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magazine_winter08 ( PDF ) - University of Florida Levin College of
UF LAW
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FREDRIC G. LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW • WINTER 2008
The
Future
And what we are doing about it
n ANNUAL REPORT ISSUE
FROM THE DEAN
PHOTO BY KRISTEN HINES
In the Business of Shaping Leaders
I
DEAN ROBERT JERRY
Levin, Mabie & Levin Professor of Law
n the four and a half years I have been
privileged to serve as the dean of your
law school, I have learned a great deal
about our traditions, our history, and
the graduates who have walked through
our halls. It is strikingly clear that
among our college’s greatest achievements
are its contributions to training
and developing leaders for our
nation, our state, and our communities. Because I have spent
nearly half of my own career
in academic leadership positions of one kind or another, I
have had a growing interest in
learning more about what is
involved in developing and nurturing leadership. In
turn, this has given me insights into the history of our
college, which through the years has been so successful in producing graduates who lead.
This issue of UFLaw, like others before it, is filled
with examples of our college’s alumni, faculty, and students who have demonstrated great aptitude for leadership. This is evident in the stories about not only the
alumni inducted into the college’s Heritage of Leadership but also the alumni who have worked to vindicate
justice, who provide leadership in our profession, who
are leaders in government service, and who lead by
shouldering the problems and burdens of their clients.
It seems clear enough that if someone wants to be
a competent and skilled lawyer, obtaining one’s legal
education at the Levin College of Law is a good thing
to do. It is also evident, however, that UF Law does
more than prepare its students to be first-rate professionals. UF Law also prepares its students to be leaders in the workplace, the profession, our state, our
nation, and our communities. Our college’s tradition
of leadership development is something which we
should embrace, honor, and
project into the future.
This issue of UFLaw also
tells the first story of the “Florida Tomorrow” capital campaign, which the University of
Florida kicked off this fall. The
$47 million law school campaign goal will add resources
to skillfully train law students
to be ethical leaders in law,
politics, and business and to contribute positively
to social and economic development in our state and
nation. You can read more about the campaign and our
college’s part in it beginning on page 10, and I encourage you to do so. Ultimately, this campaign is about
leadership – positioning our law school to play a
decisive role in developing the next generation of leaders for our profession, our state, our nation, and our
communities. I encourage you to become a part of this
ambitious effort.
Thank you for reading this message and this
magazine, and for your support of our law school.
We hope you enjoy this issue, including the stories it
tells and pictures it contains of many of the students,
our future leaders, who will benefit from the generosity of our supporters.
“Our college’s
tradition of leadership
development is
something which we
should embrace, honor,
and project into
the future.”
Primary photography by Kristen Hines
2
UF LAW
Vol. 44, Issue 1 • Winter 2008
4
News Briefs
6
Heritage of Leadership
8
Partners
10 Florida Tomorrow
Important Work Underway at UF Law
16 David Roth
A Top Florida Criminal Attorney
20 Leslie Lott
At the Top of Intellectual Property Game
24 Unequal Justice
Young Alum Takes on Texas Wrong
30 Faculty News
32 Faculty Scholarship
38 FLETCHER BALDWIN
On the Money Trail
39 Class Notes
51 ANNUAL REPORT
82 Farewell
83 Up and Coming
UF Law students:
Madelin Ruiz (3L)
Hercules Collins (3L)
PHOTO BY KRISTEN HINES
WINTER 2008
3
NEWS BRIEFS
Law students
on community
service day.
Community Service
Starts at Home
U
niversity of Florida law
students, faculty and staff
removed trash, debris and exotic invasive plants from a 3.3-acre
wooded area across from the Levin
College of Law as part of UF Law’s
annual Community Service Day at the
start of the school year, which
involved more than 400 volunteers at
13 locations throughout the Gainesville area.
The law school woods area is being
restored thanks to a $16,300 grant to
UF Law’s Environmental & Land Use
Law Society from UF Student Government and UF Physical Plant.
4
“We had a great group of volunteers and accomplished a lot in a few
short hours,” said UF Law student
Ashley Henry, project manager for the
restoration project. “By merely pulling
down some of the air potato vines, we
saw how the woods began to open up.
Residents living in the adjacent
Golfview neighborhood were excited
to see our group working and stopped
by to learn more about our project.”
With everyone performing three
hours of service, the time given totaled
more than 1,200 hours. The day allowed first-year students to get a good
start toward earning a Community Service Certificate, which is awarded to
students who perform at least 35 hours
of community service during their time
in law school.
Add Your Memories
100 Year
Celebration
UF Law has a rich history,
from humble beginnings in 1909
through the most recent innovative renovations in 2006. In
preparation for the college’s
centennial, alumni and friends
are invited to go to the college’s
website and add their personal
accounts to help create an interactive archive of the history of the
college.
On each history page at
www.law.ufl.edu/history, visitors
are encouraged to complete
an electronic form that will be
forwarded to the college’s history
team and included on the website.
UF LAW
Faculty Scholarship
Ranked Highly
Levin College of Law faculty scholarly
impact has been recognized as one of
the best in the country in the latest
rankings from University of Texas Law
Professor Brian Leiter. UF Law was
ranked among the “Top 35 Law Faculties
Based on Scholarly Impact for 2007.”
Rankings were based on standard
“objective” measures of scholarly impact,
per capita citations to faculty scholarship
using Westlaw’s JRL database. The 10
most-cited faculty members were Professors Jeffrey Harrison, Berta HernandezTruyol, Jerry Israel, Robert Jerry, Lars
Noah, William Page, Juan Perea, Leonard Riskin, Christopher Slobogin and
Barbara Woodhouse.
“I think it’s clear the output of our
faculty has been increasing in recent
years, and that’s a real credit to them,”
Dean Jerry said. “It’s good to see that
the impact of the work is being recognized through citations. There are limitations to any ranking, including this one,
but it’s very good to be listed in something of this sort.”
Trial Team Brings Home
National Title
The UF Trial Team brought home a
national title at the St. John’s University National Civil Rights Trial Competition in Jamaica, NY, in October. After
an intense three-day competition,
team members Jessica Anderson (3L)
Frank Gaulden (3L) Alicia Philip (3L)
and Justin Stevens (3L) defeated 15
teams from across the country, including Pace, Arizona State and Emory.
The team was coached by Stacy
Scott (JD 95) and the Hon. David Gersten (JD 75), chief judge of Florida’s
3rd District Court of Appeal in Miami.
After weeks of practicing the team is
very proud of the victory. “We had only
four weeks, but everyone worked extremely hard day in and day out and in
the end it all paid off. I’m so proud of
the effort my teammates put in, and
we couldn’t have done it without our
coaches,” Philip said.
WINTER 2008
Race and Race Relations
First Oral Competition Planned
T
he University of Florida Center
for the Study of Race and Race
Relations (CSRRR) announced
it will hold its first oral competition in
February. The Race, Law and Justice
Oral Competition provides law students
an opportunity to research, discuss and
debate important issues of race and
justice.
The subject for this year’s
competition is race-based hate speech.
The hypothetical case that students will
research and debate is based upon an
actual incident involving racial conflict
between white and black high school
students in a South Carolina town. White
students wore T-shirts emblazoned with
the Confederate flag and “100 percent
cotton and you picked it.” Black students
responded by having T-shirts printed with
the Confederate flag in red, black, and
green—the colors of African liberation.
Awards from $2,500 to $1,000 will
be given to the top three teams. A panel
of judges, including UF professors and
Gainesville community representatives,
will hear the teams compete. The event
is open to the public.
Get Your UF Law News Online
After several years as an award-winning print
publication, the Levin College of Law’s weekly
newsletter during the academic year, FlaLaw, has
gone electronic. It includes timely news of events
at the college, alumni profiles and faculty news.
In addition, you can receive UF Law E-News,
the college’s electronic newsletter written especially
for alumni. If you are interested in receiving either
publication electronically, please send your request,
name and e-mail address to [email protected]
ON THE
Web
5
Heritage of
Leadership
UF Law honors the best of the best
B y aline ba k er
T
he Honorable C. Clyde Atkins (JD 36), an
influential judge and a champion of civil
rights, and John Moore McCarty (JD 41),
a former state senator, judge, Florida Bar
president and member of the influential
1968 Constitution Revision Commission,
have been posthumously inducted into the
University of Florida Levin College of Law Heritage of Leadership
Recognition Society.
Atkins
6
C. CLYDE ATKINS
Atkins was known as a defender for those who were less fortunate
as well as a passionate supporter of the legal justice system. His
achievements in this arena included advocating for the rights of the
homeless, upholding the rights of Cuban and Haitian refugees to lodge
petitions in U.S. courts and working for the desegregation of public
schools. Atkins’ academic career began at UF, where he earned a
degree in law in 1936.
In 1941 he joined law school classmate Bill Lantaff (JD 36) at
Casey & Walton in Miami, where he worked for the next 25 years and
became a name partner. Practicing as an active trial lawyer in the areas
of corporate, real estate, railroad and insurance gave him the foundation
for his exceptional 33-year career as a federal judge.
Atkins was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson as the
judge of the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida, and
served as the chief judge of the district from 1977 to 1982. President
Jimmy Carter recognized his willingness to serve others by appointing
him to the National Commission for the Review of Antitrust Laws
and Procedures from 1978 to 1979. Atkins presided over thousands
of cases and was known by many for his astute judgment, fairness,
impartiality and commitment to the law.
“If he’s convinced it’s guaranteed by the Constitution, he is fearless,”
the late Chesterfield Smith (JD 48) once said of Atkins’ commitment to
law. “He doesn’t care if it’s unpopular. He’ll stand alone.”
UF LAW
Some of Atkins’ most publicized cases included presiding
over the desegregation of Dade County schools beginning in
1969 and continuing jurisdiction for more than 25 years; a ruling
allowing Allen Ginsberg, a poet who was denied his freedom of
expression when the chief of police turned off his microphone,
to give another reading free of charge; the action brought by the
Justice Department seeking to prevent Florida Power & Light
from building the Turkey Point nuclear power plant in Dade
County; and a wildcat machinist strike at National Airlines,
in which he refused to reinstate striking machinists after they
disobeyed his injunction to return to work to allow the airline to
resume operations. Atkins also presided over serious drug cases
that earned his district court a national reputation as one of the
finest in the 1970s.
In the 1990s Atkins ruled against both the Bush and
Clinton administrations’ policies to repatriate Cuban and
Haitian refugees housed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. In 1992
he ruled on arguably his most influential case involving the
homeless in Miami. He ordered the creation of “safe zones” for
the area’s homeless to congregate without the threat of police
arrest. Much of the nation’s subsequent attitude to rehabilitate
the homeless through training and the creation of shelters was
influenced by this decision.
Over his illustrious career Atkins received numerous public
service awards, including being named as a Knight of St.
Gregory by Pope Paul VI, having the University of Miami’s
Moot Court named in his behalf and being honored with the
National Conference for Community and Justice Distinguished
Community Service Award. Atkins died in 1999.
John Moore McCARTY
McCarty graduated from law school in 1941 and
immediately went into private practice with Liddon & Fee
in his home town of Fort Pierce, focusing on general civil
practice. His civil practice duties were cut short when he was
called to active combat duty in the Army during World War II,
where he served in the Pacific theater of operations. He earned
the Bronze Star while commanding the 292nd Joint Assault
Company of the 77th Infantry Division and took part in the
amphibious landings on Guam, the Philippines and Okinawa,
as well as the original occupation of Japan.
Upon returning from the war in 1945, he established his own
law practice and began to put his maturity and leadership skills to
work to pave the way for a truly exceptional career.
In 1948 and 1952 he served as campaign manager and
chief of staff to his brother, Florida Gov. Dan McCarty, which
enabled him in 1953 to play a key role as part of a small
group that lobbied for and implemented the legislation to
establish the College of Medicine at UF. In 1957 McCarty was
appointed judge of the 9th Judicial District and served as a
circuit judge until his resignation in 1959, when he mounted
an unsuccessful campaign for governor in 1960. He was elected
to the Florida Senate in 1962 and reelected in 1966. McCarty
also was a member of the influential 1968 Constitution
Revision Commission that made the last major changes to
Florida’s Constitution and established the state’s modern-day
judicial system.
WINTER 2008
McCarty
McCarty served on the first Supreme Court Nominating
Commission along with past Heritage of Leadership inductees
Dixie Beggs (2003) and John Wigginton (2006). He also served on
the American Bar Association House of Delegates, the Florida Bar
Board of Governors and as a director of the American Judicature
Society. He was elected and served as president of the Florida Bar
in 1971 to 1972.
McCarty served as chair of the UF College of Law’s first
capital campaign in the early ’80s, which led to the construction
of Bruton-Geer Hall at the law school. He also was a founding
member of the UF Foundation and Law Center Association,
receiving the Trustees’ Award in 1981, and served as a member
of the UF President’s Council and Gator Boosters. He has been
named to both the Florida Blue Key Hall of Fame and to UF’s Hall
of Fame, and was designated a Distinguished Alumni in 1973.
In addition to his legal career, McCarty maintained business
interests in citrus groves and cattle ranching in Fort Pierce. His
community involvement included serving on the Board of
Directors for Florida Power and Light Company, the Port St. Lucie
Bank, the Fort Pierce Memorial Hospital and as a state director
of the Orange Bowl. In addition, he was a senior warden and
Sunday school superintendent at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church,
president of Rotary, and an active member of the Junior Chamber
of Commerce, all in Fort Pierce. McCarty died in 1995.
The alumni honored by the Heritage of Leadership Recognition Society
are preeminent graduates who, in the decades since, assumed leadership
positions on national and international levels and distinguished
themselves in legal, governmental, academic and corporate sectors.
They labored to improve the administration of justice and received the
highest commendations for contributions to the profession and service
to education, civic, charitable and cultural causes. To permanently honor
outstanding and notable alumni of UF Law and their contributions to
the state and university, the Law Center Association Board of Trustees
established the Heritage of Leadership Recognition Society in 2003.
7
PARTNERS
Real Estate Gifts Are a Smart
G
ifts of real estate make great
sense for anyone considering
major philanthropy with current
or estate gifts.
In almost all instances,
the IRS allows a
deduction of the
full appraised
value of the
property for
outright
gifts. This
deduction
can
be
used
to
offset up to
30 percent
of adjusted
gross income
in the year of
sale, plus five carryforward years. When the
university sells the real estate,
no capital gains tax is due. The full
net proceeds can then be leveraged by
claiming matching funds from the state
of Florida at rates ranging from 50-100
percent.
Charitable remainder unitrusts
funded with real estate can have spectacular
results when used for retirement or other
lifetime income. Funding the unitrust with
real estate generates a sizeable income
Take Advantage of
F
Move
tax deduction, even if the property is not
immediately liquidated. When liquidated,
there are no capital gains taxes on the
proceeds, nor are taxes due on gains in
the market once the proceeds
have been invested. At
the recommended payout rates of 5-7 percent
of the value of the
corpus, returns
should average
in excess of
the
pay-out.
Excess returns
are reinvested
and can provide
a hedge against
inflation as the
corpus grows.
The University
of Florida Foundation,
Inc., has an experienced
staff that can assist as you consider
gift vehicles or estate planning for
you or your clients. To support the
law school, contact Bruce DeLaney,
director of real estate at (352)
392-5405 or [email protected]
You may also contact the law school
Office of Development directly at
(352) 273-0641.
—Bruce Delaney
UF Director of Real Estate
The Pension Act
or just a short time, charitably-minded UF Law alumni 70 1/2 years of age
and older can take advantage of a new law that will allow them to make
donations from their IRAs while excluding the amount from their gross income.
“The Pension Protection Act of 2006 is a wonderful opportunity for alumni
who meet the requirements and who want to support the law school,” said
Kelley Frohlich, senior director of development. “However, the window of opportunity to use this creative tool is currently only available until the end of
2007.” Gifts cannot exceed $100,000 per taxpayer per year, and gifts of
$100,000 may qualify for Florida’s matching gift program. For specific
information, call (352) 273-0640.
8
From Ohio State to
Titletown
O
f all the law schools in the land,
Sara Grimm decided to leave
Ohio State University to work
at the university that defeated
Ohio State in national basketball
and football championships. As UF
Law’s new director of annual fund
& stewardship programs, she says
it’s an entertaining topic of
conversation
as she meets
alumni across
the nation.
“At
the
championship
football game,
being a Florida
native,
my
fiance and I
Grimm
both wore our
Gator gear to the parties in Ohio,” said
Grimm. “We were also the only two
happy people at the end of the game.”
Grimm previously served as
assistant director of development
for reunions at the Mortiz College of
Law at Ohio State. In her current role
she is managing the annual giving
program for the college, supporting
the Law Alumni Council, and
coordinating gift acknowledgement
processes and stewardship efforts.
She is a graduate of Penn State
University.
Grimm is in for another big change
as well. She is a former professional
figure skater and skating instructor
who will not find many ice skating
rinks in North Central Florida.
“Although I spent more than
22 years in ice rinks skating, I’m
enjoying thawing out and practicing
my golf game and scuba diving,”
she said.
UF LAW
Scholarship Fund
Among Generous Gifts
T
he memory and distinguished career
of Edwin Presser (JD 58), the founder
of Jacksonville law firm Goldman &
Presser, is being honored by three former
colleagues and his son, Stephen. The
donors have given $668,000, which
will be matched by state funds to the
Edwin Presser Scholarship Fund for
law students, with a preference given
to students wanting to practice in the
field of public interest law.
Other recent gifts were funded by:
•S
tearns Weaver Miller Weissler
Alhadeff & Sitterson P.A. Student
Professional Development Endowment
The spendable income from this
$100,000 fund will be used to
support teaching, research and
programs that enhance the leadership
and professionalism of law.
• J im Theriac (JD 74), who contributed
$100,000 in an unrestricted bequest.
•W
. Kelly (JD 66) & Ruth Smith, who
provided a cash pledge of $50,000 to
be used in an unrestricted endowment.
•N
orton, Allen & Blue PA, which
endowed a $50,000 Book Award in
Employment Discrimination, which
will honor the top student in that
course in perpetuity.
• J ohn (JD 82) & Ultima (JD 80)
Morgan, who provided a cash pledge
of $100,000 with purpose TBD.
Macdonald Prize
Awarded
T
he winner of the W.D. Macdonald
Prize this year is Daniel Glassman
from West Palm Beach. Working on his
master’s in tax law at UF, he will graduate in May and work for Gunster, Yoakley
& Stewart in West Palm Beach, focusing
on business and corporations tax law.
The award of $3,000 is presented each
spring to the graduate with the highest
cumulative law school average.
WINTER 2008
Enjoying the UF Law alumni social in Orlando are, from left, college Alumni Council member
Laura Minton-Young (JD 04), Sarah Rumpf (JD 03), the event organizer and an executive
committee member of the Alumni Council, with other Alumni Council member Felipe Guerrero
(JD 05).
Alumni Gather for Fun
I
t’s true that The Gator Nation
is everywhere, and better yet,
its UF Law citizens are organizing more often to have fun and
network with each other. Most recently, alumni in Orlando and Tampa reached out to stay connected
with other alums. Brent Gordon (JD
04) organized a social in Tampa, and
Sarah Rumph organized an event in
Orlando.
“Planning these events has been
really rewarding. I’ve met so many of
our wonderful alumni, and their dedication to the profession and enthusiasm for UF never ceases to amaze
me,” said Rumpf, who added that they
are already planning the next Orlando
event for Feb. 28, 2008.
and Networking
Kelley Frohlich, senior director
of the Office of Development at
UF Law, said her office will provide
advice on arrangements, including
contacting alumni living in the
designated area.
“We know that alumni really
enjoy these events, so we are happy
to work with organizers to provide
information and tips on how to
sponsor an event in their area.
There are lots of benefits to staying
connected with the law school and
each other, so we encourage this type
of alumni initiative,” Frohlich said.
“Sarah and Brent did a phenomenal
job of getting the alums together in
their area, and we hope to see more
of this around the state and nation.”
9
10
UF LAW
Florida
Tomorrow
Creating a better tomorrow is underway today at UF Law
Natalie Caula
For nearly a century, the law school at the University of
Florida has taught and shaped the characters and opinions
of thousands of men and women who have studied here
before going on to practice law, lead businesses and serve in
leadership roles around the globe.
Now, through the university’s Florida Tomorrow
campaign, the law school hopes to raise $47 million to
continue to address the challenges facing all of us, both today
and tomorrow.
What is required to both sustain this record of success and
build a great law school for tomorrow?
To recruit and retain the best faculty, we must build an
intellectual community rich in energy and productivity that
enables individual faculty members to set and attain high
WINTER 2008
professional aspirations, says UF Law Dean Robert Jerry.
“The best faculty do more than pass on knowledge
to their students; they also ignite a lifelong passion for
the law,” said Jerry. The funds will be used to endow
professorships, chairs, fellowships and scholarships as
well as support additional student services.
“Updated facilities also will be key to the acquisition
of top faculty and their ability to teach, as well as to
the ability of students to learn,” Jerry said. “Funds for
renovations and technological enhancements and training
are vital to the modern learning environment.”
Creating a better tomorrow is already underway
as conveyed by a sampling of programs at the Levin
College of Law. 11
Conservation Clinic students examine
a Cedar Key clamming operation.
12
UF LAW
UF’s Environmental and Land Use
Law Program, under the direction of
Alyson Flournoy (right), provides both
academic and practical training
in these closely related fields.
Florida Tomorrow is a place …
where our natural resources and
rights are protected.
O
PHOTOS BY KRISTEN HINES
n Florida’s shores, where erosion and development
are squeezing coastal animals out of their habitats
and homeowners are losing backyard beaches to the
sea, UF law students drew a line in the sand.
Ryan Osborne and Heather Brown collaborated with
graduate students in wildife ecology and interdisciplinary
ecology to help a sea turtle advocacy group draft legislation
that put purchasers of coastal property on notice that they are
buying an eroding shoreline that they share with endangered
sea turtles and other vulnerable species.
That endeavor illustrates what UF’s Environmental and
Land Use Law Program is all about, says Alyson Flournoy,
its director. The program, she explains, is meant to instill in
its students vigorous independence and professionalism —
essential qualities for protecting the state’s natural resources
against damage and contamination.
To accomplish that, the integration of land use law and
environmental law is essential, she says. So is Flournoy
and her team’s association with UF’s Center for Governmental Responsibility, as well as their ties with an array of
other UF academic departments — wildlife ecology, environmental engineering, urban and regional planning, and
agriculture.
Students in the Environmental and Land Use Law
Program are also active in UF’s Conservation Clinic, directed
by Tom Ankersen. It’s there that students truly take charge.
Erika Zimmerman was one of those students. She drafted
a petition to UNESCO on behalf of the Belize Institute of
Environmental Law and Policy to list Belize’s Barrier Reef as
a threatened world heritage site. Her petition, noted by both
The New York Times and BBC, inspired two other petitions
filed on behalf of Mount Everest and a World Heritage site
in Peru. Ankersen notes that the Conservation Clinic and
its students serve as a model for international initiatives in
developing countries such as Costa Rica, where a joint UFWINTER 2008
University of Costa Rica program allows students to work
across cultural boundaries. Of course, issues closer to home
are also actively addressed by the Conservation Clinic.
“Our program has had demonstrable success providing
state and local governments with policy approaches that
have been enacted into law,” he says.
Florida Tomorrow is a day …
when all people live
under the rule of law.
A
trial lawyer, Jennifer Zedalis believes, is like an artist.
Sketch an argument. Add details. Paint a picture
that convinces a judge and jurors.
Like all artists, it’s practice, Zedalis knows, that can
make a good law student a great trial lawyer. And as director of the Trial Practice Program at the Fredric G. Levin
College of Law, she’s passionate about training that next
generation of trial lawyers to be masters at their craft.
“The most visible lawyers in our culture are those arguing cases in front of juries,” she says.
Consequently, trial lawyers represent not only their clients, but the whole profession. In order to do both effectively — to become what Zedalis calls “mature” lawyers
— students in Trial Practice undergo rigorous training. In
addition to traditional coursework, they attend lectures
and discussions, participate in weekly workshops taught
by practicing attorneys and judges, and hone their skills
through one-on-one video critiques. Ethical conduct, integrity, professionalism and devotion to client are stressed.
So is the need to understand increasingly complex scientific evidence, such as DNA and data from fields like engineering, forensics and medicine.
As law becomes more specialized and places more demands on its practitioners, training new trial lawyers to
understand and successfully meet those demands becomes
even more essential, Zedalis insists.
“The higher the standard set for the profession,” she
says, “the more noble the profession.”
13
Toward that end, students completing Trial Practice —
some 90-plus each semester — can intern through the State
Attorney’s or the Public Defender’s Office, representing actual clients before real judges. Or they can assist indigent
members of the community through the Virgil Hawkins
Civil Law Clinic. Students also compete to be on UF’s Trial
Team, which has won national titles three times in the last
five years, including the National Civil Rights Advocacy
Competition and the National Civil Trial Competition.
All that preparation pays off in the end, Zedalis says.
Students are taught to think quickly, synthesize information
from other disciplines, understand and apply subspecialties
in law and communicate effectively and persuasively — all
while adhering to the highest principles exemplified by the
profession.
After all, Zedalis says, “trial practice is an art form.” Florida Tomorrow is a belief …
that everyone deserves equal,
informed and fair representation.
A
t the Fredric G. Levin College of Law, children
are important clients. Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
makes sure of it. Woodhouse is director of the
law school’s Center on Children and Families. The center,
established in 2001, has an ambitious vision. Woodhouse
and her team see the center as a spearhead in efforts to serve
Florida’s most vulnerable residents: its children.
To put it in simple terms, the center’s mission is to make
sure all neglected and abused children receive integrated
help from professionals in law, social services, education
and mental health.
“We make a difference,” Woodhouse says, “because we
are involved at every level — from the trenches to the Supreme
Court.” With legal issues nowadays affecting families and
children so commonplace — there are 1.2 million divorces
each year and more than 21 million children involved in
some form of custody or child support dispute — the need
for coordinated services has never been greater, Woodhouse
14
explains, especially when resolution and problem-solving,
rather than litigation, is the goal.
To that end, UF’s Center on Children and Families now
includes the Child Welfare Clinic. The clinic is one of the first
in the country devoted to teaching law students the skills to
collaborate with physicians, nurses and social workers in a
unified approach to child protection. Another program in the
UF Law Virgil Hawkin’s Civil Clinics, Gator TeamChild,
makes it possible for law students to learn firsthand the art
and science of child advocacy. Through Gator TeamChild,
UF students become Florida Supreme Court-certified legal
interns and represent at-risk and indigent children in the 16county area surrounding Gainesville. The program provides
practical, ethical and interdisciplinary experience in cases
involving custody disputes, delinquency, domestic violence
and health care.
To date, some 50 graduates of the Levin College of
Law have earned a Family Law Certificate, creating what
Woodhouse calls a ripple effect in society. In training a new
generation of child-centered advocates, Woodhouse and the
other founders of UF’s Center on Children and Families
hope to see that salutary effect strengthen and spread.
As Woodhouse explains, the center’s initial leadership
role — based on the philosophy of inclusion and collaboration
— might well serve as a model for other similar and muchneeded statewide initiatives.
Florida Tomorrow is a place …
where business and the
economy thrives.
A
n invisible framework supports every business,
every organization, every way of life. It governs
how institutions and individuals interact, and can
dictate who succeeds and who fails. It is the Rule of Law,
and it provides the structure that allows civilizations to
flourish.
The University of Florida Levin College of Law has
helped build and maintain this framework for close to a
UF LAW
Florida is the fourth largest state in the
nation in terms of population, with an
unusually high number of retired and
elderly residents who require services,
programs and law graduates trained in
areas related to elder law issues such as
estates and trusts planning.
hundred years. With more living alumni than only a handful
of law schools and top-ranked programs in vital areas such
as Taxation, Family Law and Environmental and Land Use
Law, UF Law graduates are found everywhere important
decisions are made.
“You cannot successfully generate or distribute assets
without a sound understanding of the law,” says Dean Robert
Jerry. “Businesses realize this, and you can find many of
our graduates at the top of the country’s most successful
organizations. Our alumni also are shaping public policy at
the highest levels and leading law firms that help define how
the law is applied and followed.”
UF Law’s Graduate Tax Program, for example, has
impacted the nation’s formulation and interpretation of the
nation’s tax laws for 30-plus years. It is widely regarded by
tax scholars and practitioners nationwide as a leader among
all graduate tax programs. Its faculty include internationally
respected people in the field such as Culverhouse Eminent
Scholar Larry Lokken and Freeland Eminent Scholar Paul
McDaniel.
“My years at UF provided wonderful preparation for my
career,” says Lindy Paull, a current co-managing partner of
PricewaterhouseCoopers in Washington, D.C. who earned her
J.D. and her LL.M. in Taxation from UF before embarking
on a career that includes service as chief of staff of the Joint
Committee on Taxation of the U.S. Congress.
This respected program recently increased its impact by
adding the nation’s first Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.)
in Taxation, and an LL.M. in International Taxation Program
that places the program at the forefront in the study of
international taxation.
“Legal expertise in international taxation is greatly
valued in a world of multinational corporations, electronic
commerce, and international business and investment
transactions,” says Associate Dean Michael Friel, head
of the law school’s Graduate Tax Program. “U.S. lawyers
in cities throughout the country must become more
familiar with international tax rules, and foreign lawyers
must become more familiar with both U.S. and international
tax rules.”
WINTER 2008
Florida Tomorrow is a day …
when our assets and loved ones
are protected.
F
lorida is one of the most populous states in the country and growing fast. It also features an unusually high
number of the retired and elderly, with an accompanying need to provide top-notch programs and graduates well
versed in their special needs.
The UF Law Center for Estate and Elder Law Planning integrates teaching, training, research, scholarship and public service,
and is dedicated to advancing estate planning, charitable giving,
and elder law knowledge, professionalism, skills and policy by
educating and training both students and lawyers.
“We offer meaningful academic programs and services, help
prepare students to meet the challenges of an estates and trusts
practice, and provide community services for the area’s elderly
and poor. Many of our alumni practice in the field,” says Center
Director Lee-ford Tritt.” I believe our center and our graduates
can play a major role in shaping estates and trusts public policy
and statutes in Florida and beyond.”
The center also administers the Certificate Program in Estates
and Trusts Practice and supervises the Estates, Trusts and Elder
Law Society, which enables students to participate in outreach programs as community service to the elderly, and judicial externships
for academic credit, established in probate divisions of several judicial circuits. It coordinates with UF’s Graduate Tax Program,
is affiliated with the Institute for Learning in Retirement, which
sponsors adult education courses on estate planning and elder law
issues, and works closely with UF’s Oak Hammock retirement
community, where faculty regularly teach classes to residents.
“Resources through the Florida Tomorrow campaign will help
train and shape the lawyers and leaders we need to enhance economic development and encourage successful entrepreneurship,”
says Dean Jerry. “We also see it as our mandate to help others successfully manage their assets, both physical and personal, to the best
uses for the well being of the state, the economy, their families, and
themselves, and pass on those assets according to their wishes in
later years.”
15
In the Line
of Fire
David Roth makes his way in the
high pressure world of criminal defense
B y J ames H ellegaard
16
UF LAW
D
Dealing with reporters is part of the
job in Roth’s high-profile practice.
avid Roth’s face gives
away very little. If he
hadn’t spent the last four
decades developing a
reputation as one of the
best criminal defense attorneys in Florida,
he likely could have done very well for
himself as a professional poker player.
The pressure that comes from having
a client’s life riding on his legal acumen
or the power of his argument is kept well
hidden. Like his boyhood idol, New York
Yankees slugger Mickey Mantle, Roth
doesn’t blink when facing a tough
adversary under the bright lights in a
tension-packed situation. He thrives.
Photo by Lannis Waters of the palm Beach Post
WINTER 2008
17
“It’s a lot more exciting,” Roth says of criminal defense
law. “And the stakes are obviously significantly higher than in
other areas of the practice.”
To be successful in this line of work, he says, “I think you
have to be compassionate, you have to be non-judgmental by
nature, recognize human frailty and faults, and deal with them
accordingly.” A good defense lawyer must be “a good listener,
and instill confidence in the client that you’re going to do your
very best for him or her.”
Still, Roth admits, knowing how his success or failure in
the courtroom can impact another person’s life is a very grave
responsibility, which can result in “a lot of lost sleep, a lot of
work, a lot of anxiety, and a substantial amount of secondguessing.”
The sky is gray and overcast outside the window of Roth’s
law office, which overlooks Palm Beach, the well-heeled
enclave where he has spent his entire career. It’s a long way
from the rough-and-tumble streets of New York where he first
steeled his nerves
playing
stickball
and sneaking into
Yankee Stadium to
watch his heroes
play ball.
Born in the
Bronx, Roth moved
at a very young age
to Brooklyn with his
mother after his
parents
divorced.
After graduating from Abraham Lincoln High School in
Coney Island, Roth attended Brooklyn College and City
University of New York. He first traveled to Florida during
winter breaks from school when he worked with some college
friends as a waiter and busboy at the Sterling Hotel on Collins
Avenue in Miami’s South Beach. Attracted to the warm
climate, Roth applied to UF Law and was awarded an out-ofstate scholarship.
Roth quickly discovered that Gainesville was not Miami
Beach. There was no ocean breeze to cool things down. “It was
culture shock. The first day of law school I was in Buckman
Hall. It was in August. It was about 95 degrees and there was
no air conditioning.”
it would be very intellectually challenging, interesting and
emotionally rewarding to represent people that were accused
of crimes, particularly if they weren’t guilty.”
More than 40 years later, criminal defense work has proven
to be all that and more, Roth says, before adding this caveat:
“Unfortunately, the majority of my clients are not innocent
victims of circumstance.”
in the limelight
Indeed, Roth’s clients have put him front-and-center in some
of Palm Beach County’s most notorious cases.
In 1998 Roth and law partner Douglas Duncan
negotiated a plea deal that resulted in probation and a fine
for Palm Beach socialite Stephen Fagan, who was accused
of abducting his two young daughters from Massachusetts
during a custody struggle, creating a fictional identity for
himself and convincing the girls that their mother was dead
(Roth and Duncan handled matters in Florida only).
In 1986 Roth and
Duncan took on the case
of Robert Spearman, a
wealthy boatyard owner
who, through an ad in Soldier of Fortune magazine,
hired professional hitmen
to kill his wife, an assistant
city manager in West Palm
Beach. Spearman was convicted of first-degree murder, spared the death penalty, and later committed suicide in his cell.
In 2000 Roth and Duncan’s client, jewel dealer Jack Hasson,
was sentenced to 40 years in federal prison for defrauding a
slew of prominent locals, including pro golfers Jack Nicklaus
and Greg Norman, as well as with laundering more than $80
million in money (Hasson was not their client at the time of his
trial or sentencing).
More recently, Roth has represented the Rev. Francis Guinan,
63, who along with the retired Rev. John A. Skehan, 79, is
accused of misappropriating $8.7 million in cash from donations
to St. Vincent Ferrer Catholic Church, one of the area’s largest
and oldest parishes.
Like any defense attorney, Roth has faced his share of people
who can’t understand how he can defend some of the people he
has represented.
“That’s probably the easiest question, and the answer to that
is that the Constitution provides for everyone having a defense
and having their rights protected,” Roth says. “And the system
only works when the accused is represented as vigorously as the
state or federal government is.”
Having argued before scores of juries, however, Roth
understands many people have a difficult time avoiding
judgments and make up their minds about a person’s guilt or
innocence in a fairly quick and hasty manner.
Roth again placed himself in the line of fire last year when an
old friend was caught in the media’s crosshairs. On Sept. 29, 2006,
“I think you have to be compassionate …
non-judgmental by nature,
recognize human frailty and faults,
and deal with them accordingly.”
class challenges
Soon he was sweating it out in class with a tough but
enlivening young law professor who would reveal to him the
magnificent intricacies of the U.S. Constitution.
“The first time I probably thought about [criminal defense
law] was in August of 1966 in constitutional law with
Professor Fletcher Baldwin,” says Roth, who recalls his
professor as “intimidating” and “no-nonsense,” but also as
someone who awoke a passion for the law in his students.
“He was very inspiring,” Roth says of Baldwin.
“Obviously, in constitutional law the primary focus is on
criminal defense, at least from what I recall, and I thought
18
UF LAW
Roth received a call from Mark Foley, who an hour earlier had
resigned his seat in the U.S. House of Representatives after admitting he wrote lurid and explicit messages and e-mails to young
male pages. Foley’s legal troubles would put Roth’s face on televisions, newspapers and magazines all over the world.
“I had known Mark Foley for almost 40 years,” Roth says.
“He owned a little salad bar in Lake Worth long before he became involved in politics, and throughout the years I had an excellent relationship with him as a friend, and he referred many
cases to me before and during the time he was in Congress.”
In the days following the Foley’s resignation, former federal
prosecutor Mark Schnapp, who has known Roth as both a colleague and an adversary, told the Miami Herald: “David knows
how to work his way through a difficult position. He’s incredibly
savvy. But he’s got his hands full here.”
Foley sought Roth’s advice and assistance, and Roth says he
tried to give him the best counsel he could. Over the next several
weeks, Roth acted as spokesman for his client, holding press
conferences during which he informed the world that Foley was
an alcoholic, had entered
rehab, was molested as a
teenager by a clergyman,
was gay, and that he never
had sex with any underage congressional pages.
Roth says the work he
did on Foley’s behalf exacted an emotional toll.
“It’s always difficult
to see a friend or someone you care about in trouble, whether it’s criminal trouble or
medical trouble or marital trouble,” he explains. “It’s just more
difficult.”
“Hundreds of young people had been arrested, so my first
exposure to the criminal defense practice was representing
mostly college students and high school students in drug cases
in Palm Beach County,” Roth says.
Roth was selected as the youngest United States Magistrate
Judge at the age of 26, and was elected president of the Palm
Beach County Bar Association in 1981.
