MA in Irish Folklore Booklet

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MA in Irish Folklore Booklet
Postgraduate Student Handbook
Roinn an Bhéaloidis
Department of Folklore
University College Cork
National University of Ireland
http://www.ucc.ie/en/
www.ucc.ie/folklore
http://www.ucc.ie/en/bealoideas/current/courses/postgrad/
http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/what/acsss/masters/folklore/
+353 (0)21 490 3935
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ROINN AN BHÉALOIDIS
DEPARTMENT OF FOLKLORE
Head of Department:
Dr. Stiofán Ó Cadhla
Executive Assistant:
Bláthnaid Ní Bheaglaoí
Lecturers:
Dr. Stiofán Ó Cadhla
Dr. Marie-Annick Desplanques
Dr. Clíona O’Carroll
Ciarán Ó Gealbháin
Dr. Margaret Humphreys
Jennifer Butler
Angun Sønnesyn Olsen
Department Website:
http://www.ucc.ie/folklore
Handbooks and all relevant
Departmental Web Page.
information
on
the
Course Co-ordinator:
Dr. Clíona O’Carroll
[email protected]
Léann Dúchais Leictreonach (LDL)
Dr. Stiofán Ó Cadhla, Dr. Marie-Annick Desplanques, Dr.
Clíona O’Carroll, Ciarán Ó Gealbháin, Dr. John Eastlake
& Colin MacHale
Cork Northside Folklore Project:
Northside Community Enterprises Ltd
St. Finbarr’s College
Farranferris
Redemption Road
Cork
Mary O'Driscoll
http://www.ucc.ie/research/nfp/
Manager:
Website:
Department Office is Located on the Top Floor of No. 5 Elderwood, College Road
Office Hours from 09:15 – 13:00 and 14:10 – 17:00 Monday to Friday
Telephone: 021 4903935
email:
[email protected]
http://twitter.com/@folkucc
http://www.facebook.com/pages/UCC-Folklore/122545201130379
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MA in Irish Folklore
The MA in Irish Folklore is a full-time Taught Masters Programme running (from 2012-2013) for 12
months from the date of registration for the programme. Those with a minimum Second Class Honours
standard in an approved primary degree or Masters Qualifying Examination can apply and where there
is competition a First Class honours will be given precedence. This may include graduates in Folklore,
both Irish and Visiting Students, especially those from cognate disciplines with an interest in Irish
folklore and culture. Applicants are asked to submit a succinct proposal outlining their particular
interest. This must indicate an ability and willingness to complete the research within the deadlines
outlined. Students take 45 credits from taught modules in the first part and a dissertation (45 credits) in
the second.
What is Folklore?
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The study of man has been called anthropologia since 1501.
The eighteenth century saw the emergence of new disciplinal names. Some of these were based on
the idea of man or ánthropos and others derived from people or ethnos.
Anthropology had a recognizable identity in the English speaking world by 1805.
Popular Antiquities, usages, practices, manners, customs, ways, habits or superstitions, were all
used in the English language to refer to what we call ‘folklore’ since the middle of the nineteenth
century.
The English word folklore was coined in 1846, coinciding with the construction of University
College Cork itself and a little before Charles Darwin revealed his earth shattering theory of
evolution.
‘Folklore’ is of dual origin associated with enlightened enquiry into the populations of territories
and pre Romantic and Romantic ideas of the specificity and singularity of peoples.
The word Volkskunde ('knowledge about the people', 'folklore') is first found in statistical enquiry
from 1787.
In Europe Herder (1744-1803) is associated with the notion of the Volksgeist, the soul or genius
specific to each nation and found in its purest state in those groups least affected by
cosmopolitanism.
The word folklife (folkliv) was already used in Sweden in the first half of the nineteenth century.
The term folklife research (folklivsforskning) was coined early in the twentieth century and passed
into other languages.
Ethnologie was coined by the Swiss Chavannes in 1787 and referred to the history of the
successive stages towards civilization. In the twentieth century it became synonymous in Central
and Northern Europe with folklife research, regional ethnology and later 'European ethnology',
proposed as a new name in 1955.
The discipline in Cork has developed a critical and questioning approach to Irish cultural studies,
folklore and ethnology. It seeks new ways to name, describe and theorise itself in new and old
circumstances and contexts. It views culture variously as indigenous, vernacular, popular, as ‘livedin’ or everyday life.
The Irish term béaloideas is already recorded in 17th century, but only after 1893 and the
foundation of the Gaelic League it is identified with the English folklore.
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In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, folklore tended to be understood either in
devolutionary or evolutionary terms. The former was Romantic, seeing in folklore the fragments of
a former unified national culture, and was most influential in countries where there was a divide
between an indigenous majority and an exogenous ruling class.
The evolutionary perspective was associated with the British anthropologist Edward Tylor's
survivals and saw folklore as the historical evidence of an earlier cultural state, analogous to
primitive mentalities.
There is a rich archive of ethnographic data in Ireland. Major research archives were a by-product
of cultural nationalist movements in Europe, in Finland, Estonia and Ireland, where the largest of
such archives are situated (the Irish one, assembled from the 1920s, has up to two million pages of
material).
The Ulster Folk Museum was established outside Belfast in 1958.
The National Museum of Ireland - Country Life is the latest addition to the National Museum of
Ireland. It opened to the public in September 2001. The exhibitions portray the lives of ordinary
people who lived in rural Ireland in the period 1850 – 1950.
The study of ‘folk’ – indigenous knowledge, vernacular or popular culture - then, in urban and in
rural, in local and global contexts, came to be seen as the research field of béaloideas, ethnology
and folklore, and that perspective informs the work that has been carried out in UCC since 1977.
MA in Irish Folklore
Students will be introduced to the key theoretical ideas in Irish folklore scholarship but through the
discussion of various grounded examples of traditional culture, creativity and behaviour itself.
Examples will lead to some consideration of the meaning and context of Irish folklore. Stories and
storytelling, ritual and belief, “superstitions” and customs such as wakes, pilgrimages to holy wells or
wedding traditions will be looked at. It is hoped to include a fieldtrip(s) as this has been a very
welcome and successful aspect of folklore programmes at undergraduate level. This would provide
unique opportunities to actually experience social and cultural life at first hand. The department of
folklore is proud to publish a postgraduate journal Béascna and there may be opportunities, in
conjunction with the current editors, to publish on aspects of your research.
Peasants to Natives: The Emergence of Irish Folklore and Popular Culture
This module will introduce the intellectual history and emergence of the collection and study of Irish
folklore and popular culture in an ethnological context. The focus will be on the key ideas, moments
and interests in the intellectual and popular history of folklore in Ireland. Lectures will cover key
moments in the emergence of the study of Irish popular culture and folklore and situate the discipline
in the broader context of Irish popular culture and cultural studies in general. The module will discuss
the intellectual history of the idea of folklore.
Popular and Unpopular Culture: Festival, Ritual, Belief and Narrative
This module will explore the core elements of Irish popular culture incorporating some of the
traditional concerns of the discipline such as ritual, festival, belief and narrative. It aims to discuss the
relationship of Irish folklore with popular culture in general and develop a critical awareness of the key
concerns and interests. It will introduce in an ethnographic context the content of indigenous Irish or
traditional culture, folklore and popular culture studies in general; for example calendar customs, life
cycle ritual, belief and storytelling. It will offer examples relevant to the appreciation and interpretation
of everyday life as a research interest and concern.
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Scholars and Schizophrenics: Issues in Writing Irish Culture
This module will analyze examples of research of an ethnological, folkloristic or anthropological
nature. It aims to explore the authorship of ethnography or folklore or cultural description in general. It
asks questions about the representation of people and debates issues through dominant themes and
topics that have emerged. The module will use texts and examples of folkloristic or ethnographic
writing on Ireland. It will discuss and explore selected samples from both the past and the present.
Questions of a theoretical nature will be raised. This will enhance the student's own research interest
and analytical competency.
The Uses of Folklore: Community, Field and Archive
This module will introduce you to a basic element of folklore and ethnology. It offers personal
experience of the contexts and practical use of Irish folklore in communities and key offsite locations.
It discusses the value of archives and folklore in general in institutional as well as public and
community settings. It introduces the Irish National Folklore Collection, outlines its value to Folklore
studies and other disciplines such as history, literary studies, geography and Irish studies. This module
will comprise primarily of training in the use of archives including the National Folklore Collection,
training in field collection techniques including recorded ethnographic interviews, and will, where
practicable, include fieldtrip(s), and the compilation of a research journal.
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Module Descriptions
FL6000 Peasants to Natives: The Emergence of Irish Folklore and Popular Culture
Credit Weighting: 10
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Methods: 32 x 1hr(s) Lectures (and 16 hr(s) of Independent, Supervised Research or
Seminars).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr. Clíona O’Carroll
Lecturer(s): Staff, Roinn an Bhéaloidis / Department of Folklore.
Module Objective: To introduce the intellectual history and emergence of the collection and study of
Irish folklore and popular culture in an ethnological context.
Module Content: The module will focus on the key ideas, moments and interests in the intellectual
and popular history of folklore in Ireland.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
 Identify key moments in the emergence of the study of Irish popular culture and folklore.
 Situate the discipline in the broader context of Irish popular culture and culture in general.
 Understand the intellectual history of the idea of folklore.
 Critically engage with the theoretical underpinnings of their own approach to the discipline.
 Identify areas of interest in related fields within their own interest.
 Locate Irish folklore in a broader intellectual context.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and
including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved.
Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be
deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of
zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
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End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous
Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (in
consultation with the Department).
FL6001 Popular and Unpopular Culture: Festival, Ritual, Belief and Narrative
Credit Weighting: 10
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Methods: 32 x 1hr(s) Lectures (and 16 hr(s) of Independent, Supervised Research or
Seminars).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr. Marie-Annick Desplanques
Lecturer(s): Staff, Roinn an Bhéaloidis / Department of Folklore.
