Mar. 29 - University of Victoria

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Mar. 29 - University of Victoria
the
MARTLET
A
University of Victoria
“if no news is good news,
then
-
bad news’/[ do”
-
-
Vol. 1 2 No. 2 7 March 2199, 7 3
in
Codd Mean
N o Tenure
N 0 PU
photo by Sean mckierahan
An ethnicjourney from Greece
Committee and was contributedto
Viewed fromthe other side it
:oAfrica,from China to
the West by both campus and non-campus
gave
the
immigrants
an
ndies and from Poland
to
Great
organizations.
opportunity
to
show
what
they are
by the
Teprimary objective was toall
about.The considerableeffort
3ritainwasprovided
nternationalFestival in the SUB give W‘etorlans brief
a
inswht and w’ork put. inta-.,,.these
In Tuesday last.
into
the
cultures of some of contributions wasmeasure
a
of
The festival was
the
brainchild
Canada’s
multi-national
the
national
pride
so common to
)f the International
campus
residents.
all
of us.
Call For Liberal
A r t s Programme
by d. todd
Being presented to Senatesoon
UVic
Iffer aBA programme in Liberal
4rts, starting in 1975.
If implemented it would serve
students requiring an all-round
?ducation rather than preparation
!or aprofession
or academic
specialism says Lionel Adey,
:hairman
of Senate
the
Zommittee for an Experimental
.nter-Disciplinary Programmeof
Liberal Studies.
A centralfeature of the BA
programme,
(which
the
Eommittee says would be mainly
servedfromexistingcourses)
would be Liberal Arts 305.
The
report
and
its
recommendations
were
considered by the
Arts
and
Science Curriculum Committee
last Friday and are to go before
the Arts and Science
Faculty
itself beforeany Senate decisions
are made.
Last May Senatereceiveda
report
recommending
Liberal
Studies courses be instituted, and
the committee,
consisting
of
Adey,
David
Chabassol of
Education, CharlesForward of
Geography, Nelson
Smith
of
English and John Woods of
Philosophywas askedto make
specific proposals.
They now suggestthata
BA
shall be awarded upon the
successful completion of the
course and the passing of a
Liberal Studies
Bachelor’s
Examination to be taken in the
.s a recommendation that
spring of a student’s fourth year. would be to provide a forum in
interdisiplinary
A requirement that courses be which
selected from the following eight connectionscan be established
divisions is proposed: The Arts and discussed and toprepare
(arts, music, theatre, literature); student:; for the Liberal Studies
Bachelor’s
Examination,
the
English
Composition;
the
Physical
Sciences;
the
Social
report says.
“Secondly, in the opinion of the
Sciences;
Foreign
Languages;
Mathematics;
History
and Director ofcontinuing Education
( Dr. Laurence Devlin),
it
Philosophy.
An overall standing of at least (Liberal Arts BA programme)
attract
off-campus
second class would be a condition would
a student mustfulfill if he wanted students; in this neighbourhood,
50 or more per year may Well
to remain in the programme.
In the firstthreeyears
a enroll. :”
TheSenateCommitteesays
student would take 3 language
courses, 3 physical science that if the Arts and Science
Facultydivide,thedesignation
courses, 3, social
science
courses, 3 arts courses,
1 course “BA Liberal Studies” might be
in mathematics, 1in Liberal Arts preferred.
Cons,ideration
by
the
and 1 elective.
The
graduating
year would committee was also giventoa
demand study of an Arts course, a plan put forward by Dr. Adey and
History
course,
a
Philosophy Dr. M:ac Power of Political
course and 2 electives, one of Science which favours courses to
be taken on topics or problems
which
Committee
the
e.g.
recommends should be Science rather than disciplines.
300 (a natural science course for women’s studies, or, mentioned
in thereport,a
study of the
non-scientists).
between
the
The proposal, the Committee relationship
says,is an endorsement of a humanities and the sciences.
Other
recommendations
are
scheme brought forwardsome
time ago by Dr. Charles Daniels that adirector of Liberal Studies
of
the be appointed forathree-year
and Dr. John Woods
term by the Dean of, Academic
Philosophy Department.
Affair:s,that course content be
One reason for this support it
says, is that the University would evaluated
by
student
have to offeronly one new course questiconmire or another method
in addition to those
in the calendar to be chosen by the Director and
now, a fourth-year Liberal Arts
“cross-disciplinary”
that
seminar.
eont’d on 13
The seminar’s chief PurPOSeS
The Dean of Arts and Science
has recommendedto President
Hugh Farquhar that a Geography
professor not be granted tenure
because he has never published
anything.
The Martlet
learned
late
Assistant
yesterday
that
Geography prof Bret Wallach has
been turned down for tenure by
Dean J-P Vinay andmay be given a
terminal contract next year.
Wallach was recommended for
a sinecureby both h i s Department
and Dean’s
Advisory
the
Committee, headed by English
prof Robin Skelton.
The Department of Geography
supported Wallach unanimously.
The Martlet was alsoinformed
by one sourcethat theDean’s
Advisory
Committee
had
Geography
supported
the
professor by a large margin, but
was unable to confirmthis report.
Advisory Committee chairman
Skelton could not be reached for
confirmation last night.
Wallach says thatin a message
from Dean Vinay he was told the
decision not torecommend him
for tenure “hasnothing to do with
teaching effectiveness”.
“In my case it’s purely a case
of publish or perish”, Wallach
said.
Wallach was eligible for tenure
lastyear and applied but was
turneddown. He was told that he
should completethe book he is
currently working on.
The Universitygave
him an
extra year to finish writing it.
Wallach saidhe is being told
that “we’ve given you an extra
year and been generous toyou, so
goodbye”.
Thenotion that all faculty with
tenure a r e both outstanding
scholars
and
outstanding
teachers is “hogwash”, he said.
In fact, “the level of teaching
effectiveness at this campus is
abysmal.
And level
the
of
scholarship is not that much
higher”, Wallach commented.
Vinay reluctant
wasto
comment, saying he would rather
wait until the matter is dealt with
at the April Board of Governors
meeting,
thus
lending
further
weight tospeculationthatthe
Universitywantsto
dispose of
tenure and promotion matters as
early in the year a s possible.
Last weekVinay said that he
hoped tenure decisions could be
made by the Boardwhen they meet
on the 19th of next month.
He called
discussi’on
by
Wallach of therecommendation
not to grant tenure“washing your
dirty linen in public, which to my
way of thinking is not academic.”
Wallach has oneyear left in his
contract with the University. If he
does not receive tenure he will
have to leave next spring.
A meeting by students
to
discuss actionwhich can be taken
to let President Farquhar know
student opinion on this and other
promotion and contract matters
is to be held next week, probably
on Monday.
Liberal A r t s
will be here
next year
Liberal Arts Director Dr. Rodney Symington met with Arts and
Science Dean J. P. Vinay onMonday to discuss the programme’s
budget for the coming year.
Earlier therehad been rumours that financingproblems
could force
a cancellation of the Liberal Arts 305 course in 1973-74.
At present faculty a r e lent to the programme by their departments,
who absorb the cost of getting instructors to teach course sections
otherwise left unattended.
The
freezing
of current
faculty
levels could
develop
an
unwillingness on the part of departments to partwith professors, one
professor connected with this year’s scheme suggests.
All other costs for Liberal Arts are paid through the office
of
theDean of Arts and Science.
OnTuesday morning Symington was confident that there will be a
Liberal Arts course next year.
He said implementation of more coursesof a liberal arts nature this
fall is unlikely howeverbecause itis too late to begin planning them.
Symington leaves UVic next year togo onstudy leave. Liberal A r t s
Directorfor
73-74 will be Dr. Tony Jenkins, of theEnglish
Department.
THE COMING SCENE
MacKenzie Valley. Newcombe
The UVic
Women’s
Action
Auditorium. 8 p.m. Admission
Group meets at 12:30 in Mac. 116. Free.
All insertions for the Coming
Scenemustbe inthe Martlet office
by noon Monday. Be sure to
include the event, location, time
andplace. All submissions must
be legible and preferably
typewritten.
The wonders of thedeep a r e
Blues Union plays atthe
exploredeveryFriday when the PUB tonight.
DivingClub
meetsat
12:30in
Cunningham 0011
15 Artists -- a show by this
year’s Visual Arts graduating
class. Theexhibitopens 8 p.m.
tonightand continues through to
April 4th inthe MacLaurin lobby.
Sculpture, painting, printmaking,
photography are all on display.
Works are for sale.
c
Thur 29
The UVic Flying Club is having
its final general meeting of the
year at 12:30 p.m. in the SUB
Boardroom. All present and
future pilots please attend.
“Between Time and Timbuktu”
a sciencefiction fantasy by Kurt
Vonnegut. One show onlyat 7:15 in
Mac.144. Admission 75 cents,
SUB
Sat 3 1
Activities Council presents an
Informal Bash with Sugarcane at
theCommonsBlock,Saturday,
March 31, 9pm-lam.
Cinecenta presents a Uscience
fiction
fantasy
horrorterror.
details.
and a double
SeeFridayfor
-
Derk Wynand,
and
poet
translator, will give a reading of
his worksat 4:30 this afternoonin
Cornett 168.
c
“The Abominable Doctor
Phihes”
plus
“Count
Yorga
Vampire”at 9:00 p.m. in Mac.
144. Admission 75 cents. (Price
does not include Vonnegut film).
The Spring CraftFaire opens in
the SUB today at noon and
Pottery,
continues to 8 p.m.
weaving, batik etc b y Island
craftsmen.
lor the woman of action a Friday meeting
MONTESSORI
DAYCARE
Parents who wishto placetheirchildrenthisfall,it
is
essential to call NOW to express this interest.
Priority will be given to:
1)Working parent(s) or students(working parent and-or
student parent)
2)Who require Day Care(more than 4 hrs.
per
day) Gov’t financial assistance for those who need it
Call most any time-Day or Evening Mr. T. Harris
Nmminated For
4 Academy Awards
Best Actress Maggie Smith
Best Cinematography
Best Art Direction & Set Decoration
Best Cbstume Design ‘
419-2136
LARGE
SELECTION
COMICS
-
OF P O S T E R S
PAPERBACKS
-
RECORDS
t
PANAVISION”
METROCOLOR
t
587 JOHNSONS T R E E T
PHIL ROBBIE
383-0633
............................
i
MGM
Wed 4
All fresh air lovers are
invited
to the Outdoors Club meeting at
12:30 in Elliot 061.
CLASSIFIED RATES
Commercial- $3 3 lines; f . 6 5 ,
each additional line.