Since that time, Roth has handled thousands of cases. And
while many people know his name for his connection to clients
whose crimes have achieved a level of notoriety in the public
eye, it’s the people who Roth has helped to get their lives back
on track that stand out most in his mind. There was the young
man who got into serious trouble for burglary, and who is
now one of the top research oncologists in the world and has
developed very hopeful therapy for cancer treatment.
STIMULATING CRIMINAL CASES
Particularly satisfying to Roth has been the work he and
Duncan have done representing victims in criminal cases.
One of those cases was his
representation of Patricia
Bowman, who in 1991
accused William Kennedy
Smith of raping her at the
Kennedy compound in Palm
Beach. Smith, who was
defended by Roth’s friend
Roy Black, was eventually
acquitted, but the result
didn’t diminish Roth’s
gratification with the case.
“Even though the verdict was not guilty, there was a
tremendous amount of vindication for her and healing as a
result of Mr. Smith being prosecuted,” Roth says. “So that was
rewarding.”
Black told the Miami Herald last October: “David is an
excellent lawyer with a well-deserved reputation in Palm Beach
for helping people out of perilous positions.”
In addition to his legal practice, Roth devotes time to a
number of organizations, including the Narcotic Overdose
Prevention & Education (NOPE) Task Force, formed by former
Florida Gov. Jeb Bush five years ago in the wake of an alarming
rise in drug overdoses and drug-related deaths among youths in
Palm Beach County.
“It’s been very rewarding because it seems to have had a
very positive effect,” Roth says of his involvement.
By his own estimation, Roth, 62, has mellowed somewhat
since his younger days. Roth has two daughters and
three step-daughters. In December, he and his second wife,
Paula, will celebrate their 10th wedding anniversary. Roth,
who typically spends seven days a week at work, says
he plans to continue practicing law “probably until they
cart me out.”
“I enjoy getting up in the morning and going to work, and
I still find it rewarding. So as long as that continues, I’ll be
coming into the office.”
“The system only works when the
represented
as vigorously as the
accused is
state or federal government is.”
THOROUGH TRAINING
Of course, those kinds of difficulties are part of the bargain
Roth struck when he chose to practice criminal defense law. After being drafted into the U.S. military on the day he graduated
from law school in 1968, at the height of the Vietnam War, Roth
enlisted in the National Guard. He completed his obligation in
1975 and began his law career by finishing a clerkship for the
4th District Court of Appeal in Vero Beach, which had been temporarily interrupted by his military service.
That’s when Roth found his place in the law. He landed a
position with one of the largest and most successful plaintiff’s
personal injury firms in West Palm Beach, Cone Wagner Nugent & Johnson. There he handled a variety of cases, including
plaintiff’s personal injury cases, commercial litigation, family
law and criminal defense law.
It was under the tutelage of firm partner Chuck Nugent, who
had been county solicitor (the equivalent now of state attorney)
in Palm Beach County, that Roth’s interest in criminal defense
blossomed. Nugent asked Roth to assist him with some of his
cases. At the time there had been a deluge of drug cases in West
Palm Beach, including many stemming from arrests made by
undercover officers at a local rock music festival.
WINTER 2008
19
Which One
Getting to the bottom of counterfeiting takes
Leslie Lott to the top of her game
B y J ames H ellegaard
A
s criminal operations go,
this one was significant.
The idea was simple
enough. Dredge the ponds
at golf shooting ranges, run
the algae-covered balls through an acid
wash, re-varnish them, and sell them
back to golf courses as practice balls.
If only the people running the
operation out of the back of a sports
shop in a strip mall in west Broward
County had stopped there. They
didn’t. Instead, they took the balls,
originally made by a slew of different
manufacturers, and stamped them with
the name “Titleist,” one of the best-selling
brands in the world.
Simply put, that’s stealing.
20
UF LAW
is Real?
That’s where Leslie Lott comes in. A 1974 graduate of the
University of Florida Levin College of Law, Lott is one of the top
intellectual property lawyers in Florida. When law enforcement
raided the counterfeit golf ball operation, Lott was there, along
with a representative from her client, Acushnet, the manufacturer
of golf-related products, including Titleist® golf balls.
“I’ll never forget the client representative from Acushnet
who was down here with us when we conducted the raid on the
operation,” Lott recalls. “There were all these drying racks with
stacks of trays full of golf balls lined up in them, still damp, with
the varnish drying on them, and the varnish was pooling in the
dimples. And he was a tall man walking around with his hands
up in the air yelling, ‘These golf balls have been aerodynamically
devastated.’ He was so passionate about his company, and he was
so furious.”
Such emotion is common when someone’s intellectual
property has been stolen. Lott has seen many clients come into
her office at Lott & Friedland in Coral Gables. They’re angry,
indignant that someone is taking something they created and trying
to call it their own, stealing property that is rightfully theirs.
A big part of IP law and an area that gets a lot of attention
is counterfeiting, the illegal activity that was taking place
at the golf ball operation. Busting such operations can be
dangerous. Oftentimes, counterfeiters are turned in by
the competition—people who sell products legitimately,
says Lott, whose clients have included Mont Blanc® pens, Singer®
sewing machines, Cartier® watches and Reebok® athletic shoes.
“Usually you find counterfeits through local distributors or
local licensees who tell you they’ve seen counterfeits at this store
or this flea market, or they’ll come back and say, ‘Wait a minute,
how can Joe Schmo sell the same product I’m selling for half the
price? Are you giving him a better price?’” Lott explains. “And
that also will alert the manufacturer.”
Private invest-igators then move in to help build a case, to literally track down the source, make a buy and obtain the goods. The
product then goes back to the company, which determines whether
it’s original and authentic or a counterfeit. Attorneys then take the
counterfeit into court, lay out the information before a judge, who
authorizes a seizure order to allow for the raid of the operation, usually with federal marshalls, and seizure of the counterfeit goods,
WINTER 2008
paperwork and
other documentation.
Things
don’t always go
smoothly, of course.
Lott has avoided
peril
so
far,
but
she’s heard plenty of
stories of others who haven’t been so
fortunate, including an attorney in
New York who was stabbed in a counterfeit
raid (he recovered), and another who broke an arm when
she was knocked down a flight of stairs by counterfeiters dashing down a back stairway, seeking to escape a raid
in New York’s Chinatown, one of the most notorious areas
in the country for selling counterfeit goods.
“You’re dealing with criminal activity by definition, and
you’re interfering with people’s livelihood,” Lott says. “And
it can be dangerous.”
As Lott and those who know will tell you, though, there’s
nothing else she would rather be doing. Circuit Judge Martha Lott (JD 81) of Gainesville remembers her older sister
being “committed to going to law school since she was in
elementary school” and showing off her legal skills at an
early age.
“She drafted her first contract when we were gosh, less
than 10 years old,” Martha Lott recalls of their time growing
up in Perry.
Lott’s father, Russell, still has a contract Leslie wrote
around that same time. The contract was made with her two
younger sisters, Martha, and Sarah, a businesswoman who
lives in Portland. The girls had traded bedrooms, and the contract laid out the terms of the trade:
“The term was for one week—it provided for a trade back on
Sunday—unless I hit Martha, in which case she could demand a
trade back at any time, or unless both parties agreed,” Leslie explains. “We each had to clean the room we occupied and could not
trade back a room that was not clean. If the rooms were not clean
21
“Technology has
given rise to
increasingly
more intellectual
property issues.”
Lott with items often counterfeited
at the end of the contract term, the parties
remained in the rooms they then occupied
for an additional two days in order to clean
both rooms before trading back. A 10-cent
fine was imposed on anyone who wore her
sister’s clothes without permission.”
“Practicing law without a license, I
think we’d call that now,” notes Martha.
Russell Lott was a mechanical engineer
for Proctor & Gamble, and his wife, Allene,
was a housewife with a degree in chemistry. Martha remembers being baffled at the
apparent fun Leslie would have “arguing
like a lawyer” with their father at a very
young age. She compares it to watching a
kid playing chess. Leslie was always “very
rational, very modulated”—qualities you
wouldn’t expect in a little girl. The intellectual challenge of the debate prepared
her sister well for a career in law.
22
“She’s very similar to my father,” says
Martha Lott. “They both love to logically
argue points, and obviously she gained
skill starting awfully young. That’s not
normal recreation for an 8- or 9-year-old.”
FORMAL TRAINING BEGINS
Leslie Lott left Perry for Gainesville
to attend the University of Florida, where
she was president of Panhellenic Council, attorney general of the Honor Court
and part of the first class of women ever
admitted to Florida Blue Key, UF’s leadership honorary. Following graduation
from UF Law, Lott decided she wanted
to work in Washington, D.C., and landed
a job with the United States Patent and
Trademark Office.
“It was really just a fluke,” Lott says of
that first job, which would lead her on the
path to a career in intellectual property law.
After two years, Lott joined the venerable
New York law firm of Pennie & Edmonds,
where Leslie was one of the only woman
lawyers. That wasn’t surprising in the early
1970s, the tipping point for women moving
into the law. When she entered UF Law in
1972, Lott was one of a handful of women
in law school. By the time she graduated,
women comprised about one-third of the
entering law school classes.
While her mentors along the way were
men who were always supportive of her,
Lott recalls one client at Pennie & Edmonds who tried to give her a bit of a compliment as they left court one day.
“You know, I don’t mind one bit having a woman lawyer,” Lott recalls him saying. “I always hire women in my business.
I learned a long time ago they work twice
UF LAW
as hard as men and you don’t have to pay
’em as much.”
Lott laughs at the memory. “He was
really proud of himself. It’s funny, I didn’t
find it offensive at all. I thought it was kind
of cute,” she says. “He thought that was his
enlightened view. Now listen, I’ll take it any
way I can get it, you know.”
Lott’s husband, Michael Moore (JD 74),
recalls how Leslie made an impression on
her male colleagues in the firm. The men
were gathered around trying to figure out a
new puzzle known as Rubik’s Cube when
Leslie stepped up to give it a try.
“She looked at this thing in front of these
five male lawyers, and she took the cube and
made a couple of quick turns and solved the
puzzle,” says Moore. “It was one of those
moments when the guys realized she would
be one of the team.”
WINTER 2008
In 1980 Lott and Moore moved back
to Florida. A few years later, Lott saw an
opportunity. As far as Lott or Moore knew,
there were only two lawyers at the time
specializing in intellectual property law
in South Florida. Lott launched her firm
from the couple’s home.
“I remember discussing with her that
she should follow her dreams,” says Moore,
who started his own marine and aviation
law firm, Moore & Co., after many years
at Holland & Knight. “She literally started
the firm from scratch. She had no associates, no office. She just started putting out
the word, and then she started practicing
and letting friends and family know, ‘this
is what I’m going to do.’”
Still, starting her own firm, Lott says,
was kind of frightening.
“What if you give a party and nobody
comes? It was that kind of a feeling,” she
says from her office overlooking Coral
Gables. “But things went really well.”
David Friedland (JD 88), who clerked
for Lott when he was in law school, joined
the firm after practicing law in Atlanta and
is now the firm’s senior patent counsel.
Lott & Friedland, with offices in Coral
Gables and Fort Lauderdale, now has five
partners, six associates and six paralegals.
The firm will celebrate its 25th anniversary
this May.
In retrospect, Lott couldn’t have
chosen a better area of law in which to
practice. As technology has developed
and grown over the last quarter century,
including the explosion of the Internet,
intellectual property law has followed right
along with it, bringing increasing business
for both the patent practice and technology
practice.
“Because it’s now so easy to set up a
business on the Internet, people who at
one time might have had a brick-and-mortar business in one location, all of a sudden
are on the Internet and that one little shop
is intergalactic for all we know,” Lott says.
“So there’s a lot more potential for conflicts. Every step of the way, technology
has given rise to increasingly more intellectual property issues.”
counterfeiting expands
Lott, whose own practice focuses on
trademark litigation, has watched as the
law continues to try to keep pace with
technology. With the globalization of the
economy and the ease with which goods
go from one country to another, stemming
the tide of counterfeiting can seem an impossible task. Manufacturers of American
and European products outsource to Asian
countries where the makers will make an
over-supply of products from Louis Vuitton® bags to Gloria Vanderbilt® jeans.
Luxury goods are one thing, Lott says,
but a far greater danger comes with the
manufacture and sale of counterfeit medicines, airplane parts, car tires—products
that by their poor quality are actually lifethreatening.
“Now they’re finding some links to
counterfeiting rings and counterfeiting
operations funding international crimes
and international terrorists,” she explains.
“These people are criminals and they’re
involved in criminal activity. So it’s not
to be taken lightly.”
Today, decades after she drew up that
first contract with her sister and honed her
arguing skills with her father, Lott finds
some of her greatest satisfaction in helping to resolve disputes. She is a member
of the Panel of Distinguished Neutrals for
the Resolution of Trademark Disputes,
established by the International Trademark Association, and has participated
in a number of mediation conferences in
connection with ongoing efforts to provide cost-effective alternatives to litigation.
“If you can help people get to a resolution that saves them money, saves them
time, saves them the resources of their
company, and gets them to where they
can shake hands and part friends more or
less, it’s so satisfying to be able to resolve
things that way,” Lott says.
While the law continues to fascinate
her, Lott says the most enjoyable part of
her job is working with the creative people she has for clients.
“Being able to work with people who
are creating books, creating music, creating software, creating works of art, creating companies, creating businesses—I
just love being around people who are
making things happen,” she says. “Our
client base is a very exciting, interesting, dynamic group of people, and I love
working with them and trying to help
them protect what they’ve created.”
23
Unequal
Justice
One journey begins, and one ends,
when a brand new lawyer gets mad
B Y K AT H Y F L E M I N G
24
UF LAW
W
hite, black. Rich,
poor. Free, not free.
Just, unjust. It’s a plot
that could have come
right out of a John
Grisham bestseller. Instead it came from
ABC’s “20/20” television show, and,
luckily for the protagonist, a fledgling
Jacksonville lawyer was watching.
Charlie Douglas
Photo by Kristen Hines
WINTER 2008
25
“I honestly can’t believe
the multitude of people out
willing to
help a mere stranger.”
there
—Tyrone Brown in a letter to Charlie Douglas
Brown wrote
Douglas often
November 3, 2006:
Charlie Douglas (JD 06) got home earlier than usual that
Friday night. He always eats out at the end of the long work
week, and this Friday was no exception. He dropped down on
the couch just in time to catch the tail end of ABC’s “20/20”
television show. It wasn’t a show he would normally watch, but
one segment shook the tiredness right out of his bones.
The story:
Two young men go through the same Dallas, Texas,
courtroom of Judge Keith Dean at about the same time.
John Wood, a white young man, is the son of one of the
most prominent pastors in Texas. A “paragon of privilege,” he
is called. After having sex with a male prostitute at his home,
Wood argued about the $30 payment and shot the prostitute in
the back.
He obtained the finest legal representation, pleaded guilty,
had a one-day trial at which the most powerful pastor in Texas
spoke on his behalf and received 10 years probation.
While on probation, the young man was caught repeatedly
with cocaine and other serious offenses. A witness said “Daddy
fixed everything.”
Judge Dean gave him a mere slap on the wrist … a “post card
probation” requiring him to confirm his address once a year. He
served his 10 years probation and his record was expunged.
Then there is the case of Tyrone Brown, a poor black
16-year-old who, with a friend, waited outside a Bennigan’s
restaurant one night and robbed a man at gunpoint. Brown
gave the victim his wallet back after removing the $2
it contained.
It was a first offense, and like the other young man, Brown
pleaded guilty and received 10 years probation.
However, when Brown tested positive for smoking marijuana
during a probation check, he didn’t get the usual treatment of
26
having the minor offense noted in his records. Judge Keith Dean
sentenced him to life in prison.
“Good luck, Mr. Brown,” Judge Dean told the stunned young
man.
Tyrone Brown spent the next 16 years in a Texas prison.
From his Jacksonville town home, 24-year-old Charlie
Douglas watched the broadcast in disbelief.
“Although robbery is a serious crime and I certainly don’t
condone that behavior, I was shocked at the disparity in the two
sentences,” he said. “I immediately went to the computer, found
the ABC message board and met others who were as equally
outraged as I was over Mr. Brown’s unjust sentence.”
November 4, 2006:
Douglas drove to Orlando early the next morning to attend
the wedding of two UF Law classmates, but spent the rest of the
day holed up in his hotel room, e-mailing back and forth with
angry viewers on the message board.
Before the day was over, Douglas found himself at the
forefront of a grassroots advocacy group resolved to accomplish
just one goal: bring Mr. Brown home.
November 5, 2006:
The grassroots campaign officially commenced.
“A medical student in California took care of the
technical issues of formatting our Web site named SaveMrBrown.
com, and I started researching Texas law to see what legal
avenues were available to free Mr. Brown,” Douglas said.
A commutation of sentence was the only option, but in Texas,
that’s not an overnight project.
“We couldn’t simply walk into the governor’s office and
politely ask that he review the documents and sign the necessary
paperwork,” Douglas said.
UF LAW
MELANIE BURFORD/Staff Photograph © Corbis.
Brown reunites with his family
after 16 years of incarceration.
The Texas Constitution and Administrative Code requires a
three-step process.
The first step is to secure the signatures of the local officials
— the sentencing judge, district attorney and sheriff. If two of
those three people recommend a commutation, the second step
is to secure the votes of a majority of the members of the Texas
Board of Pardons and Paroles. The third and final step is the
governor.
After learning what was ahead and loosely formulating
a plan of action, Douglas called Nora Brown, Tyrone’s
mother, and introduced himself. He told her the process would
be long, but promised he would not abandon her or her son.
“I was in it for the long haul, whether it took four months or
four years. I wasn’t going anywhere until Tyrone was home,” he
told her that day. “I later learned that several people had made
similar promises throughout the 17 years her son was in prison,
so now looking back I’m a bit surprised she didn’t hang up the
phone immediately.”
Douglas knew exactly what to do and had, in fact, been
leading groups with passionate causes since high school. In
2000 he was named Florida’s Youth Advocate of the Year for his
work combating tobacco company tactics as part of the “Truth”
campaign run by Florida teenagers. As a result of that success,
the American Legacy Foundation invited him to serve as a
national spokesperson, enabling him to maintain his quest against
“big tobacco.” He even formed a company, called Revolution
Consulting, with three other young advocates while in college
that took him all over the country to teach young people how to
be advocates for change.
The son of the now retired Putnam County sheriff, Douglas
realized trial law was his calling when he attended a personal
injury trial as part of a business law class he took as an
undergraduate business major at UF. From there it was a short
WINTER 2008
trip over to the law school, where he was elected editor-in-chief
of the Florida Law Review and graduated second in his class of
211.
This time the stakes were higher. He knew the next step in this
fight was to get the attention of the decision makers in Texas, so
he and dozens of other campaign members began sending letters
— hundreds of them — to local and state officials in Texas.
He also called Brown’s mother at least three times a week to
keep her updated with all the information he received. Later on
he called her every day, and she began to think of Douglas, a man
she had never met eye-to-eye, as another son.
November 30, 2006:
District Attorney Bill Hill seemed like the logical
place to start. The team, which had swelled in number
to the hundreds, began sending letters to Hill pleading for him to
recommend to Gov. Rick Perry that Brown be released.
“I called the president of the Dallas NAACP, Bob Lydia,
and asked if he could help us find people in Dallas who knew
Bill Hill and who would be willing to talk to him on Tyrone’s
behalf,” Douglas said. “Within days of our initial battle, Mr. Hill
wrote a letter to Gov. Perry recommending Tyrone’s release.”
In those early days, Lydia and Douglas developed a close
working relationship, strategizing about the campaign nearly
every other day.
So they waited some more.
Like those in Texas, Douglas found that many people he
knew in his own state weren’t taking his efforts seriously.
“People were skeptical,” he said. “I’m a brand new attorney
and some thought I was being idealistic … that I was chasing
windmills.”
Douglas, who even looks idealistic and has the polite manner
of Mayberry’s Opie Taylor, would not be deterred.
27
“If people are willing to rise up,
passionately fight for
a cause, and refuse to be
discouraged by bureaucracies,
change will happen.”
Careful to work on the crusade during his own time while
balancing a heavy case load at work, Douglas was relieved when
the people whose opinion most count in the life of a young lawyer — his employers at Harrell & Harrell, Renee (JD 95) and
Bill (JD 74) Harrell — became believers early on. They picked
up all his costs and encouraged him to keep going.
“The firm first became involved when Charlie needed help to
get out to Texas and back Christmas Eve. At that time it appeared
he could get the governor’s signature and Mr. Brown would be
able to go home Christmas day. Until that time, Charlie worked
on his own and sought no recognition for his time and sacrifice,”
said Bill Harrell. “We hired Charlie for the type of person we
thought he was and this confirmed that we were right.”
December 11, 2006:
The campaign turned to Judge Dean, the same judge who
had sentenced Tyrone Brown 16 years earlier. For several weeks
the group sent letters and faxes asking him to join the district
attorney in recommending that Brown be released. Exactly two
weeks before Christmas, Judge Dean wrote Gov. Perry and asked
for Tyrone’s release.
“That day represented a monumental triumph because without his signature we could not have progressed to the second
step, which was the Parole Board,” Douglas said.
To ensure Brown knew everything that was happening outside his prison walls, Douglas sent him several letters each week
to keep him up-to-date. Brown responded with heartfelt letters
of appreciation.
“When it became apparent that the governor’s office was not
taking our campaign seriously, we decided to recruit the help
of State Rep. Helen Giddings, who represents Dallas, Tyrone’s
home town. Rep. Giddings agreed to meet with the governor on
Tyrone’s behalf, but still nothing happened,” he said.
The “Save Mr. Brown” team continued to maintain their
28
weekly conference calls to synthesize what had happened
the week before and set goals for the upcoming week. As the
Christmas holidays drew nearer, they raised money to send
presents to Brown’s mother and daughter on his behalf.
“I began calling and e-mailing the governor’s press secretary
and deputy general counsel every other day it seemed, but both
sealed their lips and wouldn’t talk,” Douglas said.
The letters continued to flood the governor’s office, Douglas
continued to make phone calls, and Rep. Giddings continued to
push the governor to action.
January 19, 2007:
The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles was the next stop
on the road to freedom. They received Tyrone’s commutationof-sentence application on Dec. 29, 2006, and the “Save Mr.
Brown” team reinvigorated the campaign by sending countless
e-mails, faxes and letters to each of the seven board members.
The board evaluated Mr. Brown’s application and voted five to
two to recommend a commutation-of-sentence.
January 22, 2007:
Texas Gov. Perry received Tyrone’s commutation application.
The campaign group, which had grown to more than 1,000
members, waited for days. Then weeks and months.
“Every single day our team was steadily flooding the
governor’s office with e-mails, faxes, letters and phone calls,”
Douglas said. “Still, nothing happened.”
Meanwhile, Douglas established the Tyrone Brown Freedom
Fund to raise money for Brown while he was in prison and after
his release.
March 9, 2007:
Gov. Perry finally signed an executive proclamation
to release Tyrone from prison. Instead of a full
UF LAW
MELANIE BURFORD/Staff Photograph © Corbis.
Tyrone Brown climbs into the bus to
freedom after he was released from
the Huntsville Unit at Huntsville, TX
on March 15, 2007.
commutation, Brown received a conditional pardon, but it
was great news.
March 15, 2007:
Early Thursday morning a group of about 20 family
members, reporters and Douglas boarded a bus in Dallas to make
the three-hour drive south to Huntsville. They arrived at the
prison at 9:45 a.m. Tyrone’s mom was on the verge of collapsing,
and other family members were sobbing and shaking.
“At exactly 10 a.m., through the glass doors I could see
walking down the hallway a tall black man with a big smile. As
he walked through those doors, I recognized his face, and I knew
it was him,” Douglas said.
After living in a prison cell for 16 years and 10 months,
inmate number 554317 walked out of those penitentiary doors
and became Citizen Tyrone Dwayne Brown.
“The whole experience was surreal,” Douglas remembers.
“I couldn’t help but recognize that I was standing in front of
the building where Texas houses its execution chamber, and I
thought that of all of the lives taken inside those walls, Tyrone’s
life would not be among them.”
As the celebration continued and the group returned home
to Dallas, Brown gave numerous media interviews and caught
up with family, neighbors and friends who stopped by to offer
congratulatory hugs. Finally, he made his way to the dining
room table where his mom served up a southern-style feast.
An impromptu neighborhood block party went on late into the
night.
While his release marked the end of one phase of the
campaign, it also ushered in the beginning of another.
“When Tyrone was in prison, I promised him we would not
abandon him after his release. We would meet his needs and help
ensure that his re-entry was a success,” Douglas said.
Douglas remained in Dallas a few extra days to help Brown
WINTER 2008
enroll in parole classes, reconcile outstanding court costs from
16 years earlier and shop for new clothes. It took many calls
to department store headquarters before Douglas found a store
willing to help.
Stein Mart’s Julia Taylor (whose husband John Taylor, JD
70, is a UF law school alumnus) agreed and made the necessary
arrangements with one of their Dallas stores.
The Save Mr. Brown campaign also assisted in finding Tyrone
a new job in maintenance at a Dallas church and arranged for him
and his family to see his favorite sports teams … the Mavericks,
Cowboys and Rangers. One couple in California donated $5,000
for a used vehicle.
Now, many months later, Brown, 34, has earned his GED
and visits juvenile detention facilities to counsel and motivate
kids at risk. He plans to write a book about his experiences and
is the focus of a documentary being filmed for television or the
big screen.
“Tyrone is a good-hearted man who holds no bitterness for
the judge who sentenced him or the government that incarcerated
him,” Douglas said. “He is looking forward to making the best
out of the years he has ahead.”
Douglas continues to be part of Brown’s daily life and plans
to bring him to Jacksonville soon so he can see the ocean and go
out in a boat for the first time.
“I think of Charlie like a little brother,” Brown said. “He is
kind and has a big heart. He was willing to jump on my case and
once we started, he was there non-stop to the very end. Still is. I
was just lucky he was there.”
For Douglas, those four and a half months of daily battles
just confirmed his belief that equal justice under the law is an
ideal, not a truth, that can be achieved with persistence.
“I learned that advocacy works,” he said. “If people are
willing to rise up, passionately fight for a cause and refuse to be
discouraged by bureaucracies, change will happen.”
29
FACULTY NEWS
UF Law Professor
Takes Top Consumer
Advocate Award
T
he National Association of
Consumer Agency Administrators
(NACAA) recently awarded
University of Florida Law Professor
Christopher L. Peterson (above) its
Consumer Advocate of the Year Award
for 2007 for his research on predatory
lending and his advocacy for legislation
adopted last year by Congress that caps the
interest rate lenders may charge military
personnel.
Peterson, an associate professor at
UF’s Levin College of Law, co-authored
a study last year with Steven M. Graves,
an assistant professor of geography at
California State University, which helped
spur the U.S. Congress to pass legislation
protecting military families from predatory
lenders who charge interest rates that can
reach well into the triple digits. The study
surveyed more than 13,000 zip codes
and found that payday loan companies
30
clustered in areas near military bases.
The findings were cited in a report by the
Pentagon, and Peterson testified before
the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban
Affairs Committee.
Just 15 days after Peterson’s testimony,
Congress agreed to legislation prohibiting
lenders from imposing an interest rate of
more than 36 percent on loans to members
of the armed forces or their dependants.
Peterson called it “probably the most
consumer-friendly legislation Congress
has passed in a generation.”
Award Given Only Occasionally
for Distinguished Work
The NACAA is a not-for-profit
association of U.S. and Canadian
government agencies that are responsible
for enforcing consumer protection law.
NACAA Executive Director Elizabeth
Owen said the award is not presented
annually and is only given when the
nominating committee recognizes a truly
outstanding person who has distinguished
himself in the field of consumer protection.
More than anyone else in the country, she
said, Peterson recognized the devastating
impact of payday lending on the military,
regular citizens and the economy.
“We credit him for drawing national
attention to this problem, which has
plagued consumer protection agencies for
years,” Owen said. “Members of NACAA
are honored to know Chris, made better
by his example and inspired by his
dedication. The emphasis on consumer
protection and the importance of taking
care of those people victimized by fraud
and greed seems to have been brushed
aside lately. At such a young age Chris
has already accomplished so much—
everyone in the consumer protection field
can’t wait to see what he does next.”
Peterson, who began teaching in 2003,
has been studying predatory lending for
years and is the author of Taming the
Sharks: Towards a Cure for the High
Cost Credit Market, which received the
American College of Consumer Financial
Services Attorneys’ Best Book of the Year
Award for 2004.
In addition to capping interest rates,
the bill also prohibits mandatory binding
arbitration in contracts with military service members. Critics of arbitration argue
UF LAW
that it is a more expensive, secret system
designed by big business to deflect rather
than resolve consumer complaints. This
ban, Peterson said, creates an exciting new
exception to the Federal Arbitration Act, a
law which many believe is being used by
big business to deny consumers access to
the civil justice system.
Peterson’s current research offers a
startling analysis of how many state legislatures use small, innocuous numbers in
usury law in an attempt to minimize the
public outcry over their decision to legalize
triple-digit interest rate consumer loans.
“It feels like further confirmation that
my research is being noticed and maybe
making a small difference in the world,”
Peterson said. “And to have a big group
of people from around the country get together and agree that that’s happened is really very gratifying.”
Professor Testifies
on the Hill
U
F Law Professor Michael Seigel testified in September before the U.S.
Senate Committee on the Judiciary on legislation that would limit federal prosecutors’
ability to pressure cooperation from companies under investigation for corporate fraud.
Seigel testified at a hearing on “Examining Approaches to Corporate Fraud Prosecutions and the Attomey-Client Privilege
Under the McNulty Memorandum.”
A video of his testimony is online as a
link from his website at www.law.ufl.edu/
faculty/Seigel.
Sustainability
Addressed
T
om Ankersen, Legal Skills professor and director of the Conservation
Clinic, has been named as UF’s first Provost’s Faculty Fellow for Sustainability. The
one-year appointment charges him with
assisting the Office of the Provost with the
development a university-wide academic
program in sustainability.
2007 Report of the Faculty Online
The UF Law faculty is comprised of highly accomplished scholar-teachers who
bring remarkable experience and knowledge to the classroom and the legal arena.
To learn more about their recent accomplishments, see the 2007 Report of the
Faculty online at www.law.ufl.edu in the News and Publications section.
New Faculty Members Join UF Law
U
F Law welcomes two new faculty members to its
teaching ranks.
Shani King has joined the faculty as an assistant
professor. He previously was a staff attorney with Legal
Services for Children in San Francisco and a guest
lecturer at University of San Francisco School of Law and
University of California-Berkeley School of Law.
After earning a B.A. from Brown University and J.D. from
Harvard Law School, he completed the Harvard Sheldon Knox
Traveling Fellowship and went on to work for two New York
firms, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson and Morvillo,
Abramowitz, Grand, Iason & Silberberg.
Assistant Legal Skills Professor Leslie Knight has joined
the faculty from UF’s Office of the General Counsel, where
she continues to be Of Counsel to the university. Knight has
a B.S. from Florida State University and a J.D. from Duke
University School of Law.
King
Knight
WINTER 2008
31
Faculty
Scholarship
Mary Jane Angelo
Associate Professor
n Published article, “Regulating Evolution for Sale: An Evolutionary Biology
Model for Regulating the Risks Posed
by Genetically Modified Organisms,”
42 Wake Forest Law Review 93 (2007).
n Published article, “Reforming the
Federal Insecticide Fungicide and
Rodenticide Act, CPR for the Environment: Breathing New Life into the Nation’s Major Environmental, Center for
Progressive Reform” (2007).
Yariv Brauner
Associate Professor
n UF’s “young scholar” presenter at the
2008 SEALS Conference.
Stuart R. Cohn
Associate Dean for International
Studies; Professor; Gerald A. Sohn
Scholar; Director of International and
Comparative Law Certificate Program
n Revised treatise, Securities
Counseling for Small and Emerging
Companies (2007 ed. Thomson/
West).
The New York Times, October 9, 2007
“
We don’t charge people in absentia
in this country. You can’t prosecute
somebody who’s not, in effect, there
to defend himself.
—Michael L. Seigel, Professor
”
Quoted in an article about dismissing a case against a former federal prosecutor after he committed
suicide in his prison cell. “They have no choice,” said Seigel, adding that case dismissal is standard
procedure when a defendant dies, even after conviction if the defendant has not exhausted his appeals.
Presented a talk titled, “United
States Administrative Law and
United States Alternative Dispute
Resolution Law,” CURSO : O Direito Norte-Americano (e a Common
Law), in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
n Presented paper, “Integrating
Emergy Synthesis into Environmental Law,” at the Lewis and Clark Law
and Science Forum.
n
Tom Ankersen
Legal Skills Professor and
Conservation Clinic Director
n Published article, with Thomas
Ruppert, “Defending the Polygon:
The Emerging Human Right to Communal Property,” 59 Oklahoma Law
Review 681-757 (Winter 2006).
32
Charles W. Collier
Professor; Affiliate Professor of
Philosophy
n Spoke at panel on “Affirmative Action:
Grutter and Beyond” at the SEALS
annual meeting.
n Published article, “Terrorism as an
Intellectual Problem,” 55 Buffalo Law
Review (December 2007).
Elizabeth Dale
Affiliate Professor of Law, Levin
College of Law; Associate Professor
of Constitutional and Legal History,
Department of History
n The Berkeley Journal of Employment
and Labor Law accepted her article,
“Employee Speech & Management
Rights: A Counterintuitive Reading of
Garcetti v. Ceballos,” scheduled for
publication in the spring volume.
n Panelist on “Studies of Law at the
Intersection of History and Theory” at
the Law, Culture and Humanities Annual
Conference at Georgetown University
Law Center.
George R. “Bob” Dekle
Legal Skills Professor
n Published book, Prosecution Principles: a Clinical Handbook (1st Ed.
Thomson/West, 2007).
n Spoke at the Florida Prosecuting
Attorneys Association annual conference on the use of technology in
the courtroom and also spoke at
their homicide prosecution seminar
on arguing circumstantial evidence.
Mark Fenster
Professor
n Published article, “Regulating Land
Use in a Constitutional Shadow: The
Institutional Contexts of Exactions,” 58
Hastings Law Journal 729-776 (2007).
n Published article, “The Folklore of
Legal Biography,” 105 Michigan Law
Review 1265-1282 (2007) (review essay).
n Published article, “Takings, Version
2005: The Legal Process of Constitutional Property Rights,” 9 University Of
Pennsylvania Journal Of Constitutional
Law 667-744 (2007).
n Presented “The Dilemmas of Local
Transparency” at the Governing in the
Sunshine Conference, The Municipal
Law Institute and the Center for State and
Local Government Law at the Hastings
College of the Law.
n Presented “Thurman Arnold and Legal
Theory” at the American Studies Association Annual Meeting.
n Presented “A Transparent Narrative:
The Lives of The 9/11 Commission Report” at the Law & Society Association
Annual Meeting in Berlin, Germany, and
at the Association for the Study of Law,
Culture and Humanities Annual Meeting.
UF LAW
Alyson C. Flournoy
Professor; Director of Environmental
and Land Use Law Program;
UF Research Foundation Professor
n Published article, “Squandering Public
Resources,” a Center for Progressive
Reform Report (with Margaret Clune
Giblin and Matt Shudtz) (Sept. 2007).
Jeffrey L. Harrison
Stephen C. O’Connell Professor
n Published two books, Law and Economics: Positive, Normative and Behavioral Perspectives (Thomson/West, 2nd
Ed., 2007) and Law and Economics in a
Nutshell (Thomson/West, 4th Ed., 2007).
n Sat on “Teaching Socio-Economics in
Law Schools” panel at the SEALS annual meeting.
Berta Esperanza Hernandez-Truyol
Levin Mabie and Levin Professor;
Associate Director, Center on Children
and Families
n Sat on “Addressing Transnational
Collaboration in the Law School Curriculum” panel at the SEALS annual meeting.
Richard H. Hiers
Affiliate Professor Emeritus
n Published article, “Institutional Academic Freedom or Autonomy Grounded
upon the First Amendment: A Jurisprudential Mirage,” 30 Hamline L. Rev.
1-58 (2007).
Thomas R. Hurst
Professor; Sam T. Dell Research Scholar
n Published article, “Hedge Funds in the
21st Century,” 28 Company Lawyer 228
(2007).
Jerold H. Israel
Professor, Samuel T. Dell Research
Scholar
n Published “Francis Allen—The
Gainesville Years,” 59 Florida Law
Review No. 3 (p.vii-xv).
n Published Criminal Procedure and the
Constitution, 2007 edition (with Amisar,
LaFave, & King) (Thomson/West).
n Published 2007 Supplement to Modern Criminal Procedure (with Kamisar,
LaFave, King & Kerr) (Thomson/West).
n Published 2007 Pocketpart to Criminal Procedure Hornbook (with LaFave
& King) (Thomson/West).
WINTER 2008
San Francisco Chronicle, July 20, 2007
“
I believe that mindfulness can help
mediators and other dispute resolution
professionals (including lawyers) feel better,
get more satisfaction out of their work
and do a better job for their clients.
”
—Leonard L. Riskin, Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law
Quoted in an article focused on the importance of stress-reducing mindfulness mediation in the
legal world. Riskin, who began discussing mindfulness meditation in his law classes in 1999, wrote
an article, The Contemplative Lawyer: On the Potential Contributions of Mindfulness Meditation to
Law Students, Lawyers and Their Clients” that launched a nationwide awareness. He is referred to
in this article from a previous interview with an online legal magazine, www.mediate.com.
Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky
Professor; UF Research Foundation
Professor
n Mentor for paper presentation by a
faculty member at Loyola-LA in the
young scholar program at the SEALS
annual meeting.
n Published “Medium-Specific Regulation of Attorney Advertising: A Critique,”
with co-author Tera Peterson in the Journal of Law and Public Policy.
