EMMAUS BIBLE COLLEGE ACADEMIC CATALOG 2013-2014

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EMMAUS BIBLE COLLEGE ACADEMIC CATALOG 2013-2014
EMMAUS BIBLE COLLEGE
ACADEMIC CATALOG
2013-2014
The information and requirements included in this catalog are effective beginning the August 2013 academic year. This catalog is not
a contract. Emmaus Bible College reserves the right to change policies or revise the information contained in this catalog at any time.
Information regarding revisions and updates is available from the Registrar’s office.
Emmaus Bible College admits qualified students who are personally committed to faith in Jesus Christ and does not discriminate on
the basis of sex, age, disability, race, color, national or ethnic origin.
Emmaus Bible College
2570 Asbury Road
Dubuque, IA 52001
(800) 397-2425
(563) 588-8000
www.emmaus.edu email: [email protected]
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Letter from Our President
Our Distinctives
Our Heritage
Related Ministries
Accreditation and Recognition
Board of Trustees
Faculty
Administration
Admissions
Financial Information
Financial Aid
Student Development
Academic Life
Academic Programs
Bible and Theology Department
Certificate in Biblical Studies
Associate of Arts in Biblical Studies
Bachelor of Science in Biblical Studies
Bachelor of Science in Bible Exposition and Exegesis
Major in Bible/Theology
Minor in Biblical Languages
Minor in Biblical Ministry
Continuing Education Certificate in Biblical Studies
Business Department
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Business Administration
Minor in Business
Computer Studies Department
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Computer Information Systems
MCSE Certification Track
L.A.M.P. Track
Ministry Track
Programming Track
Systems Analyst Track
Computer Security Track
Advanced Networking Track
Minor in Computer Applications in Ministry
Continuing Education Certificate in Computer Applications in Ministry
Counseling Department
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Counseling Psychology
Minor in Biblical Counseling
Educational Ministries Department
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Camp Ministries
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Youth Ministries
Minor in Youth Ministries
Continuing Education Certificate in Youth Ministries
Intercultural Studies Department
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Intercultural Studies
Minor in Church Planting and Revitalization
Minor in Intercultural Studies
Minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
Continuing Education Certificate in Missions
Music Department
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Music
Concentration in Music Ministry
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Music Education (K-12)
Minor in Music
Minor in Music Ministry
Teacher Education Department
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Elementary Education
Table of Contents
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Secondary Education
5-12 Business
5-12 Psychology
5-12 World History
Bible (ACSI Certification)
Teacher Education Program Admission and Continuation Policies
Cooperative Dual-Degree Program
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology with an Associate of Applied Science in Nursing
General Education Department
Associate of Arts in General Studies
General Education Core
Course Descriptions
Biblical Studies
Bible
Theology
Biblical Languages
Business
Computer Studies
Counseling Psychology
Educational Ministries
Camp Ministries
Youth Ministries
General Education
Humanities
Social Sciences
Natural Sciences
Inter-Area Studies
Intercultural Studies
Music
Ensembles
Applied Music
Music
Teacher Education
TESOL
Letter from the President
Dear Student:
Thank you for considering Emmaus Bible College, and taking the time to look at our program of study. Students have
been coming to Emmaus for over 70 years because they want to be transformed by the study of God’s Word, to have
their character shaped by Christ, and to prepare for a life of service. We would love to have you join us for the next step
in your education!
Today’s college programs at Emmaus are designed to prepare you to serve the Lord in your local church, your ministry,
the community in which you will live, and through the professional career you choose. All our programs are designed to
include intensive study of the Bible as the foundation, with the option to focus on a major in Bible and Theology only, or
to also choose another major. Our other majors include Ministry Studies such as Counseling Psychology, Intercultural
Studies, Youth Ministries, or Camp Ministries; and Professional Studies, such as Elementary or Secondary Teacher
Education, Nursing, Business Administration, and Computer Information Systems. The choices at Emmaus Bible
College are designed to thoroughly prepare you for your calling in life—to fulfill your passion to serve the Lord, lead
your family, serve and lead in the church, and excel in your chosen profession.
Emmaus is also unique because of the quality relationships that will develop between you and those of us who serve
here. Our faculty and staff will build long-term relationships with you, and will mentor you during your time at Emmaus
- challenging you to grow in the knowledge of God and His Word, and to deepen your relationships with Christ. During
your time here, we will have meals together on campus, you will visit in our homes, and we will serve together in local
churches.
The best way to experience Emmaus is to visit us in person. I would love to have you visit our campus, attend a class,
talk to our faculty and current students, and even spend the night here. I think you’ll discover that Emmaus is a place
where your life can be changed, your character shaped, and your purpose found.
Please stop by my office when you are on campus, I would love to say hello and personally welcome you!
Philip Boom
President
Our Distinctives
Mission Statement
The mission of Emmaus Bible College, as an institution of higher learning, is to glorify God by teaching the Bible and
by educating and equipping learners to serve and lead in churches, ministries, communities, and vocations.
The Emmaus Experience
Academic programs infused with biblical content, meaningful relationships between faculty, staff and students, and a
campus environment conducive to spiritual and personal growth.
Vision
A Bible college of national distinction offering both ministry and vocational education that prepares servant leaders for
impact in the Church and the world.
Core Values
• Authority of Scripture
• New Testament church principles
• Dignity of the individual
• Integrity
• Accountability
• Culture of excellence
• Commitment to service
Institutional Goals
Emmaus purposes to:
• Empower learners to realize their full potential through high-quality academic and student development
programs that are Biblically grounded and culturally relevant.
• Create an attractive, safe campus environment conducive to learning and spiritual and personal growth.
• Encourage the personal and professional development of each faculty and staff member.
• Strengthen institutional financial health.
• Engage external constituencies, including brethren assemblies and related ministries, other evangelical
churches, and the community through education, ministry, and service.
• Increase the educational influence of the college, its faculty, and its students.
Educational Goals
Through its academic programs, Emmaus purposes to:
• Increase understanding of the Bible and Christian theology.
• Challenge for spiritual growth and development of Christian character.
• Develop servant-leaders, equipped for service, ministry, and vocation.
• Challenge for the development and integration of a biblical worldview.
• Develop foundational knowledge and skills to support lifelong learning.
• Cultivate educated contributors to contemporary society.
Educational Philosophy
The educational philosophy of Emmaus Bible College is framed by our beliefs about the nature of truth and learning.
• Biblical/Christian Education
We recognize the final authority of the Bible in all that it affirms. The direct study of the Bible is part of every
academic program at Emmaus. This is educationally significant not only in Bible and theology coursework but
also in general education, ministry and vocational studies, and co-curricular and extra-curricular programs and
activities.
• Higher Education
We are committed to providing a high-quality educational experience for every student. Our faculty possesses
appropriate academic qualifications, and students are admitted on the basis of their ability to be successful at the
undergraduate level.
• Freedom of Inquiry
We believe that all truth has God as its ultimate source and needs to be pursued with honest, thorough, and open
inquiry. At the same time, we recognize the limitations of individuals in the process of determining what
information is relevant and how that information should be appropriately interpreted.
• Foundation for Lifelong Learning
We believe that learning is a lifelong pursuit. Curricular, co-curricular, and extra-curricular experiences are
designed to foster a desire for lifelong learning in the lives of students.
Our Distinctives
• Holistic Education
We seek to educate the whole person, not simply the mind. Curricular, co-curricular, and extra-curricular
activities are all intended to contribute to personal growth and development in the lives of students. This holistic
approach to education is articulated more specifically in the Student Development Philosophy below.
Student Development Philosophy
As an institution of higher learning, Emmaus Bible College seeks to create a learning environment in which students are
challenged to develop intellectually, spiritually, vocationally, and personally.
• Through partnerships between academic life and student development, students are challenged in and out of the
classroom to increase their knowledge of the Bible and their understanding of the world and pursue their
personal role in God's plan through their chosen ministry or vocation.
• Through co-curricular programs, students are challenged to grow spiritually and build qualities of Christian
character into their personal lives.
• Through internship and practicum opportunities and the Servant Leader Training program, students are
challenged to develop ministry and vocational skills and competencies.
Curriculum
The academic programs at Emmaus Bible College are designed to meet our institutional mission and educational goals in
the lives of learners. The programs of study are organized into the following curricular areas:
• Core Studies
The Core Studies curriculum is part of the academic program of each Emmaus student and includes Bible and
theology and general education. Specific areas of study in Bible include Biblical Studies, Bible Exposition and
Exegesis, and Biblical Languages. The General Studies program provides the foundational knowledge, skills, and
dispositions necessary to be productive contributors to society, as well as coursework that supports student
learning within specific major programs.
• Ministry Studies
Students may elect to complete elective coursework or a major or minor in Ministry Studies. Areas of study
include Camp Ministries, Intercultural Studies, Music Ministry, Youth Ministries, Biblical Counseling, Church
Planting and Revitalization, Computer Applications in Ministry, and Biblical Ministry.
• Professional Studies
Students may elect to complete elective coursework or a major or minor in Professional Studies. Areas of study
include Business Administration, Computer Information Systems, Counseling Psychology, Elementary Education,
Secondary Education, Music, Music Education (K-12), Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
(TESOL), and a cooperative program in Nursing offered in partnership with Northeast Iowa Community College.
Assessment of Student Learning
Emmaus Bible College is committed to providing a high-quality educational experience for each student. The
assessment of student learning process provides a mechanism for evaluating the effectiveness of the academic programs
at Emmaus. Each academic program has established a set of learning outcomes to be met by certificate or degree
graduates. Evaluation tools are used at the program level and at the institutional level to assess whether or not learning
outcomes are being met. The evidence collected is then analyzed and used to make academic program changes or
improvements.
Doctrinal Statement
The teaching of Emmaus Bible College is based on the following:
•
The Bible is inspired of God, inerrant in the original documents and of final authority in all matters of faith and
practice.
•
There is one God, eternally existent in three Persons, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
•
The Lord Jesus Christ is fully God and fully man. He was born of a virgin and is sinlessly perfect. His sacrifice
is substitutionary and representative. He rose bodily from the dead and ascended to His Father's right hand,
where He now ministers as our Great High Priest. He will come to rapture His Church and subsequently return
to reign over the earth.
•
Each member of the human race is fallen, sinful and lost, and regeneration by the Holy Spirit is absolutely
essential for the salvation of man. Redemption is wholly by the blood of Christ, and salvation is by grace,
through faith in our Lord Jesus Christ.
Our Distinctives
•
The Holy Spirit indwells the believer who is thus empowered to live a godly life. There will be resurrection of
the saved and of the lost, of the saved unto eternal life, and of the lost unto eternal conscious judgment.
•
The Church began with the descent of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost and is composed of all true believers in the
Lord Jesus Christ. These believers are united to Him and to one another by the indwelling Spirit. The Church's
calling, hope and destiny are heavenly, and its chief functions are to glorify God and to witness for Christ until
His return.
•
Christ, the risen head of the Church, is the giver of spiritual gifts to all believers. Gifted individuals such as
evangelists, pastors and teachers are responsible to Him for their service and are given “for the equipping of the
saints for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ.”
•
There are two Christian ordinances, baptism and the Lord's Supper. Baptism by immersion signifies that the
believer, having died with Christ, is buried with Him in baptism and also is risen with Christ to walk in newness
of life. The Lord's Supper is a memorial feast, instituted by the Lord Himself exclusively for His own.
•
Every true child of God possesses eternal life and being justified, sanctified and sealed with the Holy Spirit, is
safe and secure for all eternity.
•
The personal imminent return of the Lord Jesus Christ to translate His Church will be followed by the
Tribulation and the inauguration of Christ's reign over the earth; He will then deliver up the Kingdom to God
the Father that the Triune God may be all in all.
The teaching of Emmaus Bible College follows the historic, evangelical interpretation of the Scriptures, which has, in
general, been accepted by the Christian church since its inception. It recognizes no sectarian barriers and seeks to
declare the whole counsel of God without over-stressing any single line of truth.
Our Heritage
In 1938 a young missionary in Belgian Congo became burdened by the need for a school in North America where young
people could gather for intensive study of the Bible in a context where the principles of New Testament Christianity could be
taught without compromise. Shortly thereafter, R.E. Harlow left his Congo mission station and returned to Toronto. In
collaboration with two friends, John Smart and C. Ernest Tatham, he undertook the work of organizing Emmaus Bible
School. The growth of the school’s ministry is indicative of the divine blessing it has enjoyed.
The school’s name appears just once in the Bible in Luke 24:13. Although Emmaus was a very small village, the events that
occurred near there make its name one to be remembered. Three days after the death of the Lord Jesus, two of His disciples
were walking from Jerusalem to Emmaus. They were depressed that their Master had been killed because they were hoping
it was He who was going to redeem Israel. The Lord joined them in their walk, and through they didn’t recognize Him, He
talked to them about His resurrection, and showed them in all the Scripture “the things concerning Himself.” These disciples,
later reporting the incident to other disciples, recounted with joy,
Did not our hearts burn within us while He talked with us on the road, and while He opened the Scriptures to us?
(Luke 24:32)
This incident explains the use of the name Emmaus. It expresses the purpose of the college, a place where young men and
women come to have the Scriptures opened to them, where they learn “the things concerning Himself.”
1941
Evening school classes commence in Central Hall, Toronto, Canada, under the leadership of the school founders, R.E.
Harlow, John Smart, and C. Earnest Tatham.
1942
The correspondence school is established to meet a need for systematic Bible study materials for men and women
serving in the military during World War II.
1945
Resident school classes begin in Central Hall, Toronto.
1946
Increased enrollment necessitates the purchase of a building at 81 Harcourt Avenue, Toronto.
1947
Growing enrollments lead to the establishment of a campus on Normal Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. The school offers a
one-year Biblical Studies program.
1949
The Chicago, Normal Avenue campus begins to offer an upper level, senior division of studies.
1953
To accommodate continuing growth, the school acquires a former YMCA building at 156 North Avenue, Oak Park,
Illinois. Co-founder R. E. Harlow is named Principal of Emmaus Bible School.
1954
The Toronto and Chicago campuses merge. All classes are now offered at the Oak Park campus.
1956
Emmaus Bible School becomes a member of the Evangelical Training Association (ETA).
1959
William McDonald becomes the second President of Emmaus Bible School.
1960
The school purchases a 20-unit apartment building in close proximity to the Oak Park campus to house additional
resident students.
1965
John Smart, one of the three founders, assumes the presidency of Emmaus.
Our Heritage
1966
Property adjacent to the Oak Park Avenue building is purchased for future expansion. The school adds a missions
program to the curriculum.
1967
The Groveland Apartment building provides housing for male resident students.
1968
Construction of a new faculty wing is completed.
1972
Emmaus Bible School hosts its first Missionary Emphasis Week focused on overseas missions.
1974
Renovation of the Oak Park building results in the addition of an 1800-square-foot student center.
1976
Daniel H. Smith is inaugurated as the fourth President of Emmaus Bible School.
1979
Emmaus Bible School hosts its first Home Worker’s Week focused on ministries in North America.
1983
The school hosts its first Christian Ministries Seminar combining the Missionary Emphasis Week and Home Worker’s
Week into a program highlighting avenues for service both at home and abroad. The board approves the purchase of the
former Aquinas Institute of Theology campus in Dubuque, Iowa.
1984
Emmaus Bible School becomes Emmaus Bible College and relocates to its new 17-acre campus in Dubuque, Iowa
1985
Emmaus offers college-level evening courses in the Dubuque area.
1986
Emmaus receives accreditation from the Accrediting Association of Bible Colleges (AABC) and begins to grant bachelor
degrees. The Trust Services department is established to assist the Lord’s people with their estate planning and financial
stewardship needs.
1989
The College purchases adjacent land for a future athletic field.
1991
Emmaus celebrates its 50th anniversary. Work on the new athletic field is completed.
1992
The college establishes the Emmaus Archives to preserve the unique history of Emmaus Bible College.
1993
Emmaus joins the National Christian College Athletic Association and officially begins competing in men’s and
women’s basketball at the collegiate level.
1994
Construction of the Pollard Field House is completed. Emmaus is approved by the Accrediting Association of Bible
Colleges to offer a degree in Elementary Teacher Education.
1996
Emmaus marks 50 years of commencement exercises and awards degrees to the first graduates from the Elementary
Education program.
Our Heritage
1997
The State of Iowa Department of Education approves the Elementary Education program for teacher licensure. The
Robbie Pile Dining Hall is dedicated.
1998
Three new double majors are authorized by the Board and added to the academic offerings: Biblical
Studies/Intercultural Studies, Biblical Studies/Youth Ministries, and Biblical Studies/Computer Systems Management.
1999
The Emmaus Ministry Resources project is instituted in partnership with Stewards Ministries.
2000
Kenneth A. Daughters is inaugurated as President. Dr. Daniel Smith is appointed the first chancellor. Daniel H. Smith
Hall opens in October to house maintenance shops, business offices, the computer classroom and lab, and three
dormitory floors.
2001
The first issue of Journey magazine is published in the spring, followed by the first Iron Sharpens Iron conference in
May. Emmaus Trust Services becomes Believers Stewardship Services.
2001
Emmaus celebrates its 60th anniversary.
2002
Emmaus Correspondence School becomes ECS Ministries.
2003
The college community engages in a comprehensive, institutional self-evaluation in preparation for an accreditation team
visit from the Higher Learning Commission.
2004
Emmaus Bible College achieves candidate status with the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association
of Colleges and Schools.
2005
A new double major in Biblical Studies/Music Ministry is added to the academic offerings. Work is completed on a new
Science Lab.
2006
Emmaus Bible College is regionally accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and becomes a member of the
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The college also receives reaffirmation of accreditation from the
Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) and reaffirmation of State of Iowa approval of the Elementary
Education program for teacher licensure.
2007
Two new programs in Biblical Studies/Nursing and Biblical Studies/Business Administration are offered in cooperation
with Northeast Iowa Community College.
2008
Emmaus Bible College is recognized for “the extraordinary and exemplary community service contributions of its
students, faculty, and staff in meeting community and national needs” by The President’s Higher Education Community
Service Honor Roll.
2009
Two new double majors are added to the academic offerings: Biblical Studies/Business Administration and Biblical
Studies/Counseling Psychology. Men’s soccer and women’s volleyball are added as intercollegiate sports. The David
A. Glock auditorium is dedicated. The college celebrates 25 years in Dubuque, Iowa.
Our Heritage
2010
The State of Iowa approves the K-12 Music Education program for teacher licensure. Emmaus hosts an evaluation team
from the Higher Learning Commission for reaffirmation of accreditation.
2011
The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools reaffirms regional
accreditation for Emmaus Bible College until 2020-2021.
2012
The State of Iowa reaffirms approval of the Elementary Education program for teacher licensure and approves Secondary
Education programs in business, psychology, and world history. A Camp Ministries major, offered in cooperation with
Camp Forest Springs (WI), and an Associate of Arts degree in General Studies are added to the academic program
offerings.
2013
Mr. Philip Boom is inaugurated as the sixth president of Emmaus Bible College.
Related Ministries
EmmausOnline
As a service to the assemblies and the church around the world, Emmaus Bible College offers a number of its courses
online at www.emmaus.edu/online and on iTunes U. These courses are offered in video and audio format. Access
requires the use of a computer and a high speed Internet connection or a mobile device with Internet access. Lectures
may be streamed or downloaded and viewed offline. Not every course taught at Emmaus is available, but new courses
and lectures are added regularly. College credit is not available for EmmausOnline courses.
Extension Courses
Emmaus offers Bible and Bible-related evening courses in local churches within approximately 90 miles of the college.
Extension courses provide opportunities for God’s people to become better grounded in the Word and for young people
to get a taste for college-level Bible study. The entire Emmaus curriculum is available for selection by the local
sponsoring committee. College credit is not available for extension courses.
The Emmaus Journal
The faculty of Emmaus Bible College produces the Emmaus Journal, a journal of Biblical studies, twice annually.
Copies and subscription information may be obtained from the editor, Dr. Jack Fish (563-588-8000 x1207).
Emmaus Ministry Resources (EMR)
Emmaus Ministry Resources is an initiative to help strengthen the health and growth of New Testament churches by
ministering to and through local churches. The EMR initiative is accomplished through several ministry programs
including Journey magazine, Iron Sharpens Iron conference, EmmausOnline, the Emmaus Journal, and other projects.
ECS Ministries
ECS Ministries publishes a variety of Christian literature including books, booklets, small group study guides, and Bible
correspondence courses. All of these have the goal of helping individuals and groups study the Bible. Through its
Emmaus Correspondence School division, ECS Ministries has offered quality Bible education by home study on a
popular level since 1942. Over 25 million courses have been distributed around the world in over 125 different
languages. Courses offered through the Correspondence School are not college-level courses, but are a means of
comprehensive study for Christians who want a deeper knowledge of God's Word. Through this convenient and
economical method, students can benefit from Bible training while maintaining their normal routines right at home.
Contact ECS Ministries and find out more about the courses and programs offered for home study. Phone: (888) 3387809, or at the website www.ecsministries.org.
Believers Stewardship Services
Believers Stewardship Services (formerly known as Emmaus Trust Services) is a ministry designed to glorify God by
helping Christians accomplish their financial and estate planning goals in fulfilling biblical stewardship. This mission is
accomplished by educating believers about these important topics, encouraging them as they seek to be wise stewards,
and enabling them to implement their personal financial and estate planning goals, all without charge or obligation.
Other services are available to assist local assemblies and related ministries in stewardship, planned giving, and other
related matters. For additional information, please call (888) 338-7810.
Accreditation and Recognition
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA)
Emmaus Bible College is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central
Association.
The Higher Learning Commission
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, Illinois 60604
(800) 621-7440
www.ncahlc.org
Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE)
Emmaus Bible College is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of the Association for Biblical Higher
Education (ABHE), formerly the Accrediting Association of Bible Colleges (AABC). ABHE is a member of the
Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) and is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as the
accrediting agency for biblical higher education.
The Association for Biblical Higher Education
5850 T.G. Lee Boulevard, Suite 130
Orlando, Florida 32822
(407) 207-0808
www.abhe.org
State of Iowa Department of Education
www.boee.iowa.gov
Emmaus Teacher Education (K-8 and 5-12) and Music Education (K-12) programs are approved by the State of Iowa for
teacher licensure. Successful program graduates are eligible to be recommended for an Iowa Teachers’ License.
United States Department of Justice: Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS)
Permission for foreign students to attend Emmaus is granted by the United States Immigration and Naturalization
Service (INS). Acceptance of foreign students is approved provided such students have proper government certification
and sufficient financial resources to complete college. In alignment with government requirements, foreign students
must have a sufficient knowledge of English to carry a full course load upon matriculation.
Veterans Administration (VA)
Under U.S. Public Law 358 veterans may receive educational training. A veteran must be accepted as a student before
applying for educational assistance. For more veteran’s information see the Financial Assistance section of this catalog.
Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI)
www.acsi.org
Emmaus is a member of the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) and students graduating from the
Teacher Education program qualify for ACSI teacher certification.
Board of Trustees
Officers of the Board
Chair
Dr. Steven L. Leary
Secretary
Mr. Glen C. Tepe
Vice Chair
Mr. Robert C. Sullivan
Treasurer
Mr. Kenneth W. Murray
Members of the Board
Mr. Daniel M. Burson
Wesley Chapel, Florida
Retired Manager
Mr. Philip Boom*
Dubuque, Iowa
President,
Emmaus Bible College
Mr. Evan C. Davis
Wyoming, Ohio
Retired Attorney and
Executive
Mr. George R. Farber
Waterloo, Iowa
Full-time Worker,
Pastoral and Teaching Ministry
Mr. David S. Harper
Imler, Pennsylvania
Fulltime Worker and Elder
Mr. James W. Iverson
Davenport, Iowa
Retired,
Pastoral and Teaching Ministry
Mr. Mark A. Keller
Webster Groves, Missouri
Chief Executive Officer,
Confluence Investment
Management
Dr. Steven L. Leary*
High Ridge, Missouri
Assistant Vice Chancellor,
Washington University
Dr. Stephen B. Leverentz
Edina, Minnesota
Retired Ophthalmologist
Mr. Frederick Schwertfeger
Brookfield, Wisconsin
President, Horicon Bank
Mr. Robert C. Sullivan*
Yonkers, New York
Executive Director,
Morgan Stanley
Mr. William D. Longstreet
Matthews, North Carolina
Account Manager,
McNaughton-McKay Electric Co.
Mr. Ian S. Taylor*
Kenosha, Wisconsin
Commended Worker,
President, Good Tidings
Publishing
Dr. William J. Moore*
Ames, Iowa
Fulltime Worker,
Retired Academic Administrator
Mr. Glen C. Tepe*
West Chicago, Illinois
Account Manager,
NetApp
Mr. Kenneth W. Murray*
Wheaton, Illinois
Retired Executive
Mr. Richard L. Nohr
Sugarland, Texas
Retired Executive
* Executive Committee Members
Mr. Matthew J. Phelan
Lewisburg, Tennessee
Executive Director,
Horton Haven Christian Camp
Board of Trustees
Trustees Emeriti
Mr. Lewis Clarkson
Johnston, Iowa
Mr. Joseph M. Cumming
Shelby Township, Michigan
Mr. Edward W. Goodwin
Taylors, South Carolina
Mr. James M. Gray
La Mesa, California
Mr. Brad C. Hanes
Waterloo, Iowa
Dr. Daniel T. Hayden
Silverdale, Washington
Mr. Walter Modrzejewski
Chicago, Illinois
Mr. John A. Montgomery
Lombard, Illinois
Mr. John E. Phelan, Sr.
Nashville, Tennessee
Dr. John T. Pollard, Jr.
Bedford, Massachusetts
Mr. John W. Riley
Dubuque, Iowa
Mr. Gerhard L. Schultz
Barrington, Illinois
Dr. Daniel H. Smith
Dubuque, Iowa
Mr. James A. Stahr
Wheaton, Illinois
Mr. Jack O. Weatherford
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
Mr. Stephen C. Wilson
Parnell, Iowa
Faculty
The Faculty
Lisa L. Beatty
Vice President/Dean for Academic Affairs
B.A., Music/Music Education, Clarke College
M.A., Vocal Performance, University of Iowa
Doctoral Candidate, Higher Education Administration, University of Iowa
1992 – present
Emphasis: Music
Philip Boom
President
Chair, Business Department
Program Director, Business Administration
B.S., Chemical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology
M.B.A., International Business and Marketing, Temple University
2010 – present
Emphasis: Business
Ben R. Brown
B.S., Bible Exposition and Theology, Emmaus Bible College
M.A., Teaching, Trinity International University
Illinois Teaching License
2012 – present
Emphasis: History
Elisa C. Cooper
Chair, Music Department
Program Director, Music, Music Ministry
B.M., Piano Performance, Wheaton College
M.M., Piano Performance, Indiana University
2005 – present
Emphasis: Music
John H. Fish
Program Director, Biblical Languages
B.A., Linguistics, Brown University
Th.M., Semitics and Old Testament, Dallas Theological Seminary
Th.D., New Testament Literature and Exegesis, Dallas Theological Seminary
1969 – present
Emphases: Biblical Languages, Biblical Studies
David A. Glock
Diploma, Emmaus Bible College
B.S., Biblical Studies, Philadelphia College of Bible
Th.M., New Testament Literature and Exegesis, Dallas Theological Seminary
1968 – present
Emphasis: Biblical Studies
Jonathan W. Glock
Vice President for Advancement/Dean for Student Development
B.S., Biblical Studies, Emmaus Bible College
M.A., Biblical Studies, Dallas Theological Seminary
2005 – present
Emphasis: Inter-area Studies, Youth Ministries
Faculty
Susan M. Henderson
B.A., Elementary Education, Eastern College
Program Director, Elementary Education
M.Ed., Teaching and Curriculum, Pennsylvania State University
Pennsylvania Teaching License
2006 – present
Emphasis: Teacher Education
Joel A. Hernandez
Chair, Intercultural Studies Department
Program Director, Intercultural Studies
B.S., Biblical Studies, Emmaus Bible College
Th.M., Pastoral Ministries, Dallas Theological Seminary
2007 – present
Emphasis: Intercultural Studies, Misisons
Timothy J. Iverson
Certificate, Emmaus Bible College
B.A., Mathematics, University of Northern Iowa
M.A., Mathematics, University of Northern Iowa
M.S., Science Education, Institute for Creation Research Graduate School
1995 – present
Emphases: Science, Mathematics
Franklin S. Jabini
B.A., General Bible, Caribbean College of the Bible, Belize
M.Min., Biblical Studies, Caribbean College of the Bible, Trinidad
Post-graduate Certificate in Bible Translation, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
D.Min., Christian Bible College, North Carolina (unaccredited)
Th.D., Missiology, University of Zululand
2013 – present
Emphasis: Intercultural Studies, Missions
John B. Jimo
Chair, Teacher Education Department
Diploma, Emmaus Bible College
B.A., Elementary Education, Northeastern Illinois University
Th.M., Bible Exposition/Academic Ministries, Dallas Theological Seminary
Doctoral Studies, Elementary Education, University of Iowa
Professional Teaching Licenses: Illinois, Texas
2004 – present
Emphasis: Teacher Education
David J. MacLeod
Dean for Biblical Studies
B.S., Secondary Education/American History, Worcester State College
Th.M., New Testament Literature and Exegesis, Dallas Theological Seminary
Ph.D., Systematic Theology, Dallas Theological Seminary
1983 – present
Emphasis: Theology
Arthur T. Manning
Interim Program Director, Computer Information Systems
B.S., Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota
M.S., Electrical Engineering, University of Texas/Austin
2001 – present
Emphasis: Computer Studies
Faculty
Benjamin T. Mathew
Chair, Counseling Department
Program Director, Counseling Psychology
Director of Counseling Services
B.S., Biblical Studies, Emmaus Bible College
M.A., Biblical Counseling, Dallas Theological Seminary
Licensed Mental Health Counselor, State of Iowa
2002 – present
Emphases: Counseling, Psychology
Sarah L. Poling
Certificate, Emmaus Bible College
B.S., Elementary Education, Greenville College
M.A., Teaching, Coe College
Illinois Teaching License
1998 – present
Emphasis: Teacher Education
Sheri Popp
Associate Dean for General Education and Assessment
Program Director, Secondary Education
B.S., Biblical Studies, Emmaus Bible College
Certification English Literature 5-9, 9-12, Missouri Baptist University
M.S., Education, Educational Administration, Missouri Baptist University
Ed.S., Missouri Baptist University
2011 – present
Emphases: Teacher Education, General Education
Jeffrey D. Riley
Chair, Educational Ministries Department
Program Director: Camp Ministries, Youth Ministries
B.S., Biblical Studies, Emmaus Bible College
M.A., Christian Education/Academic Track, Dallas Theological Seminary
2010 – present
Emphasis: Educational Ministries, Youth Ministries, Camp Ministries
John H. Rush
Director of Library Services
B.S., Social Studies Education/English, Bob Jones University
M.L.S., Rutgers University
1983 – present
Steven H. Sanchez
Chair, Bible and Theology Department
Program Director: Bible and Theology, Biblical Studies, Bible Exposition and Exegesis
B.A., Political Science, Columbia University in the City of New York
Continuing Education Certificate, Emmaus Bible College
Th.M., Old Testament, Dallas Theological Seminary
Ph.D., Old Testament, Dallas Theological Seminary
2005 – present
Emphases: Biblical Studies, Biblical Languages
Faculty
Seth L. Scott
B.S., Biblical Studies and Intercultural Studies, Emmaus Bible College
M.A., Community Counseling, Regent University
Licensed Mental Health Counselor, State of Iowa
Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor, State of Maine
Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor, State of Maine
National Certified Counselor, National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc.
2012 – present
Emphases: Counseling, Psychology
Daniel H. Smith
Chancellor
B.A., Education/Psychology and History/Political Science, Greenville College
Th.B., Theology and Greek, Midwest Bible Seminary
M.Ed., Counseling, University of Missouri
Ed.D., Administration and Leadership, Loyola University
1959 – present
Emphases: Biblical Studies
Mark R. Stevenson
Certificate, Kawartha Lakes Bible College
B.S., Biblical Studies, Emmaus Bible College
M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Doctoral Studies, Evangelische Theologische Faculteit, Leuven, Belgium
Doctoral Candidate, Spurgeon’s College, University of Wales
1999 – present
Emphases: Biblical Studies, Church History, Biblical Languages
James M. Van Dine
B.A., Economics, Luther College
Th.M., Old Testament Literature and Exegesis, Dallas Theological Seminary
Ph.D., Bible Exposition, Dallas Theological Seminary
2002 – present
Emphases: Biblical Studies, General Education
Kathryn L. Van Dine
Registrar
B.A., Physical Education, Luther College
M.S., Physical Education, Indiana University
Professional Teaching Licenses: Iowa, Alberta, Texas
2001 – present
Emphasis: Teacher Education
Megan K. Von Bergen
B.A. English, Bob Jones University
M.A., English, Kansas State University
2011 – present
Emphasis: General Education
Carolyn Sue Weigert
B.S., Education, Seattle Pacific University
M.A., Education, Middle Tennessee State University
Ed. Specialist, Middle Tennessee State University
Tennessee Teaching License
1998 - present
Emphasis: Teacher Education
Faculty
Adjunct Faculty
John C. Borke
B.S., Accounting, Northern Illinois University
M.A.S., Northern Illinois University
Licensed CPA, Illinois
2009 – present
Emphasis: Business
Kristin Eby
B.A., Music Education and Piano, Westmont College
M.M, Choral Conducting, University of Oregon
2011 – present
Emphasis: Music
Steven Herzig
B.S., Biblical Studies, Philadelphia College of the Bible
B.S., Sociology, Kent State University
1984 - present
Emphasis: Jewish History
Paul T. Jensen
B.A., North Park College
M.Div., Th.M., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
J.D., University of Iowa
Ph.D., University of Virginia
2009 – present
Emphasis: Business Administration
Philip F. Jensen
B.S., Illinois State University
J.D., University of Nebraska at Lincoln
2010 – present
Emphasis: Business Administration
Jeffrey M. Masterson
B.A., Organizational Studies, Bethel College
M.B.A., Organizational Leadership, Ashford University
Graduate Studies, Theological Studies, Bethel Theological Seminary
2010 – present
Emphasis: Business Administration
Jenna E. Mathew
B.S., Biblical Studies/Elementary Education, Emmaus Bible College
Reading Recovery Certificate, Drake University
Iowa Teaching License
2006 – present
Emphasis: Teacher Education
Roger Poling
B.S., Biblical Studies, Emmaus Bible College
M.Ed., Business Education, Clarke College
Iowa Teaching License
2013 – present
Emphasis: Computer Studies
Faculty
Janelle Routley
Associate Dean for Student Development
B.S., Biblical Studies/Computer Information Systems, Emmaus Bible College
M.Ed., College Student Affairs, Azusa Pacific University
2011 – present
Emphasis: Inter-area Studies
John J. Routley
Certificate in Biblical Studies, Emmaus Bible College
B.A. Archeology and Near Eastern Studies, Wheaton College
M.A. Theological Studies, Faith Baptist Theological Seminary
2012 – present
Emphasis: Educational Ministries
Tracey Rush
B.S., Music Education, Bob Jones University
M.M., Music Education, University of Northern Iowa
2010 – present
Emphasis: Music
Paul Thompson
B.A. Business Marketing, Bethel University
M.B.A., Aurora University, George Williams Campus
2012 – present
Emphasis: Business Administration
Micheline Witter
B.A. Portuguese, English, and Literatures, Universidade Estadual da Bahia
B.A. Spanish and Literature, Universidade de Nova Venecia
Post-Graduation Degree, English, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Minas Gerais
M.A. Teaching, Spanish and Literature, University of Northern Iowa
Emphasis: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
Gregory M. Woodhouse
Director of Information Technology
B.S. Electrical Engineering/Computer Systems, New Jersey Institute of Technology
M.S., Computing Technology in Education, Nova Southeastern University
1995 - present
Emphasis: Computer Studies
Administration
Administration
President*
Philip Boom
Chancellor
Daniel H. Smith
Vice President/Dean for Academic Affairs*
Lisa L. Beatty
Vice President for Advancement*
Jonathan W. Glock
Vice-President for Administration and Finance*
Mark A. Presson
Dean for Biblical Studies
David J. MacLeod
Dean for Student Development
Israel Chavez
Associate Dean for General Education and Assessment
Sheri Popp
Associate Dean for Student Development
Janelle Routley
*President’s Cabinet
Admissions
Admissions Policies
Spiritual Requirements
Salvation
The prospective student must give evidence of knowing the Lord Jesus Christ as his or her personal Savior. Space is
provided on the application form for the applicant’s testimony.
Compatibility
Living within a college community requires a desire for harmonious living and an ability to cooperate. Like any
community, certain guidelines are necessary. The Student Handbook contains information on the student’s relationship
to social activities, general conduct, and the college family. A teachable spirit, a healthy attitude, and reasonable
compatibility are expected of every student.
Physical Requirements
A physical examination is not required as part of the acceptance process but is required prior to enrollment. The medical
form provides information in the event of a medical emergency and indicates conditions that may require further
attention.
Academic Requirements
Graduation from a public or private high school, home-school program, or completion of a GED (General Equivalency
Diploma) is required. An official transcript showing courses taken, grades received, and the student’s graduation date
must be submitted prior to enrollment. Students who have not maintained acceptable grades during high school may be
admitted on academic assistance.
ACT or SAT Scores
Prior to admission, all applicants must take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test
(SAT) and have their scores submitted to Emmaus. (The Emmaus ACT code is 1371 and the SAT code is 1215.)
Students receiving an ACT score under 19 or an SAT score under 920 (two test score) may be admitted on academic
probation. Exemption of the ACT or SAT may be granted to some transfer students or to those who have been out of
high school for two or more years.
Policy of Non-Discrimination
Emmaus Bible College is non-discriminatory and admits students who are personally committed to faith in Jesus Christ
of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or
made available to students at the college. It does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, national or ethnic
origin in administration of its educational and admission policies and other college-administered programs.
Admission of Foreign Students
Students from foreign countries must be able to prove that they have sufficient financial resources to study at Emmaus
Bible College. The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) will not issue a student visa to those without sufficient
funds. Please contact Enrollment Services for other admissions requirements.
Foreign students from non-English speaking countries must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) as
administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). A score of 550 on the paper-based exam, 213 on the computerbased exam, or 80 on the Internet-based exam is required. For more information, visit TOEFL.org or write to:
TOEFL
Educational Testing Service
Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A. 08540
Transfer Students
Students wishing to transfer to Emmaus from another college should complete the regular application form. In addition
to all other requirements, the candidate should request that official transcripts from each post-secondary institution
attended be sent directly to the Emmaus Registrar’s office. If a transfer student does not have an incoming cumulative
grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0, the student will be placed on academic probation.
Admissions
Transfer Decisions
Transfer credit may be given for courses from other institutions with demonstrated quality, comparability,
appropriateness, and applicability to those of Emmaus. Courses with grades below C (or a grade-point below 2.0) are
not transferable. Transfer credits do not affect G.P.A. Emmaus Bible College is a member of the Higher Education
Transfer Alliance (HETA) and makes transfer decisions consistent with that organization’s stated criteria
(www.chea.org/HETA). Transfer decisions at Emmaus are not made solely on the source of accreditation of a sending
program or institution.
Transfer Policy for Credits from Non-Accredited Schools
Students coming to Emmaus from non-accredited schools may receive up to a maximum of 24 credits toward
Bible/Theology requirements at Emmaus. Transfer decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis upon review of
submitted course descriptions and/or course syllabi. Emmaus will only consider approving credit for courses where the
student receives a letter grade, and that grade must be a “C” or higher. “Pass/fail” or satisfactory/unsatisfactory” grades
are not transferable to Emmaus.
Kawartha Lakes Bible College, New Tribes Bible Institute, and Jackson Hole Bible Collegeare approved institutions for
transfer to Emmaus. For more information, please contact the Academic Affairs office at (563) 588-8000 x1103.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Emmaus accepts College Level Examination Program (CLEP) credit as administered by The College Board. College
credit will be given for subject exams only, and only for those subjects that are comparable to Emmaus courses.
Acceptable scores vary with each exam. The student should request that The College Board send scores directly to the
Emmaus Registrar’s office. The Emmaus school code is 1215.
Advanced Placement (AP)
Emmaus will grant credit for Advanced Placement (AP) if the credit is validated by the appropriate AP exam
administered by The College Board. Acceptable scores vary. The student should request that The College Board send
scores directly to the Emmaus Registrar’s office.
Application Procedure
Emmaus application forms are available upon request by calling 1-800-397-2425 or at www.emmaus.edu. The
applicant will receive an application form, a medical form, and two reference forms. Upon receiving these materials, the
following steps should be taken:
1. Complete the application form and mail the form to the Admissions Office with the $25 non-refundable
application fee (U.S. funds).
