week.
Corequisite or prerequisite: BSC 1020.
A laboratory course designed to accompany
BSC 1020. Exercises emphasize the application of
biological principles and knowledge to the concerns
of humans.
BSC 1037C (upon request only)
HONORS BIOLOGY, BIOTECHNOLOGY
AND BIOETHICS (4). G-4000.
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
This course explores the frontiers of modern biology.
Students examine the latest developments in
biological science from several viewpoints: scientific
contribution, ethics and morality, economics, and
societal impacts. Emphasis will be on the application
of individual and group study in preparation for more
advanced formal study. It is especially designed to
meet the needs and interests of exceptionallyqualified students.
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
BSC 1050 F, W, S
LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
This course examines current environmental concerns
and their management. It integrates and correlates the
features of the natural environment with human activities.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
187
Topics include basic ecology, population growth and
world hunger, energy resources, environmental
regulations and water, air and noise pollution.
Emphasizes an understanding of, and solutions to,
environmental problems. This course may be
counted as either a biological OR physical
science credit.
BSC 1050L F, W, S
LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT LABORATORY (1).
2 hours per week.
Corequisite or prerequisite: BSC 1050.
A laboratory course designed to accompany BSC 1050.
Exercises in ecology and environmental science. The
lab emphasizes field and laboratory methods for
general ecology and the study of human and
environmental interactions.
BSC 1051 W
LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT II (3).
3 hours lecture per week.
Prerequisite: BSC 1050 or equivalent or permission
of instructor.
A continuation of BSC 1050 which examines emerging
human health issues due to air and water pollution,
emerging infectious agents, mosquito vectored
diseases and food borne illnesses. An investigation
into environmental health will include loss of genetic
diversity, habitat loss, degradation of the earth’s
natural resources and the impact on natural systems.
This course may be counted as a biological OR
physical science credit.
BSC 1080 F, W, S
BASIC ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
A basic anatomy and physiology non-laboratory
course that may be used to meet general education
science requirements. Emphasis will be placed on the
structure of the human body, the functions of its many
different systems, and the diseases associated with
these systems. It is designed for some Health
Occupations programs. Check your particular
program of study to verify that this course meets
needed requirements.
BSC 2085C F, W, S
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I
WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry
(completed with a grade of “C” or better), or one of
the following courses BSC 1010C, BSC 1080, or
any college level chemistry course (CHM 1033 is
recommended for Health Science majors)
completed with a grade of “C” or better.
An introduction to the human body. Examines the
molecular, cellular and tissue levels of organization
and these organ systems: integumentary, skeletal,
muscular and nervous.
188
BSC 2086C F, W, S
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: BSC 2085C or consent of instructor.
A continuation of BSC 2085C that covers the following
organ systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic,
respiratory, immune, digestive, urinary and
reproductive. Metabolism, fluid balance and
homoestatic mechanisms are included.
BUL 2241 F, W
BUSINESS LAW I (3).
3 hours per week.
This course considers the fundamental law that relates
to business transactions and focuses on the U.S. legal
system, torts, criminal law, contracts and sales under
the UCC.
BUL 2242 W
BUSINESS LAW II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: BUL 2241 and PLA 1003.
This course continues the study of fundamental law
that relates to business transactions and includes
subjects such as commercial paper, business
organizations, creditors’ rights, agency, government
regulation, and property.
CCJ 1020 F
INTRODUCTION TO
CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is intended to introduce the student to
the American criminal justice system and process. It
describes the formal components of the criminal
justice system, their history of evolvement, and their
operations. The focus throughout is on people: the
criminal offenders, the professional members, and
the role of the public. The course also deals with the
interaction of the members of this system with each
other, the problems that exist to circumvent full
cooperation between the sub-systems, and potential
solutions to these problems.
CCJ 1500 F
JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course deals with major areas of consideration,
including the juvenile delinquent in society, significant
problem areas in juvenile delinquency, the causal
context of crime and delinquency, plus treatment
and control of delinquency. It includes divergent
philosophies, treatment strategies, social ramifications
and trends. The course provides for practical exposure,
including visits from appropriately experienced
personnel and field trips to different juvenile agencies
in the area.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
CCJ 2010 W
CRIMINOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
A study of the causes and theories of crime and social
processes in the development of the criminal.
Consideration is given to the criminal act, the criminal
offender, the victim and the social context.
CCJ 2013 W
CRIMINAL VICTIMIZATION (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is about victims of crime. It provides an
introductory-level review of the many facets of criminal
victimization and the efforts that have been made in
recent years to ameliorate crime victims’ pain and
loss. It covers a wide range of topics including trends
and interpretations of victimization research; victimization laws, programs and services; the emotional and
social impact of crime; and the extent of participation
by victims in the criminal justice process. The course
is designed to blend theory together with practical
application as much as possible.
CCJ 2111 F
THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
LAW ENFORCEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed for those students who may
be considering a police career or who are already in
the police service as well as those students who are
not considering a career in law enforcement but are
still concerned consumers of those police services.
The course looks at the methods and issues,
personalities and problems, and attitudes and beliefs
of those persons who wear the badge. The course
also addresses the primary concerns of those in the
community who rely on the police for protection and
service. There is a service learning component built
into the course where the student can get a grasp of
the practical aspects of everyday policing. Special
emphasis is placed on unique aspects of police work
such as community policing, modern management
principles and civil liability factors. Other more critical
issues that are found all too often on the front pages of
our nation’s newspapers such as the police
subculture, excessive use of force and corruption are
also addressed. In essence, this course explores in
depth what the police service is doing to meet the
challenges that the crime phenomena and America’s
serious social problems pose for them in the 21st
century.
CCJ 2320 W
COMMUNITY-BASED CORRECTIONS (3)
3 hours per week.
This course places emphasis on community treatment
programs as alternatives to institutionalization.
Programs to be studied include halfway houses, work
release and study release, plus youth diversionary
programs such as JASP (Juvenile Alternative Service
Programs). Discussion will touch on probation and
parole. The course will examine community resources
in the correctional process, e.g., legal aid, welfare,
volunteers and guidance services.
CCJ 2940 F
PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS IN CORRECTIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is a practical applications class for the inservice correctional officer. It provides an opportunity
for the working criminal justice professional to synthesize
work experience with educational theory and practice.
A major project paper is required. This course should
be taken in the student’s last term and replaces the
co-op courses required for pre-service corrections majors.
CCJ 2941 F
PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS
IN LAW ENFORCEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is a practical applications class for the inservice law enforcement officer. It provides an
opportunity for the working criminal justice professional
to synthesize work experience with educational theory
and practice. A major project paper is required. This
course should be taken in the student’s last term and
replaces the co-op courses required for pre-service
law enforcement majors.
CEN 1305 (upon request only)
MS 2152
SUPPORTING MICROSOFT WINDOWS 2000
PROFESSIONAL AND SERVER (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CEN 1322.
Provides students with the knowledge and skills
necessary to install and configure Microsoft Windows
2000 Professional on stand-alone and client
computers for both workgroups and domains. Install
and configure Windows 2000 Server to create, file,
print, and terminal servers. Course includes scenario
labs, certification reviews, and one exam voucher.
CEN 1321 (upon request only)
MS 2153
SUPPORTING A MICROSOFT WINDOWS 2000
NETWORK INFRASTRUCTURE (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CEN 1305.
Provides for installing, configuring, managing and
supporting a network infrastructure using Microsoft
Windows 2000 Server products. Topics include service
of DHCP and DNS servers, network security protocols,
managing and troubleshooting routing and remote
Access configurations. Course includes scenario labs,
certification reviews and one exam voucher.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
189
CEN 1322 (upon request only)
MS 2151
MICROSOFT WINDOWS 2000 NETWORK AND
OPERATING SYSTEM ESSENTIALS (1.5).
1.5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CGS 1100.
Students are introduced to Microsoft Windows 2000
and networking technologies. Topics include user
accounts, security, networking architecture, protocols,
hardware and software components and IT tools used
to perform administrative tasks. Course includes scenario labs, certification reviews and one exam voucher.
CEN 1325 (upon request only)
MS 1561
DESIGNING A MICROSOFT WINDOWS 2000
DIRECTORY SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE (1.5)
1.5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CEN 2320.
Students are taught the knowledge and skills
necessary to design a Microsoft Windows 2000
directory services infrastructure in an enterprise
network. Topics include directory naming strategies,
delegation and security of administration rights,
situational analysis for multiple-domain active directory
structures, and active directory replication issues.
Course includes scenario labs, certification reviews
and one exam voucher.
CEN 2320 (upon request only)
MS 2154
IMPLEMENTING AND ADMINISTERING
MICROSOFT WINDOWS 2000
DIRECTORY SERVICES (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: CEN 1305 and CEN 1321.
Provides students with the knowledge and skills
necessary to install, configure and administer
Microsoft Windows 2000 Active Directory Services.
Primary focus is on implementing group policy and
understanding tasks required to centrally manage user
computers. Course includes scenario labs, certification
reviews and one exam voucher.
CEN 2327 (upon request only)
MS 1562
DESIGNING A MICROSOFT WINDOWS 2000
NETWORKING SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE (2).
2 hours per week.
Students will be taught how to develop a Microsoft
Windows 2000 networking services solution for
enterprise networks. Topics include networking services
that provide Internet Protocol (IP) infrastructures,
remote user support, dynamic routing protocols,
multicasting, demand-dial routing, and Internet access
management. Course includes scenario labs,
certification reviews and one exam voucher.
190
CEN 2500 F, W
DATA COMMUNICATION AND NETWORKING (4).
Prerequisites: CGS 1100 and CET 1172 or
CET 1171 and CET 1172.
4 hours per week.
An introduction to networks and data communication,
concentrating on connecting microcomputers in local
area networks. A variety of networking software and
topologies will be examined with emphasis on practical
solutions to common PC networking problems.
CET 1171 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to
enter a computer-related career by introducing them to
basic hardware and software concepts and
terminology inherent in today’s microcomputer
systems. Topics include hardware issues such as
motherboards, disk drives, CD-ROMs, memory and
modems, as well as software-related issues such as
operating systems. Students will have hands-on
practice working with multimedia devices and
software, and using compression software, Windows
98 and DOS file management tools, and the Internet
and e-mail.
CET 1172 F, W
A+ COMPUTER HARDWARE (4).
4 hours per week.
Corequisite: CGS 1100 or CET 1171.
An introduction to the structure and function of
microcomputer hardware. Emphasis is on the practical
applications of installing, troubleshooting, and doing
basic repair on a variety of personal computers and
their peripheral equipment.
CET 2173 F, W
A+ PERIPHERALS AND TROUBLESHOOTING (4).
4 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CET 1172.
An intermediate-level examination of microcomputer
hardware function and repair. The course will include
building a personal computer from components, then
upgrading a PC by adding RAM, mass storage
devices, modems and network interface cards. Finally
a section on troubleshooting will cover common
problems and their solutions.
CGS 1062 W
COMPUTERS IN SOCIETY–HONORS (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
An examination of the influence of computers on various
aspects of society with emphasis on the contemporary
impact of technology and future trends. Common
microcomputer applications will also be explored. ✒
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
CGS 1100 F, W, S, offered online
MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to familiarize students with
microcomputers, using some of the more popular
commercially available software packages, including an
introduction to an operating system and/or user interface.
Emphasis is on practical exercises using word processing,
spreadsheets, database packaged programs, presentation software, and Internet browsers.
CGS 1991 F, W
WEB PROGRAMMING I (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CET 1171.
Web Programming I presents how to create a Web page
using HTML incorporating forms, cascading style sheets
and tables, plus the basics of using JavaScript to create
interactive Web sites. In addition, HTML editors will be
used to develop a site, then using FTP to mount a site to
a Web server for viewing from the outside.
CGS 2103 F, W, S
ADVANCED COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: CGS 1100.
A course designed to give students problem-solving
training in microcomputer business applications.
Topics include advanced DOS and Windows
methodology, spreadsheet, and data base systems.
Accounting applications such as payroll, accounts
receivable, accounts payable, general ledger, and
inventory control will be emphasized.
CGS 2540 F, W
DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CGS 1100.
An examination of database planning, design,
analysis, implementation and maintenance for modern
microcomputer systems. The capabilities of popular
packaged programs will be evaluated, but the
emphasis of the course will be on the use of
databases to satisfy business information needs.
CGS 2557
INTERNET TECHNOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course focuses on using the developing
technologies and resources of the Internet and World
Wide Web, as well as the significant impact of the
medium on our society and culture. Students use and
discuss these tools and their implications. Activities
include developing advanced search strategies for
Internet researching, creating basic Web pages, and
using Internet technologies (such as FTP, e-mail and
chat). Topics of the course cover the history of the
Internet, current events and news related to the
Information Technology industry, the current paradigm
shifts of business, and using the Internet as a
collaborative communication medium.
CGS 2564 F, W
PC MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
This course prepares students to work with the major
PC operating systems. Students will study the
architecture, file systems and user interface of
Windows 98, Windows NT, Windows 2000 and DOS.
Students will have hands-on experience partitioning
and formatting hard drives, installing each of the
operating systems, and configuring the OS by
installing and troubleshooting device drivers. Students
will use connection tools to connect to a network and
the Internet for each of the operating systems studied.
CGS 2821
WEB PROGRAMMING II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CGS 1991.
This course will extend skills learned in Web
Programming I by a study of scripting languages that
add interactivity to a Web site. Students will create
dynamic Web pages that control Web server
information using Active Service Pages, as well as
using JavaScript and XML to control Web content.
CGS 2831 W
WEB SERVER TECHNOLOGIES (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: CET 1171 or CGS 2557 and CEN 2500.
This course focuses on technologies used for content
delivery on the Internet, World Wide Web and
Intranets. Students will learn to install, configure,
maintain and troubleshoot Microsoft’s Internet
Information Services (IIS). Topics include the TCP/IP
protocol, HTTP servers, FTP servers, business
applications of Web servers, and Internet security. This
course focuses on Comptia’s iNet+ Examination
Objectives.
CGS 2871 F, W, S
MULTIMEDIA APPLICATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CGS 1100.
An introduction to the hardware, software, development
and implementation of multimedia computer applications.
A variety of uses will be examined, with the emphasis
on business and educational applications.
CGS 2872 F, W
WEB GRAPHICS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CGS 2871.
Web Graphics covers creation and optimization of
graphics for use on the Web. Students will learn to use
Adobe Photoshop and Fireworks to create Web
graphics, as well as rollover buttons and animations.
Acquiring images using a digital camera, scanner or
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
191
from the Internet will be covered. Sound will be
covered also: acquiring sounds, sound file formats,
editing sounds and finally, adding sounds to a Web
page. Students will practice using Flash and
embedding Flash files in a Web page.
CGS 2930 W
SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTERS (A+) (1).
1 hour per week.
Prerequisites: CET 1172, CGS 2564 or permission
of instructor.
The primary purpose of this course is to prepare the
student for the A+ examination. The course contains
review components for both hardware and software
aspects of microcomputer systems, in addition to
mock testing for the actual exam.
CGS 2930 F, W
SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTERS (NET+) (1).
1 hour per week.
Prerequisites: CET 2173, CEN 2500.
The primary purpose of this course is to prepare the
student for the Net+ examination. The course contains
review of network essentials and mock testing of actual
exam.
CGS 2930 F, W
SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTERS (ROUTERS) (1).
1 hour per week.
Prerequisites: CET 2173, CEN 2500.
The primary purpose of this course is to prepare the
student to design and troubleshoot a multi-segment
TCP/IP network.
CHD 1339 W
LEARNING THROUGH PLAY (3).
3 hours per week.
The course is designed to increase the understanding
of the values of play. Types of play will be focused on
along with appropriate materials to provide for each type.
Students will observe children in various play situations.
CHD 1440C F
CHILD CARE PRACTICUM I (3).
3 hours per week.
Provides an opportunity for practical experiences in
techniques of early childhood education under
qualified supervision in a child care center, six hours
per week. Days and times to be arranged on an
individual basis.
CHD 1441 W
CHILD CARE PRACTICUM II (3).
3 hours per week.
Course provides a hands-on experience in working
with children. Students will plan and implement a variety
of acceptable early childhood activities. The student
will control and manage a group of children using
appropriate guidance and management techniques.
192
CHM 1020C (upon request only)
CHEMISTRY FOR NON-MAJORS (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 1033 with a grade
of “C” or better, or its equivalent, or two years of
high school algebra.
A course to familiarize the non-science student with
some of the attitudes and applications of science. The
course deals with the basic concepts and theories of
chemistry and the practical application of chemical
principles in medicine; agriculture; the food, cosmetics
and household industries; and environmental science.
Laboratory is included in this course.
CHM 1025C F, W, S
INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: MAT 1033 with a grade of “C” or
better, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Course includes study of measurements, historical
approach to chemistry, periodic table, gas laws,
thermodynamics, chemical stoichiometry, acids and
bases, oxidation, and reduction.
CHM 1033C F
CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH-RELATED FIELDS
WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: MAT1033 with a grade of “C” or
better, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
This is a basic, one-term course in chemistry for
students aiming for careers in the professional health
care fields. It introduces students to the basic concepts
and principles of inorganic, organic, and biological
chemistry and their application to health care situations.
CHM 2045C F, W
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I WITH
QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHM 1025C or equivalent and MAC
1105, or higher with a grade of “C” or better.
This course may include an expanded review of
CHM 1025C. The course covers atomic structure,
bonding, formulas, nomenclature, reactions,
stoichiometry, gas, solid and liquid states. Additional
topics may include the solubility product principle,
electrochemistry, and coordination compounds.
May require the two-semester sequence to
guarantee transfer.
CHM 2046C W, S
GENERAL CHEMISTRY II WITH
QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHM 2045C with a grade of “C”
or better, or equivalent.
This course may include a review of CHM 2045, and
provides additional material. Topics that are covered in
CHM 2045 will be expanded. Additional topics include
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
equilibria and qualitative analysis. May require the
two-semester sequence to guarantee transfer.
CHM 2210C F
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, and 1-hour
problem-solving session per week.
Prerequisite: CHM 1025C with a grade of “B” or
better or CHM 2045C or CHM 2046C with a grade
of “C” or better.
The first term of a two-term sequence in college
organic chemistry covering basic principles of
structure, classification, nomenclature, synthesis,
chemical behavior, and reaction mechanisms of the
compounds of carbon. A thorough study of topics that
cuts across disciplines such as medicine, veterinary
science, chemical engineering, biology, and
pharmacy. May require the two-semester sequence
to guarantee transfer.
CHM 2211C W
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, and 1-hour
problem-solving session per week.
Prerequisite: CHM 2210C with a grade of “C”
or better.
This course is a continuation of CHM 2210C. It
completes the long form organic sequence and
continues a thorough study of compounds, structures,
functions, reactions and syntheses, which are
important components of chemical life systems and
chemical engineering. Includes the study of
nomenclature, structure, physical and chemical
properties, and chemical behavior. May require the
two-semester sequence to guarantee transfer.
CJC 1000 W
INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
An introductory examination of the broad spectrum of
systems, processes and people that constitute the
field of corrections. The course explores where
corrections in America originated, where it is today,
where it seems to be going from here, and what
issues need to be resolved to get there. There is an
accent on the problems of corrections, and the
student is stimulated to explore potential answers to
those conflict areas. Whenever possible, practical
orientations to the field of corrections are presented,
on both an in-class and extra-class basis.
CJD 1700 F
CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL I (3).
Provides an introductory overview of the criminal justice
system and a history of law. The foundation and basic
components of law are studied, with specific focus
on officer application. Court procedures and testimony
are examined. Objectives are addressed as specified
by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training
Commission. Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 1701 F
CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL II (3).
Constitutional law and its application to the public and
officers is examined. Law—including evidence
procedures, arrest law, search and seizure, and
various statutory laws that are common to police and
correctional officers—is studied. Emphasis is given to
elements of various crimes. Various civil law applications
are covered. Civil and criminal liability of officers is
studied. Objectives are addressed as specified by the
Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 1702 W
CRIMINAL JUSTICE COMMUNICATIONS (3).
The report writing process from the interview,
statement-taking, and note-taking, through the final
report product is covered, with practical exercises
included. The differences between interviewing and
interrogation are explored. Interpersonal communication
skills are covered, along with radio and telephone
procedures. Objectives are addressed as specified by
the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 1703 F
CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERPERSONAL SKILLS I (3).
Community relations techniques and courtesy are
addressed, with emphasis given to crime prevention. The
needs of various groups within society are addressed,
including juveniles, the elderly, ethnic and cultural
groups, the mentally ill and retarded, the physically
handicapped, and substance abusers. Intervention
techniques for various situations, including suicide,
domestic violence and other crises, are studied with
practical exercises. Stress recognition and reduction are
included. Objectives are addressed as specified by the
Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 1706 F, W
CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL I Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0710.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory overview of the criminal justice system,
history and evolution of laws. Studies include ethical/
professional behavior, history of corrections, legal
terms and definitions, inmate rights and responsibilities,
classification of offenses, civil and criminal liability, use
of force, and courtroom demeanor and testimony.
Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
CJD 1707 F, W
CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL II Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0711.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory overview of search and seizure concepts
and arrest laws. Studies include Baker Act, assaults, sex
crimes, homicide, and protection of archaeological sites
and artifacts. Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
193
CJD 1708 F, W
CRIMINAL JUSTICE COMMUNICATIONS
Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0712.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory overview of the report writing process.
Studies include interpersonal skills, interviewing and
statement-taking procedures. Research paper(s)/
project(s) required.
CJD 1709 F, W
CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERPERSONAL SKILLS I
Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0713.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory overview of community relations and crime
prevention. Studies include major cultural and ethnic
differences, psychological concepts of motivation and
human needs, juveniles, substance abusers, and
domestic violence. Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 1726 F, W
LAW ENFORCEMENT LEGAL III Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0730.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory overview of criminal laws. Studies include
victim/witness assistance procedure, show-up/line-up
procedures and vehicle operations considerations.
Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 1727 F, W
LAW ENFORCEMENT PATROL Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0731.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory patrol techniques. Studies include types of
patrol, patrol hazards and officer survival considerations.
Research paper(s)/ project(s) required.
CJD 1728 F, W
LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAFFIC Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0732.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory traffic investigation course. Studies
include crash management, traffic crash investigation
techniques, and impaired driver detection methods.
Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 1729 F, W
LAW ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS
Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0734.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory law enforcement investigations course.
Studies include the evolution of criminal investigation
and milestones in criminalistics, and behavioral
analysis in criminal investigation. Research
paper(s)/project(s) required.
194
CJD 1746 F, W
INTERPERSONAL SKILLS II Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0750.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory Interpersonal Skills I course. Studies
include inmate supervision and discipline, communicating with inmates, and controlling behavior. Research
paper/project(s) required.
CJD 1748 F, W
CORRECTIONS OPERATIONS Bridge Course (1).
Prerequisite: CJD 0752.
A self-paced course designed to enhance the basic
introductory correctional operations course. Studies
include intake procedures, emergency plans and
procedures. Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 2254 S
FIRST RESPONDER: EMERGENCY
[EMS 1059-o] CARE TRAINING (3).
This course is designed to provide the student with
basic skills necessary to save a life and an understanding of the role and responsibilities of a first
responder. The course, as a criminal justice offering,
also includes CPR/BLS. Objectives are addressed as
specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 2704 W
CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEFENSIVE TACTICS (3).
Instruction includes the techniques used for an
officer’s personal safety and those necessary to
subdue, search, and then transport resisting
individuals. The use of restraining devices, impact
weapons and pressure points is covered. Objectives
are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice
Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 2705 S
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WEAPONS (2).
Instruction in the use of officer firearms, including
handguns and shotguns. Safety procedures and
ammunition use are covered in lecture format.
Instruction includes the use of chemical agents, with
practical exercises included. Objectives are addressed
as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 2720 W
LAW ENFORCEMENT LEGAL III (3).
Various criminal laws and their elements are
studied. Emphasis is placed on those laws
specific to police application. Traffic and driver
license laws are studied. Legal considerations of
officer vehicle operation are explored. Objectives
are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice
Standards and Training Commission. Research
paper(s)/project(s) required.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
CJD 2721 W
LAW ENFORCEMENT PATROL (2).
Addresses the daily skills and techniques that are
needed by officers to do patrol tactics and
respond to various types of calls. Methods of
approach to various high-risk situations are
explored, with practical exercises included.
Unusual occurrence events, including firefighting
and crowd control, are addressed. Objectives are
addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice
Standards and Training Commission. Research
paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 2722 S
LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAFFIC (3).
Studies traffic enforcement and control, with the
inclusion of DUI offenses and enforcement. Traffic
accident investigation, scene management and
reporting procedures are studied. Objectives are
addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice
Standards and Training Commission. Research
paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 2723 S
LAW ENFORCEMENT VEHICLE OPERATION (1).
The components of the police driving environment
are explored, and practical exercises on the driving
range are conducted. Objectives are addressed as
specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 2724 S
LAW ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS (3).
Addresses investigation of various crimes, including
property crimes, person crimes, narcotic offenses,
vice, organized crime, terrorist activity, bombing
incidents, and death investigations. Techniques
are developed from the initial observation methods
through processing of the crime scene and case
preparation. Florida’s computer network is studied
as an information source. Objectives are addressed
as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards
and Training Commission. Research paper(s)/
project(s) required.
CJD 2740 F
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
INTERPERSONAL SKILLS II (3).
The interpersonal skills needed by officers to understand
the incarcerated society are explored, with emphasis
on supervision methods. Inmate adjustment and the
various segments of the society are studied. Includes
study of homosexuality, female inmates, deception
and manipulation by inmates, and institutional
criminalities. Objectives are addressed as specified by
the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJD 2741 W
CORRECTIONS EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (1).
Skills needed for riot and disturbance control and
firefighting in a correctional facility are studied and
practiced. Lecture includes methods of riot prevention,
handling of unusual occurrences, what to do if taken
hostage, and emergency procedures. Objectives are
addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice
Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 2742 F
CORRECTIONAL OPERATIONS (3).
The operation of correctional facilities is studied,
including the intake of new inmates, all aspects of
their daily care, institutional procedures, and
techniques utilized by officers to perform daily
tasks. Objectives are addressed as specified by
the Criminal Justice Standards and Training
Commission. Research paper(s)/project(s) required.
CJE 2601 S
INTRODUCTION TO
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION (3).
3 hours per week.
A theoretical survey of the methods and techniques
used by contemporary law enforcement agencies in
crime investigation, and its role in society. The
course will include studies of such aspects as
discovery of evidence and its preservation and
marking, fingerprinting, identification, identification
of homicide, burglary, robbery and narcotics.
CJL 2130 F, W
CRIMINAL LAW, EVIDENCE AND
PROCEDURES (3).
3 hours per week.
This course introduces students to basic individual
rights under the U.S. Constitution and how these
rights conflict with maintaining public order and
enforcing criminal laws. The exclusionary rule,
privacy, probable cause, reasonableness and
rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth
Amendments are addressed. Additionally, emphasis
is placed on the law of arrest, search and seizure
and confessions. Students are also exposed to the
rules of evidence.
COP 1224 F, W
PROGRAMMING IN C++ (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: CGS 1100.
This course is designed to develop more advanced
problem-solving skills utilizing a computer and an
object-oriented programming system (OOPS)
language. Program logic design, coding, testing and
debugging are emphasized. Students are evaluated
on their ability to solve problems from a variety of
disciplines using the C++ programming language.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
195
COP 1332 F, W
PROGRAMMING VISUAL BASIC (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: CGS 1100.
This course is designed to develop problem-solving
skills utilizing a computer and the Visual Basic
programming language. Program logic design,
coding, testing and debugging are emphasized.
Hands-on programming is required. Students are
evaluated on their ability to solve problems from a
variety of disciplines using the Visual Basic
programming language.
COP 2250 W
JAVA PROGRAMMING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CGS 1100.
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to
the Java programming language. The course is designed
for students who plan a career in the computer industry,
as well as those students who want to design and
enhance personal Web pages. Java, the programming
language of the Internet, is platform independent and the
fastest growing language in the IT industry today. The
course assumes no prior programming knowledge.
COP 2701 W
DATABASE DRIVEN WEB SITES (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CGS 2831.
Corequisite: COP 1332.
Many Web sites today are being used to support
electronic commerce applications and other database
applications. This course will continue and expand
course theories and skills learned in Web
Programming II, by creating dynamic Web pages that
interact with databases. Information on the Access
database environment, creating SQL queries are
included, plus using Visual Basic to create Web based
database applications. Scripting including client-side
and server-side scripts will be included.
CRW 2000 F, W
CREATIVE WRITING I (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent.
Introduction to the study and practice of imaginative
writing in three genres: poetry, fiction and drama.
Students learn and practice writing techniques.
Students compile a portfolio to showcase their best
work from semester projects. ✒
CTS 2320 (upon request only)
MS 2010
DESIGNING A MICROSOFT WINDOWS 2000
MIGRATION STRATEGY (1).
1 hour per week.
Prepares students to select and design a strategy to
migrate from a directory services infrastructure in
Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 to Microsoft
Windows 2000 Active Directory services. Topics
196
covered include planning processes, productivity
during the transition, and domain restructuring
strategies. Course includes scenario labs, certification
reviews and one exam voucher.
DAA 1000 F
INTRODUCTION TO DANCE (2).
3 hours per week.
This course serves as an introduction to the history,
styles and techniques of dance as an art form.
Students will learn basic principles and techniques of
ballet, modern dance and jazz, as well as gain
exposure to other dance styles (tap, social dances, etc.)
that are often used in stylized form in choreography for
musical theatre. This course incorporates lectures and
handouts, videos and movement experience into the
beginning study of dance.
DAA 1100 W
MODERN DANCE TECHNIQUE AND
PERFORMANCE (2).
3 hours per week.
This course offers additional training in modern dance
techniques for students interested in performing with
the Patriot Dance Ensemble, who need further
technical background to be ready for ensemble work.
This course is also suitable for students who may want
to study dance technique without the time commitment
required for performing with the Dance Ensemble.
Course content includes modern dance technique and
preparation for performance through practice in
learning choreography, both individual and group.
DAA 1680 F, W
PATRIOT DANCE ENSEMBLE (2).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: DAA 1100 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to provide performing
opportunities for dancers with previous performing
experience and/or dance training. The ensemble is a
modern dance repertory company that performs at
CFCC and in the community. The main concert is in
the spring, and dancers are encouraged, but not
required, to be involved through both the fall and
winter academic terms. Additional rehearsal hours
may be required for featured dancers. The course is
repeatable for credit.
DEP 2001 F
DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY:
INFANT AND CHILDHOOD (3).
3 hours per week.
A study of the mental, emotional, physical and social
growth and development patterns of children from
birth to age 12. This course may be available online or
by television.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
DEP 2004 F, W, S
HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY 2012.
A detailed study of the physical and social development
throughout the human life cycle.
EAP 0280C F, W
ESL ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE—
COMBINED SKILLS (4).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
This integrated course, designed for non-native
students with varying levels of English proficiency,
covers the four skills of reading, writing, grammar and
speaking/listening, as well as improving pronunciation
and building vocabulary. Students will develop
established skills through classroom activities,
multicultural interaction and interactive language
software with voice-mapping technology, to better
prepare themselves for academic study. The course is
also intended for community members with high
school diplomas who wish to increase proficiency
through more rigorous study.
EAP 0300C F, W
ESL ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE—
SPEECH/LISTENING (4).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
This is a skill-based course for students with limited
proficiency in English. It focuses on speech and
listening skills as they pertain to second language
acquisition. Particular emphasis will be placed on the
improvement of students’ communication skills and
fluency. This course teaches pronunciation, intonation,
and word and sentence stress, as well as structures
for use in everyday communication. Students will
develop the ability to communicate in most social
situations, clarify or rephrase statements to facilitate
communication, and use language that is socially and
culturally appropriate. This course incorporates the
use of the interactive language laboratory for
instruction and reinforcement.
EAP 0340C F, W
ESL ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE—
WRITING (4).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
ESL Writing will focus on the structure and different
kinds of paragraphs. Students will develop the ability
to write basic structured academic paragraphs in
preparation for college prep and more advanced
courses. This course covers the basics of developing
ideas for paragraphs, writing topic sentences and
supporting and concluding sentences. Additionally,
students will learn about specific kinds of paragraphs
(i.e. descriptive, narrative...) and practice writing them.
Students will be expected to write almost daily and
will have ample opportunities to revise and re-write
their work.
EAP 0360C F, W
ESL ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE—
GRAMMAR/STRUCTURE (4).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
This is a skill-based course for students with limited
proficiency in English. It places emphasis on
grammar/structure as it pertains to second language
acquisition. This course is for students who need to
develop their understanding of grammatical and
sentence structure for academic study and
communication. Students will learn to demonstrate
control of structures through classroom interaction,
group work and lab study. Students will utilize the
interactive language lab for self-assessment and for
practice and retention of skill-specific exercises.
EAP 0420C F, W
ESL ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE—
READING (4).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
ESL Reading is a skill-based course specifically
designed for ESL and international students who score
41 and below on the reading section of the CPT test.
Students will develop the ability to read academic texts
on contemporary and literary topics with an emphasis
on extensive reading and the enhancement of critical
reading skills.
