Program and Information Book - International Society for Microbial

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Program and Information Book - International Society for Microbial
14th International Symposium on
Microbial Ecology
Program and
Information
Book
POWER OF THE SMALL
19 - 24 August 2012
Copenhagen,
Denmark
www.isme-microbes.org/isme14
CONTENTS
Committees II
Welcome Message III
General Information IV
Sponsors
VI
Exhibitors
VIII
Social Events XII
Optional Tours XIII
Keynote Presenters
XIV
Awards XIX
Information for Presenters XX
Venue
XXI
Scientific Program
Sunday
19 August 1
Monday
20 August 5
Tuesday
21 August 31
Thursday 23 August 49
Friday
67
24 August III
ISME Executive Board
Steven Lindow, USA– President
Michael Wagner, Austria – Vice President
Hans van Veen, The Netherlands – Secretary / Treasurer
Hilary Lappin-Scott, UK– Past President
ISME Board
Linda Blackall, Australia
Elizaveta Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Russia
Jim Fredrickson, USA
Bo Barker Jørgensen, Germany & Denmark
Esperanza Martínez-Romero, Mexico
Bill Mohn, Canada
Alexandra Worden, USA
Liping Zhao, China
Local Organizing Committee
Jan Sørensen (Chair), University of Copenhagen
Bo Barker Jørgensen (Vice Chair), University of Aarhus
Jens Aamand, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland
Don Canfield, University of Southern Denmark
Niels Kroer, University of Aarhus
Michael Kühl, University of Copenhagen
Søren Molin, Technical University of Denmark
Per Halkjær Nielsen, Aalborg University
Ole Nybroe, University of Copenhagen
Niels Peter Revsbech, University of Aarhus
Barth Smets, Technical University of Denmark
Søren Johannes Sørensen, University of Copenhagen
Jim Fredrickson (Chair ISME13), Pacific Northwest National
Laboratories, USA
WELCOME TO COPENHAGEN
Welcome to 14th International Symposium on Microbial Ecology!
We have planned a spectacular scientific program that covers all facets
of our common research field as of today. From the ever-important
fields of genomics and diversity, evolution and novel organisms,
process regulation and pathways to the complex community studies
of interactions within microbial networks, specifying functional traits,
regulation of expression, communication, etc. We continue to see both
single-cell and community studies develop at a breath-taking pace - and
even the highest complexity of Nature´s micro-environments may not
today scare a modern Microbial Ecologist! We hope that you will enjoy
the program of Plenaries, Invited Sessions, Contributed Sessions,
Posters and Round Tables as much as we have enjoyed putting it
together for you.
We would like to express our gratitude to the people that have made this
meeting possible. Our thanks go out to the ISME Executive team and
the Local Organizing Committee who have volunteered so much of their
time to develop the program and other facets of the meeting. We would
also like to acknowledge two special and appreciated members of the
ISME team, Society Manager, Sarash de Wilde, and Events Assistant,
Sabine van Wegen, who have made tremendous efforts to make ISME14
successful! Special thanks are also due to Wonderful Copenhagen
(WoCo) giving us valuable advice from their long experience organizing
large congresses in the city of Copenhagen. Lastly, we wish to cordially
thank our sponsors and exhibitors for their contributions to the meeting.
Colleagues and ISME14 delegates - Thank you all for joining us in
beautiful Copenhagen to have an unforgettable meeting and help
advancing the science of our field. Denmark has a long and solid tradition
in Microbial Ecology and is proud to host ISME14. We hope you will have
a great ISME14!
ISME Office
Sarash de Wilde, the Netherlands - Society Manager
Sabine van Wegen, the Netherlands - Events Assistant
Anouk van Veen, the Netherlands - ISME14 Secretariat
ISME14 |
II
Steven Lindow
President of ISME
Jan Sørensen
Chair of ISME14 LOC
| ISME14
COMMITTEES
V
Symposium Venue
Bella Center Copenhagen
Center Blvd 5
DK-2300 København S, Denmark
Tel: +45 3252811
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.bellacenter.dk/English
Language
The official language of the symposium is English.
Name Badges
All participants, accompanying persons and exhibitors are kindly requested
to wear their badges throughout the symposium in order to be admitted to the
session rooms and other scheduled activities.
Registration
The Registration Desk will be open as follows:
Sunday 19 August 10:00 – 17:00
Monday 20 August 08:00 – 18:00
Tuesday 21 August 08:00 – 20:00
Wednesday 22 August Closed
Thursday 23 August 08:00 – 17:00
Friday 24 August 08:00 – 13:00
Internet
An internet and printing service is situated in the ISME lounge, near the
exhibition area, and will be available from the start of the Symposium until the
end of sessions each day. Please check with registration desk for details.
Speakers Preparation Room
A speaker’s ready room, for invited speakers and oral presenters of the
afternoon sessions, is available from the start of the Symposium until the end
of sessions each day (please follow the sign, room 16).
Refreshments
Refreshments will be served during the coffee breaks (as indicated in the
program) in the exhibition and poster area. Lunches are not included in the
registration fee.
ISME14 |
IV
GENERAL INFORMATION
Exhibition
A commercial exhibition will take place in Hall E during the Symposium.
The exhibition will be open as follows:
Sunday 19 August Monday 20 August Tuesday 21 August Wednesday 22 August Thursday 23 August Friday 24 August 14:00 – 20:00
08:00 – 17:00
08:00 – 18:00
Closed
08:00 – 17:00
08:00 – 14:00
Liability and Insurance
The organizer is not able to take any responsibility whatsoever for injury or
damage involving persons and property during the Symposium. Participants
are advised to take out their own personal travel and health insurance for their
trip.
Disclaimer
This program book was made with the greatest care and based on the
information available at the time; however, this does not imply that it
is completely without flaws or inconsistencies. We apologize for any
inconvenience caused by this.
ISME Society
Droevendaalsesteeg 10
PO BOX 50, 6700 AB Wageningen
The Netherlands
Tel +31317 473467
Fax +31317 210138
E-mail [email protected]
Website: www.isme-microbes.org
| ISME14
GENERAL INFORMATION
VII
PLATINUM SPONSOR
INVITED SESSIONS
Novozymes
Novozymes is the world leader in
bioinnovation. Together with customers across a broad array of industries we create tomorrow’s industrial
biosolutions, improving our customers’
business and the use of our planet’s
resources.
With over 700 products used in 130
countries, Novozymes’ bioinnovations improve industrial performance
and safeguard the world’s resources
by offering superior and sustainable
solutions for tomorrow’s ever-changing
marketplace.
GOLD SPONSORS
MO BIO
MO BIO Laboratories, Inc. is a global
leader in solutions for nucleic acid
purification, offering innovative tools
for research in molecular biology. MO
BIO’s line of soil, water, stool, biofilm
and microbial isolation kits are now the
method of choice among environmental
and microbiology researchers studying
microbial DNA and RNA.
Carlsberg Foundations
By the 1870s, Carlsberg had become
a very successful brewery and the
founder, JC Jacobsen, wanted to share
his success with his country. In 1876,
he used substantial amounts of the
brewery’s capital to create the Carlsberg
Foundation.
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The Foundation’s aim was to manage
the Carlsberg Laboratory and to support
Danish scientific research within the
fields of natural sciences, mathematics,
philosophy, the humanities and social
sciences.
OTTO MØNSTEDS
FOND
Otto Mønsted Fund
Otto Mønsted Fund’s main objective is to
contribute to the development of Danish
trade and industry. Within this overall
framework, the Board set out detailed
rules on aid for educational purposes.
Knud Højgaards Fund
The Fund was founded in 1944
by civil engineer Knud Højgaard.
Knud Højgaards Fund will award
scholarships to the commercial, cultural,
scientific, social and artistic purposes.
An important part of the activities of
the Fund is to support talented and
enterprising learners who wish to
supplement the domestic education with
postgraduate studies abroad.The Fund’s
purpose is to own shares in Højgaard
Holding a/s and thereby seek to
maintain the continuity of this company
and affiliated companies.
The Danish Microbiological Society
The Danish Microbiological Society
(DMS) is a professional asso­ciation
in the fields of human and veterinary
medical microbiology, general
microbiology, food microbiology, environ­
mental microbiology, biotechnology,
and virology. DMS is dedicated to the
advancement of microbiology, both
applied and basic, and promotes
microbiological information to the public.
| ISME14
SPONSORS
SPONSORS
IX
Applied Maths
Applied Maths is a leader in the field of
molecular typing data analysis. Located in
Sint-Martens-Latem (BE) and Austin (USA)
we develop and market software, services
and education in bioinformatics, in close
collaboration with renowned business and
scientific partners worldwide. The company,
founded in 1992, has gained world-wide
recognition in the analysis of biological data,
with its main software platform BioNumerics
and BioNumerics Server, materialized by a
large number of national and international
molecular surveillance networks. The software
is licensed in over 95 countries and served
for the preparation of >4000 peer-reviewed
papers.
EXHIBITORS
Cameca
Pioneer and world leader in Electron Probe
MicroAnalysis (EPMA), Secondary Ion
Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Atom Probe
Tomography (APT), CAMECA highlights the
revolutionary NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe
for multiple-mass imaging at 50nm resolution
and isotopic ratio measurements with tenth
permil reproducibility. In microbial ecology,
NanoSIMS 50L excels at coupling in-situ
phylogenic identification and measurement
of single-cell microbial activity and cellular
interactions. Methods based on stable isotope
labeling (15N, 13C, e.g.) and elemental-FISH
can be applied to other cell biology fields.
Genoscreen
Since 2001, Genoscreen develops and
performs innovative services activities in
genomics:
- sequencing (genes, genomes,
metagenomes, transcriptomes, exomes…)
- genotyping (SNP, microsatellites markers
libraries production, micro-organisms
typing…)
- bioinformatics
Genoscreen has developed a specific
expertise on microbial diversity studies
using metagenomics approaches on all
kind of samples (water, lake and marine
environments, soil, mud...). The company is
strongly committed to increasingly contribute
to the engineering and realization of many
research projects led by academic and
industrial teams. Genoscreen is also part of
Parafrap consortium (alliance against parasitic
diseases) and Patho-NGen-Trace FP7
program.
ISME14 |
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Microbiology Society of Korea
Since 1959, the Microbiological Society of
Korea (MSK) has promoted basic research
and application of microbiology as an
academic society to spread the knowledge
of microbiology. About 1,900 microbiologists
who actually work in microbiological field
joined MSK, and MSK is composed of several
specific departments related to microbiology:
biochemistry, physiology, molecular biology,
ecology, industrial microbiology, pathology,
genetics, and immunology. Each department
does their best to improve education and
research environment in microbiology field.
| ISME14
EXHIBITORS
XI
Nature Publishing Group
Nature Publishing Group (NPG) brings
leading scientific and medical research to
your desk top. The NPG portfolio combines
the continued excellence of Nature, its
associated research and review journals, and
50 leading academic and society journals in
the life, physical and clinical sciences. NPG
also provides news content through Nature
News and scientific career information through
Naturejobs.
Visit the ISME Booth to pick up your free
sample copies, subscribe at the conference
rate, or enquire about advertising opportunities in any NPG title.
Pyro Science
Pyro Science is a manufacturer of highprecision oxygen sensor technology (unique
REDFLASH technology). We offer fiber-optical
oxygen sensors for different concentration
ranges and spatial scales, operated by a
universal fiber-optic oxygen meter (Firesting
O2), as well as turnkey microprofiling setups
and customized OEM solutions for a broad
range of applications.
Thermo Scientific
Demand Thermo Scientific products
to accelerate discovery and move
science forward. The Thermo Scientific
portfolio includes a broad array of highquality instruments, reagents, laboratory
consumables, equipment, and services –
designed to help you run your laboratory at
peak performance, from start to finish.
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Unisense
Unisense is a world leading manufacturer
of microsensors and instrumentation for
microscale measurement. We provide
high-performance microsensors and
complete measuring systems for a full
range of applications in environmental and
medical research. Our dedication is to serve
researchers with excellent support and
complete solutions in the laboratory as well as
in the field.
EXHIBITORS
Wiley-Blackwell
Wiley-Blackwell is the world’s leading society
publisher, publishing more than 1,400 scholarly peer-reviewed journals and an extensive
collection of books, major reference works,
databases, and laboratory manuals, in print
and electronically.
Publishing more than 3,300 articles and
receiving 108,527 citations in 2008 alone,
Wiley-Blackwell’s Microbiology journals
account for 22% of the articles in the JCR
Microbiology category. 4 journals feature
in the top 20 for the category and 12 are
published on behalf of international societies.
Exhibiting Sponsors
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EXHIBITORS
XIII
OPENING CEREMONY AND WELCOME FUNCTION
Sunday 19 August 2012, 16:00 – 20:00
Venue: Bella Center
Dress: Casual
Tickets: Included in registration fee
Join us for the opening ceremony in the Plenary Hall of the Convention Center.
The program will feature a short historic introduction to Microbiology in
Denmark by Søren Molin, Technical University of Denmark, and our first
plenary oral presenter of the symposium, Minik Rosing, University of
Copenhagen, Denmark. As the sun sets you are invited to join all symposium
registrants for a fun evening with drinks and snacks! This is a perfect way to
catch up with colleagues and a chance to meet new ones.
TIEDJE AWARD RECEPTION AND EVENING LECTURE
Tuesday 21 August 2012, 18:00 – 20:30
Venue: Bella Center
Dress: Casual
Tickets: Included in registration fee
This evening of stunning microbial ecology will stimulate your mind. The
plenary lecture will be delivered by Víctor de Lorenzo, Molecular Environmental
Microbiology Labatory, the Spanish National Research Council, Spain,
followed by the prestigious “Jim Tiedje Award” lecture, presented by Stephen
Giovannoni, Oregon State University, USA. This evening, comprising
remarkable microbial ecological discussions, will be preceded by a short
reception with beverages.
THE ISME PARTY
Thursday 23 August 2012, 19:00 - Late
Dress: Casual
Tickets: Not included in registration, please see registration desk
Venue: Øksnehallen
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ISME’s Party venue is located in Kødbyen, Copenhagen’s meatpacking district,
which was established in the late 19th century.
Architect Ludvig Fenger was hired by the city in 1889 to construct Øksnehallen
(“Oxen Hall”), a municipal cattle barn. Completed in 1901, the building housed
1600 head of cattle; it continued to serve as a cattle barn until the 1960s.
Nowadays, the meatpacking district is no longer in use, but due to its unique
architecture and history, Kødbyen is deemed historic landmarks by the city of
Copenhagen. It now has been reborn as a vibrant culture hub, with galleries,
nightclubs, restaurants, and workplaces for creative professionals. And like the
rest of Kødbyen, Øksnehallen is a spectacular arena for multifaceted cultural
life.
Øksnehallen opens its doors for ISME delegates on 23 August, inviting you to
a spectacular three-course dinner, followed by a fantastic dance party with live
music. Dinner, a welcome drink and three additional drinks are included in the
price. Costs are € 88.00 (excl. Danish VAT).
OPTIONAL TOURS
In keeping with ISME tradition, no
scientific session will be scheduled
on Wednesday 22 August 2012.
Participants will be free to take
advantage of the many leisure
opportunities in and around
Copenhagen.
A number of tours have been
selected offering you an opportunity
to explore Copenhagen on your
day off.
For all tours please meet the tour
guides and bus at the Bella Sky
Comwell Hotel.
Some tours will still have tickets
available. Please see the
registration desk for more details.
Selected tours are:
City and Harbour Tour
The city tour of Copenhagen will
take you through the major sights
of Copenhagen.
Hours:
Morning: 9.30 am - 12.30 pm
Afternoon: 2.30 pm - 5.30 pm
EUR 29.00 (approx.)
Kayak Tour
The Kayak Tour is for those who
want to see Copenhagen from a
different angle. Discover the inner
city and places the boats can’t go.
Hours:
Morning: 9.30 am - 1.30 pm
Afternoon: 1.30 pm to 5.30 pm
EUR 87.00 (approx.)
Castle Tour of North Sealand
This is the classic of the Danish
sightseeing tours. On this Castle
Tour of North Sealand you’ll head
north, driving through the Danish
countryside and visiting three of
Denmark’s finest castles.
Hours: 11am - 5 pm
EUR 84.00 (approx.)
Christiana and the fishing village
of Dragør
A local guide will show you the
Christiana community, founded by
hippies in the seventies. The tour
continues in Dragør, one of the
oldest fishing villages in Denmark.
Hours: 10.30 am - 3.30 pm
EUR 65.50 (approx.)
Biking Tour of Copenhagen
The bike tour includes
knowledgeable and insightful
guides, full of interesting
commentary on the city’s
architecture, history and traditions
Hours: 11.00 am - 3.00 pm
EUR 75.50 (approx.)
For more information, please visit
the website, or visit the registration
desk of Bella Logistics Services.
N.B. ISME bears no responsibility for the online
reservation system of Bella Logistics Services, its
website or the tours itself.
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SOCIAL EVENTS
XV
Sunday, 19 August, 2012, 16:35
Minik Rosing, National History Museum of
Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Minik Rosing is a professor of geology at the Natural
History Museum of Denmark, University of
Copenhagen, and has held an Allan C. Cox Visiting
professorship at Stanford University. He has
based most of his research on fieldwork in
Greenland. He has studied the formation of Earth’s
continents and the interaction between early Archean life and Earth environments and climate. He has
suggested that photosynthetic metabolic strategies evolved very early on Earth,
and that the ability to harvest Solar energy allowed Life to take control over Earth
surface environments more than 3800 million years ago. The interactions between
biologic metabolisms and Earth’s geochemical cycles ultimately resulted in the rise
of Earth’s continents.
Monday, 20 August, 2012, 08:30
Martin Ackermann, Department of Environmental
Sciences, ETH Zürich, and Department of
Environmental Microbiology, Eawag, Switzerland
Martin Ackermann has a joint appointment at ETH Zurich
and Eawag, the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science
and Technology. He did his PhD on bacterial aging at the
University of Basel, and then worked for two years as a
postdoc at UC San Diego. He joined ETH Zurich in 2004,
and became professor for Molecular Microbial Ecology in
2008. The focus of his research group is on basic questions
on bacterial ecology and evolution: on the biological
significance of phenotypic heterogeneity in clonal populations, on interactions within
and between species, and on how bacteria cope with ever-changing environments.
The goal is to work on basic principles with model systems in the laboratory, and
then to test these principles in more natural situations. The group often works at
the level of single cells, and asks how this perspective provides insights that could
not be obtained by populations experiments. One of the current specific interests
is on how stochastic gene expression can promote the emergence of different
phenotypes in clonal populations, and in how these different phenotypes interact
with each other.
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KEYNOTE PRESENTERS
Tuesday, 21 August, 2012, 08:30
Michael Wagner, Department of Microbial
Ecology, University of Vienna, Austria
Michael Wagner is head of the Department of Microbial
Ecology and of the Core Facility for Advanced Isotope
Research at the University of Vienna. He received his
Ph.D. from the Technische Universität Munich, Germany,
in 1992 and subsequently worked as a Post-Doc at
the Northwestern University, USA, before he returned
to Munich as a group leader. In 2003, he became full
professor of Microbial Ecology at the University of
Vienna. Michael’s major research focus is the functional
characterization of bacteria and archaea in their natural environment. To this
end, Michael and colleagues have been instrumental in the development of
innovative single-cell methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridisation –
microautoradiography (FISH-MAR) and Raman-FISH. His work spans a variety of
microbial guilds including symbiotic chlamydiae, sulfate-reducing microbes as well
as nitrifying bacteria and archaea and has led to the discovery and characterization
of major new players among those groups.
Michael has published more than 170 papers and is listed in the ISI citation
ranking from June 2011 among the 10 most highly cited microbiology researchers
in the world. Michael is vice-president of the ISME, a chief editor of the journal
Environmental Microbiology, elected member of the German National Academy
of Sciences, Leopoldina, and a founding member of the European Academy of
Microbiology.