I
,
t
Mon 2
Wayne Campbell lectures on
A free concertof “light country
“Arctic Wildlife
in
Frigid
a
Deserf”. Dr. Campbell is one of sound” with Revelation. 12:30
several naturalistswho took part p.m. SUB Upper Lounge.
in last
summer’s
extensive
Baha’i
Faith
will
hold
its
biological survey of the proposed
pipeline route through the weekly informaldiscussionat
2:30 in the SUB Boardroom.
Fri 30
The Spring
Craft
Fair
continues in the SUB t o d a y from
noon until 8 p.m.
Sun I
There will be Open
an
Discussion on “Future Lifestyles
and the
Guaranteed
Income”,
Sunday April 1st at Open Space,
510 Fort St.
Students-
f reem
Winners of Studying ExperimentDoug Morrison, Moya Sullivan,
BruceFinegold,PeteDrenner,
Liz Mangan, Ellen Swanston.
Free transportationto Toronto in
exchange forshare
of driving
truck. Leaving Victoria about
May 5th. Phone 477-3069 between
1 and 5 pm.
Model needed for evening
photography class. Send photo to
P.O. Box 5207, Station “B”,
Victoria, B.C.
”
Nominated For
2 Academy Awards
Best Supporting Actress Jeannie Berlin
Best Supporting Actor Eddie Albert
Complete Sales & Service
TODAY
Student Finance Plan
Phone 386-3516
CharlesGrodinCybilShepherd
&
The Best>and Most
Original’Comedy
of 1972
Vincent Canby
N.Y.
.,
. Times
Starts
Friday
780 YATESSTREET
383-0513
r- 4
THE
ELAINE MAY DIRECTED IT.
HEART
NEIL SlMoN WROTE IT.
BRUCE JAY FRIEDMAN CONCEIVED IT.
v
CRAFT
FAIR
SUB
NOON 8PM
b o Friday
Millet
speaks
on
“Woman
as
Writer99
A group
from
the
UVic
Woman’s Action Committee went
to Vancouver last week to hear
Kate Millet speakat
the last
meeting of Women’s Studies, at
UBC.
you
Do
you
Do
care about
your
University?
loglcally
follows
they
should
that
have
care who your professors
are?
some
part decisionthein
making process
this
University
at
and t
hiring and firing ofOUR professors.
scholarship is an important partof this university.But ability to
communicate knowledge and inspire the pursuit of truth in,the
students of this institutionis at least an equally important task.
Thereare anumber
of professors, in theEnglish
and
Geography Departments who are being given their terminal
year. This seems to follow in the tradition of administrative
“house- cleanings” at uvic. The reasons a r e probably those of
previous years, those being non-completion of degrees or lack of
If you share this concern over the general hiring practices of
UVic or the plightof individual professors, perhaps something
published writings, seemingly without much concern for these
can be done. Information on some positive action will be made
p,rofessors’ teaching abilities.
As pastexperiencehas shown, there is no point in studentsavailable
onMonday morning.
hysterically taking up the cause for specific individuals being
released by theUniversityHowever,the
time is at hand for
Think about it,this is yourUniversity.
breaking the conspiracyof silence of those i n control of the fate
of OUR professors. Students are undeniably animportant
Some Concerned Students
element of this university (perhaps the most important) and it
Better Transit Ahead
The Women’s Studies is a noncredit program sponsoredby the
UBC Woman’s Action Group and
ohe AMS.
They have
guest
speakers and discussion groups
at
their
well-attended weekly
meetings.
The UVic group went to the last
meeting to get
ideas for a possible
Women’s Studies programhere
next year, and found that UBC’s
arrangement is so successful that
the universityis now giving credit
for some courses.
Fortheirlast
meeting
the
Women’s Studies had Kate Millet
speaker.
as
A . well-known
American feminist and author of
Sexual Politics, who is now a
lecturer at the University of San
Jose, she spoke before a crowdof
about 1500on the. subject of the
“woman as writer”, or the
“writer as woman.”
She described women in the
past a s a sub-species in the male
literary tradition.
In Hamlet, forinstance,she
described Ophelia a s “the galwho
gets jiltedand goes bananas.”She
said women readingliterature
feel
left
out;
they
aremere
appendages - wife mother,
mistress, and a r e always
peripheral.
She quoted from Michelle
Munay’s book, Images of Women
in Literature,tosupporther
belief that men don’t know much
about women, and don’t write
convincinglyabout them. She said
TheFaculty of Education is while a teaching staffof about the
that women must start writing
probably
in greater difficulties same size as three years ago is
about
themselves
without
than other partsof the University being maintained.
inhibition, and self-censorship.
Although Education has turned
should
budgetary
cutbacks
be
She read from her most recent
necessary next year, says Dean in a “nninimal request” for the
book,
personal
relating
upcoming fiscal year, Pedersen
experiences, which she has been George Pedersen.
Pedersen
says
that
the says there will more than likely
having trouble getting published.
be a reduction in the number of
has
Millet blames this on publishers enrolment in Education
more than 1600 professors on the payroll.
who want to maintain the status declinedfrom
He erpects, however, that any
students in 1969-70 to 1100 today
quo.
I go through
“The more trouble
,” said Millet, “the more
I am
dedicated
to
revolution.”
Shc
says that women, artists and
revolutionaries are programmed
for the “bell-jar”, or suicide.
“We have got to learn tomake
anger move things, and not just
destroy ourselves,” she said.
She wants
a
non-violent
The business of producing an, attitude toward criticism.
revolution.
Alsoasked for is an opinion of
AMS academic guidebook got
“Shooting is easy, but gentle
instructor’s
the
sensitivity
under
way
Monday
morning
with
change takes
intelligence
and
toward a student’s understanding
changes inside oneself. We have distribution of questionnaires to
of couirse material and of the
to become the people
we want to be all professors on campus.
However, they aren’t going to intellectual content of courses.
or it won’t happen.”, Millet said.
Answers are made using a five
be the ones who provide
the
point scale, grading professors
answers.
from very poor to very good.
Facultyhavebeenaskedto
distribute the forms to all classes Members of the AMS
this week andto collect them and Academic Affairs Guidebook
Comm:ittee are.collecting.the
seal them in envelopes provided
by the AMs, according to courses completed forms this week and
Guidebook questionnaires for1 and sections.
collatilon of information is
1.5 unit courses Tinishing in
afterwards
There are 20 questions on the expectad shortly
December or other individual forms, ranging from
thr0ug.h use of the Uqversity’s
the
courses are availablein the SUB closeness of the
computer.
relationship
General
Office the
from
The ‘guidebookis to be ready in
between course content and a
Academic Guidebook Committee. course’s outline in the calendar, late August fordistributionto
Completed sheets should be to
students
Registration
at
in
the
instructor’s
ability
to
returned by April 6 to the SUB explain clearly
concepts
and September.
Office.
principles,totheinstructor’s
A small crowd oftwo dozen people attended the final N.D.P. noon
hour speaker series, Tuesday, which hosted the minister of municipal
affairs, Jim Lorimer.
Lorimer’s talk centered on Victorias transit problemand he stated
his number one priority as being the creator of an efficient transit
system offering first class service to everyone.
A transit board has
been set up to advise the governmenton needs in
B.C., he said.
Discussion hasbegun with both regional districts and B.C. Hydro on
how to improve the transit system.
So far, 15 new buses have been purchased, and will be operating in the
Victoria area shortly. This will allow a substantial improvement on
both existing and new routes, according to Lorimer.
About five of these new buses will be usedto replace poorly
functioning models. He hopes that theother ten will allow for serviceto
areas presently without the benefits of Hydro buses.
Another of Lorimer’s plans is to implement a “belt route” which
would provide frequent service to heavily populated areas at peak
times (eg: the legislature) to takepassengers to less populated points.
This, he feels, would alleviate downtown congestion.
Lorimer stressed that although free transit is a “noble and long
will not experienceitunder the expanded
termeffort”,Victoria
system.
In fact, the annual6 million dollar deficit will undoubtedly increase
with an expanded service, he said.
Lorimer also discussed
the need for comprehensive transit
planning
throughout North America.
Education Faculty in €or
Tough Financial Times
U riderway
Extra
Forms
decline i n faculty can be effected
through natural
attrition,
and
will be no
says
that
there
deliberate actionto
terminate
anyone’s teachingcareer at UVic
if it can be avoided.
Four visitingappointments end
this yearand only one of these will
be re-filled with another visiting
academic,theMartletlearned
from Pedersen.
million this year and the Faculty
isasking for an increase to $1.47
million in the
fiscal
year
beginning next week.
A $50,000 rise looks like the
bestthatEducationcan
hope for.
rr,
Charker
Dlans a r e being- made to redace
them.
Pedersen is confident
that
a
policy of not filling old positions
will be sufficienttomeet
next
year’s money squeeze.
Thereare more students from
But the
problem
with this UVic than from Simon Fraser
approach,he freely admits, is University booking on AOSC
thatthere
is no controlover
charterflightstoEuropethis
where the attrition occurs.Some summer, says AOSC Vancouver
rehiring has to take place becauseorganizer Trenor Tilley.
of the necessity to maintain the
Tilley said Tuesday that UVic
academiccore of programmes is second only to UBC in the
offered.
number of charter
seats
to
And at Faculty
a Council
London which it is filling.
meeting last Fridaythe Dean told
Flights scheduled forMay are
thosepresentthat
theyshould
currently running at 80-90
begin to look at budget needs for percentoccu.ancy,Tilleysaid,
the fiscal year 1974-75.
and one flighton the 88thof August
80 is already completely full.
The
University
spends
percent of its operatinggrant
He dismissed as unlikely the
each yearon salaries and wages. possibility thatany charters will
The only place theuniversity can be cancelled.
really make substantial savings
Most June and July AOSC
is toremove faculty fromthe
flights to London are half full.
payroll, Pedersen says.
Tilley also said that fewer
In 1971-72the Education budget students are buying one-way
was1.35 million. It rose to $1.42 tickets than last year.
Heavy
c-
4
-t
.
the
MartCet
staff- davetodd, Sean mckierahan, phi1 esmonde, frieda
lockhart, tim de lange boom, Craig dalziel, doug pettmann,
diane styles, edeana malcolm, jaci, bill mcelroy. barry elliot,
brian, sandy richard farrell
-
Editorial opinions expressed herein are thoseof the Martlet
and not (god forbid) those of the Alma Mater Society or the
University of Victoria.TheMartlet
is published weekly
throughout the University year in Victoria by the Publications
Department of the Alma Mater Society,University
of
Victoria.
Office
Authorized as Second Class Mail by thePost
Department in Ottawa, and for payment otpostage in cash.
Subscription rates: $5 per year; $6 foreign . Mail should be
addressed: The Martlet, University of Victoria,Victoria,
B.C.
Typeset by thesingle Finger Press. Printed
in Canada. Days:
’
^.