EAP 0460C
ESL GRAMMAR/STRUCTURE 2 (4).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
This is a skill-based course for students with limited
proficiency in English. It is a continuation of EAP 0360C,
and utilizes the second half of the textbook. It places
emphasis on grammar and structure as they pertain to
second language acquisition. This course targets
students who need to develop their understanding of
grammar and sentence structure for communication
and academic study. Students will learn to demonstrate
control of structure through classroom interaction,
group work, texts and lab study. Students will utilize
the interactive language lab for self-assessment and
for practice and retention of skill-specific exercises.
ECO 2013 F, W, S, offered online
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS—MACRO (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
This course, macroeconomics, pertains to national
income, employment, and fiscal policy, monetary
policy, economic stability, and current domestic and
international economic problems, and is a course in
economic principles involving the overall operation of
the market economy. Particular attention will be given
to the effects of aggregate demand and aggregate
supply on the levels of output, employment, and
prices. This course will also examine how the tools of
fiscal and monetary policy may be used in dealing with
macroeconomics problems such as unemployment,
inflation and economic fluctuation. ✒
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
197
ECO 2023 F, W, S, offered online
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS—MICRO (3).
3 hours per week.
This course emphasizes microeconomic concepts,
including the mechanics of supply and demand,
the economics of the firm, the allocation of
resources, returns to factors of production, and the
concept of a mixed economy and current microeconomic problems.
EDE 1501 F, W
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to help teachers, prospective
teachers, and teacher’s aides in establishing positive
classroom environments and programs. Students
will become familiar with a variety of classroom
management strategies. Areas of study include
designing the physical environment, establishing
norms for behavior, encouraging student motivation
and accountability, cooperative learning, principles
for dealing with inappropriate behavior, working with
student’s families and working with students with
special needs.
EDF 2005 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Corequisite or prerequisite: ENC 1101.
An introductory course designed for those considering
entering the educational field as professionals or
paraprofessionals and for others who have an interest
in child care management. Topics include the history
of education, principles of teaching and learning,
contemporary issues in education, comparative
education, and the problems and rewards of the
profession. This course is a prerequisite for students
majoring in education in the State University System. A
minimum of 15 hours of supervised volunteer field
experience in a school setting is required. This course
may be available online or by television. ✒
EDG 2701 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION:
TEACHING DIVERSE POPULATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to provide students with an
understanding of cultural diversity and its influence on
education today. Characteristics of specific cultural
groups will be discussed along with the applications of
various multicultural approaches and instructional
techniques and skills to use in the classroom. This
course is a prerequisite for students majoring in
education in the State University System. A minimum
of 15 hours of supervised volunteer field experience in
a culturally diverse setting is required.
198
EDP 2002 F
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
An introduction to theories of learning and the
literature dealing with education from pre-school to
college-level, including principles of development,
motivation, problem-solving measurement, memory,
intelligence and self-concept.
EEC 1000 F
INTRODUCTION TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND
EDUCATION (3).
3 hours per week.
Growth and development of the child from conception
through age 5, including the physical, social,
emotional and mental development of the young child.
EEC 1603 W
CHILD GUIDANCE (3).
3 hours per week.
This course provides child guidance and group
management techniques to foster the development of
self-esteem, self-control, and social skills in young
children. Positive reinforcement will be stressed.
EEC 1907 W
OBSERVING AND RECORDING BEHAVIOR (3).
3 hours per week.
Special focus on curriculum and the home/school
relationship.
EEC 1921 W
PRE-SCHOOL WORKSHOP (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to provide the student with an
opportunity to plan an integrated curriculum unit with
no less than 10 learning activities for young children.
The student will plan and organize a developmentally
appropriate environment for pre-school children.
This will give the opportunity to explore an area of
curriculum that is of interest to the student.
EEC 1931 F
CHILD CARE SEMINAR (2).
2 hours per week.
The Child Care Seminar is designed to prepare
students with knowledge, attitudes and skills in the
development, care and guidance of children. This course
focuses on the state 30-hour training requirement.
EEC 1940 F
EDUCATIONAL FIELD EXPERIENCE (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed for students to participate in
an internship program, working with young children in
an early childhood setting. Students will have the
opportunity to plan schedules and age-appropriate
activities in an approved early childhood program. The
student will fine tune early childhood skills and enhance
pre-school teaching abilities in a “real world” setting.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
EEC 2001 F
INTRODUCTION TO EARLY
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3).
3 hours per week.
An overview of early childhood education and services
for young children and their families. Includes historical
roots, societal changes, program differentiation and
future trends.
EEC 2200 F
CURRICULUM IN CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3).
3 hours per week.
Introduction to curricular content in early learning
centers. The student will create a resource file of ageappropriate activities. The student will also make
numerous materials to use with children.
EEC 2301 F
INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES (1).
1 hour per week.
This course is designed to give the student a one-onone instruction in appropriate practices with children.
The student will be evaluated, and helpful teaching
suggestions will be offered.
EEC 2401 S
HOME AND COMMUNITY (3).
3 hours per week.
The dynamics of the relationship of home, school and
community in early childhood education are shown to
be crucial to successful early childhood programs.
EET 1084 F
SURVEY OF ELECTRONICS (3)
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAT 0024C or CPT scores.
This course is ideal for those who wish to take one
course that will introduce them to basic DC and AC
electricity theory, basic transistor operation and basic
digital circuit theory. Mathematical analysis has been
minimized in this course. Emphasis is on hands-on
circuit building and observation. This is a required first
semester course for students in the Computer
Engineering Technology A.S. degree program and the
Computer Repair certificate of progression program,
and is recommended for students in Computer
Information Technology.
EEX 2010 S
SURVEY OF DISABLING CONDITIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
Persons working in early childhood programs will, at
some point, interact with young children who have
disabilities (ADA child care requirements). Knowledge
of various disabling conditions is necessary for early
childhood educators as mainstreaming is realized,
with a greater understanding of the definitions for,
characteristics of, and conditions associated with each
disability. Early childhood personnel will be better able
to instruct, interact with and provide care for children
with disabilities.
EGS 1110 F, W
ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (3).
3 hours per week.
Basic instruction in the care and use of drawing
instruments and equipment, geometrical construction,
lettering, freehand sketching, fundamental principles of
projection, selection of views and dimensioning. Work
includes auxiliary views, sectioning screw fastenings
and threaded parts, detail and assembly drawings,
and isometric drawings.
EME 2040 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL
TECHNOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to introduce students to the
uses of educational technology, including the Internet
and World Wide Web, multimedia presentation tools,
e-mail, distance learning and contemporary issues in
technology. This course is a prerequisite for students
majoring in education in the State University System.
EMS 1119 F, W
FUNDAMENTALS OF
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (6).
6 hours per week.
Prerequisite: EMS 0090 (non-credit) (CPR).
Corequisites: EMS 1119L, EMS 1431, EMS 1354C.
This course is designed to prepare the basic Emergency
Medical Technician in accordance with U.S. Department
of Transportation curriculum and state of Florida EMS
guidelines. Includes an introductory survey of emergency
medical services including medical, legal and ethical
aspects, role of the EMT, patient assessment, care of
wounds and fractures, airway maintenance, medical
and environmental emergencies, patient transportation,
emergency childbirth, and basic extrication. Successful
completion of corequisites provides eligibility for the
state of Florida EMT certification examination.
EMS 1119L F, W
FUNDAMENTALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGY SKILLS LABORATORY (2).
4 hours per week.
Corequisites: EMS 1119, EMS 1431, EMS 1354C.
Lab practice and testing of basic Emergency Medical
Technician skills included in the Department of
Transportation EMT curriculum and state of Florida
EMS guidelines. Skills include focused history, patient
assessment, triage, airway maintenance, bandaging,
splinting, emergency childbirth, and basic extrication.
Successful completion of corequisites leads to eligibility
to take the Florida state EMT certification examination.
Health and accident insurance recommended.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
199
EMS 1354C F, W
EMERGENCY FIELD OPERATIONS (1).
Corequisites: EMS 1119, EMS 1119L, EMS 1431.
This course has two components. The first provides
students with the required hazardous materials
response training for a Level I responder. The second
provides them with basic training in Weapons of Mass
Destruction response.
EMS 1431 F, W
E.M.T. HOSPITAL/FIELD EXPERIENCE (2).
Corequisites: EMS 1119, EMS 1119L, EMS 1354C,
LAE 0005–Emergency Vehicle Operator’s Course
(non-credit).
Practical application of EMT clinical knowledge and
skills under professional supervision. Provides for
directed experiences in local hospitals and health
facilities and field observation and experience in
emergency vehicles. Successful completion of
corequisites provides eligibility for Florida state EMT
certification examination. Health and accident
insurance recommended. Liability insurance required.
Valid driver license required.
EMS 2610 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO PARAMEDIC (2).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2611, EMS 2612, EMS 2613,
EMS 2630.
This introductory course to the Paramedic program
includes: EMS roles and responsibilities, the safety
and well-being of the paramedic, injury and illness
prevention, legal and ethical issues, therapeutic
communication and life span development.
EMS 2611 F, W
PARAMEDIC FUNDAMENTALS (2).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2610, EMS 2612, EMS 2613.
This course will provide the student with basic
essential knowledge needed to perform paramedic
duties. This course will include an introduction of
pathophysiology. Emphasis is placed on dosage
calculation and medication administration, IV
therapy and IV complications.
EMS 2611L F, W
PARAMEDIC FUNDAMENTALS SKILLS LAB (2).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2610, EMS 2611, EMS 2612.
In this course the student demonstrates in a lab
environment, the psychomotor skills necessary for
being paramedics. These include use of body
substance isolation equipment, medication
administration, IV therapy and troubleshooting,
history taking, physical assessment, documentation
skills, communication skills, and the recognition and
treatment of shock.
200
EMS 2612 F, W
PARAMEDIC AIRWAY MANAGEMENT
AND VENTILATION (1).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2612L.
This course will teach the student how to establish
an airway and maintain a patient’s airway,
oxygenate and ventilate a patient and the safety
factors involved. Also included: pulmonary
circulation and respiration process, identifying
respiratory distress, suctioning the airway, uses of
oral and nasal airways, insertion of NG tube, using
a B-V-M, use of ETT, and other advanced airway
support techniques.
EMS 2612L F, W
PARAMEDIC AIRWAY MANAGEMENT AND
VENTILATION SKILLS LAB (1).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2610, EMS 2611, EMS 2612.
In this lab students will learn to use oxygen
equipment, oral and nasal airways and intubate.
Safety precautions are stressed for adults and
children.
EMS 2613 F, W
PARAMEDIC PATIENT ASSESSMENT (1).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2611, EMS 2613L.
This course will prepare the student to appropriately
evaluate a patient and develop a treatment plan
based upon the evaluation. Topics include: history
taking, techniques of physical examination, patient
assessment, clinical decision making,
communication and documentation. Therapeutic
communication will be stressed as well.
EMS 2613L F, W
PARAMEDIC PATIENT ASSESSMENT LAB (1).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2610, EMS 2611, EMS 2612,
EMS 2613.
In the lab, this course will provide the student the
ability to practice doing patient assessment
across the life span. Topics include history taking,
techniques of physical examination, patient
assessment, clinical decision making for one
and a group of patients, communication and
documentation skills. Therapeutic communication
will also be practiced.
EMS 2614 W, S
TRAUMA EMERGENCIES (2).
Prerequisite: EMS 2644.
Corequisites: EMS 2614L, EMS 2615, EMS 2619.
This course is designed to give the student an indepth study in pathophysiology and management
of trauma for both adults and children. The focus is
assessment of the trauma patient, management of
hemorrhage and shock, head and facial, thoracic,
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
abdominal, spinal and CNS injuries, burns,
special airway problems and current trends in
trauma management.
EMS 2614L W, S
TRAUMA EMERGENCIES LAB (1).
Prerequisite: EMS 2644.
Corequisites: EMS 2614.
This course is designed to give the student the
opportunity to effectively manage the essential skills
and tasks such as assessment and management of
hemorrhage, shock, burns, soft tissue trauma,
head, facial, spinal, thoracic, abdominal and
musculoskeletal trauma.
EMS 2615 W, S
MEDICAL EMERGENCIES I (3).
Prerequisite: EMS 2644.
Corequisites: EMS 2614, EMS 2614L, EMS 2619,
EMS 2619L, EMS 2615L.
This course teaches emergency care of children
and adults with cardiac and pulmonary problems.
Pharmacologic agents for these conditions are
calculated. Recognition and treatment modalities for
dysrhythmias are covered. Adults and children with
special challenges in sensory and mobility
limitations are also a focus of this class.
EMS 2615L W, S
MEDICAL EMERGENCIES LAB I (2).
Prerequisite: EMS 2644.
Corequisites: EMS 2614, EMS 2615, EMS 2619.
In this lab, students will learn to use EKG,
intubation, and ventilation equipment on both
children and adults. Abnormal EKG readings and
appropriate interventions are covered. IV
administration for cardiac and pulmonary medications
are practiced. Cardiac and respiratory arrest drills
are held. Use of ventilators, cricothyrotomy and
chest decompression are practiced. Implementation
of special challenged persons’ needs during life
threatening situations is also practiced.
renal, toxicology, hematology, environmental and
infectious diseases. Geriatric adaptation is covered.
The pharmacological agents for these conditions
are also covered.
EMS 2619L F, W
MEDICAL EMERGENCIES LAB II (1).
Prerequisite: EMS 2644.
Corequisites: EMS 2614, EMS 2615, EMS 2619.
This course is designed to give the student handson practice in the lab setting for using equipment
and skills related to those topics presented in the
didactic portion of Medical Emergencies II.
Emphasis will be on Neurology, Endocrinology,
Allergies and Anaphylaxis, Gastroenterology, Renal,
Urology, Toxicology, Hematology, Environmental
Conditions, Infections and Communicable
Diseases, Pediatrics and Geriatrics, and Acute
Intervention for the Chronic Care Patient.
EMS 2628 F, W
PARAMEDIC OB/GYN NEONATAL
EMERGENCIES (1).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2610, EMS 2611, EMS 2612.
This course is designed to instruct students in
normal and abnormal obstetric deliveries, and to
deal with specifics of neonatal emergencies. Covers
assessment of the GYN patient, GYN emergencies,
complications of pregnancy, routine care of the
neonate, and care of the distressed infant.
EMS 2628L F, W
PARAMEDIC OB/GYN NEONATAL
EMERGENCIES LAB (1).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2628.
In this lab students will practice the skills necessary
to assess emergency GYN and OB conditions;
assist with an emergency delivery and reactivate a
distressed newborn.
EMS 2618 S
EMERGENCY OPERATIONS (1).
Prerequisite: EMS 2644, EMS 2645.
Corequisites: EMS 2659.
This course will give the students an overview of
how the EMS system is managed in specific areas
of EMS operations. The course will also include
Medical Incident Command, Hazardous Materials
Incidents, Rescue, and Crime Scene Awareness.
EMS 2630 W, S
BEHAVIORAL EMERGENCIES (1).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2610, EMS 2611, EMS 2612,
EMS 2613.
The student will learn to recognize and cope with
behavioral emergencies including emotional,
suicidal, chemical and drug related. Patient and
personal safety methods are taught. Legal
implications are discussed.
EMS 2619 F, W
MEDICAL EMERGENCIES II (3).
Prerequisite: EMS 2644.
Corequisites: EMS 2614, EMS 2615, EMS 2619L.
This course focuses on the emergency care of
adults and children with the following conditions:
neurological, endocrine, allergies, gastrointestinal,
EMS 2645 F, W
PARAMEDIC CLINICAL EXPERIENCE II (4).
Prerequisite: EMS 2656.
Corequisites: EMS 2614, EMS 2615, EMS 2619.
This course is the application of knowledge, skills
and values assimilated in Medical Emergencies I
and II and Trauma Emergencies. Using the
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COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
201
background in the previous semester, the student
will enhance assessment skills and treatment plans
to the patients in a less-controlled environment.
Clinical skills will include improving assessment
skills, airway management skills, and venous
access skills. In addition the student will begin to
develop field impressions and identify treatment
plans appropriate to findings from patient
assessment and history.
EMS 2656 F, W
PARAMEDIC CLINICAL II (4).
Prerequisite: EMT Certification.
Corequisites: EMS 2610, EMS 2611, EMS 2613.
This course is the application of knowledge, skills,
and values assimilated in patient assessment,
fundamentals, behavioral emergencies, and airway
management classes to actual patients in
structured environments. Clinical skills include
patient assessments and evaluation, vital signs
management, development of airway management
skills, communications skill, IV skill, assessment
and evaluations of patients with mental health
emergencies, assessment and evaluation of OB
emergencies, various other skills necessary for
patient care, and development of safety practices.
EMS 2658 F, S
PARAMEDIC CLINICAL EXPERIENCES III (5).
Prerequisite: EMS 2656, EMS 2645 and ACLS
(non-credit).
Corequisites: EMS 2618.
This final clinical course prepares the student to
become an entry-level paramedic. With supervision,
the student will learn to function semi-independently
as a team leader on a mobile intensive care unit.
The student will have a variety of opportunities to
hone their skills and techniques to manage prehospital patients.
ENC 0001C F, W, S
COLLEGE PREPARATORY ENGLISH I
COMPOSITION (4 compensatory credits).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
An English composition course designed for the
student scoring 59 or below on the CPT or the
equivalent on the SAT or ACT, who needs to develop
basic skills in word choice, parts of speech, sentence
structure, sentence conventions, grammar, and
paragraphing. No student may enroll in this course
more than three times without paying full cost of
instruction.
ENC 0010C F, W, S
COLLEGE PREPARATORY ENGLISH
COMPOSITION (4 compensatory credits).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
An English composition course designed for the
student scoring 60 to 82 on the CPT or the equivalent
on the SAT or ACT, who needs to develop basic skills
202
in word choice, parts of speech, sentence structure,
grammar and paragraphing.
No student may enroll in this course more than
three times without paying full cost of instruction.
English as a Second Language (ESL) students are
required to successfully complete prep reading and
English courses as the higher level of the ESL program.
ENC 1101 F, W, S (offered online F, W)
FRESHMAN COMPOSITION SKILLS I (3).
3 hours per week. G-6000.
The first course in college composition designed to
develop skills in writing multi-paragraph essays with
emphasis on exposition, including the selection,
restriction, organization and development of topics.
It offers the student opportunities to improve CLAST
English skills. Students examine selected writing
samples as models of form and sources of ideas for
their own writing. A research paper is also required. ✒
ENC 1102 F, W, S (offered online F, W)
Telecourse
FRESHMAN COMPOSITION SKILLS II (3).
3 hours per week. G-6000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent.
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts
used in reading literature and in writing about
literature. Specifically, the course explores the three
principal literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama—and
the terms that apply to an understanding of how to read
those genres. Also, it builds on the compositional skills
introduced in ENC 1101 by its requirements of a literary
research assignment and other writing assignments. ✒
ENC 2210 F, W
TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101.
Technical Communications familiarizes students with
the methodology of technical communications and the
most prevalent forms of technical writing. Students
learn a variety of presentational formats as well as
practical applications, such as how to write
instructions, mechanical descriptions, summaries,
definitions, proposals and long reports. This course is
helpful for majors in business and technical fields. ✒
ENL 2000 W
HONORS ENGLISH LITERATURE (3).
3 hours lecture/discussion per week. G-4000.
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 or equivalent and
admission to the Community of Scholars honors
program or permission of instructor.
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
This course is designed for students capable of
intensive study and discussion of a variety of
representative selections from English literature,
including works by Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton,
Johnson, Pope, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, Tennyson
and T.S. Eliot. Selective admission. ✒
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
ENL 2011 F
ENGLISH LITERATURE I
(Medieval–18th century) (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent. May be taken
for credit without ENL 2023.
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
This course is an introductory survey that stresses
both the thematic content and structural importance of
British literature from Beowulf through the 17th
century. Emphasis is on poetry and drama of major
authors including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Sidney,
Donne, Milton, Pope and Johnson. ✒
ENL 2022 W
ENGLISH LITERATURE II (19th-20th century) (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent. May be taken
for credit without ENL 2013.
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
This course is an introductory survey of British
literature. Emphasis is on thematic content and
structural importance of poetry, fiction and drama of
major authors of the period, including Wordsworth,
Byron, Blake, Keats, Tennyson, Arnold, Browning,
Joyce, Lawrence and Beckett. Please note that
English Literature I is not a prerequisite. ✒
ETD 2320C F, W
COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: EGS 1110 or permission of instructor.
Instruction in the use of microcomputers to generate
working drawings. Emphasis is on the fundamental
principles of design, function and operation of a CAD
system to create, display, analyze, modify and store
detailed engineering and mechanical graphics.
ETD 2350C F, W
ADVANCED COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND
DESIGN (Industrial Track) (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ETD 2320C.
Advanced applications course for detailers and
drafters using CAD systems. The emphasis is on
controlling the display of dimensions, creating blocks
with attributes and external references.
ETD 2355C W
THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: ETD 2320C.
Introduction to the three-dimensional modeling features
of AutoCAD and Mechanical Desktop. Emphasis is on
the creation of 3-D wire frames, surface models and
solid models.
ETD 2461 F
MECHANICAL SYSTEMS DRAFTING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ETD 2320C.
This is a survey course of specialized fields in drafting
such as piping, welding, electrical, structural, and
designing gearing and cams.
ETD 2701 W
INDUSTRIAL DRAFTING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ETD 2320C.
This course emphasizes industrial drafting conventions
and practices, including tolerancing, dimensioning,
surface control, threads and assemblies, and using
A.N.S.I. standards.
ETI 1110 F
INTRODUCTION TO QUALITY CONTROL (3).
3 hours per week.
This course provides a fundamental, yet comprehensive, state-of-the-art exploration of quality control and
continuous improvement—covering not only the
principles and practices, but also the tools and
techniques used in day-to-day quality operations.
Presents tools and techniques of Statistical Process
Control (SPC), benchmarking, Quality Function
Deployment (QFD), experimental design, Taguchi’s
quality engineering, activity-based costing, and quality
strategic planning. Presents sufficient theory to ensure
a solid understanding of basic concepts and reduces
mathematical techniques to simple mathematics or
develops them in the form of tables and charts.
ETI 1113C (upon request only)
QUALITY MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ETI 1110.
An advanced study of Total Quality Management
principles concentrating in the areas of team building,
ISO 9000 and worker empowerment.
ETI 1411 F
MANUFACTURING PROCESSES I (3).
3 hours per week.
A study of methods and materials used in industrial
production of non-chip-producing processes,
including casting, forging, welding, stamping,
shearing, brake, powder, metallurgy, electrical
discharge machining and high-energy rate forming.
ETI 1446 (upon request only)
INTRODUCTION TO PRODUCTION
MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
This course provides students with a wide variety of
training in the industrial area. Selected topics in this
course are aimed at improving the value to the
employer, as well as the proficiency of the employee.
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COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
203
Topics covered range from safety, inventory management,
purchasing, and preventive maintenance to quality.
ETI 1720C (upon request only)
INDUSTRIAL SAFETY (3).
3 hours per week.
Principles of safety in a typical industrial environment.
Emphasis is on OSHA and the analysis and design of
safety programs for industry.
ETI 1930 (upon request only)
SEMINAR SERIES–INDUSTRIAL (1).
1 hour per week.
This is a seminar based on specialized topics relating
to industry. Training provides in-depth instruction in
such areas as quality, management skills, industrial
processes and human resources. Each topic provides
15 contact hours and one credit hour.
FFP 1000
INTRODUCTION TO FIRE SCIENCE (3).
40 hours.
A study of the philosophy and history of fire protection;
the history of loss of life and property by fire; the
review of municipal fire defenses; a study of the
organization and function of federal, state, county, and
private fire protection agencies; and a survey of
professional fire protection career opportunities.
FFP 1302
FIRE APPARATUS OPERATION (3).
40 hours.
A study of fire service pumps that includes pump
theory, pump rating, pressure governing priming
devices, pressure and vacuum gauges. Also studies
the relationship between flow and pressure.
FFP 1505
FIRE PREVENTION PRACTICES (3).
40 hours.
A study of fire inspection practices including such items
as purpose; definition; Fire Prevention Bureau activities;
hazards; fire causes; types of construction, including
structural features, flame spread, occupancy and fire
load; inspection techniques; conducting inspections.
FFP 1510
CODES AND STANDARDS (3).
40 hours.
A study of construction classification, methodology
and the codes written to enforce the standards
of construction.
FFP 1540
PRIVATE FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS (3).
40 hours.
A study of private fire protection and detection systems
such as sprinkler and standpipe systems, chemical
extinguishing systems, detection systems and devices.
Each system is discussed as to its need, construction,
preventive maintenance and individual uses.
204
FFP 1793
FIRE AND LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR (3).
45 hours.
This course is designed to provide the public educator
with the knowledge and skills needed to successfully
perform as a fire and life safety educator as addressed
in National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1035.
For those who practice the multidiscipline profession
of fire and life safety educator (including uniformed fire
service personnel and other professionals), topics
include fire behavior, community assessment, injury
prevention and juvenile fire setting. The student will
also develop presentation skills and learn how to
formulate public education programs. This course
meets the national certification criteria for Fire and Life
Safety Education, Level I. NOTE: This course may
require pre/post course work. Student will be notified
prior to class.
FFP 2111
FIRE CHEMISTRY (3).
45 hours.
This course is designed to show the different features
and forms of matter and energy, common substances,
and how they relate to fires. The chemical formulae of
flammable and combustible substances, their
bondings and separations, as well as the different
chemical reactions related to fire and oxidation are
covered. Particular emphasis is placed on the specific
substances to ignite and accelerate burnings.
NOTE: This course may require pre/post course work.
Student will be notified prior to class.
FFP 2120
FIRE SERVICE: BUILDING CONSTRUCTION (3).
40 hours.
A study of building construction in relation to fire
protection. The general fire behavior of each type of
building construction, including the spread of fire and
the safety of the building, occupants and fire fighter.
FFP 2211
RESCUE PRACTICES (3).
40 hours.
A study of the proper methods of rescue from ground
level and heights, including proper use of newlydeveloped tools and rescue techniques in general.
FFP 2301
FIRE SERVICE HYDRAULICS (3).
40 hours.
A study of the mechanics of the flow of fluids through
fire hoses, nozzles, pumps, standpipes, water mains
and other devices. Includes the design, testing and
use of nozzles and appliances; pumps and water
distribution systems; measurement of fluid flow; and
methods of determining quantities of water available
from a distribution system.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
FFP 2401
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS I (3).
40 hours.
A study of the characteristics and reactions to the
storage, transportation, use and handling of hazardous
materials. This includes a study of definitions,
properties and identification of hazardous materials;
command and control of hazardous materials incidents;
and pre-planning for emergencies.
FFP 2402
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS II (3).
40 hours.
Prerequisite: FFP 2401.
Advanced study of hazardous materials with emphasis
on unstable chemicals, explosive substances and their
handling, exotic fuels (solid and liquid propellants),
pesticides, corrosive and radioactive substances.
Standard operating procedures for fire departments
will be discussed.
FFP 2521
BLUEPRINT READING AND
PLAN EXAMINATION (3).
40 hours.
Review of actual building plans and knowledge of the
correct use of codes, standards, and inspection
techniques. Learn use of these techniques to find
errors and omissions, make corrections according to
code, and learn where each item is located in the codes.
FFP 2541
PRIVATE FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS II (3).
45 hours.
This course is an in-depth discussion of pre-engineered
and portable systems, extinguishing agents, inspection
procedures for code compliance and enforcement,
and alarm systems. This course is part of the Fire
Inspector II State Certification and is presented as an
intermediate course. The student must take the key
Systems I course as a prerequisite. The NFPA Fire
Protection Handbook, 19th edition is the textbook of
choice. Fire Protection Handbook is the best all
around resource on all the topics being covered. The
Local Authority having jurisdiction, if required to make
a ruling, he/she needs to consult all publications.
NOTE: This course may require pre/post course work.
Student will be notified prior to class.
FFP 2604
ARSON INVESTIGATION (3).
40 hours.
Prerequisite: State Certificate of Compliance or Fire
Inspector Certification or registered police officer.
A study of the laws pertaining to arson and explosives
to include identification and knowledge of explosives
and incendiary devices. Emphasis is placed on
interviews, statements and reports, interrogation and
presenting the arson case in the courtroom.
FFP 2610
FIRE INVESTIGATIONS: CAUSE AND ORIGIN (3).
40 hours.
A study in the procedures of fire investigation to
include incendiary fires and fire causes.
FFP 2706
PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER (3).
45 hours.
This course prepares the student to serve effectively
as an organizational spokesperson, according to
current practices in the profession of public relations
and numerous examples from the fire service.
Particular emphasis will be placed on case studies in
crisis communications and the role of the Public
Information Officer’s role in the Incident Command
System. NOTE: This course may require pre/post
course work. Student will be notified prior to class.
FFP 2720
COMPANY OFFICER (3).
40 hours.
A review of fire department organization and
administration. Emphasis is on management theory,
communications, leadership, group dynamics
and motivation.
FFP 2740
FIRE SERVICE INSTRUCTOR METHODS (3).
40 hours.
Study of the instructor’s role and responsibility; how to
develop study habits; communication; human relations
and concepts of learning and teaching; job analysis;
identification of teaching objects and demonstration of
appropriate teaching methods, techniques, and
performance evaluations.
FFP 2741
FIRE SERVICE COURSE DESIGN (3).
45 hours.
This course covers the principles of effective
curriculum design. It stresses the principles of adult
learning and student-centered learning. Designing
courses and units that address learning, performance,
and behavioral objectives is the program goal. The
curriculum is intended to facilitate the development of
nationally applicable performance standards for
uniformed fire service personnel. It is the goal of the
Florida State Fire College and the Bureau of Fire
Standards and Training to provide a comprehensive
program that, when completed, the prospective
instructor will have the knowledge and skills to present
and/or to develop a training curriculum. NOTE: This
course may require pre/post course work. Student will
be notified prior to class.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
205
FFP 2770
ETHICAL AND LEGAL ISSUES FOR THE FIRE (3).
45 hours.
This course deals with the entire spectrum of issues
facing today’s fire service leaders. Topics include labor
relations, human rights and diversity, conflicts of
interest and frameworks for ethical decision-making.
NOTE: This course may require pre/post course work.
Student will be notified prior to class.
FFP 2780
FIRE DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATION (3).
40 hours.
A study of the basic concepts of leadership and
management as applied to a fire service organization.
Emphasis is given to the development of organizational
and communication skills for interdepartmental
operations. Areas of instruction include personnel
management, fire signal systems, fire insurance, fire
insurance regulations and mutual aid systems.
FFP 2810
FIRE FIGHTING TACTICS AND STRATEGY I (3).
40 hours.
A study in the effective utilization of manpower, equipment and apparatus. Pre-planning and fire ground
organization are emphasized through the simulated
problem-solving method.
FFP 2811
FIRE FIGHTING TACTICS AND STRATEGY II (3).
40 hours.
Prerequisite: FFP 2810.
Advanced study of fire attack. Includes study of
ladder company operations, company duties and
operations in a fire ground situation, engine company
operations, handling of a major fire, and special
problem fires. The development of critical thinking
skills is stressed.
FIL 2400 F, W, S
FILM: THE HISTORY AND AESTHETICS
OF CINEMA (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
An introduction to the critical study of motion pictures,
emphasizing the history and aesthetics of cinema.
Significant American and foreign films will be viewed
and discussed. This course may be available online or
by television. ✒
FIN 2100 F
PERSONAL FINANCE (3).
3 hours per week.
Provides comprehensive coverage of personal
planning in theories of money management, career
planning, taxes, consumer credit, other consumer
decisions, legal protection, insurance, investments,
retirement planning and estate planning.
206
FRE 1120 F
ELEMENTARY FRENCH I (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
This course stresses fundamentals of grammar and
drills in pronunciation and reading, with special
emphasis on oral expression in French.
FRE 1121 W
ELEMENTARY FRENCH II (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: FRE 1120 or equivalent.
This course is a continuation of FRE 1120. It continues
to stress fundamentals of grammar and drills in
pronunciation and reading, with special emphasis on
oral expression in French.
FSS 1115 F, W
BASIC FOOD PREPARATION (3).
3 hours per week.
This course teaches students to demonstrate skills in
grilling, frying, broiling, sautéing and salad
preparation; the making of stocks and soups; and the
production of the five basic sauces, as well as some
secondary sauces. They will learn to identify and
properly prepare meats, poultry, fish, seafood and
vegetables. Students will also learn to operate food
service equipment used in commercial kitchens in a
safe manner.
FSS 1120 F
FOOD PURCHASING (3).
3 hours per week.
Upon successful completion of this course, students
will be able to define purchasing techniques and
specification writing for items used in the industry. In
addition, students will be able to demonstrate
decision-making skills in the areas of quality, quantity,
specifications and general value analysis.
FSS 1202 F
FOOD PRODUCTION I (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: FSS 1115.
This course is designed as a transition from Basic
Food Preparation to more complex skills. Upon
successful completion of this course, students will be
able to demonstrate the skills necessary to prepare
standard menu items, as well as a range of American
regional cuisines. Course consists of lecture,
demonstration, and participation in food preparation.
FSS 1246 W
FOOD SPECIALTIES I (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: FSS 1115.
This course covers the fundamentals of convenience
baking and basic garde-manger skills. It provides
knowledge of the basic skills needed in a pastry
kitchen. Students will learn to handle convenience
products from the frozen or dried state and produce
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
finished pies, cakes and dessert items. The course
also studies the garde-manger kitchen; the making of
salads, cocktail hors d’oeuvres, and cocktail
sandwiches; and economic purchases of gourmet
food items. In addition, students will learn how to
make intermezzo ices, identify different cheeses,
design and carve ice blocks for display, and learn to
develop a general plan for a buffet.