Pedro A. Malavet
Professor
n Published new paperback edition of
book, America’s Colony: The Political
and Cultural Conflict between the U.S.
and Puerto Rico (NYU Press 2007).
n Published a book chapter, [The Story
of Downes v. Bidwell:] “The Constitution
Follows the Flag … But Doesn’t Quite
Catch up With It,” in Race and the
Law Stories (Rachel Moran and Devon
Carbado, eds., Foundation Press, forthcoming 2007).
n Sat on Puerto Rico panel at the Latinos and the Law Conference sponsored
by Indiana University School of LawBloomington.
n Lectured on “Introduction to United
States Civil Procedure” at the CLE program for judges, prosecutors and law
professors from several Brazilian states
conducted at the Levin College of Law,
summer 2007.
n Lectured on “Introduction to the United
States Legal System” at the CLE program
for judges and prosecutors in the state of
Minas Gerais in Brazil, summer 2007.
n Became part of the Membership Review Committee of the Association of
American Law Schools for the 20072009 term.
Diane Mazur
Professor
n Sat on “The Military Commissions Act
of 2006, Access to Courts, and the Latest
Round of Detainee Litigation” panel at
the SEALS annual meeting.
n Published casebook, Law and Popular Culture: Text, Notes and Questions
(LexisNexis 2007) (with Papke and seven
other co-authors).
n Published article, “Military Values in
Law,” 14 Duke Journal of Gender Law
& Policy (2007), part of a special issue
on “Gender, Sexuality & the Military”
that explored topics such as women in
combat, military recruiting on law school
campuses, sexual misconduct in the
military and “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”
Paul R. McDaniel
James J. Freeland Eminent Scholar in
Taxation; Professor
n Published article, “Territorial vs.
Worldwide International Tax Systems:
Which is Better for the U.S.,” 8 Fla. L.
Rev. 283 (2007) and 62 The Record of the
Association of the Bar of the City of New
York 70 (2007).
Jon L. Mills
Professor; Director of Center for Governmental Responsibility; Dean Emeritus
n Panelist on “The Future of Higher Education in Florida: The Pappas Report”
discussion at the Askew annual meeting.
n Moderated “Grutter and Beyond” panel
at the SEALS annual meeting.
n Appointed to Advisory Commission
to the World Justice Project Committee,
American Bar Association (2007-08).
n Presented “Privacy: The Lost Right”
at Georgia State Univ. College of Law
Faculty Series Lunch.
33
Schola
FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP
Winston P. Nagan
Professor; Samuel T. Dell Research
Scholar; Director, Institute of Human
Rights and Peace Development; Affiliate
Professor of Anthropology
n Participated in a group on the United
Nations Bio-Diversity Convention.
n Participated in the UN Permanent
Forum on the Rights of Indigenous
People.
n Participated in a committee on the
revision of the Bio-Diversity Convention.
n Filed petition with the Inter-American
Commission on Human Rights
concerning the land rights of the Shuar
Nation (Ecuador).
n Gave keynote address, “Transitional
Justice in Colombia: The Testing Ground
of the Justice and Truth Process,” in
Medelin, Colombia.
n Published article, “Communications
Theory and World Public Order: The
Anthropomorphic, Jurisprudential
Foundations of International Human
Rights,” Virginia Journal of International
Law 47:3 (with Craig Hammer).
Appointed to the Board of Directors of
the Princeton Center on War Crimes and
Crimes Against Humanity.
n Publishing article, “Globalism
from An African Perspective: The
Training of Lawyers for a New and
Challenging Reality,” in Iowa Journal of
Transnational Law and Contemporary
Problems (forthcoming).
n
Lars Noah
Professor
n Published article, “Too High a Price
for Some Drugs? The FDA Burdens
Reproductive Choice,” 44 San Diego
Law Review 231 (2007).
William H. Page
Marshall M. Criser Eminent Scholar
in Electronic Communications and
Administrative Law; Professor
n Published The Microsoft Case:
Antitrust, High Technology and
Consumer Welfare (University of
Chicago Press 2007) (with John
Lopatka).
Faculty Profile: Kathleen
R
Price
esearching a unique discipline such as Islamic law
would be a great challenge for most students at other
schools, but UF Law’s associate dean of Libraries
and Technology can go back to her connections from
the Library of Congress to make life easier for UF Law students.
Kathleen Price, formerly the Law Librarian of Congress,
arrived at UF Law in 2003 to spearhead the expansion of
UF Law’s library, now known as the Lawton Chiles Legal
Information Center. She uses her previous experiences from
the Library of Congress as well as the libraries at Duke,
University of Minnesota and New York University Law School
to create a place where students want to study and congregate.
“It’s been very exciting to see how students have shifted from
books to online resources over the years,” Price said. “Now, more
than ever, they are using the library as the hub for student life.”
Price’s unique service to law academics at the state and national
level is hard to match. She faced the task of the making the Law
Library of Congress — which contains the world’s largest (more than
seven miles worth) legal collection, a massive rare book collection
that includes the Russian Imperial collection, and the vernacular
global collections of Official Gazettes — relevant to the legal
community after years of neglect resulted in out-of date-collections,
a mismatch of foreign legal specialists and congressional interests,
and numerous attempts to fold the Law Library into the general
library over the objections of the ABA.
The fact that most law students at Washington, D.C., law
schools studied in the library’s reading room provided a natural
34
Presented to the legal staff of
Microsoft Corp. with John Lopatka,
about their new book, The Microsoft
Case: Antitrust, High Technology and
Consumer Welfare.
n Sat on “Whither Dr. Miles: After 95
Years, is a Per Se Rule on Resale Price
Fixing Still Necessary?” panel at the
SEALS annual meeting.
n Testified about remedies for
monopolization at the DOJ/FTC
Hearings on Single Firm Conduct.
n Published Communication and
Concerted Action, 38 Loyola University
of Chicago Law Journal 405 (2007).
n Published “Workable Antitrust
Remedies, Antitrust Source,” Aug.
2007, www.abanet.org/antitrust/
at-source/at-source.html (review of
Richard A. Epstein, Antitrust Consent
Decrees in Theory and Practice (2007).
n Spoke on “Whither Dr. Miles: After
95 years, is a per se rule on resale price
fixing still necessary?” at the SEALS
annual meeting.
n
constituency, as did their alumni practicing
in D.C. firms and congressional staff.
Indeed, the world-class foreign and
international collections built by the foreign
legal specialists obviated the need for local
law schools to build in those areas. “We
got our motivation from knowing the legal
community really needed the Law Library.”
Upon her return to UF, where she earned her bachelor’s
degree, Price led the effort to expand Florida’s flagship law library.
“UF Law has the strongest historic collection anywhere in the
state, so the new facility serves as a backdrop for the whole state
system,” she said. “I was involved in a similar project at NYU Law
that cost almost four times as much, and I think the facility at UF
Law is far better.”
Price says one of the most interesting projects she has worked
on relates to expanding online resources with a $600,000 grant
from the Starr Foundation. “I have been active in looking into
how legal research is conducted in places like China, South
Africa and Indonesia, and the online databases for students really
level the playing field,” she said. “Now students in developing
countries and Ivy League law schools have equal access to legal
information, although it may take greater ingenuity to find it.”
She is a co-author of a bilingual guide to legal research for
Chinese law students and is working with partners on a proposal
for a Chinese legal research nutshell.
—By Jason Silver
UF LAW
arship
Don Peters
Director of Virgil Hawkins Civil
Clinics; Director of Institute for Dispute
Resolution; Trustee Research Fellow;
Professor; Associate Director, Center
on Children and Families
n Published book, Juris Types: Learning
Law Through Self-Understanding,
(with Martha M. Peters) (The Center
for Applications of Psychological
Type, 2007).
Named Consumer Advocate of the Year
by the National Association of Consumer
Agency Administrators.
n Interviewed Guest, “The Dave
Ramsey Show” nationally syndicated
radio program, 25 September 2007 (half
hour radio discussion of usury law and
payday lending).
n Speaker, “Usury Law, Payday
Loans, and Statutory Sleight of Hand:
Salience Distortion and American Credit
n
St. Petersburg Times, May 16, 2007
“
A police department is a very public
institution and it needs to have very good
relationships with all its constituencies. It
seems to me not just an understandable
rule but a very good rule to prohibit racially
insensitive or racist language.
”
—Juan F. Perea, Cone Wagner Nugent Johnson, Hazouri and Roth Professor
In an article discussing the firing of seven cadets in the police academy for overusing the
“n-word.”
Published article, “When Lawyers
Move Their Lips: Attorney Truthfulness
in Mediation and a Modest Proposal,”
2007 Journal of Dispute Resolution 119.
n
Christopher L. Peterson
Associate Professor
n Presented paper, “A Comparative
Analysis of the U.S. Subprime Home
Mortgage Lending Crisis,” at the Law
and Society Association annual meeting
at Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
n Presented paper, “Usury Law, Payday
Loans, and Statutory Sleight of Hand:
An Empirical Analysis of American
Credit Pricing Limits,” as part of an
International Research Collaborative on
Comparative Consumer Indebtedness at
the Law and Society Association Annual
Meeting at Humboldt University, Berlin,
Germany.
n Plenary speaker on “The Mythology
of American Usury Law” at the National
Association of Consumer Agency
Administrators annual meeting.
n Published article, “Predatory Structured
Finance,” in the Cardozo Law Review.
WINTER 2008
Pricing Limits,” University of Utah,
S.J. Quinney College of Law Faculty
Colloquium Series.
n Speaker, Subprime Mortgage Lending,
Securitization and Federal Consumer Protection Legislation, National Association
of Consumer Advocates Home Mortgage
Foreclosure Defense Conference.
n Speaker, “The Financial Mythology
of American Usury Law,” Ohio State
University, Mortiz College of Law.
Published article, “Preemption,
Agency Cost Theory, and Predatory
Lending by Banking Agents: Are
Federal Regulators Biting Off More than
They Can Chew?,” 56 American Law
Review 515 (2007)
n Speaker on “Usury Law, Payday
Loans, and Statutory Sleight of Hand:
Salience Distortion and American Credit
Pricing Limits,” at the Second Annual
Conference on Empirical Legal Studies
at New York University School of
Law. He also spoke on the same topic
at the California Consumer Affairs
Association 33rd Annual Conference.
n Speaker on “Subprime Lending
Challenges: How We Got Here and
Where do We Go From Here,” at the
Iowa Finance Authority’s Annual
Housing Iowa Conference.
n
John Plummer
Assistant Dean for Administrative
Affairs
n Provided primary administrative
support for the SEALS annual meeting.
n Serves as the Levin College of Law
representative to the Continuing Legal
Education (CLE) Committee of the
Florida Bar.
Stephen J. Powell
Director, International Trade Law
Program
n Served on “Addressing Transnational
Collaboration in the Law School
Curriculum” panel at the SEALS annual
meeting.
The Gainesville Sun, The Washington Post, Bradenton Herald, The News Tribune
and Forbes, May 2, 2007
“
Because of the boy’s participation in the
crime and the media attention the case
has already received, withholding the
statement now is like trying to put the
genie back in the bottle.
”
—Lyrissa Lidsky, Professor; UF Research Foundation Professor;
Associate Dean for Faculty Development
Quoted in various articles regarding an attorney’s request to withhold the release of a taped
statement from a 10-year-old boy who pleaded no contest to beating up a homeless man.
35
Schola
FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP
Leonard L. Riskin
Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law
n Co-taught a Negotiation Institute at
Northwestern University School of
Continuing Studies with Daniel Shapiro
of Harvard Law School and Harvard
Medical School.
n Republished article, “Decision-Making
in Mediation: The New Old Grid and the
New New Grid System,” 79 Notre Dame
L. Rev. 1-53 (2003), which has been
translated into Portuguese and published
as “Tomada de decisa em mediacao:
o novo ‘grafico antigo’ e o sistema do
‘novo grafico novo,’” 4 Estudoa Em
Arbitragem, Mediacao E Negociacao.
129-70 (2007). (Published by the
University of Brasilia Faculty of Law).
Elizabeth A. Rowe
Assistant Professor
n Republished article, “The Experimental
Use Exception to Patent Infringement:
Do Universities Deserve Special
Treatment?” 59 Maine Law Review
283 (2007), which first appeared in 57
Hastings Law Journal 921 (2006).
n Presented, “The Challenge of
Protecting Trade Secret Information
in a Digital World,” Symposium on IP
Protection for Fact-Based Works at the
George Washington University Law
School.
n Presented, “Exploring a Take-Down
Provision for Trade Secrets on the
Internet,” 2007 Intellectual Property
Scholars Conference.
n Presented, “Exploring a TakeDown Provision for Trade Secrets on
the Internet,” SEALS New Scholars
Workshop.
n Presented, “Exploring a Take-Down
Provision for Trade Secrets on the
Internet,” Jurisgenesis 2007 Conference.
Fraud Prosecutions and the AttorneyClient Privilege under the McNulty
Memorandum.”
n Presented as a guest of the Public
Ministry of the State of Minas
Gerais, Brazil, during the Ministry’s
Commemorative Week 2007 titled,
“Lessons Learned from the Prosecution
of White Collar Crime in the United
States: Pro and Con.”
n Served as Small Group Leader for
the Eighth Judicial Circuit Annual
Professionalism Symposium held in
Gainesville, Florida.
Michael L. Seigel
Professor
n Published “Bringing Coherence to
Mens Rea Analysis for Securities-Related
Offenses,” 2006 Wisconsin Law Review
1564 (2006).
n Published “Some Preliminary
Statistical, Qualitative, and Anecdotal
Findings of an Empirical Study of
Collegiality Among Law Professors,” 13
Widener Law Review 1 (2006).
n Testified as an Invited Witness before
the United States Senate Committee on
the Judiciary, during a hearing entitled
“Examining Approaches to Corporate
Michael Siebecker
Assistant Professor
n Awarded a $5,000 grant for
“Enhancement of Sustainability in
Instruction” from the University of
Florida Committee on Sustainability and
the University of Florida College of Law.
n Published article, “Building a ‘New
Institutional’ Approach to Corporate
Speech” in the Alabama Law Review
(forthcoming).
n Presented a speech, “Corporate Law
and the First Amendment,” before the
American Constitution Society at the
University of Florida College of Law.
Faculty Profile: Paul
I
McDaniel
t’s no secret that UF Law’s taxation program is one of the
nation’s best, and it’s because of scholars like Paul R.
McDaniel, who has worked at the Department of Treasury
and taught the subject for more than 30 years.
McDaniel, who has co-authored eight books and
more than 50 articles on taxation, arrived at UF Law after
serving as the director of New York University’s Graduate Tax
and International Tax Program. The opportunity to get to know
students at UF Law separates it from past institutions he’s been
part of, he said.
“A major difference is that the graduate tax program at UF is
about half the size of NYU’s,” McDaniel said. “The result is an
extremely gratifying experience when it comes to getting to know
students and working with them on a regular basis.”
One of McDaniel’s biggest contributions to UF Law is his
role in advancing the International Tax Law program. He uses his
experiences from NYU to help the program grow at UF Law, he said.
“The program is great because it attracts some really
outstanding students from other countries,” he said. “I’ve been
able to bring my past experiences to bear to help adapt the
program at UF Law and make the process smoother.”
One of the more unique courses McDaniel teaches involves
students from different countries working together on one team
36
to reach a common goal, he said.
“One of the new courses I teach
called International Tax Planning puts
students on teams of three, with each
student being from a different country.
They have to work with the laws and
treaties to figure out an optimal tax
strategy,” he said. “Every course I teach
is different because the students are all
from different places, and it has proven to be a very rewarding
experience.”
Throughout his career McDaniel has served the federal
government by working with the Department of Treasury
in the office of the Tax Legislative Counsel, where he was
responsible for developing tax legislation and overseeing the
issue of regulations by the Internal Revenue Service. In the
1970s he worked with Sen. Ted Kennedy on federal income
tax law.
“No matter what I’ve done with the government, every
opportunity has been very stimulating and rewarding,” McDaniel
said. “I’m always trying to have a positive impact on tax policy
and legislation in the United States.”
—By Jason Silver
UF LAW
arship
n Participated in panel, “Commercial
Speech and Corporate Power,” at the University of North Carolina School of Law.
n Upon invitation from the Center
for Progressive Reform, helped draft
a “white paper” for the Deer Creek
Foundation regarding ways to curb
excessive corporate influence on
American society.
n Served as a judge for the Pace
University Law School, Goettel Prize for
Faculty Scholarship.
Published article, “The Liberal Assault
on the Fourth Amendment,” 6 Ohio State
Journal of Criminal Law 603 (2007).
n Spoke on “Government Data Mining
and the Fourth Amendment” at the
University of Chicago Law School.
n Spoke on “Dangerousness and
Capital Sentencing” at the International
Conference on Psychiatry and Law,
Padua, Italy.
n Spoke on “Creating a Law of Counts”
at the SEALS Conference.
n
Sydsvenska, August 21, 2007
“
Scholars and consumer advocates have
been pointing this [the mortgage brokers’
role] out for a decade, but Congress hasn’t
acted. The mortgage industry gives large
campaign donations.
”
—Christopher Peterson, Associate Professor
Quoted in an article in Sweden’s leading newspaper about objectionable lending practices.
Served as external reviewer for
Stanford University Press regarding
upcoming publications.
n
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O’Connell Chair; Affiliate
Professor of Psychiatry; Adjunct Professor,
University of South Florida Mental Health
Institute; Associate Director, Center for
Children and Families
n Published the third edition of
Psychological Evaluations for the
Courts: A Handbook for Mental Health
Professionals and Lawyers (w/ Gary
Melton and four others) (recently referred
to by a reviewer as the “Bible” of forensic
mental health law).
n Article, “The Supreme Court’s Recent
Criminal Mental Health Cases: Rulings
of Questionable Competence” was the
lead piece in the October issue of the
ABA’s Criminal Justice Magazine.
n Published article, “Lying and
Confessing,” at 39 Texas Tech Law
Review 1275 (2007).
n Published article, “Teaching
Transnational Law and Regulation of the
Police” at 56 J. L. Educ. 452 (2007).
WINTER 2008
Acted as defense attorney in mock
trial of the death penalty at the
American Psychological Association
annual meeting.
n Spoke at the Florida Public
Defender’s “Life Over Death”
conference on “The Death Penalty a
and Mental Illness.”
n Spoke at a meeting of ex-foreign
intelligence officers on “Surveillance
Law.”
n Presented the University of
Florida’s Constitution Day talk on
“The Constitution and Surveillance by
the Government.”
n Presented workshops on Criminal
Mental Health Law in Fort Lauderdale
and St. Louis.
n Spoke at Emory Law School’s Public
Interest Conference on “Mental Health
Law and the Virginia Tech Incident.”
n Named inaugural Honorary
Distinguished Member of the
American Psychology-Law Society.
n Published a book Privacy at Risk:
The New Government Surveillance
and the Fourth Amendment (Univ.
Chicago Press).
n
Katheryn Russell –Brown
Director, Center for the Study of Race
and Race Relations; Professor
n Guest Editor of Journal of Criminology
and Public Policy, Vol. 6: 1-182, special
issue on race and policing (2007).
Michael Allan Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Chair in Local
Government Law; Professor
n Published book review, “Looking
Backward: Richard Epstein Ponders the
‘Progressive’ Peril,” 105 Michigan Law
Review 1233 (2007).
n Published “2007 Supreme Court
Update” and “Chapter 78B: Green
Buildings,” Powell on Real Property
(Michael Allan Wolf ed. 2007).
Danaya C. Wright
Professor
n Selected to receive a UF Research
Foundation Professorship Award
for 2007-09. These professorships
recognize faculty who have established
a distinguished record of research and
scholarship that is expected to lead to
continuing distinction in their field.
n Published article, “Rails-to-Trails:
Conversion of Railroad Corridors to
Recreational Trails,” in Michael Allan
Wolf (ed), 78A Powell on Real Property
(2007).
n Published article, “Legal Rights and
Women’s Autonomy: Can Family
Law Reform in Muslim Countries
avoid the Contradictions of Victorian
Domesticity?” 5.1 Hawwa: Journal
of Women of the Middle East and the
Islamic World 33-54 (2007).
n Published article, “The Legacy
of Colonialism: Religion, Law, and
Women’s Rights in India” (co-authored
with Varsha Chitnis), which was
scheduled to appear in the fall issue of the
Washington & Lee Law Review (2007).
Walter Weyrauch
Distinguished Professor; Stephen C.
O’Connell Chair; Associate Director,
Center on Children and Families
n Published article, “The Experience of
Lawlessness,” 10 New Criminal Law
Review 415 (2007).
37
Money
Trail
Fighting Terrorism Funding,
One Banker at a Time
Baldwin, who joined the UF
Law faculty in 1962, will retire
at the end of the school year.
B y J a m es Hellegaard
It’s Sept. 11, 2007, and University of Florida Law Professor
Fletcher Baldwin has just returned from another of his many trips
overseas, this one to Cambridge University’s Jesus College in
England where for the past 15 years he’s been an active participant in the International Symposium on Economic Crime.
More than 800 people from the worlds of banking, law enforcement, finance, legal practice, academia and government
attended the annual symposium to receive
instruction and training in anti-money laundering, anti-fraud and anti-cybercrime methods
and strategies. UF’s Center for International
Financial Crimes Studies, which Baldwin
directs, is an official co-sponsor of the
symposium.
“What we’re really trying to do is focus in
on the economies of the countries and how you can prevent the
terrorist and the organized criminal from using the banking systems of these countries,” explains Baldwin. “We discuss what
regulatory agencies should be doing that they’re not doing today, and whether the banks and the bankers are at risk, which
they are, of course.”
One thing Baldwin and other symposium speakers try to do
is educate bankers about the “horrific money threat out there.”
Among the major hurdles those fighting money laundering face
is the welcome mat laid out by many impoverished countries that
are eager to do business with terrorists and organized crime.
“A lot of the impoverished countries who have banking
systems kind of welcome money to be laundered because they
benefit from it,” he says. “Zimbabwe, for example, is a rogue
country as far as the banking systems of the world are concerned. So, as long as the illicit guys have a banking system
such as Zimbabwe’s to turn to, it’s going to be rather difficult
for legitimate people to do very much about it.”
Another problem is trying to get elected government officials to enact appropriate legislation to give compliance officers a fighting chance of getting the records they need for
convictions, Baldwin says. While much progress has been
made in the six years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, in terms
of regulatory legislation, he says, the implementation of that
legislation has not been put to its intended use, which is to
prevent terrorist financing.
“Quite frankly, a lot of law enforcement sees
this as a good opportunity to use these extraordinary powers they have for just criminal [prosecution] — go after a drug dealer, which is not what
was intended,” Baldwin explains. “The legislation
is intended to go after terrorists, not the ordinary
criminal.”
At this year’s symposium, where the theme was “The Wealth
of Nations at Risk,” speaker after speaker decried the difficulties
posed by the lack of available money and resources caused by the
Iraq War.
“Governments, including our own, are overwhelmed and so
understaffed because we need our money to fight terrorism in
Iraq,” Baldwin says. “It’s disgusting the money we’ve put into
Iraq and the money we’ve taken out of fighting the financing of
terrorists and trying to get that money out of circulation. We’re so
tied up with Iraq, we’re just neglecting everything else.”
That includes Afghanistan, where Baldwin is traveling in
February to present a program in Kabul on “The Rule of Law
Enterprise.” With the Bush Administration’s focus on Iraq, the
U.S. has lost control of Afghanistan where heroin manufacturers
are funneling their profits into terrorism funding.
“They’re back in business,” Baldwin says. “Where does their
money go? Their money goes to recruit, and they’re doing a marvelous job of it.”
“They’re
back in
business.”
38
UF LAW
class notes
­
Share Your News
The address to submit Class Notes news online has been
changed to [email protected] You also can mail submissions to: UF Law Magazine, Levin College of Law, University of
Florida, PO Box 117633, Gainesville, FL 32611.
If you wish to include your e-mail address at the end of your
class note, please make the additions to the class note or
provide permission to print.
1953
Melvyn B. Frumkes was honored with the Lifetime Service
Award by the Florida Chapter of the American Academy of
Matrimonial Lawyers.
1964
Gerald F. Richman, president of the law firm of Richman
Greer, has been named president of the Palm Beach County
Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA).
[email protected]
Richman 64
1969
DeLane E. Anderson Jr. was one of 1,092 volunteer
attorneys who participated in “Trial Lawyers Care,” which
became the largest, most successful pro-bono project in the
history of American jurisprudence. TLC represented 1,745
claimants and provided free legal representation to the
9/11 families who elected to receive injury or death
damages from the Victim Compensation Fund established
by the U.S. Congress.
Anderson 69
Thomas J. Sherrard III received the “Best of the Bar”
award from the Nashville Business Journal.
1972
Hal Kantor was named “No. 17” of 50 individuals highlighted in “Orlando’s Most Powerful People” in Orlando
Magazine.
Kantor 72
Robert A. Mandell was recently elected to the board of
trustees for the Burnham Institute for Medial Research.
1973
Holland & Knight partner Martha Barnett was named
one of the “50 Most Influential Women in Law” by The
National Law Journal.
Barnett 73
1974
Gator Law Alums
Connect in Japan
The Gator Nation truly is everywhere. Married
UF Law alums Sarah McIlrath (JD 04) and Bill
Ward (JD 03) reunited with classmates Nicole
Kibert (JD 03) and Chandra Lagrone (JD 03)
for a Mexican dinner in Tokyo. McIltrath is
working for a Japanese law firm while Ward
is stationed at Camp Zama and serves in
the Judge Advocate General’s Corps (JAG).
Chandra also is serving in JAG, stationed
in Baumholder, Germany. Kibert ([email protected]
carltonfields.com) is working at Carlton Fields
in Tampa. Pictured, from left to right, are
McIlrath, Kibert, Lagrone and Ward.
WINTER 2008
Leslie J. Lott spoke on intellectual property at the Institute
of Continuing Legal Education’s Intellectual Property Law
Summer Institute as well as the Florida Bar Intellectual
Property Certification Review.
In recognition of his life-long devotion to the legal profession and for significant contributions to the pursuit of
justice, the ABA Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Section
awarded its Pursuit of Justice Award to Larry S. Stewart.
Stewart also has been appointed to the Program Committee
of the Council of the American Law Institute, which
approves and oversees all ALI programs and projects.
Lott 74
Detzel 77
1977
Lauren Detzel of Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth,
Capouano & Bozarth in Orlando is now an adjunct professor
at UF Law.
Carlton Fields Tampa Office Managing Shareholder
Nathaniel L. Doliner (LLMT) has been appointed Vice
Chair of the Section of Business Law of the American
Bar Association (ABA) and, in addition, has become the
editor-in-chief of The Business Lawyer.
Doliner 77
Richard Fildes has been elected chairman of the board for
the 2007-08 Florida Citrus Sports Foundation.
Fildes 77
39
Thomas R. McNeill of Powell Goldstein has been appointed to the Committee on Corporate Laws of the Business
Law Section of the American Bar Association.
Wall 77
Weisman 78
Dennis Wall, an award-winning author, has written the 2007
supplement to the second edition of his book, Litigation and
Prevention of Insurer Bad Faith. Wall was chosen by the
International Institute for Conflict Prevention & Resolution for
its Panels of Distinguished Neutrals as a neutral mediator for
insurance disputes and insurance coverage. He also spoke
to the American Bar Association on “Payment of Undisputed
Minimum Amounts” in hurricane claims and other property
claims. [email protected]
1978
David Weisman with Greenspoon Marder was recently
appointed to the Florida Bar Real Estate Certification
Committee, which evaluates the qualifications for applicants to become Board Certified Real Estate Lawyers or
to renew that certification.
1979
Holmes 79
Guild 83
N. Diane Holmes of Orlando has been named a fellow
in the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers. In
addition, she is board certified in marital and family
law and is a Florida Supreme Court certified family
mediator.
Greenberg Traurig shareholder Alfred Malefatto has been
elected president of The Forum Club of the Palm Beaches,
Florida’s largest non-profit, non-partisan political and public
affairs organization.
1982
Hernandez 83
Chris Ballentine of Fisher, Rushmer, Werrenrath, Dickson,
Talley & Dunlap made a presentation to risk managers,
claims adjusters and other insurance professionals on the
topic of “Understanding the Current CGL Policy.”
John Neukamm of Mechanik Nuccio Hearne & Wester in
Tampa was elected as a member of the American College of
Real Estate Lawyers. He currently serves as the Real Property
Division director for the Florida Bar’s Real Property, Probate &
Trust Law Section. [email protected]
Holland & Knight partner Jim Shimberg has been named
practice group leader for the real estate section in the firm’s
Tampa office, part of the largest real estate practice in the
U.S. This practice area focuses on all areas of commercial
real estate, including developer and lender representation,
leasing, land use and zoning, and acquisition and disposition
of real estate. jim.shimb[email protected]
Linda R. Getzen has been elected president of Girl Scouts
of Gulfcoast Florida Inc. This Girl Scout council serves more
than 10,000 girls in 10 counties in Southwest Florida.
John Elliott Leighton, a partner with Leesfield Leighton
& Partners, was recognized as a “Top Lawyer for 2007”
in South Florida Legal Guide. Leighton also has been
elected vice chairman of the Academy of Trial Advocacy,
a national invitation-only organization of leading plaintiff’s
catastrophic injury trial lawyers. He was inducted in the
Melvin Belli Society as a Fellow and was re-certified by
the Florida Bar Board of Legal Specialization. Leighton
authored the two-volume treatise, Litigating Premises
Security Cases (Thomson/West, 2006), the leading text
on inadequate security litigation.
Oscar Sanchez of Akerman Senterfit was recently
featured in an article in El Nuevo Herald.
Robert Guild is the founding partner of the new
Jacksonville-based trial law firm Matthews & Guild, which
focuses on complex civil litigation and appellate work in
state and federal appeals courts.
Eugenio (Gene) Hernandez, along with five other partners,
founded the law firm of Avila Rodriguez Hernandez Mena &
Ferri in Coral Gables. He heads the firm’s immigration practice, specializing in the field of immigration, nationality and
consular law in business-related matters, with an emphasis on
corporate transfers, professionals, entrepreneurs and investors.
40
1984
1985
1983
Shimberg 84
This year marks the 20th anniversary for the
Journal of Law and Public Policy. If you worked
on past issues, please send current contact
information and graduating class year to [email protected]
law.ufl.edu (with “Contact Info” in the
subject line). All Journal alumni will be invited
to an anniversary celebration scheduled for
March 2008.
Nathan S. Collier, founder and owner of the Collier
Companies, which includes Paradigm Properties
Management Team Inc., pledged $1 million to help endow
the Nathan S. Collier Master of Science in Real Estate
Program (MSRE) at UF’s Warrington College of Business
Administration.
Michael D. Minton (LLMT) has been elected by the
shareholders of Dean Mead to serve a three-year term
as president of the law firm. [email protected]
Neukamm 84
Calling All Public
Policy Journal Staff
Robert W. Bivins has co-founded a new firm, Bivins &
Hemenway, in Brandon-Valrico. The firm will emphasize
real estate, business law, lending work and estate planning/
probate. [email protected]
1986
Jeffrey H. Brickman has been named one of “Georgia
Super Lawyers.” He practices intellectual property litigation and criminal defense and served as the district attorney of DeKalb County of Atlanta prior to joining Needle &
Rosenberg.
William E. Ruffier, a partner with Dellecker, Wilson, King,
McKenna & Ruffier in Orlando, has been elected vice
president of administration for the executive board of the Boy
Scouts of America, Central Florida Council.
UF LAW
Bill McCollum
Florida’s Top Lawyer
P
ublic service is a way of life for Bill McCollum.
After graduating from UF Law in 1968, he
served in the Navy, retiring in 1992 from the
Naval Reserve as a commander after having
served 23 years as an officer in the Judge Advocate
General’s Corps (JAG).
From 1981 to 2001 McCollum represented
Central Florida citizens in the U.S. House of
Representatives, where he founded the U.S. House
Task Force on Terrorism and Unconventional Warfare
and was recognized as an expert on terrorism. He also
served on the Intelligence and Banking committees as
well the Judiciary Committee, in which he chaired the
Subcommittee on Crime.
Since being
elected Florida’s
attorney general in
November 2006,
McCollum (JD 68) has
positioned Florida as
a national leader in
the fight against child
pornography and has
taken on several other
serious issues.
Florida’s school superintendents, our Cybercrimes Unit
has prepared a 50-minute cybersafety program we
are presenting in all middle schools and high schools
designed to make children more aware of the dangers on
the Internet and how to better protect themselves.
Recently, the Legislature passed legislation I
proposed which enhances penalties for possession
of certain types of child pornography and makes it a
separate criminal offense to travel to meet a minor to
engage in unlawful sexual conduct. It greatly increases
the punishment for “grooming,” which is when a
predator misrepresents his or her age to a child in the
course of one of these online chats or e-mails.
Also, starting in October, sexual predators and
offenders were
required to register
any e-mail addresses
and instant
messenger names
they use with FDLE.
This will help Web
sites like MySpace
and Facebook keep
these offenders from
approaching our
children on these popular social networking sites.
Florida now has the toughest laws in the nation when
it comes to protecting our children from Internet
pedophiles and child pornographers.
“Given the rate of recidivism,
it’s clear that the prisoners are
not being rehabilitated. We must
better prepare ex-offenders for
re-entry to the community.”
What is your number one priority for Florida?
My top priority as attorney general is to
make Florida a safer place to live, work and raise
a family. My main areas of focus are protecting
children from Internet pedophiles and sexual
predators, gang violence, consumer protection, crimes
against the elderly, identity theft and improving
Florida’s domestic security.
What issues regarding the legal system do you see
on the horizon for Florida?
Litigation reform remains a significant issue. We
need to work on ways to make the judicial system more
efficient and reduce the cost of litigation to the parties.
Specialty courts such as business and drug courts are
likely to receive special consideration. On a criminal
justice front, we really need to address our system of
corrections. We put people in prison to incapacitate
them, to punish them, to rehabilitate them and to send a
deterrent message. Given the rate of recidivism, it’s clear
that the prisoners are not being rehabilitated. We must
better prepare ex-offenders for re-entry to the community.
Name one achievement you are most happy to have
accomplished thus far.
I am very proud of the accomplishments we’ve made
this year in cybercrime. Seventy seven million children
use the Internet every day in the nation. Of those, one
of every seven is solicited for sex. With the support of
WINTER 2008
McCollum
How has your UF Law education prepared you for your
current position?
I certainly got a good education. Professor Probert
was an outstanding torts professor, and I really enjoyed
Dean Fenn’s course in future interests. My law school
education gave me the ability to deal with complex
issues and tasks. I learned how to get to the core of the
issue and analyze it quickly. This has been particularly
vital given how large and diverse the attorney general’s
office is. I also made friendships in law school that have
endured over the years.
If you could have a long conversation with a lawyer
from any time, who would it be and why?
My grandfather, Clyde H. Lockhart. He was an
attorney in Brooksville and truly one of the great legal
minds of his generation. In my youth I learned more at
his feet about the law and life than I did from anyone
else. At times when I have major decisions to make, I
reflect on perspectives he gave me and I wish I could
still have his counsel. n
Editor’s note: Florida’s deputy attorney general and Bill
McCollum’s chief of staff is another UF Law graduate,
Joe Jacquot (JD 99).
41
1987
Richard M. Benrubi, a partner at Liggio, Benrubi and
Williams in West Palm Beach, has been installed as president
of the Palm Beach County Justice Association. [email protected]
Benrubi 87
Brian Butler, a partner of Morris, Manning & Martin in Atlanta,
represented Noble Investment Group in its acquisition of six
AmeriSuites hotels from an affiliate of Global Hyatt Corporation.
1988
Cathryn A. Mitchell has become a partner with Fox Rothschild
in the firm’s Princeton office.
Mitchell 88
1989
After two tours in the Mideast to focus on rebuilding infrastructure, education and governmental affairs, Brig. Gen. Michael
Ferguson was a guest of honor and speaker at the Army Civil
Affairs Dinner in Pensacola. He spoke on the war on terrorism
and the need for vigilance.
Lord 90
Dietz 91
Halpern 91
1990
Robert L. Guyer taught physicians and fellows at Harvard
Medical School how to advocate successfully before state legislatures. Guyer, former legislative counsel for Ralston Purina
Co. and author of Guide to State Legislative Lobbying, lectures
extensively on skills and techniques for influencing state legislatures and executive agencies. [email protected]
Richard B. Lord has joined the National Arbitration Forum’s
national panel of independent and neutral arbitrators and
mediators.
Rosenberg 91
Stanley 91
42
Jennifer A. Dietz has been appointed by the president
of The Florida Bar to serve a second term as chair of
the Animal Law Committee. She has also been elected
to serve on the Executive Council of the Workers’
Compensation Section of The Florida Bar in 2008. She
recently spoke at the LTC 100 Conference on “Highly
Effective Workers’ Compensation Management.” At
The Florida Bar’s Annual Convention in June 2007,
she received The Florida Bar Animal Law Committee’s
Leadership Award. In addition, Dietz was a guest on Fox
Television’s show “Your Turn” to discuss recent trends in
animal law. In July 2007, Dietz opened The Law Offices
of Jennifer A. Dietz, LLC, a firm dedicated to animal law
matters. [email protected]
William N. Halpern, real estate attorney with the law firm
of Shuffield Lowman, recently received the highest rating
available to attorneys by the nationally recognized MartindaleHubbell Law Directory.
Kimberly Bonder Rezanka was recently elected as a shareholder in the law firm of Dean Mead and currently serves as
president of the Brevard County Bar Association.
The Florida Bar Foundation has doubled its funding
for Florida’s Children First (FCF) and has hired Robin
Rosenberg, pro bono counsel at Holland & Knight, as deputy
director in its new Tampa location.
Norma Stanley (LLMT) was notified in July that she is Board
Certified in Wills, Trusts, and Estates by The Florida Bar.
Joseph N. Tucker of Dinsmore & Shohl was named as one of
Kentucky’s Super Lawyers. [email protected]
Winifred L. Acosta NeSmith
Honors come from small hometown
U
Rezanka 91
1991
F Law alumna Winifred L.