Module Objective: To introduce the core elements of Irish popular culture incorporating ritual,
festival, belief and narrative. To discuss the relationship of Irish folklore with popular culture in
general and develop a critical awareness of the key concerns and interests.
Module Content: The module will introduce in an ethnographic context the content of indigenous
Irish or traditional culture, folklore and popular culture in general; for example calendar customs, life
cycle ritual, belief and storytelling. It will offer examples relevant to the appreciation and interpretation
of everyday life as a research interest and concern.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
 Interpret popular expressions in cultural context.
 Recognize some of the main communal expressions of Irish popular culture.
 Identify key occasions in life experience in terms of ritual.
 Understand the forms and functions of calendar customs.
 Discuss belief in the context of traditional Irish society.
 Discuss popular cultural expressions in an ethnographic context.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
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Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and
including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved.
Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be
deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of
zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous
Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (in
consultation with the Department).
FL6002 Scholars or Schizophrenics: Issues in Writing Irish Culture
Credit Weighting: 10
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Methods: 32 x 1hr(s) Lectures (and 16 hr(s) of Independent, Supervised Research or
Seminars).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr. Stiofán O Cadhla
Lecturer(s): Staff, Roinn an Bhéaloidis / Department of Folklore.
Module Objective: To survey different examples of research of an ethnological, folkloristic or
anthropological nature. This module explores ethnography as writing or as authorship. It asks
questions about the representation of people in ethnographies and encourages debate through dominant
themes and topics that have emerged.
Module Content: The module will use texts and/or examples of folkloristic or ethnographic writing on
Ireland. It will discuss and explore selected samples from both the past and the present. Questions of a
theoretical nature will be raised with a view to enhancing the student's own research interest and
analytical competency.
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Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
 Read ethnography critically.
 Evaluate the contribution of ethnographic texts to knowledge.
 Identify key theoretical concepts in folklore, ethnography or literary texts.
 Understand writerly / literary aspects of ethnography.
 Locate ethnography in culture in general.
 Appreciate the significance of representation.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and
including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved.
Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be
deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of
zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous
Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (in
consultation with the Department).
FL6004 Irish Folklore in Context: Community, Field and Archive
Credit Weighting: 15
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Methods: 10 lectures x 1hr, 10 practicals x 1hr (how to write and reference folklore); 30hrs
Practicals (training in Folklore methods including archival experience and some training in fieldwork
techniques; 16 x 1hr(s) field experience (Fieldtrip(s)).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marie-Annick Desplanques
Lecturer(s): Staff, Roinn An Bhéaloidis / Department of Folklore.
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Module Objective: To gain personal experience of some of the contexts and practical uses of Irish
folklore in communities and key offsite locations. To appreciate the value of archives and folklore in
general in institutional as well as public and community settings. To achieve an understanding of the
value of the Irish National Folklore Collection to Folklore studies and other disciplines such as history,
literary studies, geography and Irish studies.
Module Content: This module will comprise primarily of experience based learning and training in
the use of archives including the National Folklore Collection, elements of training in field collection
techniques including recorded ethnographic interviews, fieldtrip (or trips where practicable), and the
compilation of a research journal.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
 Experience first-hand key sites of folklore activity.
 Recognize applied aspects of the learning experience in folklore.
 Understand the interaction of the discipline with the public.
 Participate on fieldtrips through field journal.
 Keep a diary of year’s experience both studying and living in Cork.
 Engage reflexively with folklore context(s).
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (consisting of preparation and
writing of a 1 x 3,000 word report based on archival research with supporting documentation (200
marks) and one research journal of ca. 50 entries (100 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and
including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved.
Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be
deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of
zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous
Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (in
consultation with the Department).
FL6003 Dissertation
Credit Weighting: 45
Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Periods 2 and 3.
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 10.
Pre-requisite(s): None
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Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Methods: Other (Independent Research).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr. Clíona O’Carroll
Lecturer(s): Staff, Roinn an Bhéaloidis / Department of Folklore.
Module Objective: To design and complete a research project and present a written dissertation.
Module Content: Independent research on a topic agreed with the Department in the area of Irish
folklore or popular culture.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
 Design a research project.
 Identify and evaluate key sources.
 Identify and evaluate cultural themes.
 Relate their research project to the discipline.
 Experience the value of ethnographic fieldwork.
 Write a report/monograph.
Assessment: Total Marks 900: Continuous Assessment 900 marks (Research Dissertation (max 20,000
words, through the medium of English or Irish) to be submitted internally by early-September - Date to
be set by Department).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be
assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: If it is deemed that there are emendations to be made
to the dissertation or if it does not attain an appropriate mark you must consult with the Department to
determine whether you can re-submit.
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Irish Folklore: A Preparatory Reading List
Students should read key texts in their area of interest in advance of the commencement of the
programme.
ALMQVIST, Bo (1979) ‘The Irish Folklore Commission: Achievement and Legacy’, Béaloideas 457, 1977-1979.
BRIODY, Mícheál, The Irish Folklore Commission: 1935-1970 (Studia Fennica
Folkloristica Helsinki 2007).
BOURKE, Angela, The Burning of Bridget Cleary (London 1999).
BURKE, Peter, Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe (Scolar Press 1994).
CHAPMAN, Malcolm, The Gaelic Vision in Scottish Culture (Montreal, McGill-Queen’s University
Press 1978).
CLEAR, Caitríona Social Change and Everyday Life in Ireland, 1850-1922
(Manchester 2007).
DANAHER, Kevin, The Year in Ireland (Cork 1972).
DORSON, Richard M., The British Folklorists; A History (Routledge & Kegan Paul,
London).
ESTYN EVANS, E. Irish Folk Ways (Routledge & Kegan Paul 1957).
FRYKMAN, Jonas and Orvar Lofgren, Culture Builders: A Historical Anthropology
of Middle-Class Life (New Brunswick, New Jersey 1996).
GLASSIE, Henry, Passing the Time in Ballymenone (Bloomington and Indianapolis
1982).
KIBERD, Declan, Inventing Ireland: The Literature of the Modern Nation (London,
Jonathan Cape 1995).
KINMONTH, Claudia, Irish Country Furniture (New Haven & London, Yale, 1993).
LEE, J.J. Ireland 1912-1985: Politics and Society (Cambridge 1989).
MAC NÉILL, Máire, The Festival of Lughnasa (Dublin 1982).
NARVAEZ, Peter (eag.), The Good People : New Fairylore Essays (New York &
London 1991).
Ó CADHLA, Stiofán, The Holy Well Tradition (Four Courts Press, Dublin 2004).
-- Civilizing Ireland: Ordnance Survey 1824-1842 (Irish Academic Press, Dublin
2007).
-- ‘Scribes and Storytellers: The Ethnographic Imagination in Nineteenth Century
Ireland’, in Julia M. Wright (ed) Blackwell Companion to Irish Literature: Volume,
(Wiley-Blackwell 2010).
Ó CRUALAOICH, Gearóid, The Book of the Cailleach: Stories of the Wise-Woman
Healer (Cork University Press 2003).
Ó GIOLLÁIN, Diarmuid, Locating Irish Folklore. Tradition, Modernity, Identity
(Cork 2000).
Ó hÓGÁIN, Daithí, The Lore of Ireland: An Encyclopaedia of Myth, Legend and
Romance, (Boydell Press 2006).
Ó LAOIRE, Lillis, On a Rock in the Middle of the Ocean: Songs and Singers in Tory Island
(Connemara 2007).
Ó SÚILLEABHÁIN, Seán, Irish Wake Amusements (Cork 1967).
Ó SÚILLEABHÁIN, Seán, Irish Folk Custom and Belief (Cork 1977).
Ó SÚILLEABHÁIN, Seán, Storytelling in Irish Tradition, (Cork).
Ridge, Anne, Death Customs in Rural Ireland (Arlen House 2009).
ZIMMERMAN, George D. (2001) The Irish Storyteller (Dublin: Four Courts Press).
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Reading Lists
(Lecturers may adjust lists or key readings from time to time)
FL6000 Peasants to Natives: The Emergence of Irish Folklore and Popular Culture
Abrahams, Roger D. (1992) ‘The past in the presence: An overview of folkloristics in the late 20th
century’ in Reimund Kvideland (ed.), Folklore Processed (Helsinki: Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden
Seura), Q+2, 398 KVID.
Almqvist, Bo (1979) “The Irish Folklore Commission: Achievement and Legacy.” in Béaloideas. Vol.
45-47, 1977-1979, 6-26, Q+2.
Benjamin, Walter (1992) ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’
in Benjamin, Illuminations, translated by Harry Zohn (London: Fontana Press), Q+3,
809 BENJ.
Briody, Mícheál (2007) The Irish Folklore Commission: 1935-1970: history,
ideology, methodology (Studia Fennica Folkloristica Helsinki), Q+2 and Special
Collections, 398 BRIO.
CENTER FOR FOLKLIFE AND CULTURAL HERITAGE, Smithsonian Institution, Washington,
DC, Safeguarding Traditional Cultures: A Global Assessment of the 1989 UNESCO
Recommendation on the Safeguarding of Traditional Culture and Folklore
http://www.folklife.si.edu/unesco/ Read the ‘Recommendation on the Safeguarding of Traditional
Culture and Folklore’, and Anthony McCann et al., ‘The 1989 Recommendation Ten Years On:
Towards a Critical Analysis’, both in this document.
Delargey, James Hamilton (1945) ‘The Gaelic Storyteller’, in Proceedings of the British Academy
31:177-221. Special Collections and Desk Reserve.
Dundes, Alan (Ed.) (1999) International Folkloristics (Lanham, MD: Rowman and
Littlefield, 1999), Q+2, 398 DUND.
García Canclini, Néstor, Hybrid Cultures: Strategies for Entering and Leaving
Modernity (Minneapolis & London: University of Minnesota, 1995), Q+3, 980
GARC.
Gregory, Lady Augusta (1920) Visions and Beliefs in the West of Ireland (New York and London;
The Knickerbocker Press), Open Reserve Q floor, 398.2 GREG.