FSS 2100 F
MENU PLANNING & ANALYSIS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: FSS 1115 and MTB 1103.
This course teaches students the components of
menu planning for every type of service and facility.
In addition, students will be able to demonstrate an
understanding of menu layout, selection and development, price structures and the theory of menu design.
FSS 2221 F
FOOD PRODUCTION II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: FSS 1202.
This course is designed to develop students’
advanced culinary skills. They will be able to prepare
international cuisine commonly served in today’s
operations, including Latin American, European, Asian,
Middle Eastern, and Far Eastern. Students will also
learn to execute various styles of table service.
FSS 2248 W
FOOD SPECIALTIES II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: FSS 1246.
This course explores advanced concepts of cold food
production, charcuterie and baking. Students will learn
the principles of the cold kitchen and traditional, as
well as innovative, methods of salad preparation.
Students will also be able to demonstrate an
understanding of bakeshop production as it relates to
the basic principles of ingredients, measurements,
mixing, proofing, baking and final presentation. They
will learn to identify the various types of baking
equipment used in the preparation of bakeshop
products, as well.
FSS 2251 W
BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MTB 1103.
Provides an understanding of beverage control and its
use in all types of operations. This course covers the
history of wines, beers and spirits, their use, and
proper storage procedures. Students will take part in
an in-depth study of beverages, internal control
systems and Florida alcoholic beverage control laws.
FSS 2500 F, W
FOOD AND BEVERAGE COST CONTROLS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MTB 1103.
Upon successful completion of this course, students
will be able to prepare operational statements for food
service operations, conduct inventories, and establish
control systems. Areas of concentration are food cost
controls, labor cost controls, and profit production.
While enrolled in this class, students must be
employed in the hospitality industry.
FSS 2940 W
ADVANCED HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
SEMINAR (3).
Prerequisite: HFT 1000.
3 hours per week.
This capstone course is designed to prepare students
to enter the hospitality industry. Upon successful
completion, they will be able to integrate the various
components of menu planning, purchasing, food
production, supervision, design and controls. In addition,
students will be able to demonstrate an understanding
of the external factors affecting the hotel-restaurant
industry and describe the skills necessary to secure a
position in management within the hospitality industry.
While enrolled in this course, students are required to
work in hospitality related positions.
GCO 1400C W
TURFGRASSES FOR GOLF AND
LANDSCAPING (3).
3 hours per week.
Identification, evaluation, establishment and maintenance
of turfgrasses used in golf and landscape practice.
GEA 2000 F, telecourse
WORLD GEOGRAPHY (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
A study of the relationships between population,
human activities and the physical world.
Representative countries are studied on a comparative
basis as to the influence of geography on humans. This
course may be available online or by television. ✒
GEB 1011 F, W, S, offered online
INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (3).
3 hours per week.
Orientation to the study of business administration.
Emphasis on the environment, structure and functions
of business; current and emerging problems.
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
GEB 2350 W
INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3).
3 hours per week.
This is an introductory course in international
business. The major topics covered are the theoretical
basis for trade, cultural differences that influence
business transactions, the impacts of trade regulations,
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
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exchange rates, investment in other countries, and the
movement of factors of production between countries.
GEB 2935 offered online
SURVEY OF ELECTRONIC BUSINESS (3).
Prerequisites: GEB 1011, CGS 1100.
This course introduces the student to a range of
issues facing the business person engaging in
electronic commerce. Topics include business
opportunities in cyberspace, a discussion of the tools
of electronic commerce, security issues, and legal and
multicultural considerations.
GLY 1102 F
DARWIN AND DINOSAURS (3).
3 hours per week.
This course was created in response to the public
fascination with dinosaurs. It is aimed at the nonscience major. Concepts covered include the nature of
fossils and the rock record, how geologic events are
dated, plate tectonics, paleoecology, evolution,
dinosaur hunters, and, of course, the various groups
of dinosaurs themselves. The class will also focus on
three recent areas of controversy relating to dinosaurs:
their “hot bloodedness,” the cause of their extinction,
and the evolution of birds from dinosaurs. This course
may be counted as either a biological OR physical
science credit.
GLY 2010C W
PHYSICAL GEOLOGY WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
This course is an introduction to the study of the
materials, structures, and features of the Earth and the
processes that produced them. Topics addressed
include origin and classification of rocks, volcanoes
and earthquakes, glaciation, mountain building, marine
geology, hydrology, weathering and erosion, plate
tectonics and geologic time. A lab accompanies this
course and includes rock and mineral identification and
the use of topographic and geologic maps and aerial
photographs in the study of Earth’s structural features.
GRA 2830 F, W
MULTIMEDIA GRAPHICS (3).
4 hours per week.
The course provides an introduction to multimedia as
applied to CAD and graphics professionals. Students
will be instructed in the hardware and software
requirements and certain authorizing software. The
course will also include extensive use of PowerPoint
for developing multimedia presentations.
HFT 1000 F
INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY
AND TOURISM (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is an overview of the hospitality and tourism
industry, which is comprised of lodging, food and
beverage, transportation, retail outlets, special events
208
and attractions. The management of hotels, motels,
restaurants, kitchens, travel agencies, theme parks,
casinos and country clubs is introduced. This
orientation course presents the history, organization,
opportunities and challenges in the many careers that
make up the dynamic world of hospitality and tourism
management. Examples of selected topics include
pioneers and leaders in hotel, restaurant, culinary and
tourism management; independent and chain hotels;
restaurant franchising and management contracts;
cultural diversity; ethics; and quality service management.
HFT 1212 F
SAFETY AND SANITATION MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
Students will explore the scientific rationale for
sanitation and safety practices that are enforced for
group protection in institutions and food service facilities.
Students will identify causative agents of food-borne
illnesses and demonstrate preventive techniques
by adhering to sanitation standards. The course
emphasizes methods of accidents and fire prevention.
HFT 1250
HOTEL/MOTEL OPERATION (3).
3 hours per week.
This course acquaints students with the operations of
a hotel or motel, including front office procedures in
registering, accounting for and checking out guests;
promotional and sales practices; housekeeping;
interior decoration; purchase of furniture, carpeting,
linens and supplies; maintenance and engineering of a
practical nature; facilities specifications; and storage.
HFT 1410 W
FRONT OFFICE MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
This course guides students through all the necessary
skills including directing the activities and solving the
complex problems needed to properly manage the
front office of a hotel/motel. The course also acquaints
students with the operations of all the departments as
they apply to their primary responsibility of selling
rooms and serving guests.
HFT 1434 F
CLUB OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: HFT 1000.
This course introduces the student to the specialized
field of club management. It presents club organization,
characteristics of club members and committees,
marketing of the club, food and beverage operations,
managing the clubhouse and recreational activities.
This course presents the history, the opportunities and
the future of the club management.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
HFT 1500
HOSPITALITY SALES, MARKETING
AND ADVERTISING (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to provide students with basic
knowledge and practical experience that will enable
them to understand the marketing and sales area at
hotel/motel properties.
HFT 1541 W
CUSTOMER SERVICE (3).
3 hours per week.
Corequisite: HFT 1000.
The course develops an understanding of the importance
of asking customers what they want and then managing
the organization so as to fulfill these expectations. This
course also teaches how to manage an organization in a
way that focuses on the customer with a comprehensive
study and appreciation of gracious customer service.
HFT 2750 F
MANAGING CONVENTIONS AND
GROUP BUSINESS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: HFT 1000.
This course defines the group business market. It
describes marketing and sales strategies to
attract markets with specific needs and explains
techniques to meet those needs as part of meeting
and convention service.
HIM 1430
CONCEPTS OF DISEASE (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: HSC 2531.
This course gives an overview of common diseases
and illnesses. It focuses on the anatomy and
physiology, common signs and symptoms, diagnostic
tests, treatment and pharmacology associated with
each condition. Information gained in this course will
enable students to abstract, analyze and code
information from the medical record.
HIM 1800 F
INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT I (3).
3 hours per week.
Corequisite: CGS 1100.
This course is designed to introduce students to the
principles of health information management. It
provides an overview of the evolution of health care
delivery systems, health-related associations,
organizations and agencies in the United States, as
well as the history of the health information
management profession. The development, content,
and management of the hospital medical record will
be discussed. Students will be introduced to forms
design; filing methods, storage, and retention; coding
and classification systems; indexes; health information
in reimbursement; health care information; and the
impact of technology on health information processes.
HIM 1949
PRACTICUM I–ACUTE CARE SETTINGS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: HIM 1800 and HIM 2012.
This course provides students with supervised,
practical experience in an acute care facility health
information department. Emphasis is placed on
providing opportunities for students to relate
classroom theory to the actual functions of a health
information department, such as record assembly and
analysis; medicolegal procedures; information
retention, filing and retrieval; and the use of technology.
Students will become familiar with policies and
procedures and understand the relationships other
hospital departments have with the health information
department. This course also enables students to
further develop critical thinking and problem-solving
skills in realistic situations.
HIM 2012 F
LEGAL ASPECTS OF MEDICAL RECORDS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: HIM 1800 and CGS 1100.
This course is designed to assist students with an
understanding of the legal principles that govern the
health information field. It emphasizes the legal
theories underlying lawsuits involving the health care
field, medical record content, access to patient
records, confidentiality and informed consent, and
disclosure of records in legal actions.
HIM 2201 W
COMPARATIVE HEALTH RECORDS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: HIM 1800.
This course presents an overview of the management
of health information in sites other than acute care
settings, including ambulatory care and specialized
treatment facilities. Emphasis is on regulatory issues,
documentation, reimbursement and funding
modalities, information management, quality
improvement, risk management issues, and the roles
of health information personnel in each setting.
HIM 2211 W
HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: HIM 1800.
Corequisites: CGS 1100 and HIM 2201.
The purpose of this course is to provide students with
knowledge and understanding of the various
computer health information systems that are
encountered in health information departments. Topics
for discussion include clinical data repositories
(including the various registries), community health
information networks, telemedicine, transcription, the
computerized patient record, voice recognition
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
209
technology and optical disc scanning. Use of data sets
and databases, data collection methods, and the
importance of data quality will be discussed.
Systems will be reviewed. The student will have
hands-on practice using encoder software (AHIMA
Competencies).
HIM 2214 F
HEALTH CARE STATISTICS.
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: HIM 1800, MTB 1103 and CGS 1100.
The purpose of this course is to provide students with
knowledge and understanding of the statistical
information used in health care settings. Emphasis is
placed on the terminology, definitions and formulas
used to calculate common statistics, including
standard rates, percentages, and averages using
patient data. Data collection, analysis, and
presentation will also be studied.
HIM 2442
PHARMACOLOGY FOR HIM PROFESSIONALS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: BSC 1080 and HSC 2531.
Corequisite: HIM 1430.
The purpose of this course is to provide students with
introductory knowledge and understanding of
pharmacology. It will present a basic rationale for
understanding current drug therapy.
HIM 2232 F
ICD-9-CM CODING (3).
3 hours per week.
Corequisite: HIM 1430, HSC 2531, BSC 1080 and
CGS 1100.
This course provides instruction in the basic principles
and guidelines for using the International Classification
of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD9-CM) in the coding of diagnoses and procedures.
HIM 2253 W
CPT CODING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: HIM 2232 and CGS 1100.
This course is an introduction to the coding principles,
characteristics and conventions of coding using the
Physicians’ Current Procedure Terminology (CPT)
coding nomenclature. A working knowledge of
medical terminology is required for this course.
HIM 2260
MEDICAL BILLING AND REIMBURSEMENT (3).
Corequisite: HIM 2253.
This course serves as an introduction to health
insurance claims processing, carrier requirements,
and applicable state and federal regulations. It
acquaints students with the billing procedures used in
physician offices, hospital and ambulatory surgery
services. Emphasis is on electronic billing, managed
care systems, worker’s compensation, Medicare,
Medicaid, third-party payers, ethics and confidentiality.
The students will have the opportunity to apply their
knowledge in a laboratory setting utilizing billing
software. (AHIMA Competencies: I.1, I.3, V.A.3, V.A.4).
HIM 2283
ADVANCED CODING–D (3).
Prerequisites: HIM 2232, HIM 2253.
The student will learn to assign CPT and ICD-9-CM
codes to complex medical and surgical diagnoses and
procedures in the inpatient and outpatient settings.
Current concepts and changes related to coding
practice and reimbursement by Prospective Payment
210
HIM 2510
HIM MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES (3).
Prerequisites: HIM 1800, HIM 2201.
Corequisite: MAN 2021.
This course is designed to introduce the student to
supervision and management of the resources found
in HIM settings, including staff, budget and equipment.
Additionally, quality management, utilization review
and risk management will be studied in depth. The
basic management functions of planning, organizing,
leading and controlling will be discussed as applied to
HIM (AHIMA Competencies: V.1; V.2; V,3; V.4; V.5; V.6;
V.8; V.9; V.10; V.11; V.12; V.13).
HIM 2949
PRACTICUM II–ALTERNATE CARE SETTINGS (4).
Prerequisites: HIM 1949, HIM 1800, HIM 2201 and
HIM 2012.
This course provides students with supervised,
practical experience in several of the health
information departments at alternate care settings.
Emphasis is placed on providing opportunities for
students to relate classroom theory to the actual
functions in settings other than acute care. Emphasis
is on the unique regulatory requirements and recordkeeping practices of these facilities. The types of
facilities in which students may gain this experience
include public health departments, nursing facilities,
large physician practices, hospice agencies, surgery
centers, rehabilitation centers, prisons, and mental
health centers. This course also enables students to
further develop critical thinking and problem solving
skills in realistic situations.
HIS 2935 S
SEMINAR IN HISTORY (3).
This course is designed to increase the student’s
understanding of the history and culture of countries
visited in conjunction with HIS 2955, Studies Abroad in
Civilization. May be repeated for credit.
HIS 2955 W, S
STUDIES ABROAD IN CIVILIZATION (3). G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
An introduction to the political, intellectual and cultural
history of foreign nations designed to provide a crosscultural contact with people of other countries. Study
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
and travel abroad are supplemented with readings
and classroom lectures in Florida. May be repeated
for credit. ✒
HLP 1081 F, W, S, offered online
PERSONAL WELLNESS APPRAISAL AND
IMPROVEMENT (3).
Designed to help students understand their current
health status and provide them with the knowledge of
a functional program for wellness.
HSC 2100 (upon request only)
PERSONAL HEALTH (HYGIENE) (3).
Meaning and the significance of physical, mental and
social health as related to the individual and to society.
Individual health problems are discussed.
HSC 2140 F, W, S-A
DRUGS IN SOCIETY (3).
The course emphasizes the social, moral, psychological and physiological causes and effects of drug
use and abuse in society.
HSC 2400 F, W, S
FIRST AID (3).
3 hours per week.
Training in the immediate care given a victim of an
accident or sudden illness. Emphasis is placed on
skills and knowledge essential to the prevention of
accidents. Certification in first aid and cardiopulmonary
resuscitation (CPR) is issued upon satisfactory
completion of the course.
HSC 2531 F, W
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to help develop comprehensive,
integrative skills in using and understanding medical
terminology. Included in the course work are prefixes,
suffixes, roots and combining forms. Emphasis is on
pronunciation, spelling, and definition of words as
they relate to basic anatomy and physiology. Terms
for diagnostic procedures, pathology and treatment
procedures in each body system, as well as the
pharmacological terms are included. Common medical
abbreviations are covered.
HUM 1021 F, W, S, offered online
INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES (3).
3 hours per week.
An exploration of the arts, ideas and values in Western
culture. This course may be available online or by
television. ✒
HUM 1021H W (upon request only)
HONORS INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES (3).
3 hours per week.
Admission to the Community of Scholars program,
Students with 3.3 or higher GPA, or permission of
instructor.
This is a beginning course in humanities, designed
primarily for students admitted to the CFCC
Community of Scholars honors program. Honors
classes that do not have the requisite number of
honors students may admit other students on a
conditional basis, at the discretion of the instructor. In
a small, seminar-style setting, emphasis will be placed
on an in-depth analysis of the artistic expression,
philosophical and religious concepts, and cultural and
ethical values of our Western tradition, from preClassical to the present. ✒
HUM 1210 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES:
TO THE RENAISSANCE (3).
3 hours per week.
A chronological exploration of the arts, literature and
ideas in ancient and medieval Western culture. An
emphasis will be given to the role of the humanities in
expressing the dominant traits and ideas of cultural
periods from prehistoric times to the Renaissance. ✒
HUM 1230 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES:
SINCE THE RENAISSANCE (3).
3 hours per week.
A chronological exploration of the arts, literature and
ideas in modern Western culture. An emphasis will be
given to the role of the humanities in expressing the
dominant traits and ideas of cultural periods from the
Renaissance to the present. ✒
HUM 2310 F
MYTHOLOGY IN RELIGION, ART,
LITERATURE AND MUSIC (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
An introduction to Eastern and Western mythologies
and their influence on art, literature, philosophy,
religion and music. ✒
HUM 2310H F
HONORS MYTHOLOGICAL SYMBOLISM
IN ART, PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101 and admission
to the Community of Scholars program, students
with a 3.3 or higher GPA, or permission of instructor.
An intensive study, specifically for honors students,
in the identification, underlying meaning and dynamic
relation of mythological symbols in art, philosophy
and religion. ✒
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
211
HUM 2418 F
ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
A study of the arts, ideas, values and cultural
institutions of the Islamic world from the birth of
Muhammed to the present. This course is designed to
increase awareness and understanding of an
important culture outside of the Western tradition. ✒
HUM 2450 F, W
AMERICAN HUMANITIES (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
An introductory course in the arts, literature and
ideas of American culture. The emphasis is on the role
of the humanities in the historical context of the
American experience. ✒
HUM 2520 W
MUSIC IN THE HUMANITIES (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
A study of western music in relation to other
disciplines in western culture, including philosophy,
religion, mathematics and the arts.
HUM 2532 F, W
WESTERN IDEOLOGIES (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
Study of the leading ideas and doctrines that have
shaped modern Western culture from the Middle Ages
to the present. ✒
HUM 2532H W
HONORS WESTERN IDEOLOGIES (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101 and admission
to the Community of Scholars program, students
with 3.3 or higher GPA, or permission of instructor.
Designed for honors students, this course involves an
in-depth study, analysis and discussion of the major
writings from the Medieval period to the present that
have shaped the thinking and expression of our
Western culture. ✒
HUM 2930 F, S
SPANISH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
This course presents an overall view of Spanish culture
and civilization. Emphasis will be given to the Golden
Age Period. This course will be taught in English. ✒
HUN 1201 F, W, S, offered online
HUMAN NUTRITION (3).
3 hours per week.
Students will study the basic principles of nutrition and
develop skills in applying the recommended dietary
allowances to all age groups. The course emphasizes
food nutrients, impact of diet on disease and healthy
212
lifestyle across the life cycle. Cultural and economic
factors related to food and consumer information
regarding food safety are also major topics. Students
will complete personal diet analyses.
IDS 1307 W
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: MATH, SCIENCE,
AND THE ARTS (3).
3 hours per week.
This interdisciplinary course is an exploration of the
mathematical and scientific applications within the
visual and performing arts. Sample topics include
wave properties as applied to music, sound and
holography; symmetry; fractals; and chaos.
INR 2002 F, W
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to introduce the student to
some of the major developments in world politics,
with special reference to the place of the U.S. in the
world community.
ISS 1010 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (3).
3 hours per week.
An introduction to the social sciences and to the major
issues facing America today. Topics include population,
minorities, cities, crime, poverty, health, the environment, values and international relations. This course
may be available online or by television. ✒
ISS 2936 F, W
HONORS COLLOQUIUM IN
CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES (1).
1 hour per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: Admission to the
Community of Scholars Program, students with a
3.3 or higher GPA, or permission of Instructor.
An examination of contemporary social issues making
use of a variety of experiences that include guest
speakers and visiting experts.
JOU 2100 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM
AND NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION (3).
2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory per week.
May be taken concurrently with MMC 1000 or
MMC 1100. A course designed to provide fundamental
instruction and practice in mass communication writing
and production. This class produces the college
newspaper, the Patriot Press. May be repeated for
credit. Labs require some additional time.
Scholarships and tuition rebates are available,
retroactively, to students who demonstrate outstanding
ability and participation.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
JOU 2901, 2902, 2903
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN JOURNALISM (1, 2, or 3).
This course is a companion course for journalism
majors repeating JOU 2100 as editors and section
editors of the Patriot Press. This independent
study course requires study time in addition to
JOU 2100 and allows students to intensify and
broaden study in a particular field or aspect of
journalism. Scholarships and tuition rebates are
available, retroactively, for those who demonstrate
outstanding ability and participation.
LAH 2020 F
INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN
CIVILIZATION (3).
3 hours per week.
A survey of Latin American history and culture from
pre-Columbian times to the present, including
developments in philosophy and the arts, as well as
political and economic trends. Topics include preColumbian art, literature, and thought; the role of the
church; the status of women; race relations; and Latin
American relations with the United States.
LIS 2004 offered online
INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET RESEARCH (1).
1 hour per week.
This online course covers internet search engines and
research strategies including evaluating and citing
internet resources as well as internet communication,
history and protocols.
LIT 2090 W, S
INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY
LITERATURE (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
This introductory course is comprised of readings of
selected literature by contemporary authors that
provide a basis for classroom discussion and written
assignments. This course has a minimum writing
requirement of 3,000 words. Successful completion of
this course with a grade of “C” or above partially
satisfies the requirements of SBE Rule 6A-10.30. ✒
LIT 2110 F
WORLD LITERATURE I (8th century B.C.–
17th century A.D.) (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent. May be taken
for credit without LIT 2120.
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
This course develops understanding of the historical
traditions of world literature from the ancient world
through the Renaissance. Emphasis is on development
of Western literacy attitudes through works, usually in
translation, from the Old Testament and through such
authors as Homer, Aeschylus, Euripides, Aristophanes,
Virgil, Dante, Boccaccio, Chaucer, Rabelais, Cervantes,
Donne and Milton. ✒
LIT 2120 W
WORLD LITERATURE II (17th–21st century) (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent. May be taken
for credit without ENC 2110.
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
A course designed to develop understanding of the
historical traditions of world literature from the
Enlightenment to the present. Emphasis is on the
development of Western literacy attitudes and ideas
through works in translation, by such authors as
Moliere, Swift, Wordsworth, Dostoevesky, Ibsen,
Flaubert, Pirandello, Yeats, Camus, Eliot and
O’Connor. ✒
LIT 2330 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO CHILDREN’S LITERATURE (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent.
Corequisite: ENC 1102.
This course presents a survey of the field of children’s
literature, with analysis of the various genres from a
variety of cultures and traditions, and with attention
to the development of skills used in teaching literature
to children. ✒
MAC 1105 F, W, S
COLLEGE ALGEBRA (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAT 1033 with a grade of “C” or
better OR two years of high school algebra with a
grade of “C” or better.
This course is designed as a foundational course for
those students who must take additional mathematics
in their chosen majors and do not yet have an
appropriate background. The emphasis is the study of
mathematics from a functional perspective, including
linear, quadratic, rational, absolute value, radical,
exponential and logarithmic functions. Systems of
equations and inequalities and applications such as
curve fitting, mathematical modeling, optimization, and
exponential growth and decay are included.
MAC 1114 F, W, S
TRIGONOMETRY (3)
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of “C” or better.
This course is designed to assist students in
developing the trigonometric background for the
calculus curriculum and/or other areas that require
a trigonometry course. Graphing calculator and/or
computer algebraic system work is required in
this course.
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COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
213
MAC 1140 F, W, S
PRE-CALCULUS (Algebra) (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of “C” or better.
This course is designed for students who need to
develop the appropriate background for the calculus
curriculum. This course includes discussion of
functions (from an analytical, numerical and graphical
perspective) that are needed in upper mathematics
courses. The course also includes conic sections,
matrices and determinants, sequences and series,
mathematical induction and the Binomial Theorem.
Graphing calculator and/or computer algebraic system
work is required in this course.
MAC 1147 F, W
PRECALCULUS ALGEBRA/TRIGONOMETRY (5).
5 hours per week.
Prerequisites: High school trigonometry or MAC
1105 with a grade of “C” or better.
This course is a combination of MAC 1140 and MAC
1114. Graphing calculators and/or computer algebra
systems will be used and required in this course.
MAC 2233 F, W, S
CALCULUS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL
SCIENCE (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAC 1140 with a grade of “C” or better.
An introduction to calculus with applications to
business and the social sciences. The course includes
the study of functions, limits, continuity, differentiation
and integration of algebraic, logarithmic and
exponential functions, rates of change and curve
sketching. Emphasis is on modeling and practical
applications in solving business, economic and social
science problems. Graphing calculator and/or
algebraic system work is required in this course.
MAC 2311 F, W, S
CALCULUS I WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY (5).
5 hours per week.
Prerequisites: MAC 1140 and MAC 1114, MAC 1142
or MAC 1147 with a grade of “C” or better.
Single variable calculus covering analytic geometry of
the conics, differentiation and integration of the algebraic,
logarithmic, trigonometric and exponential functions.
MAC 2312 F, W
CALCULUS II WITH ANALYTIC
GEOMETRY (5).
5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAC 2311.
Single variable calculus covering differentiation of
trigonometric functions, anti-derivative techniques,
numerical integration, indeterminate forms, Taylor’s
Theorem and infinite series.
214
MAC 2313 F, W
CALCULUS III WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY (4).
4 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAC 2312 or equivalent.
Multivariable calculus covering vectors and solid
analytic geometry, partial differentiation, multiple
integrals, line and surface integrals.
MAE 2801
MATHEMATICS FOR EDUCATORS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of “C” or
better, or equivalent.
This course is designed to provide a study in
mathematical ideas suitable for education majors and
those needing course work for teacher re-certification.
The topics covered will include number sense,
concepts and operations, measurement, geometry
and spatial sense, algebraic thinking, data analysis
and probability. The topics are in alignment with the
NCTM standards, the Sunshine State Standards,
Marion, Citrus and Levy Counties math curriculum,
and the FCAT.
MAN 2021 F, W, S
PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
A study of the principles of management including
planning, organizing, directing and controlling, with
emphasis on the analytical framework for solving
organizational problems.
MAN 2300 F, W
HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
The purpose of this course is to explore the theories
and practices relating to the management of human
resources. The role of the human resources department
will be emphasized with particular attention being
focused upon the importance of department
supervisors and executives with respect to human
resources management.
MAP 2302 W, S
ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTIAL
EQUATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAC 2312.
A first course in ordinary differential equations with
applications. This course covers homogeneous and
non-homogeneous equations, linear equations with
constant coefficients, power series method, Laplace
transform, systems of first order differential equations
and numerical solutions.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
MAR 2011 F, W
PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (3).
3 hours per week.
A study of the functions, institutions and methods of
marketing goods and services. Relates marketing to
the total economic structure and emphasizes the
importance of the consumer.
MAT 0012C
INTEGRATED ARITHMETIC AND ALGEBRA
(4 college preparatory credits).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
A mathematics skills course designed to strengthen
arithmetic, geometry and beginning algebra skills.
Students who show weakness in basic arithmetic skills
will be expected to use available resources and
remediate those skills on their own while learning the
more advanced material in the course. Successful
completion of this course will depend on successful
remediation of the basic arithmetic skills, as well as
successful mastery of the remaining material. The
laboratory component is mandatory for this course.
Enrollment in any prep course is limited to three
times, and on the third enrollment, tuition
assessment will be based on the actual cost of
instruction (out-of-state tuition).
MAT 0024C F, W, S
COLLEGE PREPARATORY ALGEBRA
(4 preparatory credits).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: MAT 0012C or equivalent or sufficient
placement score.
An algebra course that assumes some previous basic
algebra skills. Algebra through quadratic equation,
radicals and rational exponents, as well as basic
graphing techniques, will be included. Designed to
assist students in developing skills needed for collegelevel mathematics work. By state mandate, a student
who does not pass the final exam will not pass the
course. Enrollment in any prep course is limited. On
the third enrollment, tuition assessment will be based
on the actual cost of instruction (out-of-state tuition).
MAT 1033 F, W, S
INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAT 0024C or suitable placement score.
This course is intended to provide students with the
opportunity to develop a mathematical foundation
necessary to take College Algebra, Statistics and/or
other Gordon Rule mathematics courses. To enroll in
this course, students should have, as a minimum, a
recent and substantial Algebra I course in high school
or equivalent. This course counts as elective credit
only. It does NOT count as mathematics credit
toward the A.A. degree.
MCB 2010C F, W, S
MICROBIOLOGY WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: BSC 1010C or BSC 2085C or any
CHM (CHM 1033C, CHM 1025, CHM 2045). BSC
2086C is strongly recommended.
A study of microbiology that emphasizes effects of
microorganisms on human systems. Topics will
include, but not be limited to, the following: microbial
cell structure, function and metabolism; requirements
for and control of growth; genetics, mutations, and
biotechnology; a survey of bacteria, viruses, algae,
fungi, protozoa and helminths; interactions with and
impact of microbes on humans, including mechanisms
of pathogenicity.
MET 1010C F, W
INTRODUCTION TO METEOROLOGY (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
This course is intended to introduce the student to the
Earth-Atmosphere system and the meteorological
processes that drive our planet’s weather and climate.
The basic concepts of local, regional, and global-scale
phenomena such as air masses, fronts, tropical
cyclones and severe weather are tied together with
recent advances in weather satellite technology to
provide the student with an understanding of the
atmosphere. Viewing the atmosphere as an integral
part of a system, the topics of climate and climate
change are made relevant to many fields of interest
beyond pure science such as agriculture, economics,
journalism, and government policy-making.
MGF 1106 F, W, S
MATHEMATICS FOR LIBERAL ARTS I (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAT 1033 with a grade of “C” or better.
This course is designed for students whose majors do
not require courses in College Algebra and above.
MGF 1106 is not designed as a prerequisite for other
mathematics courses. This course reviews and/or
covers many of the CLAST skills, including systematic
counting and probability, statistics, geometry, sets and
logic. Some topics related to the history of
mathematics are also included in the course. This
course does count toward the Gordon Rule
mathematics requirement for the A.A. degree.
MGF 1107 F, W, S
MATHEMATICS FOR LIBERAL ARTS II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAT 1033 with a grade of “C” or better.
This course is designed for those students who do not
need Statistics, College Algebra or Pre-Calculus
mathematics. This course covers a selection of topics
from within the following general areas: financial
mathematics, linear and exponential growth, numbers
and number systems, history of mathematics,
elementary number theory, voting techniques, and
graph theory. It is strongly suggested that students
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
215
who plan to take MGF 1107 complete MGF 1106 prior
to taking this course. This course does count toward
the Gordon Rule mathematics requirement for the
A. A. degree.
MGF 2118
CLAST MATH REVIEW (1).
2.5 hours per week for 6 weeks.
Prerequisites: Any course higher than MAT 1033 with
a grade of “C” or better.
This course is specifically designed to assist students
in reviewing the competencies covered on the CLAST.
This course counts only as elective credit. Does not
count toward math credit for the A.A. or A.S. degree.
MKA 2021 F
SALESMANSHIP (3).
3 hours per week.
A study of the principles of effective selling, including
an examination of the personal and economic aspects
of selling, as well as a consideration of consumer
motivation, knowledge of company and competitors’
products, and techniques of successful sales
presentations.
MKA 2511 F
CONTEMPORARY ADVERTISING (3).
3 hours per week.
Provides a broad view of advertising from the
marketing and consumer point of view. Historical
background, economic and social aspects, roles of
advertising, advertising stages, target marketing,
media, using selected behavioral science information
in advertising and obtaining proper advertising appeal
are included.
MMC 1000 F
SURVEY OF COMMUNICATION (3).
3 hours per week.
A course dealing with various mass communications
media, emphasizing newspapers, radio and television.
Principal focus is on the development and the
responsibility of these media to the public and on the
differing styles of the media for writing assignments.
MMC 1101 W
WRITING FOR MASS COMMUNICATION (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
This is a pre-professional course designed to provide
fundamental instruction and practice in writing for print
and electronic news organizations, as well as for
advertising and public relations. ✒
MNA 2141 W
BASIC LEADERSHIP/SUPERVISORY SKILLS (3).
3 hours per week.
A study of practical applications of supervisory principles
needed in a modern organizational environment
including leadership techniques, communication,
motivation, employee training and development,
decision making and performance appraisal.
216
MTB 1103 F, W, S
BUSINESS MATHEMATICS (3).
3 hours per week.
Meets core requirements for certain A.S. degree
programs in business only. A study of mathematical
problems involved in such phases of business as
payroll, depreciation, interest, discounts, notes,
invoices, and installment buying.
MTG 2204
ELEMENTS OF GEOMETRY.
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAT 1033.
This course provides a working knowledge of the
basic principles and skills of plane geometry with an
introduction to non-Euclidean geometries. Topics
involve line segments, angles, triangles, polygons,
circles, parallel lines, solids, translations and similarity.
MUE 2040 F
INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC EDUCATION (3).
3 hours per week.
This course introduces education majors to the music
education profession. It is the first course in the music
education curriculum for students working toward a
vocal, general or instrumental K-12 teaching certificate
in Florida. The organization and curriculum of
American music education in the total program of the
school will be explored. Observation in a variety of
school settings will enrich class discussion.