Acosta NeSmith (JD 95)
may practice in Tallahassee,
but she still stays true to her
roots in the small North Florida town
of Live Oak.
Her busy schedule as the assistant
U.S. attorney of the Northern District
of Florida did not stop Acosta Nesmith
from visiting her hometown to be
honored for her many contributions
back to the community. In March
she was honored by Mayor Garth
“Sonny” Nobles with the Live Oak
“key to the city” and a proclamation.
She is believed to be the first African
American to receive this honor. She
also received numerous other awards
from her high school, church, family
and civic organizations.
“If we are moved with compassion,
our time, talent and/or treasures will
touch more lives than we can ever
imagine for longer than we could
ever imagine,” said Acosta NeSmith
in her keynote address at a banquet
benefiting the Boys and Girls Club of
Suwannee County.
She urged the audience to
become mentors and encouraged
everyone to steer a misguided person
in the right direction.
Acosta NeSmith often returns
to Live Oak for public speaking
engagements and to serve on the Boys
and Girls Club Steering Committee and
the African American Development
Council. Along with her husband,
attorney Kimblin NeSmith, she
also sponsors the “Acosta NeSmith
Achievement Award,” a scholarship to a
graduating Suwannee High School senior.
Acosta NeSmith recently
was reelected to a third term on
the National Black Prosecutors
Association’s executive board and
was recognized as the “Executive
Board Member of the Year” for her
outstanding service.
“I am humbled by the honors
bestowed upon me,” Acosta NeSmith
said. “It simply pleases my heart to
brighten the lives of others, for the
Bible teaches us ‘to whom much is
given, much is required.’”
—Aline Baker
UF LAW
Rodney Brown
Aids Iraq High Tribunal
by K A T H Y F L E M I N G
O
n November 5, 2006, UF College of Law
graduate D. Rodney Brown (JD 91) stood at the
rear of the courtroom in Baghdad when deposed
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein was found guilty
of crimes against humanity and sentenced to death by the
Iraqi High Tribunal. As Hussein was led away by guards
after a defiant outburst, Hussein walked within a few feet
of Brown. Hussein smiled at Brown, and Brown politely
returned the gesture.
That was the closest that Brown, an assistant U.S.
attorney in Jacksonville, came to the notorious Iraqi ruler
during the six months he was deployed as an attorney
adviser with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Regime
Crimes Liaison’s Office at the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.
Brown was deployed in Operation Iraqi Freedom after
responding to a request from the Department of Justice
for prosecutors willing
to spend six months
in Baghdad assisting
and advising the Iraqi
High Tribunal in the
investigation and
prosecution of highranking members of the former Iraqi regime.
“I have never been in the military but always admired
those who served,” Brown said later, “especially the military
veterans who became federal agents and investigated cases
which I prosecuted. So the service part of the opportunity
appealed to me. It was something I was being led to do.”
Back home in the United States, Brown’s usual work
day as an AUSA involves investigating and prosecuting
criminal cases in federal court, including drug trafficking,
child exploitation, violent crime and firearms cases.
In Iraq, Brown and the other American lawyers
assisting the tribunal were not in the courtroom during the
trial proceedings. Instead their duties included assisting
judges, prosecutors and even defense attorneys behind
the scenes with security, logistics, defendant and witness
transportation, legal arguments and proper courtroom
procedures. He said it was “organized chaos.”
However, it was the travel throughout the country
to locate and interview witnesses to mass killings
of Iraqi citizens by the former regime that impacted
Brown most. One case involved the investigation of the
suppression of the 1991 Shi’ite uprising in which his
team had to connect victims discovered in several mass
graves to the criminal acts committed by the former
regime. American forensic anthropologists would clean
clothing found in the graves, arrange it on mannequins
and then photograph the mannequins. The photos then
would be shown to potential witnesses in town near the
mass grave sites for identification. Because much of the
clothing was handmade, surviving relatives could identify
it 15 years later.
“The victims were glad we were there. They wanted
their stories told,” Brown said.
“American forensic anthropologists would
clean clothing found in the graves, arrange it on
mannequins and then photograph the mannequins.”
WINTER 2008
Brown in Iraq
In another investigation in northern Iraq, Brown said
regime troops had taken every male over the age of 11
from several different villages and deported them. Brown
also spent a week in Kurdistan working with the Kurdish
minister of human rights investigating the 1983 genocide
of the Barzani tribe, in which the remains of 513 men
were found in a mass grave in southern Iraq.
He was appointed a special deputy United States
Marshal and carried a weapon constantly during his
tour. Although he flew more than 30 helicopter missions
without taking fire, there were times — such as one
afternoon in late January 2007 when four rockets struck
and exploded just outside the U.S. Embassy as he worked
inside — that came a little too close.
On November 11, 2006, Brown and more than 250
other Americans ran the Baghdad International Memorial
Marathon. He said that the race, which coursed through
parts of downtown Baghdad in the International Zone, was
one of the highlights of his deployment. Brown watched
and celebrated the Gators football national championship
game in Baghdad, and gloated over the victory to several of
his fellow lawyers who hailed from Ohio.
Brown said the Iraqis with whom he worked were
appreciative of the American presence and treated
him and his colleagues very well. It was, he said, the
experience of a lifetime to be part of one of the trials of the
century, like being at the Nuremburg trials in the 1940s.
On Brown’s last day in Baghdad before returning
home, he visited several of the judges with whom he had
worked closely to say goodbye. The judge thanked Brown
for his service and stated that he wished that Brown could
stay in Iraq for 10 years. Brown responded, “I don’t think
that my wife would like that.” n
43
Creating a
New Profession
UF lawyers are well-known
for expressing themselves in law
offices and courtrooms across
the country, but Madeliene Abling
(JD 90) has found a more colorful means of expressing herself
nationally.
A former Orlando attorney,
Abling is a painter whose works
have recently been exhibited
at the James Beard Foundation
Greenhouse Gallery in New York,
French Culinary Institute in New
York, Provincetown Art Association
and Museum and Lyman-Eyer
Gallery.
In a bold impressionistic style,
Madeliene paints what she loves:
chefs, drinks, cars.
“Shape, color, tone are what
matter when I’m painting,” Abling
says. “I’m currently working a great
deal with a palette knife. Quite simply, my goal is to put shapes of color
on a canvas and make paintings. I
love the process; I love the product.”
Abling works from studios
in Provincetown, Boston and
Melbourne (Fla.), and her paintings
can be seen at ablinggallery.com.
Abling’s art
44
Douglas Hendrikson
NASA launched a great career
B y J ason S il v er
M
ingling with astronauts and hanging out
at Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads
are merely dreams for many people, but
for Douglas Hendriksen (JD 66), those
experiences have been part of just another day at the
office for more than 40 years.
Hendriksen, whose main responsibilities include
giving government procurement law advice and serving
on source evaluation and mishap boards, was recently
awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal during a
ceremony in Washington, D.C.
His career at NASA, an organization that was in its
very early stages while Hendriksen was in law school,
has been an unexpected experience.
“NASA was not even around when I was growing
up in Tampa, and it was just getting started when I was
at UF,” he said. “It was a brand new agency that was
blowing up rockets all over the place. Kennedy Space
Center was not even built yet.”
After UF Law, Hendriksen went to NASA so he could
practice contractual negotiations. He arrived shortly after
the Apollo 1 fire that killed three astronauts and was
inspired by the organization’s progressive mentality.
“When I came to NASA, I got an amazing feeling,”
he said. “I had never been around so many bright,
positive and proactive people.”
He also recalls the sense of urgency around Cape
Canaveral after President Kennedy announced that the
U.S. will go to the moon in the 1960s.
“Whenever there was a problem or challenge, we
never backed down because we had to get to the moon,”
Hendriksen said. “The Apollo Program was a big venture
that attracted the best people from around the world.
That’s the kind of people NASA had back then.”
At NASA Hendriksen relies on his days from UF Law
to sometimes help solve problems totally unconnected
to legal issues. When the Apollo Program ended NASA
began preparing for the Space Shuttle Program, and had
problems figuring out how to place new cranes in the
Vehicle Assembly Building.
He thought back to his days at UF when Dean Fenn,
a UF Law professor, told his classes to think outside of
the box. Hendriksen used that mindset to help solve a
major issue.
“The engineers wanted to cut a hole in the top of
the Vehicle Assembly Building, which would have been
a very complex operation,” he said. “The roof of that
building is like lasagna, and contract-wise, the project
would have been very hard to do.”
By thinking outside the box, Hendriksen convinced
the engineers the newer refined cranes could be lifted
into position by the old cranes already in the assembly
Hendrikson at
shuttle controls
“The launch director thanked
me ... that’s thanks to Dean
Fenn showing me to think
outside the box at UF Law.”
facility. The head engineer loved the idea.
“Years later, during the Space Shuttle Program, the
launch director came up and thanked me because the
older cranes we kept in there were also still being used
from time to time,” Hendriksen said. “That’s thanks to
Dean Fenn showing me to think outside the box at UF
Law.”
An expert when it comes to giving business and legal
advice, Hendriksen has been extremely involved when
it comes to helping NASA recover from tragic accidents
like the Columbia disaster.
He serves on a board of advisers that decides what
to do with the remaining wreckage and still gets calls
daily for permission to work with the wreckage from
universities and scientists.
“When the pieces of the shuttle started to come
back, my team had to figure out what other people
could have access to, where they could view everything
and where NASA should store the wreckage,” he said.
“To this day I get calls from many different types of
people who want access and I have to make certain
recommendations.”
NASA employees value pride and honor when it
comes to their daily work. Hendriksen, like other NASA
employees, dedicates his efforts to astronauts who have
fallen in the past.
“Since we couldn’t bring back the astronauts, we
make sure the program goes on,” he said. “Everything
we do at NASA honors the astronauts who have died,
and we all spend whatever resources it takes to make
sure we get a ‘Return to Flight.’”
A “Return to Flight” refers to getting astronauts to
land safely back on Earth. In the 1970s, during the
Apollo missions, Hendriksen remembers when NASA
would allow employees to get really close to the Saturn
V Rocket liftoffs.
“NASA was more cavalier when it came to safety
back then. During Apollo 17 my colleagues and I were
allowed to stand right at the tow-away facility to watch
UF LAW
Class Notes
1992
Morgan R. Bentley was named chair of the
Williams Parker Litigation Department and
currently serves as president elect of the
Sarasota County Bar Association.
Keersten Martinez with Fisher, Rushmer,
Werrenrath, Dickson, Talley & Dunlap was
honored with the Orange County Bar
Association’s Legal Aid Society Award of
Excellence for her pro bono legal assistance
in Central Florida.
Madeline Gauthier (LLMT) has just recently
published the second edition of her book,
Where There’s A Will, There’s A Way! and
is presently practicing in Washington State.
Shutts & Bowen partner Daniel T. O’Keefe
has been appointed by Gov. Charlie Crist
to a three-year term on the East Central
Florida Regional Planning Council.
Michael G. Schwartz (LLMT), of Vorys,
Sater, Seymour and Pease in Cincinnati,
Ohio, has been selected to the 2008 Best
Lawyers in America list.
1996
1993
the launch,” he said. “I remember
having to hold onto a gatepost
while my entire body and everything
else vibrated during the launch.
They would never let us that close
nowadays.”
His responsibilities as a
contract expert allow him to work
with famous ex-astronauts such as
Apollo 13’s Jim Lovell, and former
Sen. John Glenn. Hendriksen helps
them organize math and science
scholarship programs.
“The U.S. is not as strong as it
used to be in math and science, so I
work with ex-astronauts to get young
people on track,” he said. “NASA
can’t offer scholarships because it’s
a federal agency, but we help the exastronauts figure out what they can
and can’t offer.”
Although his career at NASA
is coming to a close, he’s still
involved in daily contract writing and
reviewing. As NASA transitions into
the new Constellation Program, new
contracts have to be made to build
the redesigned rockets, transporters
and launch pads.
“We need to replace the old
crawler-transporters with one or two
new ones that cost tens of millions
of dollars each, and we have to
write out the right clauses for the
bidding that is coming up,” he said.
“In the counsel’s office we have
to be very careful about the costs
and what options we offer to the
contractors.”
After four decades of hard work
and dedication, Hendriksen says
he still loves being part of NASA
operations and that it will take a big
effort to keep him away.
“I just love working out here and
could do it much longer, but my wife
is getting mad and hammering me
to say goodbye,” he said. n
WINTER 2008
Janice Matson Rickert recently left Fowler
White Boggs Banker to start her own firm,
Janice Matson Rickert, which focuses
on defense of workers’ compensation,
personal injury and property claims and
conducting mediations. She is A-V-rated
by Martindale-Hubbell and is a Supreme
Court certified circuit civil mediator.
[email protected]
1994
Kenneth McKenna, a partner with the
Orlando law firm Dellecker, Wilson, King,
McKenna & Ruffier, recently served as a
faculty presenter for the National Business
Institute’s seminar on “Settling Uninsured
and Underinsured Motorist Claims.” He
also spoke on “Nursing Home and Medical
Malpractice Litigation” at the Florida
Legal Education Association’s annual
Guardianship Team seminar. [email protected]
dwklaw.com
Lance Reich has recently joined Woodcock
Washburn in Atlanta. He specializes in complex patent prosecution and litigation, with
a particular emphasis in the electronics,
computer software, and business methods
areas. [email protected]
Marc A. Wites’ law firm Wites & Kapetan in
Lighthouse Point, has awarded $10,000 in
scholarship funds to Brazilian and Hispanic
students attending college in the United
States.
1995
Tim Cerio was named to serve on the UF
Alumni Association national board. He is
immediate past president of the UF Law
Alumni Council and is an inaugural recipient of the Alumni Association’s Outstanding
Young Alumnus award in 2006. He and his
wife Jayne have three children and live in
Tampa.
G. Steven Fender, a shareholder of
Litchford & Christopher Professional
Association, has been appointed vice-chair
of the Judicial Liaison Committee for State
Court/Federal Court of the Business Law
Section of The Florida Bar.
Patrick W. Maraist has founded Maraist
Law Firm, a commercial litigation and
appellate practice boutique in West Palm
Beach.
[email protected]
Schwartz 92
McKenna 94
Bruce A. McGovern (LLMT), professor
of law at South Texas College of Law in
Houston, has assumed the role of vice
president and associate dean of academic
administration.
Dr. Steve Shaw has announced his
candidacy for the Florida House of
Representatives District 24 Seat.
Wite 94
1997
Scott Farrell is the creator and host of The
“Scott Farrell Show.” Scott can be heard
live each Sunday from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
on NewsTalk AM 1040 in Tampa Bay and
streaming on www.ScottFarrellShow.com.
[email protected]
Nicole L. Goetz, formerly known as
Nicole L. Smith, is a shareholder in Asbell,
Ho, Klaus & Goetz and has been named
co-chair of the ED Committee of The
Florida Bar for 2007-08.
Fender 95
Glassman 95
Sherri L. Johnson has been elected
president of the Florida Association
for Women Lawyers. [email protected]
dentjohnson.com
Rahul Patel was named to serve on the
UF Alumni Association national board.
He is a partner with King & Spalding
and is President of the UF Law Alumni
Counsel. He is an inaugural recipient of
the Alumni Association’s Outstanding
Young Alumnus award in 2006 and has
been involved with the Atlanta Gator
Club®. He and his wife Swati have two
children and live in Atlanta.
Tivoli Properties announced that Kurt A.
Raulin has joined the company as general
counsel and the head of its legal department in Atlanta.
Leslie Miller Tomczak was elected shareholder of Akerman Senterfitt. Tomczak is a
member of Akerman’s Real Estate Practice
Group and specializes in commercial real
estate transactions, “big box” retail shopping center development, warehouse and
industrial leasing, build-to-suits and reverse
Martinez 95
Johnson 97
Raulin 97
45
Julio Jaramillo
Providing Hands-on Help to Immigrants
W
hen Colombian and South American immigrants encounter
challenges upon arriving in America, a fellow countryman steps
forward to lend a helping hand. As the passionate president
of the Colombian American Service Association (CASA), Julio
Jaramillo (JD 91) advocates for human rights and helps hundreds of
individuals and families each month work to earn their citizenship.
Jaramillo, who came to the U.S. from Colombia in 1966 and recently
opened his own private law firm in Miami, feels Colombian and other South
American immigrants are ignored in the U.S.
“I got involved in CASA in 1995 because the problems my fellow
Colombians and immigrants generally faced were at the point where
something needed to be done,” Jaramillo said. “They are overlooked and
have very little representation in the community.”
The organization serves about 400 to 500 families a month from
places such as Colombia, Venezuela, Argentina and even Eastern Europe.
It receives referrals from community service organizations, elected officials
and civic leaders “because they know the work we do, and no one gets
turned away regardless of ability to pay,” he says.
CASA is currently trying to expand its reach across Florida where about
500,000 Colombians reside. Jaramillo says that by some estimates, almost
half of them are undocumented. “Though the majority of South American
immigrants are in South Florida, there has been a tremendous migration
to other parts of the state such as Naples, Tampa, even Pensacola and the
Panhandle,” he said.
Jaramillo, right, with a client
Jaramillo most enjoys the monthly “citizen drives” that CASA organizes.
“Once or twice a month we help people get their documentation and
begin the process of getting their citizenship,” he said. “You should see
their faces and the gratitude they display when they can swear themselves
in as U.S. citizens.”
Jaramillo remembers being taught at UF Law that lawyers should have
a social conscience.
“It’s not only a privilege, but an obligation to better our society on
behalf of those that can’t,” he said.
—Jason Silver
build-to-suits for national tenants. She is based in the Fort
Lauderdale office. [email protected]
1998
Tomczak 97
Michael Cavendish, attorney and shareholder with the new
Jacksonville office of Gunster Yoakley & Stewart, has been
appointed to the board of the Jacksonville Transportation
Authority by Gov. Charlie Crist.
Kendall Mills-Conrad was named a partner with Eraclides,
Johns, Hall, Gelman, Johannessen & Kempner. She will
continue to practice in the area of workers’ compensation
defense in the Jacksonville office.
Davis 98
Ellsley 98
Gonzalez 98
46
Christopher Davis is the newly-elected president of the
Daniel Webster Perkins Bar Association, named after one of
the first African-Americans to pioneer law in Duval County.
He also has joined Peek, Cobb, Edwards & Ragatz in
Jacksonville.
Rick Ellsley has been named a partner of the Fort Lauderdale
firm of Krupnick Campbell Malone Buser Slama Hancock
Liberman & McKee. He serves as an executive officer for the
Broward County Trial Lawyers Association, is a member of the
Association of Trial Lawyers of America and has been board
certified by the Florida Bar as a specialist in Civil Trial Law.
Marco Ferri, along with five other partners, founded the law
firm of Avila Rodriguez Hernandez Mena & Ferri in Coral
Gables. He specializes in corporate transactions with a focus
on cross-border mergers & acquisitions and financing transactions.
Jason Gonzalez was recently appointed general counsel to the
Republican Party of Florida. He is a shareholder with Ausley &
McMullen in Tallahassee and will continue to practice in the
areas of commercial and government litigation. [email protected] or [email protected]
John M. Howe has started John M. Howe, PA, in West Palm
Beach. Howe also has been elected to the board of directors of
the Palm Beach County Bar Association and appointed to serve on
The Florida Bar’s Member Outreach Committee. For the next year
he will continue to serve as a director-at-large on the board of the
Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and as a director
on the board of the Legal Aid Society of the Palm Beaches.
Andrew D. McNamee was recently promoted to shareholder of
the Florida law firm Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff &
Sitterson.
Adi Rappoport of Gunster Yoakley will co-chair a new practice
area specifically for tax-exempt organizations to provide advice
and counsel in the rapidly changing and highly scrutinized world
of charities and non-profits.
1999
Adam K. Feldman, formerly a partner at Patterson, Anderson
& Feldman in Jacksonville, has joined the Denver office of
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck as Of Counsel. He practices in
the areas of real estate and hospitality law.
Brian Fender has been promoted to shareholder at
GrayRobinson. [email protected]
Stefan A. Rubin, a member of Ruden McClosky’s Corporate and
Securities Group, was elected partner in their Orlando office. His
practice includes general corporate representation, mergers and
acquisitions, securities, employment and intellectual property.
Amy K. Tuck was appointed director of the Florida Division of
Elections. [email protected]
Michael J. Wilson was elected a shareholder of Williams
Parker Harrison Dietz & Getzen. He is a member of the Tax and
Business Group and concentrates his practice in the area of
domestic and international taxation.
UF LAW
Class Notes
2000
Brandon Biederman has been recognized by the South
Florida Business Journal as a “2007 Up & Comer,” which
profiled outstanding young business leaders under the age of
40 in South Florida. [email protected]
Christopher R. D’Amico (LLMT) was recently elected a
shareholder in the law firm of Dean Mead.
Osvaldo L. Gratacos has joined the Motorola Law
Department as commercial counsel with worldwide federal
contracts responsibilities in Washington, D.C. He previously
held the position of acting legal counsel to the inspector
general of the U.S. Agency for International Development
in Washington, D.C. He also is an adjunct professor of
international business transactions and procurement at the
University of Virginia. [email protected]
Asnardo (Nardy) Garro has joined Avila Rodriguez
Hernandez Mena & Ferri in Coral Gables as a partner. He
will focus on corporate and financial services group, particularly in general corporate, lending and banking law. He represents startup companies, as well as established corporate
and financial services clients with a broad range of transactional and regulatory matters.
Jorene Soto was awarded the Joint Commendation Medal
by the United States Joint Forces Command. She graduated with distinction from the Georgetown University Law
Center where she received an LL.M. with certificates in
refugees and humanitarian emergencies and international
human rights. Her article on trafficking in persons will be
published in the upcoming edition of the Cardozo Journal
of Law and Gender. [email protected]
K. Taylor White was recently promoted to shareholder
of the Florida law firm Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler
Alhadeff & Sitterson.
2001
Brad Culpepper recently opened a personal injury law firm,
Culpepper Kurland, in Tampa Bay.
D’Amico 00
Matthew B. Lerner was the recipient of the inaugural
Renaissance Associate Award given by Nelson Mullins
Riley & Scarborough for outstanding achievement in
the areas of client service, training, pro bono, marketing,
recruiting and productivity. [email protected]
Maggie D. Mooney, an associate from the Bradenton office
of Lewis, Longman & Walker, has been accepted into the
2007-2008 Leadership Manatee class.
Valle 01
The Miami office of Richman Greer has named Blanca M.
Valle as an associate. She practices primarily in the areas
of complex and commercial litigation, business torts, family
law, bankruptcy and creditors’ rights, and construction litigation. [email protected] or [email protected]
2002
Elena Kaplan (LLMT) has been elected president of the
Young Lawyers Division of The State Bar of Georgia. She
is an associate with Parker Hudson Rainer & Dobbs in
Atlanta, practicing in the areas of employee benefits and
executive compensation.
Judge Frank Orlando
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Orlando with
granddaughter Emily
Children + Teaching = Juvenile Justice
A
fter looking for a way to combine his love for children and teaching with
a career in the legal field, Judge Frank Orlando (JD 63) found himself in
the field of juvenile justice, not only in Florida but around the world.
Having served as a Circuit Court judge for 21 years, Orlando is now
the director of the Center for the Study of Youth Policy at Nova Southeastern
University Law Center in Fort Lauderdale. Orlando’s work is funded by the
prestigious Annie E. Casey Foundation in Baltimore, Md. The foundation
specifically funds projects, organizations and individuals involved in issues
related to children and families.
In 1992 Orlando received the American Bar Association Livingston Hall
Justice Award, an award that recognizes lawyers who have contributed to the
field of juvenile justice. He refers to the Livingston Award as one of his most
prized honors in addition to the work he has done at Nova University.
In 2000 Orlando was appointed as a Senior Research Fellow at the
Dartington Social Research Unit in England, becoming the first American to
receive this honor. That same year he served as the director of the International
Juvenile Justice Network at Defense for Children International in Geneva,
Switzerland.
Even with all the awards and honors Orlando has received, he believes he
could not have been as successful without his law degree.
“Without my UF Law education I couldn’t have gone anywhere,” said
Orlando. Orlando credits his success to the many students and teachers he met
while in law school and says that without them, he would not have known how
to combine his love for children with a career in the legal field.
—Alison Dubin
WINTER 2008
47
David C. Scileppi, a corporate and securities attorney at
Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart, is a co-founder of Orbis, a
non-profit organization that represents a cross-section of
the South Florida business community and is committed to
offering a variety of opportunities for young professionals to
develop their personal and business relationships.
Hand 03
2003
Christopher J. Hand has been elected by the Jacksonville
Bar Association to the Young Lawyers Section Board of
Governors
Gordon 04
Hale E. Sheppard (LLMT) of Chamberlain, Hrdlicka, White,
Williams & Martin in Atlanta has published legal articles in
The Practical Tax Lawyer, Practical Tax Strategies and The
Monthly Digest of Tax Articles.
2004
Jason Gordon, an attorney with Arnstein & Lehr, recently
joined the board of directors of the Broward Homebound
Program, an organization that provides case management
and in-home services to elderly and disabled adults.
Townsend 04
Cheryl A. Priest recently married Aaron Ainsworth (B.S.
Finance, 2005). She also was named as one of Holland &
Knight’s 2007 Pro Bono All Stars. [email protected]
Cindy A. Townsend recently joined Bell & Roper in Orlando
as an associate. Townsend’s practice concentrates primarily on employment discrimination, civil rights litigation,
municipal liability, general tort litigation and appellate law.
[email protected]
2005
Robert A. Caplen, an associate in the Washington, D.C.,
office of Greenberg Traurig, recently published “Recent
Trends Underscoring International Trade Commission
Review of Initial Determinations and Federal Circuit Appeals
From Final Commission Determinations Under Section
337 of the Tariff Act of 1930” in the Fordham Intellectual
Property, Media & Entertainment Law Journal, “The ‘Fifth’
Freedom: Freedom From Impermissible Expansion of
Academic Freedom Principles to University Admissions” in
the Southwestern University Law Review, and “Rules of
Disengagement: Relating the Establishment of Palestinian
Gaza to Israel’s Right to Exercise Self-Defense as Interpreted
by the International Court of Justice at the Hague” in the
Florida Journal of International Law. His latest scholarship,
“When Batson Met Grutter: Exploring the Ramifications of
the Supreme Court’s Diversity Pronouncements Within the
Computerized Jury Selection Paradigm,” is forthcoming in the
University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law.
[email protected]
Dr. Thomas B.R. Christenson II (LLMT) has joined the
law department of The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance
Company as counsel on the corporate team. He previously
was a tax associate for Meissner Tierney Fischer & Nichols
in Milwaukee.
Judge William Terrell Hodges
Honored with Professionalism Award
48
KRISTEN HINES
J
udge William Terrell Hodges (JD 58), a federal district court judge
from Florida, has received the American Inns of Court’s 2007
Professionalism Award for the 11th Circuit.
Judge Hodges was nominated for this distinction by members
of the Ferguson-White American Inns of Court in Tampa, who cited his
“excellence, civility, professionalism and commitment to the highest legal
and ethical standards. Based on this knowledge and experience, we have
identified Judge Hodges as the person we know who best exemplifies the
greatest ideals of our profession. He inspires each of us to strive to be
the very best we can be professionally.”
After practicing law with Macfarlane, Ferguson, Allison & Kelly
in Tampa, Hodges was appointed a U.S. district court judge in the
Middle District of Florida at 37, becoming one of the youngest people
ever appointed to the federal bench. Not only did he serve as chief
judge of his district, he also chaired the Judicial Conference’s Advisory
Committee on Criminal Rules as well as the Executive Committee of the
Judicial Conference — one of only a few district court judges to ever
hold that position. Although Judge Hodges took senior status in 1999,
he took on chairing the demanding Judicial Panel on Multi-District
Litigation soon after.
Judge Hodges has received numerous state and national awards and
accolades for his service and professionalism. He also has been a leader
in establishing the American Inns of Court movement in Florida and
served as president of both the Ferguson-White Inn of Court in Tampa
and the Chester Bedell Inn in Jacksonville.
UF LAW
Class Notes
John G. White III
Another UF Law Grad Leads The Bar
A
“Right now we’re in the initial
stages of looking into a professionalism
program for new lawyers, which will
also help encourage diversity,” White
said.
White’s strong connection to UF has
not faded since getting both his law and
undergraduate degrees in Gainesville. He
chose to attend UF Law because it’s an
excellent school, he said.
“Choosing to go to UF Law was one
of the best decisions I’ve ever made,” he
said. “I really enjoyed my six-and-a-half
years in Gainesville and obtained a great
education there.”
One of the best things about having
gone to UF Law is the fact that he can
locate fellow UF colleagues anywhere he
wants to get help or legal information,
he said.
“I can pick up the phone and call
Jacksonville, Pensacola, Tampa, Miami
or Tallahassee and speak to an old friend
from my days at UF Law,” he said. “It’s
amazing that 10, 15 and 20 years later,
the relationships from law school are
still so strong.”
—Jason Silver
Suzannah Gilman has joined the Seminole County
Victims’ Rights Coalition, working as the sole attorney
for SafeHouse of Seminole. Gilman represents victims
of domestic violence in their hearings on injunctions for
protection against domestic violence and in other legal
issues that arise as a result of the domestic violence.
[email protected]
John M. Hemenway has co-founded Bivins & Hemenway
in Brandon-Valrico. The firm’s practice will emphasize
real estate, business law, lending work and estate planning/probate. [email protected]
2006
Daniel Glassman, a corporate attorney at Gunster, Yoakley
& Stewart in West Palm Beach and a member of its Tax
Practice Group, received the highest combined score on
The Florida Bar exam for the 4th District Court of Appeal.
[email protected]
Gary M. Lucas Jr. (LLMT) with Morris, Manning &
Martin has been chosen as a visiting professor of law at
the University of Florida and will take a leave of absence
from the firm to teach taxation courses. ­
WINTER 2008
KRISTEN HINES
s he begins his term as PresidentElect of The Florida Bar, John G.
White III (JD 83) follows in the
footsteps of 32 other Levin College
of Law grads in the association’s 58-year
history who have been Bar Presidents
and is UF Law’s first president-elect
since 1998. White will take over as Bar
president in June 2008.
“It has been way too long,” said
White, who is a shareholder in the firm
Richman Greer in West Palm Beach.
With the role of leading one of the
largest bar associations in the country,
White says he’s looking forward to the
challenge of continuing to improve ethics
and professionalism among the more than
80,000 lawyers in Florida.
“The Florida Bar spends more than
$12 million on lawyer discipline every year,”
White said. “We’re really trying to make it a
more efficient disciplinary process.”
White wants to focus on educating
attorneys when it comes to ethics,
professionalism and diversity. He said
The Florida Bar is exploring the possibility
of creating mentoring projects similar to
ones in other states.
Dr. Eleanor Sorresso was selected as a full-time associate medical director for Community Hospice of Northeast
Florida in Jacksonville.
Jeffrey T. Troiano (LLMT) recently joined Williams Parker
Harrison Dietz & Getzen in Sarasota and practices in the
areas of taxation, estate planning and administration and
trust administration. [email protected]
Christenson 05
2007
Keisha Hylton-Rodic has joined the biotech practice for
the firm Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox.
In Memoriam
Sorresso 06
Catherine Barclift (1L)
William R. Frazier (JD 48)
Rebecca Jakubcin (JD 00)
Henry G. Lester Jr. (JD 36)
Clint Malone (JD 00)
49
Recognition
Several publications across
the country honor peer
recognition and professional
achievements in the field of
law. Typically hundreds of
worthy UF Law alumni are
recognized in these publications for their accolades,
including the following who
informed UF LAW magazine
about their listings.
Super Lawyers:
Florida Trend:
Jack Aiello (JD 84)
David J. Akins (JD 84)
Richard M. Benrubi (JD 88)
Darryl M. Bloodworth (JD 71)
Stephen J. Bozarth (JD 68)
Dennis M. Campbell (JD 78)
Elias N. Chotas (JD 76)
Mercer K. Clarke (JD 70)
Linda Conahan (JD 71)
Lauren Y. Detzel (JD 77)
Charles H. Egerton (JD 69)
Wayne E. Flowers (JD 73)
David K. Friedland (JD 88)
Steven C. Lee (JD 79)
John Elliott Leighton (JD 85)
Fredric G. Levin (JD 61)
Stephen R. Looney (JD 85)
Leslie Lott (JD 74)
Robert W. Mead Jr. (JD 69)
Michael D. Minton (JD 82)
Michael T. Moore (JD 74)
Stuart R. Morris (JD 89)
David H. Peek (LLMT, JD 79)
Daniel D. Richardson (JD 73)
Spencer H. Silverglate (JD 88)
C. Michael Shalloway (JD 67)
Michael Simon, (JD 88)
Mark E. Stein (JD 89)
Larry S. Stewart (JD 74)
Steve Vogelsang (JD 87)
Stephen A.Walker (JD 74)
Dennis J. Wall (JD 77)
Richard M. Benrubi (JD 88)
Michael R. Cavendish (JD 98)
Robert Dellecker (JD 83)
Reuben A. Doupe (JD 02)
Nicole L. Goetz (JD 97)
John Elliott Leighton (JD 85)
Jon Mills (JD 72)
Michael D. Minton (LLMT, JD 82)
Ellen S. Morris (JD 78)
Cheryl A. Priest (JD 04)
David C. Scileppi (JD 02)
Anthony Sos (JD 03)
The Hon. O.H. Eaton Jr. (JD 68)
Roger Kennedy (JD 94)
Ira H. Leesfield (JD 71)
Fredric G. Levin (JD 61)
Halley B. Lewis III (JD 91)
Robert M. Montgomery (JD 57)
James Moody Jr. (JD 03)
C. Richard Newsome (JD 89)
Debra Pole (JD 75)
Donald Sasser (JD 67)
Paul Singerman (JD 83)
Larry S. Stewart (JD 74)
Ketan Vakil (JD 96)
Bill Wagner (JD 60)
Chamber’s USA
The Best Lawyers in America
Darryl M. Bloodworth (JD 71)
Stephen J. Bozarth (JD 68)
Paul W.A. Courtnell (JD 73)
Lauren Y. Detzel (JD 77)
Charles H. Egerton (JD 69)
Stephen R. Looney (LLMT, JD 85)
Michael D. Minton (LLMT, JD 81)
Lawdragon 500
Cesar Alvarez (JD 72)
Manuel J. Alvarez (JD 79)
Mark Alexandra Avera (JD 89)
Theodore Babbitt (JD 65)
J. Kyle Bachus (JD 92)
The Hon. Rosemary Barkett (JD 70)
Robert T. Cunningham (JD 75)
David D. Dickey (JD 92)
Darryl M. Bloodworth (JD 71)
Stephen J. Bozarth (JD 68) Jane Dunlap Callahan (LLMT, JD 88)
Linda A. Conahon (JD 77)
Lauren Y. Detzel (JD 77)
Charles H. Egerton (JD 69)
Lynn J. Hinson (JD 73)
Steven C. Lee (LLMT, JD 79)
Robert W. Mead Jr. (JD 69)
R. Mason Blake (JD 81)
Michael D. Minton (LLMT, JD 82)
Howard Coker
Honored by Peers for Distinguished Leadership
A
ttorney Howard Coker (JD 71) was
named “Trial Lawyer of the Year” by
the Florida Chapters of the American
Board of Trial Advocates (FLABOTA),
an honor that recognizes his distinguished
record of results for clients, public service,
work to promote legal professionalism and
commitment to trial advocacy.
Coker, a senior partner in Coker,
Schickel, Sorenson & Daniel, helped organize
the Jacksonville chapter of ABOTA and
served as its president in 1988. By 1997
he was president of FLABOTA and is now
a Diplomate of ABOTA and a Fellow of the
ABOTA Foundation.
“Howard Coker epitomizes those
whom FLABOTA seeks to honor with the
Trial Lawyer of the Year Award. He has
successfully tried more than 200 cases to
50
jury verdict and has unselfishly shared his
leadership skills through his public service
to the legal profession and his community,”
said Tampa attorney Martin Garcia, a past
president of FLABOTA, when presenting
Coker with the award.
Coker also is past president of The
Florida Bar, the Florida Justice Association,
FLABOTA and the Florida Supreme Court
Historical Society. In 2006, Coker received
the Perry Nichols Award presented by the
Florida Justice Association Lawyers in
recognition of a lifetime of outstanding and
distinguished service in the pursuit of justice.
“I look back on my career with
amazement and gratitude,” said Coker.
“I am and always have been proud to be
an attorney and to be able to help people
whose lives have been severely impacted by
the actions of others — to help protect and
defend their rights under the law. It is a great
honor to be recognized for my work in this
way by an organization that includes some of
the finest lawyers in our country today.”
UF LAW
CH A N G I N G
LIVES
Y our gifts launch waves of transformation
UF LAW ANNUAL REPORT 2006 - 2007 • Uf Law Center Association, Inc.
F
W.C. Gentry
or the past two years, it has been my distinct honor to serve as chairman of the Law Center
Association and, more importantly, serve our law school and the exceptional students at UF
Law.
It has been an eventful time as the law school facilities were upgraded and expanded, two
U.S. Supreme Court justices visited our campus and funding was provided for a much needed
trial advocacy center. Our student teams have won numerous state and regional honors and, of
course, on my watch the Gators won three national championships. Coincidence? Seriously,
what a great time to be a Gator - particularly a Gator lawyer.
I have especially enjoyed working with the dedicated alumni who comprise the Board of
Trustees and other law alumni groups. We have helped plan for the college’s future and expanded
alumni services and involvement. These efforts have paid huge dividends and will have a lasting
influence on advancing the college.
There is just one area in which I think we can and must do better. As I’ve spoken with
alumni, I’ve come to realize that many of them have given to various projects, but are not
involved in the Annual Fund. Dean Jerry calls the Annual Fund donations the school’s “margin of
excellence.” I’ve seen firsthand how true that is. These gifts are used as discretionary resources
to send students to conferences and competitions, fund law journals and publications, provide
scholarships and financial aid, support student organizations and provide the unique enrichment
that our students and faculty need to make Florida Law an exceptional experience. I urge every
alumnus to give back to the school through the Annual Fund. By doing so, you not only express
your gratitude for the opportunities provided by your law education, but intensify the college’s
momentum toward distinction. We CAN reach our vision of becoming the number one public
law school in America, but it will only happen if each of us makes a yearly commitment. Get
involved and support your school. There’s a lot going on and you’ll enjoy being part of it.
