11-09-1973

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11-09-1973
!!NIVERSITY OF D AYTON
FLYER NE
VOL.
STUDENT PUBLICATION
li'RIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1973
xx, NO. 20
Food co-op to offer
lower-price products
By Terri Mattie
FN Staff Writer
Students will have the opportunity on Nov. 12 to buy food at
reduced prices when SG opens
their food co-op at Oak Day Swim
Center, 974 Irving Ave.
It will be run on a pre-order
basis. Students will order and
pay for the food i~ advance, then
pick it up on delivery day.
Students will be able to buy
fresh produce, dairy products,
bread, canned goods and grains.
SG will buy the food directly
from various wholesale stores
such as Country Fresh Egg
Farm, Trophy Nuts, Moler's
Dairy, Fr ey's Food, Tastee
Bread and Montana Mill and Co.
To cover overhead and spoilage,
customers will pay a service
charge of approximately five
percent.
Money to start the Food Co-op
Program will come from SG and
Fr. Cyril Middendorf. SG is
contributing $150 and Fr. Cy
$500.
Kathe Engro, SG vice-president
and chairman of the Food Co-op
Program, is basing it on the one
at Ohio State. Although students
participate in the food co-op
there, non-students run it. It
started three years ago on a preorder basis, then swMhed to
stocking the store.
The health permit is the main
obstacle preventing the food
co-op from opening, according to
Ms. Engro. Those students
working in the store will have to
8"et a food handler's license.
Days for ordering the food will
be Monday and Tuesday from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. in the SG office in
Kennedy Union. Pick-up will be
on Saturday from 12-5 p.m.
Food co-op organizers are
collecting bags and cartons to be
used to hold grains, nuts and
eggs, an ecology idea of using
things without wasting them,
according to Ms. Engro.
Reaction to the food co-op has
been favorable.
"It's a really good idea," said
Mona Behan (A&S-2) . "I buy a lot
of my own food and the prices at
the stores are too high."
"It's more convenient because
it's closer than walking to the
supermarket," said Jayne Raparelli (A&S-2). "You can buy
specifically what you want and
the quantities you want."
"It will be beneficial to
off-campus students," said Jo
Rack (A&S-3).
"It's a very good idea and
should have happened a long
time ago," said Barb Okishoff
(A&S-3).
or President's Advisory Council
SociaUst urges unity
Ca!!!!!chael presents goals
FN Staff Writer
Stokely Carmichael stressed
unity, liberation and revolution
in a speech Monday night in the
Fieldhouse.
Carmichael had goals to present
to a receptive audience of
approximately 250 people. "We
must understand ideology,
change capitalism and we must
speak about scientific socialism."
UNIFICATION
Carmichael has been living in
West Africa and studying under
the former President of Ghana,
the late Dr. Kwame N Krumah.
He is presently touring the
country, speaking on "N Krumahism" which calls for
Pan-Africanism (unification of
the African masses throughout
the world to facilitate their
liberation).
Carmichael began his four part
discussion with a quote stating
Krumah's doctrine, "Thought
without action is empty. Action
without thought is blind."
He then went on to define
ideology as "what this group
believes necessary to better the
nature of man.
"It (ideology) is the strongest
cohesive force we can find."
Carmichael equated change
with revolution. "Revolution
follows scientific principles. It is
not based on prophets telling us
what God said."
He quoted Martin Luther King,
whom he worked under during
the 60's. "If a man doesn't have
oesch examines nominees
By Jiil llardlnelll
FN Staff Writer
recent rumor has it that Rev.
ymond Roesch is trying his
dest to keep SG President
nchi Torrado off the Presint's Advisory Council. Fr.
sch denied this, however,
ing that Torrado is getting
e same consideration as are
other two nominees."
. Roesch said that he is trying
determine which of the three
didates is the most represente .~f the students, adding
t. .The student body presit IS not necessarily always
the most representative."
"As of yet, I have not even had
the time to interview them as I
have been swamped with work. I
don't feel any great pressure to
do so either, as the two students,
Noreen A. Buinewicz (A&S-3)
and Terry J. Wombacker (ED-3),
presently on the council are faithfully doing a good job."
Torrado contends that SG presidents or vice-presidents have
been asked to sit on the council
for the past three years. Fr.
Roesch, in a letter to Torrado,
disagreed saying, "During t he
last three years when the president or vice-president was a
member, such membership was
not automatic or reserved."
He gave other reasons why
Panchi wouldn't find the position
advantageous.
He said that council members
must keep certain tentative
decisions confidential. Torrado
agreed, saying, "Anything
brought out at these meetings
should be kept secret." However ,
he also said that "We (SG) do not
intend to keep t hings hidden
from t he students."
Accord ing to F r. Roes ch ,
students have difficulty contr ibuting to t he meetings because
"most of the things discussed are
not student affairs."
Torrado said, "The purpose of
t he President's Advisory Council
is to keep the president informed
of Univer sity activities. The
president a nd vice-president of
SG ar e in t he best position since
we are elected by the student
body."
Fr. Roesch said that in the end
the decision on whether or not to
choose Torrado will depend upon
"whether or not Panchi agrees to
support me and whether or not
he'll be a help to me in decision ·
making."
Fr. Roesch concluded by saying
that although he has disagreed
with some of Torrado's views, he
is pleased with his establishment
of the ombudswoman and that
there are no hard feelings.
"I do not believe that Torrado
would be difficult to work with if
I do appoint him to the council."
(UDPS folo by Campi.II)
STOKELY CARMICHAEL
something he's willing to die for, history books glamorize Amerithen he has nothing to live for." can heroic figures. Calling John
NO COMPROMISE
Kennedy a "knight in shining
Carmichael's statement, "a armor ," he credited Kennedy
revolutionary cannot compro- with t he murder of Patrice
mise in any matter," brought Lamumba, an African leader.
cheers and applause from the
"DOWNRIGHT STUPID"
audience.
Carmichael combined his views
He again invoked audience on capitalism and socialism int o
approval when he began a strong one t opic. Vehemently opposed
push for black people to unite. to capitalism, " a downright
"When you talk about your st upid system," he gave an
people, say black people are illustrative st ory about a manubea u tiful, black people are fact urer to emphasize his hatred
scientific."
of t he system.
Carmichael asked for t he
Giving many examples to
support of his audience when he degrade American society,
said, "Promise me if you don't Carmichael stated, "America is
have anything positive to say Africa's number one enemy.
about our people, you'll keep America hated Africa so much
she went to Africa and stole
your mout h shut."