Tuesday, 21 August, 2012, 12:30
Patrick Forterre, Pasteur Institute, France
Patrick Forterre is Professor at the University of ParisSouth and senior member of the Institut Universitaire de
France. He supervises two research groups, one in Orsay
(Paris-South) and the other at the Institut Pasteur in Paris.
From 2003 to 2009, he was director of the microbiology
department at the Institut Pasteur. Patrick Forterre had
been working on DNA replication in Bacteria; from 1984
until now, he became interested to Archaea, the third
domain of life, and works on various aspects of their
molecular biology. His research surprisingly led in 1997 to
the discovery of the enzyme responsible to trigger meiotic recombination (genetic
exchanges) in human. Patrick Forterre has always been interested in evolution
and wrote many theoretical papers discussing the early steps of life evolution,
the topology of the tree of life or else the nature and origin of hyperthermophilic
microbes. These last years, he became more and more interested in the origin
and nature of viruses and their role in life evolution. He recently suggested
that interaction between cells and viruses is the major force driving Darwinian
evolution. As an example, he proposed that DNA originated in the framework of
competition between ancient RNA cells and RNA viruses. His research group at the
Institut Pasteur currently focus on unusual features exhibited by viruses infecting
hyperthermophilic archaea, whereas his research group in Orsay is studying
production of membrane vesicles by living cells, a universal mechanism that could
be related to the origin of viruses.
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KEYNOTE PRESENTERS
XVII
Tuesday, 21 August, 2012, 18:30
Víctor de Lorenzo, Molecular Environmental
Microbiology Laboratory, The
Spanish National Research Council, Spain
Víctor de Lorenzo (Madrid, 1957) is a Chemist by training
and he holds a position of Research Professor in the
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), where he
currently heads the Laboratory of Environmental Molecular
Microbiology at the National Center for Biotechnology.
He specializes in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology of
soil bacteria (particularly Pseudomonas putida) as both
models and active agents for the decontamination of sites
damaged by industrial waste. At present, his work explores the interface between
the Synthetic Biology and Environmental Biotechnology.
Tuesday, 21 August, 2012, 19:15
Tiedje Award Presentation: Stephen J.
Giovannoni, Oregon State University, USA
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Stephen J. Giovannoni is a Distinguished Professor,
in the Department of Microbiology at Oregon State
University. He received his B.A. in biology from the
University of California, San Diego, where his first
experience with bacteria was raising cells and isolating
photosynthetic reaction center proteins for physicist
George Feher. He earned his M.A. in Biology from
Boston University, where he studied under Lynn
Margulis. Dr. Giovannoni continued his education at
the University of Oregon, where he received a Ph.D.
in Biology for work with advisor Richard Castenholz to isolate and describe novel
thermophilic bacteria from Yellowstone National Park. He then joined Norman
Pace’s research team at Indiana University to develop molecular techniques for
studying microbial ecology, before accepting a faculty position at Oregon State
University.
Dr. Giovannoni’s research focuses on the microbial diversity, genomics and
ecology in marine ecosystems. He developed PCR methods to clone rRNA
genes from microbial communities and identified many cosmopolitan, uncultivated
bacterioplankton clades. In 2000 Dr. Giovannoni founded the High Throughput
Culturing Laboratory (HTCL) at Oregon State University with the aim of culturing
globally important marine bacterioplankton. A consistent theme in Dr. Giovannoni’s
research is the highly abundant marine alphaproteobacterium SAR11, which he
and his team discovered in 1990. In 2011 his research team reported that SAR11
are likely to share a common ancestor with mitochondria. Their current research
is focused on understanding SAR11 metabolism, and how these cells interact with
marine dissolved organic carbon.
KEYNOTE PRESENTERS
Thursday, 23 August, 2012, 08:30
Nicole Dubilier, Symbiosis Group, Max Planck
Institute of Marine Microbiology, Bremen,
Germany
Nicole Dubilier is the Head of the Symbiosis Group
at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology
in Bremen, Germany. She gained her PhD in Marine
Zoology from the University of Hamburg and then
did a two year postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard
University in the USA. She has been at the Max Planck
Institute for Marine Microbiology since 1997 where she
was the Coordinator of the International Max Planck Research School for Marine
Microbiology from 2002 – 2006, and became the Head of the Symbiosis Group in
2007. Her research group studies the diversity, ecology, and evolution of microbial
symbionts, as well as the interactions of the symbionts with each other, their
hosts, and the environment. The main focus is on symbioses from chemosynthetic
environments such as hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, whale and wood falls,
upwelling regions, and coastal sediments. Her group uses a wide array of methods
to study chemosynthetic symbioses that range from deep-sea in situ tools to
molecular, ‘omic’ and imaging analyses.
Thursday, 23 August, 2012, 12:30
Janet Jansson, Earth Sciences Division,
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,
Berkeley, CA, USA
Professor Janet K. Jansson is a senior staff scientist
in the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA. She also has
positions at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the
Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI). She is a Co-Editorin-Chief of the ISMEJ and is a member of several
other editorial boards. Janet received her Ph.D. in Microbial Ecology from Michigan
State University, followed by 20 years in Sweden, starting with her postdoctoral
research at Stockholm University. She became Professor of Microbiology at
Södertörn University College in 2000 and then Professor (Chair) of Environmental
Microbiology at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in 2003. She
was also Vice Dean of the Faculty for Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences
at SLU. Her expertise is in the area of molecular microbial ecology and “omics”
approaches with a focus on soil, marine sediment and the human gut environments
| ISME14
KEYNOTE PRESENTERS
XIX
Friday, 24 August, 2012, 08:30
Liping Zhao, Shanghai Center for Systems
Biomedicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
China
Liping Zhao got his PhD in 1989 from Nanjing Agricultural
University and worked in Cornell University as visiting
scholar from 1993-1995. He is currently a professor
for microbiology and associate dean for School of
Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong
University. He is also the leader for the functional
Metagenomics platform in Shanghai Center for Systems
Biomedicine. He is a Board member of the International
Society for Microbial Ecology.
His team is one of the first in China to apply molecular and genomic tools for
systems understanding and predictive manipulation of the complex microbial
communities in human and animal guts. They have published more than 30 papers
in PNAS, ISME Journal, AEM, FEMS Microbiology Ecology etc. Their current focus
is the interactions between nutrition and gut microbiota for onset and progression
of chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, and how traditional Chinese
medicine and medicinal foods may modulate this relationship for achieving
preventive healthcare.
Friday, 24 August, 2012, 16:40
Kenneth H. Nealson, Wrigley Professor
of Environmental Sciences, University of
Southern California, USA
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Ken Nealson is the Wrigley Professor of
Environmental Sciences at the University of Southern
California (USC) in Los Angeles. He is a professor in
both the department of Earth Sciences, and Biological
Sciences, and is involved with the University
Research Initiative in Geobiology. His early work
at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography involved
elucidating some of the factors involved with Quorum
Sensing (defining the system, purifying, identifying
and synthesizing the first homoserine lactone, and cloning the luxR and luxI genes,
involved with the control of quorum sensing). Later work, done at the University of
Wisconsin, Caltech/JPL, and now at USC has been in the area of metal geobiology,
with a focus on both the oxidation and reduction of iron and manganese oxides:
work that brought him into the area of extracellular electron transport, which will be
subject of the ISME lecture. Dr. Nealson is a member of the American Academy
of Microbiology, and a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, and has won
several awards for both teaching and research during his career of nearly 40 years.
AWARDS
Jim Tiedje Award
“Jim Tiedje Award” is presented by the ISME to an exalted microbial ecologist who
is recognized for their outstanding lifetime contribution to the field of microbial
ecology. Past winners of this award include Bo Barker Jørgensen (2010), Norman
Pace (2008), Gijs Kuenen (2006) and Farooq Azam (2004). An expert panel
comprising individuals selected by the ISME Executive are judges of this biennial
award. The 2012 award recipient is Dr. Stephen J. Giovannoni.
The ISME Young Investigator Award
The “ISME Young Investigator Award” recognizes early career microbial ecologists
who have made significant contributions to this field. Past winners of this award
include Ian Head (2004), Phil Hugenholtz (2006), Forest Rowher (2008) and Marc
Strous (2010). The recipient of the 2012 award is Dr. Victoria Orphan, and she will
be presented the award during the session ‘Novel High-Resolution Technologies’,
on Friday 24 August.
The ISME Student Poster Award
The “ISME Student Poster Award” is reserved for students who are the first and
presenting author on a submitted poster presentation (proof of postgraduate
studentship will be required). Three outstanding posters will be chosen each day
(Monday, Tuesday and Thursday) of the ISME14 conference. Awardees will receive
free membership of ISME for 2013. The nine winning posters will be displayed in a
prominent location on Friday 24 August 2012. The awards will be presented at the
closing ceremony of ISME14.
The David C. White Award
David C. White’s vision was to honour and respect the power of quantitative
analytical chemistry to microbial ecology. Thus, the “D.C. White Award” will
be presented to the most innovative poster at the ISME14 conference. The
announcement of the “D.C. White Award” will be made at the closing ceremony of
the ISME14 symposium and will be presented by Sandy White.
The Bill Costerton Young Scientist Prize
The Bill Costerton Young Scientist Prize will recognise early career scientists
who demonstrate the most promising research that best evolves new theories in
Microbial Ecology that have wider inter-disciplinary significance.
The MO BIO Poster Award
Once again, our Gold Sponsor MO BIO will be selecting a poster out of the selected
ISME Poster awards to be the recipient of this inaugral award. The winner will be
announced during the closing ceremony and the award will be presented by MO
BIO CEO Mark Brolaski.
The Young Postdoc Research Award
The ISME Postdoctoral Research Awards will acknowledge the accomplishments
and promise of outstanding postdoctoral research associates on the basis of the
presentations that they make at the ISME Symposium. The criteria will include
scientific accomplishments and innovation as well as clarity of presentation at the
Symposium. Initial selection criteria will be on the basis of submitted abstracts that
will be chosen for oral presentations by the organizers. Final evaluation will be
made at the meeting, by evaluating the oral presentations of the candidates.
| ISME14
KEYNOTE PRESENTERS
XXI
Poster Presenters
Posters will be displayed for 2 days of the conference, either Monday/Tuesday or
Thursday/Friday. Authors are requested to ensure that the poster is displayed by
8am on the first day and are removed when the poster session on day 2 ends.
Those not removed by this time will be disposed of by the event coordinators.
Poster Sessions: Authors are requested to be available for questions of your
poster during the scheduled poster sessions. Please check you poster number and
assigned session in the program.
Oral Presenters
Length of Presentations: Each contributed session presentation will be 15 minutes
in length including time for questions. Speakers in invited sessions are allocated 30
minutes including question time.
Session Chairpersons: Please refer to the Program Book you will receive at the
conference for name of your session’s Chairperson. Please meet your Chairperson
in your session room 15 minutes prior to the start of your session.
Presentation Upload: If you are using a PowerPoint or other electronic presentation,
it must be uploaded onto the conference computers in the speaker preparation
room preferable the day before your presentation or at least 2 hours prior. Speaker
ready staff will be available in the speaker preparation room (room 16):
Sunday 19 August Monday 20 August Tuesday 21 August Thursday 23 August
Friday
24 August 11:00 - 16:00
08:00 - 18:30
08:00 - 16:00
08:00 - 16:00
08:00 - 14:00
It is strongly encouraged for you to bring your presentation on a number of formats
and you are discouraged from using your own laptop.
Audio Visual Information: The use of PowerPoint presentations is strongly
encouraged and the following equipment will be provided in all meeting rooms:
ISME14 |
XX
* Data Video Projector
* Computer with Microsoft Office.
* Screen
* Lectern and Microphone
* Laser Pointer
No other equipment will be provided unless agreed to by the Organising Committee.
VENUE
| ISME14
INFORMATION FOR PRESENTERS
SUNDAY 19 AUGUST
SCIENTIFIC
PROGRAM
* Indicates the presenting author. Program is subject to
change. Please check the addendum if supplied.
©Ziner.nl Photography by: ©Ben Kucinski, ©Armin Kübelbeck & ©Tomo.Yun
AUD. 12
SUNDAY 19 AUGUST
1600 - 1730
AUD. 11
1600 President’s Address, Steven Lindow
Welcome to ISME14
AUD. 10
1615 Introduction to the Bill Costerton Young Scientist Prize
by Hilary Lappin-Scott
1635 PLENARY SESSION
Chair: Bo Barker Jørgensen
Minik Rosing, National History Museum of Denmark, University of
Copenhagen, Denmark
4 billion years of microbial reign over Earth
WELCOME RECEPTION
Hall E
Informal gathering with drinks and snacks
SOCIAL
PROGRAM
1800 2000
1600
1400 2000
1000 1700
TIME
| ISME14
OPENING
CEREMONY
OPENING PRESENTATIONS
Plenary Hall A1
1720 ISME14 Chair Address, Jan Sørensen
Exhibition open
Hall E
SUNDAY 19 AUGUST 2012
Sponsored by: the Danish Microbiological Society
Registration and Speakers preparation room open
HALL A1
HALL A2
HALL A3
AUD. 15
ROOM B3
ROOM B4
1620 Opening Presentation
Søren Molin, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
Microbiology in Denmark - anything particular?
1735 Cultural Program
A Cultural Introduction to Denmark
ISME14 |
2
PLENARY
HALL A1
3
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
SCIENTIFIC
PROGRAM
* Indicates the presenting author. Program is subject to
change. Please check the addendum if supplied.
CONTRIBUTED
SESSIONS
POSTER
SESSION
ROUND TABLES
1230
1330 1530
1530 1730
1730 1900
INVITED
SESSIONS
HALL A2
HALL A3
AUD. 15
ROOM B3
ROOM B4
IS12: Single Cell
Microbiology
CT12: Microbial
Symbioses - 1
RT11: Microbial
Network
Ecology:
Deciphering
Complex
Network
Interactions
in Microbial
Communities
IS11: Microbial
Dispersion and
Biogeography
- is everything
everywhere?
CT11: Microbial
Interactions and
Behavior - 1
RT10:
Terragenome:
The Exponential
Growth of Soil
Metagenomics
IS10: Microbial
Community
Diversity: 16S
and Beyond
CT10: Microbial
Dispersion and
Biogeography
- is everything
everywhere?
Young Scientist
/ISMEJ
Publication
Workshop
Lunch Break
CT14: Microbial
Community
Diversity: 16S
and Beyond - 1
CT15: Microbes
in a Changing
Ocean
RT12: Frontiers
in microbial
ecosystem
science:
Energizing the
research agenda
RT13: Guarding
microbial
diversity:
importance for
fundamental and
applied research
RT14: Flow
Cytometry in
Microbiology
Poster session including afternoon coffee and tea
CT13: Single cell
Microbiology
ISME Members Meeting - Hall A2
IS13: Microbial
Symbioses
IS16: Empowered
by Microbes
CT18:
Empowered by
Microbes
IS15: Pathways
and Physiology
CT17: Pathways
and Physiology
RT16:
Unraveling
the bacterial
mobilome:
Potentials and
limitations of
the present
methodology
IS14: Microbes
in a Changing
Ocean
CT16: Microbial
Element Cycling:
from genes to
turnover - 1
RT15: Indoor
microbiology:
new molecularbased
insights and
management
strategies
Morning Coffee and Tea in the Exhibition and Poster Viewing Area
Paul Reiter - International Water Association
Announcement of the collaboration between IWA and ISME
Plenary Hall A1
RT17: Microbial
invasions: What
defines whether
a microorganism
is an invasive
species?
CT19: Light and
Microbial Life
AUD. 12
AUD. 11
AUD. 10
Early Morning Coffee and Tea in the Exhibition and Poster Viewing Area
MONDAY 20 AUGUST 2012
PL02 - Plenary Hall A1
Martin Ackermann, Department of Environmental Sciences, EtH Zürich, and Department of Environmental Microbiology, EAWAG, Switzerland
Introduction by: Hans van Veen
Exhibition open
Hall E
Registration and speaker preparation room open
HALL A1
0830 - 0920
1000 - 1200
ISME14 |
SOCIETY
MEETING
1200
1000 1200
0930
0920 0930
0830 0920
0800 0830
0800 1700
PLENARY
SESSION
| ISME14
0800 17.30
TIME
6
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
Chair: Hans van Veen
PLENARY SESSION
Martin Ackermann, Department of Environmental Sciences, ETH Zürich,
Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Bacteria: Collective Functionality
through Microbial Individuality
and Department of Environmental Microbiology, EAWAG, Switzerland
PLENARY
HALL A1
IS10: Microbial Community diversity: 16S and beyond
Chairpersons: Philip Hugenholtz, University of Queensland, Australia
Laurent Philippot, INRA, Dijon, France
1000 16S and beyond: the TM7 story
Philip Hugenholtz, University of Queensland, Australia
1030 Use of functional traits to study microbial diversity
Laurent Philippot, INRA, Dijon, France
1100 The ancestral human microbiota and impact of acculturation
Maria Gloria Domínguez-Bello, University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico
1130 Tracking OTUs around the environment - a challenge for clustering
algorithms and interpretation
Christian von Mering, University of Zurich, Switzerland
7
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1000 - 1200
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
HALL A2
IS11: Microbial Dispersion and Biogeography - is everything
everywhere?
Chairpersons: Noah Fierer, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
Jack Gilbert, Argonne National Laboratory, USA and
University of Chicago, USA
1000 Cross-biome comparisons of soil microbial communities and their functional
potentials
Noah Fierer, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
1030 Experimental biogeography of bacteria in miniature ecosystems
Thomas Bell, Imperial College, London, UK 1100 Biogeography and the deep biosphere: deep-to-shallow dispersal routes
revealed by thermophilic endospores in cold marine sediments
Casey Hubert, Newcastle University, UK
1130 The Earth Microbiome Project: A new paradigm in geospatial and temporal
studies of microbial ecology
Jack A. Gilbert, Argonne National Laboratory and University of Chicago, USA
1000 - 1200
HALL A3
IS13: Microbial Symbioses
Chairpersons: Nancy Moran, Yale University, USA
Forest Rohwer, San Diego State University, USA
1000 The lignin-specific pathway in algae plays a surprising role in bacterial-algal
symbiosis
Rebecca Case, University of Alberta, Canada
1030 Evolution and functions of the multilayered symbiosis in termite guts
Yuichi Hongoh, Riken, Japan
1100 Genome Dynamics in Symbionts of Insects and Consequences for Host
Ecology
Nancy Moran, Yale University, USA 1130 Crawling Holobionts and the Fate of Coral Reefs
Forest Rohwer, San Diego State University, USA
1000 - 1200
AUD. 10
IS14: Microbes in a Changing Ocean
Chairpersons: Rudi Amann, Max Planck Institute for Marine
Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
Ramunas Stepanauskas, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean,
Maine, USA
Chairpersons: Stephen Giovannoni, Oregon State University, USA
Osvaldo Ulloa, University of Conceptión, Chile
1030 Will we gain the respect of microbes by treating them as individuals?
Ramunas Stepanauskas, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, Maine,
USA
1100 Providing a Glimpse into the Life of Microbial Dark Matter
Tanja Woyke, US DOE Joint Genome Institute, USA
1130 The Power of One - Single Cell Metabolomics
Renato Zenobi, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Switzerland
1000 Does global climate change promote microbial food web activity?
Corina Brussaard, NIOZ, the Netherlands
1030 Microbial carbon sequestration in the ocean under natural and
anthropogenic impacts
Nianzhi Jiao, Xiamen University, China
1100 Arctic marine microbes: looking forward to a shorter winter?
Carlos Pedrós - Alió, Institut de Ciències del Mar- CMIMA, Spain
1130 Microbial life in anoxic marine zones
Osvaldo Ulloa, University of Conceptión, Chile
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 15
IS12: Single Cell Microbiology
1000 Have a look - in situ identification of single microbial cells
Rudolf Amann, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen,
Germany
8
1000 - 1200
9
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1000 - 1200
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
AUD. 11
IS15: Pathways and Physiology
Chairpersons: Derek Lovley, University of Massachusetts, USA
Marc Strous, Max Planck Institute for Marine
Microbiology, Germany
1230 - 1330
HALL A2
ISME Members Meeting
All are invited to attend the biennial meeting of the International
Society for Microbial Ecology to hear what has been happening with
the Society, Journal and Events
1000 Electromicrobiology: new paradigms for long-range extracellular electron
transport and interspecies electron transfer
Derek Lovley, University of Massachusetts, USA
1030 Sulfur cycling associated with anaerobic oxidation of methane
Jana Milucka, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen,
Germany
1100 Anaerobic Benzene Degradation in Pure Culture: Alternative Pathways in
Archaea and Bacteria
Dawn Holmes, Western New England University, USA
1130 Element cycling – in search of the big picture
Jeanine Geelhoed, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen,
Germany.