It’s great to be a UF Law graduate and it’s great to be a Gator.
Go Gators!
W.C. Gentry (JD 71)
Chair, UF Law Center Association
A Higher Level
The University of Florida Law School has consistently provided
the highest quality legal education to generations of students. The
contributions of our loyal alumni to the Annual Fund ensure that we
remain one of the premier public institutions for legal excellence in
the United States.
My thanks go out to all of you who have made gifts, pledges,
and contributions of time and effort to our law school. A hallmark
of any elite law school is significant alumni participation in annual
giving and fundraising efforts. Your gifts to the law school have
helped provide valuable support for students and faculty, and
enhanced the academic programs available at the college. Your
contributions have enabled us to reward more students with much
deserved financial aid, and sponsor events and programs that help
make the law school a great place to work and study. With the
opening of our new building and expansion of our library, we are now
laying the foundation for the next era of excellence at Florida.
A special thanks to a remarkable group of dedicated people—the
Alumni Council members and class representatives who volunteer
each year to help with annual giving. Also, to the graduating classes
52
who demonstrate their commitment to the
future of our school through their significant
class gifts. Combined, their efforts in
contacting classmates and colleagues
on behalf of the law school make all the
difference. Although we can improve our
participation rate, Florida has some of
the most committed and faithful alumni
and students in the country. I believe this
display of loyalty and affection shows that
our “law school family” is our institution’s greatest strength.
Your continued support will allow our law school to compete on
an even higher level—a level we must reach to maintain our rightful
place at the forefront of legal education. Your generosity will make a
difference for the future of our law school and generations of students,
proving that now and always, “it’s great to be a Florida Gator!”
Mark Klingensmith (JD 85)
President, UF Law Alumni Council
UF LAW
Alumni Receptions
A
lumni receptions and other
events around the nation are
made possible by annual fund contributions from firms and individuals
who understand the long-term value
of close ties to the law school, alumni
and legal profession.
“Beat the Bulldogs”
UF Law Alumni Reception
October 25, 2006
FIRM SPONSORS
Volpe, Bajalia, Wickes,
Rogerson & Wachs
Holland & Knight
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Charlie Commander
John A. Devault, III
W.C. Gentry
Charles P. Pillans, III
Matthew Posgay
Evan J. Yegelwel
Dean’s Holiday Reception
December 14, 2006
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Janet Ailstock & David Hudson
Rick & Aase Thompson
Lynn M. Schackow
WINTER 2008
Florida Bar Annual Mid-Year Meeting
UF Law Alumni Reception
January 18, 2007
FIRM SPONSORS
Feldman Gale
Hughes Hubbard & Reed, LLP
Levin, Papantonio, Thomas, Mitchell,
Echsner & Proctor
Wites & Kapetan
Lott & Friedland
Akerman Senterfitt
Greenberg Traurig
Ruden McClosky
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Scott E. Atwood
Carlos Concepcion
Dexter Douglass
Bruce M. Harris
Stumpy Harris
Mark W. Klingensmith &
Wendy H. Werb
Robert M. Montgomery, Jr.
Oscar A. Sanchez
W. Kelly Smith
Evan J. Yegelwel
Gwynne A. Young
Florida Bar Annual Meeting
UF Law Alumni Reception
June 28, 2007
FIRM SPONSORS
Akerman Senterfitt
Bedell, Dittmar, DeVault,
Pillans & Coxe
Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth,
Capouano & Bozarth
Jones, Foster, Johnston, & Stubbs
Levin, Papantonio, Thomas, Mitchell,
Echsner & Proctor
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
DuBose Ausley
C. Bruce H. Bokor
Tom Cardwell
Bruce Culpepper
Dexter Douglass
Bruce Harris
Stumpy Harris
Les Joughin
Margaret Mathews
Joseph Mellichamp
Bruce Platt
F. Wallace Pope
Gary Lee Printy
Charles Rand
Oscar A. Sanchez
Ernest A. Sellers
Larry & Cathy Sellers
W. Kelly Smith
William Weber
Evan J. Yegelwel
53
financial
2006-2007 Fiscal Year (July 1, 2006-June 30, 2007)
Donor Pie Chart
$ Total % of total
Law Alumni
1700 $1,517,474.53
Alumnus, UF
17
$67,233.00
Friend
44
$977,116.15
Parent
9
$212,813.61
UF Faculty & Staff
11
$50,380.00
Community/Charitable Fund 10
$136,358.71
Corporation
65
$291,947.00
Family Foundation
15
$798,499.40
Foundation
2
$114,490.84
Other Organization
17
$57,699.76
1890 $4,224,013.00
Donors
35.92%
1.59%
23.13%
5.04%
1.19%
3.23%
6.91%
18.90%
2.71%
1.37%
Donor Types: The majority of Community/Charitable Fund, Corporation and Family
Foundations from which we receive gifts are law alumni owned or directed.
Total Cash Received:
Donors & Gifts
2006-2007: Represents all gifts
to the Levin College of Law. State
match money has been excluded.
54
Fiscal Year
Amount
2003
$2,208,023
2004
$1,929,432
2005 $3,791,324
2006 $5,741,724
2007
$4,224,013
UF LAW
Annual Fund Participation:
Annual Fund Contributions
Fiscal Year
Donors
Participation
2003
1357
7.95%
2004
1571
9.20%
2005
1595
9.34%
2006
1623
9.51%
2007 1439 8.21%
Contributions received to non-endowed, non-building funds
Endowment Income
Total Participation
Total Giving Participation (all donor types)
Total Alumni Giving Participation
Annual Fund Participation
WINTER 2008
11%
10%
8.21%
Gifts to the law school’s endowment are
not spent, but instead are carefully invested
to yield a dependable, stable source of income
in perpetuity. Approximately 4 percent of
earned interest from the market value of the
endowment fund balance was transferred and
spent for specific uses designated by donors and
by college administrators for annual operating
and administrative costs. (The additional earned
interest above the 4 percent is returned to the
fund balance.) The fund grew just over 21% in
2006-07 under the stewardship of the University
of Florida Foundation Investment Company
(UFICO), which oversees investments and law
school endowment income.
Fund Balance
Interest
Transferred
1998-1999 $43,410,446 $1,197,483
1999-2000 $57,931,929 $2,129,167
2000-2001 $58,442,477 $2,907,585
2001-2002 $59,837,880 $2,971,718
2002-2003 $46,903,630 $2,287,087
2003-2004 $52,975,580 $1,582,204
2004-2005 $59,588,895 $1,634,109
2005-2006 $67,250,539 $2,004,200
2006-2007 $81,594,986 $2,512,741
55
endowed fund
The Endowed Fund provides a permanent foundation for the college and is indispensable
in supporting important programs and activities. Donors give to this fund for many reasons:
to provide scholarships, honor distinguished careers, memorialize loved ones, serve as an
estate-planning tool, or to simply thank and support the college. The benefits from those gifts
are immeasurable and allow the college to weather state cuts and plan for the future. The
donors recognized on these and the following pages gave in the 2006-2007 fiscal year.
Chairs & Professorships
Dennis A. Calfee Eminent Scholar
Chair in Federal Taxation
Matthew J. Ahearn
David S. & Myrna L. Band
S. C. Battaglia Family Foundation, Inc.
W. Michael Black
R. Mason & Amelia S. Blake
Darryl M. Bloodworth
Bovay, Cook & Ossi
Boyer, Dolasinski & Miller, P.C.
William A. & Laura M. Boyles
Stephen J. & Sharon J. Bozarth
Jane D. Callahan
Thomas H. Carter, Jr.
Marc D. & Tracy D. Chapman
Richard G. Cherry
Gary J. Cohen
Alan B. & Lauren K. Cohn
Christopher R. D’Amico
Alan H. Daniels
Lauren Y. Detzel
Charles H. & Karen A. Egerton
David H. & Kathryn E. Evaul
Paul D. Fitzpatrick
Alan S. & Marcia Gassman
Ellen B. Gelberg
John N. & Ruth T. Giordano
Robert E. Glennon, Jr.
Cheryl L. & Scott E. Gordon
Bradley R. & Vanessa R. Gould
K. Lawrence & Maureen G. Gragg
James A. Hauser
Michael S. Hawley &
Katherine P. Pierce
Lynn J. & Evelyn R. Hinson
John A. & Linda M. Hirschy
Peter T. & Karla D. Kirkwood
Steven C. Lee
William V. & Shirley F. Linne
Stephen R. & Paige B. Looney
Louis & Bessie Stein Foundation
Peter M. MacNamara &
M. Therese Vento
Michael D. & Mary P. Minton
Robert E. & Jeanne Panoff
Lindy L. Paull
David H. Peek
Please report any corrections to
Sara Grimm at [email protected]
or call 352-273-0640.
56
Pamela O. & Chad T. Price
Purcell, Flanagan & Hay
Richard M. & Gail M. Robinson
Richard A. & Kimberly F. Rodgers
Sarah E. Rumpf
Randolph J. & Sue N. Rush
John J. & Lynn G. Scroggin
Hans G. & Deborah M. H. Tanzler
John K. & Marie L. Vreeland
David P. & Debbie M. Webb
Williams, Parker, Harrison, et al.
Patricia A. & Charles H. Willing, Jr.
James J. Freeland Eminent Scholar
Chair in Federal Taxation
Philip B. & Barbara L. Barr
Harry S. Colburn, Jr.
John J. & Lynn M. Collins
Nathaniel L. & Debra L. Doliner
Bradley C. & Candace Grossenburg
Marsha P. & Richard R. Wikfors
John H. and Mary Lou Dasburg
Professorship
John H. & Mary Lou D. Dasburg
Richard B. Stephens Eminent Scholar
Chair in Federal Taxation
Jean C. Coker
Harry S. Colburn, Jr.
Lester B. & Stacey L. Law
Barbara P. Winn
Richard E. Nelson Chair in
Local Government
Jane B. Nelson
Scholarships
A. H. Burnett Law Scholarship
A. H. Burnett Foundation
Benjamin H. Ayres Scholarship
Marion County Bar Association
Coker, Myers, Schickel, Cooper
and Sorensen, PA Trial Team
Scholarship
Scott E. & Vanessa S. Ray
Anna C. Shea
Dan Galfond Memorial Scholarship
Cynthia A. Alcantara
Kelly E. Anderson
Lauren A. Bond
Michael Colombo
Marana C. De Varona
Madeline Bonnie Diaz
Adrienne J. & Randall C. Figur
Meredith A. Frank
Myra Friedman
Julio & Sandra Galfond
Natasha R. & Andrew S. Greer
James F. Harrington
Laura G. Herzog
Adam M. Hirsh
Lucy M. Jacobus
Jason P. Kliewer
Charlene A. Koonin
Daniel R. Koonin
Russell Koonin
Lara Osofsky & Michael D. Leader
Sari J. Friedman Lee
Stacie M. & Samuel R. Linsky
Rachel A. & Robert A. Lunsford
Peggy A. McGovern
Sean T. McGuire
Jason S. & Victoria O. Miller
Herman Osofsky
Andrew M. Shamp
Rachel B. Sherman
Marc S. & Lillian M. Shuster
Siegfried, Rivera, Lerner, et al.
Matthew P. Slingbaum
Laurie E. Stern
Terra International Realty
Robert G. Whittel
Jean A. Whyte
Dewey and Lynn Burnsed Scholarship
R. Dewey & Lynn E. Burnsed
Mark A. Rentenbach Scholarship
Paul R. Rentenbach
Law School Faculty Scholarship
Arthur E. & Shirley D. Chalker
Rodney L. & Elizabeth B. Tennyson
Lewis “Lukie” Ansbacher Memorial
Scholarship
Barry B. & Elaine K. Ansbacher
Sybil B. Ansbacher
Sidney J. Gefen
Ronnie H. Walker Scholarship
Adria M. & Matthew S. Jensen
W. Paul and Erin C. Shelley
Scholarship
William L. Moor
Christopher L. & Susan S. Thompson
Gayle V. Watts
Other Endowed Gifts
Allen L. Poucher Legal Education
Series
Allen L. Poucher, Jr. & Diane Larson
Betty K. Poucher
Stephen H. & Elizabeth P. Reynolds
Allen Norton & Blue Endowed
Book Award in Employment
Discrimination
Allen, Norton & Blue
Brian M. O’Connell Estates and Trusts
Book Award Endowment
Brian M. & Joan B. O’Connell
Center for Race and Race Relations
Lecture Series
Bernardo Lopez & Janice L. Bergmann
Charles and Linda Wells Judicial
Process Teaching and Research
Charles T. & Linda F. Wells
Edward Downey Academic Endowment
for Trusts, Estates and Fiduciary
Representation
Edward & Julia Downey
Florida Constitutional Law Book Award
Endowment in Honor of
Bill McBride
Robert S. Bolt
Adelaide A. Sink
Gene K. Glasser and
Elaine Glasser Fund
Gene K. & Elaine R. Glasser
Sandra & Leon G. Gulden Private
Foundation
Russell H. & Karen H. Kasper
Samuel & Rose Riemer Private
Foundation
William E. Rosenberg Foundation
United Jewish Community of
Broward County
Gerald T. Bennett Prosecutor/Public
Defender Training Program
Florida Association of Criminal Defense
Lawyers
Law Review Endowment
Jeffrey W. & Amanda M. Abraham
David M. Hudson &
J. Parker Ailstock
J. Carter & Dana D. Andersen
Robert R. Pedlow & Mary Jane Angelo
Alan I. & Jacquelyn M. Armour
UF LAW
CH A N G I N G L I V E S
“Assuming a leadership role in the Journal of Technology
Law and Policy provided me the skills to manage every
aspect of the practice of law.”
F. Eugene Atwood & Dabney D. Ware
Daniel & Lynne F. Bachrach
G. Thomas & Sharon Y. Ball
Todd A. & Michelle M. Bancroft
Jennifer M. Barrett
Scott R. & Dana Bauries
Sara S. & Joshua L. Becker
Angela F. & David L. Benjamin
David L. Bilsker
R. Mason & Amelia S. Blake
H. S. Udaykumar & Christina Bohannan
Richard K. & Janice K. Bowers
David S. & Christine Boyce
Jordan G. Lee & Amy E. Bradd
Matthew C. & Catherine D. Brewer
Jeffrey P. & Jan M. Brock
Joshua R. & Monica R. Brown
Les W. & Verna W. Burke
David H. & Mary B. Burns
Dennis A. & Peggy M. Calfee
Doyle R. Campbell
L. Kinder & Barbara S. Cannon
Robert A. Caplen
Angel Castillo Jr. & Stormie G. Stafford
Timothy M. & Jayne Cerio
Jon C. Chassen
Reed R. Clary IV
Ryan S. Cobbs
Kendall Coffey, Esq. &
Joni Armstrong Coffey, Esq.
R. John & Mary M. Cole
Comcast
Alphonse G. & Julaine W. Condon
John T. & Kim Conner
Nathan L. Coppernoll
Sarah Cortvriend
Evans & Sara T. Crary
Jerry B. Crockett
Marion M. Cromwell
Raul A. & Mary L. Cuervo
Deborah E. Cupples
Duane A. & Teresa K. Daiker
Stephen E. & Barbara C. Dalton
C. LeAnn Davis
Kimberly A. Davis
John T. & Jamie L. Dekle
Lauren Y. Detzel
Benjamin F. Diamond
Juan M. Diaz
Diane L. Dick
Russell W. & Janice M. Divine
Charles T. Douglas, Jr.
Dunwody, White & Landon
Donald A. & Gene S. Dvornik
WINTER 2008
Ronald S. Stutz & Linda Ebin
Megan J. & James E. Ellis II
Kenneth C. & Mary B. Ellis
Theodore A. Erck III
Robert T. & Jodi Ervin
Kerry I. & Elizabeth K. Evander
Peter T. & Claudia P. Fay
Frank H. & Levan N. Fee
Leonard V. Feigel
Tim D. Henkel & Dyanne E. Feinberg
Joel R. Feldman
Brian J. & Stacy B. Fender
Leslie E. Stiers & Melissa Fernandez
Ray F. & Raquel Ferrero
Meredith C. Fields
S. Katherine Frazier
Michael K. Freedman
James E. & Allison A. Frye
Betsy J. Gallagher
Jon T. Gatto
W. C. Gentry Family Foundation
W. C. & Susan Gentry
Patrick E. & Barbara H. Geraghty
Alan M. Gerlach, Jr.
Robert C. Gibbons
John M. Gillies
Mandell & Joyce K. Glicksberg
Jonathan C. & Mary S. Gordon
Jonathan S. Gowdy
Lauren K. Gralnik
E. John & Yali C. Gregory
Robert S. & Nannette M. Griscti
Whitney C. & Gregory C. Harper
Christy F. & Martha C. Harris
Charles V. & Alexandra K. Hedrick
Richard H. & Jane G. Hiers
William T. & Peggy J. Hodges
James C. & Suzanne N. Hoover
Mark L. & Susan J. Horwitz
Edward M. & Mary Jackson
Michael L. & Elizabeth P. Jamieson
Robert H. & Lisa N. Jerry
Robert M. & Patricia A. Johnson
John A. & Margarette L. Jones
Hal H. Kantor
Bruce E. & Patricia A. Kasold
Micah G. & Patti J. Keating
Megan A. Kelly
Kimberly R. Keravouri
Carolyn M. & Jesse B. Kershner
E. C. “Deeno” & Patricia G. Kitchen
Kimberly M. Kleiss &
Kenneth S. Piernik
Robert D. & Elenore C. Klingler
G. Matthew Brockway
3L
Palm City
Editor-in-Chief,
Journal of Technology
Law and Policy
57
ENDOWMENT FUND
David T. & Carla C. Knight
Brian H. Koch
Ryan M. Kroll
Philip R. & Kathryn K. Lammens
Robert L. & Jennifer Lancaster
Steve & Penny Langston
Joseph L. & Erin M. Larrinaga
Marisol G. & E. A. Lauerman III
Steven D. & Pamela S. Lear
Robert W. Lee
Matthew B. & Marjorie C. Lerner
Julie M. Levitt
Robert E. & Kathryn E. Lewis
Rutledge R. & Noel D. Liles
Stacie M. & Samuel R. Linsky
Donna C. Litman
David L. & Alyson J. Luikart
Maegen Peek Luka
Clint S. & Jennifer S. Malone
Kari D. & John Marsland-Pettit
Lorie A. Mason
Maureen Monaghan &
Gerald G. Matheson
William D. & Diane Matthewman
James M. & Stacy A. Matulis
William H. McBride, Jr. &
Adelaide A. Sink
Jeffrey M. McFarland
Brian M. & Britton E. McPherson
Tiffani F. & Ryan G. Miller
Lew I. & Jennifer I. Minsky
Michael G. & Jennifer R. Moore
John H. & Joan K. Moore
George R. & Heather T. Moraitis
M. Scotland & Margaret K. Morris
Julie A. Moxley
Greg T. & Joy Sabino Mullane
Edward M. & Rima Y. Mullins
Keith E. Myers
James M. & Judith P. Nixon
Shelly E. Nixon
Megan A. Odroniec
Orlando P. Ojeda, Jr.
Toby V. Olvera
Lindsay M. Patrick
Matthew D. & Amber N. Patterson
Graham C. & Lara Hardy Penn
C. Rufus & Brooks Harby Pennington
Robert J. & Julie W. Pile
Charles P. & Judith H. Pillans
Michael A. & June Turner Piscitelli
Scott D. & Ingrid H. Ponce
James G. & Kathryn S. Pressly
Paul S. Quinn, Jr.
Denise A. & L. M. Reeder, Jr.
Laura M. & William P. Reich
Harley E. & Posey C. Riedel
James N. & LaTeshia R. Robinson
Mark E. & Lara B. Robinson
Richard P. Rollo
Edgardo Romero & Monica Vila
Louis K. & Denise D. Rosenbloum
Matthew L. & Nancy K. Rosin
Thomas K. Ruppert
Randolph J. & Sue N. Rush
James D. & Debbie S. Ruskin
Lanny & Denise M. Russell
Christopher M. & Sharon C. Sacco
Jeremy C. Sahn
Albert A. & Carolyn E. Sanchez
Rosalie M. Sanderson
Michael A. Sayre
Daniel L. & Diane L. Schaps
Katie Schuller
David C. & Caryn W. Scileppi
John H. & Julie H. Seibert
Stephen W. & Diana J. Sessums
Janice Burton & Richard A. Sharpstein
Linda L. & Lewis E. Shelley
Christian D. & K. Shawn Shields
Andrew D. & Erica S. Shultz Zaron
Rebecca Shwayri
Paula M. Sicard
John H. & Julie H. Siebert
Kenneth M. Sigelman
Michael D. & Diane Simon
Smith, Hood, Perkins, et al.
David T. & Sandra G. Smith
Douglas A. Smith
L. Ralph Smith, Jr.
Rodney W. Smith
Book Awards
W. Kelly & Ruth S. Smith
Stacy F. & Joel S. Speiller
Andrew P. Speranzini
Brian J. & Elizabeth Thompson Stack
Stewart, Tilghman, Fox & Bianchi
Edward T. & Virginia Stockbridge
Sidney A. & Annette Stubbs
Timon V. Sullivan
Hans G. & Deborah M. H. Tanzler
Grace W. Taylor
Jeffrey M. & Lisa S. Taylor
Tescher, Gutter, Chaves, et al.
Donald R. Tescher
Gregg D. Thomas
Jeffrey A. & Tanya M. Tochner
Sara A. & Don Tolliver
Seth P. & Shawna N. Traub
David R. Tyrrell
Justin B. Uhlemann
William R. Vincent
Vogel Law Office
Timothy W. & Roslyn B. Volpe
Bill & Ruth W. Wagner
Janelle A. Weber
Daniel R. & Tina G. Weede
John M. & Lane T. Welch
Winifred L. Wentworth
Scott L. & Lynda J. Whitaker
Robert G. Whittel
Wilbert’s
Jake R. Williams
Winton E. Williams
William M. Wilson, Jr.
Allen C. & Alicia Winsor
George M. Wright
Leighton D. & Phyllis H. Yates
Richard M. & Elizabeth B. Zabak
William A. & Betty A. Zeiher
Diane J. & Robert R. Zelmer
Peter W. & Joan Wagner Zinober
Richard H. Simons Charitable Trust
Faculty Professional Development Fund
Richard H. Simons Charitable Trust
Robert M. & Judith S.R. Kramer
Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff
& Sitterson, PA Student Professional
Development Fund
Mark P. & Beverly J. Dikeman
Brian J. & Georgia McDonough
John M. & Jennifer G. Rawicz
David M. & Rachel K. Seifer
K. Taylor White
Upchurch, Watson & White Dispute
Resolution Fund
Upchurch Watson White & Max Mediation
Group
Wolf Family American Property Law
Lecture Endowment
Michael A. & Betty M. Wolf
Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe, PA
Fall Moot Court Competition
Richard J. & Jennifer L. Mockler III
Charles B. Ricca, Jr.
Janice M. & Dale J. Rickert
Endowments may be established
with a minimum of $30,000.
For more information on creating
an endowed fund, contact Kelley
Frohlich at (352) 273-0640 or
[email protected]
*1909 Society Member
(see page 63 for description)
Marshall M. Criser Distinguished
Lecture Series
The Lewis Schott Foundation
Lewis M. Schott &
Marcia Whitney Schott (D)
B
ook Awards honor academic achievement by recognizing the top student in each course, while
providing essential unrestricted Annual Fund support for UF Law students, student organizations,
faculty and programs. Awards are sponsored for five years with $2,000 annually, or endowed in
perpetuity with $50,000. For more information, please contact: Development & Alumni Affairs,
Levin College of Law, (352) 273-0640.
Administrative Law
• Timothy M. & Lorena J. Cerio
Advanced Bankruptcy
• Stichter, Riedel, Blain & Prosser, PA
Advanced Litigation
• Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor &
Reed, PA
Agricultural Law & Policy
• Ernest A. Sellers
Appellate Advocacy
• Hicks & Kneale, PA
• Gary Lee Printy, Esq.
• Bruce Rogow/Rogow Greenberg
Foundation
• George A. Vaka
Business Organizations
• William A. Weber
Child, Parent & State
• The Hon. Fred Hazouri &
The Hon. Barbara Pariente
Civil Procedure
• Fox, Wackeen, Dungey, Sweet, Beard,
Sobel & McCluskey, LLP
• Gwynne A. Young
• W.C. Gentry, Esq.
Civil Tax Procedure
• R. Lawrence Heinkel, Esq.
Conservation Clinic
• Alton & Kathleen Lightsey
Constitutional Law
• Patrick E. Geraghty, PA
• Kenneth R. Johnson &
Kimberly Leach Johnson
• Oscar A. Sanchez, Esq.
Contracts
• Bilzin Sumberg Baena Price &
Axelrod LLP
• Foley & Lardner
• Richard C. Grant (Class of 1972)
In Honor of Professor Ernest Jones
Corporations
• Marshall M. Criser, Esq.
& Glenn L. Criser, Esq.
• Rahul Patel, Esq.
• Mayanne Downs, Esq.
• W. Crit Smith
Creditors’ Remedies & Bankruptcy
• Jeffrey W. Warren, Esq.
Criminal Clinic – Public Defender Clinic
• The Hon. W. Fred Turner Memorial
(Endowed)
Book Awards continued next page...
58
UF LAW
bequests
Bequests, Annuities &
Trusts
David M. Hudson & J. Parker Ailstock
Anonymous
Michael A. Bedke
John C. & Tifi Bierley
Susan H. Black
James D. Camp, Jr.
Warren M. & Dorothy C. Cason
James F. Conner II
Debra A. Doherty
Howard L. & Marie G. Garrett
Harold A. Gokey
Ransom Griffin
Robert E. & Gene S. Gunn
Stumpy & Dorothy L. Harris*
Mark Hulsey
PLANNED GIVING is critical to the future success of the law school. By making a commitment through
estate planning and documenting it with UF, we are able to celebrate and recognize these important donors
during their lifetime. Most planned gifts benefit the law school endowed funds.
Jeffery Q. Jonasen
T. Paine & Jean B. Kelly
David T. & Carla C. Knight
Frederick W. & Victoria C. Leonhardt
Harlan E. Markham
Michael J. McNerney
Mark W. Merrill
Gene Moore III in honor of Leo Wotitzky
John H. & Joan K. Moore
Corneal B. Myers, Jr.
Brian M. & Joan B. O’Connell
Benjamin F. & Marilyn (D) Overton
Robert P. Rosin
J. Quinton Rumph
David C. & Ronna G. Sasser*
Ronald Y. & Leslie E. Schram
T. Terrell & Neva S. Sessums
Eric B. Smith
W. Reece Smith, Jr.
Betty H. Stern
Robert G. Stern
James S. & Sharon Theriac
Donald Q. & Beverley Vining
A. Ward & Ruth S. Wagner
Sandra L. Warren
Frank Wotitzky
Art & Mary E. Wroble
Stephen N. Zack
Legacy Society
Donors who have named the college as
beneficiary of an insurance policy
Timothy C. Blake
Robert Eugene Glennon
James R. Holmes
Betty S. LaFace
Robert W. Morrison
Edward C. Rood
Roger Dean Schwenke
Robert Gary Stern
William K. Zewadski
BOOK AWARDS
Criminal Law
• Anthony S. Battaglia, Esq.
• R. Timothy Jansen, Esq.
• Harris, Guidi, Rosner, Dunlap &
Rudolph, PA
Criminal Procedure – Adversary System
• Phillip J. Mays, Esq., In Honor of
Professor Kenneth B. Nunn
Criminal Procedure – Police &
Police Practices
• Linnes Finney Jr., Esq.
Deferred Compensation
• Andrew J. Fawbush, Esq.
Eminent Domain & Takings
• Bruce M. Harris, Esq. &
Stumpy Harris, Esq.
Employment Discrimination
• Allen, Norton & Blue, PA (Endowed)
Environmental Law
• Professor Mandell Glicksberg Award
Established By Robert A. Mandell
Estate Planning
• C. Randolph & Cheryl R. Coleman
• Edward F. Koren, Esq. (Endowed)
Estates & Trusts
• Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs, Pa
• Brian M. O’Connell (Endowed)
Evidence
• Clarke, Silverglate, Campbell,
Williams & Montgomery, PA
• Class of 1955 (Reunion Class Gift)
• GrayRobinson, PA (Endowed)
• Wm.Terrell Hodges
Family Law
• Roberta F. Fox in Memory
of Irmgard Charlotte Fox
WINTER 2008
Federal Courts
• F. Wallace Pope Jr., Esq.
First Amendment Law
• Becky Powhatan Kelley
Florida Administrative Law
• Lawrence E. & Cathy M. Sellers
Florida Constitutional Law
• Alex Sink & Bob Bolt (JD 71) In Honor
of Bill McBride (JD 75) (Endowed)
Income Taxation
• Brett Hendee, PA
Income Taxation of Estates & Trusts
• Emmanuel, Sheppard & Condon, PA
Insurance
• Merlin Law Group, PA
Intellectual Property
• Lott & Friedland, PA
Intellectual Property Litigation
• Feldman Gale, PA
International Business Transactions
• John C. & Tifi Bierley (Endowed)
International Law
• Marjorie & Bryan Thomas
International Litigation & Arbitration
• Michael J. McNerney, Esq.
Jurisprudence
• Bill Hoppe, Esq.
Land Finance
• Rick and Aase Thompson
Land Use Planning & Control
• Casey Ciklin Lubitz Martens & O’Connell
• Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster Kantor
& Reed, PA
Law & Psychiatry
• Lawrence Keefe
Legal History
• Bruce and Brad Culpepper
Legal Research & Writing
• Constance K. & Grover C. Freeman (D)
Mediation
• James F. Page Jr., PA/Page Mediation
Media Law
• Thomas & LoCicero PL
Medical Technology and The Law
• James E. Thomison
Negotiation, Mediation & Other Dispute
Resolution Processes
• Johnson, Auvil, Brock & Wilson, PA
Partnership Taxation
• Peter J. Genz, Esq.
• Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor
& Reed, PA
Procedures in Tax Fraud Cases
• A. Brian Phillips
Professional Responsibility
& the Legal Profession
• Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth,
Capouano & Bozarth, PA In Memory
of Andy Fredricks (Endowed)
• Doug & Jack Milne
• Hill, Ward & Henderson, PA
• K. Judith Lane
Property
• Professor Emeritus Mandell Glicksberg,
Established by Andrew C. Hall, Esq. &
James A. Hauser, Esq. (Endowed)
•David C. Sasser
•Jeffrey Brock
Remedies
• Fassett, Anthony & Taylor, PA
Securities Regulation
• Daniel Aronson
Sports Law
• Frances Greer Israel,
Established by William C. Israel
State and Local Taxation
• Ausley & McMullen, PA
Taxation of Gratuitous Transfers
• Richard H. Simons Charitable Trust
Tax Policy
• Tax Analysts, Inc.
Torts
• R. Vinson Barrett, Esq.
• Paul Linder, Esq.
• Charles M. Rand, Esq.
Trial Practice
• Barry L. Davis/Thornton,
Davis & Fein, PA
• Bill Bone, Esq.
• Bush Ross, PA
• Milton, Leach, Whitman, D’Andrea,
Charek & Milton, PA
• Monte J. Tillis Jr. Memorial (Endowed)
• Scott D. Sheftall
• Vaka, Larson & Johnson, PL
• Volpe, Bajalia, Wickes, Rogerson
& Wachs
U.S. International Tax I
• Richard A. Jacobson, PA
White Collar Crime
• In Honor of Charles P. Pillans, Iii (Endowed)
Workers’ Compensation
& Other Employment Rights
• Rosenthal & Weissman, PA
59
distinguished donors
distinguished donors are individuals, businesses and organizations
contributing at the following levels: Founders Society, Dean’s Council,
1909 Society, Trusler Society and Enrichment Society.
Founders Society
Members receive permanent
recognition in the annual report.
Founders Society - Gold
Gold: Annual Gifts and five-year
pledges of $100,000 and up.
Charles W. & Betty Jo E. Abbott*
Attorneys’ Title Insurance Fund, Inc.
John Bargas
The Robert S. & Mildred M. Baynard
Trust
BellSouth Corp.
John C. & Tifi Bierley*
E. G. Boone
Mary B. Bryant
R. Dewey & Lynn E. Burnsed
James D. Camp, Jr.
Walter G. Campbell, Jr.
Carlton Fields
Warren M. & Dorothy C. Cason
Luther W. Coggin, Jr.
Coker, Schickel, Sorenson &
Daniel
Howard C. Coker
Marshall M. & Paula P. Criser
Irving & Hazel A. Cypen
John H. & Mary Lou D. Dasburg
Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, et al.
Jack C. Demetree
Edward & Julia Downey
The Dunspaugh-Dalton Foundation, Inc.
Jessie Ball duPont Fund
Ray F. & Raquel Ferrero
The Florida Bar
Florida Bar Foundation
W. C. Gentry Family Foundation
W. C. & Susan Gentry
GrayRobinson
Andrew C. Hall
Wayne Hogan
Edith E. Holiday
Holland & Knight Charitable
Foundation, Inc.
Holland & Knight
Icard, Merrill, Cullis, Timm, et al.
Justice Story Book Exchange
Nick Kapioltas (Trustee)
Robert G. Kerrigan
Kerrigan, Estess, Rankin & McLeod
Gerald J. Klein
The Kresge Foundation
Lane, Trohn, Bertrand & Vreeland
Allen L. Poucher, Jr. & Diane Larson
Levin & Papantonio Family Foundation
Fredric G. & Marilyn K. Levin
The Lewis Schott Foundation
Silver: Annual Gifts and five-year
pledges of $50,000-$99,999.
DEAN’S COUNCIL
Members receive full President’s
Council benefits and recognition,
invitations to special events, and
distinguished recognition in the
annual report.
Barrister: Gifts and five-year pledges
of $25,000-$49,999.
Partner: Gifts and five-year pledges
of $10,000-$24,999.
Associate: Gifts and five-year
pledges of $5,000-$9,999.
1909 SOCIETY
The 1909 Society commemorates the
founding year of the law school and
honors individuals who support the
law school’s annual fund program.
See page 63 for more details.
Annual fund gifts (contributions
designated to non-endowed,
non-building funds) of $2,000$4,999. All current members of
the 1909 Society are designated in
this report by an asterisk (*).
TRUSLER SOCIETY
Annual gifts of $1,000-$4,999
Members receive special recognition
in the annual report.
ENRICHMENT SOCIETY
Annual gifts of $100-$999. Donors
are recognized in the annual report.
Please report any corrections to
Sara Grimm at [email protected]
or call 352-273-0640.
60
Gifts and pledges of $100,000
and more
Stephen A. Lind
Lake H. Lytal, Jr.
John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur
Foundation
Macfarlane, Ferguson & McMullen
Margaret MacLennan
Michael C. Maher
Martin Z. Margulies
John M. McNatt, Jr.
Robert G. & Joelen K. Merkel
Mershon, Sawyer, Johnston, et al.
Montgomery Family Charitable Trust
Robert M. & Mary M. Montgomery
Morgan & Morgan
John & Ultima Morgan
Motley Rice LLC
James H. Nance
National Center for Automated
Info Research
Jane B. Nelson
Brian M. & Joan B. O’Connell
Benjamin F. & Marilyn (D) Overton
Whit Palmer, Jr.
Kitty & Philip B. Phillips
Betty K. Poucher
Justus W. & Phyllis C. Reid
Stephen H. & Elizabeth P. Reynolds
Mikel M. Rollyson
William E. Rosenberg Foundation
Gerald A. Rosenthal
J. Quinton Rumph
Saliwanchik, Lloyd & Saliwanchik
John J. & Carol Butler Schickel
Lewis M. Schott &
Marcia Whitney Schott (D)
Scruggs Law Firm
Security Sales
T. Terrell & Neva S. Sessums
Benedict A. Silverman
Richard H. Simons Charitable Trust
W. Kelly & Ruth S. Smith
Gerald Sohn
Lynn D. Solomon
Steel, Hector & Davis
Glenn W. Sturm
The Carl S. Swisher Foundation, Inc.
Robert L. & Doris M. Trohn*
United Way of Miami-Dade
Upchurch Watson White & Max
Mediation Group
Jeffrey W. & Susan P. Warren*
Michael A. & Betty M. Wolf
Samuel J. & Evelyn Wood
Foundation, Inc.
Frank Wotitzky
Yent Bayou Properties Partnership
C. Steven Yerrid
Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe
Founders Society - Silver
Gifts and pledges of $50,000 –
$99,999
C. Wayne Alford
Allen Norton & Blue
C. DuBose & Sallie M. Ausley*
David S. & Myrna L. Band
Barnett, Bolt, Kirkwood, Long &
McBride
Bedell, Dittmar, DeVault, Pillans & Coxe
Joseph Benzinger
Bruce H. & Joanne K. Bokor
Carol M. Brewer & Andrew J. Ogilvie
Broad & Cassel
Bush Ross
Community Foundation of
Tampa Bay, Inc.
Hugh F. Culverhouse, Jr.
Cynthia G. Edelman Family Foundation
Meredyth Anne Dasburg Foundation
George H. DeCarion
Kenneth C. Johnson &
M. Debra L. Donner
Dunwody, White & Landon
Philip I. & Barbara Emmer
Robert M. Ervin
Henry A. Finkelstein Memorial
The Florida Bar Tax Section
Fonvielle, Lewis, Foote & Messer
Michael K. & Jacqueline Friel
Ellen B. Gelberg
Gene K. & Elaine R. Glasser
Ruth Goodmark
James A. Hauser
Corinne C. Hodak
Wayne & Patricia Hogan Family
Foundation
David & Marie Hyman
E. C. “Deeno” & Patricia G. Kitchen
Edward F. Koren
Krome Realty, Inc.