.
‘
’
’
.
,
LET ME COUNT THE
WAYS
%
If most students aren’t sickand tired of hearing about the political.
infighting and petty bickering which surrounds the Martlet and those
connected with it, they should be. .We are too.
Theconflict between thePublicationsBoard
and itschairman,
contrived by Derry McDonnell, is the latest in a series of manoeuvres
designed to installhis chosen candidatea s the next editor of the paper.
McDonnel was convinced that David Climenhaga wasgoing to win the
d o b at last Thursday
night’s meetingand it camea s a shock tohim when
- the committee decided not to accept anyone until an extension of the
applicationperiod had expired.
McDonnel prqmised and was promised that thenext day an articleby
him would be in a special edition of the Martlet advertising for more
submissions.
But came the morningand anunexpected changeof mind. Derry had
decided that somewhere along the way something had gone wrong not
only in his plans but in the way the decision had been reached the
previous night.
In short he found himself a loophole.McDonnel searched through the
constitution and through RA minutes on Friday morning and founda way
to over-rule the re-opening of applications.
Twoof the Pubs Board members, hedecided, were ineligible
to vote:
one the editor of Karaki Magazine and the other the former Pubs
Director, Bob McLeod.
McDonnel tabled
the
Pubs Board
motion on the
grounds I
thatthe‘Constitution
grants him therightto suspend any ruling
made by the Board, provided his actions are explained at the next
student council meeting.
McDonnel maintains that heknew of the “ineligibility” of Wade and
McLeod at the time of the meeting but did not want to polarize opinion
(his words) by bringing out the fact then.
McDonnel hadcancelled the editorselection portion of a Pubs Board
the previous week when Wade was unable to attend.
It’s morethan alittle difficult tocredit h i s “polarization” rationale.
We’reconvincedthat
McDonnel wouldn’t have been so eagera
constitutional lawyer if Climenhaga had won.
Also on Friday he attacked Bob McLeod for having “fuckedme
around fouror five times” since
becoming PubsDirector. Jousting at
yet another windmill, he has accused AMS Business Manager David
Titterton of taking sides in the dispute. Titterton has said repeatedly
since assuminghis duties a yearand a half ago that he does not want to
get caught in political crossfires. True to form, he left the last Pubs
Board meetingduring a particularly sensitive partof the discussion,
commenting thathe did not believe he should be party to amatter which
could jeapordize his claim to neutrality.
McDonnel here as elsewhere has fabricated a chargehistoneeds.
fit
- 5
Only the two peoplehe personally chose for membership
on the Pubs
Board have been exempt from accusations of partiality and inability
to make creditable decisions.
A strange monopoly on truth and fair play is made more unbelievable
when admission by McDonnel is taken into account.
Pubs Boar6 members
He made themistake of telling the incompetent
that he hadcalculated theway everyone had voted at the meeting. Of six
people holding electoralpositions,four
had castballotsagainst
Climenhaga and twofor him. McDonnel considers Wade and McLeodto
be two of those voting from the “enemy” camp and has said that when
the Pubs Board meets next these two people will not be on it.
Democracy is fine as long a s you arrive atthe correct decision. It’s
an extension of the dld playground philosophy which says , “If I don’t
win, I’m picking up my marbles and going home.”
.
. .
LETTERS LETTERSLETTERSLETTERSLETTERSLETTERSLETTERSLETTERS
what you havetosay
about my
situationin this article is news I
have not heardbefore.
I am
curious toknow if it will turn out
to be true.
Review Committee’sterms
of
reference as described to me by
its chairmanand Dean J-P Vinay.
Although appreciate
I
the
Facts from these sources were
serious and appropriate concern
then applied towhat I had learned
expressed in
your
article of
from you and as you said over the
March 22 about the contracts of
Sincerely,
telephone Monday morning, I
English Department
faculty,
I
Florence K Riddle
quoted you accurately and
in
personalIy would have preferred
Assistant Professor,English
context.
it if you had not broached public
Your letter leaves me aatloss.
I was under the impression that
discussion of the issues involved
d.t.
ed. note
I
had
checked
my
information
with
in the
case
concerning my
you
for
accuracy,
through
the
reappointment while it was still
skylarks & gnp
unresolved, especially since you several Conversations I have had
with you. The speculative part of
did not first check
your
This is an open letter to thank
information and speculation about the article consisted of a quote
this matterwith me for accuracy. from the Tenure Document and a all those considerate people who
couldn’t sparethe few seconds to
discussion of the
University
A s it happens, a significant part of
Dear Sir:
-
~
follow the paved paths around the
Skylark nesting area in front of
CornettBuilding. I donotknow
what possesses you peopleto
continue walking through
the
nesting area when you realize
what is out there. Why should it
bother you though, for Skylarksdo
not increase theG.N.P.of Canada
nor a r e they directly influencing
your life. As long a s you look cool
or thoughtful as you go tripping
across the lawn you can justify
your actions even though signs
are prevalent. Maybe a wire
fence would deter you but then you
would declare that itviolated your
freedom of movement.
So please change
your
priorities from speedand ease to
those of consideration and
thoughtfulness. NOW!!!
S. Clarke
702866
ring around the...
Sir,
However objectionable
the
principle of inviting
faculty
members
to
publicize their
achievements,
that
of
caricaturing such achievements
and
of
attacking
named
!
“
F.aculty
concerned
are in “consultative’’ kind of decision- {opinion, thus reversing a lower
making favoured by the Jennings ,court decision which - declared
agreement, and the
Vice
Commission Reporton Academic that freedom of opinion could be
President.
Governance.
To choose a Dean of Academic
other
“subordinated
to
intbrests” such certain
as
Affairs,
the
same
selection
“Conventions of decency.”
procedure is to be followedand
. . The,,_cage
in qwption was that of
the nominating committeei s to be
l f h W d i + $ &ibfi$souri
graduate
‘The Wall Strekt’
Jo&nal’
of approximately
the
same
s a n t , dismissed, in 1969 for
reports
that
constitution a s the one described constitutional
newspaper
a
the
protectionsforfreedom
of the distributing
above.
It’s not too difficult to imagine press in the U.S. include student school decided containediobscene
newspapers at state colleges and material.
the
‘Senior
Advisory
Group’s
The Suppewp.Goprt said the
universities.
formalpowers,becausethat’s
First Amendment :to, - the U.S.
In a six to three decision the
what they are being expanded to
Constitution “leaves no room for
cover other appointment
matters. courtrejected any notionthat
We know of course thatwhen andif government-funded schools have the operationof a dual standardi n
with
special power to censor the on- the academic.community
that happens, it
will be on a purely
content of speech.”
campus expression of ideas by respect to the
“informal” basis.
It ruled that the-Muiyersityhad
their students.
The
memorandum,
although
I
Constitutional
guarantees
of exceeded [email protected];-epl:authority
dated lastThursday,notesthat
appointment
the
policy
was free expression apply equally to to enforce reasonable rules and
by dave todd
ordered the U. of M . to reinstate
the academic community,
the
adopted
February
7,
1972,
a
week
WHATSUP NO. 16 --- BY
the
woman.
body
said
i
n
an
unsigned
majority
after Farquhar became pro-tem
APPolNTMENT
To
someone
position
the
for
Dean
of
president. Decent of him tolet
MAJESTY THE
. of Arts and Science,
nominating
a
everybody know so soon.
Last week Dr. Farquhar was committee will be asked by the
Still on the same subject, the
quoted as saying his new Senior President to recommend a short vice presidentwho is supposed to
Then “the belong to nominating
Advisory Group on Appointments list of nominees.
the
will not have any authority or President on receipt of the list
committees is D. J . MacLaurin.
consult Since he appointed his old friend
terms of reference.
A SHALL (ouremphasis)
a Senior
proclamation to all members of withPresident’s
as academic veep pro-tem, Hugh
faculty, dated March
22, indicates Advisory Group.”
Farquhar has moved MacLaurin
Finally, after receiving advice two more step6 up the ladder to
thatsomething different is the
fromthe Group,the
President success, without a whimper of
case.
may recommendacandidate
to Drotest from any of the many on
description
It’s
a
new
of
selection
procedures
to be the BQ;irrdOf Gpv.erFop. , . . , ; , h . . r , ” c z a i t i ~ u ~ ~ ~his
~ ~ability.
~Stion
followed in choosing asenior
Thenominating
committeeis
to
From pro
to permanent
administrators. Among other bemadeup Of 3 facultymembers
academic vice presidenttovice
innovations highly convenient to electedfrom and by thefaculty
president all in the
of a few
Farquhar, it assigns a major role
concerned, 1 professor appointedshort
months. By presidential
to theSeniorAdvisoryGroup,
by the
President
after
the decree.
without
any selection
wholly contradicting what he said election, 1 student or one
committees. Without even the
undergraduate and
one
grad
last week.
*
colleagues,
under
cover
of
anonymity, is far worse. I would
cite but
two
instances of the
unfairness of thisattack.
In a
recent issueof The Ring, a faculty
member was stated
to
have
Vietnamese
a advised
government upon use of water
resources - hardlythe kind of
triviality
suggested
by your
anonymous correspondents!
Having for
five
years been
privileged
to
work
with
Dr.
Limbrick
in
Craigdarroch
College, I can testify that many
students
have
expressed
gratitude
for
her
loyal and
tirelessservice to them.The
real targetof attack should be the
consecration of self-advancement
that has contributedso largely to
theunhappiness of life on this
campus. There are surely better
ways of mounting such an attack,
than smearing
colleagues
in
anonymous letters.Perhaps
if
each of us had submitted detailsof
every attainment,with addressed his return from his vacation on
envelope for acknowledgment, the the seven seas is without a doubt
offending column would long ago millionaire’sextremely deviant
been scrapped by an overworked socialbehavior
and - if it is
editor.
Alternatively,
it
might continued - would justify a course
have
been
replaced by one of electro-shock or chemorecording in s o m e detailthe
therapy
(the
old favorite his
experience of working on some socred regime instituted in B.C.
project of public interest, such a s to curbcultural-social-political
the
one
on water-supp€y i n deviancy., .).
Vietnam.
Naturally
I
wouldn’t
Yours very truly,
prefrontal
recommend
a
Lionel Adey
lobotomy unless he becomes
physically
violent,
which is
possibly
a
little
too
benevolent
lobotomy
considering
better
the
and
disjunctive attacks he is making
“More
Power
Equals
More
on thepeople’sgovernmentof
Solitude”
B.C. in thename
of so-called
‘individual freedom’.
Dear Sir:
Perhaps B. F. Renner should be
When will this big political hiredby B.C. to help Mr. Bennett
windbag
W.A.C.
Bennett
get
get out of the “box” he now finds
smart and retireto his “don’t himself in.
fence mein” business interests?