He t hen went int o int erpreta- Africa's children!"
"We can lose America in the
tion of history. Strongly emphasizing t he fact that black history Sahara Desert of Africa!"
"We must understand what our
has either been misint erpreted
or completely ignored , Carmichael pointed out that most
(Cont1.....i on page 2)
Nixon urges nation
to conserve energy
President Nixon, in a public
address broadcast over radio and
t~levision networks Wednesday
mght, asked the nation to
conserve energy in the event of a
critical fuel shortage.
In the address, Nixon outlined
his emergency plans for
combating "a very acute energy
problem." Many of his proposals
will need the approval of
Congress before being acted
upon.
Nixon reported that he is
directing those industries and
utilities using coal for energy to
continue to do so and those using
other resources to attempt to
convert to coal for fuel. The
quantity of oil available to
airlines will be reduced, necessitating some flight cancellations.
Business firms will be directed
to reduce their usage of heating
oil for offices by 15 percent and
industries by 10 percent.
Nixon told the American people
that "it will be essential" for all
citizens to lower their home
thermostats by six degrees.
Nixon also requested Americans
to reduce their automobile speed
~o 50 m.p.h . on major highways
m order ot conserve gasoline
usage.
The Atomic Energy Commission has been asked to speed up
the licensing and construction of
nuclear plants from 10-year to
6-year projections.
Nixon also indicated that he will
be asking all state governors and
city mayors to "enforce the
appropriate actions at the state
level."
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PAGE 2
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F RIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1973
THE UD FLYER NEWS
~~.Q'.Q'[email protected]'~$"/.,0:::•:_!'.::e.::«:.t......:.;.•... . ...•... .•.'°! • •••••• :.: ••__-:.:1:."i!!:: ....•.•.-.!-.•.•.•. -•-•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•·,·.·.·,·,·.· ·,·,-·- ·;,;:,;~·:i
FLYER NEWBi1
..
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Editorialsif
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Fix The Elections
Last Sunday, Student Court
faithfully fulfilled their obligation
to uphold the Student Government Constitution. The Congressional elections were illegal because all members elected were
elected at large, not from geographical districts.
As a result, 19 members of 25
elected were from the off~ampus
area. Since these representatives
reflect different constituencies
with their different problems,
the Congress would have a continuing struggle to legislate impartially.
Student Government is loosely
structured to maintain flexibility
to respond to a changing student
body . The SG Constitution
provides the only definite guide·
lines which SG can use. U these
guidelines are ignored, one is left
with an unorganized and ineffectual body.
The lack of planning is not
entirely the fault of the chairman
of the Elections Board. Since the
Constitution is not too r estrictive, there has not been a set
procedure for the election or for
Congre ssional d istricts. This
Policy Box
EDITORIAL
LETTERS
The FL YER -HEWS
wei-• -
-
trlbutlon1 to lox I : L - to tfM
Editor. Letten ohovld not n c - 2SO
words. The FH NNrYn tt,e ...... , to
edit - . , . not rneftln a tllla - N n l.
411 contrll>utioM
be ~
-
ffl-
Deadline fo r i.tt.... to M puMlohed
Friday lo J p .n, . T_.y - , i few
T - y, J p . 111 . tfM - - · F.W.1.,
The right side
We blew it
ly Jeff Mason ( A ~)
ALTHOUGH HINDSIGHT is an easy endeavor and doesn't take
too much fortitude to use, I feel compelled to use it concerning our
present governmental crisis. I believe Amer ica had a chance to elect a
man whose strong points were in t he very areas that our crisis now
exists.
It seems to me that our troubles are rooted in the Vietnam War.
Millions of people became disenchanted with what was supposed to be
the greatest country in t he world, as t hey saw it mired in a long and
meaningless war.
THE STARS AND STRIPES became tai nted to many who saw
young men being killed, maimed, and addicted to dr ugs for the sake of
an ungrateful Asian dictatorship and a meaningless cause. The doubt
and di5trust raised by Vietnam seemed justified to many a
Water~ate surfaced. Part of the same govern ment t hat had charge of
the Vietnam War was engaged in an attempt to subvert the
democratic process.
. Charg~s of kick backs, lies, cover-ups and incompetency flew as a
v1ce_-pres1dent was forced to resign, giving millions of followers the
feeling that they'd been had.
OU_R ~RISIS, then, is two-fold. The combination of Vietnam and an
aston7'hmg lack of integrity in government has given America per
haps its sternest test. Yet, that test could have been avoided by
electing this farsighted man.
Ni~e years ago he called for no ground troops to be int roduced to
the Vietnam Wa~. He proposed a bombing of Hanoi and Haiphong and
a blockade of Haiphong harbor -- precisely the policy President Nixon
?elatedly took l~st December that freed the prisoners and ended our
mvolvem_ent. Nme years ago it was said by many that these policies
woul? brmg about.World War III -- at a time when the gap between
Russian and ~mer1can strength was much greater than it is now a nd
wh~n Red Chma w~s imbr?iled in the Red Guard affair and wa~ n·t
paymg much attention to mternational affairs.
HIS RE~ORD sho~ed him to be honest .. ruthlessly honest. On
man~ occa~ions he said unpopular things .. things that would hurl a
can<lidate m a~ election b_ut things ~hat he thought had to b<• said
had a right to know , He wo UJd Cr!'l JCJZ('
' ·
because he believed America
. .
~ewsmen ·· not a ~mart _µohtical move but an honest one. Ile was so
onest he couldn t equivocate on issues even when his campala-n
managers told him to.
n
. -~e was ahead of his time because he warned of the dangers of def
spendin~, po~erful unions and excessive government spending
ong be_fore mflat1on was an issue. He warned of lhc dangers of an
e~pand1Ji:nt aloof bureaucracy long before it achieved ils pri•l!ent
o . ese s
. e ~arned of the dangers of troop interv1-ntic;n in
~~e~?!: i:~~s:u~~nviv:m~n~
just beginning. He was ahi•ud of
e p asize
.at po\loer corrupts and hould h1
limit d be ·t
e ,
I governmental or private.
;c1
~~s
A::~c!'nONEJl~t!Yl proved to be his downfall. Ifo f1 II pr y lo th1
po J ,ca system - a system th t
l
.
ambiguities.
a rl'w1.m r1unr1111Y,11
The man? Senator Barry Goldwater.
ambiguity leads to a misinterpretation of election rules.