2. Arrange for a physical examination and send the completed medical form to the Admissions Office.
3. Give the two reference forms to qualified individuals and have them sent directly to the Admissions Office.
4. Instruct your high school and college (if applicable) to send transcripts of grades to the Admissions Office.
5. Have your ACT or SAT scores sent directly to the Admissions Office.
Applications will be processed upon receipt of all the required forms and transcripts. It is recommended that prospective
students contact their references to determine that the reference forms have been sent to the college.
Disability Services
Emmaus Bible College seeks to ensure that qualified individuals with disabilities receive equal access to all college
services, activities, facilities, and privileges. Disabilities may include specific learning disabilities, attention
deficit/hyperactivity disorder, visual impairments, deaf and hard of hearing, acquired brain injury, physical and
functional disabilities, psychiatric disabilities, and other disabilities specifically diagnosed by licensed professionals.
Reasonable academic accommodations will be made on an individual basis by application (available on the Emmaus
website). Accommodations may include services such as extended time for testing, reader for exams, semi-private room
for exams, larger-sized course materials, permission to record lectures, audio books, tutors, and other appropriate
strategies.
Students who have documented disabilities that might affect their academic performance at Emmaus and require
accommodations or other services should contact the Vice President for Academic Affairs at [email protected] to
discuss possible accommodations.
All documentation of disabilities is considered personal health information, and thus, falls under the privacy protection
of HIPPA. Disabilities are not considered during the admission process at Emmaus, and no disability information will
appear on transcripts or other documents (other than health records).
Financial Information
General Information
Emmaus Bible College operates on the principle of faith in God for direction and supply of its needs and seeks to honor
this principle in the administration of its financial affairs and publicity of its activities. In answer to believing prayer and
through faithful Christian stewards, the Lord has supplied the needs of the college since the days of its founding.
Emmaus Bible College students pay only a portion of the actual cost of their education. The remaining funds come
through gifts from individuals and local churches. The college depends on these donations to keep the cost of an
Emmaus education far lower than the national average for a private institution.
Student Fee Schedule
For current costs of an Emmaus education, please call or write for a current Student Fee Schedule or view the current
charges on our website at www.emmaus.edu (under admissions, click on financial aid).
Payment of Fees
All student fees for the semester are due in full upon receipt of a student ID card or the first day of class. Those who
cannot or do not pay in full by these dates will automatically be enrolled in a three-payment plan. The payment amounts
for the three-payment plan are generally 40%, 30%, and 30% of the balance due after deducting Emmaus approved
financial aid. Payments for the three-payment plan are due as follows: for the fall semester, upon receipt of a student ID
card or the first day of class, October 1st, and November 1st; and for the spring semester, the first day of class in January,
February 1st, and March 1st. A service charge of 1% per month will be charged on delinquent amounts with a minimum
charge of $5.00. Any future adjustments to the account, such as changes to fees, financial aid, course fees, fines, etc., are
the responsibility of the student. New charges posted to the account subsequent to the end of the drop/add period (such
as lab fees) and any amounts that may be due as a result of other account adjustments (such as parking fines), are due
immediately.
Participation in College Sponsored Trips
Until their account is paid in full, students may not participate in optional school sponsored trips, such as Summer
Missionary Exposure (SUMMEX), Rome and Israel Study trips, etc., without permission from the business office.
24/7 Access to Student Accounts
In lieu of monthly paper statements, students access their accounts at any time through Emmaus’ online web portal.
Students are expected to check their balance periodically and use that information along with their payment plan to make
accurate, timely payments on their account.
Payments
Payment can be made by cash, check, debit card, or credit card (Emmaus accepts Mastercard and Discover). All
payments made by credit card are subject to a surcharge to cover our costs; currently 2% on U.S. credit cards.
International credit/debit cards may have higher fees. Payments (cash, checks, credit card) may be made in person at the
Student Accounts office located on the second floor of Smith Hall, or by sending checks to Student Accounts through
campus mail.
Payment and Returning Students
All fees and other charges for a semester must be paid in full before the student is permitted to return for another
semester and the student has received written permission from the Business Office to attend class.
Advance Deposits
In order to ensure enrollment for the Fall Semester, a $250 non-refundable advance payment is due by May 1st for all
new students. For students accepted after May 1st, the full advance payment is due immediately along with the $25
application fee.
Health Insurance
All full-time resident students, including international students, are required to be covered by a health care plan that
provides hospitalization and medical surgical coverage in the event of sickness or accident. You must enroll in the
Student Health Plan that Emmaus offers or be covered by your own family plan. If you choose your own plan, you must
provide the college with evidence of your coverage and sign a Waiver of Insurance form provided by the college. This
form must be turned into the Student Accounts office by the date indicated on the Waiver of Insurance form (generally
August 1st). Students participating in Emmaus-sponsored international trips, such as Summer Missionary Exposure
(SUMMEX), Rome and Israel Study trips, internships, etc., are required to obtain travel insurance through the college.
Financial Information
The provisions and benefits of the policy are fully described in the health plan brochure obtainable from the Business
Office. This brochure is also available online at our website at www.emmaus.edu. It is important for the student to
familiarize themself with the details of the policy, in order to ensure full coverage and benefits.
Room and Board
One fee is charged for room and board each semester. All unmarried students are required to room and board at the
college unless they live with a relative within commuting distance. Most will be accommodated in single rooms. There
are no separate rates for rooms or meals, and allowances are not given for missed meals. During vacation periods, except
Easter break, there is an extra charge for rooms, and meals are not served.
Part-time Students
Students enrolled for less than 12 hours per semester will be classified as part-time students and will be billed per credit
hour. Part-time students who audit certain courses will be charged the audit rate per hour. These fees are payable at
registration. Please see the Student Fee Schedule for credit hour charges.
Boarders
Permission to board at Emmaus while attending a neighboring college is granted by the Dean or Associate Dean for
Student Development. Students attending neighboring colleges full-time, but living at Emmaus, are required to pay their
Emmaus fees in full prior to moving into an Emmaus residence hall and must sign a rental agreement with the Business
office. Any student wishing variation from this requirement must receive written approval from the Business office.
Graduation, Transcripts, and Indebtedness
Any student who is delinquent in the payment of fees, or against whom the college holds a record of indebtedness, will
not be given a diploma/certificate, certificate of scholastic standing, or a transcript of record until such indebtedness has
been fully paid.
Communication
Communication with the Student Accounts office is very important. The Student Accounts office will contact you about
any issues that arise with your account. If you cannot make the required payments, immediately contact the Student
Accounts office at 563-588-8000, ext 2210. We cannot consider your situation unless you share it with us. If payments
are not received and you do not communicate extenuating circumstances for us to consider, your account will become
delinquent, and appropriate action will be taken.
Refunds/Withdrawing
When a student withdraws or is dismissed from Emmaus Bible College, he or she may be entitled to a refund of charges
and/or may be required to return some of the federal funds awarded. The student may also be eligible for a refund of a
portion of the tuition, fees, and room and board paid to Emmaus for the term. If the student received financial assistance
from outside of his or her family, then a portion of the refund will be returned to the grant, scholarship, or loan source
from which the assistance was received.
If a student wishes to withdraw, he or she should see the Dean or Associate Dean for Student Development who will
guide the student through the process, which includes filing a Withdrawal Form that can be obtained from the Registrar’s
office.
Emmaus’ refund policy exists for calculating the refund of institutional charges. The policy is as follows—after the first
day of classes there will be no refund of student service or program fees. Students who withdraw will receive a pro-rated
refund of tuition fees according to the following schedule:
100% During the first week of the semester
80% During the second week of the semester
60% During the third week of the semester
40% During the fourth week of the semester
20% During the fifth week of the semester
0% After the fifth week of the semester
Room and board will be refunded on a pro-rated basis through the 10th week of the semester. There will be no refund of
room and board after the 10th week of the semester. Student fees are not refundable after the first day of classes.
Financial Aid
General Financial Aid Information
Emmaus Bible College offers a quality education in the study of God’s Word at the lowest possible cost. The charge to
students is only a portion of the total cost of their education, as additional funding is received from friends and alumni of
the college. Still, the need for financial aid exists for many of our students.
The responsibility for paying for your education rests with you and your family. This can be accomplished by saving for
education, being awarded financial aid, and participating in paid student employment opportunities. Finally, but
certainly not last or least, we pray that you will trust the Lord to provide for your educational expenses.
The costs of attending college are met in a variety of ways, including summer and part-time employment, family
assistance, federal grants and loans, state grants, institutional scholarships and grants and other private aid such as
scholarships. Institutional scholarship applications are available on the Emmaus web site. In some instances aid is
limited, so students are encouraged to apply early and to meet any published deadlines for scholarships and state grants.
Federal and/or State of Iowa Student Aid
Students who are interested in Federal and/or State of Iowa Student Aid should fill out the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA)*. You can apply online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Request that the results be sent to Emmaus Bible
College (Title IV school code 016487). Completing the FAFSA will enable the student to be considered for the
following programs:
Source
Eligibility
Amount
Deadline
Federal Pell Grant
High need on FAFSA
See Emmaus Web Site for
more information
Varies
Federal Supplemental
Educational Opportunity
Grant (FSEOG)
Extremely high need on
FAFSA
Up to $600
Varies
Subsidized Federal Stafford
Loan
Need on FAFSA
See Emmaus Web Site for
more information
Varies
Unsubsidized Federal
Stafford Loan
Students who do not
demonstrate need on
FAFSA
See Emmaus Web Site for
more information
Varies
Iowa Tuition Grant
See Emmaus Web Site for
more information
Up to $4000
July 1
Iowa Grant
See Emmaus Web Site for
more information
Up to $1000
July 1
*Students who do not fill out a FAFSA will not be considered for Federal Aid, State of Iowa Aid, and some forms of
institutional aid.
Institutional Aid
Through the generosity of friends and alumni of the college, Emmaus is able to offer scholarships and awards to some of
our students. The requirements for these vary; however, all require students to be enrolled full-time and maintain
satisfactory academic progress. A list of institutional scholarships can be found on the Emmaus web site.
Veterans Benefits
The Iowa Department of Public Instruction approves Emmaus for Benefits under Title 38, Chapter 36, U.S. Code.
Students wishing to enroll under the law should keep in mind that such financial aid will probably not be available for
several weeks from the time of enrollment. An alternative plan to meet expenses should be prepared until the
government checks are received.
Financial Aid
Veterans enrolling at Emmaus should consult with the Registrar and complete the necessary forms to receive their
educational benefits. Any eligible student, enrolled under Title 38, Chapter 36, U.S. Code who discontinues his studies
for any reason will be charged proportionately for the duration of his enrollment up to that point. All amounts paid to
Emmaus Bible College in excess of the pro-rated charge will be returned to the student.
Employment
Full-time students may work up to a maximum of twenty-four hours per week. In cases of scholastic deficiency, a lesser
maximum may be established. Employment opportunities exist on campus in several areas including food services,
facility management, security, reception, library, and business office. For those seeking off-campus employment,
Dubuque offers numerous opportunities for employment, including retailers, banks, and fast-food restaurants within
walking distance of the college.
Withdrawing from all Classes
If a student is a recipient of federal student aid and withdraws from all classes after the enrollment period starts, the
federal “Return of Title IV funds” formula dictates the amount of Federal Title IV student aid that must be returned to
the federal government by the school and the student. The federal formula is applicable to a student who receives federal
aid (Pell, FSEOG, Stafford Student Loans, PLUS Loans) and who withdraws on or before the 60% point in the semester.
Funds are returned to the appropriate aid program in the following order as applicable (worksheets used to determine the
amount to be returned are available upon request):
Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan
Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan
Federal PLUS Loan
Federal PELL Grant
FSEOG
Note: If federal grants (Pell or FSEOG) funds are released directly to a student because of a credit balance on the
student’s account, he or she may be required to repay some of the federal grants if he or she withdraws.
Refund Policy for Iowa Tuition Grant and Iowa Grant
If a student discontinues attendance before the end of any term after receiving payment under a state grant program, the
entire amount of any refund due that student, up to the amount of any payments made under the annual grant, shall be
paid by the college or university to the Commission.
If funds remain after the return of Title IV aid and the return of Iowa State aid, such funds will be issued to repay
Emmaus financial aid and other private sources of assistance. If funds still remain and the student does not have an
unpaid balance, such funds will be returned to the student.
More Information
Federal Aid: www.studentaid.ed.gov
Iowa State Aid Programs: www.iowacollegeaid.gov
Emmaus financial aid: www.emmaus.edu
Student Development
Location
Emmaus is located in Dubuque, Iowa, a Mississippi River city of 60,000 people. It serves as the metropolitan center of
250,000 residents in the Iowa/Wisconsin/Illinois tri-state area.
Dubuque provides many activities for Emmaus students. The Dubuque Symphony Orchestra performs regularly at the
Five Flags Center. The National Mississippi River Museum and Riverwalk is a draw for tourists from across the
country. There are many beautiful parks and recreation areas, including the Mines of Spain hiking area and Eagle Point
Park, which provides a spectacular view of the upper Mississippi.
Dubuque is also a center for education, hosting five colleges and three seminaries. This healthy environment is a
suitable setting for the Emmaus education and for the community outreach of service and evangelism.
Facilities
The campus is located on the west side of Dubuque on twenty-four acres of gently rolling land. The main building
includes classrooms, the Marble Chapel, the David A Glock Auditorium, administrative and faculty offices, dormitories,
the dining hall, library and study center, coffee shop, bookstore, and racquetball courts. Smith Hall contains a state-ofthe-art computer center, additional dormitories, the Business office, ECS Ministries, Believers Stewardship Services, and
maintenance facilities. The Pollard Fieldhouse, attached to Smith Hall, offers two gymnasiums, weight room, student
center, and the Courtside Cafe.
Outdoor recreational facilities include spacious grounds for softball, football, soccer, and various winter sports. The
gymnasiums offer facilities for basketball, volleyball, and other activities. The campus borders a public golf course that
provides additional recreational opportunities. Ice-skating, down-hill skiing, and cross-country skiing are also available
in the community.
Student Services
Housing
Dormitories are available for unmarried students. A variety of room styles are available including single and double
rooms, and triple and quadruple suites. All rooms are supplied with a bed, desk, chair, bookcase, closet, and dresser for
each student. All unmarried students are required to room and board at the college unless they live with a relative within
commuting distance. Housing for married students is readily available through nearby apartments with reasonable rental
rates.
Food Services
Resident students participate in a meal plan that entitles them to any/all meals that are served in the dining hall. Nonresident students may purchase individual meal tickets. The Coffee Bean and Courtside Café are open limited hours of
the day and evening.
Laundry Facilities
A fully-equipped laundry facility is available for student use.
.
Health Services
Health services are available to Emmaus students through local clinics and hospitals. For assistance in accessing medical
care, see the Director of Residence Life.
Counseling Services
Counseling services are available free of charge to all students of Emmaus Bible College. Counseling is coordinated
through the office of the Dean for Student Development,and generally consists of pastoral counseling, which is available
from the Dean for Student Development and other members of the faculty. Should the need arise for more specialized
counseling, Ben Mathew and Seth Scott, who are both Licensed Mental Health Counselors in the State of Iowa, are
skilled and qualified to provide counseling service beyond the scope of pastoral counseling. Appointments with either
Counselor can be made directly through our online scheduling service available through the ‘Counseling’ link on the
Emmaus Navigator homepage under ‘Support Links’. Occasionally, situations may require networking with other mental
health professionals in the Dubuque community, and the Dean of Student Development office will work with the student
to find the best care possible if referrals are necessary.
Academic Support Center (ASC)
Students who need assistance in their studies are encouraged to seek out the Academic Support Center (ASC). There,
they can find tutoring in writing, Bible, Greek, math and science; tutors are all Emmaus students qualified in their fields.
All tutoring is free-of-charge. ASC also offers some audiobooks. Available audiobooks are downloaded onto an iPod,
and then the iPod is loaned to the student for the semester. Audiobooks are available for students with physical or
Student Development
learning disabilities or students with language challenges.
Bookstore
Emmaus maintains a bookstore stocked with a selection of books and supplies.
Mail
Mail is distributed daily. Student mail should be addressed as follows:
Student Name, Box #
Emmaus Bible College
2570 Asbury Road
Dubuque, Iowa 52001
Learning Resources
Textbooks
Textbooks are available for purchase through the college at the beginning of each semester.
Library
A spacious library is available for student use. The collection includes approximately 120,000 books and bound
periodicals as well as pamphlets, audio-visual materials, and electronic databases. A PC lab with Internet access is
housed in the library. The Emmaus library is part of the OCLC Library Consortium providing students with access to
resources at over 35,000 other libraries.
Children’s Literature Collection
A children’s literature collection is housed within the library to support the Elementary Education program.
Area Libraries
Emmaus students have access to learning resources at six area libraries: Clarke College, Loras College, University of
Dubuque, Wartburg Seminary, and Carnegie-Stout Public Library, and the Dubuque County Library. Emmaus students
may check out materials from Loras College, University of Dubuque, Wartburg Seminary, and the Dubuque County
Library.
Computer Labs
Three computer labs are available on campus. The computer classroom is located in Smith Hall, a PC lab is located in
the Emmaus library, and a MAC lab is located adjacent to the Elementary Education curriculum lab. All labs provide
Internet access. Students may also access the Internet and email in the Coffee Bean and Study Center.
Teacher Education Curriculum Lab
A collection of materials and texts to support the Elementary Education program is housed in Classroom K.
Special Events
Spiritual Emphasis Days
Spiritual Emphasis Days is scheduled for the fall semester and focuses on the spiritual life of the believer. A guest
speaker provides ministry at special day-time and evening chapels.
Christian Ministries Seminar
Christian Ministries Seminar is scheduled for the spring semester and is designed to challenge students to consider
ministry service. Ministries from across the U.S. and Canada come to the college to present opportunities for both shortterm and long-term service and ministry.
Summer Missions Exposure (Summex) Teams
The Intercultural Studies Department sponsors faculty-led teams that travel abroad for 2-4 weeks every summer to give
students missions exposure and cross-cultural experience. A student may receive credit for participating on one Summex
Team by fulfilling the requirements of ICS 406-408 Intercultural Ministry Project. Registration for the course must be
approved by the Intercultural Studies Department, and the cross-cultural experience must be planned and guided by a
qualified faculty member.
Student Development
Student Organizations, Activities, and Leadership Development Opportunities
Athletics
Emmaus offers intercollegiate men’s and women’s basketball, men’s soccer, and women’s volleyball. In addition, the
college offers club softball and provides a full intramural sports program including basketball, volleyball, floor hockey,
softball, badminton, and racquetball.
Music Performing Groups
Students have opportunities for involvement in various music ministries at Emmaus including Chapel Choir, the
Emmaus Ensemble, and several small group ensembles. The vocal groups provide ministry at special events throughout
the year, both on- and off-campus.
Student Government
Students are elected by the student body to fill the offices of President, Vice-President, Treasurer, and Secretary, and
Off-Campus Representative of Student Government. The students of the first-year class choose two class
representatives. Student Government plans numerous social activities throughout the year. These include all-school
picnics, recreation nights, Prayer and Praise, skiing and skating outings, and annual events such as the Christmas event,
Winterfest, and the Senior Banquet.
Resident Assistants
Student leaders are selected by application and interview to serve and support their fellow students by providing
encouragement and guidance in their college experience.
Emmaus Student Ambassadors (ESA)
The mission of the Emmaus Student Ambassadors is to partner with the Office of Enrollment Services to develop a sense
of collegiate pride on campus and a global awareness of Emmaus off campus, radiating from the Dubuque community
outward.
Growth Group Leaders
Growth Group leaders oversee the small group ministry on campus, which provides a community for care and growth.
All full-time students at Emmaus participate in Growth Groups as part of the Chapel program.
Student Missionary Fellowship
Student Missionary Fellowship (SMF) promotes a passion for student involvement in the Great Commission through
prayer, reports from local and overseas evangelists and missionaries, and special programs.
Women’s Chapel Committee
The purpose of the Women’s Chapel Committee is to provide opportunities for female students to teach and encourage
one another through worship, prayer, and devotion. The Women’s Chapel Committee organizes two women’s chapels
and one women’s event each year.
Yearbook
The Yearbook program is a scholastic journalism program designed to create a print monument to what God has done at
Emmaus Bible College each school year. Participating students gain experience in desktop publishing, including
writing, photography, layout, and leadership.
Counseling Psychology Student Council
A small group of Counseling Psychology students meet throughout the school year as representatives of fellow
Counseling Psychology students for the purpose of planning, academic development, fellowship and prayer.
CREW (Cultivating Responsible Educators Worldwide)
CREW plans activities throughout the year to enhance fellowship, prayer, and professional development for Teacher
Education majors.
Emmaus Youth Ministry (EYM)
Emmaus Youth Ministry is the student fellowship group for the Youth Ministry major or minor. Its purpose is to speak
into each other’s lives through regular meetings for prayer, fellowship, and peer-driven equipping for discipling youth,
caring for families, and understanding the needs of youth culture. “Teach and counsel each other with all the wisdom He
gives” Colossians 3:16.
Student Development
Employment
Students are permitted to work a maximum of twenty-four hours per week (twenty hours maximum for international
students). In case of academic deficiency, a lesser maximum is established to meet individual student needs. There are a
number of job opportunities available on campus, with foreign students and those with needed skills given preference.
The Student Development office posts contacts for off-campus job opportunities in Dubuque.
Student Life Requirements
Standard of Conduct
Emmaus seeks to train students in the high standards of Christian conduct outlined in the Bible. General expectations
are outlined in the Student Handbook. Students are encouraged to develop healthy relationships founded on the
principles of Matthew 18:15-16 and are expected to practice holiness of life and give themselves fully to their prescribed
course of study.
Discipline is administered on the basis of individual maturity and personal need. The Student Development Committee
composed of student, faculty, and administrative representatives oversees this process. Any students who, in the
judgment of the committee, fail to conduct themselves in accordance with Emmaus standards may be dismissed.
Lifestyle Covenant
Emmaus Bible College seeks to foster a community of students who are being stretched, challenged, growing, and
preparing to serve to Lord to bring HIM glory. In order to accomplish these goals, standards for community living are
published annually in the Student Handbook. We synthesize these community expectations in the Lifestyle Covenant,
which we require students to sign each year as a statement of their intent to function as a harmonious part of the Emmaus
family.
Church Attendance
Emmaus is committed to the application of New Testament principles as they relate to church life. Each Emmaus
student is expected and encouraged to actively participate in the meetings and the ministries of a local church.
Student Work Assistance Program
Each full-time resident student is expected to participate in the Student Work Assistance Program (SWAP). The
program serves the college community by requiring each student to provide three hours of service to the college each
week. This service may be kitchen, grounds, maintenance, custodial, clerical, athletics, A.V., or research assistance.
Students not wishing to participate in this program will be charged an additional fee (see the Student Fee brochure for
current charges).
Student Concerns
Student Concerns Procedure
The Student Concerns Procedure is designed to assist in resolving problems for students who maybe having difficulties
with a faculty member, staff member, or another student. It is the teaching and expectation of Emmaus Bible College
that students follow the principles of Matthew 18 for confronting an issue, but if the student concern cannot be resolved
through informal discussion with the individual involved, a student may choose to have the issue investigated and judged
in a formal setting through the Student Concerns Procedure. (See the Student Handbook for further details.)
Formal Complaints
It is the desire of Emmaus Bible College to adhere to the accreditation standards of the Higher Learning Commission of
the North Central Association of Colleges & Schools (NCA) and the Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE).
If issues arise causing a student to question the college’s adherence to the standards of NCA or ABHE, the following
procedure should be followed. A student wishing to lodge a formal complaint must do so in writing to the following:
Academic Issues
Lisa L. Beatty
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Emmaus Bible College
2570 Asbury Road
Dubuque, IA 52001
(563) 588-8000, ext. 1103
Financial or Operational Issues
Mark A. Presson
Vice President for Finance and Administration
Emmaus Bible College
2570 Asbury Road
Dubuque, IA 52001
(563) 588-8000, ext. 1125
Student Life Issues
Israel Chavez
Dean for Student Development
Emmaus Bible College
2570 Asbury Road
Dubuque, IA 52001
Philosophical Issues
Philip Boom
President
Emmaus Bible College
2570 Asbury Road
Dubuque, IA 52001
Student Development
(563) 588-8000, ext. 1122
(563) 588-8000, ext. 1101
It is the teaching and expectation of the college that you follow Matthew 18 principles for confronting an issue.
However, in the event that you address the proper college authority and the issue remains unresolved, you may contact
either accrediting association at the following addresses:
The Higher Learning Commission of the
North Central Association of Colleges & Schools
230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL 60604
(800) 621-7440
www.ncahlc.org
Association for Biblical
Higher Education
5850 T.G. Lee Boulevard, Suite 130
Orlando, FL 32822
(407) 207-0808
www.abhe.org
Academic Life
Academic Information
Calendar and Unit of Credit
Emmaus operates on a semester basis. The academic year consists of two semesters of fifteen weeks each. The semester
hour, representing fifty minutes of instructional time three times per week for one semester, is the unit of academic
credit.
Credit Hour Load
The normal or average academic load is sixteen to seventeen hours per semester. A minimum of twelve hours a semester
must be maintained to be considered a full-time student. A maximum load of 18.5 hours per semester is allowed.
Exceptions may be requested from the Vice President/Dean for Academic Affairs. Students are expected to engage in a
minimum of two clock hours of study for each clock hour spent in class.
Classification
Students are classified as follows:
Freshman: High school graduate or equivalent
Sophomore: Completion of 30 semester hours and 30 grade points
Junior: Completion of 60 semester hours and 60 grade points
Senior: Completion of 90 semester hours and 90 grade points
Full-Time Student: 12-18.5 credit hours
Part-Time Student: Less than 12 credit hours
Attendance Policy
Students are expected to fully participate in the academic and spiritual programs at Emmaus. Attendance is required in
all classes. Students unable to attend for any reason are expected to communicate with instructors in person, by email,
or by phone message prior to the absence. Students are responsible for keeping record of all absences.
The college recognizes two types of absence—personal and administrative. Personal absences are for personal issues
such as illness, family events or challenges, emergencies, etc. Administrative absences are approved, college-initiated
absences such as sporting events, field trips, recruitment trips, etc. The number of personal and/or administrative
absences allowed without penalty is noted in the chart below.
Classes
Monday/Wednesday/Friday
Tuesday/Thursday
Once a week
Personal
Absences
3
2
1
Administrative
Absences
6
4
2
Total
Absences
12
8
4
Illness that results in extended absence from class (beyond the allowed personal absences) must be
recommended/approved by a medical professional in writing to the VP/Dean for Academic Affairs.
Personal absences that exceed the number noted above may result in reduction of a final course grade by 2% per class
hour (2% for a 50 minute class, 3% for a 75 minute class, 6% for a 150 minute class). This may result in failure of the
course. Students consistently arriving late, leaving early, or sleeping in class may also have final grades reduced as
determined by the instructor.
Administrative absences that exceed the number noted above will be counted as personal absences. Athletes, especially
those playing more than one sport, are encouraged to save personal absences to be used in addition to administrative
absences for away games.
Students whose absences exceed the total absences noted above will fail the course. Students are accountable for all
missed work due to absence. If absence occurs on days when exams are given or other assignments are due, work may
be made up in the case of administrative absence or at the discretion of the instructor.
Academic Life
Audit of Courses
Any student who wishes to attend a class without earning college credit must register as an auditor. An auditor is not
responsible for course requirements such as papers, projects, or examinations, but is expected to attend class regularly.
Students may not change course status from credit to audit or audit to credit after the drop/add period (usually the first
two weeks of the semester). Students whose absences exceed 30% of the class meetings will not be allowed to continue
auditing the class. A course taken for audit will not apply toward graduation. Students wishing to audit a class must
secure permission from the instructor before registering. Instructors may limit the number of auditors in their courses.
STUDENTS MAY AUDIT ONLY ONE COURSE PER SEMESTER.
Audit Only Students
Audit only students may take one audit course a semester at a reduced cost (see current Student Fee brochure).
Independent Study Courses
Some courses at Emmaus Bible College may be completed as Independent Study courses. Independent Study courses
may be accessed for the following reasons:
• Scheduling challenges due to unavoidable course conflicts or transfers from other colleges/universities.
• Extraordinary circumstances including prolonged illness, family-related issues, etc., that may necessitate
leaving the residential campus for an extended period.
• The desire to complete research or guided study in a particular discipline agreed upon by the student and an
instructor.
To access an Independent Study course, the student should request an Independent Study form from the Registrar and
then discuss the course request with the appropriate instructor. Approval of the request is at the discretion of the
instructor in consultation with the Vice President/Dean for Academic Affairs. The form needs to be completed, signed
by the student, instructor, and Vice President/Dean for Academic Affairs and returned to the Registrar.
Students wishing to take an Independent Study course should declare their intent as soon as possible (when course
schedules for the next semester are published). This will allow the instructor time to prepare necessary materials for the
course. The instructor will provide a schedule for the completion of assignments, projects, and examinations in a dated
course syllabus. Students are expected to complete the work within the agreed-upon time frame. Extension requests
may be granted at the discretion of the instructor.
Students may not access an Independent Study course in the same semester and the same discipline as a failed CLEP
examination. CLEP examinations should be completed early in the student’s academic program. Independent Study
course requests may or may not be approved for those students who have not followed the appropriate planner for their
academic program.
Cheating/Plagiarism Policy Statement
Emmaus Bible College expects students to complete all academic work with integrity. Students are responsible to
complete all of their own work. Dishonesty in the completion of assignments, papers, presentations, examinations or any
other academic work is contrary to Biblical principles of Christian living and is unacceptable at Emmaus.
Plagiarism is the deliberate presentation of another person’s ideas or words as your own, or the failure (intentional or
unintentional) to cite the source of your ideas. Below are some examples of plagiarism:
1. The words, sentences, ideas, conclusions, examples, and/or organization of an assignment are borrowed from a
source (a book, an article, another student’s paper, tapes, etc.) without acknowledging the source.
2. A student submits work done by another student—in part or whole—in place of his or her own work.
3. A student submits assignments received from commercial firms or any other person or group.
4. A student knowingly aids another student in plagiarizing an assignment as defined above.
5. A student submits work in which the style, language or grammar has been altered by any one besides the
writer.
Other violations of academic integrity include unauthorized collaboration, violation of the conditions under which the
work is to be done, fabrication of data, and excessive revision by someone other than the student.
Cheating, plagiarism, or other violations of academic integrity will result in academic penalty, which may include failure
of the assignment, exam, or paper, failure of the course, and further disciplinary action brought by the Student
Development Committee. The Vice President/Dean for Academic Affairs and the Dean for Student Development will be
notified.
Academic Life
Class Withdrawal Policy
Drop/Add – Weeks 1 & 2
Students may add or drop a class without penalty or record on their transcript during the first 2 weeks of class. (Biblical
language courses may be dropped without penalty through week four.)
WP/WF – Weeks 3-10
Students may withdraw from a class during this period of time with a grade of WP (withdraw passing) or WF (withdraw
failing). The instructor indicates whether the student is passing or failing at the time of withdrawal. This grade appears
on the student transcript to show that the credits were attempted but not earned. This grade does not affect the GPA.
This type of withdrawal requires the signature of the instructor, the advisor, and the Vice President/Dean for Academic
Affairs.
Grade of F – Week 11-15
Students dropping a class after the 10th week will receive a grade of “F”. This “F” will appear on their transcript and will
affect GPA.
Incomplete
Students may request a grade of I (Incomplete) if they are unable to complete course requirements on time due to
circumstances beyond their control. If you wish to request an Incomplete the following procedure should be followed:
1. The student must initiate the request. Print out a Notice of Grade of Incomplete on Emmaus Navigator.
2. If the faculty member grants your request, he or she will complete the form, give you a copy, and provide a
copy for the Registrar.
3. You will have up to 4 weeks from the last day of finals to complete your work.
Grade Appeal Process
Students who wish to dispute a final grade they have received in a course should use the following process:
1. The parties involved (student and instructor) shall discuss the problem and attempt to reach an agreement.
2. If a satisfactory agreement cannot be reached through discussion, a written appeal must be filed with the
VP/Dean for Academic Affairs within the first four weeks of the following semester for semester-long courses.
The VP/Dean will discuss the issue with both parties and seek a resolution.
3. Should efforts toward conciliation be unsuccessful, the VP/Dean will call the Academic Committee to review
the appeal. The decision of the Academic Committee will be deemed final.
Repeat of Courses
Students may elect to repeat a course in which they have earned a C-, D+, D, D-, or F. The grade achieved on the
repeated course is recorded on the academic record. While the grade from the first course remains on the record, only
the course with the highest grade is used for the calculation of hours earned and in computing the cumulative grade point
average.
Grades, Grade Points, Credits
The following system of grading is used in reporting the quality of student work
Grade
A
B
C
D
F
P
F
I
W
WP
WF
Grade Points
4.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
0
Pass
Fail
Incomplete
Withdraw
Withdraw Passing
Withdraw Failing
Percentages
93-100%
85-92%
77-84%
70-76%
0-69%
The Grade Point Average (GPA) is determined by dividing the total number of grade points by the total number of credit
hours taken.
Academic Life
Academic Assistance
A student will be placed on Academic Assistance if his or her cumulative GPA drops below 2.0, or if his or her GPA is
below 1.5 in any given semester. To provide the student additional academic support, the following measures may be
applied:
• Bi-weekly or regular meetings with a member of the Student Development staff
• Bi-weekly meetings with an assigned faculty advisor
• Limitation of employment to 16 hours per week
• Limitation of participation in athletics and intramurals
• Limitation of off-campus overnights and weekend travel
• Completion of time management worksheet to be filled out weekly
• Limitation of hours attempted
• Potential dorming, rooming, or campusing
Change of Major
Students who wish to change majors must submit a completed Change of Intent form to the Registrar. The form requires
signatures from the program directors of both the new major and the current major. Forms are available on Emmaus
Navigator.
Withdrawal
Any student withdrawing from Emmaus must begin the process with an interview with the Dean for Student
Development. In the interview, the Dean will communicate the necessary steps for withdrawal from the college.
Internship Recognition on Official Transcripts
Students participating in internships may be eligible to register for special recognition of their work on their official
Emmaus transcript. The internship will appear as a note on the transcript. To be eligible, the internship must meet the
following requirements:
• Work should be at least 80% professional in nature and related to academic major or career interest.
• Intern’s supervisor must be a professional in the field (not another student).
• Work must normally be at least 10 hours a week and 10 weeks in length.
• The student must meet the requirements established by his/her major program director, which will normally
include representative work, a reflection paper, and a supervisor evaluation.
• Internships cannot be registered retroactively. They must be registered during the semester in which the work is
completed.
Final Credits
To receive a degree or certificate from Emmaus Bible College, students must complete a minimum of 50% of required
credits at Emmaus. (See specific requirements for each academic program.) Additionally, bachelor degree students
must complete 24 of their last 30 credits at Emmaus Bible College and must be enrolled at the college during the
semester in which the degree will be conferred. (If a policy exception is granted by the VP/Dean for Academic Affairs,
the graduate must submit a letter of reference from an evangelical church leader regarding church attendance, service and
ministry, and Christian character.)
Transcripts of Record
Upon written request, students may obtain official copies of their permanent records from the Registrar. Requests should
be accompanied by $5.00 for each copy desired.
Additional Major
A person who holds a bachelor’s degree from Emmaus Bible College may complete an additional major by fulfilling the
following requirements:
• be readmitted to Emmaus Bible College;
• earn at least 30 hours beyond the granting of the original degree in residence at Emmaus Bible College;
• complete all of the requirements for the additional major. If previous courses satisfy some of the major
requirements, the department will designate courses from other areas that will enhance the major.
Academic Life
Academic Life Requirements
Chapel Attendance
Daily chapels are held for the Emmaus students, staff, and faculty. Chapel provides an opportunity for the Emmaus
community to come together daily for a devotional thought, worship, prayer, and communication of information. All
full-time students are required to attend daily chapel , floor devotions, and Growth Groups. This includes resident, nonresident, and continuing education students. Attendance at all chapel periods is recorded by means of swiping the
student ID card at the beginning of the chapel period. Failure to swipe your card will be charged as a skip. (Please see
the Student ID Card Replacement Policy if your student ID card is lost or damaged.) Resident Assistants and Growth
Group leaders are responsible for attendance at floor devotions and split chapels for resident students. Tardiness for
chapel is handled in the following manner: Five minutes is considered late. Three late offenses in the span of two weeks
are calculated as one skip. Ten minutes late is recorded as a skip.
If a full-time student needs exemption for attending chapel due to an emergency, family situation, or other personal
issue, s/he must secure permission from Student Development as soon as possible. Semester long exemptions may also
be granted at the beginning of the semester by securing permission from Student Development. Forms are available at
the front desk.
If a student exceeds 10 skips per semester, s/he will fail chapel. Chapel attendance is recorded on student transcripts
as Pass/Fail. STUDENTS MUST PASS CHAPEL EACH SEMESTER OF FULL-TIME ATTENDANCE IN ORDER
TO GRADUATE.
Students who do not pass Chapel for any given semester may contact Student Development to complete a make-up
assignment to change their grade from Fail to Pass. Please note that make-up assignments are not to be used as a
substitute for your attendance in chapel. Regular chapel attendance is encouraged and expected.
Students with two chapel failures on their transcripts will not be allowed to begin classes in the semester following until
make-up assignments for both chapel failures are submitted and approved for grade change from Fail to Pass.
Growth Groups
In order to foster spiritual growth and fellowship within the student body, Emmaus provides a small group ministry for
all students called Growth Groups. Growth Groups meet every Tuesday as part of the Chapel program. Each semester,
Growth Groups choose a book or topic for study with approval from the Director of Spiritual Life.
Servant-Leader Training (SLT)
Through its academic programs, Emmaus purposes to develop servant-leaders, equipped for service, ministry, and
vocation. The SLT program provides each student the opportunity to develop as a servant-leader through engagement in
service to the church and the community. Students are encouraged to participate in regularly-scheduled service
opportunities in church and para-church settings (e.g., Sunday School teaching, AWANA, Friday Nighters, etc.) and in
the broader community. All SLT activities must be approved by the SLT Director.
Each student must complete a minimum of 30 SLT hours a semester, 10 of which must be in service to the broader
Dubuque community (e.g., Maria House, Clarity Clinic, Multicultural Center).
A unit of SLT (.5 credits) equals 30 hours. For a Bachelor of Science degree, the SLT requirement is 7-8 units (3.5-4
credits). For an Associate of Arts degree, the SLT requirement is 4 units (2 credits). For the Certificate in Biblical
Studies or the Continuing Education Certificate in Biblical Studies programs, the SLT requirement is 2 units (1 credit).
With permission from the Director of Servant-Leader Training, students may complete 2 units of SLT in one semester.
Transfer students are required to complete 1 unit of SLT for each semester at Emmaus (a minimum of 4 units are
required). As long as transfer students meet a minimum credit requirement of 124 credits, they do not need to make up
any remaining SLT credits. Students taking 6 or more credits in any given semester must register for SLT unless SLT
unit requirements are met. Students who complete degree programs one course at a time must complete the required
units of SLT.
Bible Reading
All certificate and degree graduates must complete the Bible-reading requirement, a reading of the entire Bible during
one academic year. This is usually accomplished through completion of required reading in Old Testament Survey 1 & 2
and New Testament Survey. Bible reading must be completed by the first day of finals.
Academic Life
English Composition Requirement
Degree-seeking students must earn a minimum grade of C- in English Composition (ENG 101), or equivalent in the case
of transfer students, to pass this course. Ordinarily, the course will be completed within the student’s initial 30 credit
hours at Emmaus. Course withdrawal is rarely granted, and only when a formal request with written documentation of
extreme hardship is provided to the VP/Dean for Academic Affairs.
Students with transfer, AP, or CLEP credits in English Composition who score below 70 on the English placement exam
(or below 80 for Teacher Education majors) will be required to register for the Writing Seminar (1 credit; Pass/Fail) each
semester until they achieve a Pass (P).
General Graduation Requirements
The following requirements must be met in order to graduate from Emmaus Bible College:
• Passing grades in all required courses
• Passing grades in chapel for each semester of full-time attendance
• Completion of a minimum of 124 credit hours (varies by program)
• Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 (2.5 for Teacher Education and Music Education graduates)
• Completion of the Bible reading requirement
• Completion of required units of Servant Leader Training (SLT)
• Demonstration of consistent Christian character as articulated in the Student Handbook
• Payment of all financial obligations to the college
Awards for Academic Excellence
Academic Award
The Academic Award is given to the graduating senior who achieves the highest cumulative grade point average
throughout his or her Emmaus education.