Such anti-social rabble-rousing
Yours smilingly etc.
a s he has been carrying on Since
Rav Kraft
th ing I like
ha.t the re’s
“o( )m t c1
m y fri end
On Rocker Sole
Red Antique Leather
Tan Antique Leather
Only $23.00
“ m
The International Festival on
Tuesday
was
visited
by scores of
children from the local schools. Most
of them had been given half-a day off to
come and look at the displays. When
asked what they liked most about what
they had seen, the answers varied from
getting their names written in Russian
to seeing the big green alligator.
They all saidthat they were having a
good time, even if it was only because
they were getting a half day off s’chool.
”rarcsar
OpenC.O.D.
Thursday and Friday Nifea
crderr accepted
Cwdtt and ChwQex.hpnored
VICTORIA 1324 D O U ~ J ~ S
VANCOUVER
776 Granvi I le-Adam‘s Apple Botique
435‘W. .Hastings 542 Granville
and .Gi ldfordTown Centre
r
-\&‘l)mign #rd W@,!~‘-.&,@@#B
.
of the Villager Shoe Shoppe Ltd.”
t
difficultiesforhostellers,.once
in Germany. One unnerving
experience may arise if one meets groupsof German school-children
on hostelling vacations. The boys, almost without exception, wear
track suits tobed and spend most of the wee hours telling jokes and
shining flashlights a s if they were spotlights in the London blitz. I
soon discovered that the tracksuits were for maximum agility in
running over bedsin the darkand making twenty-yard dashes to the
toilets. Whether German schoolboys have
abnormally weak bladders
or youth hostels cause some rampant
waaddiction among them
I do
notknow, but being, a captive party to it all can be an annoying
experience.
will lead the hosteller
back to the Netherlands.
Following the Rhine
In the norththere are
fewer hostelsthan in other partsof Germany but
by no means a r e they ararity. I havenot included Scandinavia in this
circletour.Amsterdam
is atwelvehour
train journeyfrom
Copenhagen. The Danish capital has a severe shortage of student
accomodation in the summer.It may benecessary to stay in a nearby
suburb. I would recommend the hostelin Lyngby. Girls may stay in
Copenhagen at theYWCA (the Danish initials are KFUK). Stockholm
harbour has its famous floating hostel. The more remote areas of
.Norway and Sweden rarely receive visits by non-Scandinavians.
Mount Wear House Youth Hostel, Exeter
Thousands of young Canadians travel overseaseach year. A small
but increasing numbermake
Australia or New Zealand their
destination. For most, going abroad means journeying to Europe.
And so at airports nearLondon, Amsterdamand a dozen other large
European cities,theterminalsare
crowdedeach summer ‘with
whitefaced, sleepless new arrivals.
Theaverage Canadian university student making his first trip to
Europe is 18-25years old, flies onan air charter, plans a stay
of six
weeks to three months and hassomething closeto $1000 in his
moneybelt besidehis return ticket.He or she is most likely to arrive
at London’s Gatwickor Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. Other wellused pointsof entry a r e Orly, near Paris; Prestwick, Scotland; and
Frankfurt, Germany.
After a long flight, first
the priorityis not, a s might be supposed,to
check into the
nearest youth hostel and then set off in search of famous
museums. At this point, the number one sightseeing attraction is a
bedinthe closest available hotel. The effects of “jet lag” last for
several days, particularly in travel from.the Pacific Coast. For
reasons both of practicality and comfort, itis bestto spend the initial
recovery periodin a hotelrather than ahostel. Gatwick, for example,
is forty miles from
London and manyairline passengerswill attest to
the benefitsof resting there before
going into thecity. Wherever you
land, a good idea is to book a place to stay while still in Canada.
Locate acopy of Europe on Five Dollars aDay at a bookstore. Don’t
buy it. Copy down the addresses of two or three inexpensive hotels
convenient for your purposes. The chances
a r e that if these a r e listed
in Five Dollarsthey will be reputable,so don’t worryabout sending a
deposit on a room by overseas money order. (This is the only kind
word I havefor thebook - its author, Arthur Frommer, has
made his
fortune by beingtheworld’smostobsequious
Americanizer of
vacations in Europe.) A more expensive wayof doing business is to
Agents list
follow the same procedure in a travel agent’s office.
higher-priced hotels and*receive commission on the rooms booked
throughthem.Assuming you a r e one of those average Canadian
students with $1000,you probably cannot affordto sleep in a Sherator
Holiday Inn even for a single night anyway.
If you begin your hostelling in a large city, be advised that large
numbers of other young people a r e too. As a result, accomodation in
Paris andLondon requires, a reservation the year
round. Often
bookingsaremade six months in advance. Moreover, these cities’
hostels andmany others in Europeallow you toremainfora
maximum of three days and nights before moving on.
Spanish dttils And Other Delight8
Depending on which part of the continentyou find yourself in, rates
for nightly accomodation vary fromlow
a of forty Canadiancents to a
high of three dollars ‘pernight, but average closer to seventy-five
cents. Most expensiveis Scandinavia; the cheapest Spain, Greece
and
Eastern Europe. There is little,or no variation in prices within a
particular country.A night in a Bavarian castle
is the same price as a
night in a converted barn a few miles
away. Youth hostels are one of
the world’sfew institutions which operate in a spirit of true Christian
justice.
Standards of cleanliness and the qualityof facilities available tend
to reflect national standards. Swiss, German and Scandinavian
hostels a r e generally the best
kept and best equipped. They are also
the strictest. Liquor and dope a r e frowned upon.’ Being caught with .
them in thehostelcan
result in seizure of your Youth Hostels
Membership Card and a resultant
ban on your using any facilities of
the International Association. Thisis not an idle warning. I have not
had this experience but I have seen it happenand it 1s distinctly
unpleasant to be caught up the Rhone without a paddle.
Other general impressions on anational basis: FRANCE, like
more southerly countries, allows
wine in hostels. Many YHA sites in
the countryserve no meals. Wardens tendto be conspicuous by their
absence. In a town in Normandy which will go unnamed, I looked up in
the wash,room one morning
to find a beautifulyoung girl in panties and
bra brushing her teeth.She later turned out to be the warden’s girl
friend.
GREATBRITAIN,with more than 350 hostels is surpassed in
Europe only by Germany’s 650 and an even larger 700 in Poland.
Facilities in Britain a r e often donated or rented out by municipal
authorities and therefore
reflect
in their
surroundings
the
beneficenceof the local inhabitants. More than in other countries,
visitors are expected to assist with light housekeeping duties washing dishes, sweeping floors and the like. British
andDutch
hostels also provide the best breakfasts.
In England, cereal followed
by baconand eggs is standard. Elsewhere, buy your own if you are
near a grocery’store.
Throughout SWITZERLANDthe MIGROS chain
sells food andtoiletries at prices
lower thanare tobe found in Co-op
stor\es. Wherever possible, cook your own meals. It is surprising
m
-being some
1
advuce on student travel in’Eumpe
r
warm
lightweight
terylene
substitute
should be available in
Amsterdam for $10-12 Canadian. For cooking,. one or two-burner
GAZ units are avzilable at low cost, These are
fue3ed by chkap serewon cannisters of gas, available everywhere in Europe. One supply
lasts forty minutes totwo hours. If you do buy a tent, a lightweight
two-man version should be obtainable
at a costof $100. Be sure it has
it
no more than
a flysheet. Alsoif it is a two-mantent, see that weighs
six to eightpounds,has
light nylon o r aluminumpegsanda
telescoping aluminum centre-pole.
how much moneycan be saved
over a period
of two or three months. It
is also the only way to adhere to a three-dollar a dayfoodand
accomodation budget, the absolute maximumyou should be spending
while hitch-hiking and hostelling through Northern Europe.
Many Swiss hostels a r e ultra-modern - one in Zurich with 300 beds
cost morethan a milliondollars to build and its Hilton-like facilities
include anendless supply of hot water in the showers. On the other
hand, you maybe fortunate enough tostay in Langnau, halfway
between Zurich and Berne, wherethe hostelis a chalet more than300
years old.
Getting There ,By Train
SomeGERMAN hostels seem to berun by ex-Wehrmacht drill
sergeants. Always spotlessly clean, the southern part
of the country
has perhaps the most heavily-used facilities in the world. Even in
relatively remote areas, hostelscan be unexpectedly large. By the
time one gets to the beer capital
of Heidelberg, units of 500 and 600
beds a r e common. Perhaps it is because this method of vacationing
originated in Germany that it is a s much a standard way for young
people to take a holiday a s camping is in our part of the world. In
Bavaria a s elsewhere itis desirable to arrive atthe hostelas early as
possible in the afternoon to be assured
of getting in (not so if you a r e in
less-travelled areas).Crowds beginto gather an hour o r two before
opening time, which is usually 5 p.m. Registration endsat 10 p.m. or
whenever the beds run
out. In Germany the doors lock for the night
at
ten or half past the hour.If you have beenhaving a late night drinking
the local brew o r practicing pidgin German on the town’s girls,
arriving late at the hostel means sleeping
in theyard. Maybe.
German and Swiss hostels normally discourage latecomers from
spending the night on the grounds outside. Tenting
is verboten too. If
youare in the Hamburg hostel, morning begins.at 7 a.m. with rock
music over the loudspeakers. Fortunately, this is neither the usual
timenormethod of waking people. Eight o’clock is most common.
In SCANDINAVIA whole families go hostelling and buildings
may be
divided
into
separatequartersfor
them
and
younger,
more
independent travellers. For some reason
I am unawareof but suspect
to be heavycivic taxation, the hostels
in Scandinavian cities areabout
three times as
expensive as those in the country. Low-budget tourists
donot receive any relief from the high cost of food either. I am
thinking mainlyof Sweden where breadis seventy-five Canadian cents
a loaf and beefmore than three dollars per
pound. A bottle of beer in
Halsingborg costs fifty cents, whiletwo miles away at Elsinore,
Denmark (of Hamlet fame), the same bottle is twenty cents.
ITALY has probably the friendliest and most easy-going hostels
in Europe. Meals canbe nonexistent, Spartano r feast-like. At Scilla,
on the tipof the toeof Italy, anold castle now doubles a s a youth hostel
and alighthouse.Thewarden
(and lighthouse keeper) is an old
gentlemannamedPapaJohn.
By theharbour of slowly-sinking
Venice, amidst whose crumbling buildings one
would least expect it,
lies one of.the most up-to-date hostels in Europe.
When you move around the continent,there is nothing of course as
economical a s hitch-hiking, though this becomes moredifficult if you
a r e travelling with three or four people. In that case, a used van or
car might
be
a
good investment.