MUE 2450 F
WOODWIND TECHNIQUES (2).
2 hours per week.
Group instruction in woodwind instruments, with
emphasis upon basic skills of performance as well as
the appropriate teaching techniques, methods and
materials necessary for public school pedagogy.
MUE 2460 W
BRASS TECHNIQUES (2).
2 hours per week.
Group instruction in brass instruments, with emphasis
upon basic skills of performance as well as the
appropriate teaching techniques, methods and
materials necessary for public school pedagogy.
MUL 1010 F, W, S
MUSIC APPRECIATION (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
This course includes discussions of the musical
elements, forms, historical periods, and major
composers’ lives, styles and representative works.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
MUN 1270 F, W
COLLEGE BAND (1).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: audition and permission of instructor.
This large ensemble studies and performs standard
band repertoire. The group performs public concerts
each semester. The course may be repeated for credit.
MUN 1310 F, W
SHOW CHOIR (2).
5 hours per week.
Prerequisites: audition and permission of instructor.
An entertainment-oriented choral ensemble that
represents the college through performance of a varied
repertoire of choral music, often with choreography.
(Members must also take choreography class).
Membership by audition only. The course may be
repeated for credit.
MUN 1340 F, W
CHAMBER CHORUS (1).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: audition and permission of instructor.
This course includes the study and performance of
works representative of a wide spectrum of literature
designed for a small vocal ensemble. It is open to all
students through audition and by permission of the
instructor. The course may be repeated for credit and
is designed for the student who enjoys serious choral
literature and possesses musicianship skills.
MUN 1420 (upon request only)
WOODWIND ENSEMBLE (1).
2 hours per week.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
This small ensemble studies and performs chamber
music for woodwind instruments. The course may be
repeated for credit.
MUN 1430 (upon request only)
BRASS ENSEMBLE (1).
2 hours per week.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
This small ensemble studies and performs chamber
music for brass instruments. The course may be
repeated for credit.
MUN 1710 F, W
JAZZ BAND (1).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: audition and permission of instructor.
This ensemble studies and performs Big Band jazz
arrangements from the 1930s to the present.
Improvisation will be studied. The group performs both
on and off campus each semester. The course may be
repeated for credit.
MUN 1770 F, W
SHOW CHOIR BAND (Instrumental Ensemble) (1).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: audition and permission of instructor.
This select combo performs with Variations show choir
in a wide variety of popular musical styles. The group
performs both on and off campus, touring occasionally.
The course may be repeated for credit.
MUT 1001 F, W
FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC (3).
3 hours per week.
This course introduces the basics of music, including
clefs, pitch, rhythm, scales, keys, and intervals. The
course is open to all students and is required for
music majors with little or no previous music theory
background.
MUT 1111
MUSIC THEORY I (3).
45 contact hours.
Prerequisite: MUT 1001 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: MUT 1241.
Music Theory I: The course begins with written and
analytical study of the diatonic musical materials,
including scales, keys, intervals, triads, seventh
chords, chord progressions, and non-harmonicism.
Skills needed: reading music, piano or instrument
training required.
MUT 1112
MUSIC THEORY II (3).
45 contact hours.
Prerequisite: MUT 1111 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: MUT 1242.
Music Theory II: The course continues written and
analytical study of diatonic musical materials, including
four-voice part writing triads, seventh chords, chord
progressions, modulation and non-harmonicism.
MUT 1121 F
MUSIC THEORY I (4).
5 hours per week.
The course begins written, aural and analytical study
of the diatonic musical materials, including scales,
keys, intervals, triads, seventh chords, chord
progressions and non-harmonicism. Students begin
development of ear training, sight singing, and
dictation skills using diatonic materials. Skills needed:
reading music, piano or instrument training required.
MUT 1122 W
MUSIC THEORY II (4).
5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MUT 1121.
This course continues written, aural and analytical study
of diatonic musical materials, including four-voice partwriting of triads, seventh chords, chord progression,
modulation and non-harmonicism. Students continue
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
217
development of ear training, sight singing and
dictation skills.
MUT 1241
SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING I (1).
30 contact hours.
Prerequisite: MUT 1001 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: MUT 1111.
Aural Theory I: Students begin development of ear
training, sight singing, and dictation skills using
diatonic materials.
MUT 1242
SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING II (1).
30 contact hours.
Prerequisite: MUT 1241 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: MUT 1112.
Aural Theory II: Students continue development of ear
training, sight singing, and dictation skills using
diatonic materials.
MUT 2116
MUSIC THEORY III (3).
45 contact hours.
Prerequisite: MUT 1112 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: MUT 2246.
Music Theory III: The course continues written and
analytical study of musical materials, including
chromatic material, binary and ternary forms, diatonic
seventh chords and chromatic sixth chords.
MUT 2117
MUSIC THEORY IV (3).
45 contact hours.
Prerequisite: MUT 2116 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: MUT 2247.
Music Theory IV: The course continues written and
analytical study of musical materials, including
chromatic, impressionistic, and 20th century music,
9th, 11th, and 13th chords, and chords and
progressions in special situations.
MUT 2126 F (as needed)
MUSIC THEORY III (4).
5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MUT 1122 or permission of instructor.
This course stresses the written, aural and analytical
study and their application to the keyboard and to skills
in sight singing chromatic materials of music, including
modulation, secondary dominants and leading tome
chords, binary and ternary forms, application of partwriting procedures to instrumental music, diatonic
seventh chords and augmented sixth chords.
MUT 2127 W (as needed)
MUSIC THEORY IV (4).
5 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MUT 2126 or permission of instructor.
This course is a continuation of MUT 2126. The written,
aural and analytical study and their application to the
keyboard and to skills in sight singing chromatic
218
materials of music, including ninth, eleventh and
thirteenth chords, chords and progressions in special
situations; Late Romanticism; Debussy and
Impressionism; elements of 20th century music; serial
composition, and later 20th century practices.
MUT 2246
SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING III (1).
30 contact hours.
Prerequisite: MUT 1242 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: MUT 2116.
Aural Theory III: Students continue development of ear
training, sight singing, and dictation skills including
chromatic materials and modulation.
MUT 2247
SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING IV (1).
30 contact hours.
Prerequisite: MUT 2246 or permission of instructor.
Corequisite: MUT 2117.
Aural Theory IV: Students continue development of ear
training, sight singing, and dictation skills including
chromatic and atonal music.
MVK 1111 F, W
CLASS PIANO I (1).
3 hours per week.
Class instruction. This course is designed to teach
piano skills and competencies to non-piano majors. It
includes keyboard familiarization, note and rhythmic
reading, finger techniques, ensembles and easy
literature. This course is open to all students. May be
repeated for credit.
MVK 1112 F, W
CLASS PIANO II (1).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MVK 1111 or permission of instructor.
Class instruction. A continuation of MVK 1111, the
course includes continued work in finger technique,
scales, harmonization of melodies, ensembles, and
intermediate literature. The course is open to all
students. May be repeated for credit.
MVK 2121 F, W
CLASS PIANO III (1).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MVK 1112 or permission of instructor.
Class instruction. A continuation of MVK 1112. For
music majors other than keyboard principals. Sightreading, harmonizing, transposing, improvising,
accompanying, early intermediate keyboard
technique, repertoire and further musicianship will be
accomplished.
MVK 2122 F, W
CLASS PIANO IV (1).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MVK 2121 or permission of instructor.
Class instruction. A continuation of MVK 2121. For
music majors other than keyboard principals.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Continued work in technique, scales, transposing,
harmonization, sight-reading, improvisation,
accompanying and late intermediate repertoire.
MVV 1211 F, W
BEGINNING VOICE (1).
2 hours per week.
This is a one-semester class instruction in voice
designed to help the non-music and music major
student in developing fundamental vocal and
musicianship skills. Open to all students.
Note: Applied music courses have prefix letters
and numbers assigned by subject area. They all carry
the -p designation. To determine the correct course
number, refer to the table below each of the following
course descriptions:
APPLIED MUSIC–Secondary Level (1). F, W
One half-hour private lesson per week.
These courses are designed for students who desire
applied music instruction at the collegiate level and for
music majors who must study a secondary instrument
for degree requirements. Pupils study scales, chords,
etudes, and a standard repertoire for their respective
instruments. Vocal students complete exercises and
standard repertoire of each type of voice. The college
charges a laboratory fee of $120 in addition to
registration fees. The 1000-level courses are for firstyear instruction; the 2000-level courses are for secondyear instruction.
MVB 1211-2221 . . . . . . . .Trumpet
MVB 1212-2222 . . . . . . . .Horn
MVB 1213-2223 . . . . . . . .Trombone
MVB 1214-2224 . . . . . . . .Baritone Horn
MVB 1215-2225 . . . . . . . .Tuba
MVP 1211-2221 . . . . . . . .Percussion
MVW 1211-2221 . . . . . . .Flute
MVW 1212-2222 . . . . . . .Oboe
MVW 1213-2223 . . . . . . .Clarinet
MVW 1214-2224 . . . . . . .Bassoon
MVW 1215-2225 . . . . . . .Saxophone
MVK 1211-2221 . . . . . . . .Piano
MVV 1210-2221 . . . . . . . .Voice
MVO 2210-2220 . . . . . . . .Other Instruments
APPLIED MUSIC– Principal Level (2). F, W
One-hour private lesson per week.
These courses are designed for music majors. Pupils
study advanced literature and repertoire leading to
transfer to an upper-division institution. The college
charges a laboratory fee of $240, in addition to
registration fees. The 1300-level courses are for firstyear instruction; the 2300-level courses are for secondyear instruction.
MVB 1311-2321
MVB 1312-2322
MVB 1313-2323
MVB 1314-2324
MVB 1315-2325
. . . . . . . .Trumpet
. . . . . . . .Horn
. . . . . . . .Trombone
. . . . . . . .Baritone Horn
. . . . . . . .Tuba
MVP 1311-2321 . . . . . . . .Percussion
MVW 1311-2321 . . . . . . .Flute
MVW 1312-2322 . . . . . . .Oboe
MVW 1313-2323 . . . . . . .Clarinet
MVW 1314-2324 . . . . . . .Bassoon
MVW 1315-2325 . . . . . . .Saxophone
MVV 1311-2321 . . . . . . . .Voice
MVK 1311-2321 . . . . . . . .Piano
MVO 2310-2320 . . . . . . . .Other Instruments
NUR 1004C S
BRIDGE NURSING (7).
5 hours of class per week (6.7 hours Summer C)
and 6 hours of clinical lab per week (8 hours
Summer C).
Prerequisites: Admission to the LPN to ADN Bridge
program, BSC 2086C, MCB 2010C, PSY 2012, ENC
1101, MAC 1105 or STA 2023, HUN 1201 (3 credits),
DEP 2004, all with a minimum grade of “C.”
Bridge Nursing is designed to facilitate the transition of
the Licensed Practical Nurse to the role of the
Associate Degree Nurse and to build on the PN
curriculum. Nursing III and IV build on and expand
from this course. In this course, students gain
beginning knowledge about Associate Degree
Nursing, the Neuman Systems Model, needs as
adapted from Maslow and the nursing process.
Students learn the components of the role of the
nurse, wholistic health care across the life span, and
application of the nursing process. Students identify
stressors and commonly occurring responses to
stress that affect clients’ abilities to meet needs for
oxygen, perception/mobility, physiological and
psychological safety, self-esteem, and/or love and
belonging. Students expand learning about
pharmacology, pathophysiology, communication and
teaching, assessment, and intervention skills with
emphasis on primary prevention for the well child and
secondary prevention for the adult client. Students
provide care in ambulatory pediatric, community,
psychiatric, and acute care facilities.
NUR 1024C F, W
NURSING I (7).
3 hours of class and 12 hours of clinical lab per week.
Prerequisites: To be completed prior to beginning
Nursing I: Advisement/Orientation (if new student to
CFCC); Human Anatomy and Physiology I (BSC
2085C) 4 credit hours; College Algebra (MAC 1105)
3 credit hours or Elementary Statistics (STA 2023);
Freshman Composition I (ENC 1101) 3 credit
hours; General Psychology (PSY 2012) 3 credit
hours; and Basic Principles of Nutrition (HUN 1201)
3 credit hours with minimum grade of “C.”
Corequisite or prerequisite: BSC 2086C.
Corequisite: NUR 1820 with minimum grade of “C.”
All the nursing courses build on and expand from
Nursing I. In this course, students gain beginning
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COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
219
knowledge about nursing and the Neuman Systems
Model. The model includes client and environmental
systems affected by five variables. It addresses health
as a continuum. The faculty designed the nursing
curriculum with the Neuman Systems Model as the
conceptual basis. The other major concepts are basic
needs as adapted from Maslow and the nursing
process. Students are introduced to the core
components and competencies of assessment, clinical
decisionmaking, communication, caring interventions,
and teaching and learning. Students apply the nursing
process in community, extended, and acute care
facilities. Students care for diverse clients across the
life span with emphasis on the geriatric client.
NUR 1142 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY (2).
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 or STA 2023.
Corequisite: NUR 1024 or permission of instructor.
This course introduces pharmacology concepts that
are used in the care of clients of all ages. Within a
nursing process framework, students will learn dosage
calculation, as well as factors that affect the absorption,
excretion, distribution, and metabolism of drugs, and
drug actions, adverse effects and interactions. Students
will study broad groups of drugs affecting all body
systems and learn nursing considerations for specific
groups of drugs.
NUR 1210C S
NURSING IIA (5).
Average of 11 class and clinical hours per week,
but hours per week will vary.
Prerequisites: NUR 1024C, NUR 1820, NUR 1142.
Nursing IIA builds on the knowledge and skill acquired
in Nursing I. In this course students learn about
wholistic health care across the life span, and
application of the nursing process to diverse clients
needing primary prevention and those whose normal
lines of defense have been invaded to the extent
secondary and tertiary preventions are necessary.
Faculty designs learning experiences to assist
students in identifying stressors and commonly
occurring responses to stressors affecting clients’
abilities to meet needs for pain management, cellular
function, healing after surgery, oxygen, perception and
mobility, and physiological safety. Through laboratory
and clinical experiences, students continue to develop
assessment and intervention skills with emphasis on
beginning secondary prevention for the adult client.
Students learn additional nursing skills and provide
care in community and acute care facilities.
NUR 1730C F, W
NURSING II (9).
4 hours of class and 15 hours of clinical lab
per week.
Prerequisite: NUR 1024C and MCB 2010C with a
minimum grade of “C.”
Corequisite: NUR 1823 and DEP 2004.
220
Nursing II builds on the knowledge and skills acquired
in Nursing I. In this course, the student learns about
wholistic health care across the life span and
application of the nursing process to diverse clients
needing primary prevention and those whose normal
lines of defense have been invaded to the extent
secondary and tertiary preventions are necessary.
Faculty designs learning experiences to assist
students to identify stressors and commonly occurring
responses to stressors affecting clients’ abilities to
meet needs for pain management, cellular function,
healing after surgery, oxygen, perception/mobility,
physiological and psychological safety, self-esteem,
and/or love and belonging. Through laboratory and
clinical experiences students continue to develop
assessment and intervention skills with emphasis on
primary prevention for the well child and secondary
prevention for the adult client. Students learn
additional nursing skills and provide care in
ambulatory pediatric, community, psychiatric, and
acute care facilities.
NUR 1733C F
NURSING IIB (5).
Average of 11 class and clinical hours per week,
but hours per week will vary.
Prerequisite: NUR 1210C.
Corequisite: NUR 1823.
Nursing IIB builds on the knowledge and skill acquired
in Nursing I and IIA. In this course the student learns
about wholistic health care across the life span and
application of the nursing process to diverse clients
needing primary prevention and those whose normal
lines of defense have been invaded to the extent
secondary and tertiary preventions are necessary.
Faculty designs learning experiences to assist
students in identifying stressors and commonly
occurring responses to stressors affecting clients’
abilities to meet needs for psychological safety, selfesteem, and/or love and belonging, oxygen, nutrition,
and elimination. Through laboratory and clinical
experiences, students continue to develop assessment
and intervention skills with emphasis on primary
prevention for the well child and secondary prevention
for the adult client. Students learn additional nursing
skills and provide care in ambulatory, pediatric,
community, psychiatric, and acute care facilities.
NUR 1800 S
SOCIALIZATION INTO NURSING
FOR LPN TO ADN BRIDGE (2).
4 hours per week for eight weeks.
Corequisite: NUR 1004-C.
This course introduces students to the core
components and competencies of the associate’s
degree (A.D.) nurse. It is the first of two courses for
Bridge Nursing students in which specific components
are explored and expanded as the students’ experience
in nursing grows. Students will investigate the scope
of practice of the A.D. nurse and will begin the process
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
of socialization into this new nursing practice. In this
course, students are introduced to collaboration, career
management, professional behavior, communication in
management, changes in health care, standards of
nursing practice, legal and ethical aspects, and the
five aspects of management. Application of the role
components addressed in this course will be
evaluated during Bridge Nursing clinical experiences.
NUR 1820 F, W
SOCIALIZATION INTO NURSING I (1).
Corequisite: NUR 1024C.
This course introduces students to the core
components and competencies of the associate’s
degree (A.D.) nurse. It is the first of three courses in
which specific components are explored and
expanded as the students’ nursing experience grows.
In this course, students are introduced to collaboration
and career management and will concentrate on the
components of managing care; professional behavior,
including ethical and legal aspects; scope of practice;
and role of the A.D. nurse. This course introduces
health care delivery systems, managed care and the
five aspects of management in nursing. Applications of
the content discussed in this course will be evaluated
in the clinical component of Nursing I.
NUR 1823 F, W
SOCIALIZATION INTO NURSING II (2).
Prerequisite: NUR 1820 with minimum grade of “C.”
Corequisite: NUR 1730C.
This course builds on NUR 1820 and expands the
student’s understanding of the components of the
nurses’ role. Students will address standards of
nursing practice and legal and ethical aspects of
nursing. Emphasis will be placed on application of
communication techniques useful in management
situations and the nurse’s role in the context of
changes in health care delivery systems. Application
of these role components will be evaluated during
Nursing II clinical experiences.
NUR 1830 F, W
SOCIALIZATION INTO NURSING III (2).
Prerequisite: NUR 1823.
This course builds on NUR 1823 and further expands
the student’s understanding of the components and
competencies of the A.D. nurse, with emphasis on
those of managing care, communication, and
professional behavior. Students will consider
applications of the five aspects of management and
further study of the ethical and legal implications of
nursing practice. The nurse’s professional behavior
will be considered in the context of nursing history,
changes in health care delivery systems, and
transition from student to practitioner of nursing.
Students will plan for life long learning and for
entering the job market. Applications of the content
of this course will be evaluated in the clinical
component of Nursing III and Nursing IV.
NUR 2713C F
Nursing IVA (8).
Average of 15 class and clinical hours per week,
but hours per week will vary.
Prerequisite: NUR 2752C.
Nursing IVA builds on the knowledge and skills
acquired in Nursing IIIA and B. Students learn to apply
the nursing process to provide all levels of prevention
to diverse clients across the life span and their support
system experiencing responses affecting their abilities
to meet complex needs for oxygen, perception/mobility,
and/or fluid and electrolytes. Students focus on
commonly occurring responses to stressors and
interaction of problems in these need areas. Students
provide care in community and acute care facilities for
both pediatric and adult clients. In the role transition
from student to graduate nurse, students use the
nursing process to manage care for selected groups
of clients. Upon successful completion of this course,
students are eligible to apply to take the National
Council Licensure Examination to become registered
nurses.
NUR 2732C F, W
NURSING III (9).
4 hours of class and 15 hours of clinical lab
per week.
Prerequisite: NUR 1730C with a minimum grade
of “C.”
Corequisite: NUR 1830 and HUM 1021.
Nursing III builds on the knowledge and skills acquired
in Nursing II. In this course students focus on
application of the nursing process to providing all
levels of prevention to the childbearing family and to
diverse clients and their support systems whom
commonly occurring responses to stressors are having
an impact on the ability to meet the needs for nutrition,
elimination, sexuality, physiological and psychological
safety, self-esteem, and/or love and belonging.
Through clinical experiences students learn new
nursing skills, including those related to the
childbearing family. Students provide nursing care in
community, psychiatric, and acute care facilities.
NUR 2734C F, W
NURSING IV (10).
6 hours of class for 13 weeks and 14 hours of
clinical lab per week except 72 hours in the last
two weeks.
Prerequisite: NUR 2732C, HUM 1021 or equivalent
with a minimum grade of “C.”
Nursing IV builds on the knowledge and skills
acquired in Nursing III. Students learn to apply the
nursing process to providing all levels of prevention to
diverse clients across the life span and their support
systems experiencing responses affecting their
abilities to meet complex needs for oxygen,
perception/mobility, and/or fluid and electrolytes.
Students focus on commonly occurring responses to
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
221
stressors and the interaction of problems in these
need areas. Students provide care in pediatric and
adult acute care facilities, and the community. In the
role transition from student to graduate nurse, students
use nursing process to manage care for selected
groups of clients. Upon successful completion of this
course, the student is eligible to graduate and apply
to take the National Council Licensure Examination to
become a registered nurse.
NUR 2751C W
NURSING IIIA (5).
Average of 15 class and clinical hours per week,
but hours per week will vary.
Prerequisite: NUR 1733C.
Corequisite: NUR 1830.
Nursing IIIA builds on the knowledge and skills
acquired in Nursing IIA and B. In this course students
focus on use of the nursing process to provide all
levels of prevention to clients and their support
systems for whom commonly occurring responses to
stressors are having an impact on the ability to meet
the needs for physiological and psychological safety,
self-esteem and/or love and belonging, and sexuality.
Through clinical experiences students learn new
nursing skills. Students provide nursing care in
community, psychiatric and acute care facilities.
NUR 2752C S
NURSING IIIB (5).
Average of 13 class and clinical hours per week,
but hours per week will vary.
Prerequisite: NUR 2751C.
Nursing IIIB builds on the knowledge and skills
acquired in Nursing IIA and B and Nursing IIIA. In this
course students focus on nursing process to provide
all levels of prevention to the childbearing family and
to diverse clients having difficulty meeting the need for
oxygen. Through clinical experiences, students learn
new nursing skills including those related to the
childbearing family. Students provide nursing care in
community and acute care facilities.
OCB 2630 (upon request only)
INTRODUCTION TO MARINE ECOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week (in addition, two field trips are
included).
Prerequisite: BSC 1010C or PCB 2033C or PSC 1101.
Course includes a study of the physical, chemical,
geological, and biological characteristics of the world
ocean. Emphasis is on ecological relationships of
plants and animals with the physical environment.
Topics include water chemistry, salinity, temperature
and pressure, wave dynamics, ocean currents,
topography of the ocean basins, food webs and
trophic relationships, exploitation of ocean resources,
pollution, and the future of the world ocean.
222
OCE 1001 (upon request only)
INTRODUCTORY OCEANOGRAPHY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course focuses on the marine environment as a
unique feature of the planet Earth. Topics addressed in
the course are: historical perspectives of oceanography,
ocean bottom topography, characteristics of sea water,
waves, winds, currents, tides, coastal features and
processes, life in the oceans, and man’s impact on the
ocean environment. This course may be counted as
either a biological OR physical science credit.
ORH 1000C F
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
HORTICULTURE (3).
3 hours per week.
An introduction to the disciplines involved in the broad
field of horticulture, plant and animal taxonomy,
morphology, anatomy and their fundamental
processes as they relate to plant growth, pests,
production, maintenance and planting. Plant
propagation, pest and disease control, and design are
also included. This class is offered online and in the
classroom.
ORH 1020C F
HOUSEHOLD PLANTS (3).
3 hours per week.
Emphasis is placed on propagation and care of the
more common household plants. Information is also
presented on proper environmental conditions
necessary for decorative plants used in the home.
Sources for materials and information will be stressed.
A unique feature of the course is the study of many
poisonous plants found in and around the home.
Interior annual and perennial plant identification make
up a large portion of curriculum. This class is offered
online and in the classroom.
ORH 1021 F
PROPAGATION OF NURSERY PLANTS (3).
3 hours per week.
Corequisite: ORH 1021L.
Basic instruction that prepares individuals to
propagate nursery plant materials. Covers sexual
and asexual procedures; emphasizes special
methods appropriate to region and/or plant groups;
covers basic plant nutrition, tissue culture with
emphasis on nutritional requirements and development
of a fertilization program for nursery plant propagation.
Course includes planning for nursery crop production.
ORH 1021L F
PROPAGATION OF NURSERY PLANTS
LABORATORY (2).
4 hours per week.
Corequisite: ORH 1021.
Practical application of principles and practices of
working in and ultimately supervising a nursery
operation including, but not limited to, producing,
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
processing and marketing nursery plants used
principally for interior and exterior landscapes.
ORH 1113C W
PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL (3).
3 hours per week.
Covers the identification, nature and eradication of
ornamental plant pests and includes the development
of a pest management program involving the proper
selection and application of pesticides and herbicides.
Provides technical treatment of the identification,
nature and eradication of ornamental plant diseases
and disorders; covers disease control management
involving the proper selection and application of
disease control practices. This course leads to
state certification.
ORH 1260 W
GREENHOUSE OPERATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
Corequisite: ORH 1260L.
This course is designed to orient students to the art of
growing plants in the greenhouse. Greenhouse
construction, heating and cooling, propagation of
greenhouse plants, watering, shading, indoor disease
and pest control, growing media preparation, hanging
baskets, totems, use of growth regulators and dish
gardens will be covered.
ORH 1260L W
GREENHOUSE OPERATIONS LABORATORY (2).
4 hours per week.
Corequisite: ORH 1260.
Laboratory for ORH 1260.
ORH 1510 F
ORNAMENTAL PLANT IDENTIFICATION (3).
3 hours lecture and 1.5 hours laboratory per week.
A practical course designed to assist those who are
not trained botanists but want to know about the
landscape plants they see every day. The identification
of the more common grasses, flowers, shrubs and
trees, along with their cultural requirements and
landscape uses, is covered. Recommended for
ornamental horticulture majors, nurserymen, nursery
sales persons, landscapers and homeowners. This
class is offered online and in the classroom.
ORH 1601C W
RETAIL AND WHOLESALE
NURSERY OPERATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
This course covers the history of the nursery industry,
management, site selection, organization and development of a nursery. Other topics include a study of its
laws and regulations, financial market, crop marketing,
inventory control, and culture as related to crop production. This class is offered online and in the classroom.
ORH 1851 W
LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND MAINTENANCE (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ORH 1510
Corequisite: ORH 1851L.
A practical course designed to assist those who are
not trained landscape architects but want to know
about landscape design and maintenance.
The principles of landscape design, including the
study of exterior space as it relates to different
environments, selection and use of plant materials in
the landscape, installation, costing, and landscape
maintenance are included. Irrigation design and
installation make up a large portion of this class.
ORH 1851L W
LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND
MAINTENANCE LABORATORY (2).
3 hours per week.
Corequisite: ORH 1851.
Is the laboratory for ORH 1851, which includes handson designing of landscape and irrigation for both
residential and commercial applications.
ORH 1872C W
INTERIOR LANDSCAPING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ORH 1020
Fundamentals of landscaping homes, businesses,
commercial areas and malls. The course covers
selection of plant materials, installation and maintenance. Environmental conditions, along with insect
and disease control, contracts and plant leasing, will
be covered.
ORH 2832C F
ADVANCED LANDSCAPE DESIGN (3).
3 hours per week.
Continues skill building in landscape design,
emphasizing more advanced elements of both
residential and commercial landscape design.
OST 1100 F, W
PROFESSIONAL KEYBOARDING I (3).
3 hours per week.
Course provides an introduction to keyboarding with
emphasis on “touch” typewriting. Students will learn
Word 2002 and its various uses to create various
business-related documents, including e-mails, letters,
memos, tables, reports and employment documents.
This course is required for office administration majors.
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
OST 1110 F, W
PROFESSIONAL KEYBOARDING II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: OST 1100 or equivalent.
A continuation of keyboarding skill building introduced
in OST 1100, including application to more advanced
styles of business communication. Word 2002 will be
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
223
used to create a variety of documents including multipage letters and memos, reports, templates, fliers,
newsletters, Web pages, and other business-related
documents.
OST 2335 F, W
BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101.
This course teaches the concepts and skills needed to
communicate effectively in business. Emphasis is
placed on the types and tones of common business
correspondence (letters, memos, e-mail, reports) and
increasing the clarity of oral presentations.
OST 2355 F
INTRODUCTION TO RECORDS MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: OST 1100, CGS 1100.
This course is a comprehensive overview of principles
and procedures used for effective records
management. Skills are developed for operating
records systems based upon alphabetic, geographic,
subject and numeric filing. Various software programs
(primarily database) are used to facilitate filing and
retrieval methods.
OST 2401 F
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION I (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: OST 1100, CGS 1100.
To meet the demand for trained, competent office
employees, this course in office administration
provides students with assignments in a variety of
activities performed by office employees. Due to the
expanding role of employees, the ever-changing
economy and the increased use of sophisticated
technology, students will be taught to utilize and apply
various proven approaches to the systems and
procedures for the modern office.
OST 2402 W
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION II–
WORK SIMULATION (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: OST 1100, CGS 1100, OST 2401.
This course provides students with the experience of
working in a simulated company and performing
realistic duties assigned to an administrative assistant.
Students will use word processing, spreadsheet,
presentation, scheduling, and database functions in a
software applications suite (Microsoft Office XP) to
prepare integrated documents. Use of the Internet and
other research tools will be used.
224
OST 2601 W
MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION AND VOICE
RECOGNITION SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: OST 1100, ENC 1100.
This course covers dictation, transcription and voice
recognition technology. Students will transcribe
industry specific, as well as general business
documents. Emphasis will be placed on the creation
and use of various forms. Spelling, punctuation,
grammar, proofreading and editing skills are applied to
produce mailable business letters and other office
related documents.
OST 2611 F, W
MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION I (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: HSC 2531, BSC 1080 or equivalent.
An introduction to the skills required for medical
transcription. Emphasis is placed on proper operation
of transcribing equipment; preparing medical records,
including complete case histories; vocabulary and
phonetics; reference sources; and speed-building
techniques.
OST 2612 F, W
MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: OST 2611.
Continued development of skills required for medical
transcription. Emphasis is placed on medical records
preparation, medical source familiarization and use of
intermediate vocabulary and phonetic development
with increased transcription speed.
OST 2613 F, W
MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION III (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: OST 2612.
Advanced development of skills required for medical
transcription. Emphasis on advanced terminology and
vocabulary development in addition to increasing
transcription speed using various word processing/
transcription equipment.
OST 2717 F, W
ADVANCED WORD (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: OST 1110 or departmental approval.
Advanced (expert) word processing course. Students
will learn to use advanced aspects of formatting
documents, including mail merging, sorting, graphics,
creating and modifying paragraphs, managing
documents, workgroup collaboration, customizing
tables, customizing Word 2002 and various other skills
necessary for Microsoft Office Specialist certification.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
PCB 1431C F
FLORIDA WATERS, PART I (1).
18 total hours per term.
The student may take any module in a credit or
non-credit mode. Each module will give one hour
of science credit. Only if the student takes all four
modules will he or she receive four hours credit for
lecture/laboratory combinations.
This series of mini-classes focuses on the surface waters:
types, organisms, function, sources, ecosystems, and
value to the citizens in the state of Florida. Part I is:
“Where’s All The Water?” This course may be counted
as either a biological OR physical science credit.
PCB 1432C F
FLORIDA WATERS, PART 2 (1).
18 total hours per term.
The student may take any module in a credit or
non-credit mode. Each module will give one hour
of science credit. Only if the student takes all four
modules will he or she receive four hours credit for
lecture/laboratory combinations.
This series of mini-classes focuses on the surface
waters: types, organisms, function, sources, ecosystems,
and value to the citizens in the state of Florida. Part 2
is: “What’s In My Water?” This course may be
counted as either a biological OR physical science
credit.
PCB 1433C F
FLORIDA WATERS, PART 3 (1).
18 hours total hours per term.
The student may take any module in a credit or
non-credit mode. Each module will give one hour
of science credit. Only if the student takes all four
modules will he or she receive four hours credit for
lecture/laboratory combination.
This series of mini-classes focuses on the surface
water: types, organisms, function, sources,
ecosystems, and value to the citizens in the state of
Florida. Part 3 is: “Florida’s Beautiful Waterlands.” This
course may be counted as either a biological OR
physical science credit.
PCB 1434C F
FLORIDA WATERS, PART 4 (1).
18 total hours per term.
The student may take any module in a credit or
non-credit mode. Each module will give one hour
of science credit. Only if the student takes all four
modules will he or she receive four hours credit for
lecture/laboratory combination.
This series of mini-classes focuses on the surface
water: types, organisms, function, sources,
ecosystems, and value to the citizens in the state of
Florida. Part 4 is: “Water! Water! Water! How Do I Use
It?” This course may be counted as either a
biological OR physical science credit.
PCB 1440C W
FLORIDA’S LANDSCAPE, PART 1 (1).
18 total hours per term.
The student may take any module in a credit or
non-credit mode. Each module will give one hour
of science credit. Only if the student takes all four
modules will he or she receive four hours credit for
lecture/laboratory combinations. This series of miniclasses focuses on basic ecological concepts: biotic
and abiotic factors, energy flow, succession,
influences of fire on Florida’s ecosystems, and
identification of plants and animals common to the
ecosystems of central Florida. Each module is
comprised of 12 hours of activities and 6 hours of
laboratory/field experience. Part 1 is: “Ecosystems of
Florida.” This course may be counted as either a
biological OR physical science credit.