At the present time, the old
Congre ss is in pow er. Its
members should review the
present election procedures and
set a guiding policy for this and
all fu t ure elections.
It may be that a g eneral at-large
election is t he best t hing for SG.
It's t ime t hat Congress made a
d efinite d ecision to prevent
fut ure mistakes from happening.
Comment
The goals of a few optimistic individuals have been realized,
thanks to you.
The turnout for the UD Blood
Drive in the KU Ballroom Mon·
day was much larger than we had
anticipated. Although 88 donor
had been scheduled to give blood
that day, many individuals came
of their own accord.
Of the 124 VD communit)
members who regi tered, 63
were rejected for variou~ rea ·
sons. However, 61 pint or blood
were accepted and donated.
No one should consider the net
results a failure. The number or
pints received were ulficient to
get t he VD Blood Bank off the
ground and into the workin
stages.
No one who volunteered and
was rejected during th e ami •
nation hould t hink that th ir r.
forts were fruitle . What count
is t he t houghtfulne and con id·
era tion that went b hind the rfort.
The credit for thi achie~em nt
should not go to thr fl)er ~e"'
solely. We only organirt'd th
drive.
Tho e de ·erving or crt>dit are
the individuals who willingh
voluntee red to donat1 th ir
blood . You made it po ibl ;
without your h Ip all our fl rt
would have be n m an ingl ~ .
To ex pre in word t h grati •
t ude that we fe I i next to im •
po sible. But we hop th i will
ay it :
Thank you.
Rlood /Jank
Congratulations on your efforts
to organize a UD Blood Bank. As
a recent recipient I am keenly
aware of the importance of the
Community Blood Center. As a
former donor I also know how
rewarding it is to give so that
others may benefit in a time of
real need.
Good luck. I feel certain that the
University of Dayton community
will respond to your leader hip.
W. E. howalter
administrative a istant
to the pre idenl
S(, all('{!ation.,
Thi
gets submitted to Congress for
approval.
These certain individuals have
alleged that Panchi Torrado has
misused these ~unds_ for t he purpose of pre entmg his views and
not the _vi~ws of the student
body. T~is _is. bl~tant ignorallfl.
Al. o this is md1cative of S0111f,
on~ who _doe not know what.fl
gomg on m Student GovernllJIII
~nd ha con. e~uently presentli"
a ~ery egot1. tic and naive view,
pomt.
Sec<>ndly, the e ar ticles Ill'
pr en ting the view that StucW
Government comes acroea
"way-out on the radical left,"
cau
of bringing in s
wh~ have t~e courage to
behmd their convictions
m k public the information that
th Y hav concerning clandestine
gov rnmP.nt activitie and allo
implymg that the e . peakers are
hoodlums. ~Vhat _blatant igncr.
nc • Again reiterating t•e
abo\ , I m amaz d that someo~ would ":rit a public article
·1thout hem
ufficiently •
r rm
d.
1y
University
Flyer
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FIIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1973
THE UD F LYER NEWS
PAGE 3
Captain Beyond, Flash
Bands lack musical merit
lly MlclGel Tkach
FN Musk Critic
t'LASH: L TO R: Colin Carter, Pete Banks, Mike Hough, Ray
Bennett.
than half of that stipend.
Captain Beyond constitutes a
shuffle of a cold musical deck.
Two members come from Iron
Butterfly, one from Deep Purple,
one from Johnny Winter's group.
None have ever made any outstanding musical contributions;
chances are they never will.
getting footage for a planned
television special. Out of all that
In the business of popular music
came a few interesting comthere are many levels of success.
ments.
Last month Elton John and
Banks provided some insight
Chicago played in Dayton at the
into the exact nature of his lifeUD Arena. Both are very highlystyle. In response to a question
paid acts; each turns out albums
about how much time is spent in
which sell well. They have athis homeland, he answered:
tained super-stardom.
"We never work there; we
A LITTLE STONED
Two less successful bands also
never have the time_ All our time
Slightly staggering into a back- ·in England is spent rehearsing.
performed in the Dayton area
last month_ On the evening of stage dressing room around We started off our first six
Oct. 23, Captain Beyond and three in the afternoon, they months in England and then
Flash played at Hara Arena.
sheepishly admitted to being a came over here because the
Whereas Elton John and little stoned. What followed was album and the single were on t he
Chicago pulled a capacity crowd a conversation sandwiched by in- charts. We've been coming back
to a much larger hall, Captain side jokes and shallow comever since--this is our fourth tour
Beyond and Flash played before ments.
in 18 months.
a meager group of less than
What can one say to any group
2,000. Elton John and Chicago of artists whose material you
"BREAKFAST AND PLANES"
were paid over $10,000. The can't comprehend because it
"We're very cut off. When
other two bands received less seems so devoid of merit? You you're on tour all you usually see
ask them to define their music. is airports_ It's a funny thing be"That's what music is about: cause you spend most of the day
having a good time, getting sitting around waiting for breakpeople off. . .It doesn't matter fast and planes. . .you wait in
what you play if the energy is dressing rooms."
there to start a primitive thing ..
About the state of music today:
the energy will stimulate the "I can think of only four or five
body." Certain catch-phrases are rock guitarists I like. I'd rather
important: 'it doesn't matter,' listen to classical or jazz than
'primitive thing.' Both could be pop.
used as complete descriptions of
"A lot of pop musicians are
their music.
basically very lazy. They're not
Activities range from extensive
developing their technique. It's
CONTRADICTIONS
reading and forms of writing to
very depressing to listen to many
At
times
seemingly
contradicactual internships, field trips and
tory statements would pop up. guitarists--they're being very
projects.
For
example: "You can't get sick narrow-minded, they're playing
Each PSDL student has an
like ten-year olds."
evaluation committee of three of playing if the people you're
He agreed that commercial
with
inspire
you."
persons (an advisor, a faculty
pressures
had a lot to do with the
That's fine. But, coming from a
member and a third person of
bastardization of music. "That's
band
that
has
broken
up
and
retheir choice) who go over the stualways been the case . . .for jazz it
dent's work and determine how formed three or four times in less was the same ... you had people
it
sounds
a
little
than
two
years,
many credits they should receive
like Wes Montgomery churning
strange.
for it.
out diabolical albums with
there
any
deep
motivation
Was
It is possible to get anywhere
orchestration thrown in.
from eight to 17 credits with behind the music? "We just got
"His record company knew jazz
together
and
it
came
out.