Hyde, Douglas (1986) ‘The Necessity for De-anglicising Ireland’ in Language, Lore
and Lyrics. Essays and Lectures, edited with a preface and introduction by Breandán
Ó Conaire (Dublin: Irish Academic Press), Q+2, 398 HYDE.
Kirschenblatt-Gimblett, Barbara (1991) ‘Objects of Ethnography’ in Ivan Karp and Stephen D. Lavine
(ed.), Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display (Washington and London:
Smithsonian Institution Press), Q+1, 069.5 KARP.
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Löfgren, Orvar (1993) ‘The Cultural Grammar of Nation-building: The Nationalization of
Nationalism’ in Pertti J. Anttonen and Reimund Kvideland (ed.), Nordic Frontiers (Turku: Nordic
Institute of Folklore), Q+2, 398 ANTT.
Martín-Barbero, Jesús (1993) Communication, Culture and Hegemony, translated by
Elizabeth Fox and Robert A. White (London, Newbury Park, New Delhi: Sage). Q+2,
306 MART.
Ó Giolláin, Diarmuid (2000) Locating Irish Folklore. Tradition, Modernity, Identity
(Cork: Cork University Press), Q+2, 398 OGIO.
---- , ‘Copy Wrong and Copyright: Serial Psychos, Coloured Covers and Maori Marks’ (2002) in
Cultural Analysis: An Interdisciplinary Forum on Folklore and Popular Culture (University of
California, Berkeley), Vol. 3, http://ist-socrates.berkeley.edu/~caforum/volume3/vol3_discuss2.html
Ó Suilleabháin, Seán (1970) A Handbook of Irish Folklore (Detroit; Singing Tree Press), Q+2 and
Special Collections, Q+2, 398 OSUI.
Sachs, Wolfgang (1992) The Devlopment Dictionary (Johannesburg/London and New Jersey:
Witwatersrand University Press/Zed Books), Q+2, 330.9 SACH.
Stocklund, Bjarne (1999) ‘How the Peasant House Became a National Symbol. A Chapter in the
History of Museums and Nation-Building’ in Ethnologia Europaea 29: 1, Q+2.
Williams, Raymond (1988) Keywords, revised and expanded edition (London:
Fontana), Q+3, 428 WILL.
Zimmerman, Georges Denis (2001) The Irish Storyteller (Dublin: Four Courts), Q+3,
808.5 ZIMM.
FL6001 Popular and Unpopular Culture: Festival, Ritual, Belief and Narrative
Introductory and Background
√Burke, P. (1994) Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe (Scolar), Q+3: 940.2 BURK.
Bauman, R. (1992) Folklore, Cultural Performances and Popular Entertainments (Oxford), Q+2,
398 BAUM.
Clear, C. (2007) Social Change and Everyday Life in Ireland 185—1922 (Manchester), Q+2, 303.4
CLEA)
Eliade, M. (1987) The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion, Q+2, 291.1 ELIA.
Estyn Evans, E. (1957) Irish Folkways, Routledge Q+2,398 EVAN.
Frykman, J. and Löfgren O. (1996) Force of Habit, (Lund) 390 Fryk.
MacCana, P. (1968) Celtic Mythology (Newnes Books) (Chaper 8 ‘The Otherworld’), Q+3,
f891.6 MACC.
Ó Cadhla, S. (2007) Civilizing Ireland: Ethnography, Cartography and Translation (Irish
Academic Press), Q+2, 306.8 ÓCAD.
McGlinchey, C. (2007) The Last of the Name (Collins Press), Q+3, 941.6 McGL.
Ó Giolláin, D (2000) Locating Irish Folklore (UCC Press), Q+2, U398 OGIO.
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Ó hÓgáin, D. (2006) The Lore of Ireland (Boydell), Q+2 398.2 OHOG.
Ó Maitiú, S. (1995) The Humours of Donnybrook (Four Courts). Q+3, p941.83 OMAI.
√Van Gennep, A. The Rites of Passage (London: Cló Routledge), Q+2: U301.2.
Annual Cycle
√Danaher, K. (1972) The Year in Ireland. (Cork: Cló Mercier), Q+2:U390DANA.
Logan, P. (1986) Fair Day: the Story of Irish Fairs and Markets, Q+2, 394LOGA.
Ó Cadhla, S. (2003) “Calendar Custom”, in B. Lalor (ed.) The Encyclopaedia of Ireland, Dublin: Gill
and MacMillan 149-150.
Ó Danachair, C. “Calendar Customs and Festival Practices in Ireland”, A Feder agus B Schrank (eag)
Literature and Folk Culture: (St Johns), 111-128. Q+2: 398 FEDE.
Santino, Jack (1998) The Hallowed Eve (Kantucky).
√Smith, R. J. (1982) ‘Festivals and Celebrations’, in R. Dorson (eag.) Folklore and Folklife: An
Introduction (Cló Ollscoile Chicago), Q+2: 398DORS.
Lifecycle
Ballard, L. M (1998) Forgetting Frolic (Béal Feirste), Q+2: U306.8 BALL.
Carleton, W. (1973)The Party Fight and Funeral (Mercier), Q+3, 823.7 CARL.
Ó Madagáin, B. (2005) Caointe agus SeanCheolta Eile : Keening and Other Old Irish Musics (Cló
Iar-Chonnachta) (bilingual text), Q+3, 891.621 OMAD.
Ó Súilleabháin, S. (1967) Irish Wake Amusements (Mercier), Q+2: U393 OSUI.
Belief and Healing
Bourke, A. (1999) The Burning of Bridget Cleary (Pimlico), Q+2: 354.1 BOUR.
√Ó Cadhla, S. (2004) The Holy Well Tradition (Four Courts Press) Q+2: p263.9.
Ó hEochaid, S. (1977) Fairy Legends from Donegal (IFC), Q+2: U398.2 OHEO.
Ó Crualaoich, G. (2005) The Book of the Cailleach: (UCC Press), 398.2 OCRU.
Dr Stiofán Ó Cadhla (√ means necessary reading).
15
FL6002 Scholars or Schizophrenics: Issues in Writing Irish Culture
General
Arensberg, Conrad (1937 – later reprints) The Irish Countryman: An Anthropological Study,
Gloucester: Peter Smith. (307.72 Aren Q+3)
Bendix, Ruth (1997) In Search of Authenticity: The Formation of Folklore Studies, Wisconsin. (?)
Micheál Briody (2008) The Irish Folklore Commission: 1935-1970 Studia Fennica Folkloristica 17
Brody, Hugh (1973) Inishkillane: Change and Decline in the West of Ireland, Faber and Faber,
London. (Q+1, 307.72 BROD)
Burke, Peter (1994) Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe, Scolar Press (Q+3, 940.2 BURK)
Curtin, Chris, Donnan, Hastings and Thomas M. Wilson (eds) (1993) Irish Urban Cultures, IIS
Belfast. (Q+1, 307.76 CURT)
Danaher, Kevin (1975) The Year in Ireland, Mercier, Cork. (Q+1, 390, DANA)
Estyn-Evans, E (1957) Irish Folk Ways, Routledge. (Q+1, U 398 EVAN)
Fennell, Desmond (2003) ‘Wiping Out the Past and Creating a Cultural Blank Slate: What is All This
‘Modernity’ Nonsense?’ Irish Times 28.05.03, 14.
Finnegan, Ruth (1992) Oral Traditions and the Verbal Arts, (Chapter 2 Theoretical Perspectives),
Routledge. (Q+1 306 FINN)
Frykman, J and Löfgren O. (eds) (1987) Culture Builders: A Historical Anthropology of MiddleClass Life, Rutgers University Press. (?)
‘The Study of Swedish Customs and Habits’, in Frykman and Lofgren (eds) Force of Habit:
Exploring Everyday Culture, Lund Studies in European Ethnology. (Q+1, 390 FRYK)
Hammersley, Martyn and Paul Atkinson, (1995) Ethnography, (Chapter 9 Writing Ethnography),
Routledge. Q+1, 306 HAMM)
Harrison, Simon (1999) ‘Cultural Boundaries’, Anthropology Today 15:5 (?)
Ó Danachair, Caoimhín (1983) ‘The Progress of Irish Ethnology’, 1783-1982’, Ulster Folklife 29:317. (Q+1 Serials)
Thoms, William (1999 reprint, ‘Folklore and the Origin of the Word’, in Alan Dundes (ed)
International Folkloristics, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. Q+1, 398 DUND).
Some Examples
Fox, Robin (1978) The Tory Islanders: A People of the Celtic Fringe, London: Cambridge University
Press. (941.6 FOX Q+3)
Gaetz, Stephen A. (1997) Looking Out for the Lads: Community Action and the Provision of Youth
Services in an Urban Irish Parish, ISER Newfoundland. (?)
Glassie, H (1982), Passing the Time Indiana Press. (see other titles eg 1975. All Silver and no Brass).
Magowan, Fiona and Máiréad Nic Craith (eds) (2008) Anthropology and European Ethnology in
Northern Ireland: New Directions, a Special Edition of Irish Journal of Anthropology 11(1).
Messenger, John C. (1983) An Anthropologist at Play: Balladmongering in Ireland and its
Consequences for Research, University press of America: Lanham, NY, London. (941.7 Q+3 Mess)
(1969) Inis Beag: Isle of Ireland, Holt, Reinhart and Winston (306 Q+1 Mess)
Ó Cadhla, Stiofán (2002) ‘Place, Identity and Community’, review of A World of Fine Difference in
Béascna 1:120-125. (Q+1 Serials)
(2001) ‘Fast Knocks and Nags: The Stolen Car in the Urban Vernacular Culture of Cork’,
Ethnologia Europaea 31:2, 77-94. (Q+1 Serials)
O Cadhla, Stiofán (2007) Civilizing Ireland: Ethnography, Cartography, Translation (Dublin, Irish
Academic Press)
16
Ó Cadhla, Stiofán (2008) ‘The Gnarled and Stony Clods of Townlands Tip: Máirtín Ó Cadhain and the
“Gaelic” Storyteller’, Revue Canadienne d’Études Irlandais: Canadian Review of Irish Studies 34:1,
40-46.