PCB 1448C W
FLORIDA’S LANDSCAPE, PART 2 (1).
18 total hours per term.
The student may take any module in a credit or
non-credit mode. Each module will give one hour
of science credit. Only if the student takes all four
modules will he or she receive four hours credit for
lecture/laboratory combinations. This series of miniclasses focuses on the geological concepts evident in
Florida: soil types and formation, caves, and sinkholes.
Special emphasis is placed on the hydrologic cycle
and the Florida aquifer. Each module is comprised of
12 hours of activities and 6 hours of laboratory/field
experience. Part 2 is: “The Geology of Florida.” This
course may be counted as either a biological OR
physical science credit.
PCB 1449C W
FLORIDA’S LANDSCAPE, PART 3 (1).
18 total hours per term.
The student may take any module in a credit or
non-credit mode. Each module will give one hour
of science credit. Only if the student takes all four
modules will he or she receive four hours credit for
lecture/laboratory combinations. This series of miniclasses introduces the relationship between weather
and climate and how it influences ecosystems. Special
emphasis is placed on local and regional weather/
climatic conditions. Each module is comprised of 12
hours of activities and 6 hours of laboratory/field
experience. Part 3 is: “Florida’s Climate and Weather.”
This course may be counted as either a biological
OR physical science credit.
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
PCB 1450C W
FLORIDA’S LANDSCAPE, PART 4 (1).
18 total hours per term.
The student may take any module in a credit or
non-credit mode. Each module will give one hour
of science credit. Only if the student takes all four
modules will he or she receive four hours credit for
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
225
lecture/laboratory combinations. This series of miniclasses focuses on pests and pesticides, with special
emphasis on health issues related to exposure to
pesticides. Each module is comprised of 12 hours of
activities and 6 hours of laboratory/field experience.
Part 4 is: “Pests and Pesticides.” This course may
be counted as either a biological OR physical
science credit.
PCB 2033C (upon request only)
INTRODUCTORY ECOLOGY (4).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: BSC 1050 or BSC 1011C or
permission of instructor.
This course is an introduction to the study of
ecology—the nature of interrelationships among
organisms and their environment. It includes an
examination of the flow of energy through natural and
man-made ecosystems, the role of organisms in
finding habitats and filling niches, the distribution of
plants and animals, and an introduction to basic
population dynamics. The role of humans in maintaining
or altering ecological balance is an overriding theme.
The lab emphasizes field and laboratory methods
used in the description and analysis of various plant
and animal communities. There will be several offcampus field trips during the term.
PCO 2710 W
APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to promote an understanding
of the wide applications of psychology to all areas of
life including problems of motivation, adjustment,
addictions, interpersonal relationships, the family,
education, the world of work and supervision. The
course is appropriate for non-psychology majors,
including college Tech Prep students.
PEL 2014 W
TEAM SPORTS IV (1).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Continuation of PEL 2013.
PEL 2121
GOLF (1).
Skills in basic fundamentals. Advanced skills and
teaching techniques.
PEL 2216
BASEBALL FUNDAMENTALS (3).
Skills, strategy, and coaching techniques.
PEL 2341 F
BEGINNING TENNIS (1).
Skills in basic fundamentals. Advanced skills and
teaching techniques.
PEL 2342 F
INTERMEDIATE TENNIS (1).
Prerequisite: PEL 2341 or permission of instructor.
The development and analysis of advanced skills
and practices. Major emphasis on match and
tournament play.
PEM 1101 F, W, S-A
WEIGHT TRAINING AND PHYSICAL
CONDITIONING (1).
A wide variety of activities designed to provide
knowledge and improve body fitness through
organized exercises, jogging and weight programs.
PEL 1011 F
TEAM SPORTS I (1).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Skills in team sports. Emphasis on present and carryover values for physical, social, and moral fitness.
PEM 1141 F, W
AEROBICS I (1).
An introductory course in aerobics with the emphasis
on a variety of exercises that will stimulate heart and
lung activity for healthful longevity.
PEL 1012 W
TEAM SPORTS II (1).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Continuation of PEL 1011.
PEM 1142 F, W
AEROBICS II (1).
Prerequisite: PEM 1141, written permission from
PEM 1142 instructor, suggested physical from a
medical doctor.
An advanced course in aerobics with an emphasis on
varied exercises that will stimulate heart and lung
activity. Emphasis on diagnostic testing, evaluation of
progress and a study of concepts involved.
PEL 1212
FAST-PITCH SOFTBALL (3).
3 hours per week.
Emphasis on the advanced aspects of fast-pitch
softball including rules, offensive and defensive
strategy, skills and game situations.
226
PEL 2013 F
TEAM SPORTS III (1).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Skills in team sports. Emphasis on present and carryover values for physical, social and moral fitness.
Continuation of PEL 1012.
PEM 1953 F, W
VARSITY CHEERLEADING (1).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
This course is designed to provide students with
instructions on proper cheerleading techniques.
Instruction includes warm-up procedures, safety, attitude
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
projection during games, promoting school spirit and
sportsmanship, and striving to build better school
relationships. May be repeated up to four times for credit.
PEN 1121 F, W, S
BEGINNING SWIMMING (1).
Instruction and participation for the beginner or nonswimmer in the basic swimming strokes and skills,
safety skills and survival techniques, including
‘‘drownproofing’’ and elementary forms of rescue and
mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
PEN 1122 F, W, S
INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING (1).
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Emphasis is on learning and participating in
intermediate skills and several methods of selfpreservation in the water.
PEO 1004
CONTEMPORARY COACHING CONCEPTS (3).
Course offers instruction in the concepts of contemporary
coaching techniques and methods. This includes the
organizational, administrative and motivational aspects
of coaching.
PEO 2013 S
SPORTS OFFICIATING (3).
Personal skills, knowledge of rules and officiating
techniques in football, basketball and other sports.
Field work in intramural activities.
PEO 2121 SP
SKILLS AND PRACTICES IN AQUATICS (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is aimed at the improvement of
performance skills, techniques and knowledge in
swimming and the teaching of swimming skills for
students who are planning a career either as a
physical education teacher or recreation leader.
PEO 2621 F
BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS (3).
Fundamentals of offensive and defensive basketball.
PET 1000 F
INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3).
Designed to interpret physical education for the
student planning to major in this area. It gives a better
understanding and overall view of the field.
PET 2622C
CARE AND PREVENTION OF
ATHLETIC INJURIES (3).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
This course explores the art and science of effectively
preventing and managing athletic-related injuries. It is
designed to facilitate the student’s understanding of
the principles related to appropriate prevention,
treatment and rehabilitation in order to maximize the
proper care of athletes and athletic injuries.
PHH 2403 W
SURVEY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: PHI 2010 or PHI 2600
or HUM 2532.
A survey of major philosophers of the Modern period
(17th and 18th centuries), including Descartes,
Hobbes, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume and Kant.
PHI 1100 W
INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC (3).
3 hours per week.
A beginning course in logic placing major emphasis
on the practical application of critical and creative
principles of reasoning to everyday problems of
judgement and decisions. Both formal and informal
methods of inference (including deduction, induction
and abduction) will be introduced.
PHI 2010 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
A beginning course for students having no previous
college training in the study of philosophy. Readings
from classical and contemporary thinkers will be used
to discuss issues such as: Does God exist? Are we
free? What is the nature of reality? What is truth? Is the
mind separate from the brain? ✒
PHI 2600 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (3).
3 hours per week.
An introductory course in ethics, emphasizing the
application of classical, medieval, and modern ethical
theories to contemporary moral issues such as abortion,
euthanasia, punishment and the death penalty, sexual
ethics, pornography and censorship, equality of the
sexes, and population, hunger and the environment.
PHI 2631 W
ETHICS AND BUSINESS (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
An introductory course in ethics focusing on moral
issues arising in the workplace, especially for business
students. Discussions of ethical theories will be used
to clarify and provide approaches to practical issues
faced by employers and employees. ✒
PHT 1000 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL THERAPY (1).
1 hour lecture per week.
Prerequisite: admission into the Physical Therapist
Assistant program for Phase II.
Introduces the history of the physical therapy
profession, the American Physical Therapy Association
and the role of the physical therapist assistant, as well
as other health care providers. Addresses organizational
perspectives, communication skills, and practice
issues related to both the Guide to Physical Therapy
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COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
227
Practice and the Clinical Performance Instrument for
the PTA. Key concepts related to the practice of
physical therapy are also presented.
PHT 1014 F, W, S
DOCUMENTATION FOR THE PHYSICAL
THERAPIST ASSISTANT (1).
1 hour lecture per week.
Prerequisite: ENC 1101 (completed with a grade of
“C” or higher).
Corequisite: PHT 1000.
Presents information, theories, and guidelines for
documenting and writing progress or interim notes in
the medical record, incorporating the language of the
Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Focuses on the
needs of PTAs, emphasizes the role of the PTA within
the PT team, and covers major types of records
including incident reports, phone conversations,
reimbursement, legal issues, functional outcomes and
goals.
PHT 1130L F
DATA COLLECTION SKILLS FOR THE PTA (2).
4 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: admission into the Physical Therapist
Assistant program.
Corequisite: PHT 1175C and PHT 1000.
Introduces processes and procedures used to gather
information through observation, measurement, and
subjective, objective and functional findings. Includes
range of motion, muscle strength, skin and sensory
integrity, vital signs (including respiratory status),
postural alignment, body mechanics and pain
assessments.
PHT 1175C F
FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY AND KINESIOLOGY (3).
2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: admission into the Physical Therapist
Assistant program for Phase II.
This course covers the relationships between the
systems that relate to functional movement of the
human body. Covers all functional body movements
such as mechanisms, muscles actions, planes and
other relationships to body movements. Includes the
upper extremity, lower extremity, face and trunk.
PHT 1210C F
THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES I (4).
2 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: admission into the Physical Therapist
Assistant program for Phase II.
Introduces patient care techniques, including patient
preparation, and the theories and practical application
of physical therapy modalities. The physiological
effects and indications/contraindications of heat, cold,
radiant therapy, traction, intermittent compression, and
massage are emphasized. Ethical and legal aspects
will be included.
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PHT 1212C W
THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES II (3).
1 hour lecture and 4 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: completion of all general education
requirements, and PHT 1130L, PHT 1210C, PHT
1175C and PHT 1000 with a grade of “C” or higher.
Provides a study of the rationale, contraindications,
and application techniques of various electrical
stimulation equipment.
PHT 1225C W
THERAPEUTIC PROCEDURES (3).
1 hour lecture and 4 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: completion of all general education
requirements, and PHT 1130L, PHT 1000 and PHT
1175C with a grade of “C” or higher.
Introduces the rationale and skills for patient
therapeutic procedures. Includes traditional exercise
routines, such as passive, active-assistive, active and
resistive ranges of motion, gait training, and other
skills necessary for patient treatment.
PHT 1300 W
SURVEY OF PATHOLOGICAL DEFICITS (4).
4 hours lecture per week.
Prerequisites: completion of all general education
requirements, and PHT 1130L, PHT 1000 and PHT
1175C with a grade of “C” or higher.
Introduces the pathophysiology of selected medical,
surgical, orthopedic and neurological conditions
commonly treated in physical therapy.
PHT 1801 W
CLINICAL PRACTICE I (4).
16 hours clinical per week for 10 weeks.
Prerequisites: completion of all general education
requirements, and PHT 1000, PHT 1175C, PHT
1210C, and PHT 1130L with a grade of “C” or higher.
Introduces actual patient care utilizing beginning
physical therapy techniques under the supervision of a
licensed physical therapist. Designed to parallel
classroom skills learned during previous courses.
Various agencies in the tri-county area that provide
physical therapy services will be utilized. Students are
responsible for making their own transportation
arrangements for assigned clinical rotations.
PHT 2162C S
REHABILITATION PROCEDURES (4).
2 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in PHT 1225C,
PHT 1300, PHT 1212C and PHT 1801.
Introduces neurological principles, pathology, and
specialized rehabilitation techniques for pediatric and
adult care.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
PHT 2227C S
DISABILITIES AND THERAPEUTIC
PROCEDURES II (3).
1 hour lecture and 4 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in PHT 1225C
and PHT 1300.
Provides a study of the rationale, contraindications
and exercise skills needed to develop appropriate
exercise programs for geriatric, orthopedic and
surgical conditions.
PHT 2342 F, W, S
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR THE PHYSICAL
THERAPIST ASSISTANT (2).
2 hour lecture per week.
Prerequisite: BSC 2085C with a grade of “C” or
higher.
Corequisite: BSC 2086C.
This course is a supervised self-study of medical
terminology and abbreviations that describe the
pathology of the body systems used in relationship to
the practice of physical therapy. Terms associated with
diagnostics, surgery, laboratory tests, pharmacology,
medical orders, reports and patient care will be
included.
PHT 2810 F
CLINICAL PRACTICE II (5).
40 hours clinical per week for 6 weeks.
Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in PHT 2227C,
PHT 2162C and PHT 2931.
Includes treatment of patients under the supervision of
a registered physical therapist in various types of
delivery systems. Problem-solving techniques are
employed in the evaluation and execution of patient
care plans. Various agencies in the tri-county and
central Florida area that provide physical therapy
services will be utilized. Students are responsible for
making their own transportation arrangements for
assigned clinical rotations.
PHT 2820 F
CLINICAL PRACTICE III (5).
40 hours clinical per week for 6 weeks.
Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in PHT 2227C,
PHT 2162C and PHT 2931.
Corequisite: PHT 2810.
Focuses on advanced clinical experiences in selected
agencies under the supervision of a registered
physical therapist. Emphasis is on critical thinking and
problem solving in patient care. Various agencies in
the tri-county and central Florida area that provide
physical therapy services will be utilized. Students are
responsible for making their own transportation
arrangements for assigned clinical rotations.
PHT 2931 S
TRENDS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY (1).
1 hour per week.
Prerequisite: grade of “C” or better in PHT 1225C,
PHT 1300, PHT 1212C and PHT 1801L.
Introduces other allied health and physical therapy
specialties, issues, and current trends. Develops
topics of special interest to students or instructors.
PHY 1020 F, W
ELEMENTARY PHYSICS FOR
NON-SCIENCE MAJORS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: one year high school algebra or
equivalent.
This course provides a basic introduction to the
several traditional divisions of classical physics. These
include mechanics, heat, material properties, molecular
and atomic structure, electricity and magnetism, wave
motion, including light and sound, optics, radioactivity,
and the basic postulates of relativity.
PHY 1020L (upon request only)
ELEMENTARY PHYSICS FOR
NON-SCIENCE MAJORS LABORATORY (1).
2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHY 1020.
This course is designed to offer a laboratory experience
in physics to accompany PHY 1020. The course
includes planning and carrying out physics laboratory
experiences and observing the phenomena of physics
in a laboratory setting.
PHY 1053C F, S
GENERAL PHYSICS I WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory, and 1-hour
problem-solving session per week.
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 or equivalent. Some
knowledge of trigonometry is strongly
recommended.
This course presents mechanics, heat and mechanical
waves. Topics covered include: measurements,
accelerated motion, Newton’s laws, work and energy,
momentum, gas laws, motion in plane, rotational
motion, motion of rigid bodies, mechanical properties
of matter, temperature, thermal properties of matter,
thermodynamics, vibratory motion, wave motion,
sound. The laboratory experiences are designed to
enhance the lecture part of the course, as well as to
cover various laboratory techniques.
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
PHY 1054C F, W
GENERAL PHYSICS II WITH LAB (4).
3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory, and 1-hour
problem-solving session per week.
Prerequisite: PHY 1053C or equivalent.
This course presents electricity, magnetism, light, and
modern physics. Topics covered include: electric
charge and electric field, electric potential and
capacitance, electric current and resistance, magnetism,
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229
electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits,
geometrical optics, optical instruments, wave optics,
relativity, atomic structure, quantum mechanics, atomic
nuclei. The laboratory experiences are designed to
enhance the lecture part of the course, as well as to
cover various laboratory techniques.
PHY 2048C F
GENERAL PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I
WITH LAB (5).
4 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory, and 1-hour
problem-solving session per week.
Prerequisite: MAC 2311.
Corequisite: MAC 2312.
This course is a combined lecture/laboratory course
designed primarily to meet the requirements for
majors in engineering and/or the physical sciences.
Topics include static and dynamic mechanics, energy
and power, relativity, material properties and continuum
mechanics, and heat and thermodynamics.
PHY 2049C W
GENERAL PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II
WITH LAB (5).
4 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory, and 1-hour
problem-solving session per week.
Prerequisite: PHY 2048C.
Corequisite: MAC 2313.
This course is a combined lecture/laboratory course
designed primarily to meet the requirements for
majors in engineering or the physical sciences,
as a continuation of the classical physics topics series
initiated in PHY 2048C. Topics include electricity and
magnetism, wave motion (including sound and
radiation), geometrical optics.
PLA 1003 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL TECHNOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to provide an overview of the
training and purpose of legal assistants. The course
surveys the structure of the legal system and various
fields of law, and discusses the ethical and professional
standards that apply to legal assistants and lawyers.
The course emphasizes legal procedures and terminology and introduces basic legal research and writing.
PLA 1104 F
LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING I (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: PLA 1003.
This course provides the student with an in-depth
examination of the law library and the processes of
legal research. It also provides information on how to
write interoffice legal memoranda.
230
PLA 2114 W
LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING II (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisites: PLA 1104 and PLA 1003.
An advanced course in legal writing and research
intended to familiarize the practicing and potential
legal assistant with the problems and procedures in
legal drafting, writing and research. It also provides
information on how to prepare memorandums of law.
PLA 2201 F
LITIGATION PROCEDURES (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: PLA 1003.
This course covers the Florida rules of civil procedures.
It also includes preparation for pleadings, motions and
discovery documents, as well as for trial and appeals.
PLA 2273 W
TORTS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: PLA 1003.
This course presents the fundamental principles of tort
law. It includes negligence, strict liability and other
special liability theories (including products liability and
non-physical harm). Emphasis is placed on damages
and tort defenses.
PLA 2600 F
WILLS, TRUSTS AND PROBATE
ADMINISTRATION (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: PLA 1003.
This is a study of the legal aspects of the preparation of
wills and trusts, as well as the probating of estates. It
also covers the procedures involved in accounting,
administrations, gifts, life insurance, and estate planning.
PLA 2610 F
REAL ESTATE LAW AND PROPERTY
TRANSACTIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: PLA 1003.
This course is designed to familiarize the practicing
and potential legal assistant with the problems and
procedures in real estate law and property transactions,
and includes the drafting of various kinds of real estate
contracts and agreements.
PLA 2803 W
LAWS OF FAMILY RELATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: PLA 1003.
This course is designed to familiarize the practicing
and potential legal assistant with problems and
procedures related to the laws of domestic relations
and covers such topics as divorce, separation,
adoption, guardianship, and support.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
POS 2041 F, W, S
AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
Particular attention is devoted to the Constitution, the
three branches of the federal government, parties,
pressure groups and current issues. ✒
POS 2112 W
STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
The course is a study of the chief political problems
facing these governments, the functions of the
governments, and the services they provide.
PSC 1101 F, W, S
EARTH SCIENCE (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is a broad survey, at the introductory level,
of topics in geology, oceanography, meteorology, and
astronomy. Students are introduced to basic concepts
and current theories in the aforementioned fields. It is
designed to make the student more aware of his or
her physical environment and the dynamic planet on
which we all live.
PSY 2012 F, W, S
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
This course introduces the student to the study of
behavior as a science, the design of experiments,
statistical analysis of data, basic vocabulary, classical
experiments, major contributors, and current trends in
the discipline. This course may be available online or
by television. ✒
PSY 2012H (upon request only)
HONORS GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101 and admission
to the Community of Scholars program, students
with 3.3 or higher GPA, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed for students capable of
intensive investigation into the study of behavior,
classical experiments, major contributors, and current
trends in psychology. Course includes computer
simulations, requires research and completion of a
3,000-word (APA style) Gordon Rule requirement. ✒
PSY 2930 F, W
SPECIAL TOPICS: PSYCHOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY 2012.
This course centers around topics of current interest or
of special interest to students or instructors. Topics or
focus may vary from semester to semester. Topics will
be identified by the PSY 2930 title published in the
course schedules for each term that the course is
offered. May be repeated for credit. Special topics
credit hours are not automatically transferable.
Transfer credit is the prerogative of the receiving
institution.
REA 0001C F, W, S
COLLEGE PREP READING I
(4 compensatory credits).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
This reading course is a requirement for the student
scoring 59 or below on the CPT: it focuses on
reading comprehension (with emphasis on literal
comprehension), vocabulary and study skills
improvement, and does not satisfy any degree
requirements in communications. No student may
enroll in this course more than three times without
paying full cost of instruction.
REA 0002C F, W, S
COLLEGE PREP READING II
(4 compensatory credits).
3 hours lecture and 1 hour laboratory per week.
This reading course is a requirement for the student
scoring between 60 and 82 on the reading section of
the state-approved college entrance examination, the
CPT, or the equivalent to these scores on the SAT or
ACT, or a standardized test approved by the reading
department of CFCC. Students of REA 0001– the first
level reading course–are also required to take this
course, with the exception of those whose exit score
is equivalent to a CPT score of 83 or higher. This
course focuses on expanding the reading skills and
strategies introduced in the first college prep reading
course for improvement in comprehension,
vocabulary, critical thinking, and study skills. This
second level college prep reading course does not
satisfy any degree requirements in communications.
No student may enroll in this course more than
three times without paying full cost of instruction.
RED 1010 W, S
INTRODUCTION TO READING EDUCATION (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to provide a study in reading
concepts and strategies suitable for education majors
needing course work for teacher re-certification or
paraprofessional training. The topics covered will
include reading foundations, phonics, vocabulary,
comprehension, fluency, classroom organization and
professional collaboration. The topics are in alignment
with the Sunshine State Standards, the Marion, Citrus
and Levy Counties’ reading curricula, and the “No
Child Left Behind Act.”
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
REE 2040 (upon request only)
REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES I (4).
4 hours per week.
An introduction to real estate principles and practices,
with successful completion qualifying the student to
take the state of Florida’s real estate salesperson
examination.
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231
REL 2210 F
THE OLD TESTAMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is an introduction to the Old Testament. It
deals with the history, geography, religion and
important personalities of ancient Israel and its
surrounding peoples. Attention will also be given to
the influence of the Bible on Western culture.
REL 2240 W
THE NEW TESTAMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
An introduction to the New Testament, which involves a
study of the Graeco-Roman and Jewish background of
early Christianity, the personality and teachings of
Jesus, the work and thought of Paul, and the
development of the church. Attention also will be given
to the influence of the Bible on Western culture.
REL 2300 F, W, S
COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
A beginning course for students having no previous
college training in the comparative study of religion. The
major features of 11 great religious traditions are studied
as the means for obtaining an insight into the nature
and expression of people’s religious aspirations. ✒
REL 2300H W
HONORS COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101 and admission
to the Community of Scholars program, students
with 3.3 or higher GPA, or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the major religions of the world,
designed especially for honors students. Careful
readings of primary texts will be emphasized. ✒
RTV 2261L F, W
ADVANCED NEWSWRITING
AND PRODUCTION (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: RTV 2300.
This advanced broadcast newswriting and production
course is geared to give students hands-on field
experience in gathering, writing and producing news
packages for television, and giving them on-air
experience.
RTV 2300 F
INTRODUCTION TO
BROADCAST NEWSWRITING (3).
Corequisite: ENC 1101.
This course prepares students to select and locate
various sources of news for broadcast, and to use
basic broadcast writing style. Students are also
exposed to the roles performed in a news production
team, basic technology associated with production,
and preparation of broadcast scripts. News team
232
members will participate in a weekly news magazine
show featuring events and people at CFCC.
SBM 2000 F
SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
A study of the management concepts underlying the
operation of a small business including planning,
locating, operating, evaluating and controlling the
enterprise. Fundamentals of financing, budgeting,
marketing, promotion, and profit analysis are examined.
SLS 1301
CAREER DEVELOPMENT (1).
2.5 hours per week.
This course is for students who are undecided or need
clarification in choosing a major course of study at a
university and/or a career path. It includes the study of
foundations of career development including choice,
educational and life planning, personal and
environmental assessment. Emphasis is given to
personal experiences of students and to skills needed
for effective academic, life and career planning.
SLS 1501 F, W, S
COLLEGE AND CAREER SUCCESS (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to build and reinforce skills
necessary for college and career success. Topics
include: learning styles, time management techniques,
learning skills (reading, note-taking, critical thinking
and writing), people skills (understanding diversity and
relationships), and career planning.
SLS 1715
PEER EDUCATION LEADERSHIP TRAINING (1).
1 hour per week.
Prerequisite: must complete any college
preparatory courses with a grade of “C” or higher.
This course trains Peer Educator participants to
provide information and referral resource knowledge
to other college students. Completion of this course is
mandatory to maintain Peer Educator status.
SLS 2261 F, W, S
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
This course is for individuals who wish to develop their
leadership skills. It is designed to aid students in
increasing their understanding of themselves and the
theories and techniques of leadership and group
processes. Topics include using logic and creativity in
decision making, resolving conflict, time management,
and leadership ethics. ✒
SOP 2602 F
APPLIED HUMAN RELATIONS (3).
3 hours per week.
This course deals with the multifaceted aspects of
human relations from a managerial standpoint. Emphasis
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
is on communications, motivation, leadership, personal
problems at work, and employee management in
relation to the economy. While primarily business
oriented, the principles are applicable to all phases
of life.
SOW 1031 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK.
3 hours per week.
An introduction to the field of social work for those
interested in careers in social welfare or related human
service fields. Topics include the history of social
welfare, values and ethics, the profession of social
work, and current issues in social work.
SPA 1612 F, W
INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I (4).
4 hours per week.
An introduction to the linguistic structure and
conceptual vocabulary of American Sign Language as
used by deaf adults. The course emphasizes the
development of sign language skills and the ability to
translate from ASL to English and English to ASL.
Various sign systems and regional signs will also be
described. The course also describes the history,
values, and culture of deaf persons in America.
SPA 1613 W, S
INTRODUCTION TO
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II (4).
4 hours per week.
Prerequisite: SPA 1612 or equivalent.
This course is a continuation of SPA 1380, emphasizing
intermediate level sign vocabulary, increasingly complex
grammatical construction, idioms, inflectional usage, and
the development of intermediate receptive and expressive
conversational American Sign Language skills.
SPA 1614 F, S
INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN SIGN
LANGUAGE III (4).
Prerequisite: SPA 1613 or equivalent.
SPA 1614 is an advanced American Sign Language
class which will focus on interpreting, transliterating,
and knowing the interpreter’s code of ethics. Students
must have prerequisites or teacher approval indicating
previous training in ASL and knowledge of Deaf
culture. This course, through video-taped peer
practice sessions, receptive video tape practice and
live interpreting/transliterating will provide students
with experiences in problem-solving, vocabularybuilding, fingerspelling, and visual orientation.
Successful students will emerge with skills necessary
to pass the EIE QA Level I FRID test as well as an
understanding of the difference between the EIE and
the General Test.
SPC 2594 F, W
INTERCOLLEGIATE FORENSICS SPEECH
1 credit hour–repeatable up to 3 credits
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
With admission by permission of instructor, SPC 2594
is a speech course designed for intercollegiate
competition stressing understanding and using
effective platform interpretive speaking techniques,
including debate and oral interpretation. Students will
compete in tournaments against other colleges. Class
activities are comprised of weekly laboratory sessions
during which students prepare for competition.
SPC 2600 F, W, S (offered online F, W)
EFFECTIVE SPEAKING (3).
3 hours per week.
Corequisite: ENC 1101 or equivalent.
The nature and basic principles of speech, with
emphasis on improving speaking and listening skills
common to all forms of communication through a
variety of experiences in public speaking.
SPC 2600H
HONORS EFFECTIVE SPEAKING (3).
Prerequisite: acceptance into the Community of
Scholars Honors or permission of instructor.
This course is designed for students capable of
intensive study into the historical aspects of speech
communication, preparation of speeches addressing
principles of argumentation and debate, and
preparation and delivery of speeches that investigate
the principles of reasoning and motivating, as well as
the analytical skills needed to construct arguments
and refutation.
SPC 2601 F, W
INTERMEDIATE EFFECTIVE SPEAKING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Forensics only. This course continues the study and
application of communication strategies in speaking
extemporaneously. The student will develop informative
and persuasive expertise, learn modes and techniques
of delivery, use guidelines for special occasions and
motivational appeals, and practice answering questions
from the audience.
SPN 1120 F, W, S, telecourses
ELEMENTARY SPANISH I (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
This course stresses fundamentals of grammar and
drills in pronunciation and reading, with special
emphasis on oral expression in the language.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
233
SPN 1121 F, W, S
ELEMENTARY SPANISH II (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: SPN 1120 or equivalent.
A continuation of SPN 1120. The course continues to
stress fundamentals of grammar and drills in pronunciation and reading, with special emphasis on oral
expression in the language.
SPN 2200 F, S
INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: SPN 1121 or equivalent.
This course is designed to develop ability to read with
comprehension from materials dealing with the Spanish
and Spanish-American civilization.
SPN 2201 W, S
INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II (4).
3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: SPN 2200 or equivalent.
A continuation of SPN 2200. This course continues
to develop ability to read with comprehension from
materials dealing with the Spanish and SpanishAmerican civilization.
STA 2023 F, W, S
ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAT 1033 with a grade of “C” or better.
A study of descriptive statistics, probability theory,
random variables, hypothesis tests, confidence intervals,
beta errors, and comparison of two sample means.
SYG 2000 F, W
INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
A course to help students better understand the
evolution, structures and functions of our present
society, as well as predicted trends in various social
institutions, such as family, education and religion.
Also helps students make connections between the
larger society and their own life experiences. This
course may be available online or by television. ✒
SYG 2430 F, W
MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY (3).
3 hours per week.
An exploration of the diversity and complexity of
intimate relationships, especially in marriage and
the family. Topics include dating, courtship, sexual
values and behavior, communication and conflict
resolution, parenting, alternative family forms and
families in transition. This course may be available
online or by television.
234
TAX 2000 F
FEDERAL INCOME TAX I (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is designed to familiarize the student with
the various rules governing and procedures used in
the preparation of individual federal income tax returns.
TAX 2010 W
FEDERAL INCOME TAX II (3).
3 hours per week.
This course examines installment and deferred payment
sales, dividends, inventories, deductions for expenses,
depreciation and investment credits, depletion, bad
debt deduction, and income averaging. Particular
emphasis is given to these and related topics in
preparation of corporation income tax returns.
THE 1000 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO THE THEATER (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
Offers the student an appreciation of the theater as a
group art form through study of its historical development, literature and theory, with attention placed
on its dramatic structure, techniques, and the various
forms and modes of dramatic composition. ✒
THE 1925 F, W
PLAY PRODUCTION (3).
3 hours per week.
Practical, hands-on study of theater from the perspective of the technician, the actor and the director.
Students will perform in a one-act play. Course
requires limited work outside class.
THE 2925 F, W
PRODUCTION AND PERFORMANCE (1).
3 hours per week.
Participation in the production program of the
curriculum with work in technical or performance
aspects of major theater productions and one-act plays.
This course may be repeated for credit. Assignments
and grades are based on contract with the instructor.
THE 2927 F, W
ADVANCED PLAY PRODUCTION (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
The principles of dramatic interpretation and stagecraft
are applied in laboratory production of plays. May be
repeated for credit. Assignments and grades are
based on contract with the instructor.
TPA 2070 W
SCENE PAINTING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
This course includes the study and application of
stage scenery painting technique involving equipment,
preparation, mixing and layout. This course includes
lab work on actual stage productions.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
TPA 2212 (as needed)
SOUND PRODUCTION FOR THE THEATRE (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
This course includes the practical use of sound on the
stage, including the properties of microphones,
speakers, amplifiers, and control systems. It also
incorporates hands-on experience in sound for stage
productions. The course includes lab work on actual
stage productions.
TPA 2220 F
STAGE LIGHTING (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
The practical use of lighting on stage, including the
properties of light and color, instruments and control
systems, plus hands-on experience in lighting and
designing stage productions. This course includes lab
work on actual stage productions.
TPA 2232 F, W
BEGINNING COSTUME AND MAKE-UP (3).
3 hours per week.
This course is an introduction to costuming for the
theater. Subjects to be covered include: safety and
health issues for the costumer; job descriptions and
positions in the costuming field; fabric identification;
overview of patterning options; basic hand and
machine sewing techniques; measurements, fitting
and alterations; costume research; pre-production and
production period and budget; stage make-up: basic,
old age and specialty; and portfolio development.
Students will be involved in building the fall and spring
show and will be expected to work outside of class
when necessary.
TPP 2100 F, W
ACTING I (3).
3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: THE 1925 or permission of instructor.
A course in movement, voice, and acting, with primary
emphasis on performance of monologues, scenes and
class exercises. Students will also read and analyze
plays and study various theories of acting.
WOH 1012 F, W, S, offered online
WORLD CIVILIZATIONS I (3).
3 hours per week.