We
PSDL and grading is done on a
wasn't
selling, so they stuck on
satisfactory/ unsatisfactory ba- only established one criteria: strings. Even Charlie Parker did
that
we
would
not
play,
and
sis.
it. We've made a couple of singles
Students can register for PSDL would not initiate what 500 other
which have been turned down
bands
were
doing."
merely by coming up to its office
because record companies didn't
which is located in Room 224 of
think they were commercial
FLASH
the Women's Gym. If a student
Flash is basically a derivative of enough."
wants to use PSDL to fulfill rethe
old Yes group. Besides Peter
quirements for a particular deFRANKLY ...
partment, he must work it out Banks, the lead guitarist and exWhat is the end result of heavy
Yes
member,
there
is
little
worth
with the chairman of that
commercial influence? Banks
thinking about in Flash.
department.
answered quickly: "Let's be
They
are
different
from
Captian
This year's director of PSDL is
blunt. Bands tend to throw
Dr. Joseph Kunkel, philosophy Beyond in a least three ways. things together. They're not
They're
more
popular,
they
dept., and other program memreally going into it hard enough.
bers are Ms. Kalven, Dr. Arons, sound very much like a good The result is that things get
English dept., and Fr. C. Brady, band (most specifically the Yes sloppy.
group), and there is at least one
theology dept.
"The Stones, for an example,
Ms. Kalven believes that PSDL intelligent mind at work in the don't get me off at all. But I like
must and will continue in the group--Peter Banks.
rock and roll bands. . .I like
future of UD. She refers to the
watching the Who.
TV SPECIAL
following quote from John
"It's like the Faces ... t hey're all
The back-stage scene was hectic pretty mediocre musicia ns.
Gardner as her "ultimate
and confusing. During the inter- They're great guy s. R od
justification" for this position:
"We are handing our children vi~w. there were bright lights
cut flowers instead of teaching shmmg and movie cameras
(Continued on page 4)
them how to plant their own."
rogram allows students
o arrange own learning
By Martha Yeranko
FNStllffWrilllr
ew students are taking adntage of an alternate form of
dy on UD's campus known as
DL (Program for Self-Dited Learning).
hen the program first started
the fall semester of 1971, there
re 35 students enrolled. Presly there are 18.
. Janet Kalven, associate ditor of PSDL, gives two reafor this decline.
"NO ENTHUSIASM"
e said there is "no enthusiand energy in innovative
ams like there was t hree
sago." Her second explanawas that most students
't even aware of PSDL or
what it's all about.
e have trouble getting t he
ge out over campus," she
DL is just what it says. The
ent directs his own learning,
free of structured classes,
teacher's requirements and
scheduled times.
Each student determines what
course of action could best aid his
learning in a particular subject
area and then follows it.
ALL WELCOME
Ms. Kalven said that all
students are welcome, no matter
what their major or area of interest might be. Most students use
PSDL to work at their own pace
and "pursue something they
can't do in a classroom," she said.
Ms. Kalven also noted two main
aspects of PSDL_ One is "finding
out who you are on a personal
level" and the other is "getting
skills and knowledge on a
competency level."
"Only a small number of
students have clear-cut ideas
when they first come," she said,
so that PSDL helps them
discover goals as well.
U. D. Student Government Presents
l)L\VII)
~oio"'
~l'lti
Guest Act: LINDA RONSTADT
, D. Arena Friday Nov. 91 8:30 p.m.
Tickets $4.50 Reserved Seats
Available at all Sears, Rllut•s (downtown),
FCl'llt, Cl.ncinnat1 Tictetroo, U.D. Arena and F ieldhouse
BELKIN,PRODUCTIONS
c SG and AFRO-AMERICAN CENTER----i
~present~
MARTIN L. KING - A Film Record
"MONTGOMERY to MEMPHIS"
A Compllatlon of newsreel footage of King's
Modern Clvll Rights Movement Including the
Assassination.
Nov. 12 & 13 Monday & Tuesday Wohlleben Hall
--...;'FREE - - -
7 PM
·~ft/-: ..\-,.~·;.>; ·, · -·. >,,
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FJUJ)AY , NOVEMBER 9, 1973
THE UD FLYER NEWS
Ms. Moore: 'Back to A.frira '
If
/1
Leader stresses heritage
1ys.on.._,
FN Staff Wrl ....
(UDPS folo by D....-.)
A "COOL" MEG BOSA VAGE [A&S-2) glances at her book
while nurse Carol O'Brien draws a pint of blood for t he UD
Blood Bank. The drive was held Monday in the KU Ballr<>?~
netting 61 pints of blood. A complete list of those who partic1·
pated will appear in Tuesday's edition.
Reminiscing 55 years as a
fi g hter fo r bl ac k liberation,
Queen Mother Moore addressed
a predominantly black crowd of
about 60 Tuesday night in KU
Ballroom.
Ms. Moore, founder and
president of th_e ,Universal
Association of Eth10p1an Women
related how Marcus Garvey,
leader of the "Back to Africa"
movement, was prohibited from
making a speech in New ?rlea~s
during the early 1920 s. His
enraged supporters however,
"were determined that Garvey
.
was going to speak."
In spite of the numerous police
in the New Orleans hall,
everyone carried firearms. "I
had two guns," stated 75 y1•ar old
Ms. Moore. Wh<•n Garv,·y wa,
restrained upon hi ~ i•ntrarw1·
on .stage•, th<· audil'n<·e prod ur,•d
their wi•apons 1·nabling him t,,
speak without intnfor1•nre.
"You have no id<·a. young t1•r '
how murh blood, swt•at and ll'llr
went into th1• liberation of hlark
people in thi5 rountry," hf' aid.
Throughout hn pcerh, M .
Moor<· strc cd th,• re pon ih1li
ty of blark youth to find ir11•ntity
in their i•xr1•ptional hi 1,,ry. "W •
have t•vrry rea on Lo qu r • our
shoulders and be proud pPopl ,"
she said. "When you don't know
your hi tory, you allow nythmg
to happen."
he ritl'd
fr1ca a
th
birthplar1i of dvih1.alion
nd
highlightPd the contr1but1 n of
many blar.k to w P crn cultur ·,
including !Iannib:il and olomon.
"l)o you know,"
h
d,
''what really ov rthr
Chri tianity. J u
that w
er at d by th
man and brou ht l th
PER FOR
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fAIRBORN,
OHI04"24
In Americans' lifesty le
Books provide basis
Expert studies auto's role
for "babbling" ideas
ly Dkk ...,_..mlth
FN Staff Writer
lly ~ Sclwldler
FNStaffWrililr
Tuesday evenings at 8 p_.m. at
the Off-Campus Center 1s the
setting for Book n' Babble, a pr<:
ject offered to students _by Umversity Activities. It mvolves
discussion of ideas, using pop~lar
contemporary books as a sprmgboard.