Business Administration Award
The Business Administration Award is given annually to the outstanding graduate in the department. The recipient is
determined by the Business faculty.
Certificate of Biblical Studies Award
The Certificate of Biblical Studies Award is presented annually to one male and one female student who have completed
the certificate with high academic achievement and have demonstrated Christian character and leadership throughout the
year.
Computer Information Systems Award
The Computer Information Systems Award is given to the outstanding graduate in the department. The recipient is
determined by the Computer Studies faculty.
Counseling Psychology Award
The Counseling Psychology Award is presented annually to a graduate who has done outstanding work in the
department. The recipient is determined by the Counseling faculty.
Dean’s List
Students achieving a 3.5 or better grade point average qualify to be on the Dean’s List. This award is recognized at the
conclusion of each semester.
Delta Epsilon Chi
Delta Epsilon Chi is the honor society of the Association for Biblical Higher Education. The Emmaus faculty nominates
students to the honor society based on academic achievement, Christian character, and leadership ability.
Educational Ministries Award
The Educational Ministries Award is given to the graduate who best exemplifies the skills and dispositions found in an
effective youth or camp worker. The recipient is determined by the Educational Ministries faculty.
Elementary Education Award
The Elementary Education Award is given to the graduate who best exemplifies the skills and dispositions found in an
effective elementary teacher. The recipient is determined by the Teacher Education faculty.
Academic Life
Intercultural Studies Award
The Intercultural Studies Award is given to the graduate who best exemplifies the skills and dispositions found in an
effective missionary. The recipient is determined by the Intercultural Studies faculty.
Music Award
The Music Award is presented annually to a student for participation in and service to the music program. The recipient
is determined by the Music faculty.
Music Education Award
The Music Education Award is given to the graduate who best exemplifies the skills and dispositions found in an
effective music specialist. The recipient is determined by the Music and Teacher Education faculties.
Nursing Award
The Nursing Award is presented to an outstanding graduate from the dual-degree program in Bible/Theology and
Nursing. The recipient is determined by the Nursing advisor with input from the nursing faculty at Northeast Iowa
Community College.
Secondary Education Award
The Secondary Education Award is given to the graduate who best exemplifies the skills and dispositions found in an
effective secondary school teacher. The recipient is determined by the Teacher Education faculty.
Servant Leader Training Award
The Servant Leader Training Award is given annually to the student who best demonstrates leadership and commitment
in carrying out SLT responsibilities. The recipient is determined by the Servant Leader Training Director.
Student Teaching Award
The Student Teaching Award is given to the graduating student teacher who has demonstrated outstanding achievement
during student teaching. The recipient is determined by the Teacher Education faculty.
TESOL Award
The TESOL Award is presented annually to a graduate who has done outstanding work in the TESOL minor or
certificate programs. The recipient is determined by TESOL faculty.
Zondervan Greek Award
The Zondervan Greek Award is presented annually to a student who has done outstanding work in New Testament
Greek. The recipient is determined by Biblical Languages faculty.
Zondervan Hebrew Award
The Zondervan Hebrew Award is presented annually to a student who has done outstanding work in Old Testament
Hebrew. The recipient is determined by Biblical Languages faculty.
Zondervan Theology Award
The Zondervan Theology Award is given to the outstanding graduating senior in the Bible Exposition and Exegesis or
Biblical Studies program. The recipient is determined by the faculty of the Bible and Theology department.
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Bible and Theology Department
Dr. Steven Sanchez, Chair; Dr. Jack Fish, Mr. David Glock, Dr. David MacLeod, Dr. Daniel Smith, Mr. Mark
Stevenson, Dr. James Van Dine
Department Mission
To provide students with a comprehensive overview of and reverence for the Scriptures, an understanding of the major
Christian doctrines, and an ability to incarnate biblical truth in their lives.
Programs of Study
Certificate in Biblical Studies
Associate of Arts in Biblical Studies
Bachelor of Science in Bible Exposition and Exegesis
Bachelor of Science in Biblical Studies
Major in Bible/Theology (must be taken as part of a double-major or cooperative, dual-degree program)
Minor in Biblical Languages
Minor in Biblical Ministry
Continuing Education Certificate in Biblical Studies
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Certificate in Biblical Studies
The Certificate in Biblical Studies is a one-year program designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of
the Bible.
Program Director: Dr. Steven Sanchez
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. evidence basic knowledge of the content of the Bible.
2. evidence basic understanding of Christian theology.
3. evidence basic ability to study the Bible independently.
4. evidence a worldview that is distinctly Christian.
5. evidence growth in Christian character and lifestyle.
Certificate Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 32 semester credit hours
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses
3. A minimum of 16 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life and Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview (PH 106)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Electives
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/105)
Award: Certificate in Biblical Studies
Recommended Plan of Study for the
Certificate in Biblical Studies 2013 – 2014
First Semester
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Elective
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
Second Semester
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Intro to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Elective
Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed:
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
32
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
The Associate of Arts in Biblical Studies
The Associate of Arts in Biblical Studies is a two-year program designed to provide the student with both knowledge of
the Bible and general education knowledge and skills.
Program Director: Dr. Steven Sanchez
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. evidence increasing knowledge of the content of the Bible.
2. evidence increasing understanding of Christian theology.
3. evidence increasing ability to study the Bible independently.
4. evidence a worldview that is distinctly Christian.
5. evidence growth in Christian character and lifestyle.
Associate Degree Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 64 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 32 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (24 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Bible/Theology Electives
Inter-Area Studies (3 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-202/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-204/5)
Humanities (15 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview (PH 106)
Humanities Elective
Social Sciences (9 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Western Civilization (HIS 131/132) or American History (HIS 234)
Social Science Elective
Natural Sciences (7 credits)
College Math (MAT 140)
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Electives (6 credits)
Award: Associate of Arts in Biblical Studies
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the
Associate of Arts in Biblical Studies 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Elective
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Bible/Theology Elective
Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Humanities Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Second Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
3(
4(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Bible/Theology Elective
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Western Civilization (HIS 131/132 or
American History (HIS 234)
College Math (MAT 140)
Social Science Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3( )
3( )
3( )
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
16.5
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed:
15.5
64
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
The Bachelor of Science in Biblical Studies
The Biblical Studies major is a four-year program of study designed to provide students with a thorough knowledge of
the Bible and Christian theology. The program includes intensive study in two academic areas; Bible/theology and
general education. The Biblical Studies major includes 18 credits of open electives, which provides the opportunity to
add a minor program of study.
Program Director: Dr. Steven Sanchez
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. evidence comprehensive knowledge of the content of the Bible.
2. evidence comprehensive understanding of Christian theology.
3. evidence advanced ability to interpret the Bible accurately.
4. evidence ability to defend biblical truth and the Christian faith.
5. evidence a worldview that is distinctly Christian.
6. evidence growth in Christian character and lifestyle.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Complete the freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
2. Prior to the sophomore year, declare a major in Biblical Studies.
3. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Biblical Studies program. The application
procedure includes completion of a formal application. After the application has been received, the Bible and
Theology faculty will review it. Their decision will be delivered to the student by means of a formal letter.
4. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Bachelor of Science in Biblical Studies Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 126 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 63 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (57 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Applied Theology (BT 462)
Christian Evidences (BT 166) or Apologetics (BT/PH 350)
Life of Christ (BT 247)
Bible Geography (BT 278)
Romans (BT 335)
Old Testament Elective
Bible/Theology Electives**
Educational Ministries (3 credits)
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Inter-Area Studies (5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Humanities (15 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Humanities Elective
Social Sciences (15 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Western Civilization (HIS 131/132) or American History (HIS 234)
Church History (HIS 376)
Social Science Electives
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
College Math (MAT 140)
Math or Science Elective
Electives (18 credits)
*meets Bible-Related requirement
**at least one book study required
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with a major in
Biblical Studies 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Elective
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Intro to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Social Science Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Christian Evidences (BT 166) or Apologetics (BT/PH 350)
Life of Christ (BT 247)
College Math (MAT 140)
Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Applied Theology (BT 462)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Humanities Elective
Elective
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Second Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
3(
4(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Bible Geography (BT 278)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Romans (BT 335)
Western Civilization or American History
Math or Science Elective
Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Old Testament Elective
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Church History (HIS 376)
Social Science Elective
Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 403)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 405)
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
Total Credits
15.5
Total Credits Needed:
126
*at least one book study required
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible Exposition and Exegesis
The Bible Exposition and Exegesis major is a four-year program of study designed to provide students with a thorough
knowledge of the Bible and Christian theology. The program includes intensive study in three academic areas: Bible/
theology, Biblical languages, and general education. The Bible Exposition and Exegesis program is designed to provide
a thorough foundation for seminary or other graduate studies.
Program Director: Dr. Steven Sanchez
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. evidence comprehensive knowledge of the content of the Bible.
2. evidence comprehensive understanding of Christian theology.
3. evidence advanced ability to interpret the Bible accurately.
4. evidence ability to defend biblical truth and the Christian faith.
5. evidence a worldview that is distinctly Christian.
6. evidence growth in Christian character and lifestyle.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Complete the freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
2. Prior to the sophomore year, declare a major in Bible Exposition and Exegesis.
3. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Bible Exposition and Exegesis program. The
application procedure includes completion of a formal application. After the application has been received, the
Bible and Theology faculty will review it. Their decision will be delivered to the student by means of a formal
letter.
4. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Bachelor of Science in Bible Exposition and Exegesis Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 127 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 64 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (70 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Applied Theology (BT 462)
Christian Evidences (BT 166) or Apologetics (BT/PH 350)
Church Leadership and Practice (BT 450)
Old Testament Elective
New Testament Elective
Bible/Theology Electives**
Greek 1 (FL 102 & 104)
Greek 2 (FL 202 & 204)
Educational Ministries (3 credits)
Homiletics (EM 222)
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Inter-Area Studies (5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Humanities (15 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Humanities Elective
Social Sciences (15 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Western Civilization 1 (HIS 131), Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132), or American History (HIS 234)
Church History (HIS 376)
Social Science Electives
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
College Mathematics (MAT 140)
Math or Science Elective
Electives (6 credits)
*meets Bible-Related requirement
**at least one book study required
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with a major in
Bible Exposition and Exegesis 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Greek 1, Part 1 (FL 102)
Transitions (IAS 101)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Greek 2, Part 1 (FL 202)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Elective
Christian Evidences (BT 166) or Apologetics (BT/PH
350)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
College Math (MAT 140)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Homiletics (EM 222)
Applied Theology (BT 462)
Humanities Elective
Social Science Elective
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Second Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
4(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
3(
4(
3(
4(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Greek 1, Part 2 (FL 104)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Greek 2, Part 2 (FL 204)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
3(
3(
3(
3(
4(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
4(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
14.5
Total Credits
16.5
3( )
3( )
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Elective
3( )
3( )
3( )
New Testament Elective
3( )
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
Western Civilization or American History
Math or Science Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Old Testament Elective
Church Leadership and Practice (BT 450)
Church History (HIS 376)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Social Science Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 403)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 405)
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
Total Credits
15.5
Total Credits Needed:
127
*at least one book study required
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Major in Bible/Theology
The Bible/Theology major is the biblical component of every double major or cooperative, dual-degree program at
Emmaus Bible College. It cannot be completed as a stand-alone program. See the planners for double-majors or
cooperative, dual-degree programs for additional information.
Program Director: Dr. Steven Sanchez
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. develop advanced knowledge of the content of the Bible.
2. develop advanced understanding of Christian theology.
3. evidence advanced ability to interpret the Bible accurately.
4. evidence ability to defend biblical truth and the Christian faith.
6. evidence a worldview that is distinctly Christian.
5. evidence growth in Christian character and lifestyle.
Bible/Theology Major Requirements
Bible/Theology (39 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible/Theology Electives**
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Humanities (3 credits)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
*meets Bible-Related requirement
**at least one book study required
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Minor in Biblical Languages
The minor in Biblical Languages is a program of study designed to provide the student with the necessary tools for the
independent study of the Bible in Greek or Hebrew. Coursework for the minor can be used to fulfill elective
requirements in a major area of study.
Program Director: Dr. Jack Fish
Program Outcomes
Greek New Testament Studies Track
The student will:
1. Evidence an ability to understand the basic forms of New Testament Greek and read the New Testament
using a Greek lexicon.
2. Evidence an ability to use the basic tools for independent study and basic research in the study of the New
Testament in Greek.
3. Evidence an ability to analyze and study the New Testament independently.
Greek and Hebrew Studies Track
The student will:
1. Evidence an ability to understand the basic forms of New Testament Greek and Hebrew Old Testament and
read the New Testament using a Greek lexicon and the Old Testament using a Hebrew lexicon.
2. Evidence an ability to use the basic tools for independent study and basic research in the study of the Bible
in the original languages.
3. Evidence an ability to analyze and study the Bible independently using the original languages.
Biblical Languages Minor Requirements
Greek New Testament Studies Track
Greek 1 – Part 1 (FL 102)
Greek 1 – Part 2 (FL 104)
Greek 2 – Part 1 (FL 202)
Greek 2 – Part 2 (FL 204)
Greek 3 – Part 1 (FL 302)
Greek 3 – Part 2 (FL 304)
22 credit hours
Greek and Hebrew Studies Track
Greek 1 – Part 1 (FL 102)
Greek 1 – Part 2 (FL 104)
Greek 2 – Part 1 (FL 202)
Greek 2 – Part 2 (FL 204)
Hebrew 1 – Part 1 (FL 103)
Hebrew 1 – Part 2 (FL 105)
22 credit hours
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
Minor in Biblical Ministry
The minor in Biblical Ministry is a program of study designed to prepare students for effective ministry in the local
church. Coursework for the minor can be used to fulfill elective requirements in a major area of study.
Program Director: Dr. Steven Sanchez
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. Demonstrate the ability to articulate the essence, nature, purpose, and program of the local church.
2. Demonstrate basic ministry skills.
3. Understand the principles and dynamics that contribute to effective congregational leadership.
4. Evidence knowledge of basic principles of biblical counseling.
5. Demonstrate skill in teaching the Bible.
Biblical Ministry Minor Requirements
Church Leadership and Practice (BT 450)
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Children’s Ministries (EM 215) or Foundations of Youth Ministry (EM 206)
Homiletics (EM 222) or Small Group Communication (EM 320)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
Church Planting and Growth (ICS 310) or Women’s Ministries (EM 225)
Foundations of Church Music (MUS 250)
23/24 credit hours
Academic Programs – Bible and Theology Department
The Continuing Education Certificate in Biblical Studies
The Continuing Education Certificate in Biblical Studies is a program of study designed to provide the college graduate
or career-interruption student the opportunity for intensive Bible study. Courses are selected according to student
interest and background in consultation with the Bible and Theology department chair.
Program Director: Dr. Steven Sanchez
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. evidence increasing knowledge of the content of the Bible.
2. evidence developing knowledge and skillfulness in areas of their own selection.
3. evidence ability to study the Bible independently.
4. evidence a worldview that is distinctly Christian.
5. evidence growth in Christian character and lifestyle.
Continuing Education Certificate in Biblical Studies Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 30 credit hours. (Students in the program may complete up to 65 credit hours.)
2. Maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average.
3. Courses may be selected from any academic program. A minimum of 50% of total credits must be earned in
Bible/Theology (BT) courses.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Award: Continuing Education Certificate in Biblical Studies
Academic Programs – Business Administration Department
Business Administration Department
Mr. Philip Boom, Chair; Mr. Jack Borke, Dr. Paul Jensen, Mr. Philip Jensen, Mr. Jeffrey Masterson, Mrs.
Sheri Popp, Mr. Paul Thompson
Department Mission
To prepare students to be highly competent business professionals with a biblical worldview, equipped to
work effectively in commercial or ministry settings.
Programs of Study
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Business Administration
Minor in Business
Academic Programs – Business Administration Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Business Administration
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Business Administration is a four-year program designed
to provide students with a thorough understanding of the Bible and of current business principles, preparing
them to operate effectively as business leaders in either commercial or non-profit settings. The program
includes intensive study in three academic areas: Bible/Theology, general education, and business.
Program Director: Mr. Phil Boom
Student Learning Goals
In addition to meeting the Bible/Theology major outcomes, the student will:
1. Develop a thorough understanding of fundamental business principles.
2. Acquire the skills and dispositions needed to enable sound business practices.
3. Develop awareness of current business issues and trends and how to effectively operate in a changing
environment.
4. Develop a philosophy of business that incorporates a biblical worldview.
5. Evidence the ability to operate as business professionals in a variety of settings—commercial,
ministry, and cross-cultural.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Complete the freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
2. Declare a major in Bible/Theology and Business Administration.
3. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Business Administration program.
The process includes completion of a formal application. After the application has been received, it
will be reviewed by the Business faculty. Their decision will be delivered to the student by means of a
formal letter.
4. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual
statement of fees.
5. The Business department will consider up to 18 transfer credits in business, subject to review of grades
and course descriptions. The following courses must be taken at Emmaus:
Business Ethics (BUS 210)
Principles of Management and Leadership (BUS 330)
Organizational Behavior and Development (BUS401)
Business Law (BUS 420)
Business Policy and Strategy (BUS 410)
Business Internship (BUS 480/490)
Business Administration Degree Requirements:
1. Complete a minimum of 129 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. A minimum of 65 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (39 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible and Theology Electives+
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Academic Programs – Business Administration Department
Inter-Area Studies (5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Business Administration (45 credits)
Financial Accounting (ACC 110)
Managerial Accounting (ACC 210)
Global Business (BUS 102)
Introduction to Management Information Systems (BUS 140)
Business Ethics (BUS 201)
Principles of Finance (BUS 310)
Principles of Marketing (BUS 320)
Principles of Management and Leadership (BUS 330)
Organizational Behavior and Development (BUS 401)
Business Policy and Strategy (BUS 410)
Business Law (BUS 420)
Business Internship (BUS 480/490)
Business Electives**
Humanities (15 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Business Communication (COM 230)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Social Sciences (12 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 103)
Western Civilization (HIS 131/132) or American History (HIS 234)
Principles of Macroeconomics (ECN 105)
Principles of Microeconomics (ECN 205)
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
College Mathematics (MAT 140)
Introduction to Statistics (MAT 160)
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
*meets Bible-Related requirement
+at least one book study required
**Business Elective Course Offerings:
Business for Non-Profit Organizations, Non-Profit Organization
Development and Management, Camp Ministry Management, Business as Mission, Executive Leadership, Human
Resource Management, Production/Operations Management, Entrepreneurship, International Marketing, selected
Computer Information Systems courses
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Business Administration Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Business Administration 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Bible/Theology Elective*
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Financial Accounting (ACC 110)
Business Ethics (BUS 201)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Western Civilization or American History
Principles of Macroeconomics (ECN 105)
Introduction to Statistics (MAT 160)
Business Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Principles of Finance (BUS 310)
Principles of Management & Leadership (BUS 330)
Organizational Behavior & Development (BUS 401)
Business Elective
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Business Elective Options:
Human Resource Management (BUS 340)
Production/Operations Management (BUS 350)
Business for Non-Profit Organizations (BUS 360)
Non-Profit Organization Development and Management (BUS
370)
International Marketing (BUS 470)
Executive Leadership (BUS 430)
Entrepreneurship (BUS 440)
Business as Mission (BUS 450)
Camp Ministry Management (BUS 460)
Selected CIS courses
Second Semester
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First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Global Business (BUS 102)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
College Mathematics (MAT 140)
Managerial Accounting (ACC 210)
Business Communication (COM 230)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Intro to Management Information Systems (BUS 140)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Principles of Microeconomics (ECN 205)
Principles of Marketing (BUS 320)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Business Policy and Strategy (BUS 410)
Business Law (BUS 420)
Business Internship (BUS 480/490)
Business Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 403)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 405)
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Total Credits
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Total Credits Needed:
129
*at least one book study required
Academic Programs – Business Administration Department
Minor in Business
The minor in Business complements a primary area of study in several critical areas, and will give students an edge as
they seek to function in today’s society. Business ethics, management, leadership, competency in economics and
finance, and a global perspective are among the elements to which students will be exposed. These are highly desirable
attributes in the external world, whether in places of business or in ministry settings.
Program Director: Mr. Phil Boom
Program Outcomes
The student will
1. develop a thorough understanding of fundamental business principles.
2. acquire the skills and dispositions needed to enable sound business practices.
3. develop a philosophy of business that incorporates a biblical worldview.
Business Minor Requirements:
Global Business (BUS 102)
Financial Accounting (ACC 110)
Business Ethics (BUS 201)*
Principles of Management and Leadership (BUS 330)*
Principles of Macroeconomics (ECN 105) or Principles of Microeconomics (ECN 205)
Business Electives (6 credits)
*courses must be taken at Emmaus
21 credit hours
Academic Programs – Computer Studies Department
Computer Studies Department
Mr. Arthur Manning, interim chair; Mr. Tim Iverson, Mr. Roger Poling, Mr. Mark Woodhouse
Department Mission
To equip students to determine, analyze, and implement the information technology needs of a company or ministry, and
to prepare them to take full advantage of technology in their own Bible study and Christian service for the Lord.
Programs of Study
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Computer Information Systems
MCSE Certification Track
L.A.M.P. Track
Ministry Track
Programming Track
Systems Analyst Track
Computer Security Track
Advanced Networking Track
Minor in Computer Applications in Ministry
Continuing Education Certificate in Computer Applications in Ministry
Track Descriptions
MCSE Certification Track
The Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer certification is an industry-recognized credential that can be very helpful in
securing employment in the computer field wherever Microsoft products are in use. This track allows the student to
pursue this credential while gaining a much broader understanding of Computer Information Systems than a typical
MCSE would have, making employability even greater.
L.A.M.P. Track
This track allows the student to develop expertise in a group of open-source software programs that provide significant
functionality without costly licensing agreements and are thus gaining popularity in the business community. These
open-source programs include the Linux operating system, the Apache web server, the MySQL database engine, and the
PHP programming language.
Academic Programs – Computer Studies Department
Ministry Track
This track allows the student to develop expertise in a variety of software that provides capabilities specifically
applicable to Christian ministry. The track covers such skills as computer-based publishing, multimedia development,
church support software, and website development.
Programming Track
For students who have an interest in computer programming, this track provides training in various programming
languages and advanced programming techniques. An emphasis on program structure and documentation gives the
student a firm foundation for future programming pursuits.
Systems Analyst Track
This track provides the student with a broad understanding of computer support technologies without specialization in a
specific area of study. This is the default track for CIS majors.
Computer Security Track
Computer security skills are prized highly in the computer industry and graduates with credentials in this area will find
their skills very marketable. There are two primary organizations offering standard credentials, the International
Information Systems Security Certification Consortium, Inc. (ISC2), and the International Council of e-Commerce
Consultants (EC-Council). These organizations offer certifications in different areas of computer security at various
levels. Our graduates could qualify for the Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), the Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator
(C|HFI), and Certified Security Analyst (CSA) credentials as well as preparing to take the first steps in acquiring the
Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP) credential following one year of relevant experience.
Advanced Networking Track
The core coursework of the Computer Information Systems major includes fundamental training in computer networks,
enabling students to design and specify networking equipment and policies. This track would extend the knowledge and
skills of the student to enable the student to obtain industry-standard certifications in network-related areas of
expertise. The Cisco Certified Networking Professional (CCNP) and other security-related certifications would be
available to students through the completion of this track.
Academic Programs – Computer Studies Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Computer Information Systems
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Computer Information Systems is a four-year program of study designed
to provide students with a thorough understanding of the Bible and computer information systems expertise. The
program includes intensive study in three academic areas: Bible/theology, general education, and computer studies.
Interim Program Director: Mr. Arthur Manning
Program Mission
To equip students to effectively analyze the computer technology requirements of a business or ministry, determine the
computer systems and networks necessary to satisfy those requirements, and effectively manage the resulting
information technology environment.
Program Outcomes
In addition to meeting the Bible/Theology outcomes, the student will be able to:
1. Analyze technology needs. Identify and analyze the information technology needs of a business or ministry
and, using critical thinking skills, translate that analysis into a set of specifications that include items like
capacities, access controls, user interfaces, data flows and repositories required to satisfy the needs identified.
2. Design a specified IT environment. The environment will be based on specifications generated through the
analysis of a business or ministry, and will consist of computer hardware, software, databases and networks.
3. Communicate professionally. This would include commenting of programming code, presenting technical
information clearly in an aural format, and documenting an information technology environment including
software integration, database structures, computer and network security elements, configuration, directory
services and other essential components of the environment.
4. Implement a technology solution. Assemble, configure, and troubleshoot a typical secure business computing
environment based on specific documentation of system requirements, including networking, hardware and
software integration, database design, and overall systems administration.
Track-Specific Outcomes
1. Systems Analyst Track: The student will demonstrate advanced understanding of systems integration,
particularly as it pertains to the Microsoft suite of operating systems.
2. MCSE Track: The student will obtain industry-standard Microsoft certifications based on computer core and
track-specific coursework.
3. L.A.M.P. Track: The student will demonstrate the ability to effectively integrate open-source operating systems
and software to provide functionality appropriate for business or ministry uses.
4. Ministry Track: The student will demonstrate that he/she can effectively apply information processing
technology to areas of church automation, Christian ministry, and biblical studies.
5. Programming Track: The student will demonstrate proficiency in developing software programs in multiple
modern programming languages using appropriate tools and software development methodologies.
6. Computer Security Track: The student will demonstrate the ability to detect and mitigate security
vulnerabilities in computers and networks.
7. Advanced Networking Track: The student will obtain industry standard networking certification(s) to
demonstrate proficiency in network design, implementation, and security.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Complete the freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
2. Successful completion of courses CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy and PH 108 Logical Analysis.
3. Prior to the sophomore year, a student must declare a major in Computer Information Systems.
4. At the beginning of the sophomore year, students must apply for entrance into the program. The application
procedure includes completion of a formal application. After the application has been received, the Computer
Studies faculty will review it. Their decision will be delivered to the student by means of a formal letter.
5. Payment of all applicable additional fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in their
annual statement of fees.
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Computer Information Systems Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 129 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 65 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet the course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (39 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
Academic Programs – Computer Studies Department
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Computer-Assisted Bible Study/Computers in Ministry (BT/CS 225)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible and Theology Electives**
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Inter-Area Studies (5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Computer Studies (45 credits)
Core Courses:
Modern Programming Techniques using Visual Basic (CS 151)
Modern Office Automation Applications (CS 205)
Introduction to UNIX (CS 232)
Database Management and Design (CS 312)
Microcomputer Hardware (CS 317)
Computer Networking (CS 322)
Systems Analysis & Design (CS 412)
Systems Administration (CS 422)
Computer Security (CS 432)
MCSE Certification Track Courses:
MCSE-1: Managing a Windows Server 2003 Environment (CS 351)
MCSE-2: Implementing a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure (CS 352)
MCSE-3: Planning a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure (CS 353)
MCSE-4: Planning a Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure (CS 454)
MCSE-5: Windows XP Pro (CS 455)
MCSE-6: Designing Security for a Server 2003 Environment (CS 456)
L.A.M.P. Track Courses:
Leveraging the World Wide Web (CS 325)
MySQL Administration (CS 345)
Advanced Linux (CS 410)
Scripting Languages (CS 430)
Programming in PHP (CS 420)
Advanced Web/e-Commerce Technology (CS 445)
Ministry Track Courses:
Computer Graphics (CS 315)
Leveraging the World Wide Web (CS 325)
Publications (CS 380)
Multimedia Systems (CS 435)
Ministry Project in CIS (CS 480)
Ministry Internship (CS 475)
Programming Track Courses:
Principles of Object-Oriented Programming (CS 212)
Leveraging the World Wide Web (CS 325)
C++ (CS 330)
Programming in PHP (CS 420)
Scripting Languages (CS 430)
Student-Selected Programming Language (CS 440)
Systems Analyst Track Courses:
Principles of Object-Oriented Programming (CS 212)
Leveraging the World Wide Web (CS 325)
Multimedia Systems (CS 435)
Microsoft Windows Architecture (CS 335)
Computer Elective
Computer Elective
Academic Programs – Computer Studies Department
Computer Security Track Courses:
Certified Ethical Hacking (CS 300)
Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (CS 302)
Certified Security Analyst (CS 304)
Network Security Administrator (CS 400)
Penetration Testing Techniques (CS 402)
System Security Certified Practitioner (CS 404)
Advanced Networking Track Courses:
Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CS 320)
CCNP 1: Implementing Cisco IP Routing (CS 324)
CCNP 2: Implementing Cisco IP Switched Networks (CS 326)
CCNP 3: Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (CS 414)
Computer Networking Internship (CS 416)
Network Security Administrator (CS 400)
Computer Electives Include:
Computer Graphics (CS 315)
Advanced Networking (CS 425)
Specialty Studies in Computer Technology (CS 450)
Java/JavaScript Programming (CS 460)
Introduction to Robotics (CS 340)
Introduction to Computer-Aided Design/CAD (CS 355)
Humanities (15 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Logical Analysis (PH 108)
Social Sciences (12 credits)
Western Civilization 1 (HIS 131), Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132) or American History (HIS 234)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Social Science Electives
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
College Math (MAT 140)
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
Math or Science Elective
*meets Bible-Related requirement
**at least one book study required
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Computer Studies Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Computer Information Systems 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Bible/Theology Elective*
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Visual Basic (CS 151)
Microcomputer Hardware (CS 317) or
Computer Networking (CS 322)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
College Math (MAT 140)
Track-Specific Course
CABS/CIM (BT/CS 225) or
Track-Specific Course
Computer Networking (CS 322) or
Microcomputer Hardware (CS 317)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Social Science Elective
Track-Specific Course or
CABS/CIM (BT/CS 225)
Systems Administration (CS 422)
Track-Specific Course
Servant Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
*at least one book study required
Second Semester
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First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Intro to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Logical Analysis (PH 108)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Western Civilization or American History
Modern Office Automation Apps (CS 205)
Introduction to UNIX (CS 232) or
Database Management & Design (CS 312)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Math or Science Elective
Database Management & Design (CS 312) or
Introduction to UNIX (CS 232)
Track-Specific Course
Track-Specific Course or
Computer Security (CS 432)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Social Science Elective
Systems Analysis/Design (CS 412)
Computer Security (CS 432) or
Track-Specific Course
Track-Specific Course
Servant Leader Training (IAS 403)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 405)
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Total Credits Needed:
129
Academic Programs – Computer Studies Department
Minor in Computer Applications in Ministry
The minor in Computer Applications in Ministry is a program of study designed to prepare graduates to effectively use
computer technologies within a local church or other ministry setting. Coursework for the minor can be used to fulfill
elective requirements in a major area of study.
Interim Program Director: Mr. Arthur Manning
Program Mission
To equip students to effectively use computer technology in their own Bible study, their local church, or other Christian
ministries.
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. Effectively apply information processing technology to areas of church automation, Christian ministry, and biblical
studies
2. Take full advantage of the Internet through effective research techniques, communications applications, and the
design and implementation of web-based solutions for ministry operations and publicity.
3. Create effective computer-based graphics for publication and presentation
4. Create, edit and integrate multimedia components (text, graphics, animation, sound, and video) to support cohesive
and effective communications.
Computer Applications in Ministry Minor Requirements
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101) or demonstrated competency
Computer-Assisted Bible Study/Computers in Ministry (CS 225)
Computer Graphics (CS 315)
Leveraging the World Wide Web (CS 325)
Publications (CS 380)
Multimedia Systems (CS 435)
18 credit hours
Academic Programs – Computer Studies Department
The Continuing Education Certificate in Computer Applications in Ministry
The Continuing Education Certificate in Computer Applications in Ministry designed to provide the college graduate or
career-interruption student the opportunity for intensive study of Bible/theology and to equip them to effectively use
technology in support of a variety of ministries as well as in their own personal Bible study.
Interim Program Director: Mr. Arthur Manning
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. develop knowledge of the content of the Bible.
2. develop an understanding of Christian theology.
3. evidence qualities of spiritual growth.
4. demonstrate the skills required to use the computer effectively in personal Bible study and to support the effective
use of computer technology in a church or ministry setting.
Certificate Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 30 credit hours.
2. Maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and receive a passing grade in all required courses.
3. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
4. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Continuing Education Certificate in Computer Applications in Ministry Requirements
Bible/Theology (15 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Computer-Assisted Bible Study/Computers in Ministry (BT/CS 225)
Computer Studies (15/18 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101) or demonstrated competency
Computer Graphics (CS 315)
Leveraging the World Wide Web (CS 325)
Publications (CS 380)
Multimedia Systems (CS 435)
Computer Elective
30/33 credit hours
Award: Continuing Education Certificate in Computer Applications in Ministry
Academic Programs – Counseling Department
Counseling Department
Mr. Ben Mathew, chair, Mr. Seth Scott
Department Mission
To equip students with the ability to integrate, under a biblical authority, theories, practices, and methodologies of
counseling psychology for effective counseling ministry to those in need.
Programs of Study
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Counseling Psychology
Minor in Biblical Counseling
Academic Programs – Counseling Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Counseling Psychology
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/theology and Counseling Psychology is a four-year program designed to provide
students with a thorough understanding of the Bible, and counseling theory and practice to equip them for effective
counseling ministry and/or vocation. The program includes intensive study in three academic areas: Bible/theology,
general education, and counseling psychological studies.
Program Director: Mr. Ben Mathew
Program Outcomes
In addition to meeting the Bible/Theology major outcomes, the student will:
1. Distinctively Christian Integration
Develop the skills necessary to integrate a comprehensive knowledge of the Bible and major theological concepts
with skills in psychological theory, methodology and technique.
2. Knowledge of Theories
Be conversant with the major secular and Christian psychological theories and practices and be able to evaluate
them from a sound Biblical and theological point of view.
3. Knowledge of Problems and Delivery of Care
Be able to identify the issues and problems that people, groups, and communities face in life, for the purpose of
treating and bringing help to those problems.
4. Development of Counseling Skills
Develop competent counseling skills within a thoroughly-Biblical framework, including interviewing skills and
communication skills in one-on-one and small group situations.
5. Appreciation of Diversity in Counseling
Demonstrate awareness of multicultural, gender, and racial concerns in counseling relationships and how diverse
populations respond differently to counseling.
6. Knowledge of Abnormal Psychology
Demonstrate a basic understanding of psychopathology and the various treatments available.
7. Professional Development
Understand the legal, ethical, ministerial, and professional issues in contemporary counseling ministry and/or
practice.
8. Personal Growth
Reflect on his or her own mental, spiritual, emotional, and relational growth to help strengthen his or her Christian
character and develop a deep level of dedication to people, and to a ministry of helping them with their lives in a
way that is honoring to God.
9. Ministry and Vocational Opportunities
Be prepared for ministry or career roles within a variety of church, para-church, private, and governmental social
services that require effective personal, emotional, and relational abilities.
10. Preparation for Graduate Studies
Complete core courses in Counseling Psychology to pursue graduate work in mental health services or a related
academic/professional field leading toward certification or licensure.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Complete the freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
2. Prior to the sophomore year, make a declaration of intent to pursue the program in Bible/Theology and Counseling
Psychology.
3. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Counseling Psychology program. After the
application has been received, the Counseling faculty will review it. Their decision will be delivered to the student
by means of a formal letter.
4. Pay all applicable fees for this program as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement
of fees.
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Counseling Psychology Requirements:
1.
Complete a minimum of 128 semester credit hours.
2.
A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3.
At least 64 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4.
Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5.
Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (42 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Academic Programs – Counseling Department
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Applied Theology (BT 462)
Bible/Theology Electives
Counseling Psychology (44 credits)
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
Marital and Family Therapy (COU 221)
Methods and Techniques of Counseling (COU 311)
Group Dynamics of Counseling (COU 321)
Multicultural Counseling Techniques (COU 322)
Crisis Intervention Counseling (COU 411)
Ethics and Issues of Counseling (COU 412)
Applied Integration (COU 421)
Addictive Behaviors (COU 422)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Psychological Theories and Application 1 (PSY 212)
Psychological Theories and Application 2 (PSY 221)
Abnormal Psychology (PSY 311)
Counseling Psychology Elective
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Inter-Area Studies (5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-104/5)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Humanities (15 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Humanities Elective
Social Sciences (12 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Western Civilization (HIS 131/132) or American History (HIS 234)
Marriage and Family Life (SOC 109)
Social Science Elective
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
College Mathematics (MAT 140)
Introduction to Statistics (MAT 160)
*meets Bible-Related requirement
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Counseling Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Counseling Psychology 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Psychological Theories & Application 1 (PSY 212)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Second Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
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P/F(
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)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
3(
4(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Marriage and Family Life (SOC 109)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Marital & Family Therapy (COU 221)
Psychological Theories & Application 2 (PSY 221)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Applied Theology (BT 462)
Humanities Elective
Crisis Intervention Counseling (COU 411)
Ethics & Issues of Counseling (COU 412)
Introduction to Statistics (MAT 160)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Counseling Psychology Electives
Pastoral Epistles (BT 342)
Job/Ecclesiastes (BT 361)
Proverbs (BT 364)
Pauline Theology (BT 359)
Organizational Behavior and Development (BUS 401)
Biblical Discipleship (EM/BT 115)
Women’s Ministry (EM 225)
Child Development (PSY 254)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Cultural Anthropology (SOC/ICS 314)
Cross-Cultural Communication (SOC/ICS 330)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Introduction to Speech (COM 112)
Methods & Techniques of Counseling (COU 311)
Abnormal Psychology (PSY 311)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
2(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
14.5
Third Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Western Civilization or American History
College Mathematics (MAT 140)
Group Dynamics of Counseling (COU 321)
Multicultural Counseling Techniques (COU 322)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Bible/Theology Elective
Social Science Elective
Applied Integration (COU 421)
Addictive Behaviors (COU 422)
Counseling Psychology Elective
Servant Leader Training (IAS 403)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 405)
18.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
Total Credits
15.5
Total Credits Needed:
128
Academic Programs – Counseling Department
Minor in Biblical Counseling
The minor in Biblical Counseling is a program of study designed to provide the student with an introduction to the
fundamentals of counseling integrated with biblical and theological truth. Coursework for the Biblical Counseling minor
can be used to fulfill some elective requirements in a major area of study.
A minor in Biblical Counseling does not enable an individual to enter into professional counseling as a vocation, but it
does provide the basic tools for effective people-helping and gives foundational knowledge should a student desire to
pursue graduate study in counseling or psychology.
Program Director: Mr. Ben Mathew
Program Mission
To begin the process of equipping individuals with understandings and basic skills of counseling with the integration of
God’s holy Word and train them to serve as people-helpers within various ministry settings.
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. demonstrate the ability to integrate a general knowledge of the Bible and major theological concepts with
psychological theory.
2. be aware of and understand the issues and problems that people face in life from a thoroughly-biblical point of view.
3. be exposed to and evaluate secular and Christian psychological theories and practices from a sound biblical and
theological point of view.
4. develop fundamental counseling skills within a thoroughly-biblical framework, focused on ministry.
5. develop a deep level of dedication to people and to a ministry of helping them with their lives in a way that is
honoring to God.
Biblical Counseling Minor Requirements
The following courses must be taken in pre-requisite order:
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
Marital and Family Therapy (COU 221) or Addictive Behaviors (COU 422)
Methods and Techniques of Counseling (COU 311)
Group Dynamics (COU 321) or Multicultural Counseling Techniques (COU 322)
Crisis Intervention Counseling (COU 411)
Ethics and Issues of Counseling (COU 412)
20 credit hours
Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
Educational Ministries Department
Mr. Jeff Riley, chair, Mr. Jonathan J. Routley
Department Mission
It is our purpose that students are adequately prepared for productive, innovative, and Christ-centered ministry to
adolescents and their families in a variety of professional and ministry contexts.
Programs of Study
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Camp Ministries
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Youth Ministries
Minor in Youth Ministries
Continuing Education Certificate in Youth Ministries
Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Camp Ministries
Emmaus’s Camping Ministries program works in partnership with the Leadership, Training, and Development (LTD)
program at Camp Forest Springs (CFS) in Westboro, WI. In addition to studying at Emmaus, students will spend their
entire senior year immersed in a professional Christian Camping environment while earning academic credit to fulfill
their degree requirements. The Emmaus Camping Ministries program is designed to combine Emmaus’ excellent Bible
and Theological training with dynamic Christian Camping ministries in conjunction with CFS’s experiential and handson classroom instruction. Students get the benefit of direct on-site training by CFS vocational staff. Students will work
toward developing a personal philosophy and implementation of Christian camp ministry as they live out real-life
camping ministry.
Program Director: Mr. Jeff Riley
Camp Ministries Program Outcomes
In addition to meeting the Bible & Theology outcomes the student will acquire proficiency in the following Camp
Ministry areas:
1. Personal Christian Character
Demonstrate servant leadership by consistent modeling of Christ-like behavior through personal devotion, obedience
and life style.