LexisNexis
Lawrence A. Lokken
Kevin A. Malone
Francis T. McCoy
Gene Moore III
Jon C. & Jean M. Moyle*
National Conference of Bar Examiners
UF LAW
CH A N G I N G L I V E S
“UF Law has changed my life by allowing me
to become a recognized leader on campus and
achieve goals beyond my expectations.”
Mark & Debra Nouss
F. Wallace & Christine R. Pope
James G. & Kathryn S. Pressly
Mark J. Proctor
Reid, Ricca & Rigell
David M. Richardson
Richman, Greer, Weil, et al.
Richard M. & Gail M. Robinson
Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell
Buddy & Mary Lou Schulz
Searcy, Denney, Scarola, et al.
Shutts & Bowen
Richard B. Stephens, Jr.
Sidney A. & Annette Stubbs
Terrell, Hogan, Ellis, Yegelwel
John Thatcher
U.S. Sugar Corp.
A. Ward & Ruth S. Wagner
Charles T. & Linda F. Wells
Scott L. & Lynda J. Whitaker
J. J. & Susan L. Wicker
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward, et al.
Susan Winn
Yegelwel Family Foundation
Evan J. & Arlene S. Yegelwel
Yerrid Foundation, Inc.
Dean’s Council - Barristers
Gifts and pledges of $25,000 –
$49,999
S. C. Battaglia Family Foundation, Inc.
Robert S. Bolt
A. H. Burnett Foundation
Caribbean Conservation Corp.
Alan B. & Lauren K. Cohn
John N. & Ruth T. Giordano
K. Lawrence & Maureen G. Gragg
Michael A. Hanzman
John H. Haswell
Kluger, Peretz, Kaplan & Berlin
Alton L. & Kathleen R. Lightsey*
Chris M. Limberopoulos
Louis & Bessie Stein Foundation
Peter M. MacNamara
Erick S. Magno
William H. McBride, Jr.
Michael J. McNerney
Cynthia F. O’Connell
Cheryl R. Peek
David H. Peek
A. Brian Phillips*
Dale M. Swope & Diane Ross
Adelaide A. Sink
Hans G. & Deborah M. H. Tanzler
M. Therese Vento
White & Case LLP
Stephen N. Zack
Dean’s Council - Partners
Gifts and pledges of $10,000 –
$24,999
Gerrard L. Grant
3L
Orlando, FL.
President of BLSA
Richard H. & Joyce Adams*
W. George & Enid Allen
Thomas C. Allison
Ausley & McMullen
R. Vinson & Carlene A. Barrett
Bilzin Sumberg, et. al
Bill Bone*
Bovay, Cook & Ossi
Jeffrey P. & Jan M. Brock*
Casey, Ciklin, Lubitz, et al.
Timothy M. & Jayne Cerio
C. Randolph & Cheryl Coleman
Anne C. Conway*
Brad Culpepper II*
Bruce & Virginia M. Culpepper*
Brian T. Degnan*
Lauren Y. Detzel
Mark P. & Beverly J. Dikeman
Mayanne Downs*
James E. Eaton, Jr.
Peter C. K. Enwall
Fassett, Anthony & Taylor
Foley & Lardner
Peter J. Genz*
Patrick E. & Barbara H. Geraghty*
Robert E. Glennon, Jr.
Richard C. & Marjory E. Grant*
Sandra & Leon G. Gulden Private
Foundation
R. Lawrence Heinkel
Brett T. & Rhonda K. Hendee*
Hill, Ward & Henderson
Bill & Angela Hoppe*
Richard A. & Lisa G. Jacobson
R. Timothy Jansen
Johnson, Auvil, Brock & Wilson*
Kenneth R. & Kimberly L. Johnson*
Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs
Lawrence & Lynn Keefe*
Peter T. & Karla D. Kirkwood
K. Judith Lane*
Lewis, Longman & Walker
*1909 Society Member (see page 63 for description)
WINTER 2008
61
DISTINGUISHED DONORS
Paul R. Linder
Robert A. Mandell
Marion County Bar Association
Margaret D. Mathews &
Scott C. Ilgenfritz
Phillip J. & Stacey L. Mays
Brian J. & Georgia McDonough
Robert W. & Barbara J. Mead
Wilton R. & Susanne D. Miller
Douglas J. & Nora P. Milne
Milton, Leach, Whitman, et al.
Michael D. & Mary P. Minton
James F. & Dianne S. Page*
Rahul & Swati Patel*
Lindy L. Paull
Gary L. & Suzzanne G. Printy*
J. Stephen Pullum
John M. & Jennifer G. Rawicz
Bruce S. Rogow
Rosenthal & Weissman
Randolph J. & Sue N. Rush
Oscar A. Sanchez &
Lida R. Rodriguez-Taseff*
David C. & Ronna G. Sasser*
John J. & Lynn G. Scroggin
David M. & Rachel K. Seifer
Lawrence E. & Cathy M. Sellers*
Ernest A. & Norma M. Sellers
Scott D. & Regina P. Sheftall*
W. Crit & Dee Ann Smith*
Tax Analysts, Inc.
Terra International Realty
Thomas & LoCicero
Marjorie B. & Bryan M. Thomas
James E. & Lori G. Thomison*
Rick & Aase B. Thompson*
George A. & Shaun Vaka*
William A. & Kathleen M. Weber*
K. Taylor White
Douglas A. & Patricia J. Wright
Gwynne A. Young
Dean’s Council - Associates
Gifts and pledges of $5,000 – $9,999
Cory L. Andrews
Barry B. & Elaine K. Ansbacher
Sybil B. Ansbacher
R. Mason & Amelia S. Blake
Boyer, Dolasinski & Miller
William A. & Laura M. Boyles
Richard B. Bush
Mercer K. & Mary F. Clarke
Cobb Family Foundation, Inc.
Gary J. Cohen
Glenn L. & Michele Criser
Nathaniel L. & Debra L. Doliner
Thomas M. Ervin, Jr.
Paul D. Fitzpatrick
Florida Association of Criminal
Defense Lawyers
Richard T. Garfield
B. Milfred Gerson Trust
Cheryl L. & Scott E. Gordon
Stephen H. & Fay F. Grimes
J. Bruce & Marion S. Hoffmann
Hughes, Hubbard & Reed
Richard C. Jans
Hal H. Kantor
Russell H. & Karen H. Kasper
Frederick W. & Victoria C. Leonhardt
Margol & Pennington
Christine N. Markussen &
James P. Walsh
Pedro A. & Maria H. Martin
George I. Milev
Gregory A. Nelson
Matthew N. & Suzanne S. Posgay
Pamela O. & Chad T. Price
Purcell, Flanagan & Hay
John T. & Leah A. Rogerson
Stephen F. Rossman
Juliet M. Roulhac
Melvin L. & Lorna I. Rubin
Albert A. & Carolyn E. Sanchez
Clifford A. & Michele W. Schulman
Sarah Helene Sharp
Jacqueline Allee Smith
Mark & Shari L. Somerstein
Andrew K. & Marie S. Strimaitis
Grace W. Taylor*
John J. & Karen S. Upchurch
Timothy W. & Roslyn B. Volpe
John K. & Marie L. Vreeland
Jack A. & Jordana S. Weiss
Samuel G. Wells
Michael K. Wilson
James E. Yonge
Class Gift
62
Trusler Society
Annual gifts of $1,000 – $4,999
A. P. Phillips Foundation, Inc.
Akerman Senterfitt
John-Edward & Ruth R. Alley
Timothy G. & Carole W. Anderson*
Jerald D. & Susan R. August*
Fletcher N. Baldwin, Jr. &
Nancy T. Baldwin
G. Thomas & Sharon Y. Ball
James B. & Caroline V. Barnes
Martha W. & Richard R. Barnett
Philip B. & Barbara L. Barr
Jennifer M. Barrett
Suzanne C. Bass Trust
Charles H. & Molly Baumberger
Leslie F. Johnson & Lisa C. Berry
W. O. Birchfield & Dana L. Ferrell*
Jeffery A. & Shirley L. Boone*
Stephen J. & Sharon J. Bozarth
Norman Broad*
Dennis A. & Peggy M. Calfee
James D. Camp III Trust
William M. Camp Trust
Hank B. Campbell
John W. & Mona P. Campbell*
Maria C. Carantzas
Joseph P. & Lynn Carolan*
Robert J. & Kathryn A. Carr
Central Florida Bankruptcy Law
Association
Clark, Campbell & Mawhinney
Allan P. & Betsy F. Clark*
Clarke, Silverglate, Campbell, et al.
Jean C. Coker
Richard P. Cole*
The Community Foundation, Inc.
Drew S. Fine & Susan E. Cook*
Patrick S. & Kaydne Roberts Cousins
Ernest A. & Maria G. Cox
Barry R. Davidson
George L. & Sally K. Dawson*
Diane L. Dick
Charles H. & Karen A. Egerton
Kenneth C. & Mary B. Ellis
Patrick G. Emmanuel*
Thomas J. Farkash
Ladd H. & Renee M. Fassett*
Andrew J. & Melinda W. Fawbush
Peter T. & Claudia P. Fay
Scott J. & Jamie R. Feder
Feldman Gale
Jeffrey D. & Susan Feldman*
Michael L. & Jane M. Ferguson*
William H. Ferguson*
W. O. Birchfield & Dana L. Ferrell*
Phillip R. & Carole S. Finch
Fine, Farkash & Parlapiano
Jack J. & Cherie H. Fine*
James C. & Mary K. Fleming*
M. Lanning & Jane P. Fox
Melvyn B. Frumkes
James A. Gale*
Sidney J. Gefen
Linda R. Getzen
Mandell & Joyce K. Glicksberg
J. Charles & Saundra H. Gray
Greenberg Traurig
Ellen C. Ham
Lenore R. & James L. Hanapel
Marie C. Hansen Trust
Daniel B. Harrell
Bruce M. & Medea D. Harris*
Stumpy & Dorothy L. Harris*
Robert M. Harris
Scott G. & Lisa V. Hawkins
Katherine P. Pierce &
Michael S. Hawley
Frederick A. Hazouri &
Barbara J. Pariente*
Mark & Ann Hicks
John A. & Linda M. Hirschy
Holland & Knight
Hopping, Green & Sams
Mark L. & Susan J. Horwitz
Elizabeth A. Jenkins
Mark Hulsey
E. L. Roy Hunt
Gary W. & Mary E. Huston
Michael L. & Elizabeth P. Jamieson*
The Jelks Family Foundation, Inc.
Allen N. Jelks, Jr.
S
tudents in the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 classes gave back to their law school in
participation rates exceeding alumni giving this year, contributing a combined $99,426
towards the class gift campaign for the law school annual fund.
Both classes helped establish groundwork for a culture of giving, with the Fall 2006
class generating $49,801 in gifts and pledges to be paid over a five-year period. Twenty nine
percent of the students participated in the campaign. Chairs of the campaign were Oshia
Gainer & Will Sexton
The Spring 2007 class came extremely close to matching the amount raised by the Fall
2006 class, with 30 percent of the class pledging $49,625. The class was led by chairs David
Sams and Kemay Jackson
The purpose of the class gift campaign is not only to give back to the school but also
to recognize how past alumni generosity has enhanced the law school experience. These
students, who are now alumni, have created a legacy that will provide meaningful support to
the future scholars of law at the University of Florida.
UF LAW
Robert H. & Lisa N. Jerry*
Johnson, Pope, Bokor, Ruppel & Burns
Richard A. Johnston, Jr.
Brian B. & Lisa M. Joslyn
Becky Powhatan Kelley*
D. Burke & Carolyn E. Kibler III
Mark W. Klingensmith &
Wendy H. Werb
Donald S. & Marilynn Kohla*
Robert M. & Judith Kramer
Levin, Papantonio, Thomas, et al.
Virginia A. Lipton*
Lott & Friedland
Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster,
Kantor & Reed
Maegen Peek Luka
P. Matthew Luka
Marsha G. Madorsky
Thomas M. & Shannon C. McAleavey
Harold F. & Patricia L. McCart
Clifton A. & Kathleen H. McClelland*
Dorothy S. McCurry Trust
Robert J. McDermott
Joseph C. Mellichamp III &
Barbara J. Staros*
The Merlin Law Group
Jon L. & Beth B. Mills*
David B. Mishael*
Daniel F. Molony*
James S. & Kelli O. Moody
Julie A. Moxley
North Florida Land Trust
James B. & Jingli C. O’Neal
Eduardo Palmer*
Donovan L. Parker
Alan R. Parlapiano
Kathleen M. & Darwin R. Paustian
Darrell W. & Deborah J. Payne
S. Austin & Fredda T. Peele*
J. Carter & Barbara K. Perkins*
Michael S. Hawley & Katherine Pierce
Charles M. Rand
Dee D. Reiter
Joseph E. Rhile
Harley E. & Posey C. Riedel
Samuel & Rose Riemer Private
Foundation
Edgardo Romero
Ruden, McClosky, Smith, et al.
E. Thom Rumberger
Johnson S. & Mary Savary
Gerald D. & Joanne W. Schackow
Stephen W. & Diana J. Sessums
Ned M. & Patricia T. Shandloff
Janice Burton & Richard A. Sharpstein
John A. & Kari A. Shipley
Siegfried, Rivera, Lerner, et al.
Ned F. Sinder
Cynthia C. & Michael Slack
Henry T. & Sheila G. Sorensen
Stichter, Riedel, Blain & Prosser
Gregg D. Thomas
Richard B. & Lisa L. Troutman
United Jewish Community of
Broward County
Frank D. & Katherine G. Upchurch*
Wilfred C. Varn
David H. Vickrey*
Monica Vila
Volpe, Bajalia, Wickes & Rogerson
Bill & Ruth W. Wagner
Williams, Parker, Harrison, et al.
Warren E. & Marilyn B. Williams
Patricia A. & Charles H. Willing, Jr.
Marc A. Wites*
R. Duke & Colleen C. Woodson
Leighton D. & Phyllis H. Yates
Peter W. & Joan Wagner Zinober*
Life Members of the Trusler Society
Herbert L. Allen
William Goza
B. Douglas Hind-Marsh
Julius F. Parker, Jr.
William F. Sheffield
William K. Zewadski
Enrichment Society
Annual gifts of $100-$999
Barry A. Abbott
Jeffrey W. & Amanda M. Abraham
Luis A. & Sallie B. Abreu
Howard M. Rosenblatt &
Eve D. Ackerman
Mark A. & Mary A. Addington
Matthew J. Ahearn
Jack J. & Laurie B. Aiello
J. Parker Ailstock & David M. Hudson
Akerman Senterfitt
Alachua County Board of County
Commissioners
Richard O. Alawaye
Robert Gene & Joni D. Aldridge
Debra T. & Dan R. Alexander
Genevieve Alexander
J. Stephen & Torree V. Alexander
Ben & Katie V. Alexander
Larry B. & Susan M. Alexander
Steffan K. Alexander
Matthew C. Vinton & Lynn S. Alfano
Thomas J. Mary Beth Ali
Linda A. Alley
Alan B. & Kathy R. Almand
James W. & Anne W. Almand
Adam L. Alpert
Albert W. Alschuler &
Penelope E. Bryan
Alejandro Alvarez
Chintan K. Amin
Joseph L. & Kimberlee T. Amos
C. LeDon Anchors, Jr.
Michelle Anchors & Stephen A. Medina
1909
1909 Society
T
he 1909 Society commemorates the founding year and
approaching centennial of the
University of Florida law school,
while recognizing alumni and
friends who sustain and advance
the college with gifts to the annual
fund in the amount of $2,000 –
$4,999 during a single fiscal year.
Support at this level improves
the quality and innovation of programs for students, student organizations, teaching and research,
academic programs and services,
and outreach efforts.
Gifts to the annual fund include
those designated to non-endowed,
non-building funds. The 1909
Society donors recognize the
college’s distinguished legacy of
leadership and future potential
while setting a standard of commitment that encourages support
from others.
WINTER 2008
Charles W. & Betty Jo E. Abbott
Richard H. & Joyce Adams
Timothy G. & Carole W. Anderson
Jerald D. & Susan August
C. DuBose & Sallie Ausley
R. Vinson & Carlene Barrett
John C. & Tifi Bierley
W. O. Birchfield & Dana L. Ferrell
Bill Bone
Jeffery A. & Shirley Boone
Norman Broad
Jeffrey P. & Jan Brock
John W. & Mona Campbell
Joseph P. & Lynn Carolan
Allan P. & Betsy Clark
Richard P. Cole
Anne C. Conway
Susan E. Cook & Drew S. Fine
Brad & Monica Culpepper
Bruce & Virginia Culpepper
George L. & Sally K. Dawson
Brian T. Degnan
Mayanne Downs
Patrick G. Emmanuel
Robert M. Ervin
Ladd H. & Renee M. Fassett
Jeffrey D. & Susan Feldman
William H. Ferguson
Jack J. & Cherie H. Fine
James C. & Mary K. Fleming
James A. Gale
Peter J. Genz
Patrick E. & Barbara H. Geraghty, Sr.
Richard C. & Marjory E. Grant
Bruce M. & Medea D. Harris
Stumpy & Dorothy Harris
Frederick A. Hazouri & Barbara J. Pariente
Brett T. & Rhonda K. Hendee
Bill & Angela Hoppe
David & Marie Hyman
Michael L. & Elizabeth P. Jamieson
Robert H. & Lisa N. Jerry
Kenneth C. Johnson & Debra L. Donner
Kenneth R. & Kimberly Leach Johnson
Hal H. Kantor
Lawrence & Lynn Keefe
Becky Powhatan Kelley
Donald S. & Marilynn Kohla
K. Judith Lane
Alton L. & Kathleen R. Lightsey
Virginia A. Lipton
Robert A. Mandell
Christine N. Markussen & James P. Walsh
Clifton A. & Kathleen H. McClelland
Joseph C. Mellichamp III &
Barbara J. Staros
Jon L. & Beth B. Mills
David B. Mishael
Daniel F. Molony
Jon C. & Jean M. Moyle
James F. & Dianne S. Page, Jr.
Eduardo Palmer
Rahul & Swati Patel
S. Austin & Fredda T. Peele
J. Carter & Barbara K. Perkins, Sr.
A. Brian Phillips
Gary L. & Suzanne G. Printy
J. Stephen Pullum
Joseph E. Rhile
David C. & Ronna G. Sasser
Lewis M. Schott
Clifford A. & Michele W. Schulman
Ernest A. & Norma M. Sellers
Lawrence E. & Cathy M. Sellers
Scott D. & Regina P. Sheftall
Jacqueline Allee Smith
W. Crit & Dee Ann Smith
W. Kelly & Ruth S. Smith
Mark Somerstein
Grace “Betty” W. Taylor
James E. & Lori G. Thomison
Robert L. & Doris M. Trohn
Frank D. & Katherine G. Upchurch
George A. & Shaun Vaka
David H. Vickrey & Gary R. Ensana
Jeffrey W. & Susan Warren
William A. & Kathleen M. Weber
Marc A. & Andrea Wites
Peter W. & Joan Wagner Zinober
63
DISTINGUISHED DONORS
J. Carter & Dana D. Andersen
Bruce R. & Donna K. Anderson
Everett P. & Martha P. Anderson
Kelly E. Anderson
Robert R. Pedlow & Mary Jane Angelo
John R. Angstadt & Joy B. Shearer
Carolyn S. & Michael R. Ansay
Ronald P. & Kay W. Anselmo
Ronald J. Antonin
Eric N. Appleton
Earl H. & Patricia K. Archer
Terrell K. & Miriam M. Arline
Alan I. & Jacquelyn M. Armour
Thomas R. & Dayna W. Arnold
Michael R. & Beth L. Green Aronson
Kevin A. & Prudence L. Ashley
Frank A. & Sharon Ashton
Reubin O. & Donna-Lou Askew
Jena R. & Robert S. Atlass
F. Eugene Atwood & Dabney D. Ware
Scott E. Atwood
Richard C. Ausness
Daniel & Lynne F. Bachrach
Alton D. & Kelly S. Bain
Fred R. Baisden, Jr.
Peter & Elizabeth A. Baker
Haywood M. & Anne T. Ball
Todd A. & Michelle M. Bancroft
Michael R. & Marice C. Band
David C. & Janet W. Banker
James A. & Lelia S. Barks
Robert J. Barna
Dwayne W. Barrett & Miriam L. Bliss
Richard L. Barrett
Bernard A. Barton, Jr.
Martha A. Bass
Douglas D. & Julia B. Batchelor
George Z. & Janan G. Bateh
Bruce McGrew & Joni Batie-McGrew
Scott R. & Dana Bauries
James P. Beadle
Joseph W. & Geremy G. Beasley
Jill F. & Edward R. Bechtold
Sara S. & Joshua L. Becker
Frank M. & Ashley Bedell
Joan F. & Dennis J. Beer
Steven L. & Vivian H. Beiley
William M. Dillon &
Kimberley A. Belcastro
Ronald G. Reeves & Anne Moorman Bell
Cathleen G. & Jeffery S. Bell
Robert J. & Sherry F. Bellino
John E. Leighton & Caryn L. Bellus
Angela F. & David L. Benjamin
Morgan R. & Elizabeth Bentley
Zelma L. Berger
Bernardo Lopez & Janice L. Bergmann
Jeffrey F. & Maria Berin
Bill Berke
Christopher D. Bernard
E. Sue Bernie
Yahn W. Bernier
Paul B. Bernstein
Brandon C. & Rachel E. Biederman
Jay Paul Cohen & Christine K. Bilodeau
David L. Bilsker
Tina M. & Robert A. Bird
E. Kelly Bittick, Jr. &
Patricia J. McClendon
W. Michael Black
Russell M. Blain
Kimberly B. & Gary Blanchard
Bart L. Cohen & Hazel Blockman-Cohen
Please report any corrections to
Sara Grimm at [email protected]
or call 352-273-0640.
Darryl M. Bloodworth
Rhonda B. & Kenneth D. Boggess
David M. Boggs & Martha A. Curtis
H. S. Udaykumar & Christina Bohannan
Andrew J. & Carol M. Bohlmann
Thomas R. & Caroline R. Bolf
Bradley J. & Tandy G. Bondi
Alexander M. Stremler &
Alexandra Bongard-Stremler
Glenn M. & Deborah M. Booker
Stephen K. & Jennifer S. Boone
Bradley T. & Samantha L. Borden
Richard K. & Janice K. Bowers
David S. & Christine Boyce
Cecilia R. & James A. Boyd, Jr.
Christopher W. & Kristine M. Boyett
Robert J. & Alice P. Boylston
Jacqueline Bozzuto
Jordan G. Lee & Amy E. Bradd
Lenore T. Brakefield
Steven L. & Carole C. Brannock
Charles D. Brecker
John T. & Marilyn A. Brennan
Matthew C. & Catherine D. Brewer
K. Clayton & Sarah M. Bricklemyer
Thomas P. & Kate L. Briggmann
R. Edson & Gennifer L. Briggs
Howard W. & Katherine P. Brill
Penny H. Brill
Todd C. Brister
Heather R. Brock & Edwin W. Parkinson
W. Bard & Kathryn W. Brockman
Jeanelle G. & Theotis Bronson
Richard J. Brooderson &
JoAnn M. Guerrero
Greg & Sonya M. Brown
Joshua R. & Monica R. Brown
Derek E. Bruce
Michael J. & Rochelle H. Brudny
John M. & Caroline P. Brumbaugh
Wayne P. & Jennie B. Bryan
Patrick M. Bryan
Ernest T. & Susan Buchanan
Morison & Virginia M. Buck
Allen & Elmira Buckley
Mark P. & Courtney R. Buell
Karen M. & Robert Buesing
AnneMarie H. Bui
Robert Bulloch
Dean B. & Martha W. Bunch
John W. & Katherine Randolph
Brian D. Burgoon
Julianna K. & Roy D. Burke
Les W. & Verna W. Burke
Alden E. & Robert K. Burlington
Faye A. Burner
David H. & Mary B. Burns
Tobi B. Butensky
Patricia G. & James F. Butler, III
Scottie J. & Sue Butler
David K. & Donna J. Cahoone
Christa E. & James T. Calamas
Ashley N. Calhoun
Jane D. Callahan
Jessica M. Callow
C. William Sharon &
Amelia M. Campbell
Doyle R. Campbell
Timothy F. Campbell
David E. Cannella
L. Kinder & Barbara S. Cannon
Robert A. Caplen
J. Thomas & Kathy A. Cardwell
John K. & Tami B. Carey
Christopher L. & Lauren A. Carmody
Steven W. Carta
Thomas H. Carter, Jr.
Charles H. & Lisa H. Carver
J. Richard & Wendy K. Caskey
Thomas D. Casper
Angel Castillo Jr. & Stormie G. Stafford
Casey M. & Kelli A. Cavanaugh
John W. & Susan C. Caven
James R. Chandler III
Marc D. & Tracy D. Chapman
James L. & Tonya B. Chase
Jon C. Chassen
Misty M. Chaves-Taylor &
Richard R. Chaves
Richard G. Cherry
Neil H. & Patricia Chonin
Thomas B. Christenson II
Christian Community Foundation of
South Florida
John T. & Susan Christiansen
Russell P. Chubb
Mark & Andrea H. Citrin
Jordan P. & Johanna W. Clark
Reed R. Clary IV
Randall C. & Terri S. Clement
Ryan S. Cobbs
Kendall Coffey, Esq. &
Joni Armstrong Coffey, Esq.
Jon A. May & Carol A. Cohen
Harry S. Colburn, Jr.
R. John & Mary M. Cole
Steven R. & Rebecca F. Cole
Jonathan S. Coleman
Patrick P. & Melissa B. Coll
Kaye Collie
Nathan S. Collier &
Anna V. Gueorguieva
James E. & Elizabeth G. Collins
John J. & Lynn M. Collins
Paul S. Rothstein & Suzy Colvin
Comcast
Charles E. Commander
Carlos F. Concepcion
Alphonse G. & Julaine W. Condon
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WINTER 2008
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WINTER 2008
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Denver, Colorado
Editor in Chief,
Florida Law Review
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L. David Shear
Linda L. & Lewis E. Shelley
Christian D. & K. Shawn Shields
Andrea N. & Scott E. Shirey
Kellye A. Shoemaker
Adam M. & Elizabeth A. Shonson
Andrew D. & Erica S. Shultz Zaron
Marc S. & Lillian M. Shuster
Rebecca Shwayri
Paula M. Sicard
Edward & Helen D. Siegel
Ronald L. Siegel
Kenneth M. Sigelman
Michael A. & Melissa R. Silva
Michael P. Silver
Sidney S. & Ruthie Simmons
Michael D. & Diane Simon
Michael D. Simons
Paul S. & Marte V. Singerman
Thomas J. & Marcia J. Sireci
Donald D. & Jeannett B. Slesnick
Smith, Hood, Perkins, et al.
Gilbert A. & Alpha S. Smith
Charles E. Smith
Clark W. Smith
David T. & Sandra G. Smith
Deidra C. Smith
Douglas A. Smith
Larry G. & Emmalyn M. Smith
Frederick D. Smith
Phyllis C. & James W. Smith III
L. Ralph Smith, Jr.
M. Stephen & Maureen T. Smith
Rodney W. Smith
Rupert J. Smith
J. Tom & Ann K. Smoot
W. Russell & Iralyn C. Snyder
Stacy F. & Joel S. Speiller
Andrew P. Speranzini
Martin J. Sperry
Matthew C. Sperry
Mitchell H. & Jacqueline Spingarn
Alexander Spitzer
Brian J. & Elizabeth Thompson Stack
Norma Stanley
James M. & Martha Stark
Laurie E. Stern
James P. & Colleen C. Stevens
Winfred A. & Patricia M. Stevens
Stewart, Tilghman, Fox & Bianchi
Larry M. & Lisa L. Stewart
Larry S. & Pat K. Stewart
Edward T. & Virginia Stockbridge
Brian D. & Nancy L. Stokes
William H. Stolberg
Charles S. & Susan A. Stratton
Michael H. Streater
Mara A. Strier
Timon V. Sullivan
Gary L. & Gretchen L. Summers
John H. & Mardelle Sutherland
J. Michael & Mary L. Swaine
Robert A. & Karen D. Sweetapple
Brian K. Szilvasy
Philip & Ann Tatich
James A. & Lisa B. Taylor
Jeffrey M. & Lisa S. Taylor
memorials
In memory of Corise P. Varn
Wilfred C. Varn
In memory of Dan Galfond
Cynthia A. Alcantara
Laura G. Herzog
Stacie M. & Samuel R. Linsky
Rachel A. & Robert A. Lunsford
Jason S. & Victoria O. Miller
Marc S. & Lillian M. Shuster
In memory of Edward M. Booth
W. Dexter & Terese V. Douglass
In memory of Frank Allen
Robert L. & Ellen J. Curtis
Mandell & Joyce K. Glicksberg
68
John C. Taylor, Jr.
L. Haldane Taylor
R. Bradley & Marilyn H. Taylor
Robert J. Telfer, Jr.
Harry & Vivian W. Tempkins
Rodney L. & Elizabeth B. Tennyson
Courtenay S. & Sarah G. Terrell
Tescher, Gutter, Chaves, et al.
Donald R. Tescher
David Tetrick, Jr.
Martha R. Thomas
Loretta J. Thompson
Renee E. & Thomas P. Thompson III
Robert Thornhill III
Thomas H. & Sandra H. Thurlow
Donald H. Tiller III
Jeffrey A. & Tanya M. Tochner
Julie S. & Byron A. Todman
Sara A. & Don Tolliver
Brikena I. & David J. Tomasic
John A. Walker & Stephanie J.
Toothaker
David T. Traub & Mary B. Weigly
Seth P. & Shawna N. Traub
Kenneth A. & Cynthia U. Treadwell
Tritt & Franson
Jeffrey T. Troiano
Christopher M. & Shannon Tuccitto
John K. & Deborah L. Tucker
Robert K. & Shirley A. Tucker
Kenneth D. & Tamara A. Tuschhoff
David R. Tyrrell
Justin B. Uhlemann
Scott A. & Erica A. Underwood
Whitney M. Untiedt
Jose F. & Teresa H. Valdivia
Lauren L. Valiente
Dayle M. & Greg Van Hoose
William S. Van Ness
tributes
In memory of James A. Garland
Robert J. & Sherry F. Bellino
Robert J. & Alice P. Boylston
W. D. Chapman
City of Bradenton
Firkins Chrysler Jeep Suzuki
Angus W. Graham, Jr.
In memory of Madison McClellan
Devon L. & Stuart B. Strickland
In memory of Robert Nichols
Keith M. Olivia
In memory of Leo Wotitzky
Melvyn B. Frumkes
Gene Moore III (Bequest)
Andrew G. & Mary Alice H. Pattillo
In memory of W. Paul and
Erin C. Shelley
William L. Moor
Christopher L. &
Susan S. Thompson
Gayle V. Watts
William A. & Betty A. Zeiher
In memory of Lewis Ansbacher
Barry B. & Elaine K. Ansbacher
Sidney J. Gefen
In memory of Thomas E. Henderson
D. Lawrence & Joan E. Rayburn
In honor of Jeffrey Jacobs
Comcast
In honor of Lawrence Gragg
Katie Schuller
In honor of Ryan E. Merkel
Robert G. & Joelen K. Merkel
UF LAW
Laura J. Varela
Dale W. Vash
W. Eric & Glenda P. Venable
William R. Vincent
Vogel Law Office
Wallace C. & Joan E. Von Arx
Carl M. & Janis L. Wagner
Jonathan D. & Stacey W. Wald
Glenn J. & Sheryl Waldman
Susan H. & Greg A. Walker
John R. & Erin B. Wallace
Richard I. & Harriet P. Wallsh
Courtney E. & Mary M. Walsh
J. Phillip Warren
Marc L. & Susan S. Warren
Water & Air Research, Inc.
Daniel H. & Julie W. Waters
Robert W. & Julie M. Wattwood
David P. & Debbie M. Webb
Janelle A. Weber
Daniel R. & Tina G. Weede
Gerard F. & Joann T. Wehle
Joshua B. & Lizette K. Weingard
Christine C. & Thomas G. Welch
John M. & Lane T. Welch
M. Bernadette Welch
Richard L. & Jennifer S. Weldon
Winifred L. Wentworth
Gail L. West & Jennifer A. West
Terry A. & Barbara V. Wex
Melissa L. Wheaton-McDuffie
Matthew B. & Dianna K. Wheeley
Denise L. & Beranton J. Whisenant
Daniel T. White
Robert G. Whittel
Richard Whittington
Jeffrey P. & Sherrill L. Wieland
Marsha P. & Richard R. Wikfors
Wilbert’s
Gregory F. & Susan K. Wilder
James B. & Sharon K. Wiley
James R. Wiley
Thomas J. & Jean A. Wilkes
Robert F. & Alaine S. Williams
Joseph H. & Carole A. Williams
Sarah Ritterhoff & Daniel C. Williams
Dirk A. Williams
Erica K. Williams
Gerald A. Williams
Jake R. Williams
J. Mason & Mary L. Williams
Kathryn B. Williams
Winton E. Williams
Robert H. Willis
Dale S. & Pamela J. Wilson
W. Scott & Diane H. Wilson
Harry M. & Mary J. Wilson
Richard H. & Shirley G. Wilson
Thomas G. Wilson III
William M. Wilson, Jr.
Melinda F. Wimbish
C. Douglas Wingate
Mary Ellen & Stephen A. Winkler
Gail I. & George Winson
Allen C. & Alicia Winsor
Mark J. & Myra S. Wolfson
Clarence M. Wood
Edward B. & Linda P. Woodbery
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse &
Charles F. Woodhouse
James H. & Pat Woodroffe
Ronald A. & Kathleen A. Worley
Camille L. Worsnop
George M. Wright
Art & Mary E. Wroble
Elizabeth A. Wulff
David A. & Grayce Yarema
Law Firm Giving Program
A
ttorneys in firms across
Florida, Georgia and other
key areas worked hard to achieve
100% participation of UF Law
grads in the Law Firm Giving
Program. This program encourages Gators to make a gift to the
Levin College of Law and support
a variety of worthwhile programs.
Listed on the following page are
the firm names, office locations
and volunteer champions of
the participating firms, in the following categories: 100%
and 75-99%.
WINTER 2008
Tad A. Yates
Ormend G. & Mary A. Yeilding
Laura M. & Robert E. Young
Rita L. Young
Richard M. & Elizabeth B. Zabak
Carl J. & Sharon A. V. Zahner
Susan M. & Joseph Zahniser
Thomas A. & Leigh A. Zehnder
William A. & Betty A. Zeiher
Diane J. & Robert R. Zelmer
Anton H. & Janet Zidansek
Felecia G. & Brent M. Ziegler
Joseph W. & Kylene L. Zitzka
William P. & Jeannie Zox
Sarah Elizabeth Zuckerman
Please report any corrections to
Sara Grimm at [email protected]
or call 352-273-0640.
2006-2007
100 Percent Participation
• Anchors, Foster, McInnis, Keefe
Ft. Walton Beach – Larry Keefe
•Casey, Ciklin, Lubitz
West Palm Beach – Jessica Callow
• Harris, Harris, Bauerle & Sharma, P.A.
Orlando – Bruce Harris
• Hill, Ward & Henderson
Mark Criser
• J. Parker Ailstock, P.A.
Gainesville – Janet Parker Ailstock
• Johnson, Pope, Bokor, Ruppel & Burns, P.A.
Clearwater, Tampa – F. Wallace Pope, Jr.
• Pressly & Pressly, P.A.
West Palm Beach - Grier Pressly
• Quarles & Brady, LLP
Naples – Kimberly Leach Johnson,
Kelly C. Lyon
•Sonneborn, Rutter, Cooney & Klingensmith
West Palm Beach – Mark Klingensmith
75-99% PARTICIPATION
•Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth,
Capouano & Bozarth, P.A.
Orlando – Laura M. Young, A. Felipe Guerrero
• King, Blackwell & Downs
Orlando – Mayanne Downs
69
JD Alumni
Alumni from many graduating classes made financial
commitments to help the college grow stronger and expand programs and
services, thereby permitting the college to reach toward its full potential.
Class of 1940
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$300.00
23
13%
Enrichment Society
Wilson & Erna S. Freeman
Class of 1943
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$5,000.00
8
13%
Founders Society - gold
Irving & Hazel A. Cypen
Class of 1945
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$100.00
7
14%
Enrichment Society
Harry P. Edwards & Sylvia R. Mayer
Class of 1946
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$642,100.00
13
31%
Founders Society - gold
Lewis M. Schott* &
Marcia Whitney Schott (D)
Trusler Society
Patrick G. Emmanuel*
Enrichment Society
Robert S. & Florence L. Hewitt
Class of 1947
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$10,250.00
27
7%
Founders Society - silver
Robert M. Ervin
Enrichment Society
Martha A. Bass
Please report any corrections to
Sara Grimm at [email protected]
or call 352-273-0640.
70
Class of 1948
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$2,150.00
78
5%
Trusler Society
Mark Hulsey
Wilfred C. Varn
Enrichment Society
Morison & Virginia M. Buck
Class of 1949
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$3,075.00
92
7%
Enrichment Society
Frank D. & Rebecca Jo Hall
Fred J. & Gwen M. Krim
Gilbert A. & Alpha S. Smith
Winifred L. Wentworth
Robert H. Willis
Clarence M. Wood
Class of 1952
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Trusler Society
Robert J. McDermott
Trusler Society
D. Burke & Carolyn E. Kibler III
Enrichment Society
Evans & Sara T. Crary
Enrichment Society
Bart L. Cohen & Hazel Blockman-Cohen
John A. & Margarette L. Jones
Al L. & Camilla F. Schneider
Larry G. & Emmalyn M. Smith
Class of 1953
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Class of 1950
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Trusler Society
Melvyn B. Frumkes
$1,525.00
82
12%
Founders Society - gold
Warren M. & Dorothy C. Cason
Enrichment Society
John M. Farrell
John P. Howard
Wm. A. & Leila S. Oughterson
John M. & Mary B. Scheb
Rupert J. Smith
John H. & Mardelle Sutherland
Class of 1951
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$16,477.76
92
12%
Founders Society - gold
James D. Camp, Jr.