.
Each evening starts off with a
moderator, who is usually. ~
member of the facul ty or adm1mstration, giving a brief revie""'. of
the book chosen for the evenmg
nd then expressing his views on
he book. This is followed by a
ap session involving the _stuents and faculty. The evenmgs
re open to anyone and reading
he book ahead of time is not
ecessary.
BEST SELLERS
The project was organized by
im McCabe (Bus-2), programer for Educational Developent for University Activities.
ver the summer he compiled a
· t of best sellers, then brought
gether possible moderators for
e program. Moderators often
me up with their own sugges·ons for books.
The sessions go from 90 minutes
two hours and have covered
ny topics. "Jonathan Livingon Seagull," "Bury My Heart at
ounded Knee," and "Chariot of
PAGE 5
THE UD FLYER NEWS
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1973
The role of the automobile and
the Gods" as well as Kurt
Vonnegut books are some that the interstate highway in Amerhave been discussed. The mode- ica was discussed by Dr. Mark
rators also come from varied Rose, author and professor at
areas. English, drama, political Pontifical College, in his speech
science, theology and even the before nearly 50 UD faculty and
provost's office have been repre- students Tuesday night.
sented at the discussions.
He believes the automobile has
become a very important part of
STIMULATING
McCabe believes that the dis- our American way of life. "The
cussions have been interesting car does not run across our
and stimulating but that atten- norms but extends them."
He contends that automobiles
dance has been less than spectacular. "Twenty would be an have opened new horizons for the
excellent group for this kind of American people. "We have a
discussion but we have been sense of privateness, mobility
having ten and under for most of and a control over our environment through driving. A person
the sessions.
can
get to almost any place in the
"We try to make these evenings
as informal and appealing as pos- state of Ohio from Dayton in just
sible but students have so much a few hours."
"The automobile was also one of
work for school that they don't
have time to read these books. the main reasons for the decline
We want to emphasize that of mass transit systems," exreading the book is not essential plained Dr. Rose.
He went on to say that transit
to participation."
McCabe adds that the discus- owners contributed to their own
sions are as far removed from a demise by not caring for the
classroom situation as they can well-being and comfort of the
be. The moderators, he says, paying customer.
Dr. Rose thinks that many
have all been very cooperative in
giving their time to prepare and people have misconceptions
about our highways' planning
attend the discussions.
Future sessions of Book and and construction.
"Many people believe them to
Babble will include discussion of
' The Firesign Big Book of be the result of illegal backroom
Plays," "End of the American
Era" and "Journey to Ixtlan.'
deals. Actually most of our interstate highways are a result of
careful planning by engineers
and regional planners."
He further pointed to some instances where parts of many
cities have been developed or redeveloped in accordance with
planning of interstate highways
and expressways.
Dr. Rose used Pittsburgh as a
prime example of this planning.
Pittsburgh was a dirty city and
after several floods in the early
1940's, "parts of the city stunk
from the polluted water left behind."
A coalition of concerned city
officials and businessmen, however, cleared away the old structures, built roads and constructed high rise buildings near
them, Rose explained.
Besides helping to redevelop
downtown business areas, such
planning can be used for different purposes.
Dr. Rose said, "Some systems
are planned in such a way that
they create districts, where a
highway is used as a physical
barrier. Through these districts
a sense of the old community
spirit, where everyone knows
everyone else, is sometimes attained."
He also pointed out that some
( UDP$ folo by llenedett)
DR. MARK ROSE
groups believe tax revenue from
gasoline, tires and other products, should be used strictly for
the building of roads and not for
community development.
He remarked that it is usually
the strongest political coalition
which decides which direction
state and federal funds go and
that "one can expect intense
political conflict.''
Phi Alpha Theta (international
history honorary) sponsored the
event.
.
CLASSIFIE D A DS
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Flyer News, Box 737, Campus Mall.
What Is Modem Judaism? Find out In the 2
credit course on "Modem Jewish Identity
JUD-3CM.
St. Vincent DePaul Society, help to
organl:re for poor kids In the a.- of UD,
collect and paint toys, food, cloth.. Call
Fr. Cy, 4140.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS. Have you a
home to go to at Chris- time? If not,
contact Fr. Cy 4140 for home and good
food during holldays.
Secondary Educ. and E-11 Students - TGIF Friday, Nov. 9 from 2-4. RefrNlwnenta tocJ<
chips, beer and pop.
Lota Of Luck to the Pledges of X.E.A.
during Hell Week • Brothers of X.E.A.
s-k and Ale Rastaurant now hiring
busboys, waiters, and cocktall wal-....
Contact Tom Wulf, 435-2922.
HIBISCUS
CAROLINE
1
Pat i . - llodacloua Bacon Burgen.
......,1-o IIIW..ome food. ••come
pray
with .. 1 Get a group together for two
days of . pnryw and c i . . - s to
nature. Hu.ton Woods or Glen Helen.
Organl:re your own group. Dates Nov.
9-10, or 16-17, or Dec. 1-2. Por help.
contact Pr. Cy - 229-4140.
ONE LOCATION
To ......,, Jae the Up - How'1 about a
concert, Baby?
Your fare
Breitenstrater Square
DON thick blood - n one tw. a cold
heart?
1602 Patterson Road
Dayton, Ohio 45420
Who knowa the mmt about nothing? Plnll
out In Circle K'1 trivia lowl Sign up In
front of the Snak Bar Nov. 12-16, 1-4 p.m.
-.
Wlwt's going to....,.,_ to ..,_., S.. the
Mowle ''The Return" baaed an Hal UnNy's
beskeller ''The Late G,-t Planet Earth"
at Far HIiis Baptist Church. 5200 Far HIiis
Thursday, Nov. 15th, 7130 p.m. No cha,,,.'.
WI,,,_ of Delta Tau Nu llom,e Raffle Tkket #2062 bring tkket to 511 Campus
South.
Bring a ll your rec:yclable •to the
parking lot on 300 Stonemlll Rd., - V
Saturday starting Oct. 20tl\, 1-4 p.m.
UD house r-'ed, 1 male
s tudent opening. Call 293-923 4 or
224-3022.