(replacing Marc Strous)
1000 - 1200
AUD. 12
IS16: Empowered by Microbes
Chairpersons: Martin Keller, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
Willy Verstraete, Ghent University, Belgium
1000 Power for the Body : Microbes Inside
Willem de Vos, Wageningen University, the Netherlands
10
1100 Biogas for Mega Watt Power Production
Willy Verstraete, Ghent University, Belgium
1130 Biomass to Next Generation Biofuels: Microbes at Work
Martin Keller, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1030 Steering fermentations using electrical current: communities and products
Korneel Rabaey, Ghent University, Belgium
11
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
CT10: Microbial Dispersion and Biogeography - is everything
everywhere?
Chairpersons: Noah Fierer, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
Jack Gilbert, Argonne National Laboratory, USA and
University of Chicago, USA
1330 Forces affecting microbial community dynamics in the Hanford aquifer
Allan Konopka*, Xueju Lin, James Stegen, Jim Fredrickson [USA]
1345 Patterns of bacterioplankton distribution and gene expression across a river
to ocean gradient
Caroline S. Fortunato*, Byron Crump [USA]
1400 Local and regional biogeography of marine cyanophages
Marcia Marston*, Samantha Taylor, Noel Sme, Rachel Parsons, Jennifer
Martiny [USA]
1415 Evidence for ocean-wide distribution of an abundant photoheterotrophic and
CO oxidizing RCA roseobacter population in the North Sea and North Atlantic
Meinhard Simon*, Thorsten Brinkhoff, Bernd Wemheuer, Helge A. Giebel,
Christine Beardsley, Insa Bakenhus, Rolf Daniel, Sonja Voget [Germany]
1430 Pole to pole biogeography of surface and deep marine bacterial communities
Jean-Francois Ghiglione*, Pierre Galand, Thomas Pommier, Els Mass, David
L. Kirchman, Connie Lovejoy, Carlos Pedros-Alio, Patricia Yager, Alison
Murray [France]
1445 Either Of yeast, grapes and wasps: saccharomyces cerevisiae ecology
revised
Irene Stefanini*, Leonardo Dapporto, Jean-Luc Legras, Antonio Calabretta,
Monica Di Paola, Carlotta De Filippo, P Capretti, Mario Polsinelli, Stefano
Turillazzi, Duccio Cavalieri [Italy]
12
1515 Micro-scale drivers of bacterial diversity and biogeography
George Kowalchuk* [Netherlands]
HALL A2
CT11: Microbial Interactions and Behavior - 1
Chairperson: Michael Givskov, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1330 With a little help from my friends: community interactions alter biofilm
development
Scott Rice*, Kai Wei Kelvin Lee, Manisha Mukherjee, Staffan Kjelleberg
[Singapore]
1345 Cooperative interactions in bacterial biofilms
R Fredrik Inglis*, Martin Ackermann [Switzerland]
1400 Impact of colony growth on quorum sensing
Burkhard Hense* [Germany]
1415 Fungal control of dispersion and activity of bacteria in unsaturated
environments
Pilar Junier*, Martin Pion, Saskia Bindschedler, Daniel Bravo, Anaele Simon,
Daniel Job [Switzerland]
1430 Unusual phenotype of fungal-interactive Burkholderia terrae BS001
Rashid Nazir*, Jan A. Warmink, Jan Dirk van Elsas [Netherlands]
1445 Only what you risk is what you get? Investigating the overlooked question of
why bacteria secrete siderophores
Konstanze Schiessl*, Martin Ackermann, Gabriel Leventhal [Switzerland]
1500 Ecological populations of bacteria act as socially cohesive units of antibiotic
production and resistance in the wild
Otto X. Cordero*, Hans Wildschutte, Benjamin Kirkup, Tracy Mincer, Martin
Polz [USA ]
1515 Function and importance of Akkermansia spp. in the intestinal tract
Clara Belzer*, Noora A. Ottman, Janneke P. Ouwerkerk, Hauke Smidt,
Willem M. de Vos [Netherlands]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1500 Soil bacterial biogeography: a taxonomic and functional perspective
Rob Griffiths* [United Kingdom]
1330 - 1530
13
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
HALL A3
CT13: Single Cell Microbiology
Chairperson:
Chairpersons: Rudi Amann, Max Planck Institute for Marine
Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
Ramunas Stepanauskas, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean,
Maine, USA
Gaelen Burke, University of Georgia, USA
1345 Shifting beneficial microbial symbioses marks cockroach and termite
evolution
Zakee Sabree*, Nancy Moran [USA]
1400 Microbial Ecology of the Symbiotic Fungus Gardens Cultured by Leaf-cutter
Ants
Frank Aylward*, Kristin Burnum, Susannah Tringe, Garret Suen, Mary Lipton,
Cameron Currie [USA]
1415 Host-intestinal microbiota coevolution in the house mice
Jun Wang*, John Baines [Germany]
1430 Genome evolution in the heritable, extracellular earthworm symbiont
Verminephrobacter
Andreas Schramm*, Kasper U. Kjeldsen, Nicolas Pinel, Stephane De Mita,
Marie B. Lund, David A. Stahl, Thomas Bataillon [Denmark]
1445 Exploiting genomics to study the evolution and adaptation of Sinorhizobium
meliloti to different environments
Marco Bazzicalupo*, Marco Galardini, Emanuele Biondi, Francesco Pini,
Alessio Mengoni [Italy]
1330 What makes a bacterium fresh? Genome wide functional comparison of
marine and freshwater SAR11
Stefan Bertilsson, Siv Andersson, Alexander Eiler*, Leyden Fernandez-Vidal,
Manuel Martinez-Garcia, Rex Malmstrom, Katherine D McMahon, Ramunas
Stepanauskas, Katarzyna Zaremba [Sweden]
1345 Freshwater Actinobacteria acI as revealed by single-cell genomics
Sarahi L Garcia*, Trina McMahon, Abhishek Srivastava, Hans-Peter
Grossart, Ramunas Stepanauskas, Alex Sczyrba, Tanja Woyke, Sandra
Barchmann, Falk Warnecke [Germany]
1400 Single cell sequencing on a microbial community performing anaerobic
oxidation of methane
Ying Chen*, Fengping Wang, Yu Zhang, Xiang Xiao [China]
1415 Reconstructing genomes of uncultured microorganisms from marine
sediments using single cell genomics - an Aarhus Bay, Denmark, case study
Lars Schreiber*, Karen G. Lloyd, Dorthe G. Petersen, Sabine Lenk, Sara
Kleindienst, Bo B. Jørgensen, Andreas Schramm [Denmark]
1430 Single cell Raman spectroscopy for cell imaging, manipulation and sorting
Wei Huang* [UK]
1445 Carbon and N2 fixation rate measurements on individual uncultivated
cyanobacteria (UCYN-A) by nanoSIMS
Andreas Krupke*, Niculina Musat, Julie LaRoche, Wiebke Mohr, Bernhard M
Fuchs, Rudolf I Amann, Marcel MM Kuypers, Rachel A Foster [Germany]
1500 Cardinium hertigii - a reproductive manipulator with a role in host nutrition
Thomas Penz*, Stephan Schmitz-Esser, Suzanne Kelly, Anneliese Müller,
Tanja Woyke, Stephanie Malfatti, Martha Hunter, Matthias Horn [Austria]
1500 Menu á la carte: in-situ substrate preferences of abundant freshwater
bacterioplankton populations
Michaela Salcher*, Thomas Posch, Jakob Pernthaler [Switzerland]
1515 Evolution of the distinct symbiotic microbiota in bugs of the Pyrrhocoridae
family (Hemiptera)
Sailendharan Sudakaran*, Christian Kost, Martin Kaltenpoth [Germany]
1515 In situ HCR-FISH: a new sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridization
technique for detecting environmental microorganisms
Tsuyoshi Yamaguchi*, Shuji Kawakami, Masashi Hatamoto, Masanobu
Takahashi, Kengo Kubota, Hiroyuki Imachi, Nobuo Araki [Japan]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 15
CT12: Microbial Symbioses - 1
1330 Functional equivalence and evolutionary convergence in complex
communities of microbial symbionts
Torsten Thomas*, Lu Fan, David Reynolds, Michael Liu, Manuel Stark,
Staffan Kjelleberg, Nicole Webster [Australia]
14
1330 - 1530
15
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
ROOM B3
CT15: Microbes in a Changing Ocean
Chairperson:
Chairpersons: Stephen Giovannoni, Oregon State University, USA
Osvaldo Ulloa, University of Conceptión, Chile
Philip Hugenholtz, University of Queensland, Australia
1345 Complexity does not necessarily create diversity
Elizabeth Heidrich*, William Sloan, Tom Curtis [United Kingdom]
1400 Selection history affects the predictability of microbial ecosystem
development
Andrew Free*, Eulyn Pagaling, Fiona Strathdee, Bryan Spears, Michael
Cates, Rosalind Allen [United Kingdom]
1415 Can we use microbial life strategies to understand the response of microbial
communities to moisture stress?
Sarah Evans*, Matthew Wallenstein [USA]
1430 Towards a unified taxonomy for ribosomal RNA databases
Pelin Yilmaz*, Frank Oliver Glöckner [Germany]
1445 Systematic design of 18S rDNA primers for assessing eukaryotic diversity
Luisa Hugerth*, Daniel Lundin, Emilie Muller, Laura Lebrung, Hugo Roume,
Paul Wilmes, Anders Andersson [Sweden]
1500 Targeted metagenome exploration by solution hybridization-selection capture
coupled to next-generation sequencing
Jérémie Denonfoux*, Nicolas Parisot, Eric Dugat-Bony, Corinne Biderre-Petit,
Delphine Boucher, Diego Pablo Morgavi, Eric Peyretaillade, Pierre Peyret
[France]
1515 Time and space resolved deep metagenomics to investigate selection
pressures on low abundant species in complex environments
Mads Albertsen*, Aaron M. Saunders, Kåre L. Nielsen, Per H. Nielsen
[Denmark]
1330 Stratified bacterial and archaeal communities across the oxygen minimum
zone of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific
Phil A Arevalo*, Cornelia Wuchter, Tzu-Hsuan Yang, Marco J. L. Coolen,
Stefan M. Sievert [USA]
1345 Depletion of the rare bacterial biosphere in expanding oceanic oxygen
minimum zones
J. Michael Beman*, Molly Carolan [USA]
1400 Abundance and potential functional role of gammaproteobacterial sulfuroxidizers in pelagic redoxclines of the central Baltic Sea and the Black Sea
Sabine Glaubitz*, Matthias Labrenz, Günter Jost, Katrin Kießlich, Klaus
Jürgens [Germany]
1415 Direct pH effects on marine microbial communities
Evamaria Krause*, Antje Wichels, Gunnar Gerdts [Germany]
1430 Effects of strong oxygen depletion on bacterial composition and phosphorus
dynamics
Remy Tadonleke*, Thomas Pollet, Peter Van Rijswik, Brigitte Leberre, Jack
Middelburg [France]
1445 The genetic and physiological adaptation of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium
trichodesmium to elevated CO2: a four-year experimental evolution study
Nathan Walworth*, Feixue Fu, Nathan Garcia, Avery Tatters, Elizabeth Yu,
Eric Webb, David Hutchins [USA]
1500 Can sponges and their symbionts soak up the pressures of climate change?
Nicole Webster*, Craig Humphrey, Sven Uthicke, Lu Fan, Torsten Thomas
[Australia]
1515 Increased freshwater discharge shifts the trophic balance in the coastal zone
of the northern Baltic Sea
Johan Wikner*, Agneta Andersson [Sweden]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
ROOM B4
CT14: Microbial Community Diversity: 16S and beyond - 1
1330 Rarity and the problem of measuring diversity
Bart Haegeman*, Jérôme Hamelin, John Moriarty, Peter Neal, Jonathan
Dushoff, Joshua S. Weitz [France]
16
1330 - 1530
17
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
AUD. 10
CT17: Pathways and Physiology
Chairperson:
Chairpersons: Dawn Holmes, Western New England University, USA
William Inskeep, Montana State University, USA
Nils Risgaard-Petersen, University of Aarhus, Denmark
1345 Coupled aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen cycling within permeable sediments;
implications for global N-loss and N2O emissions
Hannah Marchant*, Gaute Lavik, Marcel Kuypers [Germany]
1400 Response of microbial transcriptome, proteome, and activity to rainfall pulses
in a prairie soil
David Myrold*, Lydia Zeglin, Peter Bottomley, Ari Jumpponen, Charles Rice,
Maude David, Janet Jansson, Emmanuel Prestat, Susannah Tringe, Nathan
Verberkmoes, Robert Hettich [USA]
1415 Genomic analysis illuminates the evolution and metabolism of the major
marine nitrite oxidizer Nitrospina gracilis
Sebastian Lücker*, Boris Nowka, Eva Spieck, Michael Wagner, Holger Daims
[Austria]
1430 Determination of in situ growth rates and intracellular accumulation of
ammonium in single cells of marine anammox bacteria
Phyllis Lam*, Tim Kavelage, Gaute Lavik, Marlene M Jensen, Boran Kartal,
Mike S M Jetten, Marcel M M Kuypers [Germany]
1445 Field-scale labelling of active methanotrophs by combining stable-isotope
probing with gas push-pull tests
Ruth Henneberger*, Eleonora Chiri, Jan Blees, Helge Niemann, Martin H.
Schroth [Switzerland]
1500 Revisiting N2 fixation in photosynthetic microbial mats by a functional
approach - 15N2 stable isotope probing combined with single cell analysis
Dagmar Woebken*, Luke C Burow, Peter K Weber, Steven W Singer, Alfred
M Spormann, Jennifer Pett-Ridge, Brad M Bebout [USA]
1515 Bacterial community structure and composition in high arsenic contaminated
ground water from West Bengal and microbial role in subsurface arsenic
release
Pinaki Sar*, Dhiraj Paul, Angana Sarkar, Sufia K Kazy, Tarak Nath Pal [India]
1330 Regulation of denitrification - bet hedging and “hitchhiking” for survival
Lars Bakken*, Asa Frostegard [Norway]
1345 Decrypting the sulfur cycle in oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones
Sean Crowe*, Donald Canfield, Osvaldo Ulloa, Juan Francisco Santibáñez
[Denmark]
1400 Impact of environmental conditions on the transcriptome and proteome of a
model soil bacterium: Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus
Maude M. David*, Lydia Zeglin, Emmanuel Prestat, Jill Dvornik, Robert
Hettich, Kristen Corrier, Ari Jumpponen, Konstantinos Mavromatis,
Charles Rice, Renee Koutsoukis, Manesh Shah, Susannah Tringe, Nathan
Verberkmoes, Steve Lindow, David Myrold, Janet K. Jansson [USA]
1415 Environmental fate of nitrate - dinitrogen or ammonium?
Beate Kraft*, Halina E. Tegetmeyer, Marc Strous [Germany]
1430 Metabolic model for an unusual and versatile Tetrasphaera involved
in enhanced biological phosphorus removal based on whole genome
sequencing
Rikke Kristiansen*, Hien Thi Thu Nguyen, Aaron Marc Saunders, Jeppe
Lund Nielsen, Reinhard Wimmer, Vang Que Le, Steve Petrovski, Simon Jon
McIlroy, Robert Seviour, Alexandra Calteau, Kåre Lehmann Nielsen, Per
Halkjær Nielsen [Denmark]
1445 Actinobacterial steroid catabolism
William Mohn* [Canada]
1500 Tradeoffs in protein synthesis provide a mechanistic explanation for the
ecological strategies of heterotrophic bacteria
Benjamin R. Roller*, Thomas M. Schmidt [USA]
1515 Detection of the bacterial fermentation product 2,3-butanedione in the
lungs of a cystic fibrosis patient may indicate anaerobic respiration through
bacterial synergism
Katrine Whiteson*, Yanwei Lim, Simone Meinard, Rob Schmeider, Mike
Furlan, Jose Evangelista, Don Blake, Doug Conrad, Forest Rohwer [USA]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 11
CT16: Microbial Element Cycling: from genes to turnover
1330 Genome-centered analysis of biogeochemical cycling
Kelly Wrighton*, Brian Thomas, Michael Wilkins, Nathan Verberkmoes, Cindy
Castelle, Itai Sharon, Chris Miller, Robert Hettich, Mary Lipton, Ken Williams,
Phil Long, Jill Banfield [USA]
18
1330 - 1530
19
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1330 - 1430
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
AUD. 12
CT18: Empowered by Microbes
Chairpersons: Martin Keller, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
Willy Verstraete, Ghent University, Belgium
1330 Microbial communities associated with the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus
hampei; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and their role in caffeine metabolism
Javier A. Ceja-Navarro*, Fernando E. Vega, Ulas Karaoz, Hsiao-Chien Lim,
Peter K. Weber, Zhao Hao, Hoi-Ying Holman, Jennifer Pett-Ridge, Eoin L.
Brodie [USA]
1345 Fiber screening study: how do fibers change gut microbiota and their short
chain fatty acid production?
Floor Hugenholtz*, Katja Lange, Marlene Escobar, Natasa Giallourou, Guido
Hooiveld, Michiel Kleerebezem, Hauke Smidt [Netherlands]
1400 Determining the relationships between ruminal microbes and milk production
efficiency in dairy cows
Kelsea Jewell*, Elizabeth Strassman, Christine L Odt, David M Stevenson,
Paul J Weimer, Suen Garret [USA]
1415 A cooperatioin of algae and methane oxidizing bacteria allows the creation of
added value products from biogas
David van der Ha*, Leen Nachtergaele, Frederiek-Maarten Kerckhof,
Giovanni Ganendra, Willy Verstraete, Nico Boon [Belgium]
1430 - 1530
AUD. 12
CT19: Light and Microbial Life
Chairperson: Niels-Ulrik Frigaard, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1430 An early-branching microbialite cyanobacterium forms intracellular
carbonates
Estelle Couradeau*, Karim Benzerara, Emmanuelle Gerard, David Moreira,
Sylvain Bernard, Gordon E. Brown JR., Purificacion Lopez-Garcia [France]
1530 - 1730
POSTER
HALL B
POSTER SESSIONS
- MEET THE AUTHORS
PS01 Empowered by Microbes
PS02 Light and Microbial Life
PS03 Microbes in a Changing Ocean
PS04 Microbial Community Diversity: 16S and Beyond
Main Authors A - C
PS05 Microbial Dispersion and Biogeography - is everything everywhere?