Ó Cadhla, Stiofán (2008b) ‘Subterfuge and Evasion in the Irish Folklore Commission?’ léirmheas ar
The Irish Folklore Commission: 1935-1970: History, Ideology, Methodology (2007) le Mícheál
Briody (Helsinki, Studia Fennica Folkloristica), Studia Celtica Fennica V, 98-100.
Ó Cadhla, Stiofán (2009 le teacht gan mhoill) ‘Scribes and Storytellers: The Ethnographic Imagination
in Nineteenth Century Ireland’, Blackwell Companion to Irish Literature (Oxford: Cló Blackwell).
Peace, Adrian (2001) A World of Fine Difference: The Social Architecture of an Irish Village,
University College Dublin. (?)
Santino, Jack (1998) The Hallowed Eve: Dimensions of Culture in a Calendar Festival in Northern
Ireland, The University Press of Kentucky. (?)
Semali, Ladislaus M. and Joe L. Kincheloe. (eag.) (1999) What is Indigenous Knowledge? Voices from
the Academy (Londain, Cló Falmer).
Scheper-Hughes, Nancy (1979) Saints, Scholars and Schizophrenics: Mental Illness in Rural
Ireland, California University Press. (Q+1, 307.72 SCHE)
Taylor, Lawrence J. (1995) Occasions of Faith: An Anthropology of Irish Catholics, Lilliput Press,
Dublin. (Q+1, 282.415, TAYL)
(1996) ‘There are Two Things That People Don’t Like to Hear About Themselves: The
Anthropology of Ireland and the Irish View of Anthropology’, South Atlantic Quarterly 95:1, 213226. Ireland and Irish Cultural Studies, J.P. Waters (ed) Q+3, 941.5)
17
FL6004 Irish Folklore in Context: Community, Field and Archive
Abu-Lughod, Lila. (1985) "A Community of Secrets: The Separate World of Bedouin Women."
Signs 10: 637-57. (JSTOR)
Abrahams, Roger. (1975) "Negotiating Respect: Patterns of Presentation among Black Women."
Journal of American Folklore 88: 58-80. (JSTOR)
Almqvist, B., (1979) The Irish Folklore Commission: Achievement and Legacy, Baile Atha Cliath:
Comhairle Béaloideas Éireann. Boole (Q+2 Floor p 398 ALMQ)
Agar, Michael. (1980) The Professional Stranger (San Diego: San Diego Academic Press (Open
Reserve Q Floor 301 AGAR)
Barley, Nigel, (1983)The Innocent Anthropologist Harmondsworth: Penguin (Boole Q+3 Floor 916
BARL)
Bauman, Richard, and Joel Sherzer, ed. ( 1975) Explorations in the ethnography of speaking
London: Cambridge UP, (Boole Q+2 Floor 306.4 BAUM)
Bausinger, Hermann. (1990) Folk Culture in a World of Technology Bloomington, Indiana UP,
(Boole Q+2 Floor 398 BAUS)
Ben-Amos, (1976) Dan. Folklore Genres. Austin: U of Texas Press, (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 FOLK)
Ben-Amos, Dan and Kenneth S. Goldstein (eds). (1975) Folklore Performance And
Communication La Hague: Mouton (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 BENA)
Brennan Harvey, Clodagh. (1992) Contemporary Irish Traditional Narrative. The English Language
Tradition Berkeley: U of California Press, (Boole Q+2 Floor U 398.1 HARV)
Briggs, Charles. (1989) Competence in Performance: The Creativity of Tradition in Mexicano
Verbal Art Philadelphia:University of Pennsylvania Press, (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 BRIG)
Briggs, Jean L. (1970) Never in Anger. Cambridge: Harvard U Press, (Boole Q+2 Floor 301.2 BRIG)
Caraveli-Chaves, Anna. (1980) "Bridge between Worlds: The Greek Women's Lament as
Communicative Event." Journal of American Folklore 93 : 129-57. (JSTOR)
Clifford, James and George E. Marcus. eds. (1986)Writing Culture. (Berkeley: U of California Press,
(Boole Q+2 Floor 306 CLIF)
Cohen, Anthony. (1985) The Symbolic Construction of Community London: Routledge, (Boole Q+2
Floor 307 COHE)
Cross, Eric. (1999) The Tailor and Ansty. Cork: Mercier, (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 CROS)
Curtin, Chris, Hastings Donnan and Thomas M. Wilson (eds.). (1993) Irish Urban Cultures Belfast:
Institute of Irish Studies, (Boole Q+2 Floor 307.76 CURT)
Denzin, Norman, K. (1997) Interpretive Ethnography. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications (Boole
Q+2 Floor 305.8 DENZ)
Dundes, Alan, (1965).The Study of Folklore Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall (Boole Q+2 Floor 398
DUND)
Dundes, Alan, ed. International Folkloristics: Classic Contributions by the Founders of Folklore.
(1999) New York: Rowman & Littlefield, (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 DUND)
Erickson, Ken and Donald Stull. (1998) Doing Team Ethnography, Warnings and Advice Thousand
Oaks: Sage Publications, (Boole Q+2 Floor 305.8 ERIC)
Farrer, Claire, ed. (1975) Women and Folklore. Austin: U of Texas P,. Special issue of JAF)
(JSTOR)
Feintuch, Burt. (1995) “Common Ground: Keywords for the Study of Expressive Culture.” Special
Issue of the Journal of American Folklore. (JSTOR)
Finnegan, Ruth (1992), Oral Traditions and the Verbal Arts London: Routledge, (Boole Q+2 Floor
306 FINN)
18
Garnert, Jan, 'Rethinking Visual Representation: Notes on the Folklorist and Photographer Nils
Keyland' in Pertti J. Anttonen & Reimund Kvideland (ed.), (1993). Nordic Frontiers. Recent
Issues in the Study of Modern Traditional Culture in the Nordic Countries Turku: Nordic
Institute of Folklore, (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 ANTT)
Georges, Robert A. & Jones, Michael Owen. (1995) Folkloristics. An Introduction Bloomington:
Indiana UP, (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 GEOR)
Goldstein, Kenneth (1964), A Guide for Field Workers in Folklore Hartboro (Boole Q+2 Floor 398
GOLD)
Greenhill, Pauline and Diane Tye eds. (1997). Undisciplined Women. Montreal, McGill UP, (Boole
Q+2 Floor 398 GREE)
Handler, Richard, Nationalism and the Politics of Culture in Quebec (1988) Univ. of Wisconsin chap.
‘In Search of the Folk Society’. (Boole Q+2 Floor 320.5 HAND)
Hannerz, Ulf (1980), Exploring the City: Inquiries towards an Urban Anthropology New York,
Columbia UP, (Boole Q+2 Floor 307.76 HANN)
Hannerz, Ulf (1992), Cultural Complexity, Studies in the Social Organization of Meaning New
York: Columbia UP (Boole Q+2 Floor 306 HANN)
Honko, Lauri (1977), 'The Role of Fieldwork in Tradition Research' in Ethnologia
Scandinavia (Boole Q+2 Serials)
Honko, Lauri, (1989) 'The Final Text of the Recommendation for the Safeguarding of Folklore' in NIF
Newsletter 2-3/, 3-12. (Boole Q+2 Serials)
Jordan, Rosan A., and Susan Kalcik, eds. ( 1985). Women's Folklore, Women's Culture.
Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 JORD)
Keating, Elizabeth, “The Ethnography of Communication” in Atkinson, Paul Amanda Coffey, Sara
Delamont,
John Lofland and Lyn Lofland Eds. (2001) Handbook of Ethnography. (Thousand Oaks: Sage
Publications) pp 285-301 (Boole Q+2 Floor 305.8 ATKI)
Keenan, Elinor. (1974). "Norm-Makers, Norm-Breakers: Uses of Speech by Men and Women in a
Malgasy Community." Explorations in the Ethnography of Speaking. Eds. Richard Bauman
and Joel Sherzer. New York: Cambridge UP, (Boole Q+2 Floor 306.4 BAUM)
Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Barbara, (1991)'Objects of Ethnography' in Ivan Karp & Steven D. Lavine
(ed.), Exhibiting Cultures Washington & London, 386-443. (Boole Q+1 Floor 069.5 KARP)
Kodish, Debora. (1983): "Fair Young Ladies and Bonny Irish Boys: Patterns in Vernacular Poetics."
Journal of American Folklore 96 131-50.