2. Intentional Christian Education
Acquire the necessary skills to effectively integrate the Bible and Systematic Theology with ministry in Christian
Education and Christian Camping.
3. Philosophy of Christian Education
Design a Camping ministry plan based on a Christian worldview through the redemptive theme in the biblical and
historical development of the Church.
4. Christian Camping and the Church
Value the centrality of the Church in relation to the complimentary role of Christian Camping in global missions and
local church contexts.
5. Methodology of Camp Ministry
Demonstrate competence in the various teaching techniques and methodologies for intentional ministry to all camp
participants.
6. Foundations of Spiritual Leadership
a) Implement the Great Commission of evangelism and discipleship to promote Christian faith ownership and
leadership in camp participants.
b) Balance the demands of ministry with the responsibility of personal growth and family well-being.
7. Foundations of a Spiritual Environment
Provide a ministry environment that promotes the personal safety, dignity and enrichment of each individual through
Christ-like qualities.
8. Administrative Components of Christian Camping
a) Implement ministry Vision, Mission, goals and outcomes in support of the overall intentions of the
organization.
b) Recognize the ethical, ministerial, and professional tasks in management in the key areas of Christian Camping
(for example, facility maintenance, general organization, finances, food services and staffing).
9. Promotion and Public Relations
Demonstrate an understanding of non-profit ministry planning appropriate organizational marketing, promotion and
public relations.
10. Ministry and Vocational Opportunities
Be prepared for full-time Christian Camping leadership roles that require effective administrative, teaching, pastoral
and leadership qualities.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Complete the freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
2. Prior to the sophomore year, declare a major in Bible/Theology and Camp Ministries.
3. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Camp Ministries program. The application
procedure includes completion of a formal application and various references. After the application has been
received, the Educational Ministries faculty will review it. Their decision will be delivered to the student by means
of a formal letter.
4. Attend CFS LTD program orientation weekend during the fall semester of the sophomore or junior year.
5. Satisfactorily complete the Christian Camping summer Practicum before beginning the LTD program.
6. During the fall semester of the junior year, make application for acceptance into the Camp Forest Springs LTD
program.
7. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Camp Ministries Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 136 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 68 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (42 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Biblical Discipleship (BT 116)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Apologetics (BT 3510)
Applied Theology (BT 463)
Bible and Theology Elective (book study)
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Educational Ministries Core (14 credits)
Educational Ministries (EM 106)
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Educational Ministries Sophomore Field Studies (EM 240)
Small Group Communication (EM 320)
Educational Ministries Junior Field Studies (EM 340)
Administration and Leadership (EM 350)
Educational Program of the Church (EM 410)
Camp Ministries (36 credits)
Introduction to Camp Ministries (CMP 101)
Camp Management (CMP 300)
Camp Maintenance (CMP 310)
Promotion and Public Relations (CMP 320)
Food Service Management (CMP 330)
Camp Counseling (CMP 340)
Camp Organization (CMP 341)
Camp Administration (CMP 342)
Camp Programming (CMP 350)
Camp Teaching (CMP 360)
Camp Safety (CMP 370)
Camp Ministries Seminar (CMP 490)
Marriage and Family Life (SOC 109)
Inter-Area Studies (4 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-104/5)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Humanities (12 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Social Sciences (15 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Western Civilization 1 (HIS 131/132) or American History (HIS 234)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
College Math (MAT 140)
Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
Math or Science Elective
*meets Bible-Related requirement
LTD courses at Camp Forest Springs
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Camp Ministries 2013 – 2014
Fall Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Educational Ministries (EM 106)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Biblical Discipleship (BT 116)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Missions & Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Apologetics (BT 350)
Applied Theology (BT 463)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Administration and Leadership (EM 350)
Educational Program of the Church (EM 410)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Fourth Year at Camp Forest Springs
Camp Management (CMP 300)
Camp Maintenance (CMP 310)
Promotion and Public Relations (CMP 320)
Food Service Management (CMP 330)
Camp Counseling (CMP 340)
Camp Organization (CMP 341)
Camp Administration (CMP 342)
Camp Programming (CMP 350)
Camp Teaching (CMP 360)
Camp Safety (CMP 370)
Camp Ministries Seminar (CMP 490)
Total Credits
Spring Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
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)
)
)
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)
)
16.5
3(
3(
4(
3(
3(
3(
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)
)
)
)
)
19.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
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)
)
)
)
)
18.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
6(
3(
4(
1(
1(
P/F(
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Marriage & Family Life (EM/SOC 109)
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Introduction to Camp Ministries (CMP 101)
EM Freshman Field Studies (EM 140)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
College Math (MAT 140)
EM Sophomore Field Studies (EM 240)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Science or Math Elective
Western Civilization or American History
Small Group Communication (EM 320)
Bible Elective (book study)
EM Junior Field Studies (EM 340)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
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)
)
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)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
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)
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18.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
2(
3(
P/F(
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)
)
)
)
)
Total Credits
17.5
Total Credits Needed:
136
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
30
*Servant Leader Training in Educational Ministry
Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Youth Ministries
The Bachelor of Science in Bible and Theology and Youth Ministries is a four-year program designed to provide
students with a thorough understanding of the Bible and equip them for effective ministry to youth. The program
includes intensive study in three academic areas: Bible/theology, general education, and educational ministries,
specifically youth ministries.
Program Director: Mr. Jeff Riley
Program Mission
It is our purpose that students are adequately prepared for productive, innovative and Christ centered ministry to
adolescents and their families in a variety of professional and ministry contexts.
Program Outcomes
In addition to meeting the Bible/Theology outcomes the student will acquire proficiency in the following ministry areas:
1. Personal Christian Character
Demonstrate servant leadership by consistent modeling of Christ-like behavior through personal devotion,
obedience and life style.
2. Intentional Christian Integration
Effectively integrate the Bible and systematic theology with ministry to youth and their families.
3. Philosophy of Christian Education
Design a ministry plan based on a Christian worldview through the redemptive theme in the biblical and the
historical development of the Church
4. Components of Youth Ministry
Interact with the key pieces of the youth ministry environment in the areas of church, family and community for
spiritual growth in adolescents.
5. Methodology of Youth Ministry
Demonstrate skill in the various teaching techniques and methodologies of youth ministry.
6. Culture of Modern Youth
Explore the impact of technology, adolescent sociology and secular worldviews in relation to the spiritual
development of youth.
7. Pastoral Orientation to Youth Ministry
Promote faith ownership and leadership in adolescents through evangelism and discipleship through intentional
guidance and informed counseling.
8. Leadership and Administration
Synthesize a comprehensive plan for youth ministry through the major organizational management components.
9. Professional Development
Recognize the ethical, ministerial, and professional challenges of working with minors and the value of ongoing
training.
10. Ministry and Vocational Opportunities
Engage in full time ministry or volunteer leadership roles in a variety of youth ministry contexts with teaching,
pastoral and leadership qualities.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Complete the freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
2. Prior to the sophomore year, declare a major in Bible/Theology and Youth Ministries.
3. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Youth Ministries program. The application
procedure includes completion of a formal application and a reference form from a church leader at the student’s
home church. After the application has been received, the Educational Ministries faculty will review it. Their
decision will be delivered to the student by means of a formal letter.
4. During the fall semester of the junior year, make application for the Youth Ministries internship program.
5. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Youth Ministries Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 132.5 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 67 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (42 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Biblical Discipleship (BT 116)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Apologetics (BT 3510)
Applied Theology (BT 463)
Bible and Theology Elective (book study)
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Educational Ministries Core (13 credits)
Educational Ministries (EM 106)
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Educational Ministries Sophomore Field Studies (EM 240)
Small Group Communication (EM 320)
Educational Ministries Junior Field Studies (EM 340)
Administration and Leadership (EM 350)
Educational Program of the Church (EM 410)
Youth Ministries (33 credits)
Marriage and Family Life (EM 109)
Foundations of Youth Ministry (EM 206)
A/V and Technology (EM 230)
Youth Culture and Challenges (EM 310)
Principles and Methods of Youth Ministry (EM 315)
Ethics and Issues in Youth Ministry (EM 380)
Youth Ministries Internship (EM 497)
Educational Ministries Electives
Inter-Area Studies (4.5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-104/5)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Humanities (12 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Social Sciences (15 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Western Civilization (HIS 131/132) or American History (HIS 234)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
College Math (MAT 140)
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
Math or Science Elective
*meets Bible-Related requirement
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Youth Ministries 2013 – 2014
Fall Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Educational Ministries (EM 106)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Biblical Discipleship (BT 116)
Intro to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Foundations of Youth Ministry (EM 206)
AV and Technology (EM 230)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)*
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
College Math (MAT 140)
Principles & Methods of Youth Ministry (EM 115)
Apologetics (BT 350)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)*
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible Elective (book study)
Applied Theology (BT 463)
Administration and Leadership (EM 350)
Educational Program of the Church (EM 410)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 402)*
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
*Servant Leader Training in Youth Ministry
Spring Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
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16.5
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4(
3(
3(
3(
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17.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
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18.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
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P/F(
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)
15.5
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Marriage and Family Life (EM/SOC 109)
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
EM Freshman Field Studies (EM 140)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Western Civilization or American History
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
Youth Culture and Challenges (EM 310)
EM Sophomore Field Studies (EM 240)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)*
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Math or Science Elective
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Small Group Communication (EM 320)
Ethics/Issues in Youth Ministry (EM 380)
EM Junior Field Studies (EM 340)
Educational Ministries Elective
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)*
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Youth Ministries Internship (EM 497)
Educational Ministries Elective
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed
Educational Ministries Electives
BT 210 Biblical Church Leadership
EM 215 Children’s Ministries
EM 222 Homiletics
EM 225 Women’s Ministries
EM 390 Christian Camping Overview
EM 490 His Mansion Internship (6 cr.)
EM Camp Ministry Internship (6 cr.)
MUS 250 Foundations of Church Music
Coursework toward the Biblical Counseling Minor
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Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
Minor in Youth Ministries
The minor in Youth Ministries is a program of study designed to provide the student with knowledge of the basic
principles of youth ministry. Coursework for the minor can be used to fulfill elective requirements in a major area of
study.
Program Director: Mr. Jeff Riley
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. Develop an historical framework and Biblical philosophy for Christian education.
2. Acquire a fundamental knowledge and methodology of youth ministry.
3. Become acquainted with the uniqueness of adolescent development and how to reach them.
4. Develop basic pastoral administration and leadership skills.
Youth Ministries Minor Requirements
Educational Ministries (EM 106)
Foundations of Youth Ministry (EM 206)
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Youth Culture and Challenges (EM 310)
Principles and Methods of Youth Ministry (EM 315)
Administration and Leadership (EM 350)
Educational Ministries Elective
21 credit hours
Academic Programs – Educational Ministries Department
Continuing Education Certificate in Youth Ministries
The Continuing Education Certificate in Youth Ministries is a program of study designed to provide the college graduate
or career-interruption student the opportunity for intensive study in Bible/theology and youth ministries.
Program Director: Mr. Jeff Riley
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. develop knowledge of the content of the Bible.
2. develop an understanding of Christian theology.
3. lay a foundation for a worldview that is distinctly Christian.
4. evidence qualities of spiritual growth.
5. develop knowledge and skills in youth ministry.
Certificate Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 33 credit hours.
2. Maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and receive a passing grade in all required courses.
3. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
4. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Continuing Education Certificate in Youth Ministries Requirements
Bible/Theology (18 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Biblical Discipleship (BT 116)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview (PH 106)
Educational Ministries (12 credits)
Foundations of Youth Ministry (EM 206)
Principles/Methods of Youth Ministry (EM 315)
Educational Ministries Electives – 6 credits
Church Leadership and Practice (BT 450)
Marriage and Family Life (EM/SOC 109)
Women’s Ministries (EM 225)
Youth Culture and Challenges (EM 310)
Small Group Communication (EM 320)
Administration and Leadership (EM 350)
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
33 credit hours
Award: Continuing Education Certificate in Youth Ministries
Academic Programs – Intercultural Studies Department
Intercultural Studies Department
Mr. Joel Hernandez, chair, Dr. Franklin Jabini, Mrs. Micheline Witter
Department Mission
To equip students to become agents for cross-cultural worldview transformation.
Programs of Study
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Intercultural Studies
Minor in Church Planting and Revitalization
Minor in Intercultural Studies
Minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
Continuing Education Certificate in Missions
Academic Programs – Intercultural Studies Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Intercultural Studies
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Intercultural Studies is a four-year program designed to provide students
with a thorough understanding of the Bible and equip them for effective cross-cultural ministry. The program includes
intensive study in three academic areas: Bible/theology, general education, and intercultural studies.
Program Director: Mr. Joel Hernandez
Program Outcomes
In addition to meeting the Bible/Theology major outcomes, the student will be equipped in:
1. Cross-cultural Adjustment
Students will demonstrate the ability to adjust successfully to a foreign culture by: overcoming culture shock,
making measurable progress in language-learning, bonding with foreign nationals, and adjusting to life and ministry
abroad.
2. Cross-cultural Communication
Students will demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate the Gospel cross-culturally by: understanding
cultural and religious contexts, performing ethnographic cultural research, synthesizing ethnographic research into a
worldview, evangelize and disciple cross-culturally, and producing a contextualized Gospel message.
3. Cross-cultural Leadership
Students will demonstrate the ability to lead cross-culturally by: applying New Testament Church principles to
Christian communities, evaluating controversial missiological issues and formulating their personal stance,
demonstrating servant leadership and solving problems inherent in cross-cultural situations.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Complete the freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
2. Prior to the sophomore year, declare a major in Bible and Theology and Intercultural Studies.
3. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Intercultural Studies program. The application
procedure includes completion of a formal application. After the application has been received, the Intercultural
Studies faculty will review it. Their decision will be delivered to the student by means of a formal letter.
4. During the spring semester of the sophomore year, make application for the Intercultural Studies internship program.
5. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Intercultural Studies Degree Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 127.5 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 64 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (39 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Acts/Paul (BT 334)
Apologetics (BT 350)
Bible and Theology Electives
Educational Ministries (3 credits)
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Inter-Area Studies (4.5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Intercultural Studies (42 credits)
History of Missions (ICS 106)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Missions and Evangelism 2 (ICS 214)
Academic Programs – Intercultural Studies Department
Missionary Life & Work (ICS 212)
Church Planting and Growth (ICS 310)
Cross-Cultural Communication (ICS 330)
Issues in Missions (ICS 451)
Urban Ministries (ICS 461)
Cross-Cultural Internship (ICS 422)
Context Studies Elective
ICS Elective
Humanities (18 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Comparative Religions (REL 308)
Humanities Elective
Social Sciences (12 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 103)
Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132)
Cultural Anthropology (SOC 314)
Social Science Elective
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
College Mathematics (MAT 140)
Math or Science Elective
*meets Bible-Related requirement
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Intercultural Studies Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Intercultural Studies 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Missionary Life & Work (ICS 212)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Apologetics (BT/PH 350)
College Mathematics (MAT 140)
Comparative Religions (REL 308)
Cultural Anthropology (SOC 314)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Acts/Paul (BT 334)
Humanities Elective
Social Science Elective
Cross-Cultural Communication (ICS 330)
Urban Ministries (ICS 461)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Second Semester
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First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective
History of Missions (ICS 106)
Introduction to Philosophy/CWV (PH 106)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132)
Math or Science Elective
Missions and Evangelism 2 (ICS 214)
Church Planting and Growth (ICS 310)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Cross-Cultural Internship (ICS 422)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Issues in Missions (ICS 451)
Context Studies Elective (ICS 341-346)
ICS Elective
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed
ICS Elective Options: Intercultural Ministry Project, World Geography,
Western Civilization 1, Church History, Context Studies, Introduction to
Linguistics, Introduction to TESOL, TESOL Methods 1, TESOL Methods
2, Foundations of Church Music, World Music, Christian Evidences, Life
of Christ, Computer-Assisted Bible Study/Computers in Ministry,
Multimedia Systems, Leveraging the World Wide Web, Administration and
Leadership, Biblical Discipleship, Small Group Communication,
Multicultural Counseling Techniques, Marriage and Family Life,
Homiletics, Issues in Church Planting and Revitalization
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Academic Programs – Intercultural Studies Department
Minor in Church Planting and Revitalization
The minor in Church Planting and Revitalization is a program of study designed to develop servants equipped for
planting New Testament churches or revitalizing struggling ones. Coursework for the minor can be used to fulfill
elective requirements in a major area of study.
Program Director: Mr. Joel Hernandez
Program Outcomes
The student will
1. learn to apply church planting and church growth principles in diverse and cross-cultural situations for the purpose
of planting a new church or reviving a struggling one.
2. support an intended church plant with visible evidence of ministry, evangelism, and discipleship that would enhance
the proposed plant.
3. gain practical experience through various opportunities supporting a church planting project.
Church Planting and Revitalization Minor Requirements
1 Corinthians (BT 236)
Pastoral Epistles (BT 342)
Church Leadership and Practice (BT 450)
Missions and Evangelism 2 (ICS 214)
Church Planting and Growth (ICS 310)
Issues in Church Planting and Revitalization (ICS 410)
CPR Practicum (ICS 412)
21 credit hours
Academic Programs – Intercultural Studies Department
Minor in Intercultural Studies
The minor in Intercultural Studies is a program of study designed to provide the student with the underlying philosophy
of biblical missions, an in-depth study of a missionary’s life and work, and some initial training in cross-cultural
transitions. Coursework for the minor can be used to fulfill elective requirements in a major area of study.
Program Director: Mr. Joel Hernandez
Program Outcomes
The student will
1. Develop an understanding of cross-cultural adjustment
2. Develop an understanding of cross-cultural communication
Intercultural Studies Minor Requirements
Acts/Paul (BT 334)
History of Missions (ICS 106)
Missionary Life and Work (ICS 212)
Missions and Evangelism 2 (ICS 214)
Comparative Religions (REL 308)
Cultural Anthropology (SOC 314)
Choose one of the following courses:
Church Planting and Growth (ICS 310)
Cross-Cultural Communication (ICS 330)
Context Studies Elective (ICS 341-347)
21 credit hours
Academic Programs – Intercultural Studies Department
Minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
The minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a program of study designed to equip
students to teach English to non-native speakers at all levels of ability, either in the U.S. or abroad. Coursework for the
minor may be used to fulfill elective requirements in a major area of study. Upon completion of the minor, the student
will also receive the Certificate in TESOL.
Program Director: Mr. Joel Hernandez
Program Mission
To equip student to fulfill Christ’s Commission by means of teaching English cross-culturally, based upon the belief that
God gave language to build relationships both temporal and eternal.
Program Outcomes
The student will
1. learn the basics of linguistics as a foundation for teaching the English language.
2. gain exposure to a number of different approaches to TESOL.
3. become familiar with the variety of factors which affect both teachers and learners in the English-learning
experience.
4. develop an awareness of how English teaching and Christian ministry can interface without compromising either
one.
5. gain knowledge of and practice in teaching all facets of the English language.
6. be exposed to and use a wide range of TESOL resources and learn where to access additional resources.
7. develop an understanding of the basic elements of culture and how English teaching is affected by culture.
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Minor Requirements
Introduction to Linguistics (ESL 202)
Introduction to TESOL (ESL 210)
TESOL Methods – Part 1 (ESL 304)
TESOL Methods – Part 2 (ESL 422)
Cultural Anthropology (ICS 314)
Comparative Religions (ICS 308) or
Context Studies Elective (ICS 341-347)
18 credit hours
Pre-requisite
English Composition (ENG 101)
Academic Programs – Intercultural Studies Department
Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
The certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a program of study designed to equip
students to teach English to non-native speakers at all levels of ability, either in the U.S. or abroad. Coursework for the
certificate may be used to fulfill elective requirements in other certificate or degree programs. Students must complete
the Certificate in Biblical Studies in order to receive the Certificate in TESOL.
Program Director: Mr. Joel Hernandez
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. learn the basics of linguistics as a foundation for teaching the English language.
2. gain exposure to a number of different approaches to TESOL.
3. become familiar with the variety of factors which affect both teachers and learners in the English-learning
experience.
4. develop an awareness of how English teaching and Christian ministry can interface without compromising either
one.
5. gain knowledge of and practice in teaching all facets of the English language.
6. be exposed to and use a wide range of TESOL resources and learn where to access additional resources.
Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Requirements
Introduction to Linguistics (ESL 202)
Introduction to TESOL (ESL 210)
TESOL Methods – Part 1 (ESL 304)
TESOL Methods – Part 2 (ESL 422)
12 credit hours
Pre-requisite
English Composition (ENG 101)
Academic Programs – Intercultural Studies Department
The Continuing Education Certificate in Missions
The Continuing Education Certificate in Missions is a program of study designed to provide the college graduate or
career-interruption student the opportunity for intensive study in Bible and a basic skills and knowledge in cross-cultural
ministry.
Program Director: Mr. Joel Hernandez
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. develop knowledge of the content of the Bible.
2. develop an understanding of Christian theology.
3. evidence qualities of spiritual growth.
4. develop a foundational understanding of cross-cultural adjustment.
5. develop a foundational understanding of cross-cultural communication.
Certificate Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 30 credit hours.
2. Maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and receive a passing grade in all required courses.
3. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
4. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Continuing Education Certificate in Missions Requirements
Bible/Theology (15 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Acts/Paul (BT 334)
Intercultural Studies (15 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Missions and Evangelism 2 (ICS 214)
Comparative Religions (ICS/REL 308)
Cultural Anthropology (ICS/SOC 314)
ICS Elective: (3 credits total)
History of Missions (ICS 106)
Religions in America (ICS/REL 204)
Missionary Life and Work (ICS 212)
Judaism (ICS/REL 216)
Church Planting and Growth (ICS 310)
Cross-Cultural Communication (ICS/SOC 330)
Context Studies Elective (ICS/SOC 341-347)
Intercultural Ministry Project (ICS 406-408)
Urban Ministries (ICS 461)
30 credit hours
Award: Continuing Education Certificate in Missions
Academic Programs – Music Department
Music Department
Miss Elisa Cooper, chair, Mrs. Lisa Beatty, Mrs. Kristen Eby, Mrs. Tracey Rush
Department Mission
To produce musicians of excellence and integrity who glorify God by serving and enriching the Christian church and
society.
Programs of Study
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Music
Concentration in Music Ministry
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Music Education (K-12)
Minor in Music
Minor in Music Ministry
Academic Programs – Music Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Music with a Concentration in Music Ministry
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Music with a Concentration in Music Ministry is a four-year program
designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the Bible and equip them for effective music ministry.
The program includes intensive study in three academic areas: Bible/theology, general education, and music ministry.
NOTE: EMMAUS IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING NEW APPLICATIONS TO THIS PROGRAM AS OF
AUGUST 2013.
Program Director: Miss Elisa Cooper
Program Outcomes
In addition to meeting the Bible/Theology major outcomes, the student will:
1. Demonstrate the ability to hear, identify, and work conceptually with the elements of music—rhythm, melody,
harmony, and structure.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of style periods, genres, composers, and a wide selection of literature in the historical
development of Western European art music.
3. Attain the ability to perform with fluency on at least one major instrument.
4. Play the piano at a functional level.
5. Demonstrate understanding of the biblical foundations for and historical practices of the use of music in the church
and integrate this knowledge into a biblical philosophy of music.
6. Demonstrate effective skills in music ministry through a practicum experience.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Audition with the music faculty (by May 1 prior to fall registration; audition by April 1 to be eligible for a music
scholarship)
2. Music Faculty will review the application and audition, and their decision will be delivered to the student by means
of a formal letter.
3. Complete freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0
4. Successfully complete
a. Music Theory 1 (MUS 144) and Aural Skills 1 (MUS 115)
b. Two semesters of applied music with successful performance in recitals each semester.
5. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Music program. The application procedure
includes completion of a formal application and self-evaluation.
6. Meet with music department faculty to discuss the self-evaluation document and goals at this stage of musical
development.
7. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Successful completion of these steps will result in full acceptance to the music department.
Music Degree Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 132 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.0 in music coursework.
4. At least 66 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
5. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
6. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (39 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible/Theology Electives+
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Inter-Area Studies (5 credits)
Academic Programs – Music Department
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Music (36 credits)
Applied Music
Vocal/Instrumental Ensemble
Music Fundamentals** (MUS 010)
Music Theory 1 (MUS 114)
Aural Skills 1 (MUS 115)
Music Theory 2 (MUS 214)
Aural Skills 2 (MUS 215)
Music Theory 3 (MUS 314)
Aural Skills 3 (MUS 315)
Music Theory 4 (MUS 414)
Aural Skills 4 (MUS 415)
Music History 1 (MUS 273)
Music History 2 (MUS 373)
Conducting 1 (MUS 365)
Keyboard Skills** (MUS 328)
Class Voice** (MUS 124)
Concert Attendance (MUS 235/6-435/6)
Music Ministry (12 credits)
Foundations of Church Music (MUS 250)
Methods of Music Ministry (MUS 256)
Composing/Arranging (MUS 388)
Music Ministry Practicum (MUS 455)
Music Elective
Humanities (15 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Survey of Music History (MUS 173)
Social Sciences (12 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132)
Church History (HIS 376)
Social Science Electives
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
College Math (MAT 140)
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
Math or Science Elective
*meets Bible-Related requirement
**or demonstrated proficiency
+at least one book study required
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Music Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Music with a Ministry Concentration 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Music Fundamentals* (MUS 050)
Private Lessons
Performing Group
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Bible/Theology Elective**
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Music Theory 2 (MUS 214)
Aural Skills 2 (MUS 215)
Concert Attendance (MUS 235)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Class Voice* (MUS 124)
Private Lessons
Performing Group
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Foundations of Church Music (MUS 250)
College Math (MAT 140)
Concert Attendance (MUS 335)
Music Theory 4 (MUS 414)
Aural Skills 4 (MUS 415)
Private Lessons
Performing Group
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Bible/Theology Elective**
Social Science Elective
Music History 1 (MUS 273)
Keyboard Skills* (MUS 328)
Conducting 1 (MUS 365)
Concert Attendance (MUS 435)
Private Lessons
Performing Group
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Second Semester
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First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective**
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Music Theory 1 (MUS 114)
Aural Skills 1 (MUS 115)
Private Lessons
Performing Group
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Music Theory 3 (MUS 314)
Aural Skills 3 (MUS 315)
Concert Attendance (MUS 236)
Methods of Music Ministry (MUS 256)
Private Lessons
Performing Group
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Math or Science Elective
Survey of Music History (MUS 173)
Concert Attendance (MUS 336)
Composing/Arranging (MUS 388)
Private Lessons
Performing Group
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Church History (BT/HIS 376)
Music History 2 (MUS 373)
Concert Attendance (MUS 436)
Music Practicum (MUS 455)
Music Elective
Private Lessons
Performing Group
Servant Leader Training (IAS 403)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 405)
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16.5
Total Credits
*or demonstrated proficiency
**at least one book study required
Music Electives: Teaching Secondary Music, Survey of Choral Literature,
Teaching Elementary Music, Vocal Techniques, Diction and Song Literature
Total Credits Needed:
15.5
132/137
Academic Programs – Music Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Music Education (K-12)
The Music Education program is a five-year program of study leading to a double major in Bible/Theology and Music
Education (K-12) with an emphasis in General/Vocal Music. The program includes study in four academic areas:
Bible/Theology, general education, music, and professional studies. It is recommended that teacher candidates
apprise themselves of program admission, continuation, and completion policies, procedures, and deadlines to
assist them in completing all program requirements in a timely manner.
NOTE: EMMAUS IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING NEW APPLICATIONS TO THIS PROGRAM AS OF
AUGUST 2013.
Program Directors: Mrs. Lisa Beatty, Mr. John Jimo
Program Outcomes
In addition to meeting the outcomes of the Bible/Theology major, the student will:
Music Outcomes
1. Demonstrate the ability to hear, identify, and work conceptually with the elements of music—rhythm, melody,
harmony, and structure.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of style periods, genres, composers, and a wide selection of literature in the historical
development of Western European art music.
3. Attain the ability to perform with fluency on at least one major instrument.
4. Play the piano at a functional level.
Emmaus Teacher Education Professional Standards and Learning Outcomes
The Emmaus Bible College teacher education program outcomes are based on the updated (April 2011) InTASC Core
Teaching Standards developed by the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers) Interstate Teacher Assessment
and Support Consortium (www.ccsso.org/intasc) and are aligned with the State of Iowa’s standards for initial teacher
licensure (www.state.ia.us/boee).
The teacher candidate will demonstrate the requisite professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions in each of the
following outcomes:
The Learner and Learning
Standard #1: Learner Development. The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of
learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical
areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
Standard #2: Learning Differences. The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and
communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
Standard #3: Learning Environments. The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and
collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
Content
Standard #4: Content Knowledge. The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the
discipline(s) he or she teachers and creates learning experiences that make the discipline accessible and meaningful for
learners to assure mastery of the content.
Standard #5: Application of Content. The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to
engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global
issues.
Instructional Practice
Standard # 6: Assessment. The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their
own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making.
Standard #7: Planning for Instruction. The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous
learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well
as knowledge of learners and the community context.
Standard #8: Instructional Strategies. The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage
Academic Programs – Music Department
learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in
meaningful ways.
Professional Responsibility
Standard #9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice. The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses
evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others
(learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.
Standard #10: Leadership and Collaboration. The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take
responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and
community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.
Professional Core for Teacher Education Programs of Study and Licensure
The following courses are bold on all teacher education program of study planners because they are required for every
teacher candidate enrolled in a program of study for Iowa licensure.
Foundations Coursework
Introduction to Education (ED 106 - 3 s.h.)
Field Studies (ED 194 - P/F)
Child Development (PSY 254 - 3 s.h.) or Developmental Psychology (PSY 211 - 3 s.h.)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231 - 3 s.h.)
Field Studies (ED 295 - P/F)
Educational Technology (CS 240 - 3 s.h.)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351 - 3 s.h.)
Methods Coursework
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311 - 3 s.h.)
Content Area Literacy (ED 420 - 2 s.h.) for all secondary education majors
Instructional Design (ED 330 - 1 s.h.)
Instructional Adaptations (ED 331 - 3 s.h.)
Practicum 1 (ED 395-1 s.h. or ED 396 - 1 s.h.)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-8 Social Studies & Content Area Literacy Strategies (ED 435 - 3 s.h.) for
elementary education and music education majors
Principles of Management and Assessment (ED 470 – 2 s.h.)
Practicum 2 (ED 495 – 1 s.h.)
Internship Coursework
Student Teaching (ED 490 to 497 – 6 to 12 s.h.)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499 – 1 s.h.)
Assessment of Teacher Candidates
Signature performance assessments embedded in professional core courses are used to measure and evaluate each
candidate’s professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions throughout their program of study. Performance data and
evaluation results are used to inform departmental decisions regarding a candidate’s status in the program and
determination for program completion and licensure recommendation. Iowa requires passing test scores on two Praxis II
exams before candidates are eligible for licensure. Graduates must pass a pedagogy exam and a content exam using
Iowa’s cut scores. Be sure to consult the teacher licensure requirements for other states if you plan to teach outside of
Iowa.
Each teacher candidate will be introduced to the concept and design of an eportfolio in CS 240 Educational Technology.
Throughout a candidate’s progression in the TEP, it is recommended that s/he house signature assignments, performance
evaluations, and personal reflections that evidence professional growth and development for the purpose of using selfselected artifacts to showcase professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions to prospective employers.
We recommend the following artifacts for your eportfolio:
An “About Me”page
ED 203 Autobiography
Why I Want To Teach Essay (Program Application Version)
Cumulative Field Studies Data Base
ED 330 Unit of Instruction
ED 395 Practicum 1 Video Clip & Reflection on Practice
Academic Programs – Music Department
ED 435, ED 410, or ED 440 Unit of Instruction
ED 495 Practicum 2 Reflection
ED 490-497 Student Teaching Formative and Summative Performance Evaluations
ED 499 10 Professional Artifacts & Rationale Statements
Program Admission Requirements
1. Audition with the music faculty (by May 1 prior to fall registration; audition by April 1 to be eligible for a music
scholarship).
2. Music faculty will review the application and audition, and their decision will be communicated to the student by
means of a formal letter.
3. Complete freshman year at Emmaus with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5.
4. Successfully complete
a. Music Theory 1 (MUS 114) and Aural Skills 1 (MUS 115)
b. Two semesters of applied music with successful performance in recitals each semester.
5. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Music program. The application procedure
includes completion of a formal application and self-evaluation.
6. Meet with the Music department faculty to discuss the self-evaluation document and goals at this stage of musical
development.
7. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Successful completion of these steps will result in full acceptance to the Music department. For admission requirements
related to Music Education, see the Teacher Education requirements.
Music Education Degree Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 163 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.5 minimum cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 82 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. All methods coursework and student teaching must be earned from Emmaus.
5. Achieve a 2.0 minimum grade point in each professional studies course in the music education program.
6. Achieve a 2.0 minimum grade point in each content area course in the music education program.
7. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
8. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (39 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible/Theology Electives+
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Inter-Area Studies (5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Music (43 credits)
Applied Music
Vocal/Instrumental Ensemble
Music Fundamentals** (MUS 010)
Music Theory 1 (MUS 114)
Aural Skills 1 (MUS 115)
Music Theory 2 (MUS 214)
Aural Skills 2 (MUS 215)
Music Theory 3 (MUS 314)
Aural Skills 3 (MUS 315)
Academic Programs – Music Department
Music Theory 4 (MUS 414)
Aural Skills 4 (MUS 415)
Music History 1 (MUS 273)
Music History 2 (MUS 373)
Conducting 1 (MUS 365)
Conducting 2 (MUS 465)
Vocal Techniques (MUS 350)
Diction and Song Literature (MUS 385)
Survey of Choral Literature (MUS 286)
Keyboard Skills** (MUS 328)
Concert Attendance (MUS 235/6-435/6)
Music Education (36 credits)
Introduction to Education (ED 106)
Field Studies (ED 194)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Field Studies (ED 295)
Teaching Elementary Music (ED 309)
Teaching Secondary Music (ED 310)
Practicum 1 (Music) (ED 396)
Instructional Design (ED 330)
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Content Area Literacy (ED 420)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in Social Studies (ED 435)
Principles of Management and Assessment (ED 470)
Practicum 2 (ED 495)
Student Teaching (ED 491/493)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499)
Humanities (15 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Survey of Music History (MUS 173)
Social Sciences (12 credits)
Educational Technology (CS 240)
Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
College Math (MAT 140)
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
Math or Science Elective
*meets Bible-Related requirement
**or demonstrated proficiency
+at least one book study required
Award: Bachelor of Science
In addition to fulfilling the requirements for the bachelor’s degree, teacher candidates must fulfill all program completion and
licensure requirements (see the TEP program policies on the pages following) to be recommended to the Iowa Board for
Educational Examiners (BOEE) for the desired teaching endorsement(s).
Academic Programs – Music Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and K-12 Music Education 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Music Fundamentals* (MUS 050)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Private Lessons+
Performing Group
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Intro to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Educational Technology (CS 240)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Music Theory 2 (MUS 214)
Aural Skills 2 (MUS 215)
Private Lessons+
Performing Group
Concert Attendance (MUS 235)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
College Math (MAT 140)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Music Theory 4 (MUS 414)
Aural Skills 4 (MUS 415)
Private Lessons+
Performing Group
Concert Attendance (MUS 335)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Bible/Theology Elective**
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Content Area Literacy (ED 420)
Diction and Song Literature (MUS 385)
Music History 1 (MUS 273)
Keyboard Skills* (MUS 328)
Conducting 1 (MUS 365)
Private Lessons+
Performing Group
Concert Attendance (MUS 435)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Fifth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
CIA in Social Studies (ED 435)
Principles of Management & Assessment (ED 470)
Practicum 2 (ED 495)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Survey of Choral Literature (MUS 286)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 504)
Total Credits
Second Semester
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First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Introduction to Philosophy/CWV (PH 106)
Bible/Theology Elective**
Music Theory 1 (MUS 114)
Aural Skills 1 (MUS 115)
Private Lessons+
Performing Group
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Bible/Theology Elective**
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Survey of Music History (MUS 173)
Introduction to Education (ED 106)
Field Studies (ED 194)
Music Theory 3 (MUS 314)
Aural Skills 3 (MUS 315)
Private Lessons+
Performing Group
Concert Attendance (MUS 236)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Science or Math Elective
Teaching Elementary Music (ED 309)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Field Studies (ED 295)
Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132)
Private Lessons+
Performing Group
Concert Attendance (MUS 336)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Teaching Secondary Music (ED 310)
Practicum 1 (Music) (ED 396)
Instructional Design (ED 330)
Music History 2 (MUS 373)
Conducting 2 (MUS 465)
Vocal Techniques (MUS 350)
Private Lessons+
Performing Group
Concert Attendance (MUS 436)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 403)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 405)
Total Credits
Fifth Year
Student Teaching (ED 491/493)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499)
Total Credits
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13
14
Total Credits Needed:
Professional Core
Professional Content Major
3(
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*or demonstrated proficiency
**at least one book study required
163
(9/4/13)
Academic Programs – Music Department
Minor in Music
The minor in Music is a program of study that provides foundational study in music theory, music history, and applied
studies. Coursework for the minor can be used to fulfill some elective requirements in a major area of study.
Program Director: Miss Elisa Cooper
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of music theory and music history.
2. Demonstrate understanding of the biblical foundations for and historical practices of the use of music in the church
and integrate this knowledge into a biblical philosophy of music.
3. Evidence continued growth in musical performance skills.
Music Minor Requirements
Music Fundamentals** (MUS 050)
Music Theory 1 (MUS 114)
Aural Skills 1 (MUS 115)
Music Theory 2 (MUS 214)
Aural Skills 2 (MUS 215)
Survey of Music History (MUS 173)
Foundations of Church Music (MUS 250)
Applied Private Voice or Piano – 4 semesters
Performing Group – 4 semesters
20-23 credit hours
**or demonstrated proficiency
Academic Programs – Music Department
Minor in Music Ministry
The minor in Music Ministry is a program of study designed to equip the student for effective music ministry.
Coursework for the minor can be used to fulfill some elective requirements in a major area of study.
Program Director: Miss Elisa Cooper
Program Outcomes
The student will:
1. Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of music theory and music history.
2. Demonstrate understanding of the biblical foundations for and historical practices of the use of music in the church
and integrate this knowledge into a biblical philosophy of music.
3. Evidence continued growth in musical performance skills.
Music Ministry Minor Requirements
Music Fundamentals** (MUS 050)
Music Theory 1 (MUS 114)
Aural Skills 1 (MUS 115)
Music Theory 2 (MUS 214)
Aural Skills 2 (MUS 215)
Survey of Music History (MUS 173)
Foundations of Church Music (MUS 250)
Methods of Music Ministry (MUS 256)
Applied Private Voice or Piano – 3 semesters (at least one semester of each)
Performing Group – 2 semesters
20-23 credit hours
**or demonstrated proficiency
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Teacher Education Department
Mr. John Jimo, chair, Mrs. Lisa Beatty, Miss Susan Henderson, Mrs. Jenna Mathew, Mrs. Sarah Poling, Mrs. Sheri
Popp, Mrs. Kathy Van Dine, Mrs. Sue Weigert
Mission
The mission of the Teacher Education Department of Emmaus Bible College is to produce teachers with a Christian
worldview, who are innovative and sound in their professional practice, and who practice service to others as a lifestyle.
Degree Programs of Study for Iowa Initial Licensure Recommendation
Bachelor in Bible/Theology and Elementary Education
Bachelor in Bible/Theology and Secondary Education
Degree Program of Study for ACSI Certification
Bachelor in Bible/Theology and Secondary Education in Teaching Bible
Teacher Education Program (TEP) Accreditation and Affiliation
Our TEP offers academic undergraduate professional programs of study in Elementary, Secondary, and K-12 Music
Education and is approved by the Iowa Department of Education (www.educateiowa.gov) and the Iowa Board of
Educational Examiners (www.boee.iowa.gov) to recommend teacher candidates for initial teacher licensure in five
content endorsements and to recommend both teacher candidates and in-service teachers for three add-on endorsements
to a teaching license.
The Teacher Education Department (TED) holds professional membership with the Iowa Association of Colleges for
Teacher Education (IACTE – www.iowacte.org) and with the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI –
www.acsiglobal.org).
Teacher Education Program Motto
Our program motto is based on a conceptual framework of cultivating professional educators who relate to others
through a Christian worldview: “Growing innovative and professional educators who consistently serve others in their
learning communities for the glory of God.”
Teacher Education Program Graduates
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Our TEP graduates pursue careers as K-12 classroom teachers in national and international public and private schools,
K-12 music specialists, K-8 reading specialists, K-6 special education teachers, 7-12 Bible teachers, lead teachers and
curriculum coordinators in Christian schools, home school educators and coordinators of home school cooperatives, and
outdoor educators and program directors at Christian youth camps.