A survey of our past, emphasizing the intellectual,
cultural, political and economic forces that have
shaped our modern heritage from the civilizations of
Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Medieval
Christendom, Islam, Africa and the Far East. This course
may be available online or by television. ✒
WOH 1012H F
HONORS WORLD CIVILIZATIONS I (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101 and admission
to the Community of Scholars program, students
with a 3.3 or higher GPA, or permission of instructor.
An interpretive introduction to the events, ideas,
movements and literature of the ancient and medieval
world. This course will be conducted in seminar form,
and students are expected to read and write
extensively. Admission to this course is selective. ✒
WOH 1022 F, W, S, offered online
WORLD CIVILIZATIONS II (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
A survey of the major civilizations of the modern world.
Topics include the Age of Reason, the French
Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, liberalism and
socialism, European nationalism, imperialism, the
Great War, the Russian Revolution, fascism, national
socialism, totalitarianism, World War II, nationalism in
Africa and Asia, the Cold War and the post-Cold War
world. This course may be available online or by
television. ✒
WOH 1022H W
HONORS WORLD CIVILIZATIONS II (3).
3 hours per week.
Admission to the Community of Scholars program,
students with a 3.3 or higher GPA, or permission of
instructor.
An interpretive introduction to the events, ideas,
movements and literature of modern world history.
This course is conducted in seminar form, and
students are expected to read and write extensively.
Admission to this course is selective. ✒
WST 2010 F
INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S STUDIES (3).
3 hours per week. G-4000.
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENC 1101.
An interdisciplinary study of the experiences and
perceptions of women in Western culture. Readings
from literature, philosophy, history, psychology and
other academic disciplines will be used to examine
topics such as women and politics, women in the work
force, women and sexuality, and women in the arts. ✒
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
235
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
(Course prefix determined by area of study)
1949-d F, W, S
WORK EXPERIENCE I (1-6).
Available to all disciplines except Nursing and EMT.
Prerequisites: completion of 12 semester hours of
course work, a minimum grade point average of
2.0, satisfaction of employer work requirements,
and approval of the Cooperative Education office.
First work experience (or internship) in the Cooperative
Education program, in a job (or voluntary learning
activity) directly related to the student’s academic
major and career objective. Grade determined by the
Co-op office.
2949-d
WORK EXPERIENCE II (1-6).
Available to all disciplines except Nursing and EMT.
Prerequisites: successful completion of 1949, a
minimum grade point average of 2.0, satisfaction of
employer work requirements, and approval by the
Cooperative Education office.
A second work experience (or voluntary internship
activity) as a continuation of Work Experience I, or a
change in learning assignment with approval by the
Co-op office.
The State of Florida Articulation Agreement
specifies that no more than 7 semester hours of
co-op credit may be applied toward the Associate
in Arts degree.
Business and Economics
ACG 1949 Accounting Co-op I
ACG 2949 Accounting Co-op II
ETD 1949 Drafting and Design Co-op I
ETD 2949 Drafting and Design Co-op II
MAN 1948 Management Co-op I
MAN 1949 Management Co-op II
MAR 1949 Marketing Co-op I
MAR 2949 Marketing Co-op II
Legal Assistant Co-op I
PLA 1949
Health Information Management
HIM 1949
Health Information Management
Co-op I
HIM 2949
Health Information Management
Co-op II
Hospitality and Tourism
HFT 1949
Hospitality and Tourism Co-op I
HFT 2949
Hospitality and Tourism Co-op II
236
Communications/Fine Arts
MMC 1949 Communications Co-op I
Culinary Arts
FSS 1949
Culinary Arts Co-op I
Computer Information and
Computer Engineering Technology
CET 1949 Comp. Eng. Co-op I
CET 2949 Comp. Eng. Co-op II
CIT 1949
Computer Info Tech Co-op II
CIT 2949
Computer Info Tech Co-op II
COP 1949 Internet Services Co-op I
COP 2949 Internet Services Co-op II
Criminal Justice
CCJ 1949 Criminal Justice Co-op I
Humanities
HUM 1949 Museum Internship Co-op I
HUM 2949 Museum Internship Co-op II
Music
MUE 1949 Music Education Co-op Experience I
Office Systems Technology
OST 1949 Administrative Assistant Co-op I
Legal Secretary Co-op I
Medical Secretary Co-op I
Medical Transcriptionist Co-op I
Social and Behavioral Sciences
EDE 1949 Education Co-op I
HUS 1948 Social Service Co-op I (4 cr. hours)
HUS 1949 Social Service Co-op II (3 cr. hours)
PSY 1949
Psychology Co-op I
PSY 2949
Psychology Co-op II
Wellness/Fitness
PET 1949
Recreation Technology Co-op I
PET 2949
Recreation Technology Co-op II
Note: Cooperative Education courses I and II
are available to students in all disciplines. If
discipline or course level (I or II) is not listed,
students should contact the Cooperative
Education Coordinator two semesters prior to the
desired semester to take the needed course.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
POSTSECONDARY
ADULT
VOCATIONAL
CERTIFICATE
PROGRAMS
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
237
VOCATIONAL
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ACR 0000 F
INTRODUCTION TO AIR CONDITIONING (4).
An orientation to air conditioning, refrigeration and
heating techniques emphasizing general safety, tool
utilization, work organization and systems. An
introduction to air conditioning and refrigeration—
the history, the refrigeration cycle, tools of the trade
and principles of work management. Covers the
fundamental theory of all types of conventional
soldering and brazing, including the proper selection
of soldering and brazing materials.
ACR 0001 F
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS I (4).
A course designed to teach the physical principles of
refrigeration, including the understanding of matter
and heat behavior, temperature, pressure, volume,
enthalpy, state and condition of refrigerant, refrigerant
oil, contaminants and dehydration. Also communicates
a working knowledge of heating, air conditioning and
refrigeration systems, their components and accessories.
ACR 0002 W
INTERMEDIATE AIR CONDITIONING (4).
A course to cover the refrigeration cycle, compressors,
evaporators, condensers and system charging.
Communicates a working knowledge of air
conditioning and heating systems operations and the
start-up and check out procedures, as well as of air
conditioning, heating and refrigeration piping.
ACR 0100C F
APPLIED ELECTRICITY (4).
A course designed to teach the physical principles of
electricity and practices in air conditioning, heating
and refrigeration systems, the laws of energy, energy
equivalents, electrical components and circuits.
ACR 0106 W
APPLIED ELECTRICITY II (4).
A course designed to teach the advanced principles of
electricity and practices in air conditioning, heating
and refrigeration systems. Focuses on troubleshooting
air conditioning, heating and refrigeration electrical
control systems and their components, along with
wiring and troubleshooting electrical motors and their
components.
ACR 0202 S
REFRIGERATION FUNDAMENTALS II (3).
This course presents the operation of air conditioning,
heating and refrigeration testing equipment and
instruments as pertaining to the testing and servicing
of systems. Focuses on troubleshooting valves,
238
regulators and metering devises used in the air
conditioning, heating and refrigeration systems.
ACR 0303 W
AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION
CONTROLS AND REPAIR (4).
Course covers application of, installation of, servicing,
troubleshooting and repairing integrated electrical and
solid state controls as used in the air conditioning,
heating and refrigeration systems.
ACR 0600 S
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
FUNDAMENTALS (3).
A course designed to provide training in installation,
maintaining, troubleshooting, servicing and repairing
the latest designed air conditioning, heating and
refrigeration systems. Focuses on understanding and
determining the properties of air and the measurement
and testing of the same. The use of a pressure/enthalpy
chart to diagram a refrigeration cycle is also presented.
ACR 0930L F, W
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING SKILL
DEVELOPMENT LAB (3).
This course is designed for students to acquire
practical, hands-on experience in a laboratory setting,
and may be repeated as needed.
AER 0110C F
ENGINE REPAIR (3).
This course is designed to teach the principles
necessary to rebuild an automotive engine. It provides
training in cylinder head repair, lower block repair, and
front engine repair. It also provides diagnosis and repair
of other engine related sub-systems.
AER 0231 W
MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS/DRIVE LINES (3)
This course is designed to teach the principles,
operation, maintenance and repair of the automotive
drive line including clutches, transmissions/transaxles,
front and rear drive systems, and differential units.
AER 0250 W
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS/TRANSAXLES (3)
This course is designed to teach the principles and
operation of automatic transmissions/transaxles. It
provides practical experience in diagnosing,
removing, maintaining and repairing transmissions/
transaxles as they relate to both front and rear wheel
drive vehicles.
AER 0310C W
AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC
SYSTEMS (3).
This course covers electron theory, components,
symbols, basic electrical circuits, Ohm’s Law, series,
parallel and complex circuits. It provides experience
in the testing and diagnosis of batteries, lighting
systems, warning devices, horns, wipers, switches,
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
relays, solenoid, motors and other accessory
components and wiring circuits
the R-12 system to a retrofitted R134A air conditioning
system.
AER 0311C W
ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL/
ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS (3).
This course covers the operational theory, diagnosis,
repair and replacement of the automotive battery,
cranking motor and related starting components, the
alternator and related charging system components.
It also covers the ignition systems and related
components from the points/condenser system to the
direct induction systems of today.
AER 0930 F, W
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY SKILLS
DEVELOPMENT LAB (3).
This course is designed for students to continue to
further develop their practical skills. It may be repeated
each semester to allow students to continue their skill
development in any one of eight, or a combination of
the eight areas.
AER 0410C F
BRAKE SYSTEMS (3).
This course covers the theory of operation, diagnosis,
repair and replacement of the brake system and its
components. It also covers the physics of hydraulics,
drum brakes, disc brakes, parking brakes, power
assist units, lines and hydraulic components, electrical
brake components and circuitry, and anti-lock systems.
AER 0450 F
STEERING SUSPENSION AND ALIGNMENT (3).
This course is designed to teach the principles of
steering systems, suspension systems and wheel
alignment. It provides practical experience in the
diagnosis, repair and replacement of steering and
suspension components. The course also includes tire
repair, balancing, safety restraint systems and the
electrical circuitry associated with each system.
AER 0522 F
ENGINE PERFORMANCE I (3).
This course covers the integrated systems that make
the engine a performance power plant. It covers basic
engine testing in regard to compression, fuel and
spark delivery. The importance of a well-balanced
emission system is stressed. It also covers the basic
testing techniques for the ignition, fuel, electrical and
emission system components of the engine.
AER 0523 F
ENGINE PERFORMANCE II (3).
This course teaches the student the proper techniques
of testing sensors, controllers and other related
components of the computerized fuel injected systems
of today. This course concentrates on the use of
diagnostic test equipment such as the DDM, scanners,
ignition analyzers, lab scopes and emission testers.
AER 0610 W
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING SYSTEMS (3).
This course teaches the operational principles,
diagnosis, repair and replacement of both air
conditioning and heating systems. It covers the
environmental impact that refrigerants have on the
atmosphere. It also covers the proper refrigerant
recovery techniques needed to meet EPA regulations.
The student will also study the essentials of converting
ARR 0001 F
INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMOTIVE
COLLISION REPAIR (3).
Course covers auto body construction, basic hand
and power tools, damage assessment, shop safety
and procedures, metal straightening, shrinking sheet
metal, filling dents. Also includes principles of metal
repair using hammers, dolly blocks, and picks;
principles of oxyacetylene welding equipment; setup
and use of equipment and welding safety procedures.
ARR 0121 F
AUTOMOTIVE BODY REFINISHING (6).
Course covers surface preparation for painting, metal
straightening, filling dents, sanding, masking,
preparing paint, matching colors, spray painting
equipment, advanced techniques of sanding, seating
and applying paint.
ARR 0122 F
AUTOMOTIVE BODY REFINISHING II (6).
Course covers advanced spot repair methods, base
coat/clear coat and tri-coat refinishing, custom
finishing and advanced color match techniques.
ARR 0125L W
REPAIR AND REFINISHING SKILL
DEVELOPMENT LAB (3).
Covers overall refinishing preparation, color-coat/clearcoat refinishing, acrylic-enamel and polyurethane
preparation and application, auto detailing, troubleshooting the paint finish, color matching, paint
formulation, fillers and their application. Course allows
students to acquire practical, hands-on experience in a
laboratory setting, and may be repeated as needed.
ARR 0126L F
REPAIR AND REFINISHING SKILL
DEVELOPMENT LAB (5).
Covers overall refinishing preparation, color-coat/clearcoat refinishing, acrylic-enamel and polyurethane
preparation and application, auto detailing, troubleshooting the paint finish, color matching, paint
formulation, fillers and their application. Course allows
students to acquire practical, hands-on experience in a
laboratory setting, and may be repeated as needed.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
239
ARR 0292 W
AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR II (6).
Course includes damage assessment, straightening
panels, replacing fenders and panels, replacing
fenders and panels, cutting and welding, auto body
maintenance, and shop safety procedures.
ARR 0293 S
AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR III (6).
A course designed to teach replacement and repair of
body panels, auto glass, hoods and deck lids, doors,
door hardware, interior strip and weatherstrip, seats
and windows, moveable roof panels, and convertible
and vinyl tops.
ARR 0330 W
UNIBODY AND FRAME STRAIGHTENING (6).
Course designed to teach repairing and straightening
damaged vehicle frames, front suspension alignment,
and associated tasks.
BSC 0084 F, W, S
ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR HEALTH
OCCUPATIONS CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
(45 clock hours).
Required for Dental Assisting, Paramedic and
Practical Nursing programs.
A non-lab, non-transferable course which essentially
covers the basic elements of human anatomy and
physiology. Students will learn to name, locate and
describe all organs, and describe the functions of
body systems and their organs.
CJD 0254
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
MEDICAL FIRST RESPONDER (2).
This course provides students with the skills necessary
in emergency medical situations. Students will identify
the types of communicable diseases among adults,
and the symptoms of each disease. Objectives are
addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice
Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0704
CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEFENSIVE TACTICS (4).
Instruction includes the techniques used for an
officer’s personal safety and those necessary to
subdue and then transport resisting individuals. The
use of restraining devices, impact weapons, and
pressure points is examined. Objectives are
addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice
Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0705
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WEAPONS (2).
Instruction in the use of officers’ firearms, including
handguns and shotguns. Safety procedures and
ammunition use are covered. Instruction includes the
use of chemical agents, with practical exercises
240
provided. Objectives are addressed as specified by the
Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0710
CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL I (2).
This is an overview of the criminal justice system and a
history of law. The basic components of law are
studied, with specific focus on officer application.
Court procedures and testimony are examined. The
concepts of probation and parole, and the philosophy
of corrections, are studied. Objectives are addressed
as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0711
CRIMINAL JUSTICE LEGAL II (2).
Evidence procedures, arrest laws, search and seizure,
and various statutory laws that are common to
correctional officers are studied. Constitutional law and
its application to the public and officers is studied. Civil
and criminal liability of officers is studied. Elements of
crimes are topics examined in this course. Objectives
are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice
Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0712
CRIMINAL JUSTICE COMMUNICATIONS (2).
Interpersonal communication skills are studied, along
with telephone and radio procedures. The report
writing process is covered from the interview through
the final report product. Interviewing and interrogation
techniques are covered. Objectives are addressed as
specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0713
CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERPERSONAL SKILLS I (2).
The needs of various groups within society are
covered, including the elderly, the physically
handicapped, and substance abusers. Suicide
intervention and crisis intervention techniques are
studied. Community relations techniques and
courtesy are examined. Objectives are addressed as
specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0723
LAW ENFORCEMENT VEHICLE OPERATION (1).
The police driving environment is examined, and
practical exercises are conducted on the driving
range. Objectives are addressed as specified by the
Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0730
LAW ENFORCEMENT LEGAL III (1).
Various criminal laws and their elements are studied.
Traffic and driver license laws are studied. Legal
considerations of officer vehicle operation are
examined. Emphasis is placed on those laws specific
to police application. Objectives are addressed as
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0731
LAW ENFORCEMENT PATROL (2).
The daily skills and techniques that are required by
officers to do patrol tactics and respond to various
types of calls are examined. Practical exercises in the
methods of approach for high-risk situations are
included. Objectives are addressed as specified by the
Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0732
LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAFFIC (1).
Traffic enforcement concepts and control concepts
are studied. Traffic accident investigation, scene
management, and reporting procedures are examined.
DUI offenses and enforcement are studied, as well as
DUI detection methods. Objectives are addressed as
specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0734
LAW ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS (2).
Examines the investigation of various crimes, including
property crimes and persons crimes. Other offenses
include narcotics violations, vice crimes, terrorist
activity and death investigation. Objectives are addressed
as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0741
CORRECTIONS EMERGENCY
PREPAREDNESS (1).
Examined are the skills needed for riot and
disturbance control and firefighting. Riot prevention
and handling of unusual occurrences are studied.
Students will examine techniques for dealing with
being taken hostage. Objectives are addressed as
specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0750
CORRECTIONS INTERPERSONAL SKILLS II (2).
The interpersonal skills needed by corrections officers
to understand the incarcerated society are explored.
Inmate adjustment and the various segments of the
inmate society are examined. Includes the study of
female inmates, deception and manipulation by
inmates. Objectives are addressed as specified by the
Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0752
CORRECTIONS OPERATIONS (2).
The intake of new inmates is studied, as well as all
aspects of their daily care. Institution procedures
and techniques utilized by officers to perform daily
tasks are examined. Objectives are addressed as
specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0760
LAW ENFORCEMENT LEGAL I (1).
This is an overview of the criminal justice system and a
history of law. The basic components of law are
studied, with specific focus on officer application.
Court procedures and testimony are examined. The
concepts of probation and parole and the philosophy
of corrections are studied. Objectives are addressed
as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0761
LAW ENFORCEMENT LEGAL II (2).
Evidence procedures, arrest laws, search and seizure,
and various statutory laws that are common to police
and correctional officers are studied. Constitutional law
and its application to the public and officers is studied.
Civil and criminal liability of officers is studied.
Elements of crimes are topics examined in this course.
Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal
Justice Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0762
LAW ENFORCEMENT COMMUNICATIONS (2).
Interpersonal communication skills are studied, along
with telephone and radio procedures. The report
writing process is covered from the interview through
the final report product. Interviewing and interrogation
techniques are covered. Objectives are addressed as
specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
CJD 0763
LAW ENFORCEMENT INTERPERSONAL
SKILLS I (2).
The needs of various groups within society are covered,
including the elderly, the physically handicapped, and
substance abusers. Suicide intervention and crisis
intervention techniques are studied. Community
relations techniques and courtesy are examined.
Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal
Justice Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0770
CORRECTIONS LEGAL I (1).
This is an overview of the criminal justice system and
a history of law. The basic components of law are
studied, with specific focus on officer application.
Court procedures and testimony are examined. The
concepts of probation and parole, and the philosophy
of corrections are studied. Objectives are addressed
as specified by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission.
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
CJD 0771
CORRECTIONS LEGAL II (1).
Evidence procedures, arrest laws, search and seizure,
and various statutory laws that are common to
correctional officers are studied. Constitutional law and
its application to the public and officers is studied. Civil
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
241
and criminal liability of officers is studied. Elements of
crimes are topics examined in this course. Objectives
are addressed as specified by the Criminal Justice
Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0772
CORRECTIONS COMMUNICATIONS (1).
Interpersonal communication skills are studied, along
with telephone and radio procedures. The report
writing process is covered from the interview through
the final report product. Interviewing techniques are
covered. Objectives are addressed as specified by the
Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
CJD 0773
CORRECTIONS INTERPERSONAL SKILLS I (2).
The needs of various groups within society are covered,
including the elderly, the physically handicapped, and
substance abusers. Suicide intervention and crisis
intervention techniques are studied. Community
relations techniques and courtesy are examined.
Objectives are addressed as specified by the Criminal
Justice Standards and Training Commission.
CJK 0005
INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT.
This is a basic course which provides an introductory
overview of the criminal justice system, basis of laws,
interpersonal communications, ethics and criminal
justice values. Objectives are addressed as specified
by CJSTC.
CJK 0010
HUMAN ISSUES.
This is a continuation of CJK 0005 Introduction to Law
Enforcement. This is a basic course in which the
student will be provided with information about mental
retardation and mental illness and how to deal with
individuals with these illnesses. The student will also
be provided information concerning alcohol and
substance abuse, and persons with physical
disabilities. In addition, the student will receive
information on street gangs and dealing with the
elderly population. Objectives are addressed as
specified by CJSTC.
CJK 0015
COMMUNICATIONS.
This is a continuation of CJK 0005, Introduction to Law
Enforcement and CJK 0010, Introduction to Law
Enforcement Part 2. This is a basic course in which the
student will be introduced to report writing, interviewing,
taking statements, and the use of telecommunications.
The student will learn officer safety and survival skills,
crisis intervention techniques, and community oriented
policing. Objectives are addressed as specified by
CJSTC.
242
CJK 0020
VEHICLE OPERATIONS.
This is a basic course in which the components of
the police driving environment are explored, and
practical exercises on the driving range are conducted.
Objectives are addressed as specified by CJSTC.
CJK 0030
MEDICAL FIRST RESPONDER.
This course will provide the student with the
techniques needed in emergency medical situations.
In addition, students will comprehend the major types
of communicable diseases among adults, the signs
and symptoms of each disease, and the methods of
transmission. This course will also introduce the
student to the regulatory requirements that apply to
first responders to hazardous materials incidents.
Objectives are addressed as specified by CJSTC.
CJK 0040
FIREARMS.
This course will introduce the student in the use of
firearms including handguns and shotguns. Safety
procedures and ammunition use are covered in
lecture format. Instruction includes the practical
exercises. Objectives are addressed as specified by
CJSTC.
CJK 0050
DEFENSIVE TACTICS.
This is a basic course of instruction which includes the
techniques used for an officer's personal safety and
those necessary to subdue, and then transport
resisting individuals. The use of restraining devices,
impact weapons, and pressure points are covered. In
addition the student will receive instruction in the use
of chemical agents, with practical exercises included.
Objectives are addressed as specified by CJSTC.
CJK 0060
PATROL.
This is a basic course which addresses the daily skills
and techniques that are necessary for officers to do
patrol tactics and respond to various types of calls.
Objectives are addressed as specified by CJSTC.
CJK 0070
INVESTIGATIONS.
This basic course includes methods and skills for
conducting an initial investigation; procedures for
crime scene management; identifying elements of a
crime; evidence collection and handling; interviewing
witnesses, victims and suspects; and preparing
investigation reports. Objectives are addressed as
specified by CJSTC.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
CJK 0075
INVESTIGATING OFFENSES.
This course includes the causes and effects of
domestic violence, procedures for referral and why it is
important for law enforcement to intervene; factors and
symptoms that signal suicide risk; methods and skills
for conducting an initial investigation into a death with
an unknown cause. Objectives are addressed as
specified by CJSTC.
CJK 0080
TRAFFIC STOPS.
This course includes methods and skills for stopping a
vehicle for violation or other lawful reason; infractions;
types of criminal violations and their element’;
abandoned vehicle handling; procedures for making a
felony stop and legal issues regarding traffic stops.
The objectives addressed as specified by CJSTC.
CJK 0085
TRAFFIC CRASH INVESTIGATIONS.
In this course the student will study traffic enforcement
and concepts, traffic crash investigations, scene
management, and reporting procedures. Objectives
are addressed as specified by CJSTC.
CJK 0090
TACTICAL APPLICATIONS.
In this course the student will learn the Florida court
system structure, courtroom demeanor; what to do
when first response to emergency situations; how to
handle bomb calls and WMD calls; and crowd control.
Objectives are addressed as specified by CJSTC.
COS 0001 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO COSMETOLOGY (4).
Introduction to Cosmetology covers school rules and
regulations, familiarization with the department,
facilities and equipment. Also covers personal and
public hygiene, proper sanitizing procedures for tools
and equipment, diagnosis and recognition of hair and
scalp disorders, selection and application of
appropriate treatments, and scalp manipulations.
COS 0080 F, W, S
BARBERING/COSMETOLOGY LAB (4).
Instruction and learning activities are provided in a
laboratory setting using hands-on experience with
chemicals, implements and equipment appropriate
to the program’s content and in accordance with
current practices in the trade. This course may be
repeated for credit.
COS 0081 F, W, S
COSMETOLOGY/BARBERING LAB II (4).
Instruction and learning activities are provided in a
laboratory setting using hands-on application of
intermediate-level skills. May be repeated to attain
required credits.
COS 0082 F, W, S
COSMETOLOGY/BARBERING LAB III (4).
Instruction and learning activities are structured to
prepare students for the school-to-work transition. May
be repeated to attain required credits.
COS 0320 F, W, S
SHAVES, BEARDS, AND MUSTACHE TRIM (4).
Identify a suitable design for the mustache and/or beard
in relation to client’s nose and face. Procedures examined
for trimming a mustache or beard including preparing
the client, performing the shaving and/or trimming,
and performing final cleansing of face and neck.
COS 0400 F, W, S
HAIR DESIGN (4).
Provides proper identification, care and use of hair
shaping implements; basic sectioning for shaping;
various guidelines, elevation and thinning techniques;
related instruction including study of various hair
textures and cutting techniques. Includes basic
procedures for finger waves, pin curls, and rollers for
wet sets; heat styling with blower, curling irons,
pressing combs or electric rollers; elements of combout techniques, related instruction including study of
features and hair textures.
COS 0500 F, W, S
INTRODUCTION TO BARBERING (4).
Provides students with beginning theoretical and
practical procedures of barbering. The basic topics
and tasks to be covered are: history of barbering;
professional image and ethics; bacteriology; sterilization
and sanitation; safe and efficient work practices; implements, tools and equipment; skin, scalp and hair
structure; disorders and treatments of hair and skin;
massage; and facial treatments. Students are required
to perform an oral presentation on the history of
barbering, make presentations in cooperative
learning groups.
COS 0644 F, W, S
CHEMICAL HAIR RESTRUCTURING (4).
Covers basic permanent-waving including hair and
scalp analysis and study of the chemical processes
involved; variations of rod sizes; blocking; wrapping
techniques; processing, test curls, and neutralizers;
special problems in permanent waving; record keeping;
safety and sanitation. Also covers basic chemical
relaxing procedures, including hair and scalp analysis
and study of the chemical processes involved; applying,
processing and neutralizing chemical relaxers; special
problems in relaxing; related instruction including
chemistry of cold waving, heat waving, chemical breakdown and rebonding of hair; and chemistry of relaxers.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
243
COS 0700 F, W, S
HAIR COLOR AND BLEACH (4).
Focuses on identification of temporary, semipermanent and permanent hair color and bleach, and
the application of each; patch testing, strand testing,
hair and scalp analysis, and use of conditioners;
record keeping; safety and sanitation; mixing of
chemicals; related instruction covering basic laws of
color, procedures for virgin heads; retouch
applications for color and bleach; color level system;
stages of bleaching; various strengths and types of
bleach and their uses; chemistry of color and bleach.
Provides hands-on lab experience.
COS 0870 F, W, S
SALON MANAGEMENT (2).
Includes setup and operation of a cosmetology salon,
operating budget, site location, equipment list and
physical layout design; also, marketing, advertising
plans, appropriate accounting system and insurance
plan. Course also includes employability skills, job
interview, entrepreneurship, advantages and
disadvantages of business ownership.
CSP 0006 F, W, S
DISEASES AND DISORDERS OF THE SKIN (3).
Includes hands-on lab experience and instruction
including histology of the skin, disorders and diseases
of the skin, operation of electric equipment, hair removal,
and the study of cells, anatomy and physiology.
CSP 0010 F
MANICURE AND PEDICURE (4).
Provides techniques for French manicure, pedicures;
study of the nail and its diseases and disorders;
hands-on lab experience and workshops. New
products and techniques are added continually to
update course content.
CSP 0012 W
COSMETOLOGY SPECIALIST–NAILS (4).
Course includes instruction in safe and efficient work
practices; Florida cosmetology law and rules;
knowledge of Cosmetology Specialist–Nails and
related chemistry, bacteriology, anatomy and
physiology; development of skills in performing the
manipulative techniques required in the practice of
Cosmetology Specialist–Nails.
CSP 0300 W
FACIALS AND MAKEUP (3).
Focuses on procedures for plain facial, application of
masks and packs; use of electrical equipment; lash
and brow tinting; application of artificial lashes;
eyebrow tweezing and waxing; application of
makeup—daytime, evening and corrective; theory of
massage. Provides hands-on lab experience.
244
DEA 0029 F, W
DENTAL SPECIALTIES.
15 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DES 1800, DEA 0800L.
Corequisites: DEA 0850L, DES 1100.
The course introduces students to various types,
functions and operations of dental operatory and
laboratory equipment, especially in areas of surgical,
pediatric, prosthodontic, orthodontic, and endodontic
and periodontic dental operations.
DEA 0800L F, S
CLINIC PRACTICE I.
60 clock hours.
Corequisites: DES 1800, DES 1800L.
This competency-based clinical course provides real
world experiences for students while incorporating
skills learned in the lab courses. Students will perform
basic skills at the beginning of the course, but will
continue to incorporate more advanced skills as they
prove competency in various areas.
DEA 0805L F, S
DENTAL CLINIC SEMINAR.
16 clock hours.
Corequisites: DES 1800, DES 0500C.
This course is designed to study clinical concepts of
dental assisting. The course includes learning the
health care delivery system and health occupations, as
well as the basic concepts of microbiology and their
relevance to sterilization. The course also offers a
segment of legal and ethical responsibilities of the
dental health care worker.
DEA 0850L F, W
CLINIC PRACTICE III.
210 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DES 1800, DES 1800L.
Corequisites: DEA 0029, DES 1100.
The lab course requires the student to perform dental
assisting duties in the dental clinic with patients. The
student will function at the intermediate level of dental
assisting.
DEA 0851 W, S
CLINIC III SEMINAR.
15 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DEA 0850L, DES 1100.
Corequisites: DEA 0851L, DES 1840.
This course is designed to allow students to reflect
and share their experiences during DEA 0851L, Clinic
Practice III. Students are expected to view patient care
at an advanced level and describe symptoms,
treatments, recommendations and patient education
from their experiences as a dental assistant.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
DEA 0851L W, S
CLINIC PRACTICE III.
285 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DEA 0850L, DES 1100.
Corequisites: DEA 0851, DES 1840.
This course is a continuation of Clinic Practice II and
provides for a realistic setting for students to practice
their advanced skills as a dental assistant. Students
are assigned to clinic extramural rotations and the
student is expected to perform at an advanced level of
dental assisting.
DEA 1135 F, S
DENTAL MICROBIOLOGY.
15 clock hours.
This course is intended to familiarize the student with
the role of microorganisms in health and disease.
Organisms of concern to the dental practitioner/
auxiliary will receive particular attention.
DES 0500C F, S
DENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION.
15 clock hours.
Corequisite: DES 1800.
This course introduces students to the basic
psychological theories and how they relate to dental
patients and workers. The course concentrates on
written and verbal communication skills, and listening
skills. A portion of the study gives attention to verbal
and non-verbal responses and how to use those skills
working with patients and dental team members.
DES 1021 F, S
HEAD, NECK AND DENTAL ANATOMY.
45 clock hours.
Corequisites: DES 1030, DES 1800.
This course is a detailed study of the hard and soft
tissues of the head and neck with emphasis on the
oral cavity. The course will include a study of skeletal,
muscular, circulatory, and nervous systems of the
head and neck. Topics also include the development
and eruption of deciduous and permanent dentition.
DES 1030 F, S
HISTOLOGY/EMBRYOLOGY.
15 clock hours.
Corequisites: DES 1021, DES 1800.
This course involves the histological and embryonic
study of the development of the head and neck
structures. Included is a study of morphology of
tissues of the teeth and supporting structures.
DES 1044 W, S
ORAL PATHOLOGY.
45 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DEA 0850L, DES 1100.
Corequisites: DEA 0851L, DES 1830C.
This course studies the principles of general pathology
with the emphasis on those related to the oral cavity.
There is a concentration on recognition of normal and
abnormal conditions of the oral cavity and surrounding
tissues.
DES 1051 W, S
DENTAL PHARMACOLOGY.
30 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DEA 0029, DEA 0850L.
Corequisites: DES 1830C, DES 1600.
The course is designed to familiarize the student with
the basic concepts of pharmacology. Topics include
the use of PDR, the use, administrations, indications,
contraindications, adverse reactions and precautions
of pharmaceutics used in dentistry.
DES 1100 F, W
DENTAL MATERIALS.
30 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DES 1800, DEA 0800L.
Corequisites: DES 1100L, DEA 0850L.
This course familiarizes the student with the
nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of
dental materials, and the manipulations of these
materials. The topics are gypsum, restorative
materials, impression materials, dental waxes and
acrylics.
DES 1100L F, W
DENTAL MATERIALS LAB.
45 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DES 1800, DES 0800L.
Corequisite: DES 1100.
The laboratory course requires students to apply the
principles learned in Dental Materials lecture theory.
Students will manipulate materials and demonstrate
competency in the dental materials.
DES 1200 F, W
DENTAL RADIOLOGY.
30 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DES 1800, DEA 0800L.
Corequisites: DES 1200L, DEA 0850L.
This course provides the student with the fundamental
knowledge of physical and biological effects, and
safety methods of exposing, processing, mounting
and evaluating radiographs.
DES 1200L F, W
DENTAL RADIOLOGY LAB.
45 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DES 1800, DEA 0800L.
Corequisites: DES 1200, DEA 0850L.
This course provides the student with laboratory
experiences in exposing, processing, mounting and
evaluating diagnostic radiographs including digital
radiographs.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
245
DES 1502 F, S
DENTAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT.