Marshall M. & Paula P. Criser
Trusler Society
Mandell & Joyce K. Glicksberg
$1,600.00
43
9%
$6,800.00
46
9%
Founders Society - gold
Charles W. & Betty Jo E. Abbott*
Enrichment Society
Murray W. Overstreet, Jr.
Andrew G. &
Mary Alice H. Pattillo
Class of 1954
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$4,800.00
45
11%
Founders Society - gold
Robert L. & Doris M. Trohn*
Associates
Stephen H. & Fay F. Grimes
Trusler Society
Ned F. Sinder
Enrichment Society
Richard W. & Judith C. Reeves
Charles E. Smith
Class of 1955
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$11,656.88
34
15%
Founders Society - gold
John Bargas
Enrichment Society
W. Dexter & Terese V. Douglass
W. Ray & Jacquelyn Fortner
Edward & Helen D. Siegel
Class of 1956
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$3,250.00
37
19%
Trusler Society
Peter T. & Claudia P. Fay
Johnson S. & Mary Savary
Enrichment Society
Reubin O. & Donna-Lou Askew
Jerry B. Crockett
Robert P. & Doris B. Gaines
William A. & Betty A. Zeiher
Class of 1957
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$205,588.95
48
13%
Founders Society - gold
John M. McNatt, Jr.
Robert M. & Mary M. Montgomery
Associates
James E. & Vanda L. Yonge
Enrichment Society
Joseph & Cornelia A. Garcia
Jose A. Gonzalez, Jr. &
Mary S. Copeland
William L. & Etta M. Hendry
Class of 1958
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$3,850.00
63
10%
Founders Society - gold
T. Terrell & Neva S. Sessums
UF LAW
CH A N G I N G L I V E S
“UF Law has changed my life by providing me with
knowledgeable professors and wonderful classmates”
Founders Society - silver
David & Marie Hyman
Enrichment Society
William T. & Peggy J. Hodges
Edward M. & Mary Jackson
Donald J. & Helen M. Lunny
Class of 1959
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$39,251.00
62
10%
Trusler Society
Stephen W. & Diana J. Sessums
Enrichment Society
Robert J. & Alice P. Boylston
J. Tom & Ann K. Smoot
Class of 1960
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$2,050.00
70
9%
Founders Society - gold
Ray F. & Raquel Ferrero
Trusler Society
Bill & Ruth W. Wagner
Enrichment Society
Shepard P. & Lissie C. Lesser
L. David Shear
Class of 1961
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$2,005,400.00
75
16%
Founders Society - gold
Fredric G. & Marilyn K. Levin
Founders Society - silver
Jon C. & Jean M. Moyle*
Trusler Society
Robert J. & Kathryn A. Carr
E. Thom Rumberger
Enrichment Society
John T. & Marilyn A. Brennan
Neil H. & Patricia Chonin
Alphonse G. & Julaine W. Condon
Paul M. & Mollene Y. Goldman
WINTER 2008
C. Parkhill & Mason C. Mays
Irvin A. & JoAnn M. Meyers
John H. & Joan K. Moore
Thomas H. & Sandra H. Thurlow
Class of 1962
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$23,311.46
109
16%
Founders Society - silver
C. DuBose & Sallie M. Ausley*
Partners
W. George & Enid Allen
Wilton R. & Susanne D. Miller
Ernest A. & Norma M. Sellers*
Associates
Grace W. Taylor*
Trusler Society
Norman Broad*
J. Charles & Saundra H. Gray
Enrichment Society
John E. M. & Carol H. Ellis
Robin & Jean H. Gibson
James H. & Virginia Gilbert
Jane R. & John F. Harris
James C. &
Suzanne N. Hoover
Peter C. Jones
R. Layton & Mary S. Mank
Antonio Martinez, Jr.
Class of 1963
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$7,735.00
95
13%
Founders Society - gold
John C. & Tifi Bierley*
Trusler Society
W. O. Birchfield & Dana L. Ferrell*
S. Austin & Fredda T. Peele*
Enrichment Society
Ronald P. & Kay W. Anselmo
Jane R. & John F. Harris
Joseph G. & Marilyn G. Heyck
Murray & Fredda Kanetsky
Joseph H. & Elsie O. Lang
Reverend Molly O. Louden &
William Bruce Louden
F. Perry Odom
Larry S. & Pat K. Stewart
Class of 1964
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$6,700.00
132
9%
Pin Lu
LLM in Taxation
Zhuhai, China
Founders Society - silver
Charles T. & Linda F. Wells
Trusler Society
Michael L. & Elizabeth P.
Jamieson*
Enrichment Society
Haywood M. & Anne T. Ball
John W. & Susan C. Caven
William H. Davis
George D. Gabel, Jr.
Ben L. Holley
Robert M. & Patricia A. Johnson
Malcolm R. & Jane Kirschenbaum
L. Ralph Smith, Jr.
Class of 1965
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$150,351.09
136
15%
Founders Society - gold
R. Dewey & Lynn E. Burnsed
Founders Society - silver
Sidney A. & Annette Stubbs
Trusler Society
John-Edward & Ruth R. Alley
Stumpy & Dorothy L. Harris*
Gerald D. & Joanne W. Schackow
Enrichment Society
C. LeDon Anchors, Jr.
Russell P. Chubb
Charles E. Commander
Wallace H. & Tracy L. Hall
Charles F. & Nancy E. Henley
Steve C. & Maxine S. Horowitz
Jere E. & Susan S. Lober
R. Stephen & Linda B. Miles
71
JD ALUMNI
Michael J. Minerva
Leroy H. Moe
Thomas R. &
Dorothy A. B. Shahady
J. Michael & Mary L. Swaine
Philip & Ann Tatich
Richard H. & Shirley G. Wilson
Class of 1966
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$37,405.17
174
11%
Founders Society - gold
W. Kelly & Ruth S. Smith
Founders Society - silver
Richard M. & Gail M. Robinson
Partners
Richard H. & Joyce Adams
Bruce & Virginia M. Culpepper*
Alton O. Paulk
David L. & Theda B. Robbins
R. William & Dee J. Rutter
Edward B. & Linda P. Woodbery
James H. & Pat Woodroffe
Class of 1968
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$59,705.00
188
13%
Founders Society - gold
Andrew C. Hall
Justus W. & Phyllis C. Reid
Partners
Patrick E. & Barbara H. Geraghty*
Douglas J. & Nora P. Milne
Rick & Aase B. Thompson*
Associates
John J. & Karen S. Upchurch
Trusler Society
Charles H. & Molly Baumberger
Allan P. & Betsy F. Clark*
Trusler Society
Stephen J. & Sharon J. Bozarth
Warren E. & Marilyn B. Williams
Enrichment Society
Ernest T. & Susan Buchanan
L. Kinder & Barbara S. Cannon
J. Thomas & Kathy A. Cardwell
Elizabeth J. du Fresne
Thomas C. & Victoria K. Dunn
Rutledge R. & Noel D. Liles
George R. & Karen K. Moraitis
James M. & Judith P. Nixon
Charles P. & Judith H. Pillans
Stephen J. & Barbara G. Powell
Benjamin W. Redding III
John F. & Sandra L. Roscow
Enrichment Society
Richard C. Ausness
Fred R. Baisden, Jr.
Douglas D. & Julia B. Batchelor
Les W. & Verna W. Burke
Ronald S. & Sharon Perlman Frankel
Jonathan C. & Mary S. Gordon
Donald J. & Nancy Y. Hall
Leon & Barbara Pomerance
Charles T. & Linda Sands
Donald D. & Jeannett B. Slesnick
Mitchell H. & Jacqueline Spingarn
Winfred A. & Patricia M. Stevens
Robert K. & Shirley A. Tucker
Class of 1967
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$9,320.00
221
11%
Founders Society - gold
Benjamin F. Overton
Founders Society - silver
E. C. “Deeno” & Patricia G. Kitchen
Partners
Bill & Angela A. Hoppe*
Trusler Society
Barry R. Davidson
Barbara J. Pariente &
Frederick A. Hazouri*
Enrichment Society
Thomas D. Casper
Stephen E. & Barbara C. Dalton
John A. & Sue S. DeVault
W. Ford & Freda Duane
William A. & Jane F. Hamilton
Calvin E. & Mary B. Hayden
Robert J. & Elizabeth M. Head
Dorsey F. Henderson, Jr.
Roger A. & Melinda K. Larson
Robert M. & Carolyn S. Lloyd
Cynthia Z. & Alexander C. MacKinnon
Hubert C. & Lynn K. Normile
Please report any corrections to
Sara Grimm at [email protected]
or call 352-273-0640.
72
Class of 1969
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$219,000.00
184
12%
Founders Society - gold
Stephen H. & Elizabeth P. Reynolds
Founders Society - silver
James A. Hauser
F. Wallace & Christine R. Pope
Partners
Robert W. & Barbara J. Mead
Trusler Society
Charles H. & Karen A. Egerton
James C. & Mary K. Fleming*
Clifton A. & Kathleen H. McClelland*
Peter W. & Joan Wagner Zinober
Enrichment Society
Scottie J. & Sue Butler
John T. & Susan Christiansen
William A. & Carol D. Evans
Frank H. & Levan N. Fee
Thomas B. & Jenina E. Hyman
Hugh & Carol G. MacMillan
Henry E. & Marilyn M. Mallue, Jr.
Noel H. & Marianne H. Nation
Ben Patterson
John C. & Nora Patterson, Jr.
Roger D. & Carol F. Schwenke
Alexander Spitzer
Donald R. Tescher
Robert F. & Alaine S. Williams
Class of 1970
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$8,195.00
204
10%
Associates
Mercer K. & Mary F. Clarke
Trusler Society
Joseph C. Mellichamp III & Barbara J.
Staros*
Alan R. Parlapiano
Enrichment Society
Howard W. & Katherine P. Brill
John M. & Caroline P. Brumbaugh
Steven W. Carta
Dabney L. & Beverly O. Conner
H. Edward & Sarah T. Dean
William E. & Virginia H. Dunwody
Charles M. & Jean B. Gadd
Harvey L. Goldstein
David F. & Elizabeth C. Hannan
Christy F. & Martha C. Harris
Donald A. & Linda S. Lykkebak
Bruce S. & Janice L. Russell
Ronald Y. & Leslie E. Schram
John C. Taylor, Jr.
Harry & Vivian W. Tempkins
John K. & Deborah L. Tucker
Class of 1971
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$83,825.00
221
7%
Founders Society - gold
W. C. & Susan Gentry
Barristers
Robert S. Bolt
Associates
John K. & Marie L. Vreeland
Trusler Society
Phillip R. & Carole S. Finch
Enrichment Society
Larry B. & Susan M. Alexander
Darryl M. Bloodworth
John R. & Geraldine W. Council
Robert V. & Winfield R. Duss
Louis F. Hubener III
Steven E. & Louise H. Rohan
Bruce G. & Pamela K. Shaffner
Martin J. Sperry
R. Bradley & Marilyn H. Taylor
Robert J. Telfer, Jr.
Class of 1972
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$74,298.79
355
11%
Founders Society - gold
John J. & Carol Butler Schickel
Jeffrey W. & Susan P. Warren*
Founders Society - silver
Bruce H. & Joanne K. Bokor
Gene K. & Elaine R. Glasser
James G. & Kathryn S. Pressly
Partners
Richard C. & Marjory E. Grant*
Robert A. Mandell*
James F. & Dianne S. Page*
Associates
Hal H. Kantor
Russell H. & Karen H. Kasper
Christine N. Markussen &
James P. Walsh
Clifford A. & Michele W. Schulman
Trusler Society
G. Thomas & Sharon Y. Ball
Mark & Ann Hicks
Mark L. & Susan J. Horwitz
Donald S. & Marilynn Kohla*
Jon L. Mills*
James S. & Kelli O. Moody
Enrichment Society
James W. & Anne W. Almand
Christopher M. & Carol D. Fear
William E. Hahn
Carl L. & Margaret K. Johnson
David L. & Maida J. Kahn
Elliott H. & Leanore Lucas
Lester & Anita Makofka
G. Carson & Laurinda F. McEachern
Michael N. Schneider
S. Mark & Claudia H. Seymour
L. Haldane Taylor
Rodney L. & Elizabeth B. Tennyson
Dale W. Vash
W. Eric & Glenda P. Venable
Richard Whittington
Harry M. & Mary J. Wilson
Class of 1973
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$1,212,800.00
390
8%
Founders Society - gold
John H. Dasburg
Founders Society - silver
Buddy & Lou Schulz
Associates
Pamela O. & Chad T. Price
Trusler Society
Richard R. & Martha W. Barnett
Kenneth C. & Mary B. Ellis
Leighton D. & Phyllis H. Yates
Enrichment Society
George Z. & Janan G. Bateh
Joseph W. & Geremy G. Beasley
Dean B. & Martha W. Bunch
Paul M. & Jolie M. Cummings
P. Kevin & Linda D. Davey
Lawrence J. & Margaret E. Davis
F. Joseph & Sally A. DuBray
R. Frank & Jane P. Gray
Thomas C. & Anne W. Heath
Lynn J. & Evelyn R. Hinson
Richard F. & Johanna P. Kane
Stephen D. & Constance M. Marlowe
Michael J. Monchick
Jan K. Seiden
Frederick D. Smith
W. Russell & Iralyn C. Snyder
James M. & Martha Stark
William H. Stolberg
Kenneth A. & Cynthia U. Treadwell
Joseph H. & Carole A. Williams
Dale S. & Pamela J. Wilson
Art & Mary E. Wroble
UF LAW
Class of 1974
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$106,606.59
292
13%
Founders Society - gold
Robert G. & Joelen K. Merkel
Barristers
K. Lawrence & Maureen G. Gragg
Partners
Robert E. Glennon, Jr.
Gwynne A. Young
Associates
J. Bruce & Marion S. Hoffmann
Frederick W. & Victoria C. Leonhardt
Trusler Society
Timothy G. & Carole W. Anderson*
Joseph P. & Lynn Carolan*
Richard P. Cole*
Andrew J. & Melinda W. Fawbush
M. Lanning & Jane P. Fox
Robert M. Kramer
Harley E. & Posey C. Riedel
Frank D. & Katherine G. Upchurch*
Enrichment Society
Everett P. & Martha P. Anderson
Zelma L. Berger
R. John & Mary M. Cole
Robert S. & Ellen G. Cross
Daniel D. & Virginia A. Eckert
Theodore A. Erck III
James L. & Nancy H. Fly
Peter J. & Diane M. Fryefield
Robert C. Gibbons
Nancy H. Henry
Norman L. & Miriam B. Hull
Michael L. & Valerie Katz
David T. & Carla C. Knight
Jeffrey B. & Penny S. Marks
Louis K. & Denise D. Rosenbloum
Eliot J. & Barbara W. Safer
Larry M. & Lisa L. Stewart
Class of 1975
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$34,387.50
364
12%
Founders Society - gold
Philip B. & Kitty Phillips
Barristers
K. Lawrence & Maureen G. Gragg
William H. McBride, Jr. &
Adelaide A. Sink
Partners
Anne C. Conway*
Trusler Society
James B. & Caroline V. Barnes
John W. & Mona P. Campbell*
Robert M. Harris
Marsha G. Madorsky
Janice Burton & Richard A. Sharpstein
John A. & Kari A. Shipley
R. Duke & Colleen C. Woodson
Enrichment Society
Barry A. Abbott
James A. & Lelia S. Barks
Bernard A. Barton, Jr.
Jeffrey F. & Maria Berin
James R. Chandler III
Craig Corbett
Ronald A. & Dona C. David
Theodore A. Deckert
Christopher A. Detzel
Wayne E. & Kathleen B. Flowers
Alan M. Gerlach, Jr.
Kim Patrick & Jody Hart
Roger C. & Ellen J. Lambert
John E. & Joan C. Lawlor
Robert C. & Jill R. Maland
Patrick F. & Sheryl R. Maroney
A. Guy & Dawn T. Neff
Jerrold K. Phillips
J. Peyton & Jill A. Quarles
Austin F. & Mary L. Reed
John R. Angstadt & Joy B. Shearer
M. Stephen & Maureen T. Smith
Rodney W. Smith
Jose F. & Teresa H. Valdivia
Terry A. & Barbara V. Wex
Gerald A. Williams
Class of 1976
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$46,886.00
383
12%
Founders Society - silver
Ellen B. Gelberg
Scott L. & Lynda J. Whitaker
Barristers
Peter M. MacNamara
Hans G. & Deborah M. H. Tanzler
M. Therese Vento
Partners
Scott D. & Regina P. Sheftall*
William A. & Kathleen M. Weber*
Associates
William A. & Laura M. Boyles
Trusler Society
Thomas J. Farkash
William H. Ferguson*
Cherie H. & Jack J. Fine
Daniel B. Harrell
Elizabeth A. Jenkins &
Charles E. Hudson
Becky Powhatan Kelley*
Gregg D. Thomas
CH A N G I N G L I V E S
“Participating in JLSA provides me with
the opportunity to give something back
to the Jewish community, help shape the
experience of Jewish students at UF Law,
and work with the leaders of many other
student organizations about concerns
such as diversity, academic concerns,
and employment opportunities.”
WINTER 2008
Ilan Kaufer
3L
Joint Masters of Forest and
Resource Conservation
Washington D.C.
2006-2007 President of
Jewish Law Students Association
73
JD ALUMNI
Enrichment Society
Michael R. & Marice C. Band
Mark P. & Courtney R. Buell
Robert D. Critton, Jr.
Gerald B. & Lane F. Curington
James N. & Linnea J. Daniel
Michael D. Fowler
Betsy J. Gallagher
Laurence C. & Jane P. Hames
Rodney N. Laham
Mark F. & Rochelle N. Lewis
James J. Long
Richard L. Martens
Alan K. & Karen K. McCall
Joseph O. & Gail W. Morrell
Frederick J. Murrell
Richard B. & Ellen J. Orfinger
Nicholas A. Pope
Glenna Joyce Reeves
Charles A. & Catherine L. Reinhardt
Stephen W. Seemer
Kenneth M. Sigelman
Charles S. & Susan A. Stratton
David R. Tyrrell
John R. & Erin B. Wallace
Class of 1977
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$14,827.00
326
13%
Partners
Lauren Y. Detzel
John J. & Lynn G. Scroggin
Trusler Society
Virginia A. Lipton*
Joseph C. Mellichamp III &
Barbara J. Staros
Enrichment Society
Michael R. & Beth L. Green Aronson
Joan F. & Dennis J. Beer
Russell M. Blain
David S. & Christine Boyce
Lewis F. & Lynn Crippen
W. Glenn & Eilleen Z. Dempsey
David H. & Kathryn E. Evaul
Richard J. & Deborah Fildes
Sally H. Foote
Don H. & Patrice D. Goode
Freddie L. Goode
Kenneth J. & Lisa L. Hirsh
Cary W. Hoover
Charles J. & Janet S. Kahn
Jack A. Kirschenbaum
Roy H. & Elizabeth M. Lasris
James J. Logue
Mary N. & James F. Morgan
Leslie K. O’Neal-Coble &
Thomas J. Harris
Please report any corrections to
Sara Grimm at [email protected]
or call 352-273-0640.
74
Bruce S. & Janice L. Russell
Lewis E. & Linda L. Shelley
Thomas J. & Marcia J. Sireci
Clark W. Smith
Class of 1978
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$50,177.00
375
16%
Barristers
David H. Peek
Dale M. Swope & Diane Ross
Partners
C. Randolph & Cheryl Coleman
W. Crit & Dee Ann Smith*
Associates
Cheryl L. & Scott E. Gordon
Pedro A. & Maria H. Martin
Albert A. & Carolyn E. Sanchez
Jacqueline Allee Smith
Trusler Society
Daniel F. Molony*
Ned M. & Patricia T. Shandloff
Enrichment Society
Robert Gene & Joni D. Aldridge
J. Stephen & Torree V. Alexander
Peter & Elizabeth A. Baker
E. Sue Bernie
The Hon. Theotis Bronson &
Ms. Jeanelle G. Bronson
Michael J. & Rochelle H. Brudny
Angel Castillo Jr. & Stormie G. Stafford
Kendall Coffey, Esq.
Jon A. May & Carol A. Cohen
Jay Paul Cohen &
Christine K. Bilodeau
Kaye Collie
Amanda A. & David F. Cowan, Jr.
David M. Boggs & Martha A. Curtis
Charles F. & Allison C. Edwards
Mitchell I. & Fern H. Fried
Melinda P. Gamot
Peter J. & Amy S. Gravina
Jay A. & Sandra Halpern
Randy M. Kammer
Thomas F. & Sheri L. Kerney
Mark S. & Laurette S. Kessler
Steven C. Lee
Chauncey W. & Martha Z. Lever
Grace N. & Robert J. Manne
Jon A. May & Carol A. Cohen
Robert J. & Michelle D. Merlin
Frank E. & Michelle M. Miller
Robert W. & Vicky L. Mixson
Peter P. & Christina S. Murnaghan
Ray Williams &
Randa M. Owen-Williams
Francis E. & Rebecca A. Pierce
Colleen A. &
B. Gen. Raymond C. Preston, Jr.
Gary S. Rabin
Charles B. Ricca, Jr.
John W. & Bonnie E. W. Salmon
Jeffrey D. & Karen J. Segal
David T. & Sandra G. Smith
Michael H. Streater
Thomas J. & Jean A. Wilkes
William M. Wilson, Jr.
Robert Q. Wyckoff, Jr. &
Alicia A. Longobardo
Richard M. & Elizabeth B. Zabak
Class of 1979
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$36,601.60
326
13%
Founders Society - gold
Brian M. & Joan B. O’Connell
Founders Society - silver
Andrew J. Ogilvie & Carol M. Brewer
Partners
Peter T. & Karla D. Kirkwood
Lindy L. Paull
David C. & Ronna G. Sasser*
Lawrence E. & Cathy M. Sellers, Jr.*
Trusler Society
Ladd H. & Renee M. Fassett*
Enrichment Society
Joni Armstrong Coffey, Esq.
James P. Beadle
Christopher D. & Christopher D. Bernard
Jay Paul Cohen & Christine K. Bilodeau
Faye A. Burner
James L. & Tonya B. Chase
V. Robert Denham, Jr.
Ronald G. & Mary A. Duryea
Joseph E. Foster
Robert S. & Nannette M. Griscti
Jack O. & Mary O. Hackett
Charles V. & Alexandra K. Hedrick
Glenn R. Hosken
Mark A. & Wendy W. Kamilar
Bruce E. & Patricia A. Kasold
Michael J. & Pamela V. Korn
Scott Lodin
Alfred J. Malefatto & Moria Rozenson
Jacqueline S. & David R. Miller
James B. Murphy, Jr.
David S. & Mary Pressly
Harold G. & Shelley S. Schenker
Timon V. Sullivan
Robert A. & Karen D. Sweetapple
Robert W. & Julie M. Wattwood
Gail L. West & Jennifer A. West
Gail I. & George Winson
Class of 1980
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$1,416,607.00
360
11%
Founders Society - silver
Evan J. & Arlene S. Yegelwel
Partners
Peter J. Genz*
Randolph J. & Sue N. Rush
Trusler Society
Michael S. Hawley &
Katherine P. Pierce
Charles M. Rand
Richard B. & Lisa L. Troutman
Enrichment Society
Alejandro Alvarez
Terrell K. & Miriam M. Arline
Richard K. & Janice K. Bowers
Steven L. & Carole C. Brannock
Penny H. Brill
Jon C. Chassen
Russell W. & Janice M. Divine
Ronald S. Stutz & Linda Ebin
Manuel Epelbaum
Kerry I. & Elizabeth K. Evander
Stephen L. & Hallie S. Evans
Cynthia A. Hawkins
Jennifer C. & Russell D. Hepler
Philippe C. Jeck
Janis B. & Gregory M. Keyser
Sharon S. & Alan N. Learch
Ross T. & Silvana Lessack
Robin Paul & Margaret A. Malloy
Chad M. & Vicki L. McClenathen
Neil M. O’Toole
Dean R. & Lise C. Plattner
Paul S. Rothstein & Suzy Colvin
Lanny & Denise M. Russell
Carl Scott & Karen V. Schuler
James D. & Debbie S. Ruskin
Richard I. & Harriet P. Wallsh
C. Douglas Wingate
Class of 1981
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$37,915.00
382
14%
Founders Society - silver
Kenneth C. Johnson &
M. Debra L. Donner*
Partners
Kenneth R. Johnson* &
Kimberly L. Johnson*
Michael D. & Mary P. Minton
Associates
R. Mason & Amelia S. Blake
Gary J. Cohen
Trusler Society
Drew S. Fine & Susan E. Cook*
Jeffrey D. Feldman*
Founders Society - gold
Mary Lou D. Dasburg
Allen L. Poucher, Jr. & Diane Larson
UF LAW
Cherie H. & Jack J. Fine*
Richard A. Johnston, Jr.
Brian B. & Lisa M. Joslyn
David H. Vickrey*
Patricia A. & Charles H. Willing, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Luis A. & Sallie B. Abreu
David C. & Janet W. Banker
Albert W. Alschuler &
Penelope E. Bryan
Randall C. & Terri S. Clement
James E. & Catherine E. Copeland
Frederick C. Craig, Jr.
Alan H. Daniels
Joseph H. & Lorenia O. Davis
Lisa H. Enfield
Kerry I. & Elizabeth K. Evander
Stephen E. Fogel
Leslie S. Haswell
Bruce E. & Anthe L. Hoffman
Bruce D. & Deborah M. Johnson
Les Joughin
Richard N. & Gay H. Lenner
Robert R. & Cheryl K. Lindgren
James E. & Mari Moye
Neal G. & Joan L. Patton
C. Rufus & Brooks Harby Pennington
D. Lawrence & Joan E. Rayburn
Howard M. Rosenblatt &
Eve D. Ackerman
Gary L. & Gretchen L. Summers
Wallace C. & Joan E. Von Arx
Susan H. & Greg A. Walker
Marc L. & Susan S. Warren
Matthew B. & Dianna K. Wheeley
J. Mason & Mary L. Williams
Carl J. & Sharon A. V. Zahner
Class of 1982
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$44,318.61
400
16%
Barristers
John N. & Ruth T. Giordano
Partners
Richard H. & Joyce Adams
Richard A. & Lisa G. Jacobson
Margaret D. Mathews
Gary L. & Suzzanne G. Printy*
Oscar A. Sanchez &
Lida R. Rodriguez-Taseff*
Carl M. & Janis L. Wagner
Jeffrey P. & Sherrill L. Wieland
Mark J. & Myra S. Wolfson
Associates
Gregory A. Nelson
Mark & Shari L. Somerstein
Timothy W. & Roslyn B. Volpe
Class of 1983
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Trusler Society
Jeffery A. & Shirley L. Boone*
Robert J. & Kathryn A. Carr
Scott J. & Jamie R. Feder
Linda R. Getzen
John A. & Linda M. Hirschy
$19,866.78
339
12%
Partners
George A. & Shaun Vaka*
Enrichment Society
Charles D. Brecker
Karen M. & Robert Buesing
David H. & Mary B. Burns
Nathan S. Collier &
Anna V. Gueorguieva
Carlos F. Concepcion
Alys N. & Steven L. Daniels
Terence J. & Janice S. Delahunty
Nancy J. Faggianelli
Alan S. & Marcia Gassman
Joel B. & Anne D. Giles
Stuart E. & Alisa G. Goldberg
Robert F. & Karen Goodrich
Michael P. Haymans
Robert F. Hoogland
Grant C. & Rosemaie P. Jaquith
Brian T. & Kimberly C. Kelly
Janis B. & Gregory M. Keyser
Frances S. & William A. King
James R. Lussier & Nancy C. Jacobson
Marybeth McDonald & Eric W. Jarvis
Eric K. Neitzke &
Kathryn Lee S. Neitzke
David B. & Wendy L. Norris
Michael A. & June Turner Piscitelli
Robert V. Potter, Jr.
Darryl R. Richards
Edward J. & Theresa A. Richardson
Neil A. & Stacey L. Roddenbery
Paul D. & Nancy P. Scala
David Smolker & Pamela Ross
Edward T. & Virginia Stockbridge
Bradford L. Thomas & Susan A. Cox
R. Dennis Tweed & Cheryl J. Lister
Trusler Society
James A. Gale*
Scott G. & Lisa V. Hawkins
David B. Mishael*
Dee D. Reiter
Enrichment Society
Thomas J. & Mary Beth Ali
Thomas R. & Dayna W. Arnold
Richard L. Barrett
Stephen K. & Jennifer S. Boone
John K. & Tami B. Carey
Stephen L. & Hallie S. Evans
Tim D. Henkel & Dyanne E. Feinberg
Gregory A. & Barbara E. Fox
Lee T. & Gisela M. Griffin
Eugenio & Elizabeth M. Hernandez
Richard H. & Jane G. Hiers
Cynthia L. & Keith B. Jackson
Edmond D. & Ann S. Johnson
Frances S. & William A. King
Russell D. Levitt
Karen G. Lipsey
William D. & Diane Matthewman
Laura Ann & William R. McCall, Jr.
Caroline P. Normann
Sidney S. & Ruthie Simmons
Paul S. & Marte V. Singerman
Glenn J. & Sheryl Waldman
Christine C. & Thomas G. Welch
James R. Wiley
Class of 1984
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$119,432.00
324
10%
Founders Society - gold
Edward & Julia D. Downey
Barristers
Alan B. & Lauren K. Cohn
Partners
Bill Bone*
Scott C. Ilgenfritz
Trusler Society
Hank B. Campbell
Allen N. Jelks, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Jack J. & Laurie B. Aiello
Thomas R. & Caroline R. Bolf
Patrick M. Bryan
Howard S. Dargan
Steven M. Dunn
Brian T. & Ariadne M. Fitzgerald
Anthony Minicucci & Celeste Gruenstein
Marlene Hammock
Christopher C. & Sally H. Hazelip
James R. Lussier & Nancy C. Jacobson
Richard L. & Linda G. Levy
R. Dennis Tweed & Cheryl J. Lister
Cynthia Z. & Alexander C. MacKinnon
Michael L. & Barbara A. O’Neill
Jeffrey C. & Kathy Regan
Brian J. & Elizabeth Thompson Stack
Brian D. & Nancy L. Stokes
Sarah Ritterhoff & Daniel C. Williams
Class of 1985
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$36,092.00
364
11%
Barristers
Michael A. Hanzman
Trusler Society
Mark W. Klingensmith
Eduardo Palmer*
Cynthia C. & Michael Slack
Richard B. & Lisa L. Troutman
Thank you for your support
WINTER 2008
75
JD ALUMNI
Enrichment Society
Alan I. & Jacquelyn M. Armour
Bill Berke
Patricia G. & James F. Butler, III
C. William Sharon &
Amelia M. Campbell
Raul A. & Mary L. Cuervo
Lynne M. & C. Vanleer Davis III
Steven & Stacey P. Ellison
Gregg H. & Jessica Fierman
Brian T. & Ariadne M. Fitzgerald
Robert M. & Helene W. Geller
Elizabeth G. Gonzalez
Willie E. & Teresa T. Hall
Linda C. Hankins
Paul J. Leichter & Brenda S. Hibbeln
Michael G. & Lucy W. Kerman
Robert W. Lee
John E. Leighton & Caryn L. Bellus
Robert E. & Kathryn E. Lewis
Mark K. & Sherri K. Lindenberg
Lila L. & Scott R. McHenry
Daniel F. & Elizabeth A. McIntosh
Sandra L. Peacock
Martha R. Thomas
David T. Traub & Mary B. Weigly
William A. Parady & Salome J. Zikakis
Class of 1986
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$28,591.43
392
6%
Partners
Mark P. & Beverly J. Dikeman
Lawrence & Lynn M. Keefe*
James E. & Lori G. Thomison*
Enrichment Society
David M. Hudson & J. Parker Ailstock
Frank A. & Sharon Ashton
Frank M. & Ashley Bedell
E. Kelly Bittick, Jr. &
Patricia J. McClendon
Alden E. & Robert K. Burlington
Mark & Andrea H. Citrin
Daniel S. Livingstone & Mary C. Crotty
Stephen V. & Jacqueline S. Hoffman
Scott E. Hunt
Michael G. & Lucy W. Kerman
Steven D. & Pamela S. Lear
Morris C. Massey
William A. Parady & Salome J. Zikakis
Frank A. & Joanne C. Pavese
William G. & Jane K. Respess
William E. & Kimberly Dockery Ruffier
Rosalie M. Sanderson
Paula M. Sicard
James A. & Lisa B. Taylor
Please report any corrections to
Sara Grimm at [email protected]
or call 352-273-0640.
76
Class of 1987
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$7,600.00
378
8%
Partners
Mayanne Downs*
Trusler Society
Kathleen M. & Darwin R. Paustian
Enrichment Society
Alan B. & Kathy R. Almand
Robert R. Pedlow & Mary Jane Angelo
Jane D. Callahan
James E. & Elizabeth G. Collins
Kurt H. & Cathleen R. Dunkle
Harolyn H. & Amitava K. Dutt
John H. & Karen Caudill Dyer
John F & Nancy P. Halula
Susan L. Hanlon
Iris G. Hernandez
Maureen Monaghan &
Gerald G. Matheson
Helen W. & William J. McAfee
Pamela J. Mills
Robert W. & Karin C. Murphy
L. Delane & Kent L. Olson
Paul S. Quinn, Jr.
Mark E. & Lara B. Robinson
Ronnie A. Sabb
Alan F. & Kelly S. Scharf
Amanda B. Scott
Class of 1988
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$38,702.47
365
10%
Barristers
Alton L. Lightsey*
Associates
Barry B. & Elaine K. Ansbacher
Trusler Society
Beth B. Mills
Darrell W. & Deborah J. Payne
Frank D. & Katherine G. Upchurch*
Enrichment Society
Richard O. Alawaye
Bruce R. & Donna K. Anderson
Ronald G. Reeves & Anne Moorman Bell
Jacqueline Bozzuto
Timothy F. Campbell
Charles H. & Lisa H. Carver
Jonathan S. Coleman
Kraig A. & Heather L. Conn
Kevin D. & Amy Z. Cooper
R. Scott & Monica O. Costantino
Michael P. Donaldson
John F. & Nancy P. Halula
Mark J. & Elizabeth A. Heise
Mark E. Holcomb & Susan L. Kelsey
Frank A. & Gillian Landgraff
Robert W. & Karin C. Murphy
Denise A. & L. M. Reeder, Jr.
Carl D. & Wendy S. Roston
Ellen R. & Scott B. Saul
Pierre J. & Joanmarie K. Seacord
Michael D. & Diane Simon
Douglas A. Smith
Gerard F. & Joann T. Wehle
W. Scott & Diane H. Wilson
Rita L. Young
Class of 1991
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Class of 1989
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Enrichment Society
Stephen A. Medina & Michelle Anchors
Steven L. & Vivian H. Beiley
Christopher W. & Kristine M. Boyett
Thomas P. & Kate L. Briggmann
Lon W. & Sherri B. Crow
Patrick J. & Martha H. Formella
Larry C. Frarey
John M. Gillies
Michael D. Kaminer
Pamela M. McClain
Jon A. & Betsy L. Morris
Edward M. & Rima Y. Mullins
Sylvia A. & R. B. Norris
Robert J. & Julie W. Pile
Katrina D. & Garrison A. Rolle
Kelly B. & David A. Rose
Lynda A. & Lawrence J. Russell
Edwin A. Scales III
William S. Van Ness
$6,713.44
355
6%
Founders Society - silver
Corinne C. Hodak
Associates
John T. & Leah A. Rogerson
Trusler Society
Patrick S. Cousins &
Kaydne Roberts Cousins
Michael L. & Jane M. Ferguson
Enrichment Society
Cathleen G. & Jeffery S. Bell
Rhonda B. & Kenneth D. Boggess
W. Bard & Kathryn W. Brockman
Julianna K. & Roy D. Burke
Marc D. & Tracy D. Chapman
William L. Honnef &
Monique L. Cordray
Donald A. & Gene S. Dvornik
Katherine M. Koops
Howard O. & Ann S. McGillin
Charles P. & Deborah A. Mitchell
Evan B. & Michelle A. Plotka
Class of 1990
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$7,805.00
379
7%
Associates
Glenn L. & Michele Criser
Jack A. & Jordana S. Weiss
Trusler Society
Ernest A. & Maria G. Cox
Julie A. Moxley
Enrichment Society
Joseph L. & Kimberlee T. Amos
David L. Bilsker
Casey M. & Kelli A. Cavanaugh
Marc D. & Tracy D. Chapman
Derrick E. & Stacey D. Cox
M. Chris & Lisa K. Edwards
Karen G. & Mark H. Getelman
Jeffrey D. & Natasha K. Hogan
Laura M. & Mallory N. Horton
Suzanne M. Judas
Bernardo Lopez & Janice L. Bergmann
Burke G. & Mary A. Lopez
John D. & Lynnette M. Malkowski
Edward M. & Rima Y. Mullins
Kenneth C. Pope
Andrew T. & Mardi L. Pozzuto
Darrin R. & Mandy S. Schutt
John T. Wettach, Jr.
Felecia G. & Brent M. Ziegler
$5,145.00
379
7%
Trusler Society
Wendy H. Werb
Class of 1992
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$3,960.00
365
8%
Enrichment Society
Jena R. & Robert S. Atlass
Morgan R. & Elizabeth Bentley
Alexander M. Stremler &
Alexandra Bongard-Stremler
Regina L. Deiulio
Scott B. Strange &
Ms. Lisa A. Esposito
Patrick J. & Martha H. Formella
S. Katherine Frazier
Courtney K. & Laurence S. Grimm
Jane A. Houk
D. Hugh & Terri M. Kinsey
Eric S. Kolar
Cynthia A. & Kenneth La Roe
Amy S. Lowndes
Sean W. & Paula P. O’Brien
Frederick D. & Lisa M. Page
John M. Porter
John W. & Katherine A. Bunn
Randolph, Jr.