Ignore
what
Volkswagen
advertisements sayabout buying new vehicles. Unloading a cheapvan
is considerably easier thin selling a near-new one and there is no
point in wasting your
money in automobile depreciation. If you return
home via Amsterdam, sell the car there.
Eurail passes are quite
well-known now, but
for those unacquainted
with them, they are passes valid for periods of several weeks o r
months duringwhich their holdermay travel an unlimited number of
miles on specified European railways. Theycarry a number of sidebenefits, including free bus travel and free boat trips on the TRhine.
in price last year for students
and offer
Eurail passes were reduced
even better value since then.
They a r e not valid in Britain, Finland ‘or Eastern Europe: British
Railways havesimilar passesavailable for use on their lines. Note
that Eurail passes dated
are from thein first day of use. Be sure not to
use one for a weekand then travel to: where it is not valid. One
conveniencethey offer comes i f you a r e in a placewhere it is
necessary to commute
by rail. Not wanting to stayin Oslo, 1 travelled
into that city every
day for aweek.from Drammen, a town fifty miles
and one houraway by train. The same situationcould apply in Paris,
Copenhagen and Munich.
Eurail passes are sold only in North America and Japan so be
careful if you buy one from someone while in Europe. A .pass is
supposedly non-transferrable and you a r e often required to show the
railway conductor your passportrwith
it. If he sees a discrepancy, he
is empowered to seize your pass and throw youoff the train, Of
course, youare not going to mention this if you need to make some
money by selling yours. Youth hostels a r e good places to sell Eurail
passes but posting noticesto that effect
on their bulletin boards is not
permitted (just a s advertising the re-sale of charter air tickets is
forbidden.) In Amsterdam go to theDam (Town Square) or the Hotel
. Cok at 30 Koninginneweg to buy o r sell. In London the best places are
outside Canada House in Trafalgar Square or at British Columbia
House on Lower Regent Street near Piccadilly Circus.
If you want to travelby motorcycle consideration may be given to
buying a bikeat the Triumph factory
in England or the Bultaco plantin
Madrid. Some hostels give preferencetotravellers
without
motorized transportation. This is most likely to happen in Britain.
Border Crossing
Spain has not got a particularly good reputation among people who
regularly cross its borders. Anything you may have heard about
Spanish Customsofficers is probably true. They carry sub-machine
guns much of the time,they do notlike people with long hair and pack
sacks and they do nothave asense of humour. That much is certain.
Be prepared to have everythingyou a r e carrying searched when you
cross the border. The worst places onare
the main road and railway
line from France to Barcelona,
and in the southat Cadiz and La Linea
-the firstSpanish town north of Gibraltar. Be polite,.smile and try not
to look offended if they ask you to take your clothes off. They are
looking for dope so if you get caughtcarrying any make sure you have
lotsofbookstoread. Youshould be able to get through the complete
works of Sir Walter Scott’during your jail sentence.
If you a r e hostelling in Spain (hotels are more comfortable and’not
much more expensive), the best bet
is to stay along the coast. Those
in the interioraremorerudimentary.
Spanish resort towns
occasionally reflect themselves
in luxury hostels as atSan Sebastian
on the Bay of Biscay, just across the French border.
Portugal, Scotland, Ireland, tho Alps and Scandinaviaa r e the only
areas of Western Europe where you will be able to do any NorthAmericanstyle camping.Everywhere else is too populated,. In
England, camping meanscaravan (trailer) sites. This
does not mean
that if you do try roughing it you will have difficulties purchasing
supplies.. Europeansa r e inveterate campersand it is best to buy what
you need there rather thaninCanada.Sleepingbags,
tents and
cooking equipment are all cheaper. If you want good quality gear,
look for in Britain. Holland is also a
Blacks of Scotland is the name to
good place to buy. If you cannot afford a .down sleeping bag, a very
,
The Eight Commandments
a
’
patterned Jamaica shorts.
So for what it is worth,, here is a potential trip following the
pattern,the Netherlands-Britain-France-Switzerland-Germany-the
Netherlands.
an arrival atSchiphol and an immediate visit to
This route assumes
Amsterdam. From the airport, take an inexpensive KLM bus to the
Centraal Station in the heart of town. Ifyou have no place to stay,
there is an accomodation bureauacross the street fromthe railway
terminal. If that fails, take a Number 1 or 2 tramcar to the Vondel
Park where you can sleep for‘free. A half-hour walkaway is the ’
Heineken brewery which offers a tour
and afree breakfast toits first
two hundred visitors each morning.
From Holland there aretwo usual ways to reach
England. One is to
take the day or night ferry across the North Sea from the Hookof
is to travelthrough Belgium to
Holland to Harwich, Essex. The other
Calais and then go across the Channelto Dover. If you a r e on bicycle I
would suggest theformer as there are
not many youth hostels in the
northeastern cornerof France. Holland has bicycle paths
flanking all
major highways and along the southernpart of its North Seacoast. A s
of lastyear,theBritrailferry
to Harwich did not chargefor
transporting bicycles. If you go via Calais, the Hovercraft is more
expensive than any other Channel boat.
Hitch-Hiking Good In BriCain
During the height
of the tourist season,
it may be impossible for
you ,
to find a place to stay
in London at a reasonable price. If that is your
plight, go in the early afternoon to Students International
House
outside Great Portland Street
Tube Station,where for a small charge
they will locate a hotelroom for you. Britain is one of the best
countries in Europe forhitch-hiking, so there should be noneed touse
the trains verymuch.Bicycling
is good as repairs are readily
available and hostels a r e neverfarapart.Theoldestdomestic
building in Scotland, ArgyllLodging in Stirling, is now a hostel. Irish
hostels close early and sometimes operate with due deference to
monastic traditions. Regardlessof the slogan on a recent Northern
Ireland tourist brochure, I would be loathe to suggest that anyone
“Come to friendly
Ulster”, though I once meta hosteller who claimed
to have walked through the Bogside without incident onthe Glorious
Twelfth.
Once in Frante, if you a r e without private meansof transport, be
prepared for considerable frustration, expense
o r both. Probably the
worst countryin Europe for hitchhiking, rides when they docome tend
to be from truck drivers going to the next village down the road.
Barringa lucky break you may have to resortto the train, about fifty
per cent more expensive
than in England. A Eurail passis essential if
you anticipate alengthy stay in France. Care has to be taken not to
misunderstand the railway schedules as‘ everything seems to be
routed in the directionof Paris. A case in point: there is no regular
linebetween Calais and Dieppe. To get between these two Channel
ports it is necessary to take a train
halfway to Paris, disembark,and
change twice more before reaching the coast again.
If you have no place to stay in Paris, sleeping under the Seine
bridges is not nearly as bad as Victor Hugo would have you believe.
What you cannot do is spend thenight in a railway station. I attempted
that once in the Gare Austerlitz but was awakened at midnight by
A Guided Non-Tour
railway police. Thereis a vague belief that a Eurail pass allows its
holder to sleep
overnight in a stationif a train is due todepart early
A hostelling trip through Europe usually involves circular
a
route,
the next morning. I have never found any opportunity to do this a s
starting and finishing at the same
point. I offer this comment neither
boarding times are rarely earlierthan one hour before departure.
From France to the most likely point to enter Switzerland is at
a s suggestion or advice, only to mention that if there are time limits
Geneva. There aretwo large hostelsin this city and some verygood
on the amount of travelling you are able to accomplish, it
is the
onesalongthelake
(e.g.Montreux-Territet, one milefromthe
likeliest format to follow. Below I offer a hypothetical itinerary,
famous Castle of Chillon).I would say Switzerland has the best
qgain not a s a suggestion. Never let anyone tellyou what places you
should visit. The great fault of travel guidebooks is that too many
hostelling facilities in Europe and the most complete set of public
people read them. As a result they are in large measure responsible
services available, both for hostellers and others. Near the
skifor creating tourist attractions and quickly ruining the charm of
school centre of Andermatt, a local train was not running one day.
places they seek to praise. Sooner or later you will want to go
The station-master’s wife assisted by driving van-loads of
somewhere relatively free from
busloads of gawking sightseers and
passengers into town. Whether she volunteered her services or was
duty-bound to,it was anactiontypical
of theSwissattitudeto
pairs of obese middle-aged cameramaniacsfrom
New Jersey in
efficiency. In Lugano, aresort complex shares its facilities with the
lHlllllllllllllllull~nn~~~nllln~ull~lllllllllllnlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll~
youth hostel and reservations are recommended. Berne, Geneva,
t
.Zurich and Basleall haveinexpensivestudentrestaurants.
An
r:
.
.attempt appears to be made to situate them very close to hostels.
Dueto anumber of requests,thisarticlehas
E
Large helpings of food can be expected.
From northern Switzerland
one may go north towards Bavaria and
=
.
been reprintedfrom the July 20, 1972 issue
*
Munich or west to Basle and down into the German Rhineland. With a
=
Eurail pass a free boat trip from Stein-am-Rhein to Schaufhausen,
of the Martlet.
Switzerland is available.The
largestwaterfallinEurope,the
5
Rhinefalls, are within walking distance of Schauffbausen. As
P
lr
I
I
N
N mentioned before, beyond crowding there should be no real
-
--...-
.
I
I
(
I
-
.
I
0
‘
e :
0
’
Hostelling anywhere can be a satisfying, education experience.
With that in mind, your presumptuous author
would like to make some
suggestions for concentrating on making it that way.
1, Cook, your own meals whenever possible.
2. If you arrive ina new country at an ungodly hour or on a public
holiday,have somenegotiablecurrency with you. Neverchange
travellers cheques anywherebut in a bank unless you a r e in a place
which hasathrivingblackmarket.
Money exchanges at railway
stations a r e open Sundays and holidays.
3. Make a noteof your Canadian medical insurance number before
you leave. If you have to be sick, tryand arrange tohave it happen in a
country with socializedmedecine.
At least you will receive
treatment before the doctor’s bill come$.
If you break any laws or have personal difficulties which cannot be
resolved without the aidof Canadiandiplomatic authorities,know that
consulates and embassies maintain regular office hours. They are
not open twenty-four hours a day or on weekends.
5. Purchase a copy of the Youth Hostel Handbook for Europe. It
contains detailsof all hostelsand locates eachon a map. Essential if
you a r e travelling in winter a s many hostels a r e not open every day.
6. Beware of so called ‘‘StudentHostels”. These arenot members
of theInternational YHA. Prices may differlittlefromregular
hotels.
7. Never buy a first-class railway ticket. An unnecessary expense.
If you a r e spending the night on a train, coach and sleeper-car
reservations have to be booked at leasttwenty-four hours in’advance.
8. ObtainanInternationalStudentsIdentityCard.These
are
available for two dollars from the General Office in the UVic SUB.