Emmaus Teacher Education Professional Standards and Learning Outcomes
The Emmaus Bible College teacher education program outcomes are based on the updated (April 2011) InTASC Core
Teaching Standards developed by the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers) Interstate Teacher Assessment
and Support Consortium (www.ccsso.org/intasc) and are aligned with the State of Iowa’s standards for initial teacher
licensure (www.state.ia.us/boee).
In addition to meeting the outcomes of the Bible/Theology major, the teacher candidate will demonstrate the requisite
professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions in each of the following outcomes:
The Learner and Learning
Standard #1: Learner Development. The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of
learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical
areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
Standard #2: Learning Differences. The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and
communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
Standard #3: Learning Environments. The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and
collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
Content
Standard #4: Content Knowledge. The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the
discipline(s) he or she teachers and creates learning experiences that make the discipline accessible and meaningful for
learners to assure mastery of the content.
Standard #5: Application of Content. The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to
engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global
issues.
Instructional Practice
Standard # 6: Assessment. The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their
own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making.
Standard #7: Planning for Instruction. The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous
learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well
as knowledge of learners and the community context.
Standard #8: Instructional Strategies. The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage
learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in
meaningful ways.
Professional Responsibility
Standard #9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice. The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning and uses
evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others
(learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.
Standard #10: Leadership and Collaboration. The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take
responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and
community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.
Professional Core for Teacher Education Programs of Study and Licensure
The following courses are bold on all teacher education program of study planners because they are required for every
teacher candidate enrolled in a program of study for Iowa licensure.
Foundations Coursework
Introduction to Education (ED 106 - 3 s.h.)
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Field Studies (ED 194 - P/F)
Child Development (PSY 254 - 3 s.h.) or Developmental Psychology (PSY 211 - 3 s.h.)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231 - 3 s.h.)
Field Studies (ED 295 - P/F)
Educational Technology (CS 240 - 3 s.h.)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351 - 3 s.h.)
Methods Coursework
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311 - 3 s.h.)
Content Area Literacy (ED 420 - 2 s.h.) for all secondary education majors
Instructional Design (ED 330 - 1 s.h.)
Instructional Adaptations (ED 331 - 3 s.h.)
Practicum 1 (ED 395-1 s.h. or ED 396 - 1 s.h.)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-8 Social Studies & Content Area Literacy Strategies (ED 435 - 3 s.h.) for
elementary education and music education majors
Principles of Management and Assessment (ED 470 – 2 s.h.)
Practicum 2 (ED 495 – 1 s.h.)
Internship Coursework
Student Teaching (ED 490 to 497 – 6 to 12 s.h.)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499 – 1 s.h.)
Assessment of Teacher Candidates
Signature performance assessments embedded in professional core courses are used to measure and evaluate each
candidate’s professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions throughout their program of study. Performance data and
evaluation results are used to inform departmental decisions regarding a candidate’s status in the program and
determination for program completion and licensure recommendation. Iowa requires passing test scores on two Praxis II
exams before candidates are eligible for licensure. Graduates must pass a pedagogy exam and a content exam using
Iowa’s cut scores. Be sure to consult the teacher licensure requirements for other states if you plan to teach outside of
Iowa.
Each teacher candidate will be introduced to the concept and design of an eportfolio in CS 240 Educational Technology.
Throughout a candidate’s progression in the TEP, it is recommended that s/he house signature assignments, performance
evaluations, and personal reflections that evidence professional growth and development for the purpose of using selfselected artifacts to showcase professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions to prospective employers.
We recommend the following artifacts for your eportfolio:
An “About Me”page
ED 203 Autobiography
Why I Want To Teach Essay (Program Application Version)
Cumulative Field Studies Data Base
ED 330 Unit of Instruction
ED 395 Practicum 1 Video Clip & Reflection on Practice
ED 435, ED 410, or ED 440 Unit of Instruction
ED 495 Practicum 2 Reflection
ED 490-497 Student Teaching Formative and Summative Performance Evaluations
ED 499 10 Professional Artifacts & Rationale Statements
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Programs of Study in Teacher Education
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Elementary Education
This four-year program of study leads to a double major in Bible/Theology and Elementary Education and has three
major areas of educational requirements: Bible/Theology, general education, and professional studies. Upon successful
completion of this degree program, the student is awarded a Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Elementary
Education. In addition to fulfilling the requirements for the bachelor’s degree, teacher candidates seeking
recommendation for an initial teaching license from the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners must complete all
program completion and state licensure requirements. Teacher candidates seeking initial certification from ACSI must
complete all requirements for the different levels of certification. It is recommended that teacher candidates apprise
themselves of program admission, continuation, and completion policies, procedures, and deadlines to assist them
in completing all program requirements in a timely manner.
Bible/Theology and Elementary Education Degree Requirements:
1. Complete a minimum of 139.5 total credit hours.
2. A minimum of 75 credit hours must be earned from Emmaus.
3. All methods coursework and student teaching must be earned from Emmaus.
4. Achieve a 2.0 minimum grade point in each professional studies course in the elementary education program.
5. Achieve a 2.5 minimum cumulative grade point average.
6. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
7. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (39 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life and Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible/Theology Electives+
Bible/Theology/Bible-Related Elective*
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Inter-Area Studies (4.5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3 – 402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5 – 404/5)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Humanities (12 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Social Sciences (15 credits)
Educational Technology (CS 240)
World Geography (GEO 117)
American History (HIS 234)
Child Development (PSY 254)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Natural Sciences (13 credits)
Number Operations and Algebra in Elementary School (MAT 270)
Spatial Math and Data Representation in Elementary School (MAT 370)
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
Science Elective
Professional Studies in Elementary Education (50 credits)
Introduction to Education (ED 106)
Field Studies (ED 194)
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Children’s Literature (ED 203)
Field Studies (ED 294)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Field Studies (ED 295)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-6 Reading (ED 301)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-8 Language Arts (ED 305)
Field Studies (ED 394)
Teaching Visual and Performing Arts (ED 307)
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Instructional Design (ED 330)
Instructional Adaptations (ED 331)
Teaching Physical Education (ED 381)
Practicum 1 (ED 395)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-6 Mathematics (ED 375)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-6 Science (ED 428)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-8 Social Studies & Content Area Literacy Strategies
(ED 435)
Principles of Management and Assessment (ED 470)
Practicum 2 (ED 495)
Student Teaching (ED 490-497)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499)
In addition to fulfilling the requirements for the bachelor’s degree, teacher candidates must complete all program
completion and state licensure requirements in order to be recommended to the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners
for a teaching endorsement. (see pages following).
*meets Bible-Related requirement
+at least one book study is required
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Elementary Education (K-6 Classroom Teacher Endorsement) 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Missions & Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Second Semester
3( )
3( )
3( )
3( )
3( )
1( )
.5( )
P/F(
)
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective* (BT _____)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Intro to Philosophy/CWV (PH 106)
Introduction to Education (ED 106)
Field Studies (ED 194)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
16.5
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Child Development (PSY 254)
3( )
3( )
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
3( )
Introduction to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241 & 242)
Educational Technology (CS 240)
Children’s Literature (ED 203)
4( )
3( )
3( )
P/F(
)
.5( )
P/F(
)
Field Studies (ED 294)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Spatial Math & Data Represent in Elem Schls
(MAT 370)
Bible/Theology* (BT ______) or Bible-Related Elective
World Geography (GEO 117)
CIA in K-6 Reading (ED 301)
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Field Studies (ED 394)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Second Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
American History (HIS 234)
Number Operations & Algebra in Elem School
(MAT 270)
Science Elective (SCI _____)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Field Studies (ED 295)
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Teaching Physical Education (ED 381)
CIA in K-6 Science (ED 428)
CIA in K-8 Social Studies & Content Area
Literacy Strategies (ED 435)
Princ. of Management & Assessment (ED 470)
Practicum 2 (ED 495) 70 Hours
CIA in K-6 Mathematics (ED 375)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
.5( )
P/F( )
18.5
3( )
3( )
3( )
3( )
3( )
P/F( )
3( )
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 203)
.5( )
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
P/F( )
19.5
Total Credits
18.5
3( )
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
3( )
3( )
Bible/Theology Elective*
3( )
3( )
3( )
3( )
3( )
P/F(
)
.5( )
P/F(
)
Instructional Design (ED 330)
Practicum 1 (ED 395) 55 hours
Teaching Visual and Performing Arts (ED 307)
Reading & Literacy Strategies (ED 355)
1(
1(
2(
3(
Diagnostic Teaching of Reading (ED 485)
3( )
Instructional Adaptations (ED 331)
3( )
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 303)
)
)
)
)
.5( )
P/F( )
18.5
Total Credits
3( )
1( )
2( )
Fourth Year
Reading Practicum (ED 482)
Student Teaching (ED 497)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499)
3( )
12( )
1( )
16.5/19.5
Total Credits
13/16
3( )
2( )
1( )
3( )
3( )
P/F(
)
.5( )
P/F(
)
18.5
Total Credts Needed:
Professional ElementaryEducation Core
Professional Content Major
Optional Reading Endorsement Coursework
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
CIA in K-8 Language Arts (ED 305)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
*at least one book study required
139.5/145.5
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology and Secondary Education
This four-year program of study leads to a double major in Bible/Theology and Secondary Education and has four
major areas of educational requirements: Bible/Theology, general education, content area and professional studies.
Upon successful completion of this degree program, the student is awarded a Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology
and Secondary Education. In addition to fulfilling the requirements for the bachelor’s degree, teacher candidates
seeking recommendation for an initial teaching license from the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners must
complete all program completion and state licensure requirements. Teacher candidates seeking initial certification
from ACSI must complete all requirements for the different levels of certification. It is recommended that teacher
candidates apprise themselves of program admission, continuation, and completion policies, procedures, and
deadlines to assist them in completing all program requirements in a timely manner.
Bible/Theology and Secondary Education Degree Requirements:
1. Complete a minimum of 139.5/148.5 total credit hours.
2. A minimum of 70 credit hours must be earned from Emmaus.
3. All methods coursework and student teaching must be earned from Emmaus.
4. Achieve a 2.0 minimum grade point in each professional core course in the secondary education program.
5. Achieve a 2.0 minimum grade point in each content major course in the secondary education program.
6. Achieve a 2.5 minimum cumulative grade point average.
7. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
8. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (39 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life and Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible/Theology Electives+
Bible/Theology/Bible-Related Elective*
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Inter-Area Studies (4.5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3 – 402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5 – 404/5)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Humanities (12 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Social Sciences (15 credits)
Educational Technology (CS 240)
Economics Elective
American History (HIS 234) or World History Elective
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Natural Sciences (10 credits)
College Mathematics (MAT 140)
Introduction to Human Biology (SCI 241)
Introduction to Human Biology Lab (SCI 242)
Math or Science Elective
Professional Studies in Secondary Education (34/35 credits)
Introduction to Education (ED 106) or Philosophy of Christian Education (EM 210)
Field Studies (ED 194)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Field Studies (ED 295)
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Field Studies (ED 394) **
Instructional Design (ED 330)
Instructional Adaptations (ED 331)
Practicum 1 (ED 395/396)
Teaching Business (ED 410) or Teaching Social Sciences in Secondary Schools (ED 440) or
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Content Area Literacy (ED 420)
Principles of Management and Assessment (ED 470)
Practicum 2 (ED 495)
Student Teaching (ED 490-497)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499)
Additional Content Required for Business Endorsement (30 Credits)
Financial Accounting (ACC 110)
Managerial Accounting (ACC 210)
Global Business (BUS 102)
Introduction to Management Information Systems (BUS 140)
Business Communication (BUS 230)
Principles of Marketing (BUS 320)
Principles of Management and Leadership (BUS 330)
Business Law (BUS 420)
International Marketing (BUS 470)
Principles of Microeconomics (ECN 205)
Additional Content Required for Psychology Endorsement (21 Credits)
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Psychological Theories and Application 1 (PSY 212)
Psychological Theories and Application 2 (PSY 221)
Abnormal Psychology (PSY 311)
Marriage and Family Life (SOC 109)
Cross-Cultural Communication (SOC 330)
Additional Content Required for World History Endorsement (21 Credits)
World Geography (GEO 117)
Western Civilization 1 (HIS 131)
Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132)
Latin American History (HIS 340)
Modern World History (HIS 350)
History of the Ancient Near East (HIS 410)
Anthropology Elective
Additional Content Required for Bible/ACSI Certification (18 Credits)
Biblical Discipleship (BT 116)
Christian Evidences (BT 166) or Apologetics (BT/PH 350)
Life of Christ (BT 247)
Romans (BT 335)
Applied Theology (BT 462)
Youth Culture and Challenges (EM 310)
*meets Bible-Related requirement
**not required for Bible/ACSI Certification
+at least one book study is required
Award: Bachelor of Science
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Secondary Education (Business 5-12 Teacher Endorsement) 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Missions & Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
First Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Intro to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Educational Technology (CS 240)
Financial Accounting (ACC 110)
3(
3(
4(
3(
3(
3(
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
.5( )
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Content Area Literacy (ED 420)
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Field Studies (ED 394)
Principles of Macroeconomics (ECN 105)
Principles of Management and Leadership (BUS 330)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Principles of Management/Assessment (ED 470)
Teaching Business in Secondary Schools (ED 410)
Practicum 2 (ED 495) 70 hours
International Marketing (BUS 470)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
)
)
)
)
)
)
P/F( )
19.5
3(
3(
2(
3(
P/F(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
3(
3(
3(
2(
3(
1(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
18.5
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Global Business (BUS 102)
Introduction to Education (ED 106)
Field Studies (ED 194)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
Total Credits
18.5
Summer Term
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Total Credits
3( )
3
Second Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
College Math (MAT 140)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Field Studies (ED 295)
Business Communication (BUS 230)
Managerial Accounting (ACC 210)
Introduction to Management Information Systems
(BUS 140)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
3(
3(
)
)
)
)
)
)
3( )
.5( )
P/F( )
Total Credits
18.5
Summer Term
World or American History Elective
Math or Science Elective
Total Credits
3( )
3( )
6
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Instructional Design (ED 330)
Instructional Adaptations (ED 331)
Practicum 1 (ED 395) 70 hours
Principles of Microeconomics (ECN 205)
Principles of Marketing (BUS 320)
Business Law (BUS 420)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Student Teaching (ED 497)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499)
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed:
Bold - Professional Secondary Education Core
Bold - Content Major
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
*at least one book study required
3(
1(
3(
1(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
12( )
1( )
13
148.5
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with majors in
Bible/Theology and Secondary Education (Psychology 5-12 Endorsement) 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Missions & Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Intro to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Educational Technology (CS 240)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Field Studies
Psychological Theories & Application 1 (PSY 212)
Content Area Literacy (ED 420)
Economics Elective (ECN 105 or ECN 205)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Principles of Management/Assessment (ED 470)
Cross-Cultural Communication (SOC 330)
Teaching Social Sciences in Secondary Schools (ED 440)
Practicum 2 (ED 495) 70 hours
Abnormal Psychology (PSY 311)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Second Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
3(
4(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
19.5
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
3(
2(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
3(
3(
2(
3(
3(
1(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
18.5
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Intro to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Education (ED 106)
Field Studies (ED 194)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Marriage & Family Life (SOC 109)
College Math (MAT 140)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Field Studies (ED 295)
Counseling Foundations (COU 121)
American History (HIS 234)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Instructional Design (ED 330)
Instructional Adaptations (ED 331)
Practicum 1 (ED 395) 70 hours
Psychological Theories & Application 2 (PSY 221)
Intro to Statistics (MAT 160)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Student Teaching (ED 479)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499)
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed:
Professional Secondary Education Core
Content Major
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
18.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
18.5
3(
3(
1(
3(
1(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
12( )
1( )
13
139.5
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with a major in
Bible/Theology and Secondary Education (World History 5-12 Endorsement) 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Missions & Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Educational Technology (CS 240)
Intro to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Western Civilization 1 (HIS 131)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
World Geography (GEO 117)
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Field Studies (ED 394)
History of the Ancient Near East (HIS 410)
Content Area Literacy (ED 420)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Principles of Management/Assessment (ED 470)
Teaching Social Sciences in Secondary Schools (ED 440)
Anthropology Elective (SOC 314 or SOC 330)
Practicum 2 (ED 495) 70 hours
Modern World History (HIS 350)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
Second Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
3(
3(
4(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
19.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
3(
2(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
3(
3(
2(
3(
3(
1(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
18.5
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Education (ED 106)
Field Studies (ED 194)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
American History (HIS 234)
College Math (MAT 140)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Field Studies (ED 295)
Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Instructional Adaptations (ED 331)
Latin American History (HIS 340)
Instructional Design (ED 330)
Practicum 1 (ED 395) 70 hours
Math/Science Elective
Economics Elective (ECN 105 or ECN 205)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Student Teaching (ED 497)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499)
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed
Professional Secondary Education Core
Content Major
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
18.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
18.5
3(
3(
3(
1(
1(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
12( )
1( )
13
139.5
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with a major in
Bible/Theology and Secondary Education (ACSI Certification) 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Missions & Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Biblical Discipleship (BT 116)
Western Civilization 1 (HIS 131)
Intro to Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)
Educational Technology (CS 240)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Apologetics (BT 350) or
Christian Evidences (BT 167 or 168)
Life of Christ (BT 247)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Content Area Literacy (ED 420)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 302)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Applied Theology (BT 462)
Comparative Religions (REL 308)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Principles of Management/Assessment (ED 470)
Practicum 2 (ED 495) 70 hours
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 402)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 404)
Total Credits
First Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
3(
3(
4(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
19.5
3( )
3( )
3(
3(
3(
2(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
2(
1(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Bible/Theology Elective*
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Philosophy of Christian Education (EM 210)
Field Studies (ED 194)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Bible Geography (BT 278)
College Math (MAT 140)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Romans (BT 355)
Field Studies (ED 295)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Teaching Bible (EM 221)
Math or Science Elective
Instructional Adaptations (ED 331)
Instructional Design (ED 330)
Practicum 1 (ED 395) 35 hours
Youth Culture & Challenges (EM 310)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 303)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 305)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Student Teaching (ED 497)
Student Teaching Seminar (ED 499)
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed:
Bold - Professional Secondary Education Core
Bold - Content Major
*at least one book study required
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
2(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
P/F(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
1(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
17.5
12( )
1( )
13
132.5
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Additional K-8 and 5-12 Endorsement(s)
Emmaus Teacher Education is authorized to recommend teacher candidates and in-service teachers for the
following teaching endorsements: K-8 Music, K-8 Reading, and K-8 Social Studies. Licensure candidates must
achieve a 2.0 minimum grade point in each course required for the endorsement. Music education candidates
seeking music endorsements are required to (1) complete the Music Information Profile which functions as an
application to their program and (2) audition with the Music department faculty. The Music department will
review your profile and audition performance and communicate their admission decision in writing.
K-8 Music – Endorsement No. 144
Teaching Elementary Music (ED 309)
Music Fundamentals (MUS 010) or demonstrated proficiency
Music Theory 1 (MUS 114)
Aural Skills 1 (MUS 115)
Music Theory 2 (MUS 214)
Aural Skills 2 (MUS 215)
Survey of Music History (MUS 173)
Music History 1 (MUS 273) or Music History 2 (MUS 373)
Private Voice or Piano Lessons (4 semesters)
Ensemble Participation (4 semesters)
Conducting 1 (MUS 365)
Survey of Choral Literature (MUS 286)
Concert Attendance (2 semesters)
Elementary Music Student Teaching (ED 493)
K-8 Reading – Endorsement No. 148
Children’s Literature (ED 203)
Introduction to Exceptionalities (ED 231)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-6 Reading (ED 301)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-8 Language Arts (ED 305)
Teaching Diverse Learners (ED 311)
Reading & Literacy Strategies (ED 355)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-6 Mathematics (ED 375)
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-8 Social Studies & Content Area Literacy Strategies (ED 435)
Principles of Management & Assessment (ED 470)
Reading Practicum (ED 482)
Diagnostic Teaching of Reading (ED 485)
Child Development (PSY 254)
K-8 Social Sciences-Social Studies – Endorsement No. 164
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-8 Social Studies (ED 435)
24 semester hours of coursework from at least three (3) of the following areas:
History
American History (HIS 234)
Western Civilization 1 (HIS 131)*
Western Civilization 2 (HIS 132)*
Latin American History (HIS 340)*
Modern World History (HIS 350)*
History of the Ancient Near East (HIS 410)*
The Holocaust 1933-1945 (HIS 470)*
Sociology
Marriage & Family Life (SOC 109)*
Cultural Anthropology (SOC 314) *
Cross-Cultural Communication (SOC 330)*
Economics
Principles of Macroeconomics (ECN 105)*
Principles of Microeconomics (ECN 205)*
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Psychology
Child Development (PSY 254)
Educational Psychology (PSY 351)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)*
Developmental Psychology (PSY 211)*
Psychological Theories and Application 1 (PSY 212)*
Abnormal Psychology (PSY 311)*
Geography
World Geography (GEO 117)
*Select 12 semester hours from electives
K-6 Instructional Strategist 1: Mild and Moderate – Endorsement No. 261
While Emmaus’s TEP is not authorized to recommend a candidate or in-service teacher for this teaching
endorsement, we do offer a cooperative program with the University of Dubuque who is approved to recommend it.
UD will transfer up to 18 semester hours from Emmaus Teacher Education, 12 semester hours from our special
education core and 6 credit hours of student teaching in special education, to their TEP and then require the
candidate to successfully complete 6 semester hours of coursework in Managing Behavior & Social Skills and
Communication & Collaborative Partnerships to be eligible for the recommendation.
Emmaus Teacher Education Special Education Core
ED 231 Introduction to Exceptionalities
ED 311 Teaching Diverse Learners
ED 331 Instructional Adaptations
ED 470 Management and Assessment of Special Needs Students
PSY 351 Educational Psychology: Testing and Measurement
ED 490 Student Teaching Special Education
In addition to successfully completing the requisite coursework for any teaching endorsement, teacher candidates
and in-service teachers must fulfill program completion and licensure requirements to be recommended to the
Iowa Board for Educational Examiners for the desired teaching endorsement.
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
Teacher Education Program Admission and Continuation Policies
Program Status Categories
1. Exploratory: Freshmen or sophomore students enrolled in foundations coursework and exploratory field
studies who have declared a teacher education program of study as their major.
2. Professional Studies: A teacher candidate whose program application has been unconditionally approved
by the department and who each semester continues to fulfill program requirements. Candidates will spend
three semesters developing the requisite entry-level professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions in
methods coursework and clinical experiences in elementary or secondary classrooms.
3. Student Teacher: A teacher candidate whose student teaching application has been unconditionally
approved by the department and who continues to fulfill program requirements.
4. Provisional: A program or student teaching applicant who has been granted conditional admission is
classified as having provisional program status. Any professional studies or student teaching student found
having any deficiency in program continuation requirements could be reclassified to provisional program
status. Teacher candidates with provisional status must meet with their assigned academic advisor in the
TED and will be given one semester to attend to all program requirement deficiencies. Following the
semester of provisional status, the candidate will either be reclassified as having unconditional program
status if program requirements are met or will be required to withdraw if program requirements have not
been met.
Program Admission Procedures
1. Complete the Declaration of Major form in the freshman year or no later than fall semester of the
sophomore year. Submission of this form to the Registrar’s Office functions only as a notice of intent to
apply for the program and to pursue a teaching license. Students declaring a teacher education program of
study as their major will be assigned an academic advisor from the TED faculty.
2. Achieve a 2.0 minimum grade point for six semester hours of English coursework and three semester hours
of mathematics coursework.
3. Achieve a 2.0 minimum grade point for ED 106 Introduction to Education, a course designed for students
to explore the teaching profession.
4. Successfully complete ED 194 Field Studies and ED 295 Field Studies (All field study placements are
arranged by the Clinical Experiences Director. A teacher candidate is not permitted to make
personal arrangements for field studies unless the Clinical Experiences Director asks her/him to do
so.)
5. Applicants to the Elementary Education Program must achieve a 2.0 minimum grade point in ED 203
Children’s Literature and pass ED 294 Field Studies.
6. Take a standardized test of basic skills in English (including an essay) and Math. The State of Iowa requires
passing scores for admission to a teacher preparation program and Emmaus offers two options:
1. Option #1 - Achieve a minimum score of 235 on both the English (includes an essay) and math
subject tests from College base. Emmaus offers this exam free of charge to sophomores in teacher
education and to juniors in the other professional studies programs on Assessment Day in the
spring semester. C-Base score reports are sent to Emmaus and to each examinee during the
summer break.
2. Option #2 – Program applicants who do not achieve the required minimum scores on the CBase
exam are allowed one retest opportunity for program admission consideration. Register for the
Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators Test #5571 prior to the beginning of the fall semester
of your junior year. Each candidate must have passing scores on file in the Teacher Education
Department to receive admission to the program. Official score reports from ETS must be
requested the day of the exam – our institution code is 1215. Conditional admittance and testing
exceptions may be granted on a case-by case basis.
7. Complete the TED’s program application in the sophomore spring semester for program admission
consideration. Prospective teacher candidates who wait to apply after this time may be required to
carry an additional course load, take summer classes, or register for semesters beyond their senior
year in order to complete program and/or licensure requirements. To be certain that pre-requisite
courses have been successfully completed and to avoid course scheduling conflicts, students are
strongly cautioned to follow the recommended plan of study when registering for courses each
semester.
Program Admission Criteria
1. Declaration of Teacher Education Major on file with the Registrar’s office.
2. A 2.0 minimum grade point in ED 106 verified by an official transcript.
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Successful completion of 45 semester hours, to include 6 semester hours of English and 3 semester hours of
math with course grades not less than 2.0 as reported on official transcript.
A 2.5 minimum cumulative grade point average verified by an official transcript
Documentation on file with the TED of successful completion of a minimum of 15 hours total from ED 194
and ED 295 exploratory field studies.
Demonstration of professional behaviors in clinical experiences such as punctuality, responsibility,
initiative in scheduling appointments, advance notification and good communication skills, and appropriate
choices for field studies attire.
Consistent demonstration of Christian character as articulated in the Student Handbook.
Program Admission Application submitted to and approved by a simple majority in the TED. Program
applications are due the first Friday following Spring Break in March.
“Why I Want to Teach” essay submitted with program application for approval by the TED. Essays
lacking standard language conventions or adequate rationale statements may be returned for resubmission.
(See essay rubric)
Request EBC Bible/Theology faculty member to complete Christian character and professional
dispositional qualities evaluation form before March deadline.
Self-assessment of Christian character and professional dispositional qualities form submitted with program
application.
Passing scores on a standardized basic academic skills exam on file with the TED (235 on C-Base or 156
Reading, 162 Writing, and 150 Math on Praxis Core Academic Skills)
The program director for elementary or secondary education will communicate the TED’s decision in
writing to applicants. CBase scores will not be known until May or early June so all applicants will be
considered provisional until score reports are received. For all other admission criteria deficiencies,
provisional status may be granted on a case-by-case basis to program applicants who evidence an aptitude
for the teaching profession and need additional time to meet admission requirements. The written notice
will detail a time frame in which admission criteria must be met to receive unconditional admittance to the
TEP.
Program Continuation Criteria for Teacher Candidates
1. A 2.0 minimum grade point in professional core and content major coursework.
2. Maintain an overall cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.5.
3. Maintain a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.5 for all teacher education professional
coursework.
4. Successfully complete the field studies and practica course requirements detailed in the clinical experience
section of the program handbook and in course syllabi.
5. Demonstrate satisfactory performance in all course-embedded licensure competencies that measure the
candidate’s professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions (cf. professional studies syllabi and program
handbook for licensure competency standards).
6. Demonstration of consistent Christian character as articulated in the Student Handbook.
Program Admission or Continuation Notification and Appeal Process
Students who believe that the decision to deny them admission to the TEP or that requires them to withdraw from
the TEP is unfair may appeal that decision to the TED Chair in writing stating the grounds for the appeal within
twenty-one days of the date of the notification. The written appeal should specifically address the reasons why the
decision is deemed unfair and supporting documents (if any) should be attached.
A pro tem admissions/continuation appeals committee led by the TED Chair, and consisting of the grade level
Program Director, one faculty member, and the Dean for Student Development acting as an advocate for the student,
will meet within seven days of the date of the appeal. The pro tem committee will review the written documentation
and may request to meet with the student. The committee’s decision is final and will be communicated to the student
in writing within forty-eight hours of the committee meeting.
Transfer Credits
While general education courses generally make for straightforward transfer of credits, transfer credit for education
courses taken at other regionally accredited institutions are granted on a case-by case basis. Transfer credit will not
be given for courses in which the demonstration of licensure competencies are evaluated (i.e. most professional core
and all teaching methods coursework).
Admission to Student Teaching
Admission to student teaching is a prerequisite for student teaching enrollment and teacher candidates should apply
at the end of their junior year. Student teaching is primarily offered in the spring semester and candidates may be
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
placed either in a public or private school for a minimum fourteen-week experience. Teacher candidates should
make the necessary preparations for student teaching to be their primary activity during the semester.
The TED makes all student teaching placements. Although teacher candidates are asked to provide input into their
placements, they should not make personal arrangements because the TED will not honor them. A range of options
exist from a split placement in area schools to a semester-long international placement through UNI’s overseas
student teaching placement program.
Approved student teaching applicants who desire an out-of state or international placement should apply to UNI’s
program and submit their application by the deadline (usually at the beginning of the semester prior to student
teaching) with the required deposit payable to UNI.
Student Teaching Application Procedures
1. Submit an application to the Student Teaching Coordinator when registering for senior methods
coursework in the spring semester of the junior year. Student Teaching applications are due the first Friday
following Spring Break in March.
2. The applicant’s transcripts on file with the Registrar’s Office will be reviewed to determine if required
coursework is complete or near completion.
3. The teacher education program director and faculty will review the application.
4. The Student Teaching supervisor will notify the applicant of the department’s approval and prospective
year-long placement.
5. Approved applicants desiring an out-of-state or international placement should complete an application
from UNI’s placement and supervision program and submit it with the required deposit to UNI before the
application deadline.
Student Teaching Admission Requirements
1. Classified as having full program status
2. Completion of 90 credit hours with a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.5
3. Successful completion or satisfactory progress toward completion of all teaching methods coursework with
a grade not less than 2.0
4. Successful completion of ED 395 Practicum 1 and ED 495 Practicum 2.
5. Demonstrate mastery of all course-embedded licensure competencies that measure the candidate’s
professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions (cf. professional studies syllabi and program handbook for
licensure competency standards).
6. Consistent demonstration of professional behaviors in clinical experiences such as punctuality,
responsibility, initiative in scheduling appointments, advance notification and excellent communication
skills, and appropriate choices for field studies attire.
7. Consistent demonstration of Christian character as articulated in the Student Handbook.
8. Business Office notification that the applicant’s financial obligations to the college have been met or
acceptable arrangements have been made.
9. Submit Application for Student Teaching to the Student Teaching Supervisor by the spring semester
deadline.
10. Teacher education faculty recommendation by a super majority.
Program Completion Requirements
1. A 2.5 minimum cumulative grade point average for coursework in the teacher education professional core.
2. A 2.5 minimum grade point average for elementary education professional studies coursework and for
secondary education content area coursework
3. 3.0 minimum grade point for ED 490-497 Student Teaching
4. All TEP teacher candidates must take two Praxis II tests, one in pedagogy and one in content area of
endorsement (see chart on page 56 in TEP Handbook for specific tests and passing scores).
5. Business Office notification that the student’s financial obligations to the college have been met.
6. Professional Portfolio demonstrating mastery of all licensure competencies that measure the candidate’s
professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions (cf. program handbook for licensure competency standards
and portfolio procedures)
7. Participate in a focus group for program assessment.
8. Completion of general graduation requirements.
State of Iowa Requirements for Teacher Licensure
Applicants must complete the following requirements to be recommended for an initial teaching endorsement from
Academic Programs – Teacher Education Department
the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners:
1. Submitted an application for Iowa Licensure to the TED during the semester of Student Teaching.
2. Paid the Iowa license fee
3. Paid the FBI background check and fingerprinting fee and submitted accompanying documents to the TED.
4. A 2.5 minimum cumulative grade point average.
5. A 2.5 minimum cumulative grade point average for coursework in the teacher education professional core.
6. A minimum 2.0 grade point in college English and math courses.
7. A 2.0 minimum grade point for each course required for each teaching endorsement recommendation.
8. Successful completion of all program requirements verified by an official transcript.
9. Completion of general graduation requirements.
10. Met all program completion requirements.
11. Received the recommendation of the licensure officer in the teacher education program.
Academic Programs – Cooperative Dual-Degree Program
Cooperative Dual-Degree Program
Emmaus Bible College offers a cooperative, dual-degree program in nursing in cooperation with Northeast Iowa
Community College. This program is designed to provide students with the opportunity to gain a thorough
understanding of the Bible and at the same time prepare for a career in nursing. The student receives a Bachelor of
Science degree in Bible/Theology from Emmaus Bible College and an Associate in Applied Science degree from
Northeast Iowa Community College.
Programs of Study
Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology with an Associate of Applied Science in Nursing
Academic Programs – Cooperative Dual-Degree Program
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology with an Associate of Applied Science in Nursing
The Bachelor of Science in Bible/Theology with an Associate of Applied Science is a four-and-one-half year program of
study designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the Bible, and knowledge, skills, and experience in
nursing. Upon successful completion of the A.A.S. in Nursing from Northeast Iowa Community College, graduates are
eligible to write the national licensure exam (NCLEX) to become a registered nurse.
Program Director: Mrs. Lisa Beatty
Program Outcomes
In addition to meeting the Bible/Theology major outcomes, the student will meet the outcomes established by Northeast
Iowa Community College for the Nursing program. See the NICC website at www.nicc.edu for up-to-date Nursing
program requirements and outcomes.
Program Admission Requirements
1. Meet all admission requirements of Emmaus Bible College.
2. Complete application for admission to Northeast Iowa Community College.
3. Declare your intent to complete the cooperative program in Bible and Theology/Nursing.
4. Meet all nursing program admission requirements of Northeast Iowa Community College.
5. At the beginning of the sophomore year, apply for entrance into the Bible/Theology program.
6. The application procedure includes completion of a formal application. After the application has been received, the
Bible faculty will review it. Their decision will be delivered to the student by means of a formal letter.
7. Pay all applicable fees for this major as determined by the Business office and published in the annual statement of
fees.
Degree Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 145.25 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 45 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. At least 45 semester credit hours must be earned at Northeast Iowa Community College.
5. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
6. Complete all graduation and Nursing program requirements of Northeast Iowa Community College.
7. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible and Theology (39 credits)
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible/Theology Electives**
Intercultural Studies (3 credits)
Missions and Evangelism 1* (ICS 104)
Inter-Area Studies (3.5 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3-402/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-404/5)
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Nursing (61.75 credits)
(Nurse Aide/CNA licensure must be completed prior to Nursing Concepts)
Human Anatomy/Physiology II & Lab (BIO:170/172)
Introduction to Nutrition (PNN:270)
Dosage Calculations (PNN:200)
Pharmacology Medications (PNN:204)
Nursing Concepts (PNN:169)
Nursing Care of Adults I (PNN:527)
Nursing Care of Adults II (PNN:528)
Nursing Care of Children (PNN:410)
Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family (PNN 430)
Academic Programs – Cooperative Dual-Degree Program
Dimensions of Practical Nursing (PNN:529)
Transition to Associate Degree Nursing (ADN:148)
Comprehensive Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family (ADN:434)
Comprehensive Nursing Care of Children (ADN:444)
Comprehensive Nursing Care of the Mental Health Client (ADN:475)
Comprehensive Nursing Care of Adults I (ADN:525)
Comprehensive Nursing Care of Adults II (ADN:528)
Humanities (12 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview* (PH 106)
Social Sciences (15 credits)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Western Civilization 1 (HIS 131/132) or American History (HIS 234)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Developmental Psychology (PSY:121)
Introduction to Sociology (SOC:110)
Natural Sciences (11 credits)
College Math (MAT 140)
Human Anatomy/Physiology I & Lab (BIO:165/167)
Microbiology & Lab (BIO: 183/184)
*meets Bible-Related requirement
**at least one book study required
Italics – Courses at Northeast Iowa Community College. See course descriptions at www.nicc.edu.
Award:
Bachelor of Science (Emmaus Bible College)
Associates of Applied Science (Northeast Iowa Community College)
Academic Programs – Cooperative Dual-Degree Program
Recommended Plan of Study for the Bachelor of Science Degree with a major in Bible/Theology with an
Associate in Applied Science in Nursing 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Bible/Theology Elective*
English Composition (ENG 101)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Hermeneutics (BT 250)
Theology 1 (BT 205)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Introduction to Psychology (PSY 111)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Human Anatomy/Physiology II & Lab
(BIO:170/172)
Dosage Calculations (PNN:200)
Second Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
First Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Human Anatomy/Physiology I & Lab (BIO:165/167)
Introduction to Nutrition (PNN:270)
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
4(
2(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
Total Credits
15.5
Second Year
Theology 2 (BT 210)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Western Civilization or American History
College Math (MAT 140)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 203)
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
)
)
)
)
)
)
4( )
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
1( )
Pharmacology Medications (PNN:204)
1( )
Total Credits
17.5
Total Credits
16.5
Summer Term
Developmental Psychology (PSY:121)
Introduction to Sociology (SOC:110)
3( )
3( )
Nurse Aide/CNA course (75 hour) must be completed prior to
Nursing Concepts (PNN:169)
Total Credits
Third Year
Theology 3 (BT 305)
Theology 4 (BT 310)
Bible/Theology Elective
Missions and Evangelism 1 (ICS 104)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 302N)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 304)
Microbiology and Lab (BIO:183/184)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Senior Seminar (IAS 410)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 402N)
6
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
4(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
P/F( )
P/F( )
Nursing Care of Adults II (PNN:528)
6( )
Nursing Care of Children (PNN:410)
Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family
(PNN:430)
Dimensions of Practical Nursing (PNN:529)
2( )
Total Credits
Summer Term
Comprehensive Nursing Care of the Mental Health
Client –Part 2 (ADN: 475)
Total Credits
2( )
4.25( )
14.25
5( )
5
Third Year
Bible/Theology Elective*
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 303N)
Nursing Concepts (PNN:169)
Nursing Care of Adults I (PNN:527)
Total Credits
Fourth Year
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 403N)
Transition to Associate Degree Nursing (ADN:148)
Comprehensive Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family
(ADN:434)
Comprehensive Nursing Care of Children (ADN:444)
Comprehensive Nursing Care of the Mental Health Client –
Part 1
(ADN:475)
Total Credits
Fifth Year – Fall Term
Comprehensive Nursing Care of Adults I (ADN:525)
Comprehensive Nursing Care of Adults II (ADN:528)
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed:
Course taken at Northeast Iowa Community College
P/F( )
3(
P/F(
6.75(
3.5(
)
)
)
)
13.25
P/F( )
4( )
4( )
4( )
1( )
13
10.25( )
1( )
11.25
145.25
Academic Programs – General Education
General Education Department
Mrs. Sheri Popp, chair, Mr. Ben Brown, Mr. Tim Iverson, Miss Megan Von Bergen, Mr. Arthur Manning, Dr. James
Van Dine
Department Mission
To equip learners with the foundational knowledge, skills, and dispositions to be productive contributors to society.
Program of Study
Associate of Arts in General Studies
General Education Core (a component of each academic program)
Academic Programs – General Education
The Associate of Arts in General Studies
The Associate of Arts in General Studies is a two-year program designed to provide the student with general education
knowledge and skills, along with a basic understanding of the Bible.
Program Director: Sheri Popp
Program Outcomes
1. Write effectively with precision and detail to communicate the intended message.
2. Understand and apply mathematical and scientific principles.
3. Use current technology for educational and work-related purposes.
4. Compose and deliver speeches which clearly and effectively communicate the intended message.
5. Demonstrate critical thinking skills through integration of Christian theology and worldview with other
academic disciplines.
6. Evidence a comprehensive knowledge of the content of the Bible.
7. Evidence growth in Christian character and lifestyle. Our approach is a self-reflective one that asks the student
to take a hard look at themselves and consider their spiritual condition in light of scripture.
Associate Degree Requirements
1. Complete a minimum of 64 semester credit hours.
2. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a passing grade in all required courses.