Kvideland Reimund, ed. (1992), Folklore Processed (Turku), [particularly Gullveig Alver, 'Ethical
Issues in Folkloristic Research' and Mihály Hoppál, 'Ethnohermeneutics in the Theory of
Tradition'] (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 KVID)
Lewis, Mary Ellen B. (1974): "The Feminists Have Done It: Applied Folklore." Journal of
American Folklore 87 85-87. (JSTOR)
MacDonald, D.A. (1972), 'Fieldwork: Collecting Oral Literature' in Dorson (ed.), Folklore and
Folklife: An Introduction Chicago, pp. 407-430 (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 DORS)
Mahon, Bríd, (1998) While Green Grass Grows. Cork: Mercier (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 MAHO)
Mukerji, Chandra & Schudson, Michael (ed.), (1991).Rethinking Popular Culture Berkeley, Los
Angeles & Oxford Boole (Q+2 Floor 306.4 MUKE)
Narváez, Peter, ed. (1997) The Good People: New Fairylore Essays. Lexington: University Press of
Kentucky,. (Open Reserve Q Floor 398.2 NARV)
Narváez, Peter, ed. (2003) Of Corpse: Death and Humor in Folklore and Popular Culture. Logan:
Utah State University Press,. (Boole Q+2 Floor 398.27 NARV)
Narváez, Peter and Martin Laba (eds) (1986) Media Sense (Bowling Green State UP), (Boole Q+2
Floor 398.1 NARV)
19
O Connor , Barbara and Michael CRONIN (1993) Tourism In Ireland. A Critical Analysis Cork
(Boole Q+2 Floor 338.4 OCON)
Ó Crualaoich, Gearóid, (2003) The Book of the Cailleach. Cork: CUP, (Open Reserve Q Floor 398.2
OCRU)
Ó Danachair, Caoimhín, 'The Progress of Irish Ethnology, 1783-1982' (1983), in Ulster Folklife 29 317. (Boole Q+2 Serials)
Ó Giolláin, Diarmuid, (2000) Locating Irish Folklore. Cork: CU P (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 OGIO)
Oring, Elliott, ed. (1986) Folk Groups and Folklore Genres. Logan: Utah State University Press,
(Boole Q+2 Floor 398 ORIN)
Ó Súilleabháin, S. (1942), A Handbook of Irish Folklore (Dublin) (Boole Q+2 Floor U 398 OSUI)
Radner, Joan Newlon. (1993) Feminist Messages, Coding in Women’s Folk Culture. Chicago: U of
Illinois Press (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 RADN)
Reiter, Rayna R. "Men & Women in the South of France: Public and Private Domains." Toward an
Anthropology of Women. Ed. Rayna R. Reiter. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1975. 25282. (Boole Q+2 Floor U 305.4 REIT)
Rieti, Barbara. (1991). Strange Terrain: The Fairy World in Newfoundland. St. John's: Institute for
Social and Economic Research, (Boole Q+2 Floor 398.2 RIET)
Rieti, Barbara. (2008) Making Witches: Newfoundland Traditions of Spells and Counterspells.
Montreal: McGill-Queen's (Boole Q+2 Floor 133.43 RIET)
Roberts, W.E. (1972), 'Fieldwork: Recording Material Culture' in Dorson (ed.), Folklore and Folklife:
An Introduction (Chicago), pp. 431-444 (Boole Q+2 Floor 398 DORS)
Rosaldo, Michelle Zimbalist. (1974.) "Woman, Culture, and Society: A Theoretical Overview."
Woman, Culture, and Society. Eds. Michelle Z. Rosaldo and Louise Lamphere. Stanford:
Stanford UP, 16-42. (Boole Q+2 Floor 305.4 ROSA)
Rosenberg, Neil V. (1985) Bluegrass: A History. Urbana: University of Illinois Press,. (Boole Q+3
Floor 781.64 ROSE)
Rosenberg, Neil V., ed. (1993) Transforming Tradition: Folk Music Revivals Examined. Urbana:
University of Illinois Press, (Boole Q+3 Floor 781.621 ROSE)
Russell, Bernard, H.. (1988)Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology (Newbury Park: Sage,
(Boole Q+2 Floor 306 BERN)
Saltzman, Rachelle H. (1987): "Folklore, Feminism and the Folk; Whose Lore Is It?" Journal of
American Folklore 100 548-62. (JSTOR)
Scheper-Hughes, Nancy, ( 2001) Saints Scholars and Schizophrenics. (Berkeley: U of California
Press, (Boole Q+2 Floor 307.72 SCHE)
Schoemaker, George H., (1990) .ed. The Emergence of Folklore in Everyday Life: A Fieldguide and
Sourcebook. Bloomington, IN: Trickster Press, Boole Q+2 Floor f 398 SCHO)
Spradley, James P. (1979), The Ethnographic Interview (New York) (Boole Q+2 Floor 306 SPRA)
Stacey, Judith. "Can There Be A Feminist Ethnography?" Women's Studies International Forum
11 (1988): 21-27.
Tedlock, Barbara, 'From participant observation to the observation of participation: the emergence of
narrative ethnography' in Journal of Anthropological Research 47, 1, pp. 69-94 (JSTOR)
Tilley, Christopher. “Ethnography and Material Culture” in Atkinson, Paul Amanda Coffey, Sara
Delamont, John Lofland and Lyn Lofland Eds. Handbook of Ethnography. (Thousand Oaks: Sage
Publications) pp 258-272
Toelken, Barre. (1996) The Dynamics of Folklore. Logan: Utah State University Press,. Boole Q+2
Floor 390 TOEL)
Skeggs, Beverley. (2001) “Feminist Ethnography.” Handbook of Ethnography. Eds. Paul Atkinson,
Amanda Coffey, Sara Delamont, John Lofland and Lyn Lofland. Thousand Oaks: Sage
Publications,. 426-442(Boole Q+2 Floor 305.8 ATKI)
20
Tonkin, Elizabeth, McDonald, Maryon & Chapman, Malcolm (ed.), (1989). History and Ethnicity
London & New York (Boole Q+3 Floor 907 TONK)
Turner, Terence "Defiant Images; The Kayapo appropriation of video" Anthropology Today 8:6
(1992) 5-16 (JSTOR)
Vaz, Kim Marie, ed. Oral narrative research with Black women (1997) Thousand Oaks (Boole Q+2
Floor 305.4 VAZ)
Whyte, W.F. (1943), Street Corner Society Chicago (Boole Q+2 Floor 304.8 WHYT)
Wolf, Diane L. ed. (1996) Feminist dilemmas in fieldwork (Boulder) (Boole Q+2 Floor 305.42
WOLF)
Websites
• Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Safeguarding
Traditional Cultures: A Global Assessment of the 1989 UNESCO Recommendation on the
Safeguarding of Traditional Culture and Folklore.
http://www.folklife.si.edu/unesco/
Read the ‘Recommendation on the Safeguarding of Traditional Culture and Folklore’, and Anthony
McCann et al., ‘The 1989 Recommendation Ten Years On: Towards a Critical Analysis’, both in
this document.
• Cultural Analysis special issue on this theme: Cultural Analysis. An Interdisciplinary Forum on
Folklore and Popular Culture, Vol. 3 (2002).
http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~caforum/current.html
• Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Barbara, ‘Objects of Ethnography’ in Ivan Karp and Stephen D. Lavine
(ed.), Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display (Washington and London:
Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991).
• McCann, Anthony, Beyond the Commons: The Expansion of the Irish Music Rights Organisation,
the Elimination of Uncertainty, and the Politics of Enclosure (University of Limerick 2002)
http://www.beyondthecommons.com
This website ‘is a developing research project dedicated to the study of enclosure as a social
dynamic of relevance to ethnomusicology, anthropology, and the social sciences, with a particular
emphasis on the analysis of the role of intellectual property and commodification in social life’.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Archives
The American Folklore Society website is an excellent resource for folklorists.
http://www.afsnet.org/
Archives of Folklore and Folklife, University of Pennsylvania
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/folklore/grad_program/handbook/archive.html
Estonian Folklore Archives of the Estonian Literary Museum, Tartu. These are the Estonian national
folklore archives.
http://haldjas.folklore.ee/rli/insti/erai.htm
Finnish Literature Society Folklore Archives, Helsinki. These are the Finnish national folklore
archives. Their English pages do not seem to be operational at the moment. The following
nevertheless is a good account by the former director. This same website,
http://www.folklorefellows.org/, is an important resource for folklorists.
http://www.folklorefellows.org/netw/ffn15/fls.html
North East Folklore Archive, Aberdeenshire, Scotland http://www.nefa.net/index2.htm
University of California Berkeley Folklore Archive
http://ls.berkeley.edu/dept/folklore/archive-policy.html
University of California Los Angeles Folklore and Mythology Archives
http://www.humnet.ucla.edu/humnet/folklore/archives/
21
Samples of Ethnographic Theses in Folklore
(Available in Boole Library)
Jacqueline M. Callan, The Galway Hooker: A Study of the Vernacular Craft, 1996
Valérie Liégeois, The Social Apprenticeship of Photography and its Use in the Construction of Family
Identity, 2002.
Karen Louise Cafferkey, Tracing Life History Through Patchwork and Quilting, 2005.
Clíona O’Carroll, We Go There and They Come Here: Migrancy and Dislocation Through the Looking
Glass of the Tourist Gaze, 2001.
Annemarie Frederike Latour, The Irish Pub Culture in a Dutch Context, 1998.
David C. Barry, A Performance Analysis of Irish Traditional Music Sessions in Cork City, 2000.
Sadhb Warren, Pinning a Tail on the Celtic Tiger; Heritage, Identity and the Celtic Tiger Generation,
2001.
Ciarán Enright, Postmodern Pubs and Plastic Paddies, Noble Knaves, and Knackered Navvies:
Imagining National Identity in London, 1997.
Seán Goggin, A Proppian Analysis of Popular Cinema Narrative, 1999.
Joseph Feller, Roots and Wings: Orthodoxy, Tradition, and Creativity in Irish Folk Catholicism, 1998.
Nicole Henkel, Dying in Our Time: Living With Death and Dying in Ireland, 2002.
Mary G. McCormack, The Ethnography of the Cobh Taizé Mass, 1998.
Marguerita T. Humphries, The Ethnography of the Dance Event, 2001.
Aiveen Cleary, The Exorcists: A Study of the Narratives about the Ritual of Exorcism and the Role of
the Catholic Priest and the Shaman in Irish and Korean Communities, 2003.
Margaret O’Rourke, The Final Journey: Ancient and Contemporary Rituals Associated with Dying and
Death, 2000.
Christine A. C. Maher, Reading Irish Popular Culture: The Myth of a Traditional Diet, 1996.
22
Tráchtais Eitneolaíocha sa Léann Dúchais
Liam Lillis Ó Laoire, Ar Chreag i Lár na Farraige: Proiseas an Chultúir i leith Sheachadadh agus
Láithriú na nAmhrán i dToraigh, 1999.
Deirdre Ní Chinnéide, An ‘Dreoilín’: Eisint agus Bunphrionsabail! 2003.
Máiréad Ní Shé, Béaloideas Pharóiste na nAilichí. 1990.
Petrina Lynch, An Biorán Suain, Tost agus Náire i Saol na mBan, 1998.