PS06 Microbial Gradient Communities
PS07 Microbial Interactions and Behavior
PS08 Microbial Symbioses
PS09 Pathways and Physiology
PS10 Single Cell Microbiology
For full listing please see separate poster book provided at the symposia
20
1500 Iridescence of a marine bacterium
Betty Kientz*, Peter Vukusic, Stephen Luke, Eric Rosenfeld [France]
1515 Proteorhodopsin-mediated phototrophy in marine Flavobacteria
Susumu Yoshizawa*, Akira Kawanabe, Hiroyasu Ito, Hideki Kandori,
Kazuhiro Kogure [Japan]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1445 Ecophysiology of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in a sulfide-rich lake revealed
by metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics
Niels-Ulrik Frigaard*, Nicola Storelli, Lasse G. Falkenby, Kirsten S. Habicht,
Mauro Tonolla, Raymond P. Cox, Mette Miller [Denmark]
21
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
1730 - 1930
1730 - 1930
RT10: Terragenome: The Exponential Growth of Soil
Metagenomics
WORKSHOP: Young Scientist /ISMEJ Publication
Chairperson: Sara Burton, University of Exeter, UK
Description: Support for early career scientists professional development: How to
get published and advice about planning to secure your next academic
position.
This workshop will offer advice about key aspects of career planning
including enhancement of your track record of publications. Sara Burton
will discuss societal opportunities for professional development and
funding opportunities for early career scientists. Hilary Lappin-Scott
will share her extensive experience of grant writing and manuscript
preparation and advise on best practice for success pre grant and
manuscript submission. Mark Bailey as Editor in chief of The ISME
Journal will share his experience of the behind the scenes post
submission processes. This workshop will clarify what are the reviewer’s
processes and will give you advice on how to ensure publication
success. This workshop will explore how to ensure you enhance your
CV and plan and prepare your publications to ensure success in career
progression to secure academic positions.
Presenters: 17:30 Sara Burton
Professional development support and & science communication
18:05 Hilary Lappin-Scott
How to mentor colleagues and students and the Pre-submission Process
for Successful Publication
22
Chairpersons: Timothy M. Vogel, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, France
David D. Myrold, Oregon State University, USA
Joonhong Park, Yonsei University, South Korea
Description: The last and maybe the most difficult frontier for metagenomics is that
of the soil ecosystem, which arguably consists of the highest microbial
diversity and the greatest spatial and temporal heterogeneity of any of
our planet’s ecosystems. The objectives of this session are to increase
communication between active soil metagenomic researchers especially
as the NSF RCN “Terragenome” began this year, to provide valuable
experience-based discussions for starting soil metagenomists, and to
begin to bring some order in this young and growing field. This session
will provide a forum to initiate the development of a coordinated 10-year
plan for the international soil metagenomic community.
Presenters:
The Promise
Janet Jansson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA
Challenges
Jim Prosser, University of Aberdeen, UK
Pitfalls
Pascal Simonet, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, France
Ten Year Plan
Jim Tiedje, Michigan State University, USA
Discussion: led by Myrold, Park, and Vogel – Census of all the
recent positive advances in soil metagenomics and microbial ecology as
a result of soil metagenomics, tales of difficulties and brain storming of
solutions, future trends.
ISME14 |
| ISME14
18:40 Mark Bailey
The Post Submission Publication Process
HALL A2
23
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1730 - 1930
HALL A3
RT12: Frontiers in microbial ecosystem science: Energizing
the research agenda
Chairperson:
Chairpersons:
Jizhong Zhou, University of Oklahhoma, USA
unique roles in various ecosystem processes and functions. In an ecosystem,
various microorganisms interact with each other to form complicated networks.
Thus, understanding the interactions among different species and their responses
to environmental changes is a central goal in ecology. However, elucidating
network interactions and their responses to environmental changes is difficult
due to the lack of appropriate experimental data and theoretical framework.
Although the network interactions and their responses to environmental changes
have been intensively studied in macroecology, very little is known in microbial
ecology. The availability of metagenomics technologies such as high throughput
sequencing and microarrays provides a great opportunuty for studying network
interactions among different populations in microbial communities. Now, a new
emerging field, network ecology, has been developed and significant progresses
have been made. Thus it is a time to have a special session to highlight the most
recent development in such an emerging field.
The objective of this roundtable session is to highlight the most recent
advances in network ecology to address fundamental questions important to
biogeochemistry, climate change, and human health. Special emphasis will be
placed on the development of new mathematical framework for network analysis
and applications on analyzing network interactions of microbial communities
related to soil microbial ecology, marine sciences, climate change and human
health. This session will also overview the network studies in macroecology and
system biology in general. This session will benefit microbiologists interested
in microbial ecology, systems biology, metagenomics, climate change,
biogeochemistry and human health. After attending this session, it is expected
that participants should be able to (i) recognize the most recent development
and applications of microbial network ecology; (ii) identify the challenges,
advantages, disadvantages and potentials of various approaches for network
analysis; (iii) obtain insights of several key microbial communities important to
biogeochemistry, global changes and human health.
Presenters: Jed Fuhrman, University of Southern California, USA
Three-domain microbial association networks at the San Pedro Ocean Time
series
Catherine A. Lozupone, University of Colorado, CO, USA
Application of network analysis to the human gut microbiota and use of
comparative genomics to understand the driving factors of microbial associations
Jeroen Raes, VIB, Belgium
Predicting association networks from meta-omics data: methods and pitfalls
Jizhong Zhou, University of Oklahoma, OK, USA
Microbial Network ecology: current status, challenge and future perspectives
Katherine McMahon, University of WisconsinMadison, USA
Jay Lennon, Indiana University, USA
Description: Ecosystem ecology focuses on the fluxes of material and energy in
natural and managed habitats.Even though microorganisms regulate
these fluxes, the disciplines of ecosystem ecology and microbial
ecology are not necessarily well integrated. To address this issue, out
roundtable will focus on the opportunities for cross-fertilization between
microbial ecosystem ecology, population/community ecology, and
evolution. The goal is to identify and discuss key research frontiers that
will significantly advance our understanding of the feedbacks between
microbial communities (i.e., structure and function) and ecosystemlevel processes. This workshop is part of a series of such discussions
being organized at conferences around the world during 2011-2012 to
solicit community input on future research directions. Results from the
discussion will serve as input for a final symposium (to be held at a later
date) that will involve approximately 50 participants and will produce
a “white paper” that would serve as an evaluation and direction for
complimentary disciplines. We envision this document being distributed
to funding agencies to guide future priority setting. The workshop
and symposium are partially supported by the US National Science
Foundation Division of Environmental Biology through a grant to the
Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies in the US.
Presenters: Soil biogeochemistry, plant-microbe interactions
Mary Firestone, Univ of California Berkeley, USA
Terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem microbiology
Jay Lennon, Indiana University, USA
The aquatic N cycle
Bess Ward, Princeton University, USA
Aquatic microbial ecology
Stefan Bertilsson, Uppsala University, Sweden
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 15
RT11: Microbial Network Ecology: Deciphering Complex
Network Interactions in Microbial Communities
Description: Microorganisms are the foundation of the Earth’s biosphere, and play integral and
24
1730 - 1930
25
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1730 - 1930
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
ROOM B3
RT13: Guarding microbial diversity: importance for fundamental
and applied research
Chairperson: Paul de Vos, University of Ghent, Belgium
Description: Identification of microorganisms - being one of the goals of bacterial and
mycological taxonomy –becomes, in the light of the wealth of data as
generated via next-generation sequencing platforms, in the interest field
of a broad scala of researchers. The expertise in taxonomy is at the same
time declining (worldwide, except perhaps for Asia) and it is more and more
difficult to maintain standards in the submitted manuscripts that report new
species discovered from a variety of biotopes at an enhanced speed. There
is hence also an increasing need to deposit strains cited in publications for
pursuance of good science ensuring that published work can be validated
and followed up. Researchers need to work with culture collections to identify
their needs for fulfilling high standards imposed by their community.
EMbaRC (http://www.embarc.eu/), an FP7 EU project aims at harmonizing
expertise of European public Microbial Resource Centers (BRC’s) for
technical, methodological as well as accessibility aspects of their holdings
and management. Continuation of this effort on the long term is a
prerequisite to reach a pan-European infrastructure as meant in the ESFRI
road map in which the MIRRI proposal has been presented. Once the
infrastructure is operational, an integrated webportal will lead researchers
and other stakeholders to compiled information on resources and services
resulting in collaborative guarding and exploring microbial biodiversity.
Several public BRC’s already support the integration of data of their holdings
with publically available sequences and other taxonomic information via the
Straininfo bioportal (http://www.straininfo.net/) at the strain level.
Presenters:
Gaps in biological resources: what is missing?
E. Stackebrandt, DSMZ- Germany / Philippe DeSmeth
(President WFCC).
Using data bases: where does it go wrong?
Pelin Yilmaz, Max-Planck-Institut für Marine Mikrobiologie, Bremen ,
Germany
26
What BRC’c (Biological Resource centers /Culture collections) can
do for you
D. Fritze, DSMZ-Germany / D. Janssens, BCCM/LMG, Belgium
What can we achieve together?
EU effort: the EMbaRC and MIRRI projects (and other
initiatives,WFCC, GBRCN).
D. Smith, CABI / D. Fritze, DSMZ, Germany
ROOM B4
RT14: Flow Cytometry in Microbiology
Chairperson:
Susann Müller, Helmholtz-Zentrum für
Umweltforschung GmbH – UFZ, Germany
Description: The still poorly explored world of microbial functioning in natural communities
is about to be uncovered by a combined appliance of older and new
technologies. Flow cytometry is such an older technology which is up to date
mainly used for analysing bacterial cell states and dynamics of cells in pure
populations. This is pitiful as flow cytometry is a cultivation independent,
high-throughput, and quantitative technology. The goal of this round table
discussion is to debate on how cytomic approaches will contribute to reveal
basic principles of microbial ecosystems.
As many methodological pitfalls prevented a breakthrough of this technology
in the past, the round table discussion will be preferably method-based and
will start on practiced handling of the cytometer and the microbes from the
very beginning (meaning instrumental setup, sampling, and detachment
and fixation procedures) and will debate how to treat vital and fixed cells
by applying structural and functional related fluorescent probes. Following,
a major part will address cell sorting applications which open the door to
“omics” technologies. How flow cytometry can also mediate insight into
complexity and functioning of natural microbial communities without using
the sorting approach will be another major part of this round table discussion.
We want to provide ideas on cytometric community pattern evaluation
that can be used to correlate community structure to certain functions of
particular members in a community.
Presenters: Cytometric analysis of natural microbial communities - an introduction
Susann Müller, Germany
How to handle bacteria sampled from the environment?
Bernhard Fuchs, Germany
How to analyse vital cells?
Kamila Czechowska, USA
How to obtain knowledge on functioning of unknown natural
communities?
Christin Koch, Germany
Merging cell sorting with genomics
Practical aspects of establishing and operating a single cell genomics
facility
Ramunas Stepanauskas, USA
ISME14 |
| ISME14
How to find bacterial resources?
P. Dawyndt, Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer
Science –Ghent University, Belgium / P. De Vos, LM-UGent, Ghent
University, Belgium
1730 - 1930
27
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
1730 - 1930
AUD. 10
RT16: Unraveling the bacterial mobilome: Potentials and
limitations of the present methodology
Chairpersons:
Chairperson: Kornelia Smalla, Julius Kühn-Institut, Federal Research
Centre for cultivated plants; Institute for Epidemiology
and Pathogen Diagnostics, Germany
Gabriele Berg , Graz University of Technology, Austria
Christine Moissl-Eichinger, University of
Regensburg, Germany
Presenters: Bacterial diversity within the home environment
Noah Fierer, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
Microbiology in clean rooms and planetary protection
Christine Moissl-Eichinger, University of Regensburg, Germany
Microbiology in Intensive Care Units
Lisa Oberauner, Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology, Austria
New possibilities to manage indoor microbial communities
Stefan Liebminger, Research Center Pharmaceutical Engineering
(RCPE GmbH) and Bio2clean, Austria
Discussion (Berg & All): new methods in indoor microbiology, how
much sterility is possible, new concept for hygiene and control
Description: Transfer of conjugative plasmids across species boundaries plays an
important role in the adaptability of bacterial populations to man-made
pollution. Plasmid-mediated genetic variation ensures rapid adaptive
responses to challenges like irregular antibiotic or metal concentrations,
or opportunities like the utilization of xenobiotic compounds. Cultivationindependent detection and capture of plasmids from environmental
bacteria, and complete sequencing provided new insights into their role
and ecology.
This roundtable aims at discussing the recent progress in the
methodology to unravel the mobilome (with focus on plasmids).
We hypothesize that abundance of mobile genetic elements and
pollution are correlated and we seek for respective experimental and
retrospective evidences. Furthermore, sequence based insights into
mobile genetic elements form the basis of hypothesis driven experiments
which contribute to a better understanding of their contribution to
bacterial adaptability and diversity and the environmental factors that
trigger horizontal gene transfer. Plasmids seem to be a successful
strategy to ensure survival of bacterial population in spatially and
temporally heterogeneous conditions with various environmental
stresses or opportunities that occur irregularly or as a novel challenge.
Presenters: Methods for monitoring selection pressures for HGT across the entire
bacterial community
Kristian Brandt, Denmark
Correlation of MGE abundance/diversity and man-made pollution
Kornelia Smalla/Holger Heuer, Germany
Measuring the permisseveness of a microbial community for MGE
uptake
Barth Smets/Sanin Musovic, Denmark
Direct plasmid isolation on complex microbial communities
Soeren Soerensen, Denmark
Sequence based inference of the evolutionary history of plasmids
Eva Top, USA
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 11
RT15: Indoor microbiology: new molecular-based insights
and management strategies
Description: Microbial communities living inside buildings and rooms are important
for human health. Another aspect is production rooms for specific
products, e.g. food, pharmaceuticals, space crafts etc. or hospitals, in
which sterility is required. However, what means sterility in rooms and
how much sterility is really necessary? It is widely recognized that the
majority of microorganisms cannot be readily cultivated and thus, the
overall diversity of microorganisms associated with indoor environments
remains largely unknown. The new molecular and microscopic
techniques such as high-throughput sequencing and fluorescence in
situ hybridization (FISH) have opened the black box of indoor microbial
communities and revealed a high diversity of archaea, bacteria and
fungi. Human-associated microbes are commonly found especially
on surfaces suggesting that bacterial pathogens could readily be
transmitted between individuals. The new techniques and bioinformatic
tools also allowed the evaluation of concepts for hygiene and sterility.
In this round table, new insights into indoor microbiology for different
environments such as living space or clean rooms for spacecraft
assembly and intensive care units will be presented (e.g. MoisslEichinger 2010; Kembel et al. 2012; both ISME J). Furthermore, efficient
management strategies and new possibilities to (biologically) control
these microorganisms into a beneficial direction will be discussed.
28
1730 - 1930
29
MONDAY 20 AUGUST
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
1730 - 1930
AUD. 12
RT17: Microbial invasions: What defines whether a
microorganism is an invasive species?
Chairperson: Emma L. Aronson, University of California, Irvine, USA
Description: In recent years many attempts have been made to understand whether
“everything is everywhere” and to what extent the environment selects
communities of microorganisms. These studies have begun to elucidate microbial
biogeography, dispersal patterns and barriers to dispersal. As our understanding
of drivers of microbial biogeography takes shape, a new question emerges: can a
microbe be considered invasive?
The goal of this roundtable is to consider whether microorganisms, bacteria in
particular, may be considered “invaders” and to envision situations under which
bacteria may be invasive. Currently, most microbial ecologists do not consider
bacteria as invasive species. However, an increasing amount of research is
showing that climatic, environmental and biological drivers (especially invasive
plants and animals) can introduce bacteria to new environments, causing
changes in the dominant members of microbial communities.
The definition we adopt of “invasive (species)” is not inclusive of all translocated
species, but specific to those that cause harm in high numbers to the species
already present. In eukaryotes, particularly humans, there are bacteria considered
invasive due to their harmful effects on their hosts. Transplanted bacteria from
foreign bodies of water are considered invasive when they display negative
effects on the other inhabitants of the body of water. The leap that we are
considering with this roundtable is whether introductions of novel bacteria can be
considered “harmful” if they change the core bacterial community and, possibly,
the ecosystem functions of that community. If so, we can define translocated
bacteria as “invasive” due to the harm they cause.
SCIENTIFIC
PROGRAM
Presenters: Definition of the core microbial community
Ashley Shade, USA
Example of invasive grass impacts on soil microbial community
Emma Aronson, USA
Pathway Analysis for the Introduction and Translocation of Harmful Aquatic
Microbes in the Great Lakes
Fred Dobbs, USA
| ISME14
Effects of climate-induced changes in soil microbes on the dominance of invasive
plants in plant communities Annelein Meisner, Denmark
Wetland sediment microbial community changes in response to invasive plants
John Kelly , USA
30
Directed discussion of 1) what constitutes invasive microorganisms; 2) how
should we test for native vs. invasive microorganisms; 3) what is the relevance of
invasive non-pathogenic microorganisms?
* Indicates the presenting author. Program is subject to
change. Please check the addendum if supplied.
1830 2000
1730 1830
1530 1730
1330 1530
1230 1315
1200 1330
1000 1200
0930
0830 0920
0800 0830
0800 1800
0800 1830
HALL A3
PLENARY
SESSION
SOCIAL
PROGRAM
POSTER
SESSION
ROOM B3
CT21: Soil
Microbiology
and
Heterogeneity
-1
CT22: Managin
Microbial
Communities
CT24: Microbial Community
Diversity: 16S
and beyond - 2
Lunch Break
CT25: VirusBacteria
Interactions
Tiedje Award Evening Wine Reception - Exhibition Hall E
Poster session including afternoon tea and coffee
CT23: Archaea:
important
players in
diverse
microbial
ecosystems
IS23: Archaea:
important
players in
diverse
microbial
ecosystems
Morning Coffee and Tea in the Exhibition and Poster Viewing Area
PL06: Tiedje Award Presentation
Stephen Giovannoni, Oregon State University, USA
Introduction by: Steven Lindow
IS26: Mobility
of Genes and
the Species
Concept
CT28: Mobility
of Genes and
the Species
Concept
CT27: The
Starving
Majority; life at
low energy flux
CT26: The
Unknowns:
rare ones and
unculturables
AUD. 12
IS25: The
Starving Majority; life at low
energy flux
AUD. 11
IS24: VirusBacteria
nteractions
AUD. 10
Early Morning Coffee and Tea in the Exhibition and Poster Viewing Area
ROOM B4
PL05 --Plenary Hall A1
Víctor de Lorenzo, Molecular Environmental Laboratory, The Spanish Research Council, Spain
Introduction by: Steven Lindow
CT20: Genetic
Potential and
Expression:
key functions
in microbial
communities - 1
Sponsored by
IWA
PL04 - Plenary Hall A1
Patrick Forterre, Pasteur Institute, France
Introduction by: Michael Wagner
IS22: The
unknowns:
rare ones and
unculturables
BIRD’S EYE
VIEW
PRESENTATION
IS21: Managing
Microbial
Communities
INVITED
SESSIONS
CONTRIBUTED
SESSIONS
AUD. 15
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST 2012
PL03 - Plenary Hall A1
Michael Wagner, Department of Microbial Ecology, University of Vienna, Austria
Introduction by: Hilary Lappin-Scott
Exhibition open
Hall E
IS20: Genetic
Potential and
Expression:
key functions
in microbial
communities
PLENARY
SESSION
HALL A2
Registration and speaker preparation room open
HALL A1
0830 - 0920
1000 - 1200
ISME14 |
32
TIME
| ISME14
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
Chair: Hilary Lappin-Scott
PLENARY SESSION
Michael Wagner, Department of Microbial Ecology, University of Vienna,
Austria
You are what you eat but not always what omics predicts: On the importance
of single cell ecophysiology of microbes
PLENARY
HALL A1
IS20: Genetic Potential and Expression: key functions in
microbial communities
Chairpersons: Jill Banfield, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Michael Schloter, Helmholtz Center München, Germany
1000 Genotypes and their idiosyncratic phenotypes: the genetic potential of
freshwater bacterioplankton?