45 clock hours.
Corequisites: DES 1800, DES 0800L.
This course introduces students to the elements of
efficient and productive dental office management
skills including phone skills, patients records
management, recall systems, appointment control,
resume writing, inventory control, bookkeeping, and
insurance management. There is a computer
component to the course.
DES 1840 W, S
PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY.
30 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DES 1200, DEA 0850L.
Corequisites: DEA 0851, DEA 0851L.
This course introduces students to the practice of
preventive dentistry by understanding the methods of
plaque control, patient education and fluoride
applications. There is an emphasis on developing
preventive programs for the dental office and
community.
DES 1600 W, S
DENTAL OFFICE EMERGENCIES.
15 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DEA 0850L, DES 0029.
Corequisites: DES 1051, DEA 0851.
This course provides students with the knowledge
base and practice in basic emergency management of
dental office emergencies. The student will be able to
recognize signs and symptoms of emergency
conditions and understand the treatment required for
the patient.
FSS 0252
FOOD PREPARATION WORKER I
5 Vocational Credits, 150 Contact Hours
Prerequisite: TABE test (w/minimum score of 9.0 in
reading, math and language).
This course introduces students to basic knowledge
and skills that include communication and math
required for food preparation workers. Students
identify career and job opportunities, examine and
practice employability skills, and function as team
members. Students develop safety and sanitation
habits and usages and care for commercial tools and
equipment. Students prepare basic food and beverage
items, and practice front-of-the-house skills.
DES 1800 F, S
INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PROCEDURES.
45 clock hours.
Corequisites: DES 1800L, DEA 0800L.
This core course introduces students to the practice of
chairside dental assisting. The course will provide
skills in recording medical/dental history, vital signs,
sterilization/asepsis, intro/extra oral exams, charting,
and assisting the dental team for restorative and
preventive dentistry.
DES 1800L F, S
INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PROCEDURES LAB.
60 clock hours.
Corequisites: DES 1800, DEA 0800L.
This course is a comprehensive course designed for
the student to participate in chairside assisting in a lab
environment. The course is competency based and
provides practice of skills necessary to function as a
vital role in the dental office. Students will also
demonstrate sterilization techniques, infection control,
record taking, dental charting and more.
DES 1830C W, S
EXPANDED FUNCTIONS WITH LAB.
75 clock hours.
Prerequisites: DEA 0850L, DES 1100.
Corequisites: DEA 0851L, DEA 0850.
The course will concentrate on the advanced dental
duties expected of a Certified Dental Assistant. This
would include sealants, placement and removal of
rubber dams, polishing of clinical crowns, fabrication
of temporary crowns, placement and removal of matrix
bands, and amalgam polishing.
246
FSS 0253
FOOD PREPARATION WORKER II.
5 Vocational Credits, 150 Contact Hours.
Prerequisite: FSS 0252.
This second introductory course expands students’
basic knowledge and skills as food preparation
workers by developing personal productivity skills, and
safe and sanitary practices. Students utilize basic
recipes, apply nutrition principles, prepare basic food
and beverage items, and practice front-of-the-house
skills. Students will develop skills as cooks, waiters
and waitresses.
FSS 0254
FOOD PREPARATION WORKER III.
5 Vocational Credits, 150 Contact Hours.
Prerequisite: FSS 0253.
This course is a continuation of Food Preparation
Worker II and includes further exploration of career
and job opportunities, continued basic skill
development, safety and sanitation, and use of
recipes. Students will also have front-of-the-house
training/responsibilities and will prepare food and
beverage items. Students will develop skills as kitchen,
baker helper and cashier.
FSS 0255
FOOD PREPARATION WORKER IV.
5 Vocational Credits, 150 Contact Hours.
Prerequisite: FSS 0254.
This course is a continuation of Food Preparation
Worker III and includes career and advancement
opportunities in cooking and baking. Instruction will be
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
provided for identification, selection and purchase of
food products; advanced cooking and baking
techniques; scientific principles in cooking and baking;
and quality standards. Time, energy and resource
management technique will be used. Communication
and math skills will be further developed and utilized in
performance of laboratory/class activities. Students will
develop skills as institutional or cafeteria cooks.
FSS 0256
FOOD PREPARATION WORKER V.
5 Vocational Credits, 150 Contact Hours.
Prerequisite: FSS 0255.
This course is a continuation of Food Preparation
Worker IV and was developed to increase students’
competencies in identification, selection and
purchasing of food, food and beverage cost control,
food science, management techniques and food
presentation. Communication and mathematics skills
will be enforced. Students will develop skills as bakers
and cooks in restaurant food service.
FSS 0257
FOOD SERVICE AND RESTAURANT MANAGER I.
5 Vocational Credits, 150 Contact Hours.
Prerequisite: FSS 0256.
This course is a continuation of Food Preparation
Worker V and explores career and advancement
opportunities. Included are competencies in
identification, selection and purchasing of food, food
and beverage cost control, food science, food
management techniques, advanced cooking and food
presentation techniques. Students will develop skills
for positions as entry-level managers.
FSS 0258
FOOD SERVICE AND RESTAURANT MANAGER II.
5 Vocational Credits, 150 Contact Hours.
Prerequisite: FSS 0257.
This course is a continuation of Food Service and
Restaurant Manager I and was developed for students
to develop competence in management skills, food
service and hospitality laws and regulations, business
plans, menus, cost control techniques, guidelines and
policies, physical plan layouts, marketing strategies,
and career opportunities. Students will develop skills
for the position of food service manager.
HEV 0111 F
CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3).
Growth and development of the child from conception
through age five, including the physical, social, emotional
and mental development of the young child; influence
of environment; principles and theories of development.
HEV 0115 F
CHILD DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR (2).
The Child Development Seminar is designed to prepare
students with knowledge, attitudes and skills in the
development, care and guidance of children. This course
focuses on the state’s 20-hour training requirement.
HEV 0141 W
GUIDANCE AND DISCIPLINE (3).
This course is designed to help students develop
appropriate guidance techniques to use with young
children. Positive guidance is emphasized as
students learn to channel children’s activities into
acceptable behavior. Students will work with children
in the laboratory child care center and practice
appropriate techniques.
HEV 0151 W
CURRICULUM FOR YOUNG CHILDREN (3).
Provides a survey of model programs and introduction
to curriculum areas. The use of appropriate materials
and teaching techniques is emphasized.
HEV 0154
PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT FOR CDA (3).
3 hours per week.
The course is designed to instruct students in the
preparation of the portfolio required to apply for a CDA
credential. Materials will be collected to document the
students competency in the CDA goals and functional
areas.
HEV 0163 S
FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES (3).
This course is designed to increase the awareness of
the relationship between family and community.
Students will examine communication techniques, as
well as strategies for the inclusion of parents in the
early childhood program. Benefits of a successful
partnership will be stressed.
HEV 0172 W
OBSERVING AND RECORDING BEHAVIOR (3).
Designed to increase objectivity and proficiency in
observing and interpreting children’s behavior and to
increase awareness of normative patterns of children
from birth through 5 years of age.
HEV 0182 F
PRE-SCHOOL LABORATORY ASSESSMENT (1).
1 hour per week.
This course is designed to give the student an
understanding of the CDA assessment requirement.
Upon satisfactory completion of the assessment, the
student will be ready to apply for the National CDA
Credential. The portfolio will be reviewed.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
247
HEV 0183 F, W, S
CHILD CARE PRACTICUM I (3).
Provides an opportunity for practical experiences in
techniques of early childhood education under qualified
supervision in the CFCC Child Development Center
and Lab School.
HEV 0184 F, W, S
CHILD CARE PRACTICUM II (3).
Provides hands-on experience in working with
children. The students will plan and implement a variety
of acceptable early childhood techniques. The student
will control and manage a group of children, using
appropriate guidance and management techniques.
ORH 0001 F
INTRODUCTION TO PLANT SCIENCES FOR
ENVIRONMENTAL HORTICULTURE (3).
Overview of the ornamental horticulture industry with
emphasis in the areas of nursery and greenhouse
operation/production, turfgrass management, exterior
and interior plantscape, installation and maintenance
of the landscape. Traditional classroom and online
instruction available.
ORH 0022 F
PLANT PROPAGATION PRACTICES (3).
A study of the techniques used in commercial
propagation of plants, including sexual and asexual
reproduction. Advantages and disadvantages of each
method will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on
techniques and includes plant tissue culture, plant
breeding, grafting, transplanting, and seedling care.
ORH 0103 W
PRINCIPLES OF PEST IDENTIFICATION AND
CONTROL FOR GOLF AND LANDSCAPE (3).
The study and classification of basic types of insects,
disease, and weeds responsible for the damage of
successful commercial production of plants in Florida.
These pathogens are studied as to kind or type, injury
they cause, and method of injury. Sources of
information used to identify their control are included.
This will lead to state certification.
ORH 0220 W
TURFGRASS IDENTIFICATION AND
MAINTENANCE FOR GOLF AND LANDSCAPE (3).
Course involves studies and practical experiences in
turfgrass management practices, including home lawn
grasses and improved turfgrass for golf. Studies
include preparation for planting, establishment of new
plantings, fertilization, watering, pest management to
include insects, weeds and turf diseases are
emphasized, as well as good mowing practices. Both
residential and golf turfgrass are emphasized.
Traditional and online instruction is available.
248
ORH 0230 W
GROUNDS MAINTENANCE (3).
Provides study and practical experience in maintaining
existing physical landscape plantings including
pruning and trimming, fertilization, pest and weed
control, budgeting and cost analysis of services, tool
and equipment use and maintenance. This study
includes organization, supervision and scheduling of
the landscape crew, customer relations, and upkeep of
equipment. Residential irrigation is included.
ORH 0251 W
NURSERY OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT (2).
Course includes studies and practical experience in
the basics of nursery production, including the
techniques of transplanting, methods of supplying
water needs, and factors affecting frequency and
amount, design and installation of irrigation systems
relating to nursery operations. Emphasis is placed on
record keeping, cost analysis, soil mixes, fertilization
and marketing nursery material.
ORH 0262 W
FLORAL PRODUCTION FOR GREENHOUSE
APPLICATIONS (3).
Provides study and practical experience in the
production of quality greenhouse plants, including
annuals, foliage plants, flowering potted plants
(including 61/2-inch potted plants), annuals from both
seed and liners, and other liner production crops.
Involves record keeping of greenhouse crops,
greenhouse construction, maintenance and safe use
of growth regulators.
ORH 0515 W
HERBACEOUS LANDSCAPE MATERIALS FOR
GOLF AND LANDSCAPE (2).
A study of the identification and culture of interior
foliage, herbaceous annual, and perennial plant
material. Landscape use, methods of propagation and
pest and disease problems are stressed. Classroom
and online instruction is available.
ORH 0517 F
WOODY ORNAMENTAL IDENTIFICATION FOR
GOLF AND LANDSCAPE (3).
A study of identification and culture of trees, shrubs,
vines and ground covers stressing native flora.
Landscape use, methods of propagation and pest
and disease problems are stressed. This course is
basis to more technical courses that follow. Classroom
and online instruction is available.
ORH 0800 F
INTRODUCTION TO LANDSCAPE
DESIGN SKILLS (3).
A study of the art of drawing/sketching and arranging
plant material in an aesthetic and useful manner
through the development and preparation of a
landscape plan, plant key, and cost estimate. This
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
includes the selection of materials and supplies, site
analysis, preparation of area layouts, a planting plan,
irrigation design, and work execution for residential
landscapes.
ORH 0873 W
INTERIORSCAPE DESIGN AND MAINTENANCE (2).
Studies include practical applications in the use of
plant material in interior spaces, to include both
residential and commercial areas. Includes selection of
plant material, drafting of an interior landscape plan,
modification of internal environmental conditions, insect
and disease control, job costing, and bid preparation.
Lab includes interior plant set up.
ORH 0949 F, W
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION TRAINING (3).
Cooperative education is a course of instruction
designed to blend classroom experiences and
practical work experiences together in assigned
activities outside the school environment.
PMT 0102 F
INTRODUCTION TO WELDING (4).
An introduction to metal, industrial practices and
procedures, various testing techniques, arc welding in
the flat position, using various thicknesses of metal.
Includes structure of the welding program, and history
of welding, with emphasis on shop safety, welding
safety, and oxyacetylene safety. Course also covers
blueprint reading for welders.
PMT 0111 F
OXYACETYLENE WELDING (4).
Course covers brazing, soldering, metalizing, and
welding steel with the oxyacetylene torch, cutting steel
of all thicknesses with oxy fuel equipment, plasma
cutting process, and welding theory.
PMT 0121 F, W
SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (4).
Course covers welding processes, safety, terminology,
electric welding in horizontal, vertical and overhead
positions, using various thicknesses of metal, and joint
design. May be repeated for credit.
PMT 0131 W
GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING (3).
A course in the fundamentals of tungsten inert gas
(TIG) welding including: setup and adjustment of the
TIG welding machine, selection of proper tungsten
electrodes, selection of filler metals, use of various
shielding gases, practical experience in TIG welding
basic welded joints on stainless and mild carbon steel,
aluminum sheet and casting, and magnesium
castings.
PMT 0134 W
GAS METAL ARC WELDING (4).
Introduction to metallic inert gas welding (MIG).
Emphasizes the principles involved in the operating
of MIG equipment. Covers MIG welding of steel
and aluminum.
PMT 0161 S
PIPE WELDING (3).
This course teaches the student to fabricate and weld
pipe joints and to perform fabrication using welding
skills. The student will develop proficiency in welding
pipes in all positions. This course may be repeated
for credit.
PMT 0930L F, W
WELDING SKILLS DEVELOPMENT LAB (2).
This course allows students to acquire hands-on
experience in a laboratory setting. It includes welding
skill development in oxyacetylene welding, flux cored
arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc
welding and gas tungsten arc welding. This course
may be repeated for credit.
PRN 0000C W
FUNDAMENTALS FOR PRACTICAL NURSING
(300 clock hours).
Prerequisite: admission to program.
Using nursing principles as the framework, students
will apply knowledge and nursing skills needed for
basic nursing care in long-term and acute care
settings. Standard precautions, comfort, as well as
therapeutic skills, are covered. Communication skills,
basic medication calculation, medication administration
and basic computer skills are also studied. A practical
nurse’s role in health care as member of the discipline,
and political activist, and the accompanying legal and
ethical roles, are explored. The class concludes with
pre- and post-op nursing care.
PRN 0010 F
VOCATIONAL RELATIONS (30 clock hours).
The practical nursing student will recognize and apply
the principles of human relationships and resultant
behavior to the discipline. The student will identify his
or her responsibilities concerning the legal and ethical
aspects, economic security, and trends in nursing.
PRN 0020 W
HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT THROUGH
THE LIFE SPAN (30 clock hours).
In this class, students explore normal human growth
and development, prenatal through geriatric. Physical,
psychological, sociocultural and spiritual issues
unique to each age are identified.
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
PRN 0030 S
PHARMACOLOGY I FOR PRACTICAL NURSING
30 clock hours.
Students begin the study of drug therapy. This course
covers the PN scope of practice in medication
administration as defined by the Florida Nurse Practice
Act. Besides focusing on principles of pharmacology,
the course focuses on medications used for diseases
and conditions in endocrine, urology, reproductive,
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
249
musculoskeletal, and gastrointestinal systems. Allergic
responses to medication therapy and pain medication
are also covered. Clinical experience is included in
Medical/Surgical I and II, as well as in Maternal
Nursing and Pediatric Nursing.
PRN 0031 F
PHARMACOLOGY II FOR PRACTICAL NURSING.
Prerequisite: PRN 0030.
This course is a continuation of the study of
medications as it relates to the PN role as defined by
the Florida Nurse Practice Act. The specific focus is
medications used in the treatment of patients with
cardiovascular, respiratory, sensory, and neurological
diseases and conditions.
PRN 0040 W
PERSONAL, FAMILY AND
COMMUNITY HEALTH (30 clock hours).
In this class, the student explores the concept of
health as it relates to the individual, the family and the
community. The wellness/illness continuum is
discussed. Principles of microbiology and contagious
diseases are explored. Physiological and mental
health concepts are incorporated. Immunity and its
relationship to disease prevention are discussed.
PRN 0070 W
NUTRITION FOR PRACTICAL NURSES
(30 clock hours).
Corequisite: PRN 0000C.
Introduction to basic nutrition, including an overview of
nutrition and nutritional needs throughout the life span.
Impact of nutrients on various conditions and illnesses
and therapeutic nutrition are discussed.
PRN 0100 S
MATERNAL NURSING.
75 clock hours.
Prerequisite: PRN 0000C.
In Maternal Nursing, students study the appropriate
nursing care for patients during the antepartal, labor,
postpartal and neonatal stages. Care during the
normal conditions, awareness of abnormal signs and
symptoms, and appropriate practical nursing care
measures are studied.
PRN 0110 F
PEDIATRIC NURSING.
75 clock hours.
Prerequisite: PRN 0000C.
Based on the knowledge learned in PRN 0020, Growth
and Development, and in conjunction with knowledge
learned in Medical/Surgical I, appropriate nursing care
of children is studied, practiced, and administered.
Clinical learning sites include acute care and well child
clinics.
250
PRN 0381C S
MEDICAL SURGICAL I.
180 clock hours.
This course addresses the physical, psychosocial,
sociocultural and spiritual nursing measures for
common diseases and disorders of patients with
medical/surgical conditions. The patient population
includes gastrointestinal, endocrine, urinary,
reproductive, musculoskeletal and immunity disorder
patients. Nursing care of patients experiencing pain is
another focus of this course.
PRN 0382C F
MEDICAL–SURGICAL II (465 clock hours).
Students expand their knowledge of more complex
patients with common diseases and disorders and the
application of nursing measures (physical, sociocultural, spiritual, psychological and developmental)
that these varied conditions require. Students manage
care for larger groups of patients and function as a
beginning member of the discipline within the practical
nurse role. The patient population includes patients
with musculoskeletal, respiratory, gastric, intestinal,
sensory, neuro and cardiovascular conditions and
disorders. Clinical experiences are in both acute and
long-term care.
PRN 0500 W
GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING (30 clock hours).
The acute and chronic diseases and disorders of the
elderly are discussed. The physiological, sociocultural,
spiritual, and psychological needs of healthy elders, as
well as persons in long-term care, are explored. This
class is the foundation for first-semester clinical
experience in long-term care agencies.
SLS 0341
SUCCESSFUL EMPLOYMENT TECHNIQUES (3).
This course is structured to enhance employability
skills necessary for successful employment. It includes
non-technical, cross-occupational competency study
related to getting and keeping a job.
STS 0003 F
INTRODUCTION TO SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
510 clock hours; 17 occupational credits.
Prerequisite: Acceptance to the Surgical
Technology program and current CPR certification.
In this 510-hour course, the student will be introduced
to the program, philosophy and requirements.
Interpersonal relationship techniques, surgical
environment, safety measures and medical terminology,
as well as the role of a surgical technologist, are covered.
The student will become aware of the surgery patient’s
total needs during surgery: physical, social, psychological
and spiritual. Routine laboratory reports including
interpretation, pharmacology and anesthetic agents,
weights, measures, and drug classifications are covered.
The individuality and uniqueness of each patient is
discussed with focus on patients with special needs.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Operating room fundamentals taught and practiced
include principles of aseptic technique, sterilization
and disinfection; correct procedure for scrubbing,
gowning and gloving; draping; identifying and
classifying instruments; handling of specimens; care
and counting of sponges, sharps and instruments;
positioning and prepping of patients. The student will
also practice handling drains, dressings, sutures,
needles and staplers. The duties of scrub, circulator
and second assistant are taught and practiced.
Students must pass an instrument test to successfully
complete this course. Students must also pass a skills
performance test to successfully complete this course.
Introduction to the structure of the body, anatomical
positions and planes of the body, systems of the body
and their interrelationships are studied. Principles of
pathology, basic concepts of microbiology and
reaction of injury and pathogenesis of disease are
discussed. Maintenance of health and prevention of
disease are emphasized. Laboratory and clinical
supervised practice are an integral part of this course.
STS 0820 S
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY II
270 clock hours; 9 occupational credits.
Prerequisite: STS 0810 with a grade of “C” or
better, satisfactory clinical evaluation in STS 0810,
and current CPR certification.
This course focuses on continuance of surgical theory
of Endoscopic procedures (MIS or MAS). Basic
concepts of physics, electricity and robotic surgery are
introduced. It provides study of special problems
which coordinate with the individual needs of students
during clinical practice, trauma, death and dying,
transplant, procurement, case studies, and preparation
to write the National Certification Examination. Clinical
supervised practice is an integral part of this course.
Students will be able to demonstrate competent, entry
level clinical skills for employment.
STS 0810 W
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY I
520 clock hours; 17 occupational credits.
Prerequisite: STS 0003 with a grade of “C” or
better, satisfactory clinical evaluation in STS 0003,
and current CPR certification.
This course focuses on expanding the basic principles
from STS 0003 to include specific patient preparation.
Information is obtained on operative procedures,
pathology that indicates surgical intervention, methods
of anesthesia, the different types of incisions, special
equipment, instruments and supplies. Also covered
are diagnostic procedures and complications of each
surgical procedure, and information associated with
emergency situations and radiation. Information is
obtained on employability skills. This course is designed
to provide the student with minimum level of competency
in surgery and related areas. Clinical practice is
coordinated with didactic content.
The student will demonstrate learned skills and
practice safety in the operating room while scrubbing,
assist circulating and second assisting in the following
specialty areas: general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, orthopedic, plastic, oral, dental,
maxillofacial, thoracic, peripheral vascular, cardiovascular,
neurosurgery, pediatric, endoscopic, laser and transplant.
Most hours will be in the scrub role.
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
251
College
Directory
COLLEGE
DIRECTORY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
253
ADMINISTRATION
DASSANCE, Charles R.
President
B.S., Grove City College (Pa.)
M.A., Michigan State University
Ph.D., University of Virginia
COOPER, Sharon
Vice President, Instruction
B.S., Florida State University
M.S., Florida State University
Ed.D., University of Tennessee
HARVEY, James
Vice-President, Administration and Finance
B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo
Ed.M., State University of New York at Buffalo
Ed.D., State University of New York at Buffalo
HUNT, Donald R. “Don”
Vice President, Student Affairs
B.S., Mississippi State
M.Ed., Mississippi State
Ed.D., Mississippi State
LILLY, Torri
Provost/Vice President, Citrus Campus
A.A., Beckley College
B.S., Concord College
M.A., English, Marshall University
M.A., School Principal, Marshall University
Ed.D., West Virginia University
PEALER, Casius H. “Cash,” Jr.
Vice President, Institutional Advancement, and
President, CFCC Foundation, Inc.
B.A., M.S., State University of New York
B.S., Hartwick College
Ed.D., Nova University
ROBINSON, Beverly
Associate Vice President
FM, Dispute Management Institute
B.A., Albany State University
M.Ed., University of North Florida
Ph.D., Columbus University
DEANS
BELLOVIN, Joanne M.
Dean, Learning Resources
B.A., University of Maryland
M.A., University of South Florida
DICKSON, Stacy L.
Dean, Public Service, and
Executive Director, Criminal Justice Institute
B.A., University of Central Florida
M.A., Ed.S., University of South Florida
Ed.D., University of South Florida
254
FANTE, Cheryl
Dean, Business, Technology and Workforce
B.A., M.A., University of South Florida
Ed.D., University of Florida
JONES, June B.
Dean, Liberal Arts and Sciences
B.S., University of Florida
M.S., Nova University
Ed.D., University of Central Florida
LAPHAM-ALCORN, Gwendolyn
Associate Dean, Nursing
B.S.N., M.S.N., Wayne State University
Ph.D., University of Florida
SIPLON, Karine
Dean, Health Occupations
B.S.N., Adelphi University
M.P.H., Loma Linda University
Ed.D., University of Idaho
DIRECTORS
BENLOLO, Henri
Director, Career Assessment Center
B.A., University of Florida
M.S., Rollins College
Ph.D., Barrington University
BOWE, Deborah S.
Program Developer for Teacher Education
A.A.S., State University of New York, Cobleskill
B.S., State University of New York, Cortland
M.A., University of South Florida
CROCKER, Gilda L.
Director, Human Resources
A.A., Miami Dade Community College
B.P.A., Florida International University
M.P.A., Florida International University
GIDDIS, Rayanne
Director, Levy County Center
B.A., University of Florida
M.Ed., University of Florida
Advanced Study, University of Florida
GRAHAM, Sheryl L.
Executive Director, Students Records and Financial Aid
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., Saint Leo University
M.A., Webster University
LIGHTSEY, Eric J.
Director, Educational Opportunity Center
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., University of Central Florida
M. Div., Oral Roberts University
MORELOCK, Tom
Director, Facilities
Certificate, Morristown Vocational Technical School
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
OLSON, Doug
ALEXANDER, Cory
Director, Institutional Effectiveness
B.A., University of Florida
M.B.A., University of California, Los Angeles
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
POWELL, Lyn (King)
Director, Enrollment Services
B.S., Brockport State
M.Ed., University of Central Florida
SMITH, Lisa M.
Director, Student Support Services
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., University of Central Florida
M.A., University of South Florida
SPONTAK, Margaret
Executive Director, Corporate Training and
Continuing Education
B.A., Florida State University
M.B.A., Nova University
STEARNS, Joan M.
Assistant to President
B.S., State University of New York
STRAIT, William R. “Bill”
Information Systems Officer
B.S., Union College
M.S., Northeastern University
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
TRAUTMAN, Stewart
Director, Purchasing
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi
M.A., Webster University
WALLACE, Joe
Director, Marketing and Public Relations
B.S., Union College
M.S., Northeastern University
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
ZELINSKI, Robert
Director, Athletics/Intramurals and Wellness Education
A.A., Miami Dade Community College
B.A., Florida Atlantic University
M.S., Nova University
FACULTY
ABSHIER, Nancy
Assistant Professor, Business and Technology
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., University of Florida
M.A., University of Florida
ADCOCK, Charles “Andy”
Instructor, Mathematics
B.S., M.A., University of Florida
Instructor, Music
B.A., Central College
M. of Music, University of Florida
ALLEN, Vernon
Professor, Accounting
B.S., M.S., M.B.A., Central Missouri
State University
M.A., Florida State University
Advanced Study
ALVARADO, Jacquelyn
Instructor, Physical Therapist Assistant Program
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., Barry University
ANDERSON, Barbara
Associate Professor, ADN Nursing
B.S.N., University of Central Florida
M.N., University of Central Florida
ASHLOCK, Gary
Professor, Science
A.A., Arlington State Junior College
B.S., M.S., Stephen F. Austin University
BAIRD, Marnie
Counselor/Assistant Professor, Citrus County Campus
A.S., St. Petersburg Junior College
A.A., Southeastern (Iowa) Area
Community College
B.A., Iowa Wesleyan College
M.A., University of South Florida
Advanced Study, University of South Florida
BANNESTER, Michael
Assistant Professor
A.A.S., Aims Community College
Certified Welding Inspector
Certified Welding Educator
BERNHARDT, Jana J.
Counselor/Associate Professor, Student Affairs
B.S., Purdue University
M.S., Indiana University
Advanced Study, University of South Florida
BLAKEMAN, Carol Ann
Associate Professor, Nursing
A.A., Florida Community College at Jacksonville
B.S.N., University of South Florida
M.S.N., University of Florida
BRADLEY, Nancy
Associate Professor, Health Occupations
A.S., Black Hawk College
B.S.N., Marycrest Intern University
BRADSHAW, Susan
Librarian/Assistant Professor, Learning Resources
Center (LRC)
B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut
M.S., University of Illinois
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE
DIRECTORY
255
BROWN, Irvin Jr.
Professor, Psychology
A.B., Indiana University
Ph.D., Stanford University
BURTON, Debra K.
Associate Professor, Wellness and First Aid
B.A., Faith Christian University
B.S., Olivet Nazarene University
M.S., Illinois State University
M.A., Th.D., Faith Christian University
CABLE, Susan E.
Associate Professor, Physics/Science
B.S., Bridgewater State College (MA)
M.S., University of New Hampshire
CALLUENG, Zinnia
Associate Professor
CANTRELL, Amy M.
Associate Professor, Mathematics
B.A., Winthrop University
M.A., Winthrop University
Ph.D., University of Florida
CHARACTER, Colleen D.
Associate Professor, Psychology
B.A., Ohio State University
M.A., Cleveland State University
Ph.D., Kent State University
CLARK, Judy L.
Counselor, Citrus County Campus (part-time)
B.S., M.A., Western Kentucky University
COOPER, Ron L.
Associate Professor, Philosophy and Humanities
B.A., The College of Charleston
M.A., University of South Carolina
M.Phil., Ph.D., Rutgers University
DANUFF, Allan
Assistant Professor, Mathematics
B.S., Florida State University
M.Ed., University of Florida
DAVIS, Judy E.
Professor, Social Sciences
B.A., University of Florida
M.A., University of Florida (English)
Ed.S., University of Florida
M.A., University of Florida (Sociology)
DAVIS, Margaret
Assistant Professor, ADN Program
A.D.N., B.S.N., M.S.N., Armstrong Atlantic
University
DEWLEN, Hope L.
Instructor, Mathematics
B.S., Lee University
M.S., Southeastern Missouri State University
256
DOUGLASS, Sally
Associate Professor, Business Technology and
Workforce Learning
B.A., Clark University (Mass.)
M.A., Assumption College (Mass.)
DuMOND, Robert
Associate Professor, Ornamental Horticulture
A.S., State University of New York
B.S., Cornell University
M.Ed., University of South Florida
EVANS, Sheila
Librarian/Assistant Professor, Learning Resources
Center
A.A., Brevard Community College
B.A., M.A., University of South Florida
FOWLER, Katherine
Associate Professor
B.S., University of Iowa
M.A., University of Washington
FRAZIER, Brenda
Program Manager/Associate Professor, Surgical
Technology
L.P.N., Wise County Vocational-Technical School
and Medical College of Virginia
Certificate, Operating Room Techniques,
University of Virginia Hospital
A.S.N, John Tyler Community College
B.S.N, University of Virginia
M.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth University
CNOR. Certification, National Certification BoardPerioperative Nursing, Inc.
CST, Certification, Liaison Council on Certification
for Surgical Technologist
FREEMAN, Bertha
Professor, Science
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., University of Florida
M.Ed., Stetson University
GARRETT, Suzanne B.
Associate Professor, Health Information Management
B.A., University of Florida
B.S., University of Central Florida
M.S., Central Michigan University
GIL, Grace
Associate Professor, ADN Nursing
B.S.N., Villa Maria College (Pa.)
M.S.N., Boston University
GIL, Tony Jr.
Professor, Computer Science,
Citrus County Campus
A.A., B.S., Havana Business University
M.S., Villanova University
Advanced Study, Nova University
Ph.D., Nova Southern University
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
HAISTEN, Judy
Assistant Professor, Communications
B.A.E., University of North Florida
M.Ed., University of Florida
HARTLEY, David
Professor, Theater and History
B.A.,Wake Forest
M.A.T., University of Florida
Advanced Study, University of South Florida,
University of Central Florida
HAYASHI, Adam
Assistant Professor, Science
B.S., Texas A&M University
M.S., University of North Texas
HIATT, Charles
Associate Professor, Business Division
B.B.A, University of Michigan–Flint
M.A., Central Michigan University
HOESTEREY, Jane
Assistant Professor, Health Occupations
B.A., Clarke College
M.S.N., University of Florida
HUNT, Delores
Program Manager/Associate Professor, Personal
Services Institute
Certificate, W. Tresper Clarke (N.Y.)
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., Saint Leo University
Florida State Licensed Cosmetologist, Barber
M.A., Webster University
INGRAM, Timothy
Associate Professor, Auto Body Repair
A.S.E. Certified
JAMIESON, Michael
Associate Professor, Mathematics
B.S., M.S., University of Illinois–Urbana/Champaign
Ph.D., University of Florida
JAYE, Harold S.
Professor, Philosophy/Humanities
B.A., University of Cincinnati
B.H.L., M.A.H.L., and D.D. (Hon.)
Hebrew Union College
Ph.D., Brandeis University
JORDAN, N. Wayne
Professor, Business Science
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., University of Florida
KEYTE, John
Assistant Professor, Heating and Air Conditioning
Refrigerant Transition and Recovery Certification
Carrier Air Conditioning Company Certification
Certificate of Merit
KIELTY, Lori A.
Assistant Professor, Computer Services
A.S., Central Florida Community College
B.A., Saint Leo University
M.A., University of South Florida
KILCREASE, Kathy
Professor of Science and Coordinator of Teaching and
Learning Institute
B.S., M.Ed., Advanced Study, University of Florida
KIRK, Richard F.
Assistant Professor, Humanities/Social Sciences
B.A., Saint Leo University
M.Ed., University of Florida
M.A., University of South Florida
KYLE, Marybeth
Associate Professor, Continuing Education, Family and
Child Care Services
B.A., Marshall University
M.Ed., University of Miami
LIVINGSTON, Janice C.
Professor, ADN Nursing
B.S.E., Edinboro State College
B.S.N., State University of New York
M.Ed., University of North Florida
M.S.N., University of South Florida
LOPP, Linda
Associate Professor, Health Occupations
B.S.N., Trenton State College (NJ)
LUEBBE, Joan
Counselor/Transfer Specialist, Student Support Services
A.A., Westchester Community College
B.A., SUNY Geneseo
M.A., University of South Florida
MacKENZIE, Stephen H.