ROBERTS JEWELERS
Want to know how power Is manipulated
tlwougl, polltkal -slnatlona? Hear
Mae llnlssel Wed. Nov. 14, KU Ballroom
3&7 p.m.
Gn A LIVING AT ITS BEST: 4 to share 6
man house on Klefaber. Also need one g lri
for house next door - 435-0784.
~ for
Christma s.
16 DAYS TIU. D-DAY.
JOHNNY GOT HIS GUN.
Extra C..h paid for all Blood types, Dayton
Illa 165 E. Helena St. 224-1973.
it until
Do you TALK In your sleep? I'd lave to find
out I
Johnny Got His Gun.
Future CPA's , leam how to pn,pare for the
CPA Exam llecker CPA REVIEW course.
Call 426-5087.
SANTA ROSA
They called him mellow cucka, that's right
babel II
-
WANTED--Student with training and experlence In electronks to repair tape
recorders and equl,--nt In language lab.
Apply In Dept. of Languages, Wolh 217.
Begin wort. at once.
All of KU - , t Batty Monday m a v.y
s .. p1c1.,.. laolclng man In a black ~
lurklng about the Ballroom.
Wlwn mked If he would Ilk• some c°"9e
he replied "No aank you madam but I
vould Ilk• some doo-1 "
1here a gra.,. mishap In Pt. T""'-,
Ky. rec:entfy. 0-- a3 perc- of the
population In this ...W..be subuotton
community lacatecl In ,-1f..., Ky. stricken with d,..,.,._ It might be well to
.....tion that Pt. Thom. Is the , _ of
- 1 / 3 of the rwtlona Choc-c:olm frealm. It
_ , . that they the ltlunt and of a
Haliow-n prank pulled by some pot
cramd manioc who n,re the . . . _ _ 11f
the Choe-cola plant ,-t,y. Appm-entty
3 cmee
this .., witted IOUI added
al Ix-lax Into the latest mixture of that
wholesome refrM'-t. lo l..t ber kick. • •THINK Nfoo-. you .-...1
Who else Is King of Trivia but the
BOSS.
w..
To Johnoon and Johns ore
that
excurslan - toolc: on Halloween a "trick"
or a "- t '' ? As far m I'm concerned It
wm a pretty "tricky treat'' (or Is It trippy
trea1j.
FREE BEER 9'00 SAT. NOV.
KIEFA8ERI 11
10, 330
I.oat: 0 . - - crown In Ballroom at
Halloween party--rd for return. Call
Kathy 224-5544.
Furnished Apt. Grafton and Grand near
..75, nice larve 3 rooms. New kitc hen.
bath. S120. 223-0720, 224-7114.
Martin L King - a film rec:ord "Montgon,.. y
to Memphis" Mon. a. T..._ Nov. 12-13, 1
p.m., Wohlleben Hall
One bedraom unfumlahed apt., range,
refrige,alof , heat. water, fumlahed. Air
conditioned, laundry facllltlea on ,,,_...
Within walking distance. R9manaltle
NC..-fty ..... It. Call Huuman hallty Co.
224-1481 , _ , , . , . 2"n-6409.
Secondary Education and E-11 Students TGIF - Friday, Nov. 9 from 2-4. REFBSHMENTS TOOt Chips. beer, and pop.
Mau In Spa. .h - V Sunday noon.
Founders Chapel I ~ welcome.
Have you wonde,ed about ''The Jews" ?
..... ......... autatandlng . . . . . ..
_ , _ "Jewish Identity In the Modem
WorW." JUD.304.
Ommltecl from -xt ..._..,.. campml•
Cuk 301
Cuclca 3
A. Nuu
"Montgcw1• y to Memphis" a film rec:anl
of Martin L King Jr. Nov. 1,-13, 7 p.m.
Wohl Hall
•
Mae ......, MQft,.., of the c-p1recy
Theory, speaking Wed. Nov. 14, Ku
Ballroom 3 p.m. and 7 p.m.
""""°""
Secondary 1-.t!on ...i 1-11 Stuolenta TG• - Prlday, Nov, 9 from ,_... •P•sttMINTS TOOi Chlpa. ..._, en11 pap.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1973
THE UD FLYER NEWS
PAGE 6
Booters lose 4-1
F.U.B.A.R. passes away
Wait 'till next season
hut their glory lingers on
lly 1<8vln Vogl
FN$por11Wrfa-
Year after year, when the
Brooklyn Dodgers got nosed out
for the National League pennant,
the cry around Ebbets Field and
Flatbush was "Just wait till next
year!".
Dayton's soccer team was
echoing that same rallying cry
Wednesday, and with good
reason.
The Flyers had been knocked
off by Cedarville, ranked ninth in
the Ohio, 4-1, finishing their season with a record of 6-2-2.
BETTER THAN EXPECTED
But this was supposed to be a
rebuilding year, and with everyone save Mike Brick and Ray
Le;, back next season, things are
looking very good for Coach Bob
Richardson's charges in 1974.
Cedarville led all the way in this
one, as Jim Gerker put home the
Jone goal for the Red and Blue,
who had beeen undefeated until a
week ago.
However, with the solid founda-
tion put down by the "kiddie
corps" this season, the _F_lyers
will receive two add1t1onal
bonuses in the persons of Mike
Cahill who will return to his
cente; fullback spot, and goalie
Dave Mechler.
lly Tony Lupla
FN Sportl Writer
F.U.B.A.R. no longer exists, but
its name lives on as a legend.
Anyone remotely interested in
Intramural football knew that
the green and white jersies worn
Cahill who had paced the side- by the F . U .B.A.R. ~layers
lines this year as Richardson's signified power and dominance.
STARTED STRONG
assistant, is fully healed from a
F. U .B.A.R.'s supremacy be mid-summer knee mishap, while
Mechler is taking it easy allowing came apparent four years ago,
a kidney that had been injur~d in when the team was formed. A
an exhibition with Dayton E1del- group of ex-intercollegiate freshmen football players were
weiss to mend.
formed into a then Intramural
SCHEDULE IMPORTANT
touch football team. They were
unable to play on the varsity be"Even if we have had a great cause of grades, injury, or some
record," Richardson added, "we other circumstance.
In the days of a freshmen footwon't get the recognition
because of the caliber of teams ball team, F.U.B.A.R. was always able to recruit, by hook or
we have on our schedule."
crook, those players who did not
"A Jot of the good teams move on to the varsity.