Jakob Pernthaler, University of Zürich, Switzerland
1030 Changes in diversity of microbial communities in a tidal wetland versus
paddy soils cultivated for different time periods
Michael Schloter, Helmholtz Center München, Germany
1100 Genome-centric metagenomic analysis of complex natural and acetatestimulated sediment microbial communities
Jill Banfield, University of California, Berkeley, USA
1130 Rumen Systems Biology: A meta-approach to study the lignocellulolytic and
methanogenic microbiome of the rumen
Matthias Hess, Washington State University, USA
33
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
1000 - 1200
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
HALL A2
IS21: Managing Microbial
Chairpersons: Ian Head, Newcastle University, UK
Per Halkjær Nielsen, Aalborg University, Denmark
Chairpersons:
Anna-Louise Reysenbach, Portland State University, USA
Rachel Whitaker, University of Illinois, USA
1000 Managing microbial communities through resource manipulation
Ian Head, Newcastle University, UK
1000 Ecological Diversity, Evolutionary And Functional Genomics Of The
Nanoarchaeota
Mircea Podar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
1030 Community systems microbiology of the enhanced biological phosphorus
removal process
Per Halkjær Nielsen, Aalborg University, Denmark
1030 New insights into Archaea from deep-sea vents
Anna-Louise Reysenbach, Portland State University, USA
1100 Microbial communities in the biogas process
Anna Schnürer, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden
1100 Methanogenic and methanotrophic archaea: key players in the carbon cycle
Rudolf Thauer, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg,
Germany
1130 Systems biology approaches to understand and direct microbial community
functioning
Wilfred Röling, VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands
1130 Let genomes do the talking: Using genomics to unravel genes under
selection in archaeal populations
Rachel Whitaker, University of Illinois, USA
1000 - 1200
HALL A3
1000 - 1200
AUD. 10
IS22: The Unknowns: rare ones and unculturables
IS24: Virus-Bacteria Interactions
Chairpersons: Yoshiteru Aoi, Hiroshima University, Japan /
Northeastern University, USA
Jay Lennon, Indiana University, USA
Chairpersons:
1000 Can dormancy theory help us retrieve rare and uncultured microbes?
Jay Lennon, Indiana University, USA
1030 New cultivation methods accessing unculturables and puzzling out
unculturability
Yoshiteru Aoi, Hiroshima University, Japan / Northeastern University, USA
1100 Shallow Breathing: The essential role of microaerobic metabolism and
environments in microbial communities
Thomas Schmidt, Department of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics,
Michigan State University, USA
1130 Directed Culturing and Insights into Host-Microbe Interactions using Next
Generation Sequencing
Jörg Graf, University of Connecticut, USA
Angus Buckling, University of Exeter, UK
Mathias Middelboe, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1000 Ecological and genetic drivers of bacteria-lytic phage coevolutionary
dynamics
Angus Buckling, University of Exeter, UK
1030 Local and global scale host range patterns and distribution of
bacteriophages infecting the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum
Mathias Middelboe, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1100 Ecology and evolution of temperate phages
Dominik Refardt, ETH Zürich, Switzerland
CANCELLED
1130 Viral-tagging and PhageFISH: Emerging methods for investigating
environmental virus-host interactions
Matthew B. Sullivan, University of Arizona, USA
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 15
IS23: Archaea: imoprtant players in diverse microbial
ecosystems
Communities
34
1000 - 1200
35
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
1000 - 1200
AUD. 11
IS25: The Starving Majority; life at low energy flux
Chairpersons:
1230 - 1315
PLENARY
HALL A1
PLENARY SESSION - BIRD’S EYE VIEW
Bo Barker Jørgensen, University of Aarhus, Denmark
Rainer Meckenstock, Helmholtz Center München,
Germany
Chair: Michael Wagner
Patrick Forterre, Pasteur Institute, France
The virocell concept: implication for environmental virology
1000 A critical review of mean metabolic rates of subsurface microbial
communities
Bo Barker Jørgensen, University of Aarhus, Denmark
1030 Metabolic Theory And Targeted Experiments At Low Energy
Jan Amend, University of Southern California, USA
1100 How Heterotrophic Microbes Make Ends Meet In A Carbon/Energy-Limited
World (Or: The Strategy Of “Mixed Substrate Growth”)
Thomas Egli, EAWAG, Switzerland
1130 Biochemical and physiological adaptations to slow growth rates by the
anaerobic naphthalene degrading organisms N47 and the toluene degrader
Geobacter metallireducens
Rainer Meckenstock, Helmholtz Center München. Germany
1000 - 1200
AUD. 12
IS26: Mobility of Genes and the Species Concept
Chairpersons: Tal Dagan, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany
Søren J. Sørensen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1000 Horizontal genetic transfer and the origin of species in bacteria
Frederick M. Cohan, Wesleyan University, USA
36
1100 Coevolution between plasmids and their hosts: consequences for the
persistence of drug resistance
Eva Top, University of Idaho, USA
1130 The communal gene pool in natural environments
Søren J. Sørensen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1030 Phylogenomic networks reveal mechanisms for lateral gene transfer during
microbial evolution
Tal Dagan, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany
37
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
CT20: Genetic Potential and Expression: key functions in
microbial communities - 1
Chairpersons:
Michael Schloter, Helmholtz Center München, Germany
Jan Sørensen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1330 Key functions and microorganisms driving organic carbon transformation in
Arctic peat soils
Alexander Tveit*, Tim Urich, Rainer Schwacke, Peter Frenzel, Mette
Svenning [Norway ]
1345 Functional community analysis of a microbial mat involved in the oxydation of
iron by metatranscriptomics
Achim Quaiser*, Xavier Bodi, Alexis Dufresne, Alexandra Dheilly,
Sophie Coudouel, Delphine Naquin, André-Jean Francez, Philippe
Vandenkoornhuyse [France]
1400 Transcriptional dynamics of catabolic genes in soil - fine-scale analysis for a
deeper understanding of soil functioning
Mette H Nicolaisen*, Mélanie M Paulin, Nanna B Svenningsen, Ole Nybroe,
Carsten S Jacobsen, Jan Sørensen, Jacob Bælum [Denmark]
1415 Endogeic earthworms shape active chlorophenol degraders in soil
Marcus Horn*, Anja Ramm [Germany]
1430 Deep transcript profiles of nitrogen and iron limited eukaryotic phytoplankton
blooms
Andrew Allen*, Ruben Valas, Hopkinson Brian, Francois Morel, Bess Ward
[USA]
38
1500 Metaproteogenomic analysis reveals Epsilonproteobacteria as drivers of
chemosynthesis at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, 9ºN East Pacific Rise
Stefan M. Sievert*, Thomas Schweder, Dörte Becher, Andrea Thürmer,
Nadine Le Bris, Craig D. Taylor, Rolf Daniel, Stephan C. Schuster, Jana
Lange, Lara K. Gulmann [USA]
1515 Distribution, diversity, and evolution of cyclic peptide secondary metabolites
in natural populations of marine picocyanobacteria
Andres Cubillos-Ruiz*, Sallie W. Chisholm [USA]
HALL A2
CT21: Soil Microbiology and Heterogeneity - 1
Chairpersons:
Naoise Nunan, BioEMCo, Centre INRA Versailles-Grignon,
France
Jim Prosser, University of Aberdeen, UK
1330 Spatial patterns of microbial communities at a soil microscale
Florentin Constancias*, Nicolas Chemidlin Prevost-Boure, Virginie Nowak,
Samuel Dequiedt, Luc Biju-Duval, Jean-Philippe Guillemin, Richard Joffre,
Jean Martins, Lionel Ranjard [France]
1345 Effect of soil moisture and pore size distribution on antagonistic bacterial
interactions
Alexandra Wolf*, Michiel Vos, George Kowalchuk [Netherlands]
1400 Self-organization of microbial consortia via trophic interactions on hydrated
rough surfaces
Gang Wang*, Dani Or [Switzerland]
1415 Fungal highways: redefining the role of soil fungal networks on oxalotrophic
bacteria for the oxalate-carbonate pathway
Saskia Bindschedler*, Martin Pion, Anaele Simon, Daniel Job, Pilar Junier,
Lukas Y. Wick [Germany]
1430 Microorganisms affecting the stabilisation of soil organic carbonin
cryoturbations of the Siberian Arctic
Antje Gittel*, Jiri Barta, Iva Lacmanova, Joerg Schnecker, Birgit Wild, Robert
Mikutta, Georg Guggenberger, Sarah Owens, Jack Gilbert, Vigdis Torsvik,
Andreas Richter, Christa Schleper, Tim Urich [Norway]
1445 Antibiotic resistance in soil bacterial communities: comparison of metals
and antibiotic residues as selecting agents and spatial heterogeneity of coselected resistance patterns
Kristian Koefoed Brandt*, Jeanette Berg, Martin Hangler, Jakub Modrzynski,
Chris Eckstein, Mette H. Nicolaisen, Gitte G. Anskjær, Jakob Magid, Peter E.
Holm, Jan Sørensen, Ole Nybroe, [Denmark]
1500 Development of zinc tolerance by the ammonia oxidising community is
restricted to ammonia oxidising Bacteria, rather than Archaea
Stefan Ruyters*, Graeme Nicol, James I. Prosser, Bart Lievens, Erik
Smolders [Belgium]
1515 Biochar amendment to arable soil links abundance of nitrous oxide reducing
bacteria to decreased N2O emissions
Johannes Harter, Hans-Martin Krause, Stefanie Schüttler, Markus Fromme,
Reiner Ruser, Thomas Scholten, Andreas Kappler, Sebastian Behrens*
[Germany]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1445 Metatranscriptomic insights into nitrification in the deep Gulf of California
Gregory Dick*, Brett Baker, Sunit Jain, Cody Sheik [USA]
1330 - 1530
39
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
HALL A3
CT22: Managing Microbial Communities
Chairpersons: Ian Head, Newcastle University, UK
Per Halkjær Nielsen, Aalborg University, Denmark
1330 Microbial methane formation and oxidation in abandoned coal mines in
Germany
Sabrina Beckmann*, Bert Engelen, Tillmann Lueders, Heribert Cypionka,
Martin Krueger [Germany]
1345 Functionally relevant microdiversity of Nitrospira-like bacteria in activated
sludge
Christiane Dorninger*, Michael Pester, Domenico Savio, Alexander Loy,
Thomas Rattei, Michael Wagner, Holger Daims [Austria]
1400 Asymmetrical behavior of cellulose anaerobic digestion towards temperature
changes: a trigger for managing anaerobic communities in digesters?
Olivier Chapleur*, Laurent Mazeas, Théodore Bouchez [France]
1415 Soil bacterial community shift after chitin enrichment: an integrative
metagenomic approach
Samuel Jacquiod*, Laure Franqueville, Sébastien Cécillon, Timothy Vogel,
Pascal Simonet [France]
1430 Impact of diet on human gut microbial communities
Cindy Nakatsu*, Andrea Clavijo, Arthur Armstrong, Berdine Martin, Connie
Weaver [USA]
1445 Mechanisms of biocide-induced antibiotic resistance: from single cell to
community
Seungdae Oh*, Madan Tandukar, Spyros Pavlostathis, Konstantinos
Konstantinidis [USA]
40
1515 Evaluating process-related and seasonal changes in bacterial community in
drinking water treatment and distribution systems
Ameet Pinto*, Joanna Schroeder, Mary Lunn, William Sloan, Lutgarde
Raskin [USA]
AUD. 15
CT23: Archaea: important players in diverse microbial
ecosystems
Chairpersons:
Anna-Louise Reysenbach, Portland State University, USA
Jose de la Torre, San Francisco State University, USA
1330 Archaeal dominated ammonia-oxidizing communities in Icelandic grassland
soils are moderately affected by long-term N fertilization and geothermal
heating
Anne Daebeler*, Guy Abell, Paul Bodelier, Levente Bodrossy, Dion
Frampton, Mariet Hefting, Riks Laanbroek [Netherlands]
1345 Pinning down a metabolism for widespread, abundant, uncultured archaea
through single cell genomic analysis
Karen Lloyd*, Lars Schreiber, Dorthe Petersen, Michael Richter, Kasper
Kjeldsen, Mark Lever, Sara Kleindienst, Andreas Schramm, Bo Barker
Jorgensen [USA]
1400 The metabolism of polar archaea: is urea playing a role?
Laura Alonso-Saez, Alison Waller, Daniel Mende, Kevin Bakker, Farnelid
Hanna, Patricia Yager, Marta Estrada, Friederike Heinrich, Lasse Riemann,
Carlos Pedrós-Alió, Peer Bork, Stefan Bertilsson* [Spain]
1415 Phylogenetic and functional attributes of a novel deeply-rooted archaea from
high-temperature acidic iron-oxide mats
Mark Kozubal*, William Inskeep [USA]
1430 The ongoing mystery of anaerobic methanotrophy: ecological physiology of
anaerobic methanotrophy and the implications for carbon and sulfur cycling
Peter Girguis*, Scott Wankel, Melissa Adams, Samantha Joye [USA]
1445 Responses of the terrestrial ammonia oxidizing archaeon Ca. Nitrososphaera
viennensis and the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosospira multiformis to
nitrification inhibitors
Tianlin Shen*, Michaela Stieglmeier, Pierre Offre, Christa Schleper [China]
1500 New insights into the physiology of the ammonia oxidizing archaeon
Candidatus Nitrososphaera viennensis
Michaela Stieglmeier*, Maria Mooshammer, Barbara Kitzler, Sophie
Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Andreas Richter, Christa Schleper [Austria]
1515 Ammonia oxidizing archaea and their role in biogeochemical cycling in
terrestrial hot spring ecosystems
Jose de la Torre*, Talia Jewell, Hope Gray, Sandra Melloy, Amy Jo Johnson,
Emily Tung, Robert Theis, Brian Hedlund [USA]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1500 Pathogen removal in slow sand filters as revealed by stable isotope probing
coupled with next generation sequencing
Sarah Haig*, Gavin Collins, Robert Davies, Caetano Dorea, Christopher
Quince [United Kingdom]
1330 - 1530
41
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
ROOM B3
CT25: Virus-Bacteria Interactions
Chairpersons:
Chairpersons:
Kasper Kjeldsen, Center for Geomicrobiology, Aarhus
University, Denmark
Laurent Philippot, INRA, Dijon, France
Dominik Refardt, ETH Zürich, Switzerland
Matthew Sullivan, University of Arizona, USA
1330 Microbial biofilm biodiversity distribution in a stream network
Katharina Besemer*, Gabriel Singer, Christopher Quince, Peter Chifflard,
Enrico Bertuzzo, Linda Wilhelm, Karoline Wagner, Tom Battin [Austria]
1330 Bacteriophage adherence to mucosal surfaces results in adaptable non-host
derived antimicrobial layer
Jeremy Barr*, Forest Rohwer [USA]
1345 Comparative genomics and population dynamics reveal the niches and
diversification patterns within the acI lineage of freshwater Actinobacteria
Trevor Ghylin*, Rex Malmstrom, Ramunas Stepanauskas, Stefan Bertilsson,
Siv Andersson, Katherine McMahon [USA]
1345 Vector particles originating from Polaribacter changed the minimum and
optimum growth temperature of Escherichia coli
Hiroshi X. Chiura*, Susumu Yoshizawa, Kazuhiro Kogure [Japan]
1415 Microbial life in deep karstic groundwater ecosystems: towards an
understanding of diversity patterns and trophic interactions
Kirsten Küsel*, Anna Rusznyak, Martina Herrmann, Denise M. Akob, Patricia
Geesink, Sebastian Opitz, Isabel Schulze, Kai-Uwe Totsche [Germany]
1430 Changes in bacterial and archaeal community composition across
geochemical zones in a coastal marine sediment
Kasper Kjeldsen*, Mark Lever, Karen Lloyd, Britta Gribsholt, Kristoffer Piil,
Nils Risgaard-Petersen, Hans Røy, Waleed Al-Soud, Søren Sørensen, Bo
Jørgensen [Denmark]
1445 Diversity of picophytoplankton along a physico-chemical gradient in the
Northeastern Pacific Ocean
Sebastian Sudek*, R. Craig Everroad, Alyssa Gehman, Rory M. Welsh,
Alexandra Z. Worden [USA]
1500 Microbial communities of marine methane seeps: sketching the big picture
Emil Ruff*, Jennifer Biddle, Andreas Teske, Alban Ramette, Katrin Knittel,
Antje Boetius [Germany]
1515 De novo assembly of an uncultured highly abundant verrucomicrobial
representative from the Baltic Sea
Daniel Herlemann*, Daniel Lundin, Matthias Labrenz, Klaus Jürgens, Zongli
Zheng, Henrik Aspeborg, Anders Andersson [Germany]
1400 Nutrient stoichiometry influences rapid eco-evolutionary feedbacks in marine
cyanobacteria and phage
Megan Larsen*, Steve Wilhelm, Jay Lennon [USA]
1415 Specific predator-prey dynamics as a driving force for microbial diversity and
evolution in a complex microbial community
Ariel Kushmaro*, Orr H Shapiro [Israel]
1430 Phage-host evolution in a model ecosystem
Connor Skennerton*, Florent Angly, Philip Hugenholtz, Gene Tyson
[Australia]
1445 Viruses, a controlling force on Prokaryotic diversity?
Ruth-Anne Sandaa*, Birte Töpper, Aud Larsen, Frede Thingstad [Norway]
1500 Explaining observational paradoxes in host-virus ecology using models that
include a trade-off between competition and defense in the hosts
Selina Våge*, Julia Storesund, Tron Frede Thingstad [Norway]
1515 Phage-bacteria interaction networks: from structure to dynamics
Joshua Weitz*, Cesar Flores, Luis Jover, Michael Cortez, Sergi Valverde
[USA]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
ROOM B4
CT24: Microbial Community Diversity: 16S and beyond - 2
1400 Seasonal synchronicity and specificity of microbial community and population
dynamics across four alpine lakes
Ryan Mueller*, Emilio Ortega Casamayor, [Spain]
42
1330 - 1530
43
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
AUD. 10
CT27: The Starving Majority: life at low energy flux
Chairpersons: Yoshiteru Aoi, Hiroshima University, Japan /
Northeastern University, USA
Jay Lennon, Indiana University, USA
Chairpersons:
1345 Targeted recovery of novel phylogenetic diversity from next-generation
sequence data
Josh D. Neufeld*, Michael D. J. Lynch, Andrea Bartram [Canada]
1400 A single-cell genome for Thiovulumsp
Alfred Spormann*, Ian P.G. Marshall, Paul Blainey, Stephen Quake [USA]
1415 Novel method for cultivation of uncultured nitrifying bacteria
Hirotsugu Fujitani*, Norisuke Ushiki, Kengo Momiuchi, Satoshi Tsuneda,
Yoshiteru Aoi [Japan]
1430 Insights into the ecological distribution and genomes of the enigmatic
and widely distributed marine subsurface ‘Dehalococcoidetes’ (phylum
Chloroflexi)
Kenneth Wasmund*, Camelia Algora, Lars Schreiber, Karen Lloyd, Dorthe
Petersen, Andreas Schramm, Myriel Cooper, Richard Reinhardt, Bo Barker
Jørgensen, Lorenz Adrian [Germany]
1445 Sponges as microbial habitats: cultivation of fastidious subseafloor
sedimentary microbes using continuous-flow bioreactor
Hiroyuki Imachi*, Takashi Yamaguchi, Ken Takai [Japan]
1500 A new isolate of Nitrospina obtained from a binary culture with an unknown
gammaproteobacterium
Eva Spieck*, Eberhard Bock, Wolfgang Ludwig, Sabine Keuter [Germany]
1515 Autotrophic Fe(II) oxidizing nature of the members of uncultured TM III group
Actinobacteria
Dheeraj Kanaparthi*, Bianca Pommerenke, Peter Casper, Marc Dumont
[Germany]
Bo Barker Jørgensen, University of Aarhus, Denmark
Rainer Meckenstock, Helmholtz Center München,
Germany
1330 Fluids from the oceanic crust support growth of autotrophic sulfate reducers
in overlying deep subsurface sediments
Bert Engelen*, Katja Fichtel, Jörn Logemann, Martin Könneke, Jürgen
Rullkötter, Heribert Cypionka [Germany]
1345 Aerobic microbial respiration in ancient oxic sediments below the Subtropical
Gyres
Hans Røy* [Denmark]
1400 Assessing microbial activity and carbon fixation in the marine subsurface lessons from stable isotope probing
Gunter Wegener*, Matthias Y. Kellermann, Kai-Uwe Hinrichs, Antje Boetius
[Germany]
1415 Endospore abundance, microbial growth and necromass turnover in deep
sub-seafloor sediment off the coast of Peru
Bente Lomstein*, Alice Langerhuus, Steven D’Hondt, Bo Jørgensen, Arthur
Spivack [Denmark]
1430 Quantification of Bacteria and Archaea in subsurface marine sediments
Axel Schippers* [Germany]
1445 Geochemistry and microbial populations in arctic marine sediments from the
Northern Baffin Bay
Martin Krüger*, Camelia Algora, Friederike Gründger, Lorenz Adrian, HansHermann Richnow, Volkmar Damm [Germany]
1500 Bacterial substrate use under extremely oligotrophic conditions
Anne Schwedt*, Michael Seidel, Thorsten Dittmar, Meinhard Simon, Vladimir
Bondarev, Stefano Romano, Gaute Lavik, Heide N. Schulz-Vogt [Germany]
1515 Origin and amount of assimilable organic carbon in alpine karst aquifers
Inés Wilhartitz*, Alexander K.T. Kirschner, Hermann Stadler, Jacqueline
Traber, Andreas H. Farnleitner, Thomas Egli [Switzerland]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 11
CT26: The Unknowns: rare ones and unculturables
1330 Effects of loss of rare microbes on soil ecosystem services
Gera Hol*, Wietse de Boer, Soren Christensen, Wim van der Putten
[Netherlands]
44
1330 - 1530
45
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
AUD. 12
CT28: Mobility of Genes and the Species Concept
Chairpersons: Tal Dagan, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany
Søren J. Sørensen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1330 You are what you eat - how environmental signals foster horizontal gene
transfer in Vibrio cholerae
Melanie Blokesch* [Switzerland]
1345 Hot spot of horizontal gene transfer: high abundance and diversity of
mobile genetic elements in bacterial communities of on-farm pesticide biopurification systems
Kornelia Smalla*, Simone Dealtry, Holger Heuer, Vincent Dunon, Dirk
Springael, Sebastian Zühlke, Michael Spiteller, Peter Holmsgaard, Søren J.