Steven H. & Lori E. Rubin
Lynn M. Schackow
Jonathan D. & Stacey W. Wald
Susan M. & Joseph Zahniser
Andrew D. & Erica S. Shultz Zaron
UF LAW
Class of 1993
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$36,785.17
406
8%
Barristers
Kathleen R. Lightsey
Partners
K. Judith Lane*
Trusler Society
Nancy T. Baldwin
Bruce M. & Medea D. Harris*
Enrichment Society
Todd A. & Michelle M. Bancroft
Yahn W. Bernier
Cecilia R. & James A. Boyd, Jr.
R. Edson & Gennifer L. Briggs
Heather R. Brock &
Edwin W. Parkinson III
David E. Cannella
Gregory J. & Elizabeth M. DeChurch
Gregory S. & Gina M. Hagopian
William J. & Sara E. Hazzard
Karl T. & Rachele D. Klein
Robert M. & Christina S. Linz
Donna L. Longhouse
Jennifer H. & John R. McRae
Mary A. Merchant
Ami R. Patel
Janice M. & Dale J. Rickert
Tatiana R. & Julio C. Salvador, Jr.
Michael D. Simons
Robert Thornhill III
Jeffrey A. & Tanya M. Tochner
Julie S. & Byron A. Todman
Class of 1994
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$9,570.00
381
9%
Associates
Matthew N. & Suzanne S. Posgay
Trusler Society
Thomas M. & Shannon C. McAleavey
Marc A. Wites*
Enrichment Society
Kimberly B. & Gary Blanchard
Duane A. & Teresa K. Daiker
Tony M. Fineman
Kenneth R. & Tamara W. Fountain
William C. & Maria B. Guthrie
George W. & Georgianna M. Hatch
Kenneth P. Hazouri
Megan A. Kelly
Michael E. & Joanna H. Kinney
Lawrence B. & Julie Lambert
Martin E. Leach
Thomas W. & Sealy H. Ledman
Paul B. & Suzanne H. McCawley
Fehintola Kemi & Bamiduro R. Oguntebi
Curry G. & Anne D. Pajcic
J. Grier & P. Kristen Pressly
Abel A. & Tammy H. Putnam
Barbara L. & Douglas A. Richard
Keith W. & Suzanne I. Rizzardi
George S. Savage
Nicholas A. & Carol B. Shannin
Michael A. & Melissa R. Silva
Laura J. Varela
Tad A. Yates
Class of 1995
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$148,311.52
380
9%
Founders Society - gold
R. Dewey & Lynn E. Burnsed
Misty M. Chaves-Taylor
Michael D. & Cynthia A. Crosbie
Eric J. Dirga
Curtis N. & Julie A. Flajole
Kimberly R. Keravouri
Michael E. & Joanna H. Kinney
Joseph H. Lang, Jr.
Keersten H. & Gregory F. Martinez
James M. & Stacy A. Matulis
Patrick F. McCormack
Jeffrey M. McFarland
Lew I. & Jennifer I. Minsky
Thomas G. Norsworthy
William C. Rencher
Richard A. & Kimberly F. Rodgers
Matthew L. & Nancy K. Rosin
Christine R. & Jeremy M. Sensenig
Christian D. & K. Shawn Shields
Jeffrey M. & Lisa S. Taylor
Daniel R. & Tina G. Weede
Thomas A. & Leigh A. Zehnder
Class of 1996
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$6,750.00
373
9%
Trusler Society
Henry T. & Sheila G. Sorensen
Greg & Sonya M. Brown
Patrick P. & Melissa B. Coll
Andrea M. & David De Camara
Kevin D. Fowler & Andrea J. Fowler
Shaw Q. & Matthew S. Goodrich
Jonathan S. Gowdy
James F. & Mary Beth K. Johnston
Sandra C. & K. Wayne Kahle
Marisol G. & E. A. Lauerman III
Joanne Toner & Russell D. Prescott
John D. Ruffier
Christine R. & Jeremy M. Sensenig
David Tetrick, Jr.
John A. Walker & Stephanie J. Toothaker
F. Eugene Atwood & Dabney D. Ware
Kathryn B. Williams
Class of 1997
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$7,721.82
374
7%
Partners
Rahul & Swati R. Patel*
Trusler Society
Maria C. Carantzas
Donovan L. Parker
Enrichment Society
Carolyn S. & Michael R. Ansay
Daniel & Lynne F. Bachrach
Tina M. & Robert A. Bird
Andrew J. & Carol M. Bohlmann
Richard J. Brooderson &
JoAnn M. Guerrero
Partners
Timothy M. & Jayne Cerio
Enrichment Society
Kevin A. & Prudence L. Ashley
Scott E. Atwood
John E. Leighton & Caryn L. Bellus
CH A N G I N G L I V E S
“As a T.A. for first-year students, I have the
opportunity to be part of the outstanding
legal writing program and contribute to the
development of these essential skills in our
future lawyers and leaders.”
WINTER 2008
Jenny Perkins
2L
Teaching Assistant for
Legal Research and Writing
and Appellate Advocacy
77
JD ALUMNI
Enrichment Society
Debra T. & Dan R. Alexander
F. Eugene Atwood & Dabney D. Ware
H. S. Udaykumar & Christina Bohannan
Brian D. Burgoon
Christa E. & James T. Calamas
Richard R. Chaves
Kevin B. Covington
Robert H. & Rachel D. Gebaide
Shannon B. & Downing L. Gray
L. E. Hutton
Sherri L. Johnson
Patrick J. & Michelle D. Lane
Sigrid S. & Daniel D. McCawley
Kurt A. Raulin
Matthew C. Sperry
John A. Walker & Stephanie J. Toothaker
Christopher M. & Shannon Tuccitto
Class of 1998
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$28,996.00
388
8%
Partners
David M. & Rachel K. Seifer
Trusler Society
Ellen C. Ham
Enrichment Society
Linda A. Alley
Chintan K. Amin
J. Carter & Dana D. Andersen
Eric N. Appleton
Bradley J. & Tandy G. Bondi
Derek E. Bruce
Eric M. & Tara A. Ellsley
Robert T. & Jodi Ervin
Jeffrey M. & Joan Hazen
Kristy M. Johnson
Julie M. Levitt
Sheryl Blackmon & Milton Mandoeng
Robert E. McFadden
Kenneth S. Piernik & Kimberly M. Kleiss
Scott D. & Ingrid H. Ponce
Taylor K. & Manjiri S. Rose
Michael J. & Laura H. Schmidt
Brian K. Szilvasy
Kenneth D. & Tamara A. Tuschhoff
Joshua B. & Lizette K. Weingard
Mary Ellen & Stephen A. Winkler
Class of 1999
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$10,431.88
390
11%
Partners
Jeffrey P. & Jan M. Brock*
Enrichment Society
Bradley T. & Samantha L. Borden
Jordan P. & Johanna W. Clark
Marc A. & Karen Z. Consalo
78
David L. & Caroline H. Dixon
Aubrey Harry Ducker, Jr. &
Laurie K. Weatherford
Donna J. Ernest
Jonathan A. Feldman
Brian J. & Stacy B. Fender
Joseph E. Fluet III
Holly J. & D. Scott Greer
Kimberly J. Gustafson
Gregory C. & Stephanie S. Harrell
Maureen M. & James Hazen
Jason Z. Jones
Chris N. & Melissa A. Kontaridis
Brian D. & Candace M. Leebrick
Rachel A. & Robert A. Lunsford
Samuel A. & Sarah G. Maroon
Katherine & William E. Martin, Jr.
Michael G. & Jennifer R. Moore
Greg T. & Joy Sabino Mullane
Ginny R. Neal
Graham C. & Lara Hardy Penn
William A. & Jennifer L. Pinto
J. Grier & P. Kristen Pressly
Richard P. Rollo
Alec D. & Ginger J. Russell
Renee E. & Thomas P. Thompson III
Ormend G. & Mary A. Yeilding
Class of 2000
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$25,282.54
393
8%
Partners
K. Taylor White
Enrichment Society
Adam L. Alpert
Paul B. Bernstein
Brandon C. & Rachel E. Biederman
Marc A. & Karen Z. Consalo
Mark H. & Kimberly C. Dahlmeier
Edward J. Dyke III
Duane L. Pinnock &
Ashley D. Foster-Pinnock
Beth Ann Gause
Paul A. Greenspan
Jill K. Harmon
Russell Koonin
Robert L. & Jennifer Lancaster
Ian R. Leavengood
Clint S. & Jennifer S. Malone
Ashley B. Moody
Andrea L. Niedermeyer
Graham C. & Lara Hardy Penn
Derek A. Schroth & Anna Perry-Schroth
Paul V. Scott
Andrew P. Speranzini
Laurie E. Stern
Sara A. & Don Tolliver
William R. Vincent
Robert G. Whittel
Class of 2001
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$8,709.00
384
11%
Partners
Brad Culpepper II
Trusler Society
Maegen Peek Luka
Enrichment Society
Ben & Katie V. Alexander
Kelly E. Anderson
J. Richard & Wendy K. Caskey
T. Spencer Crowley III
Brandon P. Cruz
Brian C. & Melonee G. Dowling
Jon T. Gatto
Jaime R. & Gregory T. Girgenti
Bradley R. & Vanessa R. Gould
E. John & Yali C. Gregory
Laura G. Herzog
Matthew M. & Sarah N. Jackson
Matthew B. & Marjorie C. Lerner
Samuel R. & Stacie M. Linsky
Rachel A. & Robert A. Lunsford
Jason S. & Victoria O. Miller
Richard J. & Jennifer L. Mockler III
Keith E. Myers
Jeffrey A. Neiman
Melody A. Nundy
Lara Osofsky & Michael D. Leader
Duane L. Pinnock &
Ashley D. Foster-Pinnock
Christopher M. & Sharon C. Sacco
Christian R. & Kelly K. Sawczyn
Andrew D. Zaron & Erica S. Shultz Zaron
Marc S. & Lillian M. Shuster
Justin B. Uhlemann
Class of 2002
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$6,307.00
404
9%
Enrichment Society
Jeffrey W. & Amanda M. Abraham
Matthew C. Vinton & Lynn S. Alfano
Sara S. & Joshua L. Becker
Robert Bulloch
C. LeAnn Davis
John T. & Jamie L. Dekle
Samantha S. Feuer
James E. & Allison A. Frye
Brian H. Koch
Theodore S. & Jennifer L. Kypreos
Philip R. & Kathryn K. Lammens
Jameil C. & Arleathia R. McWhorter
George R. & Heather T. Moraitis
Elaine I. Parris
Matthew D. & Amber N. Patterson
James N. & LaTeshia R. Robinson
David C. & Caryn W. Scileppi
Kellye A. Shoemaker
Mara A. Strier
Melissa L. Wheaton-McDuffie
Allen C. & Alicia Winsor
Class of 2003
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$9,711.66
433
12%
Enrichment Society
Mark A. & Mary A. Addington
Sara S. & Joshua L. Becker
Richard J. Brooderson &
JoAnn M. Guerrero
Jessica M. Callow
Ryan S. Cobbs
John T. & Kim Conner
Sarah Cortvriend
Benjamin F. Diamond
Juan M. Diaz
Linda C. & Jerome F. Dolan
Megan J. & James E. Ellis II
Meredith T. Fensom
Leslie E. Stiers & Melissa Fernandez
Roger D. & Shelly Hall
Pamela J. Hatley
Lauren C. Heatwole
Todd E. Herberghs
Kevin E. & Martha A. Jakab
Nicole C. Kibert
Elenore C. & Robert D. Klingler
Barry D. Lapides
Robyn L. Mandel
Kari D. & John Marsland-Pettit
Susan L. & David W. Mikolaitis
Shelly E. Nixon
Megan A. Odroniec
B. Darin Patton
Adam P. Philpott
Kevin E. Regan
Carlo A. Rodriguez
Cecil D. & Jacquatte L. Rolle
Sarah E. Rumpf
Leslie E. Stiers & Melissa Fernandez
Courtenay S. & Sarah G. Terrell
Scott A. & Erica A. Underwood
Matthew C. Vinton & Lynn S. Alfano
J. Phillip Warren
Richard L. & Jennifer S. Weldon
Class of 2004
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$9,571.00
400
17%
Enrichment Society
Bruce McGrew & Joni Batie-McGrew
Lenore T. Brakefield
UF LAW
Matthew C. & Catherine D. Brewer
K. Clayton & Sarah M. Bricklemyer
Joshua R. & Monica R. Brown
Reed R. Clary IV
William T. & Meegan L. Cook
Derek S. Cooper
Nathan L. Coppernoll
Elizabeth M. Crowder
Lauren E. Cury
Nelson D. Diaz
David Gonzalez & Maria C. Priovolos
Brent A. Gordon
Jason Gordon
Lauren K. Gralnik
Erin M. Gray
Whitney C. & Gregory C. Harper
Donovan A. Huseman, Jr.
Gregg E. Hutt
Adria M. & Matthew S. Jensen
Bret & Maria Jones
Micah G. & Patti J. Keating
Ryan M. Kroll
Jordan G. Lee & Amy E. Bradd
Michael J. Linn
Brandon L. Marshall
Lorie A. Mason
Tiffani F. & Ryan G. Miller
Chad M. Muney
Nicholas D. & Kristina L. Nanton
Matthew D. & Amber N. Patterson
David Gonzalez & Maria C. Priovolos
Allison N. Ringler
Anna C. Shea
Rebecca Shwayri
Michael P. Silver
Stacy F. & Joel S. Speiller
Loretta J. Thompson
Courtney E. & Mary M. Walsh
Jake R. Williams
Elizabeth A. Wulff
David A. & Grayce Yarema
Laura M. & Robert E. Young
Please report any corrections to
Sara Grimm at [email protected]
or call 352-273-0640.
Class of 2005
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$18,077.00
375
18%
Partners
Brian T. Degnan*
Trusler Society
Jennifer M. Barrett
Diane L. Dick
Edgardo Romero & Monica Vila
Enrichment Society
Ronald J. Antonin
Scott R. & Dana Bauries
Jill F. & Edward R. Bechtold
William M. Dillon &
Kimberley A. Belcastro
Angela F. & David L. Benjamin
Todd C. Brister
Tobi B. Butensky
Doyle R. Campbell
Robert A. Caplen
Christopher L. Carmody
Deborah E. Cupples
Kimberly A. Davis
William M. Dillon &
Kimberley A. Belcastro
Tammi J. Driver
Douglas C. Edenfield
Gregory L. & Donna H. Edwards
Meredith C. Fields
Michael K. Freedman
Norman W. Gregory
A. Felipe Guerrero
Carolyn M. & Jesse B. Kershner
Ryan A. Lopez
Meredith D. Lukoff
Michael J. & Marisa L. McDonald
Julie C. Miller
Robyn E. Moore
Charles R. & Laurie P. Morgan
Orlando P. Ojeda, Jr.
Toby V. Olvera
Elizabeth Outler
Ryan G. Padgett
Lindsay M. Patrick
Hemant M. Piduru
Laura M. & William P. Reich
Robert G. & Rhonda S. Reid
Michael A. Sayre
Adam M. & Elizabeth A. Shonson
Seth P. & Shawna N. Traub
Whitney M. Untiedt
Dayle M. & Greg Van Hoose
Janelle A. Weber
Beranton J. & Denise L. Whisenant
Erica K. Williams
Thomas G. Wilson III
Melinda F. Wimbish
Sarah Elizabeth Zuckerman
Class of 2006
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$5,478.50
408
10%
Enrichment Society
Steffan K. Alexander
AnneMarie H. Bui
Lauren A. Carmody
Charles T. Douglas, Jr.
David D. & Dayna G. Duncan
Leonard V. Feigel
Anthony P. Felice
Christine L. Fuqua
Ashley N. Girolamo
Sarah J. & Kenneth W. Knight
Gregory M. Lefkowitz & Elizabeth M.
Perez-Lefkowitz
Drew T. Melville
Jeremy C. Sahn
Carlos E. Sandoval, Jr.
Daniel L. & Diane L. Schaps
John H. & Julie H. Seibert
Donald H. Tiller III
Brikena I. & David J. Tomasic
Jeffrey T. Troiano
Lauren L. Valiente
George M. Wright
Diane J. & Robert R. Zelmer
Making a
Contribution
The Office of Development and
Alumni Affairs coordinates alumni
activities and fundraising for the
College of Law, including activities
of the Law Center Association Inc.
Board of Trustees and the Alumni
Council. To make a contribution,
please make your check payable
to UF Law Center Association to
the address below. Donations are
tax deductible as allowed by law.
For more information on making
an endowed or estate gift, please
contact:
Office of Development
& Alumni Affairs
Kelley Frohlich
Senior Director of Development
Vince PremDas
Director of Development
Sara Grimm
Director of Annual Fund &
Stewardship Programs
Victoria Rudd
Assistant Director of Development
Fredric G. Levin
College of Law P.O. Box 117623,
Gainesville, FL 32611
Phone: (352) 273-0640
Fax: (352) 392-3434
Student photos by Kristen Hines
Thank you for your support
WINTER 2008
79
LLMT Alumni
Graduates of the Graduate Tax Program — ranked in the nation’s top two —
provided significant financial support so the college could continue to meet the
challenge of achieving top-tier excellence in legal education.
Class of 1975
Class Total:
$17,594.00
No. in Class:
39
Participation:
18%
Barristers
K. Lawrence & Maureen G. Gragg
Partners
Robert E. Glennon, Jr.
Trusler Society
Dennis A. & Peggy M. Calfee
Enrichment Society
Harry S. Colburn, Jr.
David M. Hudson & J. Parker Ailstock
William V. & Shirley F. Linne
Charles E. & Kathleen P. Roberts
Class of 1976
Class Total:
$2,075.00
No. in Class:
42
Participation:
14%
Trusler Society
James B. & Jingli C. O’Neal
Enrichment Society
Bernard A. Barton, Jr.
R. Neal & Linda W. Manners
Charlton & Regina Mills
Robert A. & Caryl G. Pierce
Ronald L. & Barbara B. Rowland
Class of 1977
Class Total:
$23,566.36
No. in Class:
39
Participation:
23%
Founders Society - silver
Ellen B. Gelberg
Barristers
Peter M. MacNamara &
M. Therese Vento
Hans G. & Deborah M. H. Tanzler
Associates
Nathaniel L. & Debra L. Doliner
Trusler Society
Philip B. & Barbara L. Barr
Enrichment Society
Thomas H. Carter, Jr.
John J. & Lynn M. Collins
Michael D. Fowler
80
Class of 1978
Class Total:
$4,550.00
No. in Class:
68
Participation:
12%
Associates
William A. & Laura M. Boyles
Paul D. Fitzpatrick
Enrichment Society
David H. & Kathryn E. Evaul
Don H. & Patrice D. Goode
Bradley C. & Candace Grossenburg
Ronald L. Siegel
Class of 1979
Class Total:
$18,070.87
No. in Class:
47
Participation:
19%
Barristers
David H. Peek
Partners
John J. & Lynn G. Scroggin
Associates
Cheryl L. & Scott E. Gordon
Trusler Society
Jean C. Coker
Enrichment Society
Laurence C. & Jane P. Hames
Steven C. Lee
William J. Lindsay, Jr.
Class of 1980
Class Total:
$23,110.88
No. in Class:
47
Participation:
30%
Founders Society - gold
Brian M. & Joan B. O’Connell
Partners
Peter T. & Karla D. Kirkwood
Lindy L. Paull
Enrichment Society
David H. Kessler
Gerald R. & Sarah S. Kleedehn
Gary E. Lakritz
Patrick M. & Donna McCann
Charles I. & Judith W. Nash
Robert C. Rogers, Jr.
Robert L. & Vicki Y. Rowe
Ronald A. & Kathleen A. Worley
Class of 1981
Class Total:
$5,763.00
No. in Class:
67
Participation:
18%
Partners
Randolph J. & Sue N. Rush
Trusler Society
Michael S. Hawley & Katherine Pierce
Enrichment Society
Earl H. & Patricia K. Archer
Richard G. Cherry
Jennifer C. & Russell D. Hepler
Patrick J. McGowan
Daniel C. & Terry M. Re
Anton H. & Janet Zidansek
Class of 1982
Class Total:
$5,715.00
No. in Class:
61
Participation:
13%
Partners
Michael D. & Mary P. Minton
Associates
Gary J. Cohen
Trusler Society
Patricia A. & Charles H. Willing, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Steven R. & Rebecca F. Cole
Stephen B. & Rebecca B. Hatcher
I. Paul & Holly Mandelkern
Alan L. & Suzanne D. Rubens
Class of 1983
Class Total:
$11,160.00
No. in Class:
60
Participation:
28%
Barristers
John N. & Ruth T. Giordano
Trusler Society
John A. & Linda M. Hirschy
Enrichment Society
Wayne P. & Jennie B. Bryan
Stephen L. & Debra M. Cordell
Alan H. Daniels
Alan S. & Marcia Gassman
Stuart E. & Alisa G. Goldberg
Michael A. & Linda Gorens-Levey
Mark E. & Karin A. Manovich
Robert L. & Penne W. Miller
James P. & Colleen C. Stevens
Gregory F. & Susan K. Wilder
James B. & Sharon K. Wiley
Class of 1984
Class Total:
$1,700.00
No. in Class:
74
Participation:
7%
Trusler Society
Leslie F. Johnson & Lisa C. Berry
Enrichment Society
Lloyd V. & Ruth F. Crawford
M. Elaina Massey
R. Dennis Tweed & Cheryl J. Lister
Carl J. & Sharon A. V. Zahner
Class of 1985
Class Total:
$3,875.00
No. in Class:
74
Participation:
14%
Barristers
Alan B. & Lauren K. Cohn
Enrichment Society
Christopher A. Detzel
John A. & Sarah M. Garner
John P. Iurlano
Richard L. & Linda G. Levy
Stephen R. & Paige B. Looney
Class of 1986
Class Total:
$1,560.00
No. in Class:
49
Participation:
10%
Trusler Society
J. Carter & Barbara K. Perkins*
Enrichment Society
David K. & Donna J. Cahoone
David P. & Debbie M. Webb
Class of 1987
Class Total:
$574.00
No. in Class:
63
Participation:
10%
Enrichment Society
Shawn M. & Kathryn D. Flanagan
Scott E. Hunt
Mark A. Prater
Class of 1988
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$1,400.00
43
9%
UF LAW
CH A N G I N G L I V E S
“UF law has provided me with the opportunity to challenge
myself intellectually, establish life-long friendships and be
well-prepared for a rewarding legal career.”
Enrichment Society
Jane D. Callahan
Bruce D. & Deborah M. Johnson
Amanda B. Scott
Dirk A. Williams
Class of 1989
Class Total:
$950.00
No. in Class:
63
Participation:
8%
Enrichment Society
Allen & Elmira Buckley
Charles L. & Greta Cooper
William H. & Karen Johnson
John E. & Joan C. Lawlor
Michael R. & Laura L. Nelson
Class of 1990
Class Total:
$3,450.00
No. in Class:
53
Participation:
9%
Barristers
A. Brian Phillips*
Enrichment Society
William L. & Dorothy H. Curry
Don E. & Kimberly A. Goebel
Jonathan H. & Leigh M. Nason
Daniel T. White
Class of 1991
Class Total:
$350.00
No. in Class:
63
Participation:
5%
Enrichment Society
Michael G. & Analisa Little
Norma Stanley
Daniel H. & Julie W. Waters
Class of 1992
Class Total:
$1,100.00
No. in Class:
60
Participation:
3%
Associates
Jack A. & Jordana S. Weiss
Enrichment Society
Glenn M. & Deborah M. Booker
Class of 1993
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$1,350.00
57
12%
WINTER 2008
Enrichment Society
Dwayne W. Barrett & Miriam L. Bliss
Jane A. Houk
John F. Jewell
Lester B. & Stacey L. Law
Douglas A. Smith
William P. & Jeannie Zox
Class of 1994
Class Total:
$2,216.82
No. in Class:
64
Participation:
9%
Trusler Society
Gary W. & Mary E. Huston
Enrichment Society
Shannon B. & Downing L. Gray
Donna L. Longhouse
Jeffrey A. Maine
Camille L. Worsnop
Class of 1995
Class Total:
$595.00
No. in Class:
74
Participation:
8%
Enrichment Society
Nancy J. & Bradford C. Gibbs
Bruce R. & Ann W. Jacob
Class of 1996
Class Total:
$850.00
No. in Class:
74
Participation:
8%
Enrichment Society
Henry N. & Laurie Dick
Lamont C. & Leslie E. Loo
Lew I. & Jennifer I. Minsky
Matthew R. & Julie H. O’Kane
Peter A. Rivellini
Class of 1997
Class Total:
$230.00
No. in Class:
53
Participation:
8%
Enrichment Society
David Kamer & Marcia B. Samuels
Keith M. Olivia
Class of 1998
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$1,875.00
69
7%
Associates
Andrew K. & Marie S. Strimaitis
Enrichment Society
Matthew J. Ahearn
Robert J. Barna
Class of 1999
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Enrichment Society
Robert T. & Jodi Ervin
William J. Liss
Matthew C. Sperry
$550.00
45
9%
Class of 2000
Class Total:
$825.00
No. in Class:
64
Participation:
8%
Enrichment Society
Bradley T. & Samantha L. Borden
Christopher R. D’Amico
Timothy F. & Michonne McHugh
Diego L. Restrepo &
Tania M. Gomez-Restrepo
Class of 2001
Class Total:
$1,105.00
No. in Class:
64
Participation:
9%
Enrichment Society
Alton D. & Kelly S. Bain
Robert L. & Jennifer Lancaster
Rachel A. & Robert A. Lunsford
Sara A. & Don Tolliver
M. Bernadette Welch
Class of 2002
Class Total:
$1,150.00
No. in Class:
63
Participation:
11%
Enrichment Society
Elena Kaplan
Steven D. & Pamela S. Lear
Richard J. & Jennifer L. Mockler III
Julius B. Remmen
Kerry A. Ryan
Joseph W. & Kylene L. Zitzka
Class of 2003
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
$325.00
80
5%
Shilpa Mirchandani
LL.M. in Taxation
Orlando
(pictured on page 51)
Enrichment Society
Greg T. & Joy Sabino Mullane
Class of 2004
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Partners
J. Stephen Pullum
Enrichment Society
Ashley N. Calhoun
Barry D. Lapides
$5,300.00
79
6%
Class of 2005
Class Total:
$1,000.00
No. in Class:
77
Participation:
10%
Enrichment Society
W. Michael Black
Thomas B. Christenson II
Jordan G. Lee & Amy E. Bradd
Jeffrey S. Luechtefeld
John M. & Eleanor G. McDonald
Allison N. Ringler
Class of 2006
Class Total:
$1,130.00
No. in Class:
64
Participation:
11%
Enrichment Society
William M. Dillon &
Kimberley A. Belcastro
Micah G. & Patti J. Keating
Pierre G. Philantrope
Phyllis C. & James W. Smith III
Mara A. Strier
Class of 2007
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Enrichment Society
Jeffrey T. Troiano
$100.00
72
1%
Please report any corrections
to Sara Grimm at [email protected]
ufl.edu or call 352-273-0640.
81
FAREWELL
Editor
Associate Director of Communications
Kathy Fleming, APR, CPRC
Director of Communications
Debra Amirin, APR
retiring fa c ulty m e m ber
Walter Weyrauch
Senior Writer
James Hellegaard
Editorial Assistant
Aline Baker
Photo Editor
Kristen Hines
Design
JS Design Studio
Printing
StorterChilds Printing Co.
A
sk any UF Law alum about which professors they remember, and
chances are the retiring Walter Weyrauch will be one of them.
Since 1957 he’s been a scholar in the fields of family law, business
organizations, comparative law and legal philosophy. But first he earned his
law degree at the University of Frankfurt and other degrees at Yale Law School,
Harvard Law School and Georgetown University.
In his 50 years at UF Law, he has impacted thousands of students,
many of whom have become the leaders of Florida. In a 1988 article in the
Florida Lawyer Magazine, now Lt. Gov. Jeffrey Kottkamp called Weyrauch
his favorite professor.
“The professor I found to be the most thought-provoking, entertaining and
realistic had to be Professor Walter O. Weyrauch,” Kottkamp said. “Professor
Weyrauch is a master of intellectual legal thought. Some students may not like
his approach, but at the same time no one can ignore what he says.”
During a speech to the graduating class in August 1985, Weyrauch called
upon the new members of the legal profession to resurrect the field’s values.
“On the basic level of teaching you to be lawyers, any fixed ideas you may
have had in approaching a case or controversy may have turned out to be
potentially damaging to your professional tasks,” he said. “Preconceived ideas
originate in more or less closed intellectual systems, while a lawyer, whether he
likes it or not, is forced to operate with open-ended likes of inquiry … ”
Mark Stein (JD 89), an attorney in Coral Gables, remembers listening to a
lecture that Weyrauch gave about growing up in Nazi Germany.
“His young life experiences were fascinating to listen to, particularly from
today’s perspective,” Stein said. “During the lecture he faced tough questions
from students, and he did not back down from explaining what was going on in
Germany at the time.”
After five decades he is still working and recently published “The
Experience of Lawlessness” in the New Criminal Law Review.
—Jason Silver
Editor’s Note: Also retiring this school year are two other popular and
respected professors, Fletcher Baldwin (see page 38) and Joe Little.
Professor Little joined UF Law in 1967 as an assistant professor. His career
has included writing numerous books and publications and serving as a
visiting faculty member at several universities around the world. He also
is known for his community service, having served as a Gainesville City
Commissioner (1972-78) and Gainesville Mayor-Commissioner (1977-78).
82
Correspondence and Address Changes
[email protected]
University of Florida Levin College of Law
P.O. Box 117633
Gainesville, FL 32611-7633
Telephone Numbers
http://www.law.ufl.edu/about/contact.shtml
U F L A W C E N T E R A S S O C I AT I O N I N C . 2 0 0 6 - 2 0 0 7
W.C. Gentry (JD 71)
Bruce Bokor (JD 72)
Michael McNerney (JD 73)
Dennis A. Calfee (JD 75)
E.L. Roy Hunt
Chairman
Chairman-elect
Immediate Past Chair
Treasurer
Secretary
Active Members
Charles W. Abbott (JD 53), Cesar Alvarez (JD 72), Mark Avera (JD 89), Jean
A. Bice (JD 75), Bruce H. Bokor (JD 72), Bill Bone (JD 84), Leslie W. Burke (JD
68), J. Thomas Cardwell (JD 66), Lawton M. Chiles, III, Charles E.
Commander (JD 65), Barry R. Davidson (JD 67), John A. DeVault III (JD 67),
John H. “Buddy ” Dyer, Jr. (JD 87), Ladd H. Fassett (JD 79), Andrew Fawbush
(JD 74), Michael L. Ferguson (JD 89), W. C. Gentry (JD 71), Linda R. Getzen
(JD 82), Gene K. Glasser (JD 72), Robert Glennon (JD 74), K. Lawrence Gragg
(JD 74), Scott G. Hawkins (JD 83), Michael Heekin (JD 78), Elizabeth Hernandez
(JD 83), Elizabeth A. Jenkins (JD 76), Hal H. Kantor (JD 72), Frederick Wayne
Leonhardt (JD 74), Christine N. Markussen (JD 72), Clifton A. McClelland, Jr.
(JD 69), Michael J. McNerney (JD 73), Donald Middlebrooks (JD 72), Michael
D. Minton (JD 81), James Moody, Jr. (JD 72), Lindy Paull (JD 80), S. Austin
Peele (JD 63), F. Wallace Pope, Jr. (JD 69), Becky A. Powhatan-Kelley (JD 76),
Mark Proctor (JD 75), Juliet M. Roulhac (JD 87), Oscar Sanchez (JD 82),
Everett J. Santos (JD 66), Ernest Sellers (JD 62), Lawrence E. Sellers, Jr. (JD
79), Linda L. Shelley (JD 77), Jacqueline Allee Smith (JD 78), W. Crit Smith
(JD 78), Mark Somerstein (JD 82), Marjorie Bekaert Thomas (JD 76),
Frank D. Upchurch , III (JD 74), John J. Upchurch, IV (JD 68), George A. Vaka
(JD 83), William A. Weber (JD 76), Peter W. Zinober (JD 69)
Ex-Officio
J. Bernard Machen, Robert Jerry, George Dawson,
Paul A. Robell, Mark Klingensmith (JD 85)
LAW ALUMNI COUNCIL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 2006-2007
Mark W. Klingensmith (JD 85)
Tim Cerio (JD 95)
Rahul Patel (JD 97)
Gary L. Printy (JD 82)
President
Immediate Past President
President-Elect
Secretary
At Large Members
J. Carter Andersen (JD 98), C. Randolph Coleman (JD 78), Mayanne Downs
(JD 87), Jeffrey D. Feldman (JD 81), Joseph C. Mellichamp III (JD 70), Matthew
N. Posgay (JD 94), Sarah Elizabeth Rumpf (JD 03), Misty Chaves-Taylor (JD 95)
Ex-Officio
W.C. Gentry (JD 71), Robert Jerry
UF LAW
UP AND COMING
Media Law Gains a Champion
M
B y Hedda P ro c h aska
any people aspire to change
the world, but few can tell
you exactly how they’re
going to do it. Ana-Klara
Hering is one of those rare
individuals capable of telling
you how she is going to make
a difference and making you believe it is possible.
A recent veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps with time
spent in Iraq, Hering did not originally anticipate walking
away from the University of Florida with three graduate
degrees. However, having already obtained a masters in
communication, she is now in a joint degree program
seeking her law degree and doctorate in media law and
policy and plans to apply these skills as a summer associate
for
Thomas
and
LoCicero in Tampa.
“It’s only all come
together for me in the
last six months,” Hering
says. “Sometimes you
don’t appreciate the value
of an experience until
after the fact, and the last
five years have been
that journey for me.”
Inspired by media law classes
within UF’s College of
Journalism and
Communications, Hering
discovered the
“nexus” of her passions.
“You walk out of those classes
saying
this is the kind of stuff every American should
know just to be an American,” says
Hering.
“Media law gave me the opportunity
to still be in the journalism world
while using some
of
my
other
skills.
I want to
serve journalists now, protect
what they do —
that’s where law
and media combine.”
WINTER 2008
By immersing herself in both fields, she will be
well equipped to serve journalists in whatever capacity
necessary — something she learned through her work at
The Brechner Center and the Marion Brechner Citizen
Access Project.
“My work here allowed me to do interviews with
the top investigative journalists around the state,” says
Hering. Observing their late hours, years of hard work and
minimal financial reward gave her a renewed appreciation
for what they were striving to achieve.
“They’re the ones who are really changing things, and
I was inspired by that,” says Hering. “I realized they need
good media attorneys to defend them when they get a
“I want to serve journalists
now, protect what they
do – that’s where law
and media combine.”
subpoena, or when someone doesn’t give them the public
record they have a right to, or when somebody wants a
prior restraint on something they want to publish.”
“I want to be a part of that mix,” declares Hering.
“They all talk about the lawyer that helped them win their
battle, so that a law was written or a scandal was revealed,
and something changed.”
Hering’s convictions are strengthened by her concern
that in today’s world, journalists are getting less support
due to the business being in a financial crisis. If journalists
do not receive proper support, their ability to perform as
watchdogs is threatened.
“If the journalists aren’t going to be a surrogate for
the public, to be able to learn on their behalf what the
government is doing, to be able to relay that information
so that citizens can make good decisions, then who’s going
to do it for them?” asks Hering.
While studying First Amendment theorist Vincent
Blasi, Hering came across a US Supreme Court case, New
York Times Co. v. United States, that made it possible for
the New York Times and Washington Post to publish
the Pentagon Papers. During this case Justice Black
made a profound point that Hering now describes
as capturing “the nexus between serving my
country as a Marine, the public as a journalist, and
journalists as a future media lawyer.”
Hering uses
tools of the
trade to support
journalists.
83
Events Calendar
2008
Jan 4
New York City Alumni Breakfast
Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers
7:30-8:30 a.m.
Jan 17
Florida Bar Mid-Year UF Law Alumni Reception
Miami, Hyatt Downtown, 6:30 p.m.
Jan 25
Graduate Tax Lecture Series
Guest Speaker: Tax Court Judge Robert Wherry
feb 1 Law Center Association Board Committee
Workshop Meeting
Tampa
Feb 15
Nelson Conference
Feb 16Music Law Conference
Feb 21-22Wolf Family Lecture Series on Real Property Law
Feb 28-MAR 1
Public Interest Environmental Conference
MAR 28
JLPP 20th Anniversary
Center for the Study of Race & Race Relations
Spring Lecture - honoring Federal Judge Stephan Mickle
APR 11-12
Board of Trustees/Law Alumni Council Board Meetings
Spring Book Award Ceremony
Orange & Blue Game
APR 18
Dunwody Distinguished Lecture
JUN 18-21 (TBA) Florida Bar Annual UF Law Alumni Reception
Boca Raton
SEPT 26-27
Board of Trustees/Law Alumni Council Board Meetings
Fall Book Award Ceremony
Gators vs. Ole Miss Football Game
All events take place in Gainesville unless otherwise indicated.
Please call (352) 273-0640 for more information on any of these events.
UF Homecoming Parade 2007: UF Law
Student Affairs Associate Dean Rachel
Inman (standing) joined UF Law students
as they rode on the fire engine law school
entry donated by Gerald Schackow (JD 65).
Schackow drove the truck, taking Tom Edwards
(foreground, JD 86) along for the ride.
NON-PROFIT
O R G A N I Z AT I O N
U . S . P O S TA G E PA I D
GAINESVILLE, FL
P.O. Box 117633
Gainesville, FL 32611-7633
PERMIT NO. 94

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