Good luck.
Youth Hostels
There are more than 3200 youth hostels in
Europe
There are about 50 CYHA Hostels in Canada
More than 120 people have joined the hostels
association in Victoria since September.
Information from the head office of the British
100
hostelsorganizationindicatesthatabout
Victorians have
joined
overseas in
recent
months.
TheVictoriaoffice
is operating with “the
assistance of an OFY Grant. Located in Room
106,1951 Cook Street it is open all day Tuesday
throughS-aturday andMonday,
Thursday and
Friday evenings from 7-9 p.m.
’
.
University
e r o s s 4 a n a d a s u r v e vof
a.high s t y l e .of living
by don humphries, c.udp.
*
residence. Itwas
extensivelyshouldhavebeenreinvested
and
with
university between$50,000 and $70,000.
From coast to coast university agreement
presidents livehigh on the hog and of3cials allowing students to Carrigan possessesan American renovated to accomodate theUNB used to help pay off the interest.”
hasalso decided
decidethefuture
structure of Expresscardcourtesy
are
reluctant
to reveal
their
of the law school. When the law schoolTheuniversity
the
out,
theirorganization. In arecent
salaries.
university. He has twe cars but moved provincial
referendum,students
voted to the nature of his expenses government rente8 the building
III St.John’s,
Newfoundland,
...is
fees
retain
StephenLord Taylor,Memorial compulsory
arrangement is unknown. Only before buying it.Sommerville
collection.
University’s retiringpresident,
2,600 full-time students attend St. House currentlyhouses the New to give president Andersona
Brunswick
Development
brand
new car.
Taylor
his Mary’s.
will soon
be
giving
up his tendered
Corporation.
Officials
University
at the
of
resignation in late
January,
specially-constructed mansion to
TheboardmadethedecisionToronto,Canada’s
largest and
effective August 31. by the time
return to Britain where he is a
it certainly
despiteaprojected
$3,000,000mostinfluential
university, are
the
students’
occupation had
member of the House of Lords.
‘l’hedecision of the University deficit
for
UNB next year.
reluctant
to
release
any
ended, Taylor had lost the support
came
Tayldr
Lord
to
The
story
of board’s
the information
concerning
the
Newfoundland in 5966 with a tenof not onlystudents, but also other, of New Brunswick (UNB) board of
by the salaries of faculty members. But
year
contract
reported
to
be top administrators and even some governors to spend $92,000 on a decisionwasbroken
new mansion for new
UNB
Brunswickan,thestudentit
is known that U of T’spresident
worth $30,’000 annually.
regents.
president John Anderson has met newspaper at UNB. In amajorJohnEvansreceivesatleast
his
lordship’s
After
At theUniversity
of Prince opposition from students and thc editorial Brunswickan editor $50,000a year plus expenses. He
appointment,
university
the
E$ison Stewartattackedthreehastheuse
of a 1972Buickand
Edward Island (UPEI), president community.
expropriated a majestic
old house
Themansion, in anexclusive
studentmembers who voted forlives
in amansion in Toronto’s
near the campus formerlyowned Ronald Baker collects a salaryof
the
One student
exclusive
Rosedale
section
by a doctorand demolished it. The $34,500 per year. He lives in a area of Frederickton, is the purchase.
former
residence
of
a
Supreme
member,
Ken
De
Freitas
who
was
valued
at not less than $100,000
$70,000
house,
complete
with
doctor was unwilling to sell, but
Justice,
former
New a de1,egate to lastDecember’sandpossiblyas
high as $200,000.
maid
service,
wall-to-wall Court
the university used its powers of
Brunswick
premier
Louis
conference
of
Canadian
Evans,
former
Dean of
carpeting,
paid
utilities
and
expropriationto get the
house and
and
former University Press, seconded
Medicine
the
at
MacMaster
$200
a Robichaud,
paidleastat
$100,000 upkeep. He pays only
Governor
Wallace
University,
assumed
office
in
motion to buy the mansion.
month, whileUPEI students must Lieutenant
compensation. \
. The
pay more than $250 per month to Bird. The assessed tax value of
Saint
John
Mayor
Robert
November,
1971.
When his
Lockhart,
board
amember,
appointment
was
announced,
university thenpaid a’ similar live in a campus residence room. the property is only $55,169.
The
university
bought the attacked
the
purchase
as Evans said
the only compensation
amount to demolish the house
and Baker also receives a generous
mansion from Richard Bird, son “extravagent”.
Lockhart
he requested was for Ontario
build anothermansion
closely expense account and a car.
Baker’s salarywas secret until of Wallace Bird. By coincidence considers
the
payment
“an
Health
Insurance
Plan
(OHIP)
resembling the old one.
he
lose.
He
Duringtl#construction period, the UPEI ‘student paper, The Dick Bird is anassistant law excessive amount when the billings would
professor at UNB.
university is in financial
claimed
billings
the
only
Lord Taylor stayed at the Hotel Cadre, released the information
The UNB administrationsold
the only amounted to $25.
difficulty. ’ He was
Newfoundland with expenses paid in its February 16, 1973 edition’
along with the salaries of all other Sommerville House, the former board member
to
oppose
the
The
University
of Waterloo
by the university.
purchase.
student
demanded
hascouncil
th_e
faculty residence of Lord Beaverbrook,
‘
,Tayloris leaning Newfoundland administrators and
to the provincial government for
Theboard’sdecisionhasalso
expulsionof universitypresident
editor,,
Cadre
a s a direct
result
of his members.
money for the drawn criticismfrom A1 Rioux, BurtMatthewsfrom his $125,000
1 attempt’#@, destroy Carol Patterson, was threatened $92,000to raise the
president’s new home.
Lord
an Alumni Council member in mansion.Thecouncilwantsthe
union by chvincing with expulsion and a lawsuit for
donated
the
charge of fund raising.“Thoseproperty
sold and the money
’ the
Board of Regents to printing the information, but the Beaverbrook
residence to the university with who
understand
business
returned
to university’s
the
.threats didn’t materialize.
compulsory
discontinue
it
be used transactions know its nota good budget.
David
Owen
Carrigan, the understanding would
collection of student fees.
move,” Rioux says. “At this
Michael Oliver,
Carleton
president
of
St.
Mary’s a s an official residence for the
stage with the university having a University’s
new president, has
University at Halifax, receives a president.
But Sommerville House has $750,000 deficit the money from been an expensive proposition for
$30,000 a year salary.He lives in
aten-roommansionvalued
at neverbeen used a s a presidental‘ the sale of Sommerville House the centre of englishacademic
days
until
they
reached
an
...
...
‘
I
8
One day someone acquainted
parity, mutual veto basis in the
rl?sults before September
1. This
selection of a candidate.
they did and Strand was released. with the U Vic student paper, the
Martlet, was reading.;a copyof
After
several
weeks of The Board’sprecipitousaction
meetings,
faculty-student
the
was interpreted by ob6ervers a s a Popular Mechanics and saw an ad
...way 0..
for
College in
search committee produced only successfulattempttoget
new Blackstone
Chicago. Thead informedthe
one
name,
Strand.
students
before
they
had
a
chance
U of A, ReGna
Campus
reader aboutBlackstone’smail
At that
time
the
student to weigh the merits of the case.
Principal John Archer makes
degreecourses.Itjust
members
charged
their
faculty
Strand’s
most
infamous
move
$32,000 ayear. Theuniversity
thatBrucePartridge
counterparts had refused either
was thewholesale purge of the
has just provided him with a new seriously
any Political
from
to consider
Science-Sociology- obtained his degree
house
worth
$50,000.
Last candidate otherthan Strand or to Anthropology(PSA) department.
Blackstone
College.
When the
summer the board of governors meet with the candidate proposed
Martlet broke the story waves
the
Progressive
PSA
faculty
voted $80,000 for the new house by the students. They also said
members
and
students could be heard crashing through
close to the campus.
They sold
Victoria’s academic community.
todemocratic
established
his old house but strong the faculty was preparing
governing structures in which all But the wavesquicklysubsided
if students
objections arose and the board revoke the student veto
attempted to exercise it.
dmecisions had to be approved by into ripples, until Partridge made
decided to “pull-back”.
The
Two of the five student general student and faculty the mistakeof firing threefaculty
university spent only $50,000 of
members.
membersrefused to meetings.Thedepartmentalso
the $80,000 allocated. Archer has committee
while
the oriented academic
work
endorse
Strand,
its
a “healthy” expenseaccount that
majority
gave
a reserved toward serving exploited groups
..living
is reported not to have an upward
approval on the condition Strand’s in B.C. society rather thanthe
limit.
term of office wouldnot exceed usual
“value-free”
social
Dr. T.C. Jain, an assistant
Meanwhile, 32 untenured one year, that he would function science, which rationalizes
chemistry professor,applied for
faculty members will be fired at with theadvice
of anelected
existing
social
conditions.
the end of this academic year at student advisory committee, and
tenure but did not receive his
Strand’s principal hatchetman
Regina.
department’s recommendations
that
under
no
circumstances
was
Dean
of
Arts
Dale
Sullivan.
The life styleof the University
because of “incompatibility”.
of Alberta’s top officials is not would he stand for the permanent Stranddeclared trusteeship over Apparently Jain did not see eye to
the PSA department and helped eye with other members of the
known because all information is presidency.
Although
Strand
agreed
to
the
Sullivan
name
people
the
to
department. He appealedtothe
secret and students have not been
conditions, no studentadvisory
trustee
positions.
He Faculty
able to discover any details.
Advisory
Committee
was
recommendedtotheboard
of which
great... .
For $40,000 ayear
Kenneth committee established
(FAC)
unanimously
during
his term
as
Actinggovernors
rescinding
sections
of
David Strand rules his loyal
recommended
Jain
Th; University of Manitoba
be granted
the SFU Statement on Academic
President.
subjects atopBurnaby Mountain.
tenure.
Partridge
refused
to
administration
always
has
Freedom
and
Tenure
which
out of Canada’s
refused to reveal budget
its
to the Takingapage
accept
it.
guaranteed open appeals to fired
direction,
Simon
public, with the consent of every economic
J.P. Graff,
a
philosophy
m o m t o make...
faculty and hecalled for the firing
Fraser University
hired
a
provincialgovernment
everto
lecturer, wasrecommended by
When
he
first became of three PSA professors without both the philosophy department
genuine native-bornAmerican for
hold power. This situation lasted
President, one of his comments hearings.Theboardapproved
and Faculty
theAdvisory
until the U of M Students Union President in 1968.
Stranddid his undergraduate was, ‘‘I judgethings on what I both recommendations.