Sørensen [Germany]
1530 - 1730
POSTER
HALL B
POSTER SESSIONS
- MEET THE AUTHORS
PS11 Archaea: important players in diverse microbial ecosystems
PS12 Genetic Potential and Expression: key functions in microbial communities
PS13 Managing Microbial Communities
PS14 Microbial Community Diversity: 16S and Beyond
Main Authors D - M
PS15 Mobilty of Genes and the Species Concept
1400 Mapping genotypic diversity onto niche adaptation
Yutaka Yawata*, Kwangmin Son, Otto Cordero, Martin Polz, Roman Stocker
[USA]
1415 MetaGenomic Species: adding structure to metagenomics data
H. Bjørn Nielsen*, Agnieszka Juncker, Simon Rasmussen, Mathieu Alemeida,
Ida Bonde, Damian Plichta, Laurent Gautier, Marcelo Bertalan, Søren
Brunak, Thomas Sicheritz-Ponten [Denmark]
1430 Insights into the bovine rumen plasmidome
Itzhak Mizrahi*, Aya Brown Kav, Goor Sasson, Elie Jami, Adi DoronFaigenboim, Itay Benhar [Israel]
1445 Regulation of transfer of the ICEclc element of Pseudomonas
Jan Roelof van der Meer*, Ryo Miyazaki, Friedrich Reinhard, Sandra Sulser,
Nicolas Pradervand, Marco Minoia [Switzerland]
PS16 Soil Microbiology and Heterogeneity
PS17 The Starving Majority; life at low energy flux
PS18 The Unknowns: rare ones and unculturables
PS19 Virus-Bacteria Interactions
For full listing please see separate poster list provided at the symposia
46
1515 Permissiveness of soil microbial communities toward receipt of mobile
genetic elements
Sanin Musovic*, Uli Klümper, Luisa Lundin, Søren J. Sørensen, Barth F.
Smets [Denmark]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1500 Survival strategies of plasmids in chemostats and biofilms: effect of hostrange and competition
Sónia Martins, Christopher M Thomas, Jan-Ulrich Kreft* [United Kingdom]
47
TUESDAY 21 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
TIEDJE AWARD PLENARY SESSION
Chair: Steven Lindow
1830 PLENARY SESSION
Víctor de Lorenzo, Molecular Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, the Spanish National Research Council, Spain
Conflict management and division of labor in bacterial populations
degrading recacitrant aromatics
1915 TIEDJE AWARD PRESENTATION
Stephen J. Giovannoni, Oregon State University, USA
Outliers: Extreme Selection for Minimalism in Ocean Microbial Plankton
48
* Indicates the presenting author. Program is subject to
change. Please check the addendum if supplied.
ISME14 |
| ISME14
SCIENTIFIC
PROGRAM
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
1830 - 2000
49
1900 Late
1530 1730
1330 1530
1230 1315
1200 1230
1000 1200
0930
0830 0920
0800 0830
0800 1800
0800 1830
TIME
SOCIAL
PROGRAM
POSTER
SESSION
CONTRIBUTED
SESSIONS
BIRD’S EYE
VIEW
PRESENTATION
INVITED
SESSIONS
PLENARY
SESSION
| ISME14
HALL A2
HALL A3
ROOM B3
ROOM B4
IS31: Microbial
Life in Extreme
Environments
IS32: PlantMicrobe
Interactions
IS33: Microbial
Origin and
Evolution
Lunch Break
CT30:
Bioinformatics
in Microbial
Ecology
CT31Microbial
Life in Extreme
Environments - 1
CT32:Microbial
Community
Diversity: 16S
and Beyond - 3
CT34: Microbial
Disease Ecology
CT35:
Understanding
the functioning
of microbes
and microbial
communities
in their natural
habitat: are we
shedding light in
the black box?
ISME PARTY - ” Øksnehallen”
Tickets Available at the registration desk
Poster session including afternoon tea
CT33: Microbial
Origin and Evolution
CT36: Syntrophy
and Electron
Flow in Microbial
Communities
IS34: Syntrophy
and Electron
Flow in Microbial
communities
Morning Coffee and Tea in the Exhibition and Poster Viewing Area
PL08- Plenary Hall A1
Janet Jansson, Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA
Introduction by: Jan Sørensen
IS30:
Bioinformatics
in Microbial
Ecology
AUD. 10
Early Morning Coffee and Tea in the Exhibition and Poster Viewing Area
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST 2012
AUD. 15
PL07 - Plenary Hall A1
Nicole Dubilier, Symbiosis Group, Max Planck Institute of Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Gemany
Introduction by: Michael Wagner
Exhibition open
Hall E
Registration and speaker preparation room open
HALL A1
ISME36: Protistan Ecology:
beyond diversity
CT38: PlantMicrobe Interactions - 1
IS35: Microbial
Disease Ecology
CT37: Microbial
Symbioses - 2
CT39: Protistan
Ecology: beyond
diversity
AUD. 12
AUD. 11
0830 - 0920
1000 - 1200
Chairperson:
ISME14 |
50
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
Chair: Michael Wagner
PLENARY SESSION
Nicole Dubilier, Symbiosis Group, Max Planck Institute of Marine
Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
From omics to the environment and back: unraveling how chemosynthetic symbionts gain energy and carbon
PLENARY
HALL A1
IS30: Bioinformatics in Microbial Ecology
Jeroen Raes, VIB, Belgium
1000 Bayesian hierarchical models for defining enterotypes and ecotypes
Christopher Quince, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
1030 From the HMP to the EMP: deriving insight from large-scale sequencing
projects
Rob Knight, University of Colorado, USA
1100 Phylogenetic conservatism of functional traits in microorganisms
Adam Martiny, University of California, Irvine, USA
1130 Title to be confirmed
Jeroen Raes, VIB, Belgium
51
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
1000 - 1200
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
HALL A2
000 - 1200
AUD. 15
IS31: Microbial Life in Extreme Environments
IS33: Microbial Origin and Evolution
Chairpersons:
Chairpersons:
Aharon Oren, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
Warwick Vincent, Laval University, Canada
1000 Composition, structure and function of hot spring cyanobacterial mat
communities: use of high-throughput technologies and theory to demarcate
guilds, species and the functions they catalyze
Dave Ward, Montana State University, Bozeman, USA
1030 Ecosystem-level studies of microbial adaptation to life at high salt
concentrations: acidic proteins and organic osmotic solutes
Aharon Oren, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
1100 Andean Wetlands: a hotspot of extremophile microbial communities
associated with Microbial Evaporites, Microbialites and Stromatolites
Maria Farias, Tucuman, Argentina
Eric Alm, MIT, USA
Donald Canfield, University of Southern Denmark,
Denmark
1000 Genomic insights into early events in the history of life
Eric Alm, MIT, USA
1030 Early evolution of photosynthesis and the transition to an aerobic world
Robert Blankenship, Department of Chemistry, Washington University in St.
Louis, USA
1100 Life in low oxygen
Donald Canfield, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
1130 Feast then famine: Fe bioavailability and utilization through geological time
Christopher Dupont, J. Craig Venter Institute, USA
1130 Cold wet protists: what do we know about them?
Connie Lovejoy, Laval University, Canada
52
HALL A3
1000 - 1200
AUD. 10
IS32: Plant-Microbe Interactions
IS34: Syntrophy and Electron Flow in Microbial Communities
Chairpersons:
Chairpersons:
Gwyn Beattie, Iowa State University, USA
Angela Sessitsch, Austrian Institute of technology, Austria
Yuri Gorby, University of Southern California, USA
Lars Peter Nielsen, University of Aarhus, Denmark
1000 Unraveling the microbial ecology of the phyllosphere on the inside and out
Gwyn Beattie, Iowa State University, USA 1000 What are genomics and proteomics telling us about syntrophy?
Michael McInerney, University of Oklahoma, USA
1030 Metagenomics and transcriptomics of the rhizosphere microbiome
Jos Raaijmakers, Wageningen University, the Netherlands
1030 Electroecosystem in Black-Smoker Hydrothemal Environments
Ryuhei Nakamura, University of Tokyo, Japan
1100 Functional characteristics of endophytes revealed by (meta)genomic analysis
Angela Sessitsch, Austrian Institute of Technology, Austria
1130 Inter-kingdom and interspecies signaling in plant-associated bacteria
Vittorio Venturi, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and
Biotechnology, Trieste, Italy
1100 Living Electric Microcables
Lars Peter Nielsen, University of Aarhus, Denmark
1130 Electromicrobiology: charge transfer and communication within microbial
communities
Yuri Gorby, University of Southern California, USA
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1000 - 1200
53
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
1000 - 1200
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
AUD. 11
IS35: Microbial Disease Ecology
Chairpersons:
1230 - 1315
PLENARY
HALL A1
PLENARY SESSION - BIRD’S EYE VIEW
Søren Molin, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
David Relman, Stanford University, USA
1000 Stability and Resilience in the Human Microbiome
David Relman, Stanford University, USA
Chair: Jan Sørensen
Janet Jansson, Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA
Tackling the pitfalls and unveiling the promise of soil metagenomics
1030 Escherichia coli: of friends and foes
Ulrich Dobrindt, Institute of Hygiene, University of Münster, Germany
1100 The Vibrio cholerae chitin colonization program: stages, mechanisms and
genes
Janus Haagensen, Stanford University, USA
(replacement Gary Schoolnik)
1130 Evolutionary dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in persistent Cystic
Fibrosis airway infections
Lars Jelsbak, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
1000 - 1200
AUD. 12
IS36: Protistan Ecology: beyond diversity
Chairpersons:
Scott Dawson, University of California, Davis, USA
Tom Fenchel, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1000 Protist strategies for chemocline living
Joan Bernhard, WHOI, USA
1030 Ecology and evolution of endosymbiotic methanogens associated with
anaerobic rumen ciliates
Scott Dawson, University of California, Davis, USA
54
1130 Going where the wild things are: open-ocean phytoplankton communities
Alexandra Worden, MBARI, USA
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1100 Adaptations to a Heterogeneous World
Tom Fenchel, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
55
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
CT31: Microbial Life in Extreme Environments - 1
Chairperson: Christopher Quince, University of Glasgow, UK
Chairpersons:
1345 Investigating diversified gene functions in microbial communities of the
human gut
Lina Faller*, Zhao Jin, Daniel Segrè [USA]
1400 Large-scale characterization of the diversity and community composition of
human intestinal microbiota
Leo Lahti*, Jarkko Salojärvi, Anne Salonen, Hauke Smidt, Willem M de Vos
[Netherlands]
1415 Deciphering the microbial community and the lignocellulolytic digestome of
lower termite Coptotermes gestroi
João Paulo Franco Cairo*, Flávia Costa Leonardo, Thabata Maria Alvarez,
Junio Cota, Fernanda Büchli, Daniela Alves Ribeiro, Roberto Ruller,
Marcelo Falsarella Carazzolle, Ana Maria Costa-Leonardo, Adriana Franco
Paes Leme, Fernando Ferreira Costa, Fabio Squina, Gonçalo Amarante
Guimarães Pereira [Brazil]
1430 Linking genotypes to phenotypes: characterizing viral proteins of unknown
function
Jeremy Frank*, Jason Rostron, Cullen Pivaroff, Savannah Sanchez, Matt
Haynes, Victor Seguritan, Anca Segall, Rob Edwards, Forest Rohwer
[USA]
1445 The metagenomics of the dead: taxonomic and functional annotation
methods for analysis of ancient datasets
Katarzyna Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka*, Siv G.E. Andersson [Sweden]
1500 Dirty little secrets for soil metagenomic assembly
Adina Howe*, Jason Pell, Arend Hintze, James Tiedje, C. Titus Brown [USA]
1515 Application of Unifrac and related bioinformatic tools to assess intra-species
diversity within oral microbiomes in an anthropological context
Hans-Peter Horz*, Mark Stoneking, Jing Li, Hildegard Schilling, Georg
Conrads [Germany]
Nina Gunde-Cimerman, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Warwick Vincent, Laval University, Canada
1330 Oral Protists not pickled by hypersalinity: Microbial eukaryotes in deep
hypersaline anoxic basins (E. Mediterranean)
Virginia Edgcomb*, William Orsi, Thorsten Stoeck, Sabine Filker, Alex Stock,
Hans-Werner Breiner, Joan Bernhard [USA]
1345 Diversity of planktonic ciliates in deep hypersaline anoxic basins in the
Eastern Mediterranean Sea
Alexandra Stock*, William Orsy, Virginia Edgcomb, Hans-Werner Breiner,
Sabine Filker, Thorsten Stoeck [Germany]
1400 Environmental selection of protistan plankton communities in hypersaline
anoxic deep-sea basins, Eastern Mediterranean Sea
Sabine Filker*, Alexandra Stock, Hans-Werner Breiner, Virginia Edgcomb,
William Orsi, Thorsten Stoeck [Germany]
1415 Polyextremotolerant human opportunistic black yeasts inhabit dishwashers
around the world
Nina Gunde-Cimerman*, Polona Zalar, Monika Novak, Sybren de Hoog
[Slovenia]
1430 Microbial communities in high Arctic lakes: new insights from flow cytometry
and HPLC pigment analyses
Marie Lionard*, Isabelle Laurion, Warwick F. Vincent [ Canada]
1445 Microbial diversity within the water column of freshwater Lake Radok, East
Antarctica
Denis Karlov*, Dominique Marie, Maria Chuvochina, Irina Alekhina, Sergey
Bulat [Russia]
1500 Subzero growth and adaptation; insights from Planococcus halocryophilus
sp. nov. Or1 in Canadian high Arctic permafrost
Nadia Mykytczuk*, Simon Foote, John Lawrence, Chris Omelon, Gordon
Southam, Lyle Whyte [Canada]
1515 Anaerobic oxidation of methane in hypersaline marine cold seep sediments
Loïs Maignien*, R. John Parkes, Barry Cragg, Helge Niemann, Katrin Knittel,
Stephanie Coulon, Nico Boon [USA]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
HALL A2
CT30: Bioinformatics in Microbial Ecology
1330 Comprehensive Analysis of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in River Sediment,
Well Water and Soil Microbial Communities Using Metagenomic DNA
Sequencing
Johan Bengtsson*, Fredrik Boulund, Erik Kristiansson, DG Joakim Larsson
[Sweden]
56
1330 - 1530
57
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
HALL A3
CT33: Microbial Origin and Evolution
Chairpersons:
Chairpersons:
Ian Paulsen, Macquarie University, Australia
Laurent Philippot, INRA, Dijon, France
1345 High robustness of soil bacteria and fungi to multifactorial climate change
manipulations
Lasse Bergmark*, Merian Skouw Haugwitz, Anders Priemé [Denmark]
1400 Significant and persistent impact of timber harvesting on soil microbial
communities in northern coniferous forests
Martin Hartmann*, Steven Hallam, William Mohn [Switzerland]
1415 Bacterial diversity associated with the black truffle Tuber melanosporum
along its biological cycle
Sanjay Antony-Babu*, Aurélie Aurélie Deveau, Stéphane Uroz, Joy van
Nostrand, Jizhong Zhou, Francois Le Tacon, Pascale Frey-Klett [France]
1430 Unraveling the mysteries of the Nullarbor microbial slime communities
Ian Paulsen*, Sasha Tetu, Katy Breakwell, Liam Elbourne, Jan-Christoph
Rieckmann, Andrew Holmes, Michael Gillings [Australia]
1445 The effect of hurricanes on the composition of airborne microbial
communities
Natasha DeLeon-Rodriguez*, Luis M. Rodriguez-R, Terry Lathem, Bruce
E. Anderson, Andreas J. Beyersdorf, Luke D. Ziemba, Michael Bergin,
Athanasios Nenes, Konstantinos Konstantinidis [USA]
1500 Bacterial and fungal communities on avian eggshells: an exploratory study
Stéphanie Grizard*, Kevin Matson, Francisco Dini-Andreote, B. Irene
Tieleman, Joana Falcão Salles [Netherlands]
1515 Microbial tools for forensics: characterization of bacterial and eukaryotic
communities associated with corpse decomposition using next generation
sequencing
Jessica Metcalf*, Antonio Gonzalez, Laura Parfrey, Christian Lauber, Noah
Fierer, David Carter, Rob Knight [USA]
Eric Alm, MIT, USA
Donald Canfield, University of Southern Denmark,
Denmark
1330 Genome-wide diversification patterns of fresh and saltwater bacteria of the
SAR11 clade inferred from single cell and metagenomics data
Siv Andersson*, Katarzyna Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Stefan Bertilsson,
Alexander Eiler, Katherine McMahon, Rex Malmström, Ramunas
Stepanaukus, Johan Viklund [Sweden]
1345 Genomic insight into the evolution of acetoclastic methanogenesis
Elliott Barnhart*, Alfred Cunningham, Matthew Fields [USA]
1400 Evolutionary pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term
infection of CF airways
Trine Markussen*, Rasmus Lykke Marvig Nielsen, Niels Høiby, Helle Krogh
Johansen, Søren Molin, Lars Jelsbak [Denmark]
1415 Dating the cyanobacterial origin of the chloroplast
Luisa Falcon* [Mexico]
1430 Hypermutation and high salt adaptation in experimentally evolved marine
Vibrio bacteria
Sean Clarke*, Sonia Timberlake, Arne Materna, Eric Alm
1445 Ecological drivers of bacterial social evolution
Ines Mandic Mulec*, Polonca Stefanic, Sabina Vatovec, Levin Pal, Tjasa
Danevcic, Fred Cohan [Slovenia]
1500 Aging and repair in bacteria: an indivual-based modelling approach
Robert Clegg*, Jan-Ulrich Kreft [USA]
1515 Comparative genomics of the ubiquitous, hydrocarbon degrading genus
Marinobacter
Esther Singer*, Eric Webb, Katrina Edwards [USA]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 15
CT32: Microbial Community Diversity: 16S and beyond - 3
1330 Nitrogen fixation and bacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of the Brazilian
Atlantic Forest
Ana Paula Dini Andreote*, Sandra Patricio Montenegro Gomez, Alice de
Souza Cassetari, Marli de Fatima Fiore, Marcio Rodrigues Lambais [Brazil]
58
1330 - 1530
59
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
ROOM B3
1330 - 1530
CT34: Microbial Disease Ecology
Chairpersons:
Søren Molin, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
David Relman, Stanford University, USA
1330 The ecology of Vibrio metecus, Vibrio cholerae’s cryptic sister taxa
Yan Boucher*, Maryann Turnsek, Pierre-Alain Jachiet, Eric Bapteste, Cheryl
Tarr, Martin Polz [Canada]
1345 The microbiome and virome of Cystic Fibrosis lungs
Yan Wei Lim*, Robert Schmieder, Matthew Haynes, Forest Rohwer [USA]
1400 Molecular epidemiology and evolution of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis
patients
Rasmus Lykke Marvig*, Lars Jelsbak, Søren Molin [Denmark]
1415 Phenazine content and iron redox chemistry in the cystic fibrosis airways are
linked to microbial community complexity and disease progression
Ryan Hunter*, Vanja Klepac-Ceraj, Fadi Asfour, Dianne Newman [USA]
1430 Assessing the role of the mouse gut microbiota in mediating colitis
suppression by regulatory T cells
Pedro Dimitriu*, Guilaine Boyce, Asanga Samarakoon, Pauline Johnson,
William Mohn [Canada]
1445 Strikingly abundant and diverse antibiotic resistance genes in Chinese swine
farms revealed by high-throughput qPCR
Timothy Johnson*, Yong-Guan Zhu, Jianqiang Su, Min Qiao, Guang-Xia Guo,
Robert Stedtfeld, Syed Hashsham, James Tiedje [USA]
60
1515 Environmental genome sequencing of ‘Candidatus Clavochlamydia
salmonicola’ reveals exceptionally reduced metabolic pathways in a member
of the Chlamydiae associated with the gills of salmonid fish
Alexander Siegl*, Elena Toenshoff, Susie Mitchell, Patrick Tischler, Thomas
Weinmaier, Thomas Rattei, Matthias Horn [Austria]
CT35: European Science Foundation coordinated collaborative
research programme Ecological and Evolutionary Functional
genomics (ESF-EuroEEFG). “Understanding the functioning of
microbes and microbial communities in their natural habitat: are
we shedding light in the black box?”