Fionnuala Ní Shuibhne, Cuntas ar Ghnéithe de Shaol an Bhaineannaigh as Insint Bhéil Fhaisneoirí
MnáÓ Chúige Uladh, 1990.
John Duillea, Dámhscoil Mhúscraí Uí Fhloinn agus Éigse Dhiarmuid Uí Shúilleabháin: Léiriú ar
Thraidisiún agus ar Fhéiniúlacht Chultúrtha Ghaeltacht Mhúscraí, 1999.
Louise Ryan, Donegal’s Maritime Heritage, 1995.
Síle de Cléir, Éadach, Feisteas, agus Maisiú i Saol Traidisiúnta Oileán Árainn agus Chorca Dhuibhne,
1992.
Dónal Sugrue, An Examination of Aspects of Tradition Relating to Some Ceallúnaigh in Uíbh Ráthach,
1993.
Healers, Warriors and Virgin Mothers: Popular Images and Roles of Supernatural Females, 2006.
Máirtín Verling, Leabhar Phádraig Uí Mhurchú: Scéalta agus Seanchas ó Iar-Thuaisceart Bhéarra,
1986.
Kathry Jacobson, The Legends of Archer Avenue: Alive and Well in the Rational World, 2001.
Máiréad Ní Mhaidín, Naomh Gobnait Bhaile Bhúirne, 1986.
Mary C. Finn, The Piseog in Kerry, 1994.
William Brazil, Popular Music – A Primary Factor in Cultural/National Identity, 1995.
Clodagh Doyle, A Study of Traditional Hearth Furniture and the Hearth in Irish Rural Society 17501950, 1999.
Niall de Barra, An tÁirneán agus an Tórramh: A dTábhacht i gCoibhneas a Chéile i Slí Maireachtála
agus i Saoldearcadh Mhuintir Iarthar Dhéise Mumhan, 2000.
Eileen M. Joyce, Tomás Ó Ríordáin, An ‘Caist’: An Fear agus a Scéal, 1990.
Christin Ní Annáin, Traidisiúin Bhéil Luiminí: An Béaloideas a Bhailíodh I gContae Luimní faoi
Choimirce Choimisiún Béaloideasa Éireann, 1989.
PLEASE VISIT THE DEPARTMENTAL WEB PAGES
www.ucc.ie/folklore
23
GRADUATE AND STUDIES COMMITTEE
Students’ knowledge and understanding of the above is facilitated through regular illustrated lectures,
assessment feedback, practical workshops.
The Department’s Graduate Studies Committee has prepared a Graduate Studies Handbook which is
available on the departmental web-site.
Students should familiarise themselves with the department’s requirement on the departmental web
pages, and with the broader administrative procedures through the web pages of UCC’s Graduate
Studies Office or International Student’s Office.
Class Work
NB Students must not make substantial use of the same material in more than one piece of written
work, including Class Examinations. Use of internet sources must be verifiable and
referenced fully.
ASSESSMENT
Success in the Department of Folklore and Ethnology is judged on performance in the written work
and final examination according to the marking scheme outlined in Appendix IV. Failure to submit
written work will normally prevent a student from sitting the final examination. Students are expected
to hand in essays by the set dates, unless an extension has been obtained from the Course Organiser.
This will normally only be granted on health grounds upon production of a Medical Certificate or, in
cases of illness lasting less than the 7 days immediately before the submission deadline. Where an
essay is handed in late, and no extension has been granted, 1% will be deducted for each working
day (Monday to Friday inclusive) the essay is overdue beyond the set date, so that a total of 5%
will be deducted if the essay is one week late. If you are unable to submit work you must
immediately contact the Department or provide a Formal Medical Certificate. This must be
submitted by the deadline. Thereafter essays will be assigned a mark of 0 (zero) which will count
towards the student’s overall assessment. Marks will also be deducted from any essay which does
not adhere to the required length or does not include a proper bibliography or list of sources
with references.
Any student encountering problems with aspects of the course or the required written work should
have no hesitation in speaking to the Programme Co-ordinator, Lecturer or Tutor. Students should feel
free to discuss their marks on essays or examination scripts with the appropriate lecturer. Office hours
for staff members will be posted on the front hall notice board and on office doors and on the web-site.
At the end of the year all students are assigned a mark which is an aggregate of the classwork and
Degree Examination marks. The pass mark for the year is 40% (see Appendix IV, Marking
Scheme).
Anonymous marking is in operation.
SUBMISSION OF WORK
During term time we are required to keep students’ work (essays, exam papers etc.) in order that these
are made available to examiners. Therefore, in order to have one copy available to examiners the
student must hand in two copies of each assignment submitted.
NB If during the year you change your address, please inform the Office immediately.
24
Summer Examinations
The dates of the Summer Examination will be made available on the UCC website closer to the
Summer Examinations. On the UCC homepage this page can be accessed under information for
current students. Students should familiarise themselves with the department’s requirement on the
departmental web pages, and with the broader administrative procedures through the web pages of
UCC’s Graduate Studies Office or International Student’s Office.
http://www.ucc.ie/
Past Examination Papers
Past Folklore & Ethnology examination papers can be found on the following website:
http://booleweb.ucc.ie/
25
ARCHIVAL RESOURCES
Roinn an Bhéaloidis: The Department of Folklore and Ethnology’s Archival facilities include the The
Departmental Archive and the Cork Northside Folklore Project (CNFP). The UCC Folklore and
Ethnology Archive is situated at 5 Elderwood, College Road whereas the Cork Northside Folklore
Project, which combines a community archive and a “field station”, is located at the Northside
Community Enterprises, St. Finbarr’s College. The two branches are integrated into the Multimedia
Centre for Urban and Regional Ethnology (MCURE) which has actively participated in major research
programmes such as Documents of Ireland with HEA funding. Please visit the Cork Northside
Folklore Project web pages to read more.
The Departmental Archive is primarily a research facility within the department of Folklore and
Ethnology. Its holdings consist of multimedia material arising from the work of both staff and students of
An Léann Dúchais/Folklore together with other relevant material from external depositors. Catalogues
and indexes to the holdings can be consulted at the Archive. The collections, which cover all aspects
of rural and urban folklore, folklife and popular culture are available for consultation on site. Where
appropriate your studies will include visits to or experience of this archive.
The Cork Northside Folklore Project was founded in partnership with Roinn an Bhéaloidis /
Department of Folklore and Ethnology at University College Cork, Northside Community Enterprises
and FÁS. Since its beginnings in August 1996 researchers at the Project as well as students and staff
of the Department have been at work collecting folklore and oral histories on a wide array of topics,
documenting the everyday lives of the people of Cork. The CNFP archive contains hundreds of hours
of sound and video recordings and over 6000 photographs. Where appropriate your studies will
include visits to or experience of this archive.
The Project publishes its own annual journal The Archive and has produced a number of audio visual
works which are shown regularly at conferences and in educational contexts. The project produced a
series of ethnographic radio programmes for Cork European Capital of Culture 2005.
The project is open to the public and to students. It can be contacted through its website
http://www.ucc.ie/research/nfp/
or directly by phoning Mary O’Driscoll, on-site coordinator at 021 4228102.
ADDITIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
Seminars and Lectures
Students are warmly invited and encouraged to attend events for which notices are posted in 5
Elderwood, College Road. In addition, there are regular Research Seminars organised for all students.
Check noticeboard for details: where these are part of your studies, attendance is obligatory.
Societies
If you are interested in establishing a folklore society please contact the office of the department in the
first instance.
26
Careers Advice
The Folklore and Ethnology courses provide students with a range of transferable skills relevant to
many careers and it is important to think ahead.
On the Careers Service website you can find information on careers, vacation work, graduate jobs,
postgraduate study, working or studying abroad and information on CVs/Application Forms/Interviews
etc. The website at http://www.ucc.ie/services/careers/ gives full details of all the services available.
To make an appointment with the careers office please contact Aoife Murphy at 4903193 or email
[email protected]
Student Employment Service
The students union service may help students find suitable part-time work and to advise on their rights
and other matters relating to the mix of work and study.
Please contact the students union building located on 54 College Road.
Tel: 4903218
27
Appendix I
The following are some of the locations where students have use of campus computers
Opening Hours:
In Term
Opening Hours:
Out of Term
Boole Basement,
near Lecture Theatre
M-F: 08:30 - 22:30
S-S: 09:00 - 21:00
M-F: 08:30 - 22:30
S-S: 09:00 - 18:00
Y
Block A, 4th Floor
Food Science Building
M-F: 08:30 - 18:00
S-S: Closed
M-F: 09:00 - 18:00
S-S: Closed
Y
Kane Building
3rd Floor
M-F: 08:30 - 19:00
S-S: Closed
M-F: 09:00 - 18:00
S-S: Closed
Y
Áras na Mac Léinn
3rd Floor
As per opening of
building
As per opening of
building
Áras na Mac Léinn
Café
As per opening of
building
As per opening of
building
Boole Library
Q, Q+1. Q+2, Q+3
As per opening of
building
As per opening of
building
Kampus Kitchen Basement
Kane Building
As per opening of
building
M-S: Closed
Old Pres
Connolly Building
Western Road
M-F: 08:30 - 18:00
S-S: Closed
M-S: Closed
Enterprise Centre
Unit 23
As per opening of
building
As per opening of
building
Mercy Hospital
As per opening of
building
As per opening of
building
M-F: 09:00 - 17:00
S-S: Closed
M-F: 09:00 - 17:00
S-S: Closed
Brookfield Health Sciences Café
As per opening of
building
As per opening of
building
Victoria Lodge Coffee Shop
As per opening of
building
As per opening of
building
Cork University Hospital
As per opening of
building
As per opening of
building
Location
Brookfield Health Sciences Library
For further information regarding location of computers for student use on campus, visit the
following link: http://www.ucc.ie/en/sit/about/open/
28
Map of Student Computer Locations on Campus
29
Appendix II
WRITTEN WORK
Essays, Projects, Dissertations & Other Written Assignments (Apart from Questionnaires)
should be Typed on a Word Processor.
