Honda ST1100 Highway Peg Installation

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Honda ST1100 Highway Peg Installation
TOOL BOX
From Crouch
To Couch
INSTALLING HIGHWAY PEGS FOR THE LONG HAUL
3
Steve removed the 1/2" clevis bolt, Allen bolts, lock
washers, and metal straps from one of the brackets.
IT’S SAID THAT HONDA’S ST1100, CALLED
By George P. Blumberg and Steve Lita
the Pan European across the pond, was designed
to burn across the Autobahn at 100 mph. But
with a 7.4-gallon tank and a sporty riding position, you may find it necessary to shake the
kinks out of your legs before the tank runs dry.
In response, ST1100 owners have developed
a series of “farkles” to complement the bike’s
long-distance touring abilities. Robert Kienlen of
Dallas, Texas, has developed the ultimate foot
farkle: Speed Sticks, a set of folding highway
pegs that attach to the bike’s engine guards and
let you sit upright, then fold out of the way when
you want a sportier crouch. Now you can have
cruiser comfort on a sport-touring machine.
Robert’s kit includes Küryakyn ISO-Pegs,
steel support brackets, pivot joints, and all necessary hardware. Robert did a great job of matching Küryakyn (and Honda) quality with the
black powder-coated bracketry. Assistant Editor
Steve Lita found them very easy to install. The
Speed Sticks fold up under the winged tip-over
guards when not in use, and you can easily
extend them or fold them up with your feet while
cruising. Robert will have Speed Sticks available
for the ST1300 in March.
4
He then positioned the bracket across the top of the engine
guard tubing and loosely reinstalled the bolts, washers, and
straps to the underside of the support bracket, with the
straps around the bottom of the engine guard tubing.
5
Next, he pulled the support bracket away from the
fairing and inserted the clevis bolt and lock washer
from the back side. He repositioned the bracket,
making sure the bolt head was 1/16"-1/8" from the
fairing, and tightened the Allen bolts.
1
A complete set includes pegs, brackets, and fasteners.
6
SOURCES
Speed Sticks $215
ROBERT KIENLEN
[email protected]
www.st1100.org
2
Steve removed the plastic engine guard cowl. The plastic
should be warm — it’s brittle when cold.
78 RoadBike February/March 2005
It’s time to cut the plastic. Using the supplied templates,
Steve traced the pattern for the opening onto the engine
guard cover with a marker. He carefully cut the plastic
with a Dremel tool. Once you’ve cut out the hole, you can
smooth rough edges with fine sandpaper, followed by a
final smoothing with a cigarette lighter flame.
www.RoadBikeMag.com
7
Next he put the plastic cowl back over the
engine guards, making sure the cutout cleared
the front end of the support bracket and the
1/2" bolt. Then he put a lock washer over the
bolt and threaded the clevis onto it, leaving it
fingertight.
11
9
He then folded the peg up against the bottom of
the cowl where it would normally be stowed, and
tightened the bolt securing the clevis to the
support bracket.
Rarely seen, Steve emerged from the Witness
Protection Program to demonstrate going from
crouch…
10
8
Steve mounted the footpeg to the clevis with the
head of the pivot bolt on top. With a 3/4"
wrench, he tightened the bolt enough so the peg
would pivot with some resistance.
He pulled the peg out to the extended position
and used the supplied Allen wrench to loosen
the bolt in the outside end of the peg. He then
turned the peg to align the rubber pads so
they’d contact my foot at the proper angle,
and retightened the bolt.
12
…to couch. RB
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February/March 2005 RoadBike 79