Chairperson:
Paul Bodelier, Netherlands Institute for Ecology, the
Netherlands
Session hosted by the European Science Foundation
1330 Spatial and functional organization of deep-water microbial communities in
the ocean: role of particle attachment
Gerhard J. Herndl*, Helene Agogue, Federico Baltar, Kristin Bergauer,
Dominique Lamy, Thomas Reinthaler, Eva Sintes [Austria]
1345 Exploring trophic interactions in the microbial web of the deep-sea
Thorsten Stoeck*, Maria Pachiadaki, Virginia Edgcomb, Michail Yakimov
[Germany]
1400 From communities to single cells: finding functional coherence in the lake
microbiome
Stefan Bertilsson* [Sweden]
1415 What can we learn on ecology of the uncultivated acI lineage of freshwater
Actinobacteria from genomic analyses?
Hans-Peter Grossart*, Sarahi L. Garcia, Katherine D. McMahon, Manuel
Martinez-Garcia, Abhishek Srivastava, Alexander Sczyrba, Ramunas
Stepanauskas, Tanja Woyke and, Falk Warnecke [Germany]
1430 Living together apart: soil metagenomics and microbially relevant scales
George A. Kowalchuk* [Netherlands]
1445 Escaping Plato´s cave with meta-‘omics’ ?
Tim Urich* [Austria]
1500 From molecular inventories to function: aerobic methanotrophs in space and
time
Peter Frenzel* [Germany]
1515 General discussion
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1500 Antibiotic resistance associated with waste water treatment plant effluent
Gregory Amos*, Lihong Zhang, Peter Hawkey, William Gaze, Elizabeth
Wellington [United Kingdom]
ROOM B4
1330 - 1530
61
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
1330 - 1530
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
AUD. 10
CT36: Syntrophy and Electron Flow in Microbial Communities
CT37: Microbial Symbioses - 2
Chairpersons:
Chairperson: Zakee Sabree, Yale University, USA
Yuri Gorby, University of Southern California, USA
Lars Peter Nielsen, University of Aarhus, Denmark
1330 A sulfurous symbiosis: the pink microbial aggregates of the Sippewissett salt
marsh
Elizabeth Wilbanks*, Ulrike Jaekel, Verena Salman, Parris Humphrey, Dan
Buckley, Stephen Zinder, Jonathan Eisen, Marc Faccioti, Victoria Orphan
[USA]
1345 Natural occurrence of electrochemical oxygen consumption in the seafloor
Sairah Malkin*, Dorina Seitaj, Filip Meysman [Belgium]
1400 Direct measurements of conductivity in marine sediments suggest long-range
electron transport via minerals rather than microbial nanowires
Nikhil Malvankar*, Gary King, Derek Lovley [USA]
1415 Effects of different electricity currents on active populations and gene
expressions in cathodic denitrifying biofilms
Tae Kwon Lee* [South Korea]
1430 The impact of buffer capacity and conductivity on syntrophic propionic acid
oxidation in anaerobic granules
Natacha MS Juste Poinapen*, Bernardino Virdis, Mark S Turner, Korneel
Rabaey, Damien J Batstone [Australia]
1445 Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in methanogenic environments
Amelia-Elena Rotaru*, Pravin Malla Shrestha, Fanghua Liu, Jessica Smith,
Dan Carlo Flores, Pier-Luc Tremblay, Harish Nagarajan, Mallory Embree,
Karsten Zengler, Derek R Lovley [USA]
1515 Syntrophic benzene degradation in the Zeitz aquifer: recent advances and
open questions
Sabine Kleinsteuber*, Kathleen M. Schleinitz, Jana Seifert, Martin Taubert,
Steffi Herrmann, Jana Rakoczy, Martha Schattenhofer, Thomas R. Neu,
Carsten Vogt [Germany]
AUD. 11
1330 Caste-specific microbial gut communities of fungus-growing termites
revealed through functional metagenomics
Michael Poulsen*, Cai Li, Haofu Hu, Tânia Nobre, Judith Korb, Duur Aanen,
Jacobus Boomsma, Guojie Zhang [Denmark]
1345 Digesting the diversity - evolutionary patterns in the gut microbiota of termites
and cockroaches
Tim Köhler*, Carsten Dietrich, Andreas Brune [Germany]
1400 Genomic and functional studies identify key traits in the evolution of
polydnaviruses into beneficial symbionts of insects
Gaelen Burke*, Michael R Strand [USA]
1415 Investigation of the novel heterotrophic Osedax symbiosis using comparative
genomics
Shana Goffredi*, Hana Yi, C. Titus Brown [USA]
1430 Ianthella basta: an emerging model for functional analysis of sponge
symbionts
Faris Behnam*, Florian Moeller, Arno Schintlmeister, Thomas Rattei, Nicole
Webster, Michael Wagner [Austria]
1445 Keeping in touch - longitudinal fission in the Laxus oneistus’ ectosymbiont
Nikolaus Leisch*, Jolanda Verheul, Nika Pende, Harald R. Gruber-Vodicka,
Jörg A. Ott, Tanneke den Blaauwen, Silvia Bulgheresi [Austria]
1500 Phylogeny of ‘Endomicrobia’ and origin of flagellate symbionts
Pinki Rani*, Aram Mikaelyan, Claire Thompson, Tim Köhler, Andreas Brune
[Germany]
1515 Sphagnum-associated bacteria help to feed their hosts and to protect our
climate
Anastasia Bragina*, Christian Berg, Massimiliano Cardinale, Maier Stefanie,
Henry Müller, Andrej Shcherbakov, Vladimir Chebotar, Gabriele Berg [Austria]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1500 Methanogens are the weakest link: energetics and kinetics of syntrophic
associations with and without methanogens
Jan Dolfing*, Xu Aiping [United Kingdom]
62
1330 - 1530
63
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
1330 - 1430
THURSDAY 23 AUGUST
AUD. 12
1530 - 1730
CT38: Plant-Microbe Interactions - 1
Chairpersons:
Laure Weisskopf, University of Zurich, Switzerland
Marketa Sagova-Mareckova, Crop Research Institute, Czech
Republic
1330 A smelly world: how bacterial volatiles influence the growth of plants and of
phytopathogenic fungi
Laure Weisskopf*, Aurélien Bailly, Rita Baumgartner, Florian Schiestl, Edward
Connor, Thomas Boller, Leo Eberl [Switzerland]
1345 Host-dependent induction of insect toxin production in a root-associated
biocontrol pseudomonad
Christoph Keel*, Peter Kupferschmied, Maria Péchy-Tarr, Beat Ruffner, Pascale
Flury, Monika Maurhofer [Switzerland]
1400 The Por secretion system (PorSS): A potential link to Flavobacterium rhizosphere
abundance and plant disease protection
Max Kolton*, Omer Frenkel, Patricia Bucki, Sigal Brown Horowitz, Yigal Elad,
Eddie Cytryn [Israel]
1415 Interactions between pathogens causing common potato scab and bacterial
community of potato periderm and tuberosphere at disease conducive and
suppressive soils
Marketa Sagova-Mareckova*, Ondrej Daniel, Ondrej Komzak, Zuzana Samkova,
Martina Kyselkova, Vaclav Kristufek, Jiri Divis, Jan Kopecky [Czech Republic]
1430 - 1530
AUD. 12
CT39: Protistan Ecology: beyond diversity
Chairpersons:
Scott Dawson, University of California, Davis, USA
Tom Fenchel, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1430 Relevance of protist grazers as a regulating factor for prokaryotic abundance and
growth in Baltic Sea oxic / anoxic interfaces
Ruth Anderson*, Christian Winter, Aexander P. Mylnikov, Wilhelm Foissner,
Claudia Wylezich, Sabine Glaubitz, Klaus Jürgens [Germany]
1445 Accuracy of protist diversity assessments: morphology compared to cloning and
direct pyrosequencing of 18S rRNA genes and ITS regions using the conspicuous
tintinnid ciliates as a case study
Charles Bachy*, John Dolan, Purificación López-García, Philippe Deschamps,
David Moreira [France]
64
1515 Elucidating the role of vitamins in eukaryotic algal ecology
Darcy McRose*, Alexandra Worden [USA]
POSTER SESSIONS
- MEET THE AUTHORS
PS20 Bioinformatics in Microbial Ecology
PS21 Microbial Community Diversity: 16S and beyond
Main Authors N-Z
PS22 Microbial Disease Ecology
PS23 Microbial Element Cycling: from genes to turnover
PS24 Microbial Life in Extreme Environments
PS25 Microbial Origin and Evolution
PS26 Novel High-Resolution Technologies
PS27 Plant-Microbe Interactions
PS28 Predictive Models of Microbial Communities
PS29 Protistan Ecology: beyond diversity
PS30 Syntrophy and Electron Flow in Microbial Communities
PS31 European Science Foundation coordinated collaborative research
programme Ecological and Evolutionary Functional genomics (ESFEuroEEFG). “Understanding the functioning of microbes and microbial
communities in their natural habitat: are we shedding light in the black box?”
For full listing please see separate poster list provided at the symposia
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1500 Diatoms respire nitrate to survive dark and anoxic conditions
Anja Kamp*, Dirk de Beer, Jana L. Nitsch, Gaute Lavik, Peter Stief [Germany]
POSTER
HALL B
65
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
SCIENTIFIC
PROGRAM
BIO-INNOVATION
SUSTAINABLE ANSWERS
UNCOMMON CONNECTIONS
A BRIGHTER FUTURE
| ISME14
Novozymes is the world leader in bioinnovation.
Together with customers across a broad array
of industries, we create tomorrow’s industrial
biosolutions, improving our customers’ business
and the use of our planet’s resources.
66
With over 700 products used in 130
countries, Novozymes’ bioinnovations
improve industrial performance and
safeguard the world’s resources by offering
superior and sustainable solutions for
tomorrow’s ever-changing marketplace.
Read more at www.novozymes.com.
* Indicates the presenting author. Program is subject to
change. Please check the addendum if supplied.
1600 1715
1400 1600
1200 1400
1000 1200
0930
0830 0920
0800 0830
0800 1800
0800 1830
TIME
CLOSING
CEREMONY
Plenary Hall A1
CONTRIBUTED
SESSIONS
INVITED
SESSIONS
PLENARY
SESSION
| ISME14
HALL A2
HALL A3
AUD. 15
ROOM B3
CT42: Microbial
Element cycling:
from genes to
turnover - 2
CT41: Soil
Microbiology and
Heterogeneity
-2
CT40: Microbial
Interactions and
Behavior - 2
CT43: Microbial
Gradient
Communities
CT44: Novel
High-Resolution
Technologies
CT45: Microbial
Community Diversity: 16S and
beyond - 4
Lunch and Poster Viewing Session
IS43: Microbial
Gradient
Communities
Morning Coffee and Tea in the Exhibition and Poster Viewing Area
CT46: PlantMicrobe
Interactions - 2
Young
Investigator
Award
Presentation
IS44: Novel
High-Resolution
Technologies
AUD. 10
IS46: Light and
Microbial Life
CT49: Microbial
Life in Extrmee
Environments - 2
IS45: Predictive
Models of
Microbial
Communities
CT47: Predictive
Models of
Microbial
Communities
CT48: Genetic
Potential and
Expression:
key functions
in micriobial
communities - 2
AUD. 12
AUD. 11
17:00 Invitation to attend ISME15 in South Korea
16:55 Incomming presidents address - Michael Wagner
16:40 Kenneth H. Nealson, Wrigley Professor of Environmental sciences, University of Southern California, USA
Introduction by: Steven Lindow
16:10 Presentation of the Poster Awards, DC White Poster Award Presentation, Bill Costertond Young Scientist Prize, MOBIO Award and the Young Postdoc Research Award
16:00 Address by outgoing ISME President Steven Lindow
IS42: Microbial
Element cycling:
from genes to
turnover
IS41: Soil
Microbiology and
Heterogeneity
IS40: Microbial
interactions and
Behavior
ROOM B4
Early Morning Coffee and Tea in the Exhibition and Poster Viewing Area
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST 2012
PL09 - Plenary Hall A1
Liping Zhao, Shanghai Center for Systems Biomedicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
Introduction by: Hilary Lappin-Scott
Exhibition open
Hall E
Registration and speaker preparation room open
HALL A1
0830 - 0920
1000 - 1200
Chairpersons:
ISME14 |
68
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
Chair: Hilary Lappin-Scott
PLENARY SESSION
Liping Zhao, Shanghai center for Systems Biomedicine, Shanghai
Jiao Tong University, China
“Microbiome-wide Association Studies (MiWAS)” for Hunting down
the Obesity Bugs
PLENARY
HALL A1
IS40: Microbial Interactions and Behavior
Michael Givskov, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Roman Stocker, MIT, USA
1000 The hologenome concept: bacteria influence mating selection in Drosophila
Eugene Rosenberg, Tel Aviv University, Israel
1030 Spying on the lives of marine microbes: The power of direct observation
Roman Stocker, MIT, USA
1100 Biofilm shielding: the role of signaling, Rhamnolipids and eDNA
Michael Givskov, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1130 Quorum sensing triggers asocial behavior in the early phase of biofilm
development of Pseudomonas putida IsoF
Leo Eberl, University of Zürich, Switzerland
69
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
1000 - 1200
HALL A2
1000 - 1200
HALL A3
IS41: Soil Microbiology and Heterogeneity
IS42: Microbial Element Cycling: from genes to turnover
Chairpersons:
Chairpersons:
Jens Aamand, the Geological Survey of Denmark and
Greenland (GEUS), Denmark
Jim Prosser, University of Aberdeen, UK
1000 The fate of pesticides in soil and aquifers from a small-scale point of view:
Does microbial and spatial heterogeneity have an impact?
Jens Aamand, The Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS),
Denmark
1030 Soil aggregate-scale heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes
Céline Pallud, University of California, Berkeley, USA
1100 Spatial heterogeneity at the microbial scale: effects on microbial community
structure and functioning
Naoise Nunan, BioEMCo, Centre INRA Versailles-Grignon, France
1130 The impact of soil spatial heterogeneity on concepts of microbial interactions
and diversity
James I. Prosser, University of Aberdeen, UK
Jim Fredrickson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory,
USA
Marcel Kuypers, Max Planck Institute for Marince
Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
1000 Long distance electron transport in marine sediments: Microbial and
geochemical implications
Nils Risgaard-Petersen, University of Aarhus, Denmark
1030 Integrating genomics, geochemistry and geospatial data to understand the
development and dynamics of high-temperature acidic iron-oxide and sulfur
microbial mats
William Inskeep, Montana State University, USA
1100 The oceanic nitrogen cycle
Marcel Kuypers, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen,
Germany
1130 Turning the Wheel on the Iron Biocycle: A Molecular Basis for Extracellular
Electron Exchange
Jim Fredrickson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA
1000 - 1200
AUD. 15
IS43: Microbial Gradient Communities
Chairpersons:
Staffan Kjelleberg, University of New South Wales,
Australia
Niels Peter Revsbech, University of Aarhus, Denmark
1000 Microbial presence and activity in strong geochemical gradients near deep
sea CO2 vents
Dirk de Beer, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen,
Germany
70
1100 Signalling controlled structure function of activated sludge microbial
communities
Staffan Kjelleberg, University of New South Wales, Australia
1130 Challenges in determining metabolic activity in gradient environments
Niels Peter Revsbech, University of Aarhus, Denmark
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1030 Gradients within gradients: population and community structure within Feoxidizing microbial mats
David Emerson, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, USA 71
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
1000 - 1200
AUD. 10
1000 - 1200
AUD. 11
IS44: Novel High-Resolution Technologies
IS45: Predictive Models of Microbial Communities
Chairpersons:
Chairpersons: Jef Huisman, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Barth Smets, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
Victoria Orphan, CalTech, USA
Andrew Whiteley, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK
Presentation of ISME Young Investigator Award (by Michael Wagner)
1000 Seeing natural product mediated microbial interactions from humans,
animals, plants, oceans and land
Pieter Dorrestein, UCSD Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical
Sciences, USA
1000 Commonness and rarity: Core and satellite species groups in microbial
metacommunities
Christopher van der Gast, NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology,
Wallingford, UK
1030 Characterizing the ecophysiology of uncultured archaeal-bacterial consortia
in methane seeps
Victoria Orphan, CalTech, USA
1030 Chaos and Biodiversity: Non-Equilibrium Dynamics in Microbial Communities
Jef Huisman, Department of Aquatic Microbiology, University of Amsterdam,
Netherlands
1100 Back to Basics: Calibrating Raman Microspectroscopy for Environmental
Applications
Andrew Whiteley, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK
1100 Towards a mechanistic model of the intestinal microbiome
Joao Xavier, Sloan Kettering Institute, USA
1130 Measuring the microbial niche: Chip-SIP analysis of carbon and nitrogen
assimilation in marine heterotrophs
Jennifer Pett-Ridge, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA
1130 Micro-scale spatial expansion of microbial cells and mobile genetic elements
Barth Smets, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
1000 - 1200
AUD. 12
IS46: Light and Microbial Life
Chairpersons:
Donald Bryant, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Michael Kühl, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1000 The heated competition for light: chlorophototroph diversity in the microbial
mats of alkaline siliceous hot springs in Yellowstone National Park
Donald Bryant, Pennsylvania State University, USA
1030 Light-driven solubilization of carbonates by cyanobacteria: from enzymes to
landscapes
Ferran Garcia Pichel, Arizona State University, USA
72
1130 Colorful niches of aquatic microorganisms
Maayke Stomp, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1100 Ecology and Photobiology of Chlorophyll d-containing Cyanobacteria
Michael Kühl, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
73
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
1400 - 1600
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
PLENARY
HALL A1
CT41: Soil Microbiology and Heterogeneity - 2
Chairperson: Roman Stocker, MIT, USA
Chairpersons:
1415 Grazing resistant bacteria profit from organic carbon released during
flagellate predation
Ester Eckert*, Michael Baumgartner, Jakob Pernthaler [Switzerland]
1430 The marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. J10 produces several toxins
that vary in their effects on different heterotrophic protists
Martina Erken*, Jan Tebben, Carmen Streich, Peter D. Steinberg, Tilmann
Harder, Diane McDougald [Australia]