Blackboard
Students should familiarise themselves as early as possible with the University’s online learning
system Blackboard, where Lecturers may place helpful and relevant material for your studies. The
system does not take precedence over lectures themselves.
Layout
The cover page must state your student number, course, year of study, name of lecturer, date of
submission and the title of the essay topic chosen.
Please note that TWO Copies of all written work, should be submitted, and that the Student’s Number,
NOT Name, must be clearly stated on the cover of all work submitted for assessment. One copy (with
a copy of the completed evaluation form) will be retained in the General Office for inspection by the
External Examiner.
Format
Please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, Author-Date iteration or make clear what system you are
following. See postgraduate journal “Béascna”.
Introduction
The introduction should define your topic, what you hope to demonstrate by it, the types of evidence
you will be using, related studies you will be referring to and any special terms or techniques (e.g.
transcription or translation) involved. The introduction should be separate in a project or dissertation.
Main Body of the Work
You should make sure that there is a clear argument, or if you are writing a purely descriptive piece at
least a clearly defined theme, running throughout your piece. If you have a point of your own which
you think is worth making, but does not contribute to your main argument, put it in a footnote or an
appendix. Try out important sentences on a friend.
Conclusion
The piece should build up to a conclusion in which you sum up your findings and which gives a clear
answer to the question you set out to answer in the introduction.
Plagiarism
Students are asked to familiarise themselves with the University’s policy on plagiarism. Additional
information may be found in Appendix VI of this booklet. Please remember that copying someone
else’s material from the internet and representing it as your own is straightforward plagiarism and will
be dealt with as such. Any instances will be taken very seriously.
30
References and Quotations
Include quotations and references to other work within your text only if they are relevant to your main
theme/argument. When you do use someone else’s writing to support or illustrate an important point
in your own argument the source should be acknowledged by a reference.
Titles
Italicise the titles of books, plays, long poems published as books, pamphlets, periodicals
(newspapers, magazines and journals)
Quotations and Quotation Marks
Single quotation marks should be used to enclose short (less than 40 words of prose or two
complete lines of verse) quotations within the body of your text. If two lines of verse are
quoted the line division should always be marked with an oblique stroke (/).
e.g. ‘You taught me language and my profit on’t/Is, I know how to curse.
Enclose within ‘single’ quotation marks, and do NOT italicise the titles of articles, essays,
short stories, short poems, songs, chapters of books, unpublished works (lectures, speeches and
dissertations).
“Double” quotation marks should be used if the source you are citing itself includes a
quotation or a reference to another short text.
Long Quotations (more than 40 words of prose or 2 lines of verse) should be indented from
the main text with a blank line proceeding and following. Do not use quotation marks around
text set out in this way.
e.g. Prose – if you leave out some of the words of the passage indicate this by …
[oroonoko] was pretty tall, but of a shape the most exact that can be fancied. The most
famous statuary could not form the fugure of a man more admirably turned from head to
foot … The whole proportion and air of his face was so noble and exactly formed that,
bating his color, there could be nothing in nature more beautiful, agreeable, and
handsome.
Verse – always keep to the line layout of the verse
Then think, my dear, that you in me do read
Of lover’s ruin some sad tragedy.
I am not I; pity the tale of me.
Notes and References
References should appear in the body of your text within parentheses ( ) in the format (Author’s
Surname, Date: Page Numbers). If you incorporate the author’s name in the sentence you need
only cite the Date and Page in parentheses.
e.g. Grant (1961: 247-9) speaks of traveller crafts largely from personal experience.
These tinker made spoons are very crude…, but I have often wondered if it was the tinkers, the
cairdean [sic], who made the beautiful powder horns of the seventeenth century with their
interlaced patterns and spirited hunting scenes. (Grant 1961: 248)
[sic] is used to indicate that you realise the information in the original reference is incorrect. In
this case, that you realise that the Gaelic word is mis-spelt and should be “ceárdan”. Words in
languages other than the language of the piece should always be italicised.
Notes may be inserted in the form of footnotes or endnotes.
31
Bibliography
All essays must include a bibliography. The list of works cited shows the source of quotations and
ideas and it allows you to list all the works you have read when preparing the essay but from which
you have not quoted directly. The bibliography should follow the conclusion of your essay or
dissertation, and should come before any appendices and be divided into two sections – primary
sources and secondary sources.
Primary sources are the subject matter of the essay, usually a text or group of texts. Secondary sources
are the critical works about the subject matter.
Within each section your references should be listed alphabetically by author, and then by date within
authors. There are different forms for books and articles (see examples below). You will need to
include the author’s initial if you are quoting two people with the same surname, or give two surnames
for joint authors. For references to books you will also need to include the place of publication and the
publisher. Neither place, nor publisher, is required for references to journals.
Titles of books and journals should be italicised or, if you are hand writing your piece, underlined.
32
A book by a single author:
Author, Title, Place of Publication: Publisher, Date of Publication.
Dégh, Linda, Folktales and Society: Storytelling in a Hungarian Peasan Community, Bloomington:
Indiana University Press, 1965.
An article in a periodical:
Author, ‘Title of Article’, Title of Journal, Volume Number (Date): Page Numbers.
Fenton, A., ‘Phases of Ethnology in Britain with Special Reference to Scotland’, Ethnologia Europae,
Vol. 20, No. 2 (1990): 177-188.
A work in an anthology or compilation:
Author, Title of Text, Title of Anthology/Compilation, Editor(s), Place of Publication: Publisher, Date
of Publication, Page Numbers.
Donne, John, ‘Death be not proud’, The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Ed. M.H. Abrams, et
al. New York and London: W. W. Norton, 1986, Vol. 1, 1099.
Oliphant, Margaret, ‘The Library Window’, The Other Voice: Scottish Women’s Writing Since 1808,
Ed. Moira Burgess, Edinburgh: Polygon, 1987, 51-92
An edition:
Author, Title, Editor, Place of Publication: Publisher, Date of Publication.
Chaucer, Geoffrey, The Riverside Chaucer, Ed. Larry D. Benson, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1988.
Punctuation
The usual convention is to write words in full e.g. “they are” and “do not” rather than “they’re” and
“don’t”, unless you are transcribing spoken words. Remember that “its” has no apostrophe when it
means “of it”, but does have an apostrophe when it means “it is”. Use appropriate commas to break up
long sentences, but finish the sentence with a full stop. Aim to spell correctly. We will accept either
British or American spellings, but make sure you are consistent in whichever system you use.
Writing Style
Do not aim to write in an elaborately formal or academic style, or only use abstruse technical terms
where ordinary words will do.
The following books are available from the Boole library to aid students to write academic
essays:
How to Write Critical Essays: A Guide for Students of Literature, D. B. Pirie (808 PIRI),
How to write Essays, J. Clanchy (808 CLAN),
The MLA Style Manual, W. S. Achtert & J. Gibaldi (808ACHT).
The Chicago Manual of Style: (Chicago: University of Chicago Press). (Q+3: 808 CHIC).
33
OTHER MEDIA
Even in an essay you may wish to quote a lecture you have heard or refer to a video or museum display
you have seen. Normally a simple description will do — “the lecturer said that…but I feel that
really…”, or “In the waulking song video we saw…”
If you have consulted material via the Internet give the title and website address in your bibliography.
For projects and dissertations you are encouraged to use sound-recordings (from the Archives or made
by yourself), photographs (new or old) and unpublished sources of all kinds, as much as possible. For
ways in which to find them, and how to use them (e.g. whether to transcribe or summarise recordings)
classes at the beginning of the year will give you detailed advice, and for the purposes of your
particular project you should consult your project adviser.
If possible, you should also include some comparisons with printed studies on similar themes. Many
of your references will be to different types of source. Photographs, maps and drawings should be
clearly captioned with details of their subject and source, and numbered for a separate contents list.
Recordings, photographs and manuscripts from our Archives and student projects from earlier years
are numbered according to our standard practice, but you will have to provide your own references for
your own recordings unless you have already given them to the Archive Manager for numbering.
Make sure names or numbers on the tape boxes correspond to those in the text. A separate
bibliography or bibliographies should be made for non-printed materials, and your method of dealing
with them should be outlined in your introduction.
Projects, dissertations and associated materials are kept and added to the Archives.
34
Appendix III
Department of Folklore
Written Work Evaluation Form
STUDENT’S NAME: _________________________
LECTURER’S NAME: __________________________________
COURSE:
CENTRE:
_________________________
ASSIGNMENT TITLE:
______________________
STRUCTURE / PRESENTATION:
___________________________________
DATE SUBMITTED: ___________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONTENT:
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
ANALYSIS:
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
RESEARCH:
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
GENERAL COMMENTS:
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
STRENGTHS:
_____________________________________________________________________
WEAKNESSES:
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
MARK:
SIGNATURE:
____________________________________________________
35
Appendix IV
ASSIGNMENT CHECKLIST
(for student use)
This appendix contains a Checklist for students to use when completing class work assignments.
Think carefully about the following objectives as you work on your assignment and as you complete it.
These will be taken into account in assessment (see Written Work Assessment Form − Appendix III).
Cover Details
Have I completed my title/cover page with:
my examination number?
course title and year?
assignment title?
Introduction
Have I stated my aim clearly?
shown that I understand the question / topic?
defined any relevant terms or approaches?
Main Text
Have I presented my ideas clearly and logically?
provided examples or evidence to support the points I have made?
given accurate quotations, references and captions?
divided my writing into sections with headings and sub-headings for clarity if
appropriate?
Conclusion
Have I gathered my main points together?
tied my conclusion to my original aim?
expressed myself clearly?
Overall Style and Presentation
Have I checked my spelling, grammar and punctuation carefully?
run the spellchecker?
adhered to the word-limit set?
provided a bibliography of the works I have read and referred to in the text?
aimed for clarity of expression and presentation?