Associate Professor, Environmental Sciences
A.A., Polk Community College
A.S., Central Florida Community College
B.S., M.A., M.P.H., University of South Florida
MANGAN, Amy Y.
Associate Professor, Humanities and Social Sciences
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., University of Central Florida
M.A., University of West Florida
MANLEY, James M.
Assistant Professor, Humanities and Social Sciences
B.A., University of West Florida
M.A., University of West Florida
Ph.D., University of Florida
MATHEWS, John H.
Professor, Humanities
B.A., Milligan College
M.S., Southern Illinois University
Advanced Study, University of Chicago
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE
DIRECTORY
257
McCAULEY, Jean-Marie
Associate Professor, Physical Therapist Assistant
Program
B.A., Montclair State
Certificate, Physical Therapy, Columbia University
M.H.S.A., Medical University of South Carolina
McCLUNG, Samuel
Associate Professor, Music
B.S., University of West Virginia State
M.M., Catholic University of America
McGINNIS, Rodney
Instructor, Health Occupations
A.S., Santa Fe Community College
B.S., Illinois State University
MILLEN, James W.
Professor, Science and Biology, Citrus County Campus
B.A., College of Idaho
M.S., University of Colorado
M.S., University of Detroit
Advanced Study, Eastern Michigan University
Sc. Ed. D., Curtin University, Perth, Australia
MILLET, Polly W.
Professor, Nursing
B.S.N., Boston University
M.R.C., Bowling Green State University (Ohio)
M.S.N., University of South Florida
MINNERLY, Elizabeth
Librarian/Associate Professor, Learning Resources
Center
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., University of Central Florida
M.L.S., Florida State University
MONIER, Susan
Instructor, Communications, Citrus County Campus
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., Saint Leo University
M.A., University of South Florida
MORELOCK, Glenna
Associate Professor/Wellness
B.S., Carson Newman College
M.S., University of Tennessee
MORENO, Orlando
Professor, Communications
B.A., M.A.T., University of Florida
Ph.D., University of Madrid (Spain)
MUENNICH, Raymond
Associate Professor, Health Occupations
V.C., Hillsborough Community College
NIESPODZIANY, Edward
Professor, Electronics Engineering Technology
B.S., State University of New York
College at Buffalo
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University
258
OLSEN, Scott A.
Professor, Philosophy/Humanities
B.A., University of Minnesota
M.A., London University
J.D., Ph.D., University of Florida
PENDARVIS, Richard
Professor, Science
B.S., McNeese State University
Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi
Post Doctoral Research Fellow, Texas Tech
University
RADICE, Dennis L.
Instructor, Adult Education, Levy Center
RAMSEY, Pressley Wayne
Associate Professor, EMT/Paramedic
A.S., Central Florida Community College
RAWLS, Rhonda
Professor, Business and Technology
A.S., Central Florida Community College
B.S., University of Alabama
M.A., University of South Florida
M. Ed., Florida Gulf Coast University
RICHARDSON, Martha
Associate Professor, Personal Services Institute
Vocational Certificate, Valdez Hair Design School
RIVERS, Joann
Instructor, Health Occupations
B.S.N., Oakland University
M.S.N., Oakland University
ROBINSON, Cassandra
Assistant Professor, Communications
M.E., University of Arizona
ROE, James R.
Instructor, Mathematics
B.S., Purdue University
M.S., Nova Southeastern University
ROSSITER, Paul J.
Professor, Automotive Mechanics
B.Ed., University of Hawaii
M.Ed., Miami University
Advanced Study, University of Cincinnati,
University of North Florida, University of
South Florida
Ph.D., Hamilton University
A.S.E. Master Certified
SATTERFIELD, Sarah
Associate Professor, Music
B.M., Furman University
M.M., San Diega State University
Ph.D., University of Florida
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
SCHAEFFER, William A. “Bill”
Professor and Program Facilitator,
Workforce Development
B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College
M.S., University of West Florida
Advanced Study, University of Florida,
University of South Florida
SCOTT, (Bob) Robert L.
Assistant Professor, Social Science, Citrus Campus
A.S., Richard Bland College/College of William
and Mary
ABD, BGS, Virginia Commonwealth University
M.A., Virginia State University
Advanced Studies, Educational Counseling,
College of William and Mary
SEYMOUR, Roberta W. “Robin”
Professor, Communications
B.S., M.S., Florida State University
Advanced Study, Rollins College, University of
Central Florida
SIMPSON, John D.
Professor, Communications
B.A., University of Southern Mississippi
M.A., University of Arkansas
Advanced Study, University of Florida
SMITH, Caroline Wahle
Associate Professor/Coordinator, Legal Assisting
B.A., Florida State University
J.D., University of Florida
SMITH, E. Paulette
Associate Professor, Communications
A.A., Florida Junior College at Jacksonville
B.Ed., M.Ed., University of Florida
Advanced Study, Florida Atlantic University,
Florida State University
SMITH, Richard “Scott”
Assistant Professor, Mathematics, and Program
Facilitator, Mathematics
B.S., M.A.T., University of Florida
SMITHSON, Gene
Associate Professor, Wellness; Head Coach,
Men’s Basketball
B.S., North Central College
M.S., Indiana State University
STENTIFORD, Deanna
Associate Professor, Dental Assisting, Hampton Center
A.S., B.S., West Liberty State College
M.A., University of Central Florida
Ed.S., University of Florida
STEVENS, Albert W.
Instructor, Public Service
SURMONS, Elvira
Professor, Communications, and Program Facilitator,
Communications and Fine Arts
B.A., South Carolina State College
M.Ed., Advanced Study, University of Florida
SUTTON, Lawrence
Professor, Business and Computer Science
B.S., Quincy College
M.B.A., Long Island College
Ed.D., Nova University
THOMPSON, Andrew A.
Associate Professor, Science
B.S., Michigan State University
M.S., Georgetown
Ph.D., Logon College of Chiropractic
THOMPSON, Sally
Associate Professor, Nursing
B.S.N., University of California Medical Center
M.S., Texas Woman’s University
THURSBY, John “Jack”
Associate Professor, Fine Arts
B.S., State University of New York at New Paltz
M.Ed., University of South Florida
TICE, Connie
Professor, Communications
B.A., M.A., Speech Communication, California
State University, Long Beach
M.A., Communication Disorders, California State
University
Fullerton Certificate of Clinical Competence in
Speech/Language Pathology
TOBEY, Dava L.
Associate Professor, Journalism and Mass
Communications
B.A., Emory University (GA)
M.S., Nova University
Advanced Study, University of Florida, Florida State,
Florida Atlantic University, University of Miami
TOWNS, Debbie
Instructor, Business and Technology
A.A., A.S., Central Florida Community College
B.S., St. Leo University
UNDERWOOD, De
Assistant Professor, Hospitality and Tourism
Management, Program Facilitator
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., University of West Florida
CHE., Certification, Educational Institute AHLA
VAZQUEZ, Debra
Assistant Professor, Communications
B.A., M.A., University of Florida
COLLEGE
DIRECTORY
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
259
VORWERK, Bonnie J.
Associate Professor, Humanities and Social Sciences,
Corporate Training
B.A., M.A., Advanced Study, University of Florida
WANAMAKER, Wayne M.
Professor, Mathematics, Citrus County Campus
B.A., University of South Florida
M.A., University of South Florida
ASHCRAFT, Sara E.
Payroll Specialist
AVILA, Neidy
Purchasing Assistant
BAKER, Lena
Financial Aid Specialist II
BALBONI, Kathleen
Grants/Contract Accounting Specialist, Business Office
WARNER, Eric
Instructor, Communications
B.S., Liberty University
M.A., SUNY Brockport
WILCOX, Nyla K.
Associate Professor, Communications
B.S., Concord College
M.A., Marshall College
WILKERSON, V. Lee
Counselor/Associate Professor, Student Affairs
B.F.A., Texas Christian University
M.Ed./Ed.S., University of Florida
WIRT, Michele B.
Assistant Professor, Humanities, Citrus County Campus
A.A., Santa Fe Community College
B.A., M.F.A. University of Florida
WOOD, Judith B.
Professor, Mathematics
B.S., Radford College
M.A.Ed., Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Ph.D., Purdue University
ZIMMERMAN, Joseph P.
Associate Professor, Communications
B.A., Kent State University
M.A., University of New Mexico
BALLARD, Madelyn
Student Development Advisor
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., Saint Leo University
M.S., Springfield College
BARRY, Sarah
Technician, Financial Aid/Enrollment Records
A.A., Central Florida Community College
BARTHOLOMEW, Carole
Manager, Professional Development
B.A., University of Alaska
M.A.T., University of Alaska
BEAUCHAMP, Lance
Student Development Advisor, Levy County Center
B.A., Stetson University
BELDEN, Patrick
Training Specialist, Skills Lab
A.A., Central Florida Community College
A.S., Environmental Science Tech, CFCC
B.S., University of South Florida
M. Ed., Florida Gulf Coast
BENNETT, Cara
Web Developer/Communications Specialist
BENSCH, Susan
STAFF
AKIN, Gail
Manager, University Center
B.S., B.A., Florida State University
M.A., Webster University
ANDREW, Pamella
Custodian
ANDREWS, Cheryl
Specialist, Public Relations
A.A., Lake-Sumter Community College
B.A., University of Central Florida
BIRCH, Rita
Staff Assistant, Citrus County Campus
BLAIR, Sangi B.
Coordinator, Criminal Justice
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., University of Central Florida
M.A., University of South Florida
Information Center Specialist
ANDREWS, Tom
Safety Technician
ANTHONY, Frances
Accounting Specialist, Business Office
A.A., Central Florida Community College
ANTHONY, Junelle
Staff Assistant, Hampton Center
A.A., Central Florida Community College
260
BLANK, James
Custodian, Ocala Campus
BOCKORAS, Joel T.
Instructional Manager, ESOL
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., University of Central Florida
BOICELLI, Christine
Staff Assistant, Institutional Effectiveness
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
BOOHER, Charles E. “Chuck”
Computer Operator, Computer Services
BOOTH, Patricia A.
Senior Library Technician, Learning Resources Center,
Citrus County Campus
A.A., Canal Zone College
A.S., Central Florida Community College
B.A., Regents College, New York
BOOTH, Patricia D.
Retired Senior Volunteer Program Manager,
Workforce Development
BRANTON, Kayla L.
COLLINS, Harold
Tradesworker Supervisor and U.C.B.I.
COLLINS, Richard S.
Tradesworker
CONROY, Marie L.
Staff Assistant III, Testing
COPELAND, Mary
Assessment Specialist, Academic and
Career Assessment
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., Saint Leo University
COSMA, Joan
Custodian
BRIGHT, William
Facilities Manager
BROWN, Gail E.
Staff Assistant, Educational Opportunity Center
A.A., Central Florida Community College
BROWN, Linda
County Coordinator, Educational Opportunity Center,
Levy Center
A.A., Florida Junior College
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida
BURGOON, Richard
Programmer II
CAIRNS, Helena
Staff Assistant, Staff Services
A.S., Central Florida Community College
CAMPBELL, Horace III
Lead Custodian
Staff Assistant, Counseling and School Relations
CRAWLEY, Tonya
Program Coordinator, Liberal Arts and Sciences
CROSBY, Michael
Tradesworker
DAGHITA, Kathleen G. “Kathy”
Executive Staff Assistant, President’s Office
DAVIS, Priscilla M.
Custodian
DAVIS, Berry III
Audiovisual Specialist/Videographer,
Learning Resources Center
B.S., Florida A & M University
DAVIS, Eric
Groundskeeper
DEDOW, Lindsey J.
Coordinator, Civic Education and Student Leadership
CARLON, Martha
Custodian, Citrus County Campus
CARREL, John
Mail Courier
CHATMAR, Patricia D.
Custodian
DENISON, Diane
Staff Assistant, Business and Technology
DeSANTIS, Mary Ann
Specialist, Marketing
B.A., University of Southern Mississippi
DES BIENS, Antoinette E.
CHILDERS, Julia M., PHR
Senior Human Resource and Compensation Specialist
CIPOLLA, Mary
Property Maintenance Specialist
COE, Tofoya A.
Staff Assistant, Human Resources
A.A., Central Florida Community College
COHEN, Daniel Jerome
Tradesworker
COLLINS, Bennie L.
Landscape Caretaker
Instructional Assistant, Health Occupations
DIAZ, Caridad
Learning Support Specialist, Citrus County Campus
B.A., New Jersey City University
DISMUKE, William “Mac”
Manager, Learning Support Centers
B.B.A., Valdosta State College
DOAN, Liennhu C.
Programmer III/Data Analyst, Computer Services
A.A., Hillsborough Community College
B.S., Florida State University
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE
DIRECTORY
261
DOUGHERTY, Terry
Assessment Specialist, Academic and
Career Assessment
A.A., Central Florida Community College
A.S., Drafting and Design
B.A., Saint Leo University, Psychology
B.A., Saint Leo University, Religious Studies
DOWDY, McCoy
Custodian Supervisor
DRAGO, Marcia K.
Instructional Assistant, Science Department
B.S.E.E., Florida Institute of Technology
EIDUKOT, Patricia
Student Services Assistant, Citrus County Campus
EININK, Jo An
Staff Assistant, Workforce Learning
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
ENGESSES, Lillian
Bursar, Business Office
EVANS, Sharon L.
Teacher, Pre-School
FAMA, Cindy G.
Financial Aid Specialist I
FIGLER, Daniel S.
Comptroller, Business Office
B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo
FLEMING, Patrick
Coordinator/Associate Professor, Distance Learning
Online
B.A., Marist College (N.Y.)
M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University
FUQUA-ASHLOCK, Luanne
Enrollment Services Center Coordinator
A.A., Central Florida Community College
GABOARDI, David
High School/College Coordinator
B.A., University of Florida
GAMBLE, Jerone A.
Manager, Continuing Education
B.S., Bethune-Cookman College
M.Ph., Yale University
GARRETT, Patricia R.
Custodian
GAW, Sandra
Staff Assistant, Security
GAYLE, Michelle
Human Resource Specialist
262
GILLETTE, Rebecca
Financial Aid Specialist II
A.S., A.A., Central Florida Community College
Certified Professional Secretary
GLENN, Kathleen
Teacher, Pre-School
GLENNEY, Jr. James
ACT Center Specialist
GLENNON, Patricia L. “Trish”
Coordinator, Benefits and Special Projects
A.S., Indian River Community College
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., Saint Leo University
M.B.A., Saint Leo University
PHR, Professional in Human Resources
GONZALEZ, Charles B.
Instructional and Manager, Citrus County Campus
B.A., University of Miami
M.S., Florida International University
GROSS, Diane
Manager, Grants Development Resource Development
Department
B.S., Eastern Connecticut State University
M. Ed., Eastern Connecticut State University
GRAVES, Barbara
Student Development Advisor
A.A., Morton College
B.S., Southern Illinois University
GUARNERO, Nancy
Conference Services Specialist, Workforce Development
HART, Chenita S.
Student Development Advisor, Enrollment Services
HARTNETT, Garry
Custodian
HAUSHEER, Justine A.
Executive Administrative Assistant,
Citrus County Campus
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., M.A., University of South Florida
HESTER, Sandra
Staff Assistant, Public Service
HETTINGER, Pamela J.
Staff Assistant III, Student Support Services
HOGAN, Daphne A.
Coordinator, Corporate Computer Training
HOLMES, Michael J.
Tradesworker
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
HOWELL, Kerry A.
Technician, Financial Aid Enrollment Records
A.S., Hotel/Restaurant Management
Katharine Gibbs School of Business
HUFFMAN, Kathleen
Staff Assistant, Workforce Development
A.S., Central Florida Community College
JACOBS, Jermele
Student Development Advisor, Hampton Center
B.S., Florida State University
JACOLA, Rhonda
Specialist, Food, Child Care
JANUSZ, Wanda
Records Technician, Admissions and Records
JERNIGAN, Karen N.
Coordinator, Public Policy Institute
JOHNSON, Marvin E.
Horticulture Aide
JOHNSON, Shauna R.
Student Development Advisor, Levy County Center
B.A., Indiana University
LANZILLA, David
Programmer, Computer Services
A.S., Raritan Valley Community College
B.S., University of Massachusetts Lowell
LEGG, H. “Fred”
Tradesworker
LEMIEUX, William Jr.
Coordinator, Criminal Justice Institute
A.S., Broward Community College
B.S., Florida International University
LEMR, Camilla L.
Student Development Advisor
B.A., Goucher College
LEWIS, Stacey A.
Accounting Clerk, Foundation
A.S., Central Florida Community College
Certificate, Advanced Equine Care and Technology
LEWIS, Teresa
Instructional Assistant, Skills Lab
A.A., A.S., Central Florida Community College
B.S., Florida State University
LUTZ, Lana
Administrative Coordinator, Administration and Finance
A.A., Central Florida Community College
JONES, Vera
Custodian
JONES, Vincent
Systems Analyst, Computer Services
B.S., University of Florida
JOYNER, Teresa
Staff Assistant, Hampton Center
JUSTICE, Carmen
Custodian
MacDONALD, Rickie
Staff Assistant, Facilities Department
MACKEY, Debra
Coordinator, Continuing Education Health
MAGANA, Susan W.
Custodian
MAIER, Melissa
KIELTY, Ronald E.
Network Engineer, Computer Services
KINLEY, Joseph
Switchboard Operator
KIRCHHOFF, A. J. “Casey”
Staff Assistant, Student Leadership Development
KNEA, Connie E.
Staff Assistant, Levy Center
KOPEC, Rosemary
Accounting Clerk
LABATE, Charlie
Locksmith, Facilities Department
Pre-school Teacher II
MALCOLM, Bonnie S.
Accounting Specialist II, Business Office
MALLORY, Ronnie A.
Groundskeeper, Athletic Facilities
MALOY, Janet
Accounting Specialist II, Business Office
MANON, Peter
Programmer, Computer Services
A.A., Central Florida Community College
MARKHAM, Sandra
Executive Administrative Assistant, Office for Instruction
MATTERN, Larraine A.
LAMB, Karol
Career Specialist Assistant for Business Technology and
Workforce Learning
Accounting Specialist III, Foundation
MAYER, Troy C.
Tradesworker
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE
DIRECTORY
263
McBRIDE, Patricia “Trish”
Staff Assistant III, Health Occupations
A.A., Central Florida Community College
McCAMMON, Jr., James
E-One Corporate University Program Liaison,
Workforce Development
McDANIEL, Yolando L.
Student Development Advisor, Enrollment Services
MENADIER, Judy
Programmer, Computer Services
Certificate, Taylor Business Institute
A.A., Central Florida Community College
A.S., Central Florida Community College
MILLER, Shana M.
Staff Assistant IV, Liberal Arts and Sciences
B.A., University of Florida
MONROE, Marie G.
Administrative Assistant, Citrus County Campus
MONTALVO, Maximino “Max”
Tradesworker
MORAN, Barbara “Bobbi”
Staff Assistant IV, Athletics
MOYER, James R.
Manager, Corporate Training
MURTZ, Susan
Student Development Advisor, Teacher Education
B.S.W., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
NEELD, Wendy S.
Skills Lab Specialist, Citrus County Campus
B.A., Houghton College (N.Y.)
NEGER, Gary J.
Custodian
Library Technician I/Audio Visual
A.A., Central Florida Community College
PILGRIM, Cheryl L.
Associate Manager, Conference Services Center
PILKINGTON, Bobbye
Records Technician, Public Service
PINDER, Paula
Child Development Center and Lab School
POOLE, Selestine W.
Instructional Assistant, Math
A.A., Central Florida Community College
PORTER, Joyce
Library Assistant
A.A., Central Florida Community College
PRATT, Christy
Staff Assistant, Computer Services
PURCARO, Phyllis
Staff Assistant, Workforce Learning
A.A., Palm Beach Community College
RAGER, Linda L.
Accounting Specialist, Business Office
RAMLOW, Edith
Manager, Learning Resource Center, Citrus County
Campus
A.A., Hillsborough Community College
B.A., University of South Florida
M.A., University of South Florida
RAMOS, Sheila K.
Coordinator, Continuing Education
A.S., A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., Saint Leo University
RAULERSON, Peggy
NOBLE, Amos
Tradesworker
NOLAN, Marcia I.
Cashier Specialist
O’BRIEN, Robert E.
Coordinator, Continuing Education
A.A., Florida Community College
B.S., University of Miami
M.Ed., University of North Florida
PARFEE, Ronald E.
Facilities Worker, Hampton Center
PASCO, Juane
Financial Aid Specialist II
PELL, Sandy
Coordinator, Professional Development
A.S., Central Florida Community College
A.A., Central Florida Community College
264
PERRINE, Diane, M.
Staff Assistant II, Health Occupations
A.A., Central Florida Community College
REED, TAMMY L.
Custodian
REEDY, Patricia J.
Cashier Specialist, Business Office
RICE, Cheryl D.
Head Coach, Athletics
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., University of South Alabama
M.Ed., University of South Alabama
RICHARDSON, Jacqueline
Teacher, Pre-School
ROBINSON, Lillian
Staff Assistant, Admissions and Records
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
ROCKWELL, Ana C.
Continuing Education Support Specialist
RODGERS, Jr., Donald
Student Development Advisor, Business Technician
ROSEMOND, Farrah
Pre-School Teacher III
ROU, James Daniel
Custodian
RUTZ, Amber C.
Staff Assistant, Cultural and Conference Center
RYON, Diana
Enrollment Services Coordinator
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., University of Florida
SAGENDORPH, Linda L.
Staff Assistant, Learning Support Center
SALLS, Darla
Custodian
SMITH, Carol S.
Executive Administrative Assistant, Student Affairs
A.A., Florida State University
Certified Professional Secretary
A.S., Central Florida Community College
V.C., Central Florida Community College
SMITH, Kimberley J.
Coordinator, Equal Access Services
B.A., Eckerd College
M.A., Florida State University
SMITH, Marty
Head Coach, Men’s Baseball
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., St. Thomas University
SMITH, Victoria
Custodian, Ocala Campus
SOARD, Verba
Staff Assistant IV, Health Occupations
Certified Professional Secretary
STAHL, Steven P.
SALLS, Richard
Custodian
PC/AV Technician, Business Technician
STARKER, Joann C.
SANGIACOMO, Rose-Marie C.
Manager, Career Resource Services
SANTANA, Josue
Custodian
Student Development Advisor, Enrollment Services
STEWART, Bruce
Custodian, Citrus County Campus
STINEHOUR, Anna L.
SANTOS-PERKINS, Maria L.
Staff Assistant II, Mathematics and Science
SCOTT-SWANSON, Amy K.
Project Coordinator-Teacher
B.A., University of Florida
Accountant III, Business Office
STOWERS, Diann
Staff Assistant, Communications and Fine Arts Division
A.A., Central Florida Community College
STRICKLAND, Frank
Tradesworker
SELIG, Gaye
Staff Assistant II, Health Occupations
SERENI-MASSINGER, Christine E.
Planned Gifts Officer, Foundation
SERNA, Julio
Tutor Coordinator/Advisor, Student Support Services
B.A., University at Albany – S.U.N.Y
M.P.A., University at Albany – S.U.N.Y.
SHAPOT, Marc
Assistant Director, Plant Operations,
Citrus County Campus
SHEVLIN, Mary L.
Staff Assistant, Citrus County Campus
SIEG, Bryon K.
PC Technician, Computer Services
A.S., Central Florida Community College
THAYSEN, Debbie R.
Staff Assistant, Resource Development, Grants Office
A.S., Central Florida Community College
THOMPSON, Carole D.
Senior Library Assistant
A.S., Pensacola Junior College
THORPE, Mary S.
Grill Cook, Culinary Arts
TIMNEY, Terry
Tradesworker
TIMS, Robert G.
Senior Financial Aid Specialist
TINDALL, Margaret “Libby”
Staff Assistant, Presidents’ office
A.S., Central Florida Community College
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE
DIRECTORY
265
TREXLER, Janet
International Education Specialist
A.A., Central Florida Community College
TRICK, David
PC Technician, Citrus County Campus
TUTEN, Bill
Coordinator, Continuing Education, Senior Institute
(part-time)
B.S., Stetson University
M.P.E., University of Florida
VALENZANO, Nancy
Executive Administrative Assistant,
Administration and Finance
VISHNAGRA, Kautilya
PC Technician, Computer Services
WALKER, Hannah
Staff Assistant II, Citrus County Campus
WILSON, Rosalind
Staff Assistant, Continuing Education Division
A.S., Central Florida Community College
WILSON, Tommy
Tradesworker
WOLF, Robert
Manager, Corporate Training and Citrus County Campus
Continuing Education
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.A., Saint Leo University
M.B.A., Saint Leo University
YORK, Rebecca
County Coordinator, Educational Opportunity Center,
Citrus County Campus
B.A., Anderson University
YORK, William III
Instructional Assistant, Citrus County Campus
A.A., Central Florida Community College
WARNER, Wendy
Chief Fiscal Officer, Foundation
A.A., Central Florida Community College
B.S., University of Florida
WATSON, Wendy K.
Staff Assistant IV, Learning Resource Center
WEISS, Vela
Staff Assistant, Humanities and Social Sciences Division
WELCH, Sandy
Staff Assistant II, Marketing and Public Relations
Secretarial Diploma, Cornerstone University
WENDER, Patricia
Staff Assistant, Plant Operations
WHEELER, Jean M.
Coordinator, Corporate Training
WILLIAMS, Andrew
Custodial Supervisor
A.A., Central Florida Community College
WILLIAMS, Bobbie
Assistant Payroll Specialist
WILLIAMS, Sharon
Data Processing and Web Site Manager, Foundation
WILSON, Dianne
Staff Assistant II, Foundation
WILSON, John
Tradesworker
WILSON, Kathryn
Senior Library Technician, Learning Resources Center
A.A., Central Florida Community College
266
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
INDEX
For specific A.S. degree, credit certificate and occupational certificate
program references, see the index on pages 97–98.
Absences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–7
Academic Dismissal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Academic Probation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Academic Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60–61, 81
Academic Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Academic Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Academic Suspension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60–61
Academic Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Acceleration Mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Accident Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Accreditation and Memberships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
ACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–12, 254
Administrative Excuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Admission Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Admission Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19–28
Admission Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Admission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19–21
Advanced Placement (AP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Advisement/Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Affiliations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 38
Affirmative Action Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Aids and Bloodborne Pathogens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Alcohol and Drug Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
American College Testing Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 21, 59, 61, 81
Appleton Museum of Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Area Vocational Education School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Armed Services Educational Experiences Credit . . . . . . 29
Articulation Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Articulation Coordinating Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Articulation Officers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Associate in Applied Science Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Associate in Applied Science Programs
(see index, page 97)
Associate in Arts Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 50–51, 96
Associate in Arts Degree
Transfer Guarantees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58-59
Associate in Science Degree . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 59–60, 96
Associate in Science Degree Programs
(see index, page 97)
Attendance Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Attendance, Non-College Degree Programs, Veterans . . 46
Audit Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 32
Automobiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Blind Services and Vocational Rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . 79
Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 12
Brick City Center for the Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Buckley Amendment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–7
Campus Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270–271
Career Assessment Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
CAT-CLAST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61–62
CEEB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Center for Civic Education and Student
Leadership Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Central Florida Community College
Foundation, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 38, 43
Central Florida Symphony Orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Certificate Programs (see index, page 97) . . . . . . . 12, 61
Certified Professional Secretaries Exam Credit . . . . . . . 30
CF Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 85
CFCC Cultural and Conference Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Chairs Endowed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38–43
Child Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 70, 88
Citrus County Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 13
Civic Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Class Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31–32
Classification of Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
CLAST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64, 96
CLAST Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
CLAST Exemptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
CLAST Passing Scores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
CLEP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26–27
Clubs and Organizations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
College Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–7
College Credit Certificate Programs
(see index, page 97)
College Credit Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 32
College Entrance Examination Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
College Level Academic
Skills Test (CLAST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61–62, 64, 96
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) . . . . . . . 26–27
College Placement Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
College Preparatory Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 57, 180
College Service District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
College Square Student Residence Center . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Common Core Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49–54
Common Course Numbering System . . . . . . . . . . 58, 180
Community of Scholars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Companion Placement Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Computer Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Conference Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Continuing Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 85
Cooperative Education Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 86
Corporate Training Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 88, 85
Correctional Officer Training School Credit . . . . . . . . . . 30
Correspondence and Extension Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Course Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Course Descriptions (cooperative education) . . . . . . . 236
Course Descriptions (credit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182–235
Course Descriptions (vocational certificate) . . . . . 238–251
Course Equivalencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
COLLEGE
DIRECTORY
267
Course Numbering System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Course Prefixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
CPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
CPT Companion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Credit (defined) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Credit by Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Criminal Justice Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 63, 165
Cultural and Conference Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Day Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Dean’s List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Deferments, Veterans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Deficit Grade Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Degree Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50–51, 59–60
Degree-Seeking Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 22, 31, 32
Disability Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 21
Discrimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Dismissal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Distance Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 88
District Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 12
Drug and Alcohol Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37–38
Dual Credit Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Dual Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Early Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Education Majors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Educational Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–13
Educational Testing Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Educational Trust Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Emergency Medical Training Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Employees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254–266
Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Endowed Memorial Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
English Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Equal Access Services (EAS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Equity Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Exceptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Exemptions, CLAST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Exhibit Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Experiential Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Express Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Extension Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Faculty and Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254–266
FAFSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act . . . . . . . . . . 45
FAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Fax Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Federal Endowment Challenge Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity
Grant (FSEOG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Fee Waivers and Exemptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69–76
Felony Conviction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Final Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78–81
Financial Aid Transcript (FAT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Financial Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Fine Arts Auditorium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Florida State Employee Tuition and Fee Waivers . . . . . . 76
Florida Student Assistance Grant (FSAG) . . . . . . . . . . . 80
268
Focus: Student Development Learning Outcomes . . . . . 37
Food Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Foreign Language Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Foreign Language Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Forgiveness Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 38–43
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) . . . . . . 79
FSAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
FSEOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
General Co-op Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
General Education Common Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49–54
General Education Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
General Education Course Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51–54
General Education Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
General Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Gifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Gordon Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50, 51, 180
Grade Appeal Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Grade Point Average (GPA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Grade Point Deficit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Grades, Veterans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Grading System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62–63
Graduation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Grievances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 44
Guarantee (CFCC, additional training) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Guarantees (A.A. Transfer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58–59
Hampton Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 14
Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Hepatitis B/Meningitis Awareness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
History of College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Holiday Observance, Religious . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Honor Graduates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Honors Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Honors Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Hours of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
I.D. Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
International Baccalaureate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 58
International Education Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Job Placement and Co-op Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Klein Conference Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Lab Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Leadership Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Learning Resources Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Learning Support Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Learning Theme at CFCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Legacy Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Levy County Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 14
Limited Access Programs (CFCC) . . . . . 58, 121, 123, 131,
149, 157, 167, 175, 176
Limited Access Programs (universities) . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Lost and Found . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Mailing Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270–271
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
Mathematics Exemption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Matriculation and Tuition Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Military Service Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Mini-Mester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Non-Credit Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Non-Degree Applicants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 23, 32
Non-Traditional Studies Program
(See Distance Learning) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Notice of Basic Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Ocala Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Online Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Orientation Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Overseas Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Parallel Credit Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) . . . . . . 79
Parking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Pathways Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Pell Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Performing Arts Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Petitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 60
Phi Theta Kappa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Placement Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Police Recruit School Training Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Certificate
Programs (see index, page 98)
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Programs (PSAV) . . . . 88
Postsecondary Education Planning Commission . . . . . . 62
President’s List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Probation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 81
Programs of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99–177
Psi Beta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Public Policy Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Reclassification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20–21
Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44–45
Refund Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77–78
Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Registration Procedure—Area Vocational
Education School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Registration Procedure—College Credit Division . . . . . . 32
Religious Holiday Observance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Repayment Policy (federal) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Residence Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Residency Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Retired Senior Volunteer Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Returned Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Returning Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 32
SAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
SAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Satellite Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Schedule Change Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Scheduling of Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Senior Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Service Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Servicemember’s Opportunity College . . . . . . . . . . 30–31
Sexual Predators on Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Sigma Delta Mu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Stafford Loan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Standards of Progress, Veterans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
State University System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Statewide Course Numbering System . . . . . . . . . . 58, 180
Student Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Student Activities Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Student Advising Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Student Aid Report (SAR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Student Assistance Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Student Handbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Student Petitions and Academic
Review Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 61
Student Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44–45
Student Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Student Support Services Summer Program . . . . . . . . . 93
Substitutions for Eligible Students With Disabilities . . . . . 32
Suspension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 60
Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Taste of Citrus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Taste of Ocala . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Tech Prep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Telecourses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Telephone Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Telephone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Testing Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 71
Training Time Requirements, Veterans . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Transcripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Transfer Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Transfer Guarantees, A.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58–59
Transfer Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23–24, 60
Transient Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 23
TRIO Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Trust Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Tutoring Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
University Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Veteran’s Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45–46
Vision Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Vocational Preparatory Instruction (VPI) . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Vocational Rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
VPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Webber Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Withdrawal from College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32, 64
Work Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Writing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
269
270
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
CENTRAL FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CATALOG 2004–2005
271
91
92
93
L3
L2
L1
Administration, Enrollment Services,
Counseling, Continuing Education
Upstairs:
Learning Resources Center, Learning
Support Center, Computer Lab
Downstairs:
Bookstore, Welcome Center, Equal
Opportunity Center, Student Lounge,
Jerome Multi-Purpose Room
Upstairs:
Faculty Offices and Classrooms
Downstairs:
Classrooms and Lab
Classroom
Classrooms
Assessment Center
Citrus Campus
Levy Center

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