3. At least 32 semester credit hours must be earned at Emmaus.
4. Complete the general graduation requirements listed in the Academic Life section of the catalog.
5. Meet course requirements in the following areas:
Bible/Theology (18 credits)
Old Testament Survey I (BT 102)
Old Testament Survey II (BT 104)
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Christian Life and Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
Bible/Theology Elective
Inter-Area Studies (3 credits)
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant Leader Training (IAS 102/3–202/3)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104/5-204/5)
Humanities (15 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview (PH 106)
Humanities Elective
Social Sciences (12 credits)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Western Civilization (HIS 131/132) or American History (HIS 234)
Social Science Electives
Natural Sciences (7 credits)
Human Biology and Lab (SCI 241/242)
College Math (MAT 140)
Electives (9 credits)
Award: Associate of Arts in General Studies
Academic Programs – General Education
Recommended Plan of Study for the
Associate of Arts in General Studies 2013 – 2014
First Semester
First Year
Christian Life & Bible Study Methods (BT 110)
Survey of Doctrine (BT 151)
English Composition (ENG 101)
Bible/Theology Elective
Elective
Transitions Seminar (IAS 101)
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 102)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 104)
Total Credits
Second Year
Old Testament Survey 1 (BT 102)
Fundamentals of Speech (COM 112)
Human Biology & Lab (SCI 241/242)
Humanities Elective
Social Science Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 202)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 204)
Total Credits
Second Semester
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
1(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
16.5
3(
3(
4(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
First Year
New Testament Survey (BT 106)
Introduction to Philosophy: CWV (PH 106)
Fundamental Computer Literacy (CS 101)
Social Science Elective
Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 103)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 105)
Total Credits
Second Year
Old Testament Survey 2 (BT 104)
Introduction to Literature (ENG 102)
Western Civilization (HIS 131/132 or
American History (HIS 234)
College Math (MAT 140)
Elective
Servant-Leader Training (IAS 203)
Chapel Attendance (IAS 205)
3(
3(
3(
3(
3(
.5(
P/F(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
15.5
3( )
3( )
3( )
3(
3(
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)
16.5
Total Credits
Total Credits Needed:
15.5
64
Academic Programs – General Education
General Education Core
General Education Purpose
One of the purposes for higher education is the broadening and deepening of a person’s understanding of the world.
Emmaus not only acknowledges this but embraces it since we subscribe to the view that “all truth is God’s truth.”
Students at Emmaus Bible College are required, in addition to their major area of study, to participate in a program of
general education that is designed to provide the knowledge and learning experiences preparatory to the assumption of
their role as productive, educated citizens.
General Education Philosophy
Emmaus Bible College graduates should possess the general knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to successfully
function in contemporary society. This is accomplished through general education coursework in the humanities, social
sciences and natural sciences. Emmaus Bible College has a variety of General Education course requirements for the
academic programs offered and affirms that individual students should be allowed, within program guidelines, to make
personal, elective choices in their programs of study. Therefore, we do not assert that there is a uniform set of course
work that imparts a common set of knowledge to all students in all programs. Rather we subscribe to the position that,
within the guidelines of each program, the General Education course work is of sufficient breadth to allow graduates to
acquire the characteristics of educated persons. A broad goal of the general education program is to expose students to
the arts and sciences and promote appreciation for their aesthetic worth and their role in shaping the worldview(s) and
values of a culture.
Each student, as part of the general education component of his/her education, will complete coursework in inter-area
studies. These courses facilitate the integration of general studies with the academic majors and allow students to apply
knowledge gained in the classroom in other settings. Courses include Introduction to College Life, Chapel, Spiritual
Formation/Christian Service and Senior Seminar. The service component of an Emmaus education provides students the
opportunity to practice their skills, apply their knowledge and exercise their dispositions for the benefit of others.
The college requires that an amount of general education course work appropriate to the certificate or degree is present in
all programs regardless of major or program emphasis. All four-year degree graduates complete at least 41 credits of
general studies coursework.
General Education Outcomes
The General Education program is planned and presented to assist graduates to:
1. Write effectively with precision and detail to communicate the intended message.
2. Understand and apply mathematical and scientific principles.
3. Use current technology for educational and work-related purposes.
4. Compose and deliver speeches which clearly and effectively communicate the intended message.
5. Demonstrate critical thinking skills through integration of Christian theology and worldview with other
academic disciplines.
English Composition Requirement
Degree-seeking students must earn a minimum grade of C- in English Composition (ENG 101), or equivalent in the case
of transfer students, to pass this course. Ordinarily, the course will be completed within the student’s initial 30 credit
hours at Emmaus. Course withdrawal is rarely granted, and only when a formal request with written documentation of
extreme hardship is provided to the VP/Dean for Academic Affairs.
Students with transfer, AP, or CLEP credits in English Composition who score below 75 on the English placement exam
(or below 80 for Teacher Education majors) will be required to register for the Writing Seminar (1 credit; Pass/Fail) each
semester until they achieve a Pass (P).
Academic Programs – General Education
General Education Courses
Humanities
COM 112 Fundamentals of Speech
COM/BUS 230 Business Communication
ENG 010 Introduction to English
ENG 101 English Composition
ENG 102 Introduction to Literature
ENG 220 Christian Classics
ENG 225 C.S. Lewis
ESL 202 Introduction to Linguistics
FL 102 & 104 Greek 1
FL 103 & 105 Hebrew 1
MUS100/1-400/1 Chapel Choir
MUS102/3-402/3 Emmaus Ensemble
MUS 108/9-408/9 Small Vocal Ensemble
MUS 180/1-480/1 Dubuque Community String Orchestra
MUS 173 Survey of Music History
MUS 242 World Music
MUS 250 Foundations of Church Music
PH 106 Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview
PH 108 Logical Analysis
PH/BT 364 Apologetics
REL/ICS 204 Religions in America
REL/ICS 216 Judaism
REL/ICS 308 Comparative Religions
REL/ICS 341 Roman Catholic Context
Social Sciences
COU 121 Counseling Foundations
CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 240 Educational Technology
ECN 105 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECN 205 Principles of Microeconomics
GEO 117 World Geography
GEO/BT 278 Bible Geography
HIS 131 Western Civilization 1
HIS 132 Western Civilization 2
HIS 234 American History
HIS 270 The Holocaust: 1933-1945
HIS 281 History of the Brethren Movement
HIS 340 Latin American History
HIS 350 Modern World History
HIS/BT 376 Church History
HIS/BT 381 History of Israel
HIS/BT 382 History and Literature of the Intertestamental Period
HIS/BT 410 History of the Ancient Near East
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology
PSY 211 Developmental Psychology
PSY 254 Child Development
PSY 351 Educational Psychology
SOC/CE 109 Marriage and Family Life
SOC/ICS 314 Cultural Anthropology
SOC/ICS 330 Cross-Cultural Communication
Natural Sciences
MAT 050 Introduction to Algebra
MAT 140 College Math
MAT 160 Introduction to Statistics
MAT 270 Number Operations and Algebra in Elementary School
MAT 370 Spatial Math and Data Representation in Elementary School
SCI 230 Introduction to Earth Science
Academic Programs – General Education
SCI 241 Introduction to Human Biology
SCI 242 Human Biology Lab
Inter-Area Studies
IAS 101 Transitions Seminar
IAS 102/3-402/3 Servant Leader Training
IAS 104/5-404/5 Chapel
IAS 410 Senior Seminar
Course Descriptions
Biblical Studies Courses
Bible
BT 102 Old Testament Survey 1
3 credits
A survey of the books of the Old Testament covering the period from Creation through the Davidic monarchy. Attention
will be given to the distinctive message and major features of each book with an emphasis on the Abrahamic, Mosaic,
and Davidic Covenants as they pertain to God’s purposes for Israel and the world.
BT 104 Old Testament Survey 2
3 credits
A survey of the books of the Old Testament covering the period from Solomon through the post-exilic prophets.
Attention will be given to the distinctive message and major features of each book with an emphasis on the events
leading up to Israel’s captivity, as interpreted by the prophets, and on the nation’s return from exile. Special
consideration will be given to the prophetic expression of hope with respect to Israel’s future
BT 106 New Testament Survey
3 credits
An overview of the New Testament, including an emphasis on the distinctive message, historical setting, and theological
contribution of each book. Geographical and archaeological support for each book is also considered.
BT 110 Christian Life and Bible Study Methods
3 credits
An introduction to the principles, methods, and practice of inductive Bible study. This course also focuses on the
spiritual disciplines of the Christian life, with attention to the doctrine of sanctification and the ministry of the Holy
Spirit in the life of a believer.
BT 116 Biblical Discipleship
3 credits
A study of Christ’s teaching methodology and content in the making of biblical disciples as recorded in the Gospels.
Special attention is given to the marks or characteristics that Christ requires of all his disciples. Guidelines for
application of these principles of biblical discipleship to present-day experience and relationships form an integrated
portion of the course.
BT/CE 210 Biblical Church Leadership
1 credit
Various church leadership models will be reviewed for the purpose of evaluating each against the Bible through
exegetical studies of key passages. The course is designed to help the student understand and appreciate the roles of
leaders in the local church and prepare them to serve and/or lead.
BT 215 Genesis
3 credits
A study of the book of Genesis with a view to understanding its significance; contextually, as written for the Israelites
preparing to enter their new life in the land of Canaan; historically, as the book of the beginnings of the physical world
and of the inhabited world; theologically, as the purposes of God for His creation were revealed and the actions of God
were inserted into the world’s history to bring about His purpose of redemption; and devotionally, in applying the
principles of godliness seen in the ways of God in relation to the people and events of the time.
BT 216 Exodus
3 credits
An inductive study of the book of Exodus with a focus on Israel’s creation and its subsequent entering into a covenant
with God by which He constituted the nation as His special people and communicated the nation’s missionary mandate.
Attention will be given to the historical and theological contexts of the book, the nature of the Mosaic covenant, its
relationship to the Abrahamic covenant, the special features of Law, and the meaning of the Tabernacle.
BT 217 Numbers
3 credits
A study of the book of Numbers with a view to understanding its historical context, theology, and application for today.
BT 219 Deuteronomy
3 credits
A study of the Book of Deuteronomy with a view to understanding its historical context, theology and application for
today. Particular emphasis is placed on the significance of Deuteronomy as a covenant document between Yahweh and
Israel and the book's impact on the rest of the Hebrew canon.
Course Descriptions
BT/CS 225 Computer-Assisted Bible Study/Computers in Ministry
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the principles of applying the power and speed of computer technology to the tasks
associated with Scriptural studies, concurrent searches of multiple extra-biblical sources, access to Internet-based study
resources, and so on. Applications in the Computers in Ministry segment of the course will include an introduction to
world-wide telecommunications using the Internet for witnessing and communications with the mission field, the use of
computers in music ministries taking advantage of different electronic musical standards (MIDI, MP3, etc.), accessing
web resources as they apply to missions, publication technologies, church administration, preparation of sermon
materials and handouts, children's ministries, and so on. Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy.
BT 230 Mathew
3 credits
A detailed study of the Gospel of Matthew with particular attention given to the distinctive message of Matthew, his
argument, his theology, and the lessons that are to be learned for the church today.
BT 231 Mark
3 credits
A detailed study of the Gospel of Mark with particular attention given to the distinctive message of Mark, his argument,
his theology, and the lessons that are to be learned for the church today.
BT 232 Luke
3 credits
A detailed study of the Gospel of Luke with particular attention given to the distinctive message of Luke, his argument,
his theology, and the lessons that are to be learned for the church today.
BT 235 Johannine Literature
3 credits
A detailed exposition of the Gospel of John and the three epistles of John. Special attention is given to John’s doctrinal
emphases.
BT 236 First Corinthians
3 credits
An exposition of Paul’s First Epistle to the Corinthians with careful attention being paid to the argument of the book, its
problem passages, and its contribution to New Testament church practices.
BT 237 Galatians
3 credits
A detailed exposition of Paul’s letter to the Galatians refuting legalism and licentiousness. Special emphasis is given to
applying biblical liberty to daily Christian living.
BT 239 Prison Epistles
3 credits
A verse-by-verse exposition of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon with special attention given to the
argument, theology, and problem passages of each epistle.
BT 240 Thessalonians
3 credits
A verse-by-verse exposition of Paul’s epistles to the Thessalonians with special attention given to the eschatology
(Rapture, Day of the Lord) of the epistles and the practical ramifications of that eschatology.
BT 247 Life of Christ
3 credits
A detailed study in the life of Christ. The chronological and geographical aspects of the Lord’s ministry will be stressed
as He offers the Kingdom to Israel with its subsequent rejection. A term project tracing the geographical and
chronological movement is required.
BT/GEO 278/279 Bible Geography
3/4 credits
A study of the major geographic features of the land of Israel with particular attention paid to how these features
impacted specific events of biblical history. The goal is to help students become thoroughly familiar with the land on
which the history of the Bible unfolded. A fourth credit can be earned if the student participates in the study tour to
Israel. May be used as a social science elective.
BT 301 - 303 Bible Research Paper
1-3 credits
The student may pursue a subject area within the Biblical Studies field under the guidance of a member of the Biblical
Studies faculty. The student will do upper-level research and write a thesis of at least 10,000 words. With special
permission a student may write a shorter paper for less credit.
BT 301 minimum length: 3000 words = 1 credit
BT 302 minimum length: 6500 words = 2 credits
BT 303 minimum length: 10,000 words = 3 credit
BT 324 Daniel/Revelation
4 credits
An integrated exposition of the Old Testament Book of Daniel and the New Testament Book of Revelation is made from
Course Descriptions
the futurist and pre-millennial perspective. Alternate interpretations are considered.
BT 334 Acts/Paul
3 credits
A study of the expansion of the church from Jerusalem to the whole Mediterranean area. Special emphasis will be given
to church principles, transitional problems, and missionary principles. The character and work of Paul is enlarged to
include details from his writings.
BT 335 Romans
3 credits
A verse-by-verse exposition of the Epistle to the Romans with careful attention paid to the development of the argument
of the book, the authorship, recipients, occasion, purpose, and theology of the epistle.
BT 336 Second Corinthians
3 credits
A detailed study of 2 Corinthians with particular attention given to the argument and the theology of the book. Practical
lessons that are to be learned for the church today will also be emphasized.
BT 342 Pastoral Epistles
3 credits
An expository study of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus with a special concentration on I Timothy. Emphasis will be placed
on interpretive problems as well as the theological and practical relevance of the Pastoral Epistles for church life and
Christian living.
BT 344 Hebrews
3 credits
A verse-by-verse exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews with careful attention paid to the development of the argument
of the book. Emphasis is placed on the superiority of Christ to Judaism, and special attention is given to the warning
passages.
BT 346 General Epistles
3 credits
A verse-by-verse exposition of the Epistles of James, Peter, and Jude, with an analysis of the major themes of each book.
BT 361 Job/Ecclesiastes
3 credits
An interactive exposition of the messages of the Books of Job and Ecclesiastes with special consideration of each one’s
contribution to the canon, emphasizing their relevance to the believer’s spiritual life. Attention will be given to the nature
of Hebrew poetry and wisdom literature, to the history of interpretation of these two books, and to various interpretive
issues.
BT 363 Psalms
3 credits
A detailed study of the book of Psalms. Emphasis will be given to the different types of Psalms and the various elements
of their poetry and structure. Selected Psalms will receive in-depth study in order to understand their message, their
theology, and their practical lessons.
BT 364 Proverbs
3 credits
An inductive and conceptual study of the Book of Proverbs with special attention being given to the nature of wisdom
literature, literary forms and features, particular contribution to God’s revelation and its practical benefit to the believer’s
daily life.
BT 368 Israel’s Early Nationhood: Joshua, Judges, Ruth
3 credits
A study of the early history of the nation of Israel as recorded in the books Joshua, Judges, and Ruth. Special emphasis
will be given to practical application, the theology of the books, extra-biblical historical data, and issues of concern in
Old Testament studies.
BT 373 Life of David: 1 & 2 Samuel
3 credits
A consideration of the life and rule of David, placing him in his historical and theological contexts as a man of faith and
God’s ideal King. Special attention will be given to the role of the Davidic Covenant in David’s life as well as to a
correlation of certain Davidic Psalms with the historical record of his rule and with his spiritual journey.
BT 370 Decline and Fall of the Davidic Kingdom: 1 & 2 Kings, 1 & 2 Chronicles
3 credits
A study of the history of Israel as presented in the Books of Kings and Chronicles beginning with the reign of Solomon
and concluding with the return from Babylon. Particular emphasis is placed on helping students identify the distinct
contributions and similarities of these texts with a view to understanding Israel's history, Old Testament theology and
practical application for today.
BT 371 Restoration History: Ezra, Nehemiah & Esther
3 credits
A study of restoration history as recorded in the books Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther. Special emphasis will be given to
Course Descriptions
practical application, the theology of the books, extra-biblical historical data, and issues of concern in Old Testament
studies.
BT/HIS 376 Church History
3 credits
A survey of the development of Christianity through the centuries. Special emphases will be placed on the history and
development of Christian theology, influential leaders of the Church, the Protestant Reformation, and the rise of the
“Plymouth Brethren” movement. May be used as a social science elective.
BT 380 Introduction to Biblical Archaeology
3 credits
Archaeological research provides a unique set of data points that, when interpreted carefully, can contribute to our
understanding of the Bible and our ability to exegete it clearly. This course in an introduction to the methods, results, and
issues that are part of the field of Biblical Archaeology. Important finds that influence how the Bible is understood are
carefully considered.
BT/HIS 381 History of Israel (Old Testament)
3 credits
A general overview of the history of Israel from the call of Abraham through the return from Babylon. The course will
focus on the nation’s origin beginning with the patriarchs, its growth under bondage in Egypt, the conquest and
settlement of the promised land, the establishment of the united kingdom, the crisis and collapse of the nation during the
divided monarchy, and the return to the land. Attention will be given to placing Israel’s history in the context of the
history of the Ancient Near East. May be used as a social science elective.
BT/HIS 382 History and Literature of the Intertestamental Period
3 credits
A study of the major personalities and events of the Intertestamental period and their impact on the history of Israel and
its literature. Attention will be given to understanding how the world of the New Testament grows out of time period.
Literature will include significant amounts of reading from primary sources including: The Old Testament, Xenophon,
Diodorus, Plutarch, Herodotus, Josephus, The Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, and the Septuagint. May be used as a social
science elective.
BT/HIS 410 History of the Ancient Near East
3 credits
An examination of the history, geography, culture, and religions of the major ancient civilizations of the Mesopotamian
valley and the eastern Mediterranean basin. Survey includes Egypt, Sumer, Assyria, Babylonia, Persia, Greece, and
Rome as well as Israel and her local neighbors. Readings from ANE texts supplement lectures and class discussions.
Archaeological evidence examined where relevant. May be used as a social science elective.
BT 420 Isaiah
3 credits
A study of this significant Old Testament book will include the historic setting, authorship, structure, and contemporary
message of the book. Special emphasis will focus on the sections of the prophecy relating to the Person, work, and two
advents of the Messiah.
BT 421 Jeremiah
3 credits
A study of this often-neglected Old Testament book will include the historical setting, complex structure, and
contemporary message of the book. Special emphasis will focus on the New Covenant revelation, as well as the personal
life and experiences of the prophet as a servant of the Lord in a hostile environment.
BT 422 Ezekiel
3 credits
A study of this neglected Old Testament book will include the historic setting, prophetic visions, prophetic content, and
contemporary responses to the prophet. Special emphasis will focus on the great theological issues and eschatological
significance of the messianic kingdom revelation.
BT 426 Minor Prophets
3 credits
A study of the historical settings of these prophetic books will be made along with attention to their background,
authorship, contemporary kings, and prophets. The theological and prophetic contribution of each book will be
emphasized. This course will include a consideration of all twelve books, with two selected for detailed study.
BT 433 Gospel of John
3 credits
A verse-by-verse study of John’s Gospel that emphasizes the deity of Christ. Special attention is given to the book’s
structure. Practical application will be included.
Course Descriptions
Theology
BT 151 Survey of Doctrine
3 credits
A basic foundation in theology is provided through a study of the major themes of the Bible, including Theology Proper,
Bibliology, Christology, Pneumatology, Angelology, Soteriology, Anthropology, Harmartiology, Ecclesiology, and
Eschatology. A personal Statement of Faith is required of each student as a term project.
BT 167 Christian Evidences 1
3 credits
Christian Evidences is a systematic presentation of objective evidences to support the claims of Christianity. Christian
Evidences 1 will examine two fundamental questions: "Does God exist?" and "Is the Bible reliable?" In addition, the
evidence for the deity of Jesus Christ and for miracles will be explored. Included in the lectures are practical
applications and answers for today's critics.
BT 168 Christian Evidences 2
3 credits
Christian Evidences is a systematic presentation of objective evidences to support the claims of Christianity. Christian
Evidences II will examine the evidence that supports Biblical Creation and the Worldwide Noahic Flood. Scientific
evidence is presented for a young universe and young earth, as well as recent life. Included are illustrations designed for
use in defending the Christian faith.
BT 205 Theology 1: Prolegomena, Bibliology, and Theology Proper 3 credits
An examination of three foundational areas of Christian theology: (1) Theological prolegomena, that is, a study of the
nature and method of systematic theology, (2) Bibliology, that is, a study of divine revelation as well as the inspiration,
inerrancy, and authority of Scripture with an evaluation of contemporary views on these topics, and (3) Theology Proper,
that is, a study of the existence and attributes of God and the biblical evidence for Trinitarianism with an evaluation of
contemporary views on these topics. Pre-requisite: BT 151 Survey of Doctrine
BT 210 Theology 2: Angelology, Anthropology, and Hamartiology
3 credits
Building on the foundation of Theology 1, Theology 2 is an examination of what the Scriptures teach about the creatures
of God. Three areas of Christian theology are covered: (1) Angelology, that is, the existence, nature, and activities of
the elect angels and the evil angels, as well as the existence, fall, works, and destiny of Satan, (2) Anthropology, that is,
the origin, nature, and royal calling of man, and (3) Hamartiology, that is, the doctrine of sin, including a study of the
probation of man in Eden, his fall, and the results of his transgression including original sin, the imputation of Adam’s
sin, and personal sin. Pre-requisite: BT 151 Survey of Doctrine
BT 250 Hermeneutics
3 credits
The course in Hermeneutics presents the grammatical-historical approach to interpreting the Bible with emphases on
understanding the philosophy of the approach in distinction to other interpretive approaches and on the application of the
principles of the grammatical-historical approach toward the development of the skill of interpretation. Pre-requisites:
BT 102/4 Old Testament Survey1/2, BT 106 New Testament, BT 110 Christian Life and Bible Study Methods
BT 305 Theology 3: Christology, Pneumatology, and Soteriology
3 credits
Theology 3 logically follows the topics in Theology 2. It is a biblical and historical examination of three important areas
of Christian theology: (1) Christology, that is, a study of the doctrine of the person of Christ, including discussion of His
deity, humanity, and the hypostatic union, (2) Pneumatology, that is, a study of the Holy Spirit, including studies of His
deity, personhood, and ministries, and (3) Soteriology, that is, a study of the work (“offices”) of Christ, the nature and
extent of the atonement, the application of the work of Christ, election and human responsibility, the terms of salvation,
and the eternal security of the believer. Pre-requisite: BT 151 Survey of Doctrine
BT 310 Theology 4: Ecclesiology and Eschatology
3 credits
Theology 4 is the capstone course in Christian theology dealing with two vital areas of biblical teaching: (1)
Ecclesiology, that is, a study of the church in its two aspects, universal and local. Discussions will include the nature of
the universal church, its distinction from Israel and the kingdom, and its inception on the day of Pentecost. Emphasis
will be placed on the structure and function of the local church including discussions of church government, the
ordinances of baptism and the Lord’s Supper, spiritual gifts, the priesthood of the believer, gender roles, finances, and
discipline, and (2) Eschatology, that is, the study of “the last things”—a comprehensive outline of the future events of
God’s prophetic program. The major millennial views will be presented along with differing views of the Rapture of the
church. Attention will be given to the unconditional covenants of the Old Testament and to the development of the
doctrine of the kingdom of God in the Old and New Testaments. The reality of hell and the current debate over
conditional immortality will also be discussed. Pre-requisite: BT 151 Survey of Doctrine
BT/PH 350 Apologetics
3 credits
Course Descriptions
An introduction to the task and methodology of Christian apologetics. This course will explore common objections to
the Christian faith and prepare students to respond in reasonable and appropriate ways. Students are also introduced to
the impact of postmodernism in our culture and the challenge it presents for the apologetic enterprise. May be used as an
humanities elective.
BT 359 Pauline Theology
3 credits
The student will be guided through the construction of Pauline theology by tracing the development of Paul’s teaching in
his epistles. The distinctive contribution of Paul to biblical revelation will be emphasized.
BT 458 Dispensationalism
3 credits
An introduction to and exposition of the dispensational system of Bible interpretation. Contrasts will be drawn with
Covenant Theology and Ultra-Dispensationalism. Special attention will be given to current refinements of the system
among progressive dispensationalists.
BT 462 Applied Theology
3 credits
The student will apply the theology he has learned to contemporary issues, seeking to develop his own viewpoints on
areas of theology in which Christians, especially evangelicals, differ. The student will learn to integrate theology to life
and will discover the significant role theological reflection ought to play in the life of a believer. Pre-requisites: BT 205
Theology 1, BT 210 Theology 2, BT 305 Theology 3
Biblical Languages Courses
FL 102 Greek 1, Part 1 - Fall Semester
4 credits
An introduction to biblical (Koine) Greek, emphasizing forms, vocabulary, and the basic structure of the language.
Attention is given to the translation of various parts of the New Testament and to gaining an appreciation for the insights
from the Greek text. May be used as a Bible/Theology or humanities elective.
FL 103 Hebrew 1, Part 1 – Fall Semester
3 credits
This course is an introduction to Biblical Hebrew emphasizing the forms and basic structure of the language so that the
student may read his or her Hebrew Bible. Attention will be given to the textbook, reading portions of the Hebrew
Scriptures, and gaining appreciation of the insights which can be learned from the Hebrew text. May be used as a
Bible/Theology or humanities elective. Pre-requisite: FL 104 Greek 1, Part 2, or permission of the instructor.
FL 104 Greek 1, Part 2 - Spring Semester
4 credits
A continuation of the content and forms presented in Greek I, Part 1, with continued emphasis on translation of the New
Testament. May be used as a Bible/Theology or humanities elective. Pre-requisite: FL 102 Greek 1, Part 1
FL 105 Hebrew 1, Part 2 – Spring Semester
3 credits
A continuation of the content and forms presented in Hebrew 1, part 1 so that the student may read his Hebrew Bible.
May be used as a Bible/Theology or humanities elective. Pre-requisite: FL 103 Hebrew 1, Part 1
FL 202 Greek 2, Part 1 - Fall Semester
4 credits
A study of the Greek New Testament designed to produce facility and speed in reading, a more advanced knowledge of
Greek syntax, and the development of a comprehensive methodology for the exegesis of the Greek New Testament. May
be used as a New Testament or Bible/Theology elective. Pre-requisite: FL 102 & FL 104 Greek 1, Parts 1 & 2
FL 203 Hebrew 2, Part 1 – Fall Semester
3 credits
A study of Hebrew and the Hebrew Bible aimed at producing facility and speed in reading, a greater comprehensive of
Hebrew syntax, and an understanding of sound exegetical method with a view to helping the student exegete narrative
literature. May be used as an Old Testament or Bible/Theology elective. Pre-requisite: FL 103 & FL 105 Hebrew 1,
Parts 1 & 2
FL 204 Greek 2, Part 2 - Spring Semester
4 credits
A continuing a study of the Greek New Testament designed to produce facility and speed in reading, advanced
knowledge of Greek syntax, and the development of a comprehensive methodology for the exegesis of the Greek New
Testament. May be used as a New Testament or Bible/Theology elective. Pre-requisite: FL 202 Greek 2, Part 1
Course Descriptions
FL 205 Hebrew 2, Part 2 – Spring Semester
3 credits
A continuing study of Hebrew and the Hebrew Bible aimed at producing facility and speed in reading, a greater
comprehension of Hebrew syntax, and an understanding of sound exegetical method with a view to helping the student
exegete poetic literature. May be used as an Old Testament or Bible/Theology elective. Pre-requisite: FL 203 Hebrew
2, Part 1
FL 210/211 Hebrew Reading Seminar
1 credit
This is a one credit course designed to enable students to read and understand their Hebrew Bible. They will review the
grammar learned in first year Hebrew, build their Hebrew vocabulary, and develop facility in reading Biblical Hebrew.
This course may be taken twice in order to earn two credits. Pre-requisite: FL 105 Hebrew 1, Part 2
FL 302 Greek 3, Part 1 - Fall Semester
3 credits
The student will use the tools learned in Greek II to prepare a commentary on a selected portion of Scripture. The
commentary will present the historical background, structure, and argument of the passage, as well as a detailed exegesis
of the Greek text. Taught jointly with Greek 4. May be used as a New Testament or Bible/Theology elective. Prerequisite: FL 202 & 204 Greek 2
FL 304 Greek 3, Part 2 - Spring Semester
3 credits
A continuation and extension of FL 302 Greek 3, Part 1. Taught jointly with Greek 4. May be used as a New Testament
or Bible/Theology elective. Pre-requisite: FL 202 & 204 Greek 2
FL 402 Greek 4, Part 1 - Fall Semester
3 credits
Utilizing the tools learned in Greek 2 students will prepare a commentary on a selected portion of Scripture. The
commentary will present the historical background, structure, and argument of the passage, as well as a detailed exegesis
of the Greek text. Taught jointly with Greek 3. May be used as a New Testament or Bible/Theology elective. Prerequisite: FL 302 & 304 Greek 3
FL 404 Greek 4, Part 2 - Spring Semester
3 credits
A continuation and extension of Greek 4, Part 1. Taught jointly with Greek 3. May be used as a New Testament or
Bible/Theology elective. Pre-requisite: FL 302 & 304 Greek 3
Business Courses
ACC 110 Financial Accounting
3 credits
An introduction to basic accounting concepts and procedures, including the accounting cycle, operating activities, and
investing and financing activities, and to develop the student’s ability to interpret and analyze accounting problems, and
to use accounting information to understand business situations and make business decisions.
ACC 220 Managerial Accounting
3 credits
An introductory course that stresses accounting concepts and procedures that relate to preparing reports for internal
users (management) of accounting information. Virtually all managers need to plan and control their operations and
make a variety of decisions. The goal of managerial accounting is to provide the information they need for planning,
control, and decision making. Pre-requisite: ACC 110 Financial Accounting
BUS 102 Global Business
3 credits
A survey of current issues and trends in global business. Specific emphasis will be placed on the impact of these trends
on managers in the multinational organizational setting. Topics include a study of the economic, financial and legal
environments of international business. In addition, trade issues and corporate strategies will be discussed.
BUS 140 Introduction to Management Information Systems
3 credits
An introductory course designed to provide students with fundamental knowledge of management information systems
and their concepts including the use of information systems for management decision-making and the impact of
information systems on management. Topics may vary as technology changes but the students will learn the tools of
productivity (e.g. Excel) such as electronic spreadsheet, database, and graphics.
BUS 201 Business Ethics
3 credits
An application of biblical principles, philosophy, and ethics to the practice of business, focusing on the nature of work
and excellence in business.
Course Descriptions
BUS 310 Principles of Finance
3 credits
A study in managerial finance and the environment within which the financial decision-maker functions. Topics include:
concepts and tools of financial analysis, working capital management, capital budgeting, the cost of capital, long-term
financial management, and international financial management. Familiarity with basic accounting is essential to success
in the course. Pre-requisite: ACC 110 Financial Accounting
BUS 320 Principles of Marketing
3 credits
Description and analysis of marketing processes, methods, policies, and institutions involved in the distribution process
with an evaluation of marketing institutions and middleman according to functions they perform.
BUS 330 Principles of Management and Leadership
3 credits
An examination of the basic functions of management: planning, organizing, influencing, and controlling. Emphasis is
placed on motivational theory and its application to individual and group functioning in work situations. Leadership
styles and their relationship to particular circumstances are analyzed.
BUS 340 Human Resources Management
3 credits
A study in the theories, practices, and laws involved in the human resource function. Recruiting, selecting, training,
evaluating, promoting, and disciplining personnel within business, nonprofit, and international operations will be
explored.
BUS 350 Production/Operations Management
3 credits
A study of the management of operation variables and their part in the overall strategy of a business or NGO. Topics
include: business process engineering, allocation of resources, cost control, quality control, and standards and procedures
development.
BUS 360 Non-Profit Organizations
3 credits
An introduction to theoretical, philosophical, practical and ethical perspectives related to nonprofit organization creation
and administration. The course will examine the historical development of the nonprofit sector, the multiple rationales
for the existence of the nonprofit sector, the distinctive characteristics of nonprofit organizations, the structures,
processes and complexities of organizational governance shared by volunteer board members and professional staff, the
dynamic environment of the contemporary nonprofit organization, and the current issues of importance to nonprofit
decision makers.
BUS 370 Non-Profit Organization Development and Management
3 credits
An examination of current issues, theories, policies, and methods in the development and management of nonprofit
organizations, with emphasis upon strategic planning; resource acquisition through marketing, fund-raising, and grants;
financial and managerial accounting; and human resources development, including the board, staff, and volunteers.
BUS 401 Organizational Behavior and Development
3 credits
An introduction to the history, theory, and applications of organizational behavior including personality, stress,
motivation, job design, goal setting, learning theory, group behavior, power, leadership, organizational structure,
decision-making, and control.
BUS 410 Business Policy and Strategy
3 credits
A course that focuses on the formulation, implementation, evaluation and control of business strategies and their
supporting organizational policies. Should be taken in final year of program.
BUS 420 Business Law
3 credits
A study of areas of law of particular importance to business, including contracts, sales, negotiable instruments, secured
transactions, agency, partnerships, and corporations.
BUS 430 Executive Leadership
3 credits
An examination of factors that contribute to successful executive leadership practice in a wide variety of organizational
settings. Topics include: the nature of leadership, the challenges leaders face, the impact of leadership, and how leaders
build organizations and key relationships. Emphasis is placed on leadership knowledge, approach, and application.
BUS 440 Entrepreneurship
3 credits
A course designed to provide students with an understanding of the process for identifying and evaluating
entrepreneurial opportunities. Students will also learn how strategy, marketing, financing, legal matters, and cash flow
impact opportunities in terms of execution and growth and how to position a new firm for success.
Course Descriptions
BUS 450 Business as Mission
3 credits
An introduction of mission strategies using various business platforms for access into restricted or limited access
countries. Topics include “tent making” strategies as well as professional service and corporate points of access. The
course will also explore ways to serve and develop others through the ministry of business.
BUS 460 Camp Ministry Management
3 credits
A course designed to prepare students for management roles in camp ministry settings. Topics include program
development, counselor/staff training, board relationships, financial management, legal environment, facilities
management, and strategic planning.
BUS 470 International Marketing
3 credits
Analysis of concepts and practices related to international marketing of products and services. Topics include a review
of the scope and challenges of international marketing; survey of current global environmental forces facing an
international marketer; the strategic impact of economic, cultural, political, and legal differences; assessment of market
opportunities by region; development of global strategies for consumer and business markets; international marketing
mix—product, price, promotion, and distribution issues; and implementing and communications of globalization
strategies. Prerequisite: BUS 320 Principles of Marketing
BUS 480 Business Internship in a Commercial Environment
3 credits
A course designed to provide students with the opportunity to gain valuable insight into actual business operations in
order to better correlate their academic experience with professional experience. The student will assume professional
business responsibilities within a commercial environment. May not be taken prior to summer before final year of study.
BUS 490 Business Internship in a Ministry Environment
3 credits
A course designed to provide students with the opportunity to gain valuable insight into actual business operations in
order to better correlate their academic experience with professional experience. The student will assume professional
business responsibilities within a ministry environment. May not be taken prior to summer before final year of study.
COM/BUS 230 Business Communication
3 credits
A study of the strategies and skills necessary for effective writing and speaking in business organizations. The course
will emphasize editing and proofreading for accuracy and expression.
ECN 105 Principles of Macroeconomics
3 credits
An introduction to the theories and problems of macroeconomic policy. The emphasis of this course is on macro analysis
and covers areas such as national income, commercial banking, business fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policies and
economic growth. Topics include supply and demand, measurement, inflation, unemployment, macroeconomic
relationships and models, as well as fiscal and monetary policy. May be used as a social science elective.
ECN 205 Principles of Microeconomics
3 credits
An introduction to basic concepts of micro-economics. Topics include constrained maximization, scarcity, opportunity
costs, marginal decision-making, indifference curve analysis, budget constraint analysis, production cost analysis, market
structures, the roles of various economic sectors, and diverse economic problems. May be used as a social science
elective.
Computer Studies Courses
CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of the technologies surrounding modern computer systems using the
state-of-the-art equipment in the college’s multimedia computer laboratory. Students will learn to use Microsoft Word,
Excel, Access, and PowerPoint effectively. Students will demonstrate the ability to perform efficient research using the
World Wide Web and knowledge of the ethical use of web-based resources.
CS 151 Modern Programming Techniques Using Visual Basic
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of event-driven computer programming in a modern visual
environment. Emphasis will be placed on developing applications with a consistent, standards-based, and intuitive user
interface. Programming will be taught in a logical progression, building on prior principles. Students will be introduced
to structured programming techniques, program elements, and elementary data manipulation using multiple data
structures.
Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
Course Descriptions
CS 205 Modern Office Automation Applications
3 credits
In this course, students will become proficient in the use of a representative suite of office automation tools including the
Microsoft Office 2000 products (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access). In addition to becoming proficient in the use of the
applications themselves, students will develop skills in using macros and the programming capabilities of Visual Basic
for Applications to integrate multiple applications into a cohesive business office solution. As computer professionals,
this will enable students to customize and extend the functionality of the standard applications to meet the specific needs
of a business or ministry. Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 212 Principles of Object-Oriented Programming
3 credits
Students will learn the principles of object-oriented programming through a series of directed projects. The
fundamentals of the Java programming language will be used to demonstrate and develop object-oriented concepts for
the students. The extensibility of object-oriented programming will be demonstrated using Java, the language common
to many World Wide Web applications. Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
BT/CS 225 Computer-Assisted Bible Study/Computers in Ministry
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the principles of applying the power and speed of computer technology to the tasks
associated with Scriptural studies, concurrent searches of multiple extra-biblical sources, access to Internet-based study
resources, and so on. Applications in the Computers in Ministry segment of the course will include an introduction to
world-wide telecommunications using the Internet for witnessing and communications with the mission field, the use of
computers in music ministries taking advantage of different electronic musical standards (MIDI, MP3, etc.), accessing
web resources as they apply to missions, publication technologies, church administration, preparation of sermon
materials and handouts, children's ministries, and so on. May be used as a social science or a Bible elective. Prerequisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 232 Introduction to UNIX
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the UNIX operating system. They will learn the file system, commands, and syntax
that are common to most UNIX variants. They will also learn to write program scripts using the UNIX commands and
the Perl scripting language to perform complex administrative functions. Pre-requisite: PH 108 Logical Analysis
CS 240 Educational Technology (Professional Education Core)
3 credits
The student will be introduced to the several best practice uses of technology in education. Special emphasis will be
placed on teaching methods used to integrate technology into instruction, as a communication tool, and to enhance and
assist the teacher's productivity and professional development. The following course objectives will be emphasized: 1)
to enhance understanding of the basic computer operations and communication and productivity tools, 2) to integrate
basic and advanced technology tools into instruction and professional growth, and 3) to demonstrate competence in the
use of computer and other technologies in research and problem solving. (Fall Semester)
CS 300 Certified Ethical Hacking (CEH)
3 credits
A course designed to give the student the skills necessary to look for weaknesses and vulnerabilities in target systems
using the same tools as a malicious hacker, but in a lawful and legitimate manner to assess the security posture of the
target system(s).
CS 302 Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (CHFI)
3 credits
Computer forensics is the application of computer investigation and analysis techniques in the interests of determining
potential legal evidence. Evidence might be sought in a wide range of computer crime or misuse, including but not
limited to theft of trade secrets, theft of or destruction of intellectual property, and fraud. CHFI investigators can draw on
an array of methods for discovering data that resides in a computer system, or recovering deleted, encrypted, or damaged
file information known as computer data recovery.
CS 304 Certified Security Analyst (CSA)
3 credits
Security Analysis is a combination of advanced skills that complement the Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification
by validating the analytical phase of ethical hacking. A CSA is a step ahead of a CEH by being able to analyze the
outcome of hacking tools and technologies. Through groundbreaking network penetration testing methods and
techniques, a CSA can perform intensive assessments required to effectively identify and mitigate risks to the
information security of the infrastructure.
Course Descriptions
CS 312 Database Management & Design
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of database management and design using a modern database system.