36
Appendix V
MARKING SCHEME
All essays, projects, dissertations, Class Examinations and Degree Examinations will be graded
according to the following scheme:
National University of Ireland
REVISED MARKS BANDS
1st CLASS HONOURS
90 – 100%
80 – 89%
70 – 79%
2nd CLASS HONOURS (Grade 1)
60 – 69%
2nd CLASS HONOURS (Grade 2)
50 – 59%
3rd CLASS HONOURS (where awarded)
45 – 49%
PASS
40 – 49%
PASS (where 3rd Class Hons Awarded)
40 – 44%
PASS by Compensation
30 – 39%
Extended Grade Descriptions:
70%+ A Excellent An outstanding effort, showing originality and clarity of thought and expression. The
topic is well understood and the stated aims are fulfilled through the use of appropriate examples
and arguments. In content and presentation the work conforms well to the standards set out in the
Assignment Checklist in the Class Book.
60–69% B Very Good A commendable effort, demonstrating understanding of the subject and a capacity to
deal adequately and appropriately with relevant material. Overall, the argument is sound, and the
presentation largely conforms to the standards outlined in the Assignment Checklist.
50–59% C Good An acceptable effort with no major weaknesses. There may be insufficient detail to back up
arguments and some inaccuracy. The presentation and / or content falls short of complete
adherence to the Assignment Checklist.
40–49% D Satisfactory A satisfactory effort, but weak in the handling of material and arguments. Aims are
not sufficiently set out or, where set out, insufficiently fulfilled. Content and / or presentation
shows limitations.
30–39% E Marginal
A less than satisfactory effort with inaccuracies in content and weaknesses in
presentation. Inadequate fulfillment of the standards in the Assignment Checklist.
37
Appendix VI
PLAGIARISM STATEMENT
Students should note the University’s policy on plagiarism:
Plagiarism is the use of material taken from another writer’s work without proper acknowledgement,
presenting it as if it were your own. While it is perfectly proper in academic study to make use of
another person’s ideas, to do so under the pretence that they are your own is deceitful. Plagiarism, is
always taken extremely seriously within the University as it is a form of cheating. Work found to be
plagiarised may be penalised, assessed at zero, or not accepted, and in serious cases may lead to
disciplinary action being initiated.
While deliberate plagiarism involves an intention to deceive and is easy to avoid, it is possible to fall
unawares into practices which could be mistaken for plagiarism if you are not familiar with the proper
means of using and acknowledging material from other writers. Inadequate referencing and
inappropriate use of others’ material could inadvertently lay you open to charges of plagiarism. Since
different subjects involve different uses of material, and may have different conventions about how it
should be acknowledged, it is important that in each of their subjects students consult departmental
guidelines about the purpose and presentation of written work in that discipline.
Léann Dúchais and Folklore students should study and put into practice in all their written work the
guidelines given in this book in Appendix II (Style Sheet) and Appendix IV (Assignment Checklist).
38
Reflecting on Your Folklore Thesis
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Is there a coherent/focused working title?
What is the temporal/chronological frame?
What genre(s)?
Can I describe my methodology clearly?
Is there fieldwork?
Is there fluency in the critical appraisal of source material?
What is the specific contribution to scholarship?
Is there an appropriate and cohesive theoretical context?
Is there a social, moral, historical, ethnographic dimension?
Is there evidence that this manuscript is written for scholars? (Vocabulary: argument: academic
reference, intellectual engagement, other ___________)?
Is the argument adequate?
Is there description, discussion, evidence, corroboration?
Do you review the scholarly literature on your particular topic?
Does it offer anticipatory statements of your argument?
Can you adequately contextualize and explain the implications of your study?
Is the text organized to demonstrate a serious academic work?
Do you document & provide evidences and are you familiar with them?
Is the bibliography adequate in size and scope?
In what way are you in conversation with other scholars?
How have you chosen chapter titles and sub-heads?
Have you engaged fully with key terminology?
Are you competent in the required languages and do you provide accurate translations as/if
needed?
Do you feel that anything is missing? If so, what?
Do you presuppose anything that needs to be explained? If so, what?
Do you contribute additional information, interpretation, or other resources to scholarship?
Does it offer summary statements of your argument?
39
Submission of Minor Master’s Thesis
The University College Cork Calendar states that when submitting a candidate normally requires the
following:
1.
3 hardbound copies of thesis.
2.
Completed Minor Submission form.
The deadline for submission of theses – please consult with the Department.
Layout of Your Thesis
Title Page
There must be a title page which shall give the following information:
a) The full title of the thesis and the subtitle, if any.
b) The total number of volumes if more than one, and the number of the particular volume.
c) The full name of the author, followed, if desired, by any qualifications and distinctions.
d) The qualification for which the thesis is submitted.
e) The name of the institution to which the thesis is submitted - National University of Ireland,
Cork.
f)
The department, Faculty or organisation in which research was conducted.
g) The Month and Year of submission.
h) Name of the head of the department concerned.
i)
Name of the supervisor of the research.
The title should describe the content of the thesis accurately and concisely.
Table of Contents
The table of contents shall immediately follow the title page.
Style
The text must be either, printed, typewritten or otherwise reproduced on good quality size A4 paper,
with a left-hand margin 4 cm. Double or one and a half spacing is recommended. Copies must be
bound or otherwise securely fastened and numbered consecutively, page numbers to be located
centrally at the bottom of the page. It is normal to follow an agreed style (eg Chicago Manual of Style,
MLA etc.,).
Layout of Hard Bound Cover
Front Cover
1/4 way down - Full Title of Thesis
1/2 way down - Full Name
Spine
Left Hand Side - Degree
Middle - Name
Right Hand Side - year
Any queries should be directed to Ms. Alison Bowdren, Student Records & Examinations Office,
[email protected], 021 4903587 or to that office generally. See the University College Cork Calendar
in the particular year of your own thesis for up to date information.
40
The Degree of Master by Coursework, Examination and Dissertation/Minor Thesis (Taught
Masters)
Admission
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
To be eligible for consideration to undertake a programme of study for a Master's Degree, a
candidate must have achieved an honours standard in an approved primary degree or possess
such other qualifications as may be deemed suitable by the Head of Department/School,
following consultation with the Departmental/School Graduate Studies Committee. All
applications must also be approved by the relevant College/Faculty.
Approval for Taught Master's Degrees must be processed through College/Faculty. It should
specify the number of years (1 or 2 normally) and whether full-time or part-time.
In cases where candidates are writing up theses, and no longer use University facilities, a
registration for submission of thesis only (submission only) may be permitted on receipt of
written confirmation from the Supervisor that the candidate is registering only for the purpose of
presenting the thesis. All applications for submission only should be made to the Student
Records & Examinations Office.
All EU applications should be made online at www.pac.ie. All Non-EU applications should be
made to the International Education Office.
All applications for admission to any programme of study for a Master's Degree by coursework,
examination and dissertation must be recommended by the Head of Department/School following
consultation with the Departmental/School Graduate Studies Committee, and be approved by the
relevant College/Faculty. The period of study will be determined by the relevant College/Faculty
in accordance with the provisions applicable to the particular programme. If the application is
approved, the student will register for the Master's Degree for the duration prescribed as a
minimum.
A candidate who wishes to obtain a Master's Degree by coursework, examination and
dissertation/minor thesis must: (a) pursue a prescribed postgraduate programme for the required
duration of the programme from the date of first registration (b) must pass an examination on the
programme and reach a required standard and (c) must submit a dissertation/minor thesis or a
research project. The candidate may also be required to pass an examination on the subject
matter of the dissertation/minor thesis.
Examination
1.
2.
The candidate's research must be carried out, and the dissertation/minor thesis for the degree
must be prepared, under the direction of the Supervisor. The Supervisor should assess the
progress of the candidate and, if he/she arrives at the view that the candidate is unlikely to
achieve the degree for which he/she is registered, this should be notified to the Head of
Department/School who, following consultation with the Departmental/School Graduate Studies
Committee, should communicate with the candidate without delay.
Three copies of the minor thesis are lodged in the Department or School. One copy is for the
Extern Examiner* and the other copy is for the Supervisor, who is normally the Intern Examiner.
Another copy is held in the Department or School, pending the award of the Degree. The
Department or School must lodge the final hard bound copy of the thesis in the Library. *Where
Department/School Externs have to cope with large numbers of Masters' dissertations, those
Departments/Schools should appoint more than one Extern Examiner.
41
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
A leaflet giving full information on the format, layout and presentation of dissertation/minor
thesis for a Master's Degree is available. Dissertations/Minor Theses may be submitted at any
time during the year, up to the first Friday in October. Submissions after the first Friday in
October will require registering for the next academic year and will incur a fee.
The Minor Thesis submission form must be signed by the Supervisor and the Head of
Department/School. Where a candidate considers that such signatures for entry have been
withheld unreasonably, he/she may appeal to the President of the University.
Recommendations on the awards will be made by the relevant Examination Board, appointed
annually by the Academic Board in accordance with the general regulations relating to the
composition of such Boards. Examination Board meetings will be held in June, September and
November. A candidate's conferring is dependent on receipt of the Examiners' Reports.
Conferring Ceremonies are normally held in September and December.
In those programmes where the examination is constructed in two or more parts, the marks for
part one will be considered by the Board with a view to a recommendation where appropriate, on
whether that candidate should progress to the next part of the examination.
If the Examination Board recommends that the Master's Degree be awarded, pending minor
corrections, the candidate must re-submit a hard bound copy of the Master's dissertation/minor
thesis to the Department/School, embodying any changes prescribed by the Examiners, where
recommended. A recommendation by the Examination Board to Academic Board, for the award
of the degree will not be made until a report of the confirmation of recommended changes having
been incorporated, confirmed by the Supervisor, has been lodged with the Student Records and
Examinations Office.
Unless candidates indicate otherwise, a copy of the dissertation/minor thesis will be lodged in the
University Library. Candidates will be asked to agree that a copy of their dissertation/minor
thesis, deposited in the Library, will be available for consultation under conditions laid down by
the University.