Committee for promotion
to
released the salaries of the top84
assistantprofessor.Partridge
administrators and professors in work at Washington State think about when I’m shaving.
mm.Qm..
refused.
its student handbook last University and obtained his M.S. When I’m teaching, I think about
and Ph.D. at Wisconsin. During my next class ... When I’m doing
September. All
84
receiveat
Dr.
William
Goede,
an
A s result,
a
the
Canadian
his student years he was on the administrative work in the
least $25,000 a year.
assistant English professor, was
of
University recommended for tenure by both
regional executiveof the National university, I tend to think about Association
Dr. ErnistSirluck,
U of M
(CAUT)
placed
SFU the department and the FAC.
Teachers
President, receives a salary of Students Association. During his the coming meeting.And now that
I’m President, I think about how to under censure and advised Partridge refused.
$52,500 along with a $4,000travel period of office the Association
against
anyone
accepting
began receiving funds from the keep from cutting myself.”
After CAUT investigatedthe
a allowance,
employment there because of a situation and recommendedthe
Central
Intelligence
Agency
A
permanent
presidental
entertainmentbudget,a$4,200
(CIA).
cases be settled by “academic
search committee, establishedin lack of academic freedom.
living allowance and $7,500
a
AsofMarch 31, 1972, Strand’s tribunals”,
Strand cameto SFU in 1966 a s a 1969, recommendedthatStrand
house expense budget. On top of
Partridge
refused
economicsthat, the university purchasedand professor in the
be released from his pledge not to annual salary was !40,000 a year. CAUT
and
responded
by
He also
received
$11,275 in censuring Partridge.
commerce
department
with premanent
a thefor
renovated
a
largethree-story
stand
Strand
lives
in the
specialty in labour management
mansion for Sirluck’s exclusive
presidency so the search expenses.
Goede is currently employed by
residence
on CAUT and resides in Ottawa.
use. The price tag is estimated at and human resources. Strand was committee could propose him as President’s
I3urnaby Mountain rent-free.
in its candidate.
named
Acting-President
well $100,000.
overThe
Speaking aat
Knights of
Constructioncost of the house in Columbus meeting some months
university is alsoreported
to August 1968, following the
Despite
protests
from
the
1966 was $54,966. There is no later,
have had a hand in acquiring the
Canadian
Association
of originalstudentcommitteethat
Partridge
took the
president’s new Mercedes Benz University Teachers (CAUT) Strand’s pledge had been made assessed value on it now because opportunity to boastof how he had
the university pays no taxes.
censure of the administration and only tostudentsthroughtheir
280-SE.
succeeded in getting rid of the
One of the most infamous and dissidents from UVic.
University of Saskatchewan board
of
governors
for
elected representatives, theSFU
reknowned university presidents
Partridge officially left UVic’
President John Spinks lives in an “continued interference into Board of Governors’ initiated a
law on January 31,1972 with $72,000,
old stone mansion overlooking the academic affairs,” and over the faculty
referendum
which is presentlyafirstyear
student at the
University
of gift
from
athe
Board
of
resignation
of then endorsed Strand.
South Saskatchewan River. U of S forced
British Columbia.
Bruce Governors for leaving with four
Patrick
McTaggartstudentscall
themansion
and President
A student referendum was then
of years left in his contract.
Cowan. (McTaggart-Cowan is scheduled for the third week of the Partridge,formerpresident
surrounding
well-kept
grounds
The new President, Hugh
currently head of theScience
“Sphinx’s Palace”.
1969 fall semester to ask students the University of Victoria (U Vic),
lived in a $110,000 mansion and Farquhar receives in excess of
Council of Canada)
The university administration
his
to release Strand
from
Inan effort to democratize the promise. But before the summer receivedasalary of $35,000 plus $35,000 plus expenses. But the
refusestoreveal
any salaries,
expenses. In 1971-72,the last mansion is now used a s an official
university’s
decision-making semester was over, theboard
but some information has leaked
year
of Partridge’sthreeyear
reception and seminar facility by
moved to announced its intentiontomail
out. Spink is known to make more process, thefaculty
expenses
totalled
the university. Farquhar lives in
than Dean of Graduate Studies Van elect its own President, allowing ballots to all registered students presidency,
his own house.
to
participate
on a immediately, and to present the $9,905.
Cleave who receives $45,000 a students
After Partridge
left,
CAUT
decided
to
censure the UVic.
board because it refused to take
any actions togivethe
three
professorsafairhearing.
The
NDP provincial government has
announced it intends to establish a
commission on education and to
redraft the
University
Act.
Reliable sources i n Victoria have
learned CAUT and the NDP are
currently negotiating to obtain a
solutionto the problem at UVic.
From coast to coast it is plain
that
only
through
the
determination of studentsthat
anything is known about the life
styles of Canada’s
university
headmen. We hope students will
continue in thequestfor
open
decision-making and find out how
much in is being wasted in
universities and colleges across
excellance
Nation’s
thein
Capital. A s part of the deal
enticing Oliver from his position
as vice-president(academic) at
McGill University,
Caleton
created two vice-presidental
positions.
Each
position
is
reportedtocost
not less than
$50,000 per year.
official
The
reason
for
increasing. administrative costs
by $100,000 is to relieve Oliver
from work to allowhim to become
better acquainted with faculty
members. The$100,000will also
provide him with assistants who
already have a good knowledge df
theuniversitytoenable
him to
savetimeadjustingtothe
new
position.
Oliver’s official residence at1
Linden Terrace was purchased
for $80,000 and extensively
renovated. The university bought
the houseand will allow Oliver to
purchase it for its original price
when he retires or is fired.
A new car was tossed in as part
of the deal.
..a
year. How muchSpink exactly
makes is open to rumour.
::&
IO
Rugger Season Ends
not have quite thesame calibreof
players, as in the past, its
membership makes it by far the
mostpowerfulsportingclub
on
campus, and next year with a
large number
of
players
returning, the Vikings a r e likely
to become a power once again:
Young players such a s Laurie
Garett, Gary Cameron, Br$
Johnston, and John Buchanan will
be the ones to watch in the future..
on
several
six years, and underestimated
The rugby club has thrived campus for the last
and,
he was an important figurebehind occasions by otherclubs,
again thisyear,
fielding
four
teams, theVikings, Norsemen, the explosion of rugby talent and have so far won three games in
local league play.They still. have
success which
made
the
Saxons and Jutes. TheVikings
have not had a glorious year for University. of Victoria the a chanceof making the play-offsif
one reason or another. Most strongest club in British they win their last league game.
importantlythe
young players, Columbia and Canada up to two Their amazing success stcry is
years ago. Calton, who announced largely due to efforts of playing
have not beenableto
fillthe
coach Ian McLean who has done
vacuum created by the exodus of his retirement from coaching- at‘ yeoman service on and off ‘the
the
beginning
of
this
season,
has
many veteran players two years
ago. Playersfresh out of high not been spared by the critics, and field.
reproach
TheSaxons and Jutes have had
school have had to contend with indeed is notbeyond
it
coaching
to
the
usual
mixture of hilent,
thegrowing strength of senior when comes
rugby throughout
Victoria.
In techniques. However he has taken inexperience, and ineptitude, and
and thoughboth
sides have slhown
large part this is due to the high condemnations
disappointments
a
s
cheerfully
as signs of respectability, they have
calibre of rugby played by our own
graduates, who have now come any man could, and has worked not been able to come up with a
tirelessly to uphold the standard
back to haunt us. As coach Ian of rugby on campus. A player who sustained effort, themain reason
McLean of theNorsemen says, deserves special mention at this being that all their best players
weretaken
by Norsemen and
“you can’t send boys on a man’s time is Viking captainGaither
Vikings
a
s
the
season
errand,” and thathas been the Zinkan
who
has
added
plight of rugby on campus for the respectability to the Vikings,and progressed. Viking playerNeil
last two years. Despite their his hard workand
outstanding Bonnell offeredtohelp Howard
were
inability
to
win games, the play earlier this year
Gerwing with the coaching of the
Vikings have overcome many rewarded when he was selected to junior teams; the result being
problems
this
year,
and the play for BritishColumbia against tremendous . enthusiasm and
players who have persevered and the New Zealand All Blacks.
spirit shown by these two te:ms.
played for the Vikings have a lot to Lack of matureplayersalso
Neil hasplayedlonger
for the
who amazingly Vikings than any other player:
be proud of.
One
who
has hurt the Norsemen
persevered the hardestis the finished ahead of the Vikings in five years, but the Vikings will
coach Ray Calton who has thrown theleague. Ruu off the parka
have to play against him from now
couple of times, earlier in the on a s he graduates this year.
his back and heart into the game.
were
Calton has coached rugby oh the year, the gorsemen
Although the ruebv club dol?S
Inyom.mnway
In your own time.
On your own terns.
.yOu’II take to the
taste ofH ! e &Filter
Speedy WingerRick Rollins was
one of the fewbright spots for the
Rugby Vikings this year.
Tan Only $35.00
VHTORiA.
1324 Douglas
Open Thursday and Friday Nites
C.O.D. orders accepted.
Credit and Chargex cards honored
VIWCOUVER
776 Granville-Adam’s AppleBoutique
435 W. Hastings; 542 Granville St
and
Guildford Town
Centre1
Warning: The Department of National Health and Welfare advises that danger to health increases with amount smoke
I
+“Desipn md
Word
Trade M a r k s i n Canada of the Villager Shoe Shoppe Ltd.”
r-
-
-.”
”-7”
-
AMSW Awards Won
As special feature this week,
the AMSW (AssociatedMartlet
Sports Yriters) have announced
their selections for
individual and
teamawards:
Due to massive
public response,
the
voting
categories
includes
of
outstanding performances a s well
as those performances of major
disappointment.The
results of
this poll a r e a s follows:
(A) Outstanding Performance:
1. Male athlete of year:
MurrayFindlay, VikingHockey
goaltender, with honourable
mention Gaither
to
Zinken,
Rugby; Brent Mullin, basketball;
Peter Mason, soccer; Roger
Ruth, track and field.
2. Femaleathlete of year:
Lorna McHattie, basketball
Vikette, with honourable mention
toJanetWilliams
and Jennie
Terpenning,field hockey; Anne
Langdale, track and field.
3. UVic team of theyear:
VikettesBasketballteam,
who
finishedsecondto UBC inwhat
was considered a rebuildingyear.
Honourable mention goes to the
Viking soccerteam and men’s
volleyball team.
4. Coach of theyear:Janos
Herb, who took our volleyball to
the CWAA finals. Honourable
mention goes
to
Mike Gallo,
on campus thisyear. Reasons for
failure
this
partially
are
reflected in the worst coastof the
year category.