Instruction will include database specification, metadata, normalization, and data integrity. User interface design will be
addressed as it relates to the effective presentation of data, and graphing concepts will be examined. Pre-requisite: CS
232 Introduction to UNIX
CS 315 Computer Graphics
3 credits
This course is designed to teach the student to develop many different forms of graphics on the computer. The topics of
composition, color, texture, and form are covered to assist the student in the development of the creative as well as
technical aspects of graphic design. Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 317 Microcomputer Hardware
3 credits
This course is designed to provide the student with the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary to build, configure,
and troubleshoot a modern IBM-compatible microcomputer. Emphasis will be placed on microcomputer architectures,
the tools and resources available, and the fundamentals of the operating systems common to microcomputers today. At
the conclusion of this course, the student should be equipped with the knowledge necessary to pass the A+ certification
exam should they choose to seek that certification. Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 320 Cisco Certified Networking Associate
3 credits
This course builds on the core coursework to extend the student’s basic skills and knowledge to the point that they can
obtain the initial CCNA credential.
CS 322 Computer Networking
3 credits
In this course, students will develop a working knowledge of computer network topologies, protocols, and principles.
Instruction will include state-of-the-art communications technologies including asynchronous transfer mode (ATM),
switched fast Ethernet, and gigabit Ethernet. The focus of this course is local area networking and configuring
equipment used to connect multiple networks (routers). Pre-requisite: CS 232 Introduction to UNIX
CS 324 CCNP 1: Implementing Cisco IP Routing (Exam 642-902 ROUTE)
3 credits
This course and the associated exam will certify that the student has the knowledge and skills necessary to use advanced
IP addressing and routing in implementing scalable and secure Cisco ISR routers connected to LANs and WANs, and in
implementing secure routing solutions to support branch offices and mobiles access.
CS 325 Leveraging The World Wide Web
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the principles and techniques of developing effective sites on the World Wide Web
with particular emphases on Christian Ministry, evangelism, and small business commercial operations. Secure server
technology and the latest in programming techniques, such as Java, JavaScript, Cascading Style Sheets, Active Server
Pages, and other related technologies will also be examined. Pre-requisite: CS 232 Introduction to UNIX
CS 326 CCNP 2: Implementing Cisco IP Switched Networks (Exam 642-813 SWITCH)
3 credits
This course and the associated exam will certify that the successful candidate has important knowledge and skills
necessary to plan, configure and verify the implementation of complex enterprise switching solutions using Cisco’s
Campus Enterprise Architecture. The SWITCH exam also covers secure integration of VLANs, WLANs, voice and
video into campus networks.
CS 330 C++
3 credits
This programming course will allow the student to develop skills in the C++ programming language. This language,
which is the foundation for the UNIX operating system, is widely used in program development. The C# version of the
language will also be examined and compared with ANSI-standard C++. Pre-requisite: CS 151 Modern Programming
Techniques using Visual Basic
CS 335 Microsoft Windows Architecture
3 credits
In this course, students are introduced to the characteristics of the various flavors of Windows, from the consumeroriented Windows versions (95, 98, Me, XP Home, Vista Home) to the business versions (NT, 2000 Pro, XP Pro, Vista
Business). This course prepares the student to work effectively in all Windows versions with an eye toward systems
administration. Pre-requisite: CS 232 Introduction to UNIX
Course Descriptions
CS 340 Introduction to Robotics
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of human-machine interfaces as they pertain to programmable robots.
Using hands-on projects, the student will develop the programming techniques and logical skills necessary to control
autonomous machines. Pre-requisite: CS 151 Modern Programming Techniques using Visual Basic
CS 345 MySQL Administration
3 credits
In this course, the student will learn the details of developing and administrating databases using the open-source
MySQL software. The Structured Query Language will be used extensively in creating, populating, and manipulating
databases in both the UNIX and Windows versions of MySQL. Pre-requisite: CS 232 Introduction to UNIX
CS 351 MCSE-1: Managing a Windows Server 2003 Environment
3 credits
This course is a component of the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer certification process. The student will use
Microsoft-approved texts and online curricula to prepare for the associated certification exam. Pre-requisite: CS 101
Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 352 MCSE-2: Implementing a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure
3 credits
This course is a component of the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer certification process. The student will use
Microsoft-approved texts and online curricula to prepare for the associated certification exam. Pre-requisite: CS 351
Managing a Windows Server 2003 Environment
CS 353 MCSE-3: Planning a Windows Server 2203 Network Infrastructure
3 credits
This course is a component of the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer certification process. The student will use
Microsoft-approved texts and online curricula to prepare for the associated certification exam. Pre-requisite: CS 352
Implementing a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure
CS 355 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design
3 credits
This course provides the opportunity for the student to develop skills in the area of CAD principles and software. Using
modern CAD software, the student will learn to design 2-D and 3-D representations of real-world objects using industrystandard methods. Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 380 Publications
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the skills necessary to develop various publications on the computer, prepare them for
both in-house and out-sourced printing, and develop or access related resources on the network. These skills are taught
with an emphasis on the ministry applications of computer publication. Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer
Literacy
CS 400 Network Security Administrator (NSA)
3 credits
Students will develop network security skills and knowledge from defensive perspective. An NSA has fundamental skills
to analyze the internal and external security threats against a network, and to develop security policies that will protect an
organization’s information. Certification demonstrates that students know how to evaluate network and Internet security
issues and design, and how to implement successful security policies and firewall strategies. In addition, they will know
how to expose system and network vulnerabilities and defend against them.
CS 402 Penetration Testing Techniques
3 credits
This coursework will lead to the student obtaining his/her certification as a Licensed Penetration Tester (LPT) who can
analyze the security posture of a network exhaustively and recommend corrective measures authoritatively. It will
ensure that each student follows a strict code of ethics, is exposed to the best practices in the domain of penetration
testing and is aware of all the compliance requirements established by the industry.
CS 404 System Security Certified Practioner (SSCP)
3 credits
This course will prepare the student with the knowledge necessary to demonstrate initial information security skills,
principles and practices through passing the SSCP certification exam. The corresponding ISC2 certification can be
completed following the graduate’s first year of experience in the computer security field.
CS 410 Advanced LINUX
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the Linux operating system in more detail, building on the skills learned in the CS 232
course. Linux-specific administrative tasks, integration in a Windows environment, and other compatibility issues are
examined in detail, giving students an in-depth knowledge of the operating system. Pre-requisite: CS 232 Introduction
to UNIX
Course Descriptions
CS 412 Systems Analysis and Design
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the techniques of evaluating the management information systems requirements of
small to medium-sized ministries or businesses and determining the specifications of computer hardware, software, and
network components necessary to satisfy those requirements. The process examined in this course includes decisions
concerning computer hardware, commercial versus developed software, security considerations and acquisition and
implementation strategies. Pre-requisite: CS 232 Introduction to UNIX
CS 414 CCNP 3: Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (Exam 642-832 TSHOOT)
3 credits
This course and the associated exam will certify that the successful candidate has important knowledge and skills
necessary to (1) plan and perform regular maintenance on complex enterprise routed and switched networks and (2) use
technology-based practices and a systematic ITIL-compliant approach to perform network troubleshooting.
CS 416 Computer Networking Internship
3 credits
This course will assess the student’s skills and abilities in the application of networking knowledge to real-world
business or ministry situations. This one-semester internship must involve working directly with networking equipment
and personnel so that appropriate evaluation can take place.
CS 420 Programming in PHP
3 credits
The PHP language is used for server-side programming in the development of web site functionality. In this course, the
student will learn the syntax and application of PHP programming, allowing the student to develop sophisticated
functionality in web site design, database access, and other server-side functionality. Pre-requisite: CS 325 Leveraging
the World Wide Web
CS 422 Systems Administration
3 credits
In this course, students will become familiar with the skills necessary to install, configure, and administer operating
systems used in many business computer systems. Students will install and configure UNIX and Windows servers
including setting up user accounts, group permissions, and other security characteristics. A detailed comparison between
the UNIX and Windows operating systems will provide the student with a significant understanding of how
administrative tasks are performed in each. Pre-requisites: CS 232 Introduction to UNIX, CS 335 Microsoft Windows
Architecture
CS 425 Advanced Networking
3 credits
This course is designed to develop the student’s skills in the design of complex metropolitan or wide area networks
including the programming of devices used to provide these long-distance networking services. Pre-requisite: CS 322
Computer Networking and Telecommunications
CS 430 Scripting Languages
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of using scripting languages to control computers in the Linux and
Windows operating systems. Skills in the use of scripting languages to automate complex functionality will be
developed and used to control applications and perform administrative tasks. Pre-requisite: CS 232 Introduction to
UNIX
CS 432 Computer Security
3 credits
This course is designed to teach the student how to recognize and mitigate security vulnerabilities in computer systems.
Multiple hands-on projects will give students the opportunity to apply these skills in securing both Windows and UNIX
systems while classmates attempt to exploit known security holes to test the effectiveness of the security configuration.
Pre-requisites: CS 232 Introduction to UNIX, CS 335 Microsoft Windows Architecture
CS 435 Multimedia Systems
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the techniques used in the development and delivery of professional business
presentations. Students will develop skills in the creation and use of multimedia resources in five media areas: text,
graphics, sound, animation, and video. Students will learn the techniques of effective verbal and visual presentation of
business and spiritual concepts. Pre-requisites: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 440 Student-Selected Programming Language
3 credits
This course allows the student to select a programming language of interest not otherwise offered and develop
programming expertise in that language. Pre-requisite: CS 151 Modern Programming Techniques using Visual Basic
CS 445 Advanced Web Design/e-commerce
3 credits
This course is designed to take the student beyond basic web design. Web-based database access is covered extensively
as well as e-commerce components like electronic shopping carts. ASP, JSP, and Java Script are also addressed. Prerequisite: CS 325 Leveraging the World Wide Web
Course Descriptions
CS 450 Specialty Studies in Computer Technology
3 credits
This course is a program of directed study for the purpose of allowing the student to investigate a particular area of
computer specialization under the supervision of the Department Chair. Students are encouraged to research an area of
particular practicality within the sphere of Christian service such as the application of computer technology to Christian
education, Biblical studies, or Biblical language analysis. Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 454 MCSE-4: Planning a Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure
3 credits
This course is a component of the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer certification process. The student will use
Microsoft-approved texts and online curricula to prepare for the associated certification exam. Pre-requisite: CS 353
Planning a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure
CS 455 MCSE-5: Windows XP Pro
3 credits
This course is a component of the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer certification process. The student will use
Microsoft-approved texts and online curricula to prepare for the associated certification exam. Pre-requisite: CS 101
Fundamental Computer Literacy
CS 456 MCSE-6: Designing Security for a Server 2003 Environment
3 credits
This course is a component of the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer certification process. The student will use
Microsoft-approved texts and online curricula to prepare for the associated certification exam. Pre-requisite: CS 353
Planning a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure
CS 460 Java/Java Script Programming
3 credits
This course is designed to build on the student’s knowledge of C++ and web design. In this course, students will learn to
write Java applets and applications that can be distributed through the World Wide Web. These skills are widely sought
as the World Wide Web is used increasingly as an instrument for commerce. Pre-requisites: CS 212 Principles of
Object-Oriented Programming, CS 325 Leveraging the World Wide Web
CS 475 Ministry Internship
3 credits
This course is a practicum in which the student will work with a ministry (such as a camp or missionary) using his or her
computer skills to support the ministry and increase its effectiveness. Feedback from the ministry personnel will be used
to evaluate the effectiveness of the student’s application of computer technology. Pre-requisites: CS 315 Computer
Graphics, CS 380 Publications, CS 435 Multimedia Systems
CS 480 Ministry Project in CIS
3 credits
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for the student to demonstrate the skills involved in using computer
technology in a ministry application. It focuses on the skills acquired in the courses of the Ministry Track, encouraging
students to creatively apply those skills in a ministry-effective manner. Pre-requisites: CS 315 Computer Graphics, CS
380 Publications, CS 435 Multimedia Systems
Counseling Psychology Courses
COU 121 Counseling Foundations
3 credits
An introductory course in biblical counseling. The student will gain an understanding of counseling with a biblical
foundation while being exposed to various techniques and theories of counseling. A foundation will be set for basic
technique in counseling. Ethics, referral training, and available resources will be addressed. May be used as a social
science elective. Pre-requisite: PSY 107 Introduction to Psychology
COU 220 Counseling Psychology Field Experience
1 credit
A course designed to provide students the opportunity to integrate theory and apply learned methodologies as they
connect what they have learned to real world situations, within a supervised experience. Placement in a social service
position (as approved by the department) will include elements of work projects, classroom experience, and reflection on
field experience.
COU 311 Methods and Techniques of Counseling
3 credits
A study of the major techniques and strategies that can be appropriately and effectively used in counseling individuals or
families, including ways of determining, defining, and treating problems.
Pre-requisite: COU 121 Counseling
Foundations
Course Descriptions
COU 221 Marital and Family Therapy
3 credits
This course will focus on the theoretical and practical application of marital and family therapies with attention to the
problems presented and specific skills and treatment. Attention will be placed on the Biblical basis of marriage and
family (prerequisite, Marriage and Family Life) and analyzing aspects of contemporary family and marriage
relationships. Students will examine such topics as systems theory, the psychological bonds that shape families,
developmental stages of the family and marital life cycle, communication, and conflict resolution from a Scriptural and
systems perspective.
COU 321 Group Dynamics of Counseling
3 credits
This course is designed to assist the student with a basic understanding of the nature of group development, group
dynamics, group counseling theory, and ethical issues pertaining to group work. Students will have the opportunity to
apply their growing knowledge of group counseling by practicing the skills necessary for proposing, forming, leading,
and evaluating groups in a variety of counseling settings. Pre-requisite: COU 311 Methods and Techniques of
Counseling
COU 322 Multicultural Counseling Techniques
3 credits
A study of cultural and cross-cultural issues as they relate to counseling. The course will investigate the society and the
church in terms of the role of ethnic groups, lifestyle traditions and change, populations patterns and counseling in
various societies and mission fields.
COU 411 Addictive Behaviors
3 credits
This course will investigate the process of addiction associated with chemical dependency and other addictions, with
attention to the destructive behavior patterns and firmly held beliefs that prevent the establishment of an effective
counseling relationship and productive change. This course will use an instructional method of collaboration and
experiential learning to support students in improving their understanding of addictions and addicts, reducing established
stigmas, and exploring a Biblical perspective of addiction as a disease with affects the whole person (intellectually,
physically, emotionally, socially, and spiritually). Topics will address the variety of behaviors presenting as addiction
today as well as a focus on prevention, assessment, intervention, family issues, and the process of recovery.
COU 412 Ethics and Issues of Counseling
2 credits
A capstone, senior level course designed to expose the student to discussions regarding ethical, cultural, and spiritual
issues, with a minor emphasis in legal concerns. The student will learn how to use the knowledge and skills gained in
the Biblical Counseling program and his or her critical thinking skills in order to be effective in helping people with
problems.
COU 421 Applied Integration
3 credits
An examination of theological concepts and spiritual disciplines in the practice of psychology including sin, grace,
prayer, confession, forgiveness, use of Scripture, and fellowship. Attention will be given to the application of
these concepts and practices within an implicit/explicit model of integration, practice within psychological frameworks,
and in working with people with differing spiritual commitments and/or practices.
COU 422 Crisis Intervention Counseling
3 credits
This class will explore the concepts of crisis and trauma within the field of counseling and identify methods and concepts
of cause and response that non-professionals can utilize to support and help individuals experiencing crises. The
emphasis will be that of a Biblically-based non-professional ministry to help restore temporarily lost coping and calming
skills and aid with information to those in need. Specific emphasis will be placed on the process of dying and death with
application of theory, skills, and method for supporting the individual and family, with attention and discussion related to
ethics in end-of-life care.
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology
3 credits
The student will be provided with an introduction to the field of psychology together with its basic terminology and
concepts and be aided in developing a greater understanding of his own behavior and of human conduct in everyday life.
May be used as a social science elective.
PSY 211 Developmental Psychology
3 credits
Developmental psychology studies the continuous process of human growth and development throughout the lifespan.
This course will utilize a Christian worldview to examine the major theoretical perspectives that pertain to the biological
(bio-social), cognitive, psycho-social, and spiritual changes from conception through death. Students will consider the
biological influences (such as genetics), the environmental aspects (such as parenting techniques or the cohort effect),
and the Christian theological propositions (such as the imago Dei) that shape who we are as individuals. Developmental
disabilities and the effects of atypical development are considered but not emphasized. May be used as a social science
elective.
Course Descriptions
PSY 212 Psychological Theories and Application 1
3 credits
This course will address historical development and philosophies behind various psychological theories and their
application to help the student build a personal theory of counseling which is theologically sound and clinically
proficient to inform practice.
PSY 221 Psychological Theories and Application 2
3 credits
This course will address historical development and philosophies behind various psychological theories and their
application to help the student build a personal theory of counseling which is theologically sound and clinically
proficient to inform practice.
PSY 254 Child Development (Professional Elementary Education Core)
3
credits
This general education course focuses on the scientific study of children and adolescents and their development by
examining the physical and psychological changes that typically occur from conception through adolescence. Many
aspects of child development such as language acquisition, concrete thinking, peer relationships, motor skills, and the
emergence of self-worth are studied in the context of six major themes in developmental psychology. To assist parents
and vocational educators who use formal and informal instructional strategies to help guide a child's development in
speaking, reading, and writing, a minimum of seven class hours will be devoted to gaining a foundational knowledge for
language acquisition (birth through sixth grade) and the associated diverse cultural and linguistic variations. This course
fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester). May be used as a social science
elective.
PSY 311 Abnormal Psychology
3 credits
This course engages the student in the process of understanding abnormal behavior and the ways that mental health
professionals study and attempt to treat it. An eclectic, multicultural approach will cover the major categories of
disorders listed in the DSM-IV.
PSY 351 - Educational Psychology (Professional Education Core)
3
credits
Prerequisite: PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology or PSY 254 Child Development or PSY 260 Developmental
Psychology
This course explores factors affecting the classroom behavior of both teachers and students. Students will examine
psychological theories of child and adolescent development, including cognitive, social and moral development, then
will explore developmentally appropriate instructional strategies to address various cultural and student differences, and
learn to create positive and motivating student-centered learning environments. Additionally, students will develop
knowledge of summative assessment (of learning) and learn to use standardized testing data to drive instructional
decision-making. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester). May
be used as a social science elective.
Educational Ministries
EM 106 Educational Ministries
3 credits
A survey of the history of religious education from Old Testament times to the present and a study of theories of
Christian Education with an emphasis on developing a Biblical philosophy of Christian Education.
EM/SOC 109 Marriage and Family Life
3 credits
This course is designed to provide instruction in the biblical pattern of marriage and family life in relationship to the
supremacy of Jesus Christ. Special attention will be given to the key components of healthy relationships (i.e. intimacy,
communication, conflict and servant-hood.) Cultural worldviews on sexuality and marriage will be discussed in light of
God’s pattern for relationships. A variety of available resource materials on marriage and family will be presented
throughout the course. May be used as a social science elective.
EM 215 Children’s Ministries
3 credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to the Christian education of children. The course will assist students in
gaining the knowledge and skills needed to develop a program for teaching children and to select and present age
appropriate teaching materials.
EM 210 Philosophy of Christian Education (Required for ACSI Certification)
2 credits
In additions to course readings on schooling in the Christian tradition, the Christian school teacher candidate will acquire
foundational knowledge from the Association of Christian Schools International curriculum: Philosophy of Christian
School Education and will construct a personal philosophy of Christian education.
Course Descriptions
EM 221 Teaching Bible (Required for Secondary Education Bible Major)
3 credits
This course examines the principles and skills necessary to effectively teach the Bible in various contexts. The student
will demonstrate creativity as s/he prepares and delivers lessons from different literary genres of the Bible. (Spring
semester)
EM 222 Homiletics
3 credits
An examination of the theology, high calling and the case for expository preaching, Major emphasis is placed on the
nature, preparation, and delivery of expository messages. Both professor and peers evaluate student messages.
Pre-requisites: BT 110 Christian Life and Bible Study, BT 151 Survey of Doctrine, and COM 112 Fundamentals of
Speech
EM 225 Women’s Ministries
3 credits
A guided study of a woman’s role in the church and in society. Areas such as character development, New Testament
principles, and the ministry of women in family, church, society, and missionary endeavor will be considered.
EM 240 Educational Ministries Sophomore Field Studies
Pass/Fail
This pass/fail field studies course is for Educational Ministry students and provides practical field training in various
teaching techniques and methodologies to adolescents through outdoor education, team adventure challenge (TAC),
experiential and object lesson oriented learning and intentional programming.
EM 320 Small Group Communication
2 credits
In this course, students will examine and demonstrate the skills of communication leadership in small group ministry for
modern adolescents in the areas of teaching, pastoral care and discipleship. Specific concentration will be placed upon
the effectiveness of relational and communal learning from a biblical perspective. Students will apply these skills in the
context of a small group environment and reflect upon their experience throughout the course.
EM 340 Educational Ministries Junior Field Studies
Pass/Fail
This pass/fail field studies course is for Educational Ministry students and provides practical field training in various
teaching techniques and methodologies to adolescents through outdoor education, team adventure challenge (TAC),
experiential and object lesson oriented learning and intentional programming.
EM 350 Administration and Leadership
3 credits
This course is a survey of the basic principles involved in leadership, administration, organization, and management.
Special emphasis will be placed on developing a biblical theology of leadership and the servant leadership model. Other
areas of importance will include interpersonal relationships, decision making, time management, and methods in training
student leaders. Students will be presented with administrative issues they will encounter in non-profit organizations and
ministries.
EM 410 Educational Program of the Church
3 credits
An upper level course aimed at equipping students in the area of strategic ministry planning for the educational ministry
of the local church as well as para-church ministries. The two main components of concentration will be in the areas of
the educational cycle and professional development. Pre-requisite: EM 106 Educational Ministries
Camp Ministries Courses
CMP 101 Introduction to Camp Ministries
3 credits
This course is an introductory level course designed for students to gain a fundamental understanding to Christian
camping ministry. Course content will be structured around developing a Biblical philosophy of camp ministry with a
comprehensive survey of its major components through a servant leadership model. Close concentration and study will
be given to the uniqueness of various camp ministry models.
CMP 301 Christian Camping Practicum
6 credits
Students in the Camp Ministries major will be required to serve a minimum of three consecutive weeks at a Christian
camp of their choosing during the summer following their sophomore year. The purpose of this practicum is to allow the
student to discover and reflect upon their desire to pursue vocational Camp ministry. The student’s exposure should be
comprehensive in nature in the varied components of the Christian camping environment. The goal is to help the student
solidify a firm commitment to pursue professional Camping ministry. The student will be required to reflect upon their
experience through a daily journal/blog and will follow up with Educational Ministries faculty.
CMP 390 Christian Camping Overview
3 credits
A study of the components of Christian camping including but not limited to history, program development, board
relationships, counselor and staff training, government policy, facility management, safety, sanitation, maintenance,
Course Descriptions
budgeting, food service and strategic planning.
CMP 490 Camp Ministries Seminar
Pass/Fail
At the conclusion of the Camp Ministries program, each graduate will participate in a one-week seminar course. This
exercise will be used to assist the student in reflecting upon their experience in the Camping program, solidify a plan for
continued ministry, and evaluate the LTD program at Camp Forest Springs.
Youth Ministries Courses
EM 206 Foundations of Youth Ministry
3 credits
This course will primarily focus on the WHO and WHAT of youth ministry through a careful consideration of the main
components and strategies of the youth ministry environment in various ministry settings. Students will develop a
personal philosophy of youth ministry based upon key principles of teaching, curriculum development, the centrality of
discipleship and understanding the Biblical role of a youth director. The history, characteristics, learning styles and
developmental components of adolescents will also be closely examined throughout this course. Pre-requisite: EM 106
Educational Ministries
EM 230 A/V and Technology
1 credit
This course focuses on the influence and utilization of audio and visual technology in modern culture as well as its
relationship to Christian education. An interactive exploration of current media techniques, with an emphasis on
computer based technology for high quality and effective presentations will be explored and executed, as well as careful
consideration and discussion of how technology shapes and influences our faith and community (individually and
corporately).
EM 310 Youth Culture and Challenges
3 credits
This course is an intermediate level study of defining, identifying and caring for hurting youth within the pastoral
framework of the Christian faith. Attention will be given to contemporary adolescent development and complex cultural
challenges common to youth today. The overall approach to this course, as it addresses cultural challenges of youth,
will be broken down in three areas: 1). the overall “source” of these various issues 2). signs common to these issues and
3). basic pastoral care in aiding hurting individuals.
EM 315 Principles and Methods of Youth Ministry
3 credits
This course will primarily focus on the “how” and the “why” of youth ministry through careful consideration of the
central principles (guides-purpose) and methods (techniques-methods) which are normally and typically applied in a
healthy, biblically balanced approach to working with adolescents in various ministry contexts. Course lectures,
interaction and assignments will be purposefully designed to challenge students to think critically by integrating these
principles and methods with appropriate resources and innovative strategies to accomplish set ministry goals. Prerequisite: EM 306 Foundations of Youth Ministry
EM 380 Ethics and Issues in Youth Ministry
3 credits
An upper level course that deals directly with practical issues of ministerial leadership in youth ministry ethics and
principles for the interactive ministry management of people, resources and personal accountability and decision making
in a ministry. Intermediate attention will be given to points of liability in: working with and supervising minors,
safeguarding ministry, proper documentation, balancing life in ministry and awareness in conflict management.
EM 497 Youth Ministries Internship
12 credits
Training in a variety of youth ministries related areas including discipleship, leadership, small group interaction, program
planning, administration, and leading Bible studies. This course will be conducted on site at a local church, camp, or
para-church organization. This is a twelve-week program. Pre-requisite: EM 106 Educational Ministries
General Education Courses
Humanities
COM 112 Fundamentals of Speech
3 credits
The student will be taught the skills of public speaking. These skills will be built on a foundation of the study of
communication theory. Students will have ample opportunity to practice their speaking skills by delivering a variety of
speeches. Prerequisite: ENG 101 English Composition
COM/BUS 230 Business Communication
3 credits
A study of the strategies and skills necessary for effective writing and speaking in business organizations. The course
will emphasize editing and proofreading for accuracy and expression.
Course Descriptions
ENG 010 Introduction to English
3 credits
This course is designed for students who are unpracticed in foundational reading and writing strategies, in order to ‘bring
them up to speed’ in terms of college-level composition. The course has three main areas of focus. The first, reading
comprehension, is covered during the first few weeks of class. The other two, basic writing strategies and grammar and
style, are addressed side-by-side during the remainder of the semester. Students will practice the writing process
(including brainstorming, outlining, drafting and revising), as well as common critical thinking skills such as analysis
and evaluation. This writing will give students the opportunity to develop an interesting, grammatically-correct writing
style. The course includes three mini-papers, a number of quizzes, and six independent learning activities; there is no
final exam. Students must receive a C- in the class in order to advance to English Composition.
ENG 101 English Composition
3 credits
As a ‘gateway’ course, this writing-intensive class offers the opportunity for students to learn and master the reading and
writing skills necessary to succeed at college. The course focuses on analytical and persuasive writing about
controversial issues and includes a thorough introduction to research strategies. Students will write three papers of
varying lengths throughout the semester; these papers ask students to employ a wide range of writing strategies and
emphasize careful analysis and clear, eloquent writing. Students will also complete a number of short exercises, reading
assignments, and homework in order to prepare for the papers and train their critical thinking skills. Most programs
require a C- or higher in order to pass the class.
ENG 102 Introduction to Literature
3 credits
This course introduces students to the study and appreciation of literature. In the first weeks, students will study basic
interpretation skills; they will then draw on these skills and master them as we read a variety of literary texts, grouped by
topic. Past topics have included ‘Family Government,’ ‘Diversity,’ and ‘Faith.’ Literature from each of the four major
genres (short stories, poetry, drama and novels) is included. For each text, students will be asked to explain the literary
devices and to analyze the theme(s) they find, as well as relate the text and its meaning to everyday human life and
relationships. Most importantly, students will develop a thoughtful, biblical response to the literature read, pinpointing
any error(s) in the text but also recognizing the truth, and sometimes the presence of Christ, in what we read. Prerequisite: ENG 101 English Composition or equivalent
ENG 130-430 Writing Seminar
1 credit
This course will meet once a week for ten weeks. Course content may provide a review of reading strategies,
summarizing skills, research skills, the writing process, MLA documentation, practice in organizing and outlining a
paper, and analytical and interpretive writing. (Pass/Fail)
ENG 220 Christian Classics
3 credits
In this course we will read and reflect on classic Christian literature, texts representative of religious thought in their day
and still influential in the church today. Notably, we will focus not on theological or devotional works but on literary
ones (primarily poetry and fiction), beginning with Augustine's Confessions and moving up through Dante and Milton to
end with the twentieth-century giants T.S. Eliot and C.S. Lewis. The class will emphasize reading and in-class discussion
but will also include several short papers and an exam. Although we will study the artistry of each text, we will also
explore the way literature charts the development of Christian thought and practice, focusing on themes such as faith and
doubt, theology and service, and leadership in the church. Ultimately, reading the Christian classics will give you an
appreciation for their authors' sincere and reflective faith, thereby deepening your own understanding of Christ and walk
with Him. Prerequisite: ENG 102 Introduction to Literature
ENG 225 C.S. Lewis
3 credits
Author C.S. Lewis is often recognized for The Chronicles of Narnia, especially since three of the books appeared as
Hollywood films. Worthwhile as Narnia is, this course aims to explore the additional (and often deeper) literature
produced and so develop a big-picture understanding of one of Christianity’s most well-known authors. In the first half
of the course, we will concentrate on Lewis’s fiction: several short stories, as well as novels for adults and children. In
the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to Lewis’s non-fiction: his apologetic, critical writings and his
reflective ones. In addition, we will read a few essays of C.S. Lewis. While the specific texts read change from class to
class, every class includes both familiar and unfamiliar pieces: The combination will allow students to develop and refine
what they already know about Lewis, then add onto that knowledge and contextualize their understanding of the writer.
Course themes center around Lewis’s apologetic for Christianity as well as his vision for Christian belief and practice:
We will ask (and seek to answer) questions such as, “How can we know God? How can we know ourselves?”, “What is
important in our walk with God?” and “What lures us away from God? What draws us closer?” Most importantly, of
course, students will be encouraged to transfer what they learn from Lewis to their own personal life, thereby
strengthening their spiritual life and walking more closely with the real-life Aslan.
ESL 202 Introduction to Linguistics
3 credits
Course Descriptions
An overview of the field of linguistics and its major branches—descriptive, psycho-, socio-, and historical linguistics.
The focus of the course is the application of descriptive linguistics (including phonetics, phonology, morphology, and
syntax) in the classroom. This course is foundational to further coursework in teaching English to speakers of other
languages. Prerequisite: ENG 101 English Composition
FL 102 Greek 1, Part 1 - Fall Semester
4 credits
An introduction to biblical (Koine) Greek, emphasizing forms, vocabulary, and the basic structure of the language.
Attention is given to the translation of various parts of the New Testament and to gaining an appreciation for the insights
from the Greek text.
FL 103 Hebrew 1, Part 1 – Fall Semester
3 credits
This course is an introduction to Biblical Hebrew emphasizing the forms and basic structure of the language so that the
student may read his or her Hebrew Bible. Attention will be given to the textbook, reading portions of the Hebrew
Scriptures, and gaining appreciation of the insights which can be learned from the Hebrew text. This is a four credit
course for each semester. Pre-requisite: FL 104 Greek 1, Part 2, or permission of the instructor
FL 104 Greek 1, Part 2 - Spring Semester
4 credits
A continuation of the content and forms presented in Greek 1, Part 1, with continued emphasis on translation of the New
Testament. Pre-requisite: FL 102 Greek 1, Part 1
FL 105 Hebrew 1, Part 2 – Spring Semester
3 credits
A continuation of the content and forms presented in Hebrew I, part 1 so that the student may read his Hebrew Bible.
Pre-requisite: FL 103 Hebrew 1, Part 1
MUS 102/103 - 402/403 Emmaus Ensemble
1 credit
A mixed choral ensemble open to all students by audition. The Ensemble performs challenging choral literature from a
wide variety of musical styles. The course includes discussion and application of choral music concepts relating to
diction, tone production, blend, and musicianship. The second semester tour allows students the opportunity to gain
valuable experience in music ministry. May be repeated for credit. May be used as an humanities elective. Prerequisite: audition with the director.
MUS 108/109 – 408/409 Small Vocal Ensemble
1 credit
A performance course designed to equip students with the musical skills necessary for involvement in vocal music
ministry in the local church. The course encourages the development of independent singing skills and the application of
vocal music concepts relating to diction, tone production, blend, and musicianship. Groups could include a ladies trio,
male quartet, or other vocal combinations. May be repeated for credit. Pre-requisite: audition with the director.
MUS 180/181-480/481 Dubuque Community String Orchestra
1 credit
The Dubuque Community String Orchestra is made up of over thirty adult string players from the Tri-State area. The
orchestra presents classical concerts in the fall and spring, along with a pops concert at the Arboretum in August. Some
concerts include a full orchestra and local soloists. The ensemble rehearses Monday evenings, 7:00-8:30 PM, in the
Emmaus Choral Room. The DCSO is an official ensemble of the Northeast Iowa School of Music.
MUS 173 Survey of Music History
3 credits
A chronological survey of western music history from the Middle Ages through the 21st century. Emphasis will be on
genres, musical styles, and composers as they relate to the social and historical developments of each era. No previous
musical experience is required. May be used as a humanities elective.
MUS 242 World Music
A survey of world music that deals with cultural context and issues of indigenous music and worship.
3 credits
MUS 250 Foundations of Church Music
3 credits
A course exploring the use of music in the church. Emphasis on the biblical foundations of church music, church music
practices, and issues relating to music from Old/New Testament times through the present day. Includes study of
hymnology and church music materials across a variety of performance media and periods.
Course Descriptions
PH 106 Introduction to Philosophy: Christian Worldview
3 credits
This course will introduce the student to philosophy through a consideration of various theistic and non-theistic
worldviews, giving attention to the historical departure from Christian Theism in Western civilization and focusing on
current thinking with respect to worldview options. The student will be introduced to the concepts of secular humanism,
mystical humanism, modernism, and post-modernism, with a special emphasis on how these compare and contrast to
Christian Theism. Attention will be given to how the underlying presuppositions of these ways of viewing reality affect
one’s ability to think and evaluate his or her world and to how presuppositions relate to morality and ethics.
PH 108 Logical Analysis
3 credits
In this course, students will develop the fundamentals of critical thinking. They learn to analyze a statement and
formulate a logical response. Problems are analyzed and Boolean logic is mastered. Programming problems are
presented in pseudo-code as an extension of solution development. Pre-requisite: CS 101 Fundamental Computer
Literacy
PH/BT 350 Apologetics
3 credits
An introduction to the task and methodology of Christian apologetics. This course will explore common objections to
the Christian faith and prepare students to respond in reasonable and appropriate ways. Students are also introduced to
the impact of postmodernism in our culture and the challenge it presents for the apologetic enterprise.
REL/ICS 204 Religions in America
3 credits
An exploration of America’s religious background. Emphasis will be placed on the variant religious teachings of groups
such as Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormons, and New Age.
REL/ICS 216 Judaism
1 credit
An exploration of many facets of modern Judaism including Jewish life cycle, holidays, practices with an emphasis on
the differences between the doctrines and practices of Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform groups. The student will
also learn the difference between rabbinical Judaism and biblical Judaism.
REL/ICS 241 Roman Catholic Context Research
1 credit
This course is part of the study abroad program where students travel to Rome, Italy to contextualize Roman Catholic
history and theology. There is a research paper due at the end of the course which shows the student’s ability to grapple
with a topic on Roman Catholic theology as seen while in Rome.
REL/ICS 308 Comparative Religions
3 credits
An exploration of the major world religions will be undertaken along with a comparison of their teachings with the
teachings of orthodox Christianity. Religions such as Animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam will be analyzed for the
purpose of determining how best to reach adherents of these faiths with the gospel.
REL/ICS 341 Roman Catholic Context
3 credits
Roman Catholicism is an upper-level college course that aims to understand details important to Roman Catholics. This
course looks closely at the history and theology of Roman Catholicism , with practical implications of ministry in that
context.
Social Sciences
COU 121 Counseling Foundations
3 credits
An introductory course in biblical counseling. The student will gain an understanding of counseling with a biblical
foundation while being exposed to various techniques and theories of counseling. A foundation will be set for basic
technique in counseling. Ethics, referral training, and available resources will be addressed. Pre-requisite: PSY 111
Introduction to Psychology
CS 101 Fundamental Computer Literacy
3 credits
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of the technologies surrounding modern computer systems using the
state-of-the-art equipment in the college’s multimedia computer laboratory. Students will learn to use Microsoft Word,
Excel, Access, and PowerPoint effectively. Students will demonstrate the ability to perform efficient research using the
World Wide Web, and knowledge of the ethical use of web-based resources.
Course Descriptions
CS 240 Educational Technology (Professional Education Core)
3 credits
The student will be introduced to the several best practice uses of technology in education. Special emphasis will be
placed on teaching methods used to integrate technology into instruction, as a communication tool, and to enhance and
assist the teacher's productivity and professional development. The following course objectives will be emphasized: 1)
to enhance understanding of the basic computer operations and communication and productivity tools, 2) to integrate
basic and advanced technology tools into instruction and professional growth, and 3) to demonstrate competence in the
use of computer and other technologies in research and problem solving. (Fall Semester)
ECN 105 Principles of Macroeconomics
3 credits
An introduction to the theories and problems of macroeconomic policy. The emphasis of this course is on macro analysis
and covers areas such as national income, commercial banking, business fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policies and
economic growth. Topics include supply and demand, measurement, inflation, unemployment, macroeconomic
relationships and models, as well as fiscal and monetary policy.
ECN 205 Principles of Microeconomics
3 credits
An introduction to basic concepts of micro-economics. Topics include constrained maximization, scarcity, opportunity
costs, marginal decision-making, indifference curve analysis, budget constraint analysis, production cost analysis, market
structures, the roles of various economic sectors, and diverse economic problems.
GEO 117 World Geography
3 credits
The course is an introduction to world geography. It will cover material related to basic geographical concepts as seen
through the various regions of the world. The topics discussed in class will include physical, cultural, social, and
economic characteristics of a region.
GEO/BT 278/279 Bible Geography
3/4 credits
A study of the major geographic features of the land of Israel with particular attention paid to how these features
impacted specific events of biblical history. The goal is to help students become thoroughly familiar with the land on
which the history of the Bible unfolded. A fourth credit can be earned if the student participates in the study tour to
Israel.
HIS 131 Western Civilization 1
3 credits
This course covers the development of the West from the birth of civilization to the start of the Enlightenment (1700s).
Topics include the region/countries of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome. A brief look at the Protestant
Reformation and Renaissance will conclude the course. An important part of the course is the establishment of a model
on how to conduct historical inquiry.
HIS 132 Western Civilization 2
3 credits
The course covers the development of the West from the Enlightenment (1700s) to present day society. Topics include
the Enlightenment, French Revolution, Industrial Revolution, social unrest, nation-states, World War I and II, and
modern society. An important part of the course is the establishment of a model on how to conduct historical inquiry.
HIS 234 American History
3 credits
The course is designed to provide a broad overview of the history of the United States from 1607 to the present day.
Significant emphasis will be placed on colonial culture and society, the influence of the Enlightenment on the founding
of the nation, the challenges to establishing a new nation out of many nations, and the rise of the US in world affairs.
HIS 270 The Holocaust 1933 - 1945
1 credit
The student will examine the history of the Holocaust, the philosophies behind the scenes, and the aftermath. The
student will think through the possibility of a similar scenario recurring and will study the background of Anti-Semitism.
HIS 281 History of the Brethren Movement
2 credits
An introduction to the history and theology of the movement of which Emmaus is a part. The student will study the
factors which led to the beginnings of the movement and its first major division. The migration to North America and
the various traditions which developed will be examined.
HIS 340 Latin American History
3 credits
This course examines the development of Latin American society from the late pre-Columbian period to present day
society. Themes will include Spanish and Portuguese influence, consolidation, colonialism, racial interactions, labor
systems, the development of nation states, export economies, oligarchic rule, crises of depression and war, populist
revolts and reform movements, and modern issues.
HIS 350 Modern World History
3 credits
Course Descriptions
This course examines social, cultural, political, and economic changes, events, and concepts that defined and shaped the
20th century. Particular emphasis includes height of European imperialism, First World War, rise of totalitarian regimes,
Second World War, Cold War, decolonization and the rise of nation-states, genocides and civil wars, revolutions in Asia,
Africa and Latin America, Middle East conflict, fall of the Soviet bloc, social and intellectual movements, scientific and
technological breakthroughs, and economic globalization. It will also attempt to assess the impact of these and other
subjects upon today's world.