This coupled with the fierce fine
(notably Bowling Green) ," he
added, "have been reluctant to athlet es in the class of '73, who
play us, but we're going to make founded and annually r estocked
the team, made F .U.B.A.R. pracsure that we get some of those
tically unstoppable.
tough games next season."
Tony Derose (ED-4), who was
And Bob Richardson can hardly the team's captain for t he past
two year s and one of its ~r iginawait for that season to come.
tors, realizes t he dynasty 1s over .
"We didn't even want to enter a
team this year," he said.
"Most of the guys who played
on the team have graduated and
the rest of us who are still around
are finishing up by doing our student teaching, so we don't have
the time to devote to playing,"
Derose said.
"We didn't pick up many new
players last year and there really
weren't any good players
available for this season so,
rather than disgrace the name
F .U.B .A.R. , we decided to
retire."
Derose's desire to play, however, was too great, so he was
easily persuaded to play on
another team, The Bonebiters.
The team will be extra tough
with "Booper," as Derose is
called, playing for them.
There has been one team which
ha s been able to upset
F.U.B.A.R. in the finals. The
spoiling team is the Dayton
Hoggers,
who
defeated
F .U.B.A.R. two years ago for the
crown and lost to them last year
in the finals.
CO-FA VO RITES
The Dayton Hoggers and The
Bonebiters would appear to be
this year's favorites to go all the
way. Both teams are big, brutal,
and fast. However, whichever
team wins the championship, it
will be achieving a somewhat
hollow victory because it did not
have to face the supreme test of
playing F.U.B.A.R.
There have been many
dynasties in the world of sports,
but at UD, 'dynasty' is spelled
F.U.B.A.R.
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THE BOYS OF F.U.B.A.R. won't be around to defend their IM
foot ball title t his year, but their dominance will be remembered
fo r some ti me.
•l:Je
IS THE PLACE TO BE.!
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Closed Mondays
You must be 18
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PAGE 7
THE UD FLYER NEWS
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1973
Sports In Brief
To some it's not football
but field goals don't hurt
ly Matte %nldar
FN Spo,11 Wrl•
So you've had it with fo~tball
and all those "un-Amenc~n"
people dominating the game with
field goal after field goal?
You say you want to get back_to
the old days with greats like
Jimmy Brown and Gale Sa!~rs
dashing across the telev1s10n
screen, making yo~r weekend
afternoons more enJoyable?
Well, Ron Marciniak of the
Dayton Flyers would tell you to
take a hike, fans . And who can
blame him for his love of the
three-pointer?
Greg Schwarber is not a foreigner, but the sophomore placement kicker has given the Flyers
a potent weapon by just swinging his golden right toe.
FOURTH IN NATION
Recent national statistics have
Schwarber down as being the
fourth best kicker in the nation,
and first in percentage made past
the forty yard line.
Then comes the UD record
book. The soccer-style hooter
from Cincinnati owns every
major record except the consecutive extra point mark. He needs
just three PAT's to have the
record of 26 straight.
Last week against Xavier, Greg
made good a transcontinental
55-yarder which shattered the
old mark of 47 yards set in 1924,
when footballs were stuffed with
Mom's old dish rags.
"I feel I can hit on field goals
from 50 yards consistently," said
Schwarber, a criminal justice
major. "But like every kicker,
I've got to concentrate more, and
get to the ball quicker."
This year, the Moeller High
School graduate has accounted
for 46 points -- that's how many
he had all of last year -- and has
broken his old record of 10 field
goals by kicking 12.
BACK YARD HOOTER
"I got started as a kicker when
my brother used to punt the
football to me in our back yard. I
didn't want to throw the ball
back so I got a shoe and kicked it
back to him," said Schwarber,
recalling how his career started.
At Moeller, the 6-1, 172-pounder
became an all-State performer
his senior year, kicking six of
eight field goals he tried. Teammates voted him the Mr. Clutch
trophy that the school annually
presents to it's top football
player.
Greg won't let success spoil him
at UD. Every day in practice he
attempts nearly 100 kicks from
all angles and distances on the
field.
The cry used to be, "We want a
TD!" but that can be changed.
Right, Coach Marciniak?
Breaking open a 5-5 tie in the 15-4, 15-4.
Coach Elaine Dreidame said,
fourth inning, Classified roared
to a 20-10 win over Lambda Nu to "We just blew it to UC, we had
take the Women's Intramural . them, and couldn't put it away.
This is a comeback weekend for
Softball Championship.
us."
Dreidame's reserve team also
UD's Orienteering Club won
Andrew Marcec I nvitational had posted wins against OSU and
Tournament, which was held at Cedarville during t he past week.
Southetn Illinois University. The
Flyers came in with 34 points, · Football was revived one more
nine ahead of their closest time at Baujan Field last Sunday,
opponent in t he five team field, as the Flyer managers and
Northern Michigan.
trainers got together for t he
Jeff Basset, Charlie Martin, and
sixth annual Toilet Bowl Classic.
Pat Meehan won the Men's
When the dust had cleared, the
Yellow Relay course title, while
Managers ended up with a 29-6
Martin and Meehan tied for
rout over the mignions of trainer
individual honors on the course.
Eddie
K west.
Dayton's contingent of women,
A balanced attack, was t he key
led by Kathy Keating, grabbed
to t he manage rs' tri umph ,
five of the top six spots in their
explained Captain Joe Lipinski.
competition.
He cited key performances by
•••
•••
•••
The Flyer hockey team, will
hold an organizational meeting
Friday at 4:30 p.m. in Room
Seven of the Fieldhouse.
•••
The Women's Volleyball team
will play host to Mt. St. Joe's,
Bowling Green, and Ohio
Northern in a four-way meet
Saturday at 10 a.m. in the
Fieldhouse.
The Flyers are trying to
rebound from a 15-8, 15-11 loss to
UC this past week. Earlier, UD
had defeated Ohio State 15-12,
15-12, and Cedarville College
quarterback Mike Annarino and
Dan Brickney, and the fact that
his team had been able to pawn
off equipment manager Ken
Keck to the trainers in a last
minute deal.
Along with Keck, stars for the
medical corps included Bob
Edwards and captain John Zgala.
• ••
Distribution of requisition cards
for UD basketball tickets will
begin next Wednesday, October
14 in the Fieldhouse. Further
details will appear in the next
issue of the FLYER NEWS.
HEAT - AIR COND .
WATER
A PP LI ANCES
SH AG CARPE T
FURNISHED
UNFURNISHED
AOUARIAN
FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
3864 KETTERLING BLVD,
434-1565
(UDPS foto by Duncan)
UP, UP, AND AWAY! Greg Schwarber launched the longest
field goal in Flyer history, 55 yards, against the Xavier
Musketeers last Saturday.