1445 Why do bacteria have multiple siderophore-based iron acquisition systems?
Rolf Kuemmerli* [Switzerland]
1500 Biofilm formation on chitin protects Vibrio cholerae from predation
Shuyang Sun, Staffan Kjelleberg, Diane McDougald* [Australia]
1515 The importance of volatiles as infochemicals and competitive tools for soil
bacteria
Paolina Garbeva, Wietse de Boer* [Netherlands]
1530 Every cloud has a silver lining: invasion by Limnohabitans planktonicus
promotes the maintenance of diversity in bacterial communities
Gianluca Corno*, Karel Horňák [Italy]
1545 Characterization of a new type of bacterial clustering behavior
Robin Tecon*, Johan Leveau [ USA]
Jens Aamand, The Geological Survey of Denmark and
Greenland (GEUS), Denmark
Céline Pallud, University of California, Berkeley, USA
1400 Relation between landscape distribution of disease-suppressive soils,
iron bioavailability for biocontrol Pseudomonas on roots, and rhizosphere
expression of genes for 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol synthesis
Juliana Almario*, Claire Prigen-Combaret, Daniel Muller, Yvan MoënneLoccoz [France]
1415 Aerobic cellulose degradation at the pore scale
Michael Wilkins*, Jay Grate, Marvin Warner, Changyong Zhang, Karl Dehoff,
Fred Brockman, Allan Konopka [USA]
1430 Spatial and seasonal structure of the communities of total and cellulolytic
fungi in the mountainous spruce forest
Lucia Žifčáková*, Tomáš Větrovský, Anna Beranová, Jana Voříšková, Petr
Baldrian [Czech Republic]
1445 Shifting dynamics of bacteria and fungi during litter decomposition in wet
tropical forest soils
Kristen DeAngelis*, Chivian Dylan, Simmons Blake, Hazen Terry, Silver
Whendee [USA]
1500 Microbial degradation of organic compounds (natural, xenobiotics, and
pesticides) and the formation of soil organic matter and biogenic nonextractable (or bound) residues
Matthias Kaestner*, Anja Miltner [Germany]
1515 A molecular-ecological study of bacterial linuron degradation in agricultural
soils and on-farm biopurification systems
Karolien Bers*, Kristel Sniegowski, René De Mot, Dirk Springael [Belgium]
1530 Seasonal changes in fungal community structure and function in deciduous
forest soil
Jana Voriskova*, Vendula Valaskova, Tomas Cajthaml, Petr Baldrian [Czech
Republic]
1545 The use of natural abundance and stem-injection stable-isotope-labelling
techniques to map 60-year-old Douglas-fir influences on soil microbial
communities and C-cycling
Carolyn Churchland*, Per Bengston, Sue Greyston [Canada ]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
HALL A2
CT40: Microbial Interactions and Behavior - 2
1400 Extracellular vesicles from the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus may
mediate diverse community interactions
Steven Biller*, Sallie W. Chisholm [USA]
74
1400 - 1600
75
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
1400 - 1600
HALL A3
CT43: Microbial Gradient Communities
Chairpersons:
Chairpersons: Staffan Kjelleberg, University of New South Wales,
Australia
Niels Peter Revsbech, University of Aarhus, Denmark
Jim Fredrickson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory,
USA
Marcel Kuypers, Max Planck Institute for Marince
Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
1415 Diversity and distribution of marine denitrifiers revealed through functional
gene pyrosequencing of the nirS gene
Jennifer Bowen*, David Weisman, Amal Jayakumar, Michie Yasuda, Bess
Ward [USA]
1430 Nitrogen cycle in marine microbial mats
Haoxin Fan*, Lucas Stal [Netherlands]
1445 Nitrous oxide production and nitrogen cycling associated with marine
invertebrates
Ines Heisterkamp*, Andreas Schramm, Lone H. Larsen, Nanna B.
Svenningsen, Gaute Lavik, Dirk de Beer, Peter Stief [Germany]
1500 Ectomycorrhizal weathering on mineral surfaces leads to mineral dissolution
rates equivalent to chemical weathering in solution
Achim Schmalenberger*, Adele Duran, Maria Romero-Gonzalez, Lazar Tatic,
Jonathan Bridge, Liane Benning, Steeve Bonneville, Andrew Bray, Jonathan
Leake, Steven Banwart [Ireland]
1515 Relating the abundance and transcription of archaeal amoA genes to
nitrification activity and primary production across ocean gradients
Jason Smith*, Christopher Francis [USA]
1530 New insights on non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs in the North Pacific
subtropical gyre
Deniz Bombar*, Kendra Turk-Kubo, Julie Robidart, Brandon J. Carter,
Jonathan P. Zehr [USA]
1545 Sulfate-reducing microorganisms in wetlands - fameless actors in carbon
cycling and climate change
Michael Pester*, Klaus-Holger Knorr, Michael W. Friedrich, Michael Wagner,
Alexander Loy [Austria]
1400 The interplay of organic matter dynamics and microbial communities in the
depth gradient of freshwater lakes
Helmut Buergmann*, Dörte Carstens, Carsten J. Schubert, Francisco
Vazquez, Krista E. Köllner [Switzerland]
1415 Vertical stratification and functional guilds in the bacterial community of Lake
Kivu (East Africa)
Tamara Garcia-Armisen*, Ozgul Inceoglu, Marc Llirós, Sean A. Crowe,
François Darchambeau, Cedric Morana, Steven Bouillon, Alberto V. Borges,
Jean-Pierre Descy, Pierre Servais [Belgium]
1430 Calcification in hypersaline, EPS rich, microbial mats: a model system from
the Atoll Kiritimati
Danny Ionescu*, Svenja Spitzer, Dominik Schneider, Stefan Spring, Barbara
Zippel, Nicole Brinkmann, Dirk De Beer, Joachim Reitner, Gernot Arp
[Germany]
1445 Elucidating the roles of anaerobic diazotrophs in estuarine sediments
Bethany Jenkins*, Shelley Brown, Rodrigue Spinette, Andraya Ehrlich,
Christopher Deacutis [USA]
1500 AmoA gene expression is dominated by one thaumarchaeal cluster in central
Baltic Sea suboxic water masses
Matthias Labrenz*, Ramona Kirsch, Andreas Müller, Klaus Jürgens
[Germany]
1515 The ecology and dynamics of reactive gradients around contaminant plumes
as hot-spots of anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in groundwater
Tillmann Lueders*, Giovanni Pilloni, Christian Griebler [Germany]
1530 Metabolic flexibility as a major predictor of spatial distribution in microbial
communities
Kevin Purdy*, Brian B Oakley, Franck Carbonero [United Kingdom]
1545 Microbial dynamics in a thawing world: linking microbial communities to
increased methane flux in degrading permafrost
Rhiannon Mondav, Ben Woodcroft, Eun-Hae Kim, Manesh Shaw, Nathan
Verberkmoes, Scott Saleska, Virginia Rich, Gene Tyson* [Australia]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 15
CT42: Microbial Element Cycling: from genes to turnover - 2
1400 Anaerobic oxidation of methane in freshwater sediments
Katrin á Nordi*, Bo Thamdrup, Carsten J. Schubert [Denmark]
76
1400 - 1600
77
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
1400 - 1600
ROOM B3
CT45: Microbial Community Diversity: 16S and beyond - 4
Chairpersons:
Chairpersons:
David Berry, University of Vienna, Austria
Francesca Malfatti, UCSD Scripps Institution of
Oceanography, USA
Phil Hugenholtz, University of Queensland, Australia
Aaron Marc Saunders, Aalborg University, Denmark
1400 Correlative microscopy and chemical imaging to characterize the structure
and biogeochemical function of biofilms
Matthew Marshall*, Sara Belchik, Bin Cao, Eric Hill, Leo Kucek, Alice
Dohnalkova, Haluk Beyenal, James Fredrickson [ USA]
1400 Gut microbiome analysis and novel microbial based diagnostics for Johne’s
disease in cattle
Jessica Forbes*, Steve Hendrick, Jeroen De Buck, Herman Barkema, Gary
Van Domselaar, Denis Krause, Ehsan Khafipour [Canada]
1415 Atomic Force Microscopy, high-speed confocal laser microscopy and
NanoSIMS study of marine Synechococcus-heterotrophic bacteria
interactions study reveals species specificity and potential biogeochemical
consequences
Francesca Malfatti*, Anne Dekas, Victoria Orphan, Ty Samo, Farooq Azam
[USA]
1415 Simultaneous amplicon sequencing to explore co-occurrence patterns
of bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic components of rumen microbial
communities
Sandra Kittelmann*, Henning Seedorf, William A. Walters, Jose C. Clemente,
Rob Knight, Jeffrey I. Gordon, Peter H. Janssen [New Zealand]
1445 Click chemistry: a new approach for single cell microbial ecology
Jan Dolinsek, Faris Behnam, Arno Schintlmeister, Andreas Anderluh, Holger
Daims*, Michael Wagner [Austria]
1500 Constraining microbial sulfur cycling through high-resolution isotopic (δ34S)
and voltammetric microelectrode profiles
David Fike*, Jennifer Houghton, Greg Druschel, Victoria Orphan [USA]
1515 Dissecting the carbon cycle beneath our feet: quantifying the role of microbial
decomposers of plant litter inputs to soil
Christos Gougoulias*, Liz Shaw [United Kingdom]
1530 The design and application of a functional high-density oligonucleotide
microarray for examining ocean biogeochemistry from a microbial
perspective (MicroTOOLs project)
Irina N Shilova*, Julie Robidart, H James Tripp, Anne Thompson, Boris
Wawrik, Sasha Tozzi, Jonathan P Zehr [USA]
1545 Quantitative elucidation of structure and function of microbial communites by
protein-SIP
Martin von Bergen*, Jana Seifert, Martin Taubert, Florian-Alexander Herbst,
Carsten Vogt, Hans-Hermann Richnow [Germany]
1430 The enterotypes of great ape gut microbiomes
Andrew Moeller*, Howard Ochman [USA]
1445 Differences in Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes populations correlated with
mode of delivery in premature infants
Alexandria Ardissone*, Kevin Rechcigl, Josef Neu, Eric Triplett [USA]
1500 Wastewater treatment plants from across the globe have a reproducible core
microbial community
Aaron Marc Saunders*, Artur Tomasz Mielczarek, Mads Albertsen, Vang Quy
Le, Per Halkjaer Nielsen [Denmark]
1515 Micropollutant biotransformation rates are positively associated with microbial
community richness and evenness in wastewater treatment plants
David Johnson*, Damian Helbling, Tae Kwon Lee, Joonhong Park, Martin
Ackermann, Kathrin Fenner [Switzerland]
1530 Molecular analysis of meso- and thermophilic microbiota associated with
anaerobic biowaste degradation
Kaisa Koskinen*, Jarmo Ritari, Jenni Hultman, Jukka Kurola, Maritta
Kymäläinen, Martin Romantschuk, Lars Paulin, Petri Auvinen [Finland]
1545 Lachnospriaceae population structure in sewage reflects common human
phylotytpes that are distinct from other animal fecal sources
Sandra L. McLellan*, Ryan Newton, Jessica Vandewalle, Orin Shanks,
Susan Huse, A. Murat Eren, Mitchell Sogin [USA]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
ROOM B4
CT44: Novel High-Resolution Technologies
1430 Foraging on the host: uncovering metabolic host-gut microbiota interactions
at the single cell level
David Berry*, Arno Schintlmeister, Jochen Reichert, Isabella Rauch, Thomas
Decker, Birgit Wild, Wolfgang Wanek, Andreas Richter, Michael Wagner,
Alexander Loy [Austria]
78
1400 - 1600
79
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
1400 - 1600
AUD. 10
CT47: Predictive Models of Microbial Communities
Chairpersons:
Chairpersons: Jef Huisman, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Barth Smets, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
Ian Anderson, University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury
Institute for the Environment, Australia
Yvan Moënne-Loccoz, Université Lyon 1, France
1415 Extreme drought and rainfall effects on soil microbes can influence plant
invasiveness
Annelein Meisner*, Wietse de Boer, Gerlinde de Deyn, Wim van der Putten
[Netherlands]
1430 N2O emission from soybean rhizosphere depends on denitrification by
Bradyrhizobium japonicum and other soil microbes
Kiwamu Minamisawa*, Shoko Inaba, Fumio Ikenishi, Manabu Itakura, Yoko
Shiina, Shim Eda, Naohiko Chiba, Chie Katsuyama, Yuichi Suwa, Hisayuki
Mitsui [Japan]
1445 Assessing the sources of biological nitrogen fixation in a rice-field incubation
system using field 15N2–gas feeding
Qicheng Bei, Georg Cadisch, Zubin Xie, Frank Rasche* [China]
1500 Lettuce phyllosphere microbiota: seasonal diversity and impact on microbial
food safety
Thomas Williams*, Maria Marco [USA]
1515 Does plant evolutionary history determine root selection and functioning of
soil microbial populations?
Yvan Moënne-Loccoz*, Marie-Lara Bouffaud, Martina Kyselková, MarieAndrée Poirier, Geneviève Grundmann, Brigitte Gouesnard, Daniel Muller
[France]
1530 Aquatic macrophytes: ecological niches for sulfate-reducing prokaryotes,
impact on mercury methylation and environmental risk assessment
Sophie Gentes*, Mathilde Monperrus, Alexia Legeay, Regine Maury-Brachet,
Jean-Marc Andre, Remy Guyoneaud [France]
1545 Connections of methanotrophy and diazotrophy in boreal mosses
Sanna Maria Leppänen, Niculina Musat, Marcel M. M. Kuypers, Marja Tiirola*
[Finland]
1400 Molecular level, resource ratio analysis of in silico models of natural and
synthetic microbial communities
Ross Carlson*, Reed Taffs, Hans Bernstein [USA]
1415 The nutrient-load hypothesis: patterns of resource limitation and community
structure driven by competition for nutrients and light
Verena Brauer*, Maayke Stomp, Jef Huisman [Netherlands]
1430 Minimal modeling of the spatio-temporal dynamics of phototrophic biofilms
Andreas Bohn*, João Xavier [Portugal]
1445 Theoretical models for bacterial communities in drinking water as they travel
and evolve through drinking water distribution systems
Joanna Schroeder*, Ameet Pinto, Mary Lunn, Lutegarde Raskin, William
Sloan [United Kingdom]
1500 - 1600
AUD. 11
CT48: Genetic potential and expression: key functions in
microbial communities - 2
Chairperson: Kelly Wrighton, University of California, Berkeley, USA
1500 A complete and functioning reversed methanogenic pathway from an
enrichment mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane
Yu Zhang*, Fengping Wang, Jinquan Chen, Ji Qi, Xiang Xiao, Nico Boon
[China]
1515 Genome-based functional studies reveal unexpected metabolic features of
key nitrite-oxidizing bacteria
Hanna Koch*, Alexander Galushko, Sebastian Luecker, Arno Schintlmeister,
Denis Le Paslier, Boris Nowka, Michael Wagner, Eva Spieck, Holger Daims
[Austria]
1530 Assessing the functional gene complexity of modern thrombolitic mats using
metagenomic and metatranscriptomics
Jennifer Mobberley*, Christina Khodadad, Jamie Foster [USA]
1545 Metagenomic analysis of the long-term nutrient amendments grassland soil
Yao Pan*, Hans van Veen, George Kowalchuk, Eiko Kuramae [Netherlands]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
AUD. 11
CT46: Plant-Microbe Interactions - 2
1400 Responses of soil fungi to global change: effects of elevated atmospheric
CO2, increased temperature and drought
Ian Anderson*, Barbara Drigo, Kerry Keniry, Nathalie Curlevski, Susan
Chambers, Oula Ghannoum, David Tissue, John Cairney [Australia]
80
1400 - 1500
81
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
FRIDAY 24 AUGUST
1400 - 1600
AUD. 12
CT49: Microbial Life in Extreme Environments - 2
Chairperson:
Richard Castenholtz, Institute of Ecology and Evolution,
USA
Dave Ward, Montana State University, USA
1400 Diverse phenotypic and ecotypic characters of thermo-acidophilic
Cyanidiophyceae from Yellowstone National Park and elsewhere
Richard Castenholz*, Christina Lowell [USA]
1415 Isolation, molecular characterization, and distribution of ‘Pyrobaculum
yellowstonensis WP30’, a sulfur and arsenate respiring heterotroph important
in sulfidic geothermal systems of Yellowstone National Park
Zackary Jay*, Jacob Beam, Conner Bailey, Richard Macur, Mark Kozubal,
Susannah Tringe, William Inskeep [USA]
1430 The impact of arsenic on cyanobacterial primary production at El Tatio
Geyser Field, Chile
Kimberly D. Myers*, Christopher R. Omelon, Philip C. Bennett [ USA]
1600 - 1715
PLENARY
HALL A1
CLOSING CEREMONY
Chair: Steven Lindow
1600 Address by outgoing ISME President Steven Lindow
1610 Presentation of the Poster Awards, DC White Poster Award Presentation,
Bill Costerton Young Scientist Prize, MOBIO Award and the Young Postdoc
Research Award
1640 CLOSING PRESENTATION
Kenneth H. Nealson, Wrigley Professor of Environmental Sciences,
University of Southern California, USA
Behavioral interactions of bacteria with charged surfaces: a new
wrinkle in microbial ecology
1655 Incoming presidents address - Michael Wagner
1700 Invitation to attend ISME15 in South Korea
1445 Methanotroph community diversity in geothermal environments of New
Zealand, a stable-isotope probing approach
Christine Sharp*, Matthew Stott, Peter Dunfield [Canada]
1500 Oral Using stable isotope probing to detect carbon monoxide oxidizing
bacteria from Canadian geothermal sites
Allyson Brady*, Christine Sharp, Stephen Grasby, Peter Dunfield [Canada]
1515 Novel insights into the thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane and
methanotrophic microorganisms
Viola Krukenberg*, Katrin Knittel, Antje Boetius, Gunter Wegener [Germany]
82
1545 Assessing the role of Acidobacteria in carbon turnover in Arctic tundra
and the mechanisms promoting their activity and abundance in these soil
environments
Max Häggblom*, Minna Männistö, Suman Rawat, Marja Tiirola, Lee Kerkhof
[USA]
ISME14 |
| ISME14
1530 Psychrotolerant acidophiles in a subsurface metal sulfide mine: from (meta)
genomes to biotechnological applications
Adam Stell*, Maria Liljeqvist, Jorge Valdes, David Holmes, Mark Dopson
[Sweden]
83
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