HIS/BT 376 Church History
3 credits
A survey of the development of Christianity through the centuries. Special emphases will be placed on the history and
development of Christian theology, influential leaders of the Church, the Protestant Reformation, and the rise of the
“Plymouth Brethren” movement.
HIS/BT 381 History of Israel (Old Testament)
3 credits
A general overview of the history of Israel from the call of Abraham through the return from Babylon. The course will
focus on the nation’s origin beginning with the patriarchs, its growth under bondage in Egypt, the conquest and
settlement of the promised land, the establishment of the united kingdom, the crisis and collapse of the nation during the
divided monarchy, and the return to the land. Attention will be given to placing Israel’s history in the context of the
history of the Ancient Near East.
HIS/BT 382 History and Literature of the Intertestamental Period
3 credits
A study of the major personalities and events of the Intertestamental period and their impact on the history of Israel and
its literature. Attention will be given to understanding how the world of the New Testament grows out of time period.
Literature will include significant amounts of reading from primary sources including: The Old Testament, Xenophon,
Diodorus, Plutarch, Herodotus, Josephus, The Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, and the Septuagint.
HIS/BT 410 History of the Ancient Near East
3 credits
An examination of the history, geography, culture, and religions of the major ancient civilizations of the Mesopotamian
valley and the eastern Mediterranean basin. Survey includes Egypt, Sumer, Assyria, Babylonia, Persia, Greece, and
Rome as well as Israel and her local neighbors. Readings from ANE texts supplement lectures and class discussions.
Archaeological evidence examined where relevant.
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology
3 credits
The student will be provided with an introduction to the field of psychology together with its basic terminology and
concepts and be aided in developing a greater understanding of his own behavior and of human conduct in everyday life.
PSY 211 Developmental Psychology
3 credits
Developmental psychology studies the continuous process of human growth and development throughout the lifespan.
This course will utilize a Christian worldview to examine the major theoretical perspectives that pertain to the biological
(bio-social), cognitive, psycho-social, and spiritual changes from conception through death. Students will consider the
biological influences (such as genetics), the environmental aspects (such as parenting techniques or the cohort effect),
and the Christian theological propositions (such as the imago Dei) that shape who we are as individuals. Developmental
disabilities and the effects of atypical development are considered but not emphasized.
PSY 254 Child Development (Professional Elementary Education Core)
3
credits
This general education course focuses on the scientific study of children and adolescents and their development by
examining the physical and psychological changes that typically occur from conception through adolescence. Many
aspects of child development such as language acquisition, concrete thinking, peer relationships, motor skills, and the
emergence of self-worth are studied in the context of six major themes in developmental psychology. To assist parents
and vocational educators who use formal and informal instructional strategies to help guide a child's development in
speaking, reading, and writing, a minimum of seven class hours will be devoted to gaining a foundational knowledge for
language acquisition (birth through sixth grade) and the associated diverse cultural and linguistic variations. This course
fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester)
Course Descriptions
PSY 351 - Educational Psychology (Professional Education Core)
3
credits
Prerequisite: PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology or PSY 254 Child Development or PSY 260 Developmental
Psychology
This course explores factors affecting the classroom behavior of both teachers and students. Students will examine
psychological theories of child and adolescent development, including cognitive, social and moral development, then
will explore developmentally appropriate instructional strategies to address various cultural and student differences, and
learn to create positive and motivating student-centered learning environments. Additionally, students will develop
knowledge of summative assessment (of learning) and learn to use standardized testing data to drive instructional
decision-making. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester)
SOC/EM 109 Marriage and Family Life
3 credits
This course is designed to provide instruction in the biblical pattern of marriage and family life in relationship to the
supremacy of Jesus Christ. Special attention will be given to the key components of healthy relationships (i.e. intimacy,
communication, conflict and servant-hood.) Cultural worldviews on sexuality and marriage will be discussed in light of
God’s pattern for relationships. A variety of available resource materials on marriage and family will be presented
throughout the course.
SOC/ICS 314 Cultural Anthropology
3 credits
An examination of the major facets of culture, such as language, gender roles, family structure, and religion. Students
will be challenged to become less ethnocentric and more objective and biblical in their evaluations of other cultures.
SOC/ICS 330 Cross-Cultural Communication
3 credits
An in-depth study of a range of common types of thinking and behavior that generally vary from culture to culture such
as male/female relationships, friendship obligations, view of time, body language and individual vs. group mentality.
These cultural patterns will be examined within the context of Biblical truth, and the relevance of awareness of these
cultural differences to successful missionary work will be emphasized.
Natural Sciences
MAT 050 Introduction to Algebra
3 credits
The student will begin with basic operations of mathematics, and culminate with first- and second-degree equations and
operations with polynomials, exponents, and radicals. Designed for students who do not possess sufficient mathematics
background to do college work. Successful completion will satisfy the Emmaus pre-requisite requirement for College
Mathematics.
MAT 140 College Math
3 credits
This course is designed to expose the student to a wide range of general mathematics with a desire to help them develop
and appreciation for the beauty of mathematics, and the value of mathematical thinking. Problem Solving and Critical
Thinking skills, along with the use of technology, will be emphasized and reinforced throughout the course as the student
becomes actively involved in solving applied problems. Topics to be covered include: Algebra review, Problem Solving,
Sets, Logic, Numeration Systems and Number Theory, Equations and Functions, Basic Geometry, and Basic Statistics.
Pre-requisite: MAT 050 Introduction to Algebra or acceptable score on math pre-test
MAT 160 Introduction to Statistics
3 credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to fundamental statistical tools that will allow them to use numerical data
to examine our world and to understand it better. The student will learn basic concepts of sampling distributions,
probability, statistical inference, t-tests, ANOVA, Chi-square, correlation, and regression. Use of technology, such as
Microsoft Excel and web-site statistical calculators, will be integrated throughout the course. Pre-requisite: MAT 050
Introduction to Algebra or acceptable score on math pre-test. May be used as a math elective.
MAT 270 Number, Operations and Algebra in Elementary School
3 credits
This activities-based course in elementary school mathematics content and processes is the first in a two-course sequence
that helps pre-service teachers and parents develop their conceptual understanding of number sense and algebraic
thinking. Because all mathematics is grounded in number, students will understand numbers, ways of representing
numbers, relationships among numbers, and numeration systems; understand meaning of operations and how they relate
to one another; and compute fluently and make reasonable estimates. Students will view algebra as a strand in the
mathematics curriculum from kindergarten on and will understand patterns, relationships, and functions; represent and
analyze mathematical situations and structures using algebraic symbols; use mathematical models to represent and
understand quantitative relationships; and analyze change in various contexts (NCTM’s PSSM, 2000). May be used as
amath elective. (Spring semester).
Course Descriptions
MAT 370 Spatial Math and Data Representation in Elementary School
3 credits
This activities-based course in elementary school mathematics content and processes is the second in a two-course
sequence in which pre-service teachers explore concepts of geometry, measurement, data representation and analysis and
probability of events. Through the study of geometry, students will analyze characteristics and properties of two- and
three-dimensional geometric shapes and develop mathematical arguments about geometric relationships; apply
transformations and use symmetry to analyze mathematical situations; and use visualization, spatial reasoning, and
geometric modeling to solve problems. Through the study of measurement, students will understand measurable
attributes of objects and the units, systems, and processes of measurement; and apply appropriate techniques, tools, and
formulas to determine measurements. Through the study of data analysis and probability, students will formulate
questions that can be addressed with data and collect, organize, and display relevant data to answer them; select and use
appropriate statistical methods to analyze data; and develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on
data. Through the study of probability students will understand and apply basic concepts of theoretical and experimental
probability (NCTM’s PSSM, 2000). (Fall semester).
SCI 230 Introduction to Earth Science
3 credits
A non-laboratory introduction to the study of the Earth as a planet intended for non-science majors. Topics from
astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography will be explored to develop an appreciation of our planet as an
integrated system. Pre-requisite: MAT 050 Introduction to Algebra or acceptable score on math pre-test. May be used
as a science elective.
SCI 241 Introduction to Human Biology
3 credits
The student will be given an introduction to the fundamentals of the anatomy and physiology of the human body.
Creationism will be stressed in contrast to the evolutionary approach.
SCI 242 Introduction to Human Biology Lab
1 credit
A hands-on introduction to the processes of scientific investigation in biological science. The student will gain practical
experience that will help him/her understand lecture concepts, acquire the basic knowledge needed to make informed
decisions about biological questions that arise in everyday life, develop the problem-solving skills that will lead to
success in school and in a competitive job market, and learn to work effectively and productively as a member of a team.
Inter-Area Studies
IAS 101 Transitions Seminar
1 credit
The student will participate in reading and group discussion of material chosen for its effectiveness to help incoming,
first-time freshmen adjust to the rigors of college life. Materials cover important spiritual, intellectual, emotional, and
social principles involved in the disciplines of successful academic study and time management.
IAS 102/3 - 402/3 Servant Leader Training
.5 credits
Student-Leader Training is designed to provide students with the opportunity to advance the learning process by
applying their classroom experience as servant-leaders to meet needs in their communities and local churches. The
purpose of Servant-Leader Training is to connect students with their communities and churches in order to provide
opportunities for meaningful service. The intent of SLT is for students to develop the skills and attitudes of servantleaders as they apply the knowledge and theories gained in the classroom.
IAS 104/5-404/5 Chapel
Pass/Fail
All students are required to attend daily chapel. Chapel is held for the Emmaus students, staff, and faculty and provides
an opportunity for the Emmaus community to come together daily for a devotional thought, singing, prayer, and
communication of information. Attendance is taken. A limited number of absences are allowed. This course is required
each semester of full-time attendance.
IAS 410 Senior Seminar
Pass/Fail
This course provides graduating seniors with the practical information and hands-on experience necessary for a smooth
transition from college into their chosen vocation and/or ministry. Topics covered include job search skills, job
interview techniques, budgeting, insurance, church life, community involvement, and other subjects critical to a
successful transition into post-college life.
Intercultural Studies Courses
ICS 104 Missions and Evangelism 1
3 credits
An introduction to the Great Commission, the biblical and theological foundations of the Gospel, and the practical
implications of these for every Christian. Practical assignments help students become bold, articulate, and creative in
Course Descriptions
sharing their faith.
ICS 106 History of Missions
3 credits
Lectures and readings designed to analyze the historical development of the missionary movement from the beginnings
of Christianity until the present time, with the goal of developing a historically-informed framework that shapes crosscultural critical thinking.
ICS/REL 204 Religions in America
3 credits
An exploration of America’s religious background. Emphasis will be placed on the variant religious teachings of groups
such as Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormons, and New Age. May be used as a humanities elective.
ICS 212 Missionary Life and Work
3 credits
An in-depth consideration of guidelines and practical principles related to preparation for missions. Major aspects of a
missionary’s life and work will be explored, and complex missionary problems will be analyzed with a view to
suggesting practical Biblical solutions.
ICS 214 Missions and Evangelism 2
3 credits
Practical instruction on a lifestyle of active involvement in the Great Commission, including the steps needed to take the
Gospel across linguistic, geographic, and cultural boundaries.
ICS/REL 216 Judaism
1 credit
An exploration of many facets of modern Judaism including Jewish life cycle, holidays, practices with an emphasis on
the differences between the doctrines and practices of Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform groups. The student will
also learn the difference between rabbinical Judaism and biblical Judaism. May be used as a humanities elective.
ICS/REL 308 Comparative Religions
3 credits
An examination of the major world religions will be undertaken along with a comparison of their teachings with the
teachings of orthodox Christianity. Religions such as Animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam will be analyzed for the
purpose of determining how best to reach adherents of these faiths with the gospel. May be used as a humanities
elective.
ICS 310 Church Planting and Growth
3 credits
A study of the principles and strategies of church planting and growth as revealed in the New Testament and practiced in
the contemporary world. Each student will analyze his own church and its growth carefully and then prepare a strategy
for its future growth.
ICS/SOC 314 Cultural Anthropology
3 credits
An examination of the major facets of culture, such as language, gender roles, family structure, and religion. Students
will be challenged to become less ethnocentric and more objective and biblical in their evaluations of other cultures.
May be used as a social science elective.
ICS/SOC 330 Cross-Cultural Communication
3 credits
An in-depth study of a range of common types of thinking and behavior that generally vary from culture to culture such
as male/female relationships, friendship obligations, view of time, body language and individual vs. group mentality.
These cultural patterns will be examined within the context of Biblical truth, and the relevance of awareness of these
cultural differences to successful missionary work will be emphasized. May be used as a social science elective.
ICS/SOC 341-347 Context Courses
REL/ICS 241 Roman Catholic Context Research
1 credit
This course is part of the study abroad program where students travel to Rome, Italy to contextualize Roman Catholic
history and theology. There is a research paper due at the end of the course which shows the student’s ability to grapple
with a topic on Roman Catholic theology as seen while in Rome.
ICS/REL 341 Roman Catholic Context
3 credits
Roman Catholicism is an upper-level college course that aims to understand details important to Roman Catholics. This
course looks closely at the history and theology of Roman Catholicism with practical implications of ministry in that
context. May be used as a humanities elective.
ICS 342 Far Eastern Context
3 credits
A study of Far Eastern history, culture, language and religions with practical implications of cross-cultural ministry in
that context.
Course Descriptions
ICS 343 Islamic Context
3 credits
A study of Islamic history, culture, and religion with practical implications of cross-cultural ministry in that context.
ICS 347 European Context
3 credits
A study of European history, culture, and religion with practical implications of cross-cultural ministry in that context.
ICS 406 - 408 Intercultural Ministry Project
1-3 credits
This independent study course has three components: involvement in a short term cross-cultural ministry experience,
reading in preparation for the experience, and upon returning, a paper analyzing the experience. The student’s
participation will be evaluated by the team leader. The number of credit hours given will be based on the length of the
experience, the quantity of the reading, and the length and quality of the paper. Approval for this course must come from
the Intercultural Studies department three months before travel.
ICS 406 = 1 credit
ICS 407 = 2 credits
ICS 408 = 3 credits
ICS 410 Issues in Church Planting and Revitalization
3 credits
A study of selected issues inherent in church planting and church revitalization. Issues are explored through assigned
readings and an interactive seminar format, and include the broad categories of planting, leadership, and church life and
ministry. Prerequisite: ICS 310 Church Planting & Growth.
ICS 412 CPR Practicum
3 credits
An opportunity to integrate classroom instruction with field application, the CPR practicum consists of a minimum of 30
hours of faculty-supervised ministry working alongside a qualified mentor involved in either church planting or church
revitalization. This is a capstone course for the Church Planting and Revitalization Minor.
ICS 422 Cross-Cultural Internship
12 credits
The capstone experience of the Intercultural Studies program consists of one semester of supervised ministry in a crosscultural setting, usually outside of the United States. In preparation for the internship, the student will write an extensive
research paper on the country of service. During the internship, the student will study the language, engage in ministry,
and keep a journal of his or her experiences. Upon conclusion of the internship, the student will write a reflection paper
about what he or she has learned about missions through the cross-cultural experience.
ICS 451 Issues in Missions
3 credits
A study of selected, controversial issues in missions. Issues are explored in a highly interactive, student-led seminar
format. Students are required, in writing, to summarize each issue and biblically defend their personal point of view on
the issue. The course is the capstone course for ICS majors. Other students require special permission to register.
ICS 461 Urban Ministries
3 credits
The course is designed to make the student aware of the rapid, worldwide trend of urbanization and how this trend
should affect the deployment of ministry resources. Topics include the biblical theology of urban ministry, barriers to
reaching cities, strategies of urban church planting, and specialized urban ministries.
Music Courses
Ensembles
MUS 102/103 - 402/403 Emmaus Ensemble
1 credit
A mixed choral ensemble open to all students by audition. The Ensemble performs challenging choral literature from a
wide variety of musical styles. The course includes discussion and application of choral music concepts relating to
diction, tone production, blend, and musicianship. The second semester tour allows students the opportunity to gain
valuable experience in music ministry. May be repeated for credit. May be used as an humanities elective. Prerequisite: audition with the director.
Course Descriptions
MUS 108/109 – 408/409 Small Vocal Ensemble
1 credit
A performance course designed to equip students with the musical skills necessary for involvement in vocal music
ministry in the local church. The course encourages the development of independent singing skills and the application of
vocal music concepts relating to diction, tone production, blend, and musicianship. Groups could include a ladies trio,
male quartet, or other vocal combinations. May be repeated for credit. May be used as a humanities elective. Prerequisite: audition with the director.
MUS 180/1-480/1 Dubuque Community String Orchestra
1 credit
The Dubuque Community String Orchestra is made up of over thirty adult string players from the Tri-State area. The
orchestra presents classical concerts in the fall and spring, along with a pops concert at the Arboretum in August. Some
concerts include a full orchestra and local soloists. The ensemble rehearses Monday evenings, 7:00-8:30 PM, in the
Emmaus Choral Room. The DCSO is an official ensemble of the Northeast Iowa School of Music. May be used as a
humanities elective.
Applied Music
MUS 104/105 - 404/405 Applied Private Instrumental
1 credit
Individual instruction on a chosen instrument at levels from the beginner up to the college level. One half-hour lesson
and 5 hours of practice per week are required. Lessons are provided through the Northeast Iowa School of Music. May
be repeated for credit. Private lesson fee of $150
MUS 106/107 - 406/407 Applied Private Piano
1 credit
Individual instruction in piano at levels from the beginner up to the college level. One half-hour lesson and 5 hours of
practice per week are required. All private piano students perform in a recital at the end of the semester. May be
repeated for credit. Private lesson fee of $150
MUS 106A/107A – 406A/407A Applied Private Piano
2 credits
Individual instruction in piano at levels from the beginner up to the college level. One hour lesson and 10 hours of
practice per week are required. All private piano students perform in a recital at the end of the semester. May be
repeated for credit. Private lesson fee of $150
MUS 120/121 - 420/421 Applied Private Voice
1 credit
Individual instruction voice at levels from the beginner up to the college level. One half-hour lesson and 3 hours of
practice per week is required. All private voice students perform in a recital at the end of the semester. May be repeated
for credit. Private lesson fee of $150
MUS 120A/121A – 420A/421A Applied Private Voice
2 credits
Individual instruction voice at levels from the beginner up to the college level. One hour lesson and 6 hours of practice
per week is required. All private voice students perform in a recital at the end of the semester. May be repeated for
credit. Private lesson fee of $150
MUS 140/1-440/1 Accompanying
1 credit
Advanced pianists can earn one credit serving as accompanist for Chapel Choir or the Emmaus Ensemble. Directed
study will be under the supervision of the conductor and piano instructor. May be repeated for credit.
MUS 235/6-435/6 Concert Attendance
Pass/Fail
All music majors are required to complete six semesters of concert attendance during their academic program. Music
majors are required to attend five concerts/recitals per semester.
MUS 328 Keyboard Skills
1 credit
Directed piano study to gain keyboard proficiency in sight-reading, harmonization, transposition, score reading, and
other necessary technical skills.
Music
MUS 050 Music Fundamentals
3 credits
This course introduces students to the rudiments of music theory through reading and writing music. Concepts that will
be learned are rhythmic and pitch notation, key signatures, scales, chords and inversions, intervals and tonality.
Emphasis on fundamental ear training and dictation. Credits do not apply to the Music Ministry degree. May be used as
an elective for the certificate program only.
MUS 114 Music Theory 1
2 credits
Course Descriptions
Foundational study in diatonic harmony and melody. Topics include key signatures, intervals, triads, Roman numeral
labeling, species counterpoint, voice-leading and part-writing, harmonic function, and basic harmonization. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher on music fundamentals exam, in MUS 050, or consent of instructor.
MUS 115 Aural Skills 1
1 credit
Supports the objectives of Music Theory 1 by developing analytical listening abilities and sight-reading skills. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher on music fundamentals exam in MUS 050, or consent of instructor.
MUS 173 Survey of Music History
3 credits
A chronological survey of western music history from the Middle Ages through the 21st century. Emphasis will be on
genres, musical styles, and composers as they relate to the social and historical developments of each era. No previous
musical experience is required. May be used as a humanities elective.
MUS 214 Music Theory 2
2 credits
Continuing study of diatonic harmony and introduction to chromatic harmony. Topics include seventh chords, nonchord-tones, secondary-function chords, and modulation. Pre-requisite: Grade of C or higher in MUS 114 or consent of
instructor.
MUS 215 Aural Skills 2
1 credit
Continuation of Aural Skills 1. Supports the objectives of Music Theory 2 by developing analytical listening abilities
and sight-reading skills. Pre-requisite: Grade of C or higher in MUS 115 or consent of instructor.
MUS 242 World Music
A survey of world music that deals with cultural context and issues of indigenous music and worship.
3 credits
MUS 250 Foundations of Church Music
3 credits
A course exploring the use of music in the church. Emphases on the biblical foundations of church music, church music
practices, and issues relating to music from Old/New Testament times through the present day. Includes study of
hymnology and church music materials across a variety of performance media and periods. May be used as a humanities
elective.
MUS 256 Methods of Music Ministry
3 credits
An in-depth study on the management and implementation of a music ministry. Includes musical, administrative,
technological, and event-planning training along with the essentials of service preparation. Pre-requisite: MUS 214
Music Theory 2 or consent of instructor.
MUS 273 Music History 1
3 credits
A detailed study of western music history from antiquity to 1750 through score study and analysis, listening, and source
readings. Musical thought and theory in classical Greece, ancient Christian music, Gregorian chant, Medieval and
Renaissance polyphony, and Baroque vocal and instrumental genres will be covered. Pre-requisite: MUS 173 Survey of
Music History
MUS 286 Survey of Choral Literature
2 credits
An overview of choral repertoire from the Renaissance to the present. A wide variety of genres and styles will be
discussed, including choral music suitable for elementary-, middle-, and high-school choirs. Students will observe offcampus rehearsals in local schools.
MUS 314 Music Theory 3
2 credits
Advanced study in diatonic and chromatic harmony. Topics include modulation, the Neapolitan chord, augmented sixth
chords, borrowed chords, phrasing, small forms, and fugues. Pre-requisite: Grade of C or higher in MUS 214 or
consent of instructor.
MUS 315 Aural Skills 3
1 credit
Continuation of Aural Skills 2. Supports the objectives of Music Theory 3 by developing analytical listening abilities
and sight-reading skills. Pre-requisite: Grade of C or higher in MUS 215 or consent of instructor.
MUS 350 Vocal Techniques
1 credit
Techniques of vocal production, the function of the voice, and application of these concepts to choral singing; special
emphasis on the training of young and maturing voices.
MUS 365 Conducting 1
2 credits
Training in technical aspects of conducting, score reading/preparation, rehearsal techniques, and musical interpretation.
Course Descriptions
Emphasis on choral conducting. Pre-requisite: MUS 210 Theory/SS/ET 2 or consent of instructor
MUS 373 Music History 2
3 credits
A detailed study of Western art music from the Classical Era to the present through score study and analysis, listening,
and source readings. Special emphasis will be placed on the forms of 18th century music, the Enlightenment and its
effect on music in society, Romanticism and 20th century stylistic diversity. American vernacular styles are also
discussed. Pre-requisite: MUS 173 Survey of Music History
MUS 385 Diction and Song Literature
2 credits
A study of the fundamentals of lyric diction and use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Pronunciation of
English, Italian, French and German art song and arias with IPA annotations is emphasized. Art song styles specific to
these four languages will be introduced with incidental study of composers in this genre.
MUS 388 Composing/Arranging
2 credits
Practical composing and arranging for the music ministry of the church. Primary focus will be vocal, but instrumental
composing/arranging will be introduced. Idiomatic use of harmony, melodic figures, voicing, modulation, tonal colors,
and notational processes will be covered. Pre-requisite: MUS 210 or consent of instructor
MUS 414 Music Theory 4
2 credits
Advanced study in chromatic harmony of the 19th Century. Topics include enharmonic use of augmented sixth chords,
diminished seventh chords, keys, and analysis of larger forms. Brief overview of Impressionism. Pre-requisite: Grade
of C or higher in MUS 314 or consent of instructor.
MUS 415 Aural Skills 4
1 credit
Continuation of Aural Skills 3. Supports the objectives of Music Theory 4 by developing analytical listening abilities
and sight-reading skills. Pre-requisite: Grade of C or higher in MUS 315 or consent of instructor.
MUS 455 Music Ministry Practicum
2 credits
A supervised practicum within or beyond the institution which allows for application of music ministry skills, preferably
guided leadership experience. Normally completed in the last semester of study. Pre-requisite: MUS 365 Conducting
MUS 465 Conducting 2
2 credits
Advanced training in technical aspects of conducting, score reading/preparation, rehearsal techniques, and musical
interpretation. Pre-requisite: MUS 365 Conducting 1
Teacher Education Courses
ED 106 Introduction to Education (Professional Education Core)
3 credits
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ED 194 Field Studies
This course serves as the gateway to all other professional coursework in the Emmaus Teacher Education Program. It
provides opportunities to explore the teaching profession in both public and private schools, to analyze the craft of
teaching, to demonstrate beginning skill in the teaching process, to briefly examine the philosophical and historical
foundations of education in America, and to dialogue about current issues affecting the state of education in America.
(Spring Semester)
ED 194 Field Studies (Professional Education Core)
Pass/Fail
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ED 106 Introduction to Education or EM 210 Philosophy of
Christian Education
This pass/fail course focuses on practicing the principles and skills of Systematic Supervision with a variety of age
groups in an educational setting. A minimum of ten contact hours required, as assigned. (Spring Semester)
ED 203 Children’s Literature
3 credits
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ED 294 Field Studies
Students will read and evaluate various genres of children’s literature from variety of authors and cultures. Students will
use book selection criteria and discuss applications for using all forms of literature in the preschool through upper
elementary classroom. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester)
Course Descriptions
ED 231 Introduction to Exceptionalities (Professional Education Core)
3 credits
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ED 295 Field Studies
This course is designed to introduce education majors to student exceptionalities, including giftedness. The course
delineates the regular education teacher’s role in the identification, evaluation, and education of the exceptional student.
In addition, it focuses on the legal requirements of special education and the gifted student. This course fulfills in part the
requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Spring Semester)
ED 294 Field Studies (Professional Elementary Education Core)
Pass/Fail
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ED 203 Children’s Literature
This pass/fail class focuses on exposure to and application of quality children’s literature in an educational setting. A
minimum of eight to ten contact hours required, as assigned. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8
Reading Endorsement. (Fall Semester)
ED 295 Field Studies (Professional Education Core)
Pass/Fail
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ED 231 Introduction to Exceptionalities
This pass/fail course focuses on exposure to a variety of special educational settings. A minimum of eight hours
required, as assigned. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Spring
Semester)
ED 301 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-6 Reading
3 credits
Prerequisites: ED 203 Children’s Literature and Admission to the TEP
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 394 Field Studies
Prepares teacher candidates to plan and implement effective reading instruction, with a focus on the primary grades (K2). Students will understand the reading process and the development and diverse nature of children relating to reading
instruction. Students will examine, evaluate, apply, and reflects on various materials, and research-based methods and
strategies for teaching the major components of reading (phonemic awareness, word identification/phonics, vocabulary,
fluency, and comprehension). This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall
Semester)
ED 305 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-8 Language Arts
3 credits
Prerequisite: Declaration of Elementary Education Major
This course will prepare teacher candidates to plan and implement effective, integrated language arts program in the
elementary grades. Students will analyze, apply, and evaluate a variety of resources, methods, and techniques for
teaching reading, writing, spelling, grammar, speaking, and listening skills through the development of a literature-based,
cross-curricular unit, which meets the diverse needs of each learner. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148
K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Spring Semester)
ED 307 Teaching Visual and Performing Arts
2 credits
Prerequisite: Admission to the TEP
This course will equip teacher candidates to present visual (media, skills, and theory) and performing art (costumes &
props to create characters, skits and poetry, music and movement) activities in the elementary school. Emphasis is
placed on integrating the arts for learning across the K-6 curriculum. (Spring Semester)
ED 309 Teaching Elementary Music (Professional Music Education Core)
2 credits
Prerequisites: MUS 050 Music Fundamentals or demonstrated proficiency and Admission to the TEP
Lesson planning, curricular materials, and instructional strategies for elementary-school classroom music. Includes
curriculum design, principles of assessment, and issues of classroom management. The course also provides strategies
for the use music as a tool to enhance teaching in other curricular areas. (Spring Semester)
ED 310 Teaching Secondary Music (Professional Music Education Core)
2 credits
Prerequisites: MUS 050 Music Fundamentals or demonstrated proficiency and Admission to the TEP
Lesson planning, curricular materials, instructional and rehearsal strategies for middle-school and high-school music.
Includes curriculum design, principles of assessment, and issues of classroom management for both general music and
vocal ensembles. (Spring Semester)
Course Descriptions
ED 311 Teaching Diverse Learners (Professional Education Core)
3 credits
Prerequisites: ED 231 Introduction to Exceptionalities and Initial Admission to the TEP
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 394 Field Studies (exception for Secondary Bible)
The purpose of this course is for education majors to become aware of and respect the characteristics of diverse students
and learn attitudes and methods to assist/insure learning. For this course diversity issues may include, but are not limited
to the following: cultures, race and ethnicity, sexual identity and gender, religion, socioeconomic status, communication
differences, family diversity and social marginality. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading
Endorsement. (Fall Semester)
ED 330 Instructional Design (Professional Education Core)
1 credit
Prerequisites: ED 305 CIA K-8 Language Arts (ELED majors), ED 420 Content Area Literacy (SCED majors),
Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ED 331 Instructional Adaptations, and Continuing Admission to the TEP
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 395 Practicum 1 or ED 396 Music Practicum 1
Teacher candidates will be instructed in the principles of lesson development and assessment. Elementary education
majors will develop cross-curricular, literature-based, thematic units. Secondary education majors will develop content
specific curricular units. These units are designed to meet the needs of the wide-range of learners found in the
elementary and secondary classroom. Practical application of this and other education coursework is encouraged as units
are taught during a weeklong practicum. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement.
(Spring semester)
ED 331 Instructional Adaptations (Professional Education Core)
3 credits
Prerequisite: ED 311 Teaching Diverse Learners
This course has two major themes: teaching in brain-compatible ways and planning and adapting instruction to meet the
needs of each learner in the elementary and secondary classroom. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148
K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Spring semester)
ED 355 Reading and Literacy Strategies (Required for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement)
3 credits
Prerequisite: ED 301CIA K-6 Reading
An overview of language skill development in children and the process of learning to read form the major part of this
course. It is designed to provide the elementary teacher with the background to understand the reading process and to
use this knowledge in evaluating and selecting reading strategies and materials for the classroom. Emphasis will be
placed on comprehension strategies in grades 3-6. The readings, discussions, and assignments in the course concern the
implications of research and current practices upon teachers’ instructional decisions regarding reading. This course
fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Spring semester)
ED 375 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment of K-6 Mathematics
3 credits
Prerequisites: Minimum of 6 semester hours of mathematics content, ED 330 Instructional Design, ED 331 Instructional
Adaptations, ED 395 Practicum 1, and Initial Admission to Student Teaching
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 495 Practicum 2
This required course for elementary school educators in the Teacher Education Program is designed to engage teacher
candidates in connecting mathematical concepts to procedures, to emphasize the implementation of problem-solving
experiences and to provide a framework for the planning and managing of mathematics curriculum, instruction, and
assessment. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester)
ED 381 Teaching Physical Education
1 credit
This course will prepare teacher candidates to teach physical education in an elementary school setting. (Fall semester)
ED 394 Field Studies (Professional Education Core)
Pass/Fail
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 311 Teaching Diverse Learners
This pass/fail course focuses on K-12 student diversity and the experience of teaching K-6 Reading or secondary school
content to small or whole groups. Music education students will observe and reflect on student diversity, while assisting
in a music classroom. In addition to observing, reflecting, and assisting the teacher, you will plan, create, and teach at
least two lessons (whole or small group) as directed by the classroom teacher. A minimum of 20 hours required, as
assigned. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester)
Course Descriptions
ED 395 Practicum 1 (Professional Education Core)
1 credit
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 330 Instructional Design
Teacher candidates will experience a variety of educational settings. Classroom involvement will include small-group
activities, one-on-one tutoring, and significant teaching opportunities. In addition to observing, reflecting, and assisting
the teacher, you will teach at least four lessons from the unit created in ED 330 Instructional Design during a weeklong
practicum. A minimum of fifty-five contact hours required, as assigned. (Spring semester)
ED 395 A – K-6 ELED Practicum (1 credit)
ED 395 B – 5-12 SCED Practicum (1 credit)
ED 396 Music Practicum 1 (Professional Music Education Core)
1 credit
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 330 Instructional Design
This one-credit course focuses on the experience of teaching music. In addition to observing, reflecting, and assisting
the teacher, you will plan, create, and teach at least four lessons from the unit created in ED 330 Instructional Design,
and assist or lead a choral rehearsal. A minimum of 40 hours required, as assigned. (Spring semester)
ED 410 Teaching Business in Secondary Schools
3 credits
Prerequisites: Minimum of 24 semester hours of business content, ED 420 Content Area Literacy and Initial Admission
to Student Teaching
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 495 Practicum 2
This course focuses on the methods and materials necessary to teach secondary business courses. Teacher candidates
will plan teaching and learning experiences based on the unique needs of middle and high school learners. Teacher
candidates will learn to apply various instructional strategies and principles of assessment to improve student learning in
the secondary classroom.
ED 420 Content Area Literacy (Professional Secondary Education Core)
2 credits
Prerequisites: Initial Admission to TEP
This course focuses on integration of knowledge of text structure, vocabulary instruction, study skills, and reading
comprehension strategies within secondary content area lessons. Teacher candidates will learn to design lessons that will
allow their students to become effective independent readers and critical thinkers.
ED 428 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-6 Science
1.5 credit hours
Prerequisites: Minimum of 7 semester hours of science content, ED 330 Instructional Design, ED 331 Instructional
Adaptations, ED 395 Practicum 1, and Initial Admission to Student Teaching
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 495 Practicum 2
A study of elementary school science common core standards and curricula, instructional methods that facilitate an inquiry
approach, teaching materials and tools for the 21st century classroom, and the evaluation of student learning, relative to
teaching the natural sciences in the elementary classroom. Classroom discussions of K-6 science content and pedagogy will
be filtered through both naturalistic and Christian worldviews. This course fulfills in part the requirements for #148 K-8
Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester)
ED 435 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in K-8 Social Studies & Content Area Literacy Strategies
(Professional Elementary Education Core)
3 credits
Prerequisites: Minimum of 12 semester hours of social studies content, ED 330 Instructional Design, ED 331
Instructional Adaptations, ED 395 Practicum 1, and Initial Admission to Student Teaching
Requisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 495 Practicum 2
This course presents goals, content, materials, and teaching strategies for planning and implementing a social studies
program in the elementary classroom, with a strong focus on content area reading and writing. Development of
literature-based units of study will be a major component for this course. This course fulfills in part the requirements for
#148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester)
ED 440 Teaching Social Sciences in Secondary Schools
3 credits
Prerequisites: Minimum of 21 semester hours of social studies/science content, ED 420 Content Area Literacy, ED 330
Instructional Design, ED 331 Instructional Adaptations, and Initial Admission to Student Teaching
This course focuses on the methods and materials necessary to teach secondary social sciences courses. Teacher
candidates will plan teaching and learning experiences based on the unique needs of middle and high school learners.
Teacher candidates will learn to apply various instructional strategies and principles of assessment to improve student
learning in the secondary classroom. (Fall Semester)
Course Descriptions
ED 470 Principles of Management and Assessment (Professional Education Core)
2 credits
Prerequisites: ED 231 Introduction to Exceptionalities, ED 311 Teaching Diverse Learners, ED 330 Instructional Design,
ED 331 Instructional Adaptations, and Initial Admission to Student Teaching
Teacher candidates will gain an increased understanding of assessment tools used in education and explore a variety of
strategies for managing a classroom, with an emphasis on students with special needs. This course fulfills in part the
requirements for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Fall semester)
ED 482 Reading Practicum (Required for #148 K-8 Reading Endorsement)
3 credits
Prerequisites: ED 301 CIA K-6 Reading, ED 355 Reading and Literacy Strategies, ED 485 Diagnostic Teaching of
Reading
A supervised practicum that provides opportunities to identify and tutor elementary school children using specific
teaching strategies for correcting word and comprehension deficiencies. This course fulfills in part the requirements for
#148 K-8 Reading Endorsement. (Spring semester)
ED 485 Diagnostic Teaching of Reading (Professional Elementary Education Core)
3 credits
Prerequisites: ED 301 CIA K-6 Reading and Admission to TEP
A study of the causes of reading difficulties in the elementary classroom, their assessment and diagnosis. Focus is given
to the selection and implementation of reading assessment and instructional procedures. A variety of methods to
diagnose a reader’s strengths and weaknesses are explored. Additionally, teacher candidates will develop strategies for
teaching content area vocabulary, comprehension strategies, and writing skills within these subject areas. This course
fulfills in part the requirements for the Reading Endorsement. (Spring semester)
ED 495 Practicum 2 (Professional Education Core)
1 credit
Prerequisites: ED 395 Practicum 1 and Initial Admission to Student Teaching
Teacher candidates will focus on the start of a new school year in an elementary or secondary school classroom. The
student will attend professional development and in-service meetings and assist in preparing the classroom for incoming
students, as well as be a part of the first few days of school. A minimum of 70 hours required, as assigned. (Fall
Semester)
ED 495 A – K-6 ELED Practicum (1 credit)
ED 495 B – 5-12 SCED Practicum (1 credit)
ED 495 C – K-12 Music Practicum (1 credit)
ED 490-494, 497 Student Teaching (Professional Education Core)
6-12 credits
Prerequisites: ED 495Practicum 2 and Continuing Admission to Student Teaching
The student will complete a full time student teaching experience in either a public or Christian school under the
direction of a supervising teacher with a minimum of three years of experience and a college supervisor. This is the
capstone course in the teacher education program. By completing this full-time internship experience, you will have the
opportunity to demonstrate competency in all ten TEP outcomes that are aligned with the INTASC and state of Iowa
teaching standards. Student teaching must be a minimum of fourteen weeks. Candidates seeking initial licensure
recommendation must achieve a minimum final grade of B. (Offered in the spring semester and as needed in the fall
semester)
ED 490 K-6 Special Education Student Teaching (6 credits)
ED 491 7-12 Music Student Teaching (6 credits)
ED 493 K-6 Music Student Teaching (6 credits)
ED 494 K-6 Classroom Student Teaching (6 credits)
ED 497 A - K-6 Classroom Student Teaching (12 credits)
ED 497 B - 5-12 Content Area Student Teaching (12 credits)
ED 499 Student Teaching Seminar (Professional Education Core)
1 credit
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 490-494, 497-498 Student Teaching
This seminar addresses teacher candidate felt needs such as effective management and instructional planning during the
student teaching experience. Student teachers will communicate with and support other student teachers while reflecting
on best practices. Seminar topics will include professional ethics, communication with constituents, working with
diverse populations, and preparation for job search and interview skills. The capstone project is a professional portfolio
demonstrating competence in the INTASC standards. (Spring semester)
ED 499 A – K-6 Local ELED Placement (1 credit)
ED 499 B – 5-12 Local SCED Placement (1 credit)
ED 499 C – K-12 Local MUED Placement (1 credit)
ED 499 D – Distance Education Placement (1 credit)
Course Descriptions
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Courses
ESL 202 Introduction to Linguistics
3 credits
An overview of the field of linguistics and its major branches—descriptive, psycho-, socio-, and historical linguistics.
The focus of the course is the application of descriptive linguistics (including phonetics, phonology, morphology, and
syntax) in the classroom. This course is foundational to further coursework in teaching English to speakers of other
languages. May be used as a humanities elective. Prerequisites: ENG 101 English Composition
ESL 210 Introduction to TESOL
3 credits
A survey of a range of topics related to teaching English to non-native speakers. A number of TESOL approaches and
techniques will be discussed along with such topics as second language acquisition, learning styles and strategies, and
cross-cultural communication in and out of the classroom. The issue of a Christian combining TESOL and ministry will
also be addressed. Pre-requisite: ENG 101 English Composition
ESL 304 TESOL Methods 1
3 credits
The first of two practical courses in TESOL. The focus of this course is on how to teach grammar and writing to nonnative speakers of English. Students will observe experienced teachers, tutor a non-native speaker, and prepare lesson
plans for both in-class practice teaching and teaching an actual class of English learners. Pre-requisite: ENG 101
English Composition
ESL 422 TESOL Methods 2
3 credits
The second of two practical courses in TESOL. This course deals with how to teach reading, vocabulary, speaking,
listening, pronunciation, spelling, and culture to non-native speakers of English. The student will again be engaged in
the same kinds of practical field experiences as mentioned under Methods in TESOL – Part I. Pre-requisite: ENG 101
English Composition