10 Min. Psychic
Readings
7:30 - 9:30
EVERYONE WELCOME
Firwood Aparbnents
(513)
294-1030
ICALL TODAy I
344
FIRWOOD DRIVE
APARTMENT "A"
DAYTON, OHIO 45419
1 - 2 - 3 BEDROOMS
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JJ.t SPICIEST C~PACOLLO HAM,
GENOA 5ALAMt& PROVOLONE CHEESE I
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PAGE 8
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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1973
THE UD FLYER NEWS
News Briefs
All registered student organizations interested in booking a film
for the second semester should
come to the University Activities
office, KU 132, on Thursday,
Nov. 13. The office will open at 9
a.m. and films will be issued on a
first come-first serve basis.
•••
The secondary education dept.
will hold a TGIF today from 2 - 4
p.m. in Miriam Hall, eighth fl~r
lounge. Beer, chips and pop will
be served and all secondary
education faculty and students
are welcome .
held Feb. 1 should come to an
organizational meeting Tuesday,
Nov. 13 at 8 p.m. in KU 207.
tion on Saturday, Nov. 10, should
report to Wohlleben Hall
Auditorium (W-218) no later than
8:30 a.m. on that date. Students
taking the test must bring
following materials: (1) admission ticket, (2) four sharpened no.
2 pencils, and (3) a good eraser.
t?e
•••
University Activities' Book n'
Babble will present Prof. Gerald
Kerns discussing, "The End of
the American Era" by Andrew
Hacker, Tuesday, Nov. 13 at 8
p.m. at the Off-Campus Center.
•••
Students who registered to take
the National Teacher Examina-
•••
The 12:10 choir will meet
Saturday at 1 p.m. in the Chapel.
Voices are still needed for the
Christmas Mass - Dec. 8 at 9 p.m.
•••
Mass in Spanish will be held
every Sunday at noon at the
Founders Hall Chapel.
•••
The Social Work Club will
present a colloquium on social
work pr actice, Saturday, Nov. 10
from 8:45 a.m. - 5 p.m. in O'Leary
A uditorium. Speakers from
various aspects of social work
will be featured.
•••
The Peace Studies Institute is
offering a three credit course
(U D l-344) investigating the
pr obl e m peace war in an
essent ially violent society. For
infor mation contact the asst
provost office.
·
•••
Profs. Frank DaPalito and Tom
Brown of the psychology dept.
and Profs. Paul Tibbetts and Bill
Rich.ard s of Philosophy are
offermg a new graduate level
course entitled "Philosophy and
Psy~ho logy Interdisciplinary
Semmar: The Mind-Body Problem" (Psy-595 or Phil-591).
•••
Anyone interested in planning
the 1974 Turnabout Dance to be
LHICN
All TNEIIAY
,OTNE
ButODIIAMK.
- ..- ""- ~
.......... .
,j
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\. lfH.Slillf li:ll)W III NH lt l a, t
•n•suo•gmw11,au'5,,.,_,
•JffllllD.WWTN,OTlJIIITIM'
WlEM.SHO IN ;ROWJM POH,,_TIAl'
•
Earn up to $80 - V month.
.lult for 11v1.,.
You loin OIW lrnportllnf plasma
program and dormM blood wt..
you ...... the tt.....
It'll talc• you only 1 V, hours
twice a-'<-
H's sot.. H's simple. .lult relax.
watch -'-Ion. or study.
You'll be t.lplng your ,,__
and neigt,bon, your country, your
c-,nity, and yourself.
c.,.,. by or coll ... Now.
Bee-
~bloodallialce
165 Helena St. - Phone 224-1973
fFon...ty Dayton lllologlcols)
"1EllfSIED Ill QIDWTH l'OIENIIAl•
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAlf
INTERESTED INGROWTH POTENIIAl.'
INTERESTED INGROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED INGROWTHPOTENTIAL?
INTERfSTm INGROWTHPOTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTHPOTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTHPOTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
INTERESTED IN GROWTH POTENTIAL?
elect1;city for commercial, light-industrial and
rt•gidential npplieations.
W ith ..... ev<.'n more effici nt and powerful indu
of Uniwd Aircraft Corporation, has <nnw1mccd an
gag turbines to join tlw almost 1,000 units
objective to daubl,e sal,es through the eml of the d<'Cadl'.
sold for ~·rwrnting electricity, pumping gas and
Fact 2: Pratt and Whitney Aircraft is the larycxt <lil'i·
pelling marine vt.•sst•ls.
sion ofUnif;edAircraft Corporation and accow1!.< i.fora
If you wnnt to prove--0ut your abilities at the
majorportionoftot,al corporate sales.
of tlw stntt'-Of-tht'-mi, P&WA is a great place for
We expect to share in this growth .. . and share mat<.·· impmtnnt JWrHOrnll tniting. Further, our pro'
rially. Here's how and why.
J..rrowt h mfr HUggl'Rt!-l foster-than-usual advance
With ..... aclvanced aircraft engines generating up to opportunitit'H for thost• cnpnbll' of innovative · ·
60,000 pounds of takeoff thrust that will
'!111•11'11111!'
Wt• hnvl' n.ttrnctivc career opportunities
ensure our continuing world leadership in
<.'nJ.,rim•<.•rn und R<'it.•ntists in virtually
tt'<.·lmknl iidd. &'t.' your College Pl
powering the majority of commercial air
transports.
Olli<.'<.' for 1't.•qui1't.'nwnts, interview dates
With ..... pollution-free fuel cell power plants
our dt•R(.·riptivt> brochure. Or write Mr,
to help solve the world's energy ne(•ds.
Hliwk, Proft•Hsionul Placement, Pratt&
Experimental units have already umaHRt•d
rn•y Ait"l·rnft, J<~ast Hartford, O>nn.
over 100,000 hours of operation producing
.t 11 J,Jq 11 a/ Opportunity Employer
Then you should consider these interesting and impor-
w:ni,facts about Pratt & Whitney Aircraft.
Fact 1: H.J. Gray, president and chief execut ive <~tficer
TlCKETh
$4.50 Advance
$5.00 Day of Show
Avallable at The Goldenrod,
Forest Book & Record Shop,
and the Palace Box Ottlce
Facilities in Ea.lit Hartford, Connt~licut mul Wt'. t Pnlm B •nch, Florid
''

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