4 . Coaching Award:
Ray
Calton, Viking rugby coach, wins
this award unanimously. Though
low
on
talent
to
draw from,
Calton’s complacent
often
(B) MajorDisappointments:
attitude did nothing to supply the
1. Male individuals:
Jim
Vikings withthe desire and hustle
Wenman, who wasexpectedto
which was s o badly needed.
lead the Vikingrugby team this
5. Antagonists of theYear:
year,suffered
an on-again-offThis award is given to the team
againseason,due mainly toan
assortment of “ailments” and thatdid the mostto reducethe
injuries.Dishonourable mention respect of IJVic athletics in the
eyes
of
collegiate
other
to ChrisHall,
who wasoften
dispirited and inconsistent in his competition, Our choice this year
basketball
shoes,
and Scott is the Vikinghockey team, who
Munro, who was just plain awful often gavetheimpressionthat
as a hockeyVikingand
should they weremoreconcerned with
improving
pugilistic
their
consider hanging up hisskates
prowess rather than their hockey
before he cuts himself.
2. Femaleindividuals:There
skills. Hon’3urable mention goes
is littlereasontoisolate
any toyour truly, the sports editors,
particular female athlete
a s being who often went slightly overboard
worthy or unworthy of mention in presenting the darker side of
UVic athletics. Nothing written
here. The
poor
performances
turnedin by most womens teams about any team or individual was
a personalbasis,
hut
were
basically
the
result
of doneon
rather we’re just firm believers
overall team lapses.
Te3.Teamperformance: You in the good news - bad news
principle of journalism, while
would expectthe Vikinghockey
teamtotakethiscategory
in a also taking the spirit of sport in
landslide, but a critical $ye the true mannerto which it should
selects theViking Rugby team a s he intended.
being the major athletic disaster
Vikette basketball coach, and Ian
McLean, Norseman rugby coach.
5 . A special award goes to the
Vikettevolleyball team who, it
was felt bestexemplified the true
spirit
of
sportsmanlike
compeLition.
Viking Basketball
The UVic
Viking
Basketball they were not
consistent
team, as seems
to hethe casewith throughout the year in their play.
most UVic teams this year, had
Chris Hall and Mike Bishop led
what couldbe called a hot and cold the way with their rebounding and
season.
Unfortunately,
the
hot shooting through the early stages
streak was short, the cold far too of theyear,
hut tapered off,
long.
probably due to the heavy courseloads they were carrying.
Startingtheseason withhigh
The slack was then picked up by
hopes and visions of a conference
championship, theVikings played guard Corky Jossul and forwaFd
up to these illusions of grandeur Jim Hunter. Both of these players
by winning their first five games. worked tremendously
hardall
Cries of “bring on UCLA” could
year, hut i t wasn’tuntil after
be heard echoing through the Christmas that things started to
hangar they call home. There was go rightforthem.Jossul
and
good reasonforthisoptimism
Hunter were probably two of the
because included inthese wins bestplayers in theConference
of the year.
were two victoriesover highly- during the second part
Among the
reserves,
Pard
Conference
(later
rated
Champions) U.of Alberta Golden Hogeweide, Jim Duddridge, Dave
Bears.
Tooby, and Harry
Hunter
all
Leading the
conference
the
progressed throughout theyear
Vikes left the friendly confinesof and contributedgreatlytothe
the UVicgymand
journeyedto Vikings strong
finish.
The
UBC on Nov. 4 for what proved to performances of theseplayers
be the start of a disasterous augers well for the future of the
streak in which they lost twelve Viking team.
Although theirrecorddidn’t
consecutive
games
before
defeating the George Fox College indicate it, on the whole the
Bruins athome on Jan. 12, 64-60. .Vikings had a fairlysuccessful
Included in this streak ‘of games season. This was undoubtably the
(six at home, six on the road) were toughest schedule any UVic team
a s U. of
encounters with powerhouse hashad.Teamssuch
opponents such a s the defending Alaska and George Fox College,
to NAIA (small
Canadian champion - UBC who bothwent
eollege) playoffs, Portland State
Thunderbirds,
Portland
State
Vikings, and Western Washington Vikings who include among their
opponents the nationallyranked
State Vikings.
After their victory over
George Long Beach State Forty-Niners,
Fox, the Vikings showed some Western Washington State, Lewis
and Simon
, measure of respectibility by andClarkCollege,
Clansman,
winning eight out their last Fraser University
provide
always
tough
fourteen gamesincluding five out
competition.
their last six.
Looking ahead to next season,
Overall theVikings record was
13-18. At home they were 12 and 9 returning to the Vikingswill be
while on the road they had their Tom Holmes, HJim and Harry
ups and downs (maybe due to the Hunter, Pard Hogeweide, Jim
Dave
Tooby.
fact that they travelled with the Duddridge, and
-Vikettes),
finishing
with a,’.. , W s e players are expectedto
miserable 1 and 9 record.
form the nucleus
of the team that,
Individually, theVikings had’no God and the
Administration
player of any greatsize
and willing, (or a r e they one in the
lacked the aggressivenessneeded same) will eventually play in that
fora small team. Also, with the much talked about, planned,
exceptions of forward , Tom . tendered, but never constructed,
Holmes and guard Brent Mullin, physical education complex.
The schedule for the
Vikings in
the next fewyears doesnot appear
any easierfor including their
Conferencegamesthe
Vikings
haveplanned games in Oregon,
Alaska, ant1 aone week trip to
Hawaii. Also, there is a chance,
although very slim, of anall
expenses paid trip to Australia to
play that countriesnational team.
This would take place thiscoming
May and June.
Despite a dismal record, theViketteFieldhockvteam
hard, agg,ressive hockey.
played
Vikettes
Disappointing
Unfortunately, the fieldhockey year saw UVic winning one gam?
Vikettes have finished this year’s against U. of Sask. and narrowlv
season in fifth positionand outof a losing to Edmonton, Calgary, and
playoff position. Playing Evergreen
their TheU.B.C.
Conferencetournament held at
lastleaguegamelastSaturday
againstSandpiper I , they went U.B.C. only two weeks later saw
opponents
2-0 defeat, UVic trounceallher
home suffering
a
makingonly a 2 win and 1 tie with scores reaching as high a s
recordsincethefirstgame
in 11-0. Thistrip managed to pull
September.
Vikettes,
however,
the
team
together
after
what
seemed to he an unending stream
must be commended fortheir
excellentefforts in the last few of disappointingdefeats
in the
months. The fact that they would home league. On returning, they
not he in contention in the playoffs managed to soundly defeat
has been known for some timeand Mariners twice to knock them
even with this hanging over their foreverfromtheirfirstplace
heads, and knowing they had to standing which they had held for
play the number one teamtwice in the last two years.
a row in their last two games, the
A hearty thanksshould go to our
girls haveplgyetl some of their ever-patient and resoursefull
best and most rewarding hockey coach Craig Wilson. It took a lot
lately.
of courage to accept this position
A 1-1
tie
with the
leading
and even more to stick with it
Sandpipers in their first of two duringtheseason.
Throughout
meetings seemed to prove to the theyear he has donemuch
to
Vikettes and their few supporters improve, refine, and co-ordinate
just
exactly
what the playing eleven
very
different
playing
styles and create a happy, and
potential ant1 spirit of‘ this team
was. The Vikettes can and should much improved Varsity team.All
be proud of theireflortsthis
returning players a r e hopinghe
will be back with them next year-season. Even
though
the
city
and those leavingwill be watching
league statistics do not
show
much the seccess,
with anticipation to see what next
Intercollegiat resultsshould.
year will bring. We a r e confident
The tripto Edmonton early, in the it will bring success
[:
Hoekey Vikings Out
The athletic
directorate
at
University of Victoria
has
decided to zuspend the operation
of a collegiatehockey entry in the
Canada We:;t C\ollegiateHockey
Conference. This decision came
as a result of the administration
feeling that the amount of money
needed to support a hockey team
in a conference such as this was
more than could-be justified.
As a result, theVikings will be
competing next year in a lower
Vancouver Islandmen’sleague
with games most probably taking
place at Esquimalt Arena.
It is unfortunate
that
this
decision had to be made, but
expense of competition in the
Canada West Conference was too
large aproportion of available
athletic funds.
Had the
performances of the Vikings been
of a higher standard,
then perhaps
UVic
would
he returning
to
collegiate hockey again next year.
One of the factorswhich made the
Vikings appear a s inept as they
often did was the excellent
calibre
of competition in their league.
The Vikings wereledonce
again this year by Captain Dave
Cousins, who, along with such
other stars asBill Collins, Scott
Munro, and more
definitely
MurrayFindlay,came
upwith
severalsparklingefforts.
It is
hoped that players such as these
find home
a
with someother
university so that they may
maintain promising
their
collegiate hockev careers.
The new athletlcs complex
scheduled
to be completed next year at U Vlc
will provide
facilities
the
necessary for the development of
several campus sports. These do
not include however, any skating
facilities, so it appearsUVic will
have to wait until this complex is
expanded or until Bobby Orr
retires to Victoria before
we will
be able to rejoin inter-collegiate
hockey competition.
Soccer Team Close
UVic Vikmgs continued their
quest towards dominance of the
Island Socc:er League with a
convincing 3-0 victory
over
Nanaimo Coalshafters.
In thefirst half the Vikings
fought against a stiffwind, but did
manageto
tally on aGordini
Manzini shotfrom
twenty-five
yards out.
Dave “Watch yourhubcaps”
Achurch provided thrills galore,
a s he madeseveral brilliant dives
to prevent Nanaimo shots from
scoring.
The redundant Gordini Manzini
came back in the second forty-fivethese two wins would give them
minutes topump in another of his the league championship.
So comeout,Thursdaynight
long drives. Ted Evans,coming
in to the game late in the second and find out why Alex Nelson is
out
half, lay a finepass to the always called“TheChief”.Find
to
Ross
ubiquitous Peter Mason, who what “Q.R.” means
wasted no time in beating the Hub Woodland. Find out why the boys
.inthe shower sax;J.T. Bonetti is
city goaler.
This Thursday, March 29th, at the best dribbler on @e team. And
Royal Athletic Park, 7:30 p.m., see how chunkey Doug Puritch
really is.
the Vikings facethe OakBay
That’s Thursday night, March
squad in a game crucial in‘ the
finalleaguestandings. If Vikes 29th, 8 p.m. at Royal Athletic
should beat the Bays, their final’ Park under the lights. And bring
Polaroid.
.
game would be against thepowder. your
puff Courtenay (0-17) team, and
I t
Women’s Volleyball
This year was UVic’s best
showing inthe WCIAAsince 1968.
(We placed
second
overall.)
Duringthe yeartheteamplayedin
ten tournaments and placed in the
top three teamsin seven Of those
tournments.
PRE-CHRISTMAS:
Reynolds Invitational
Bellingham Invitational
Calgary
Portland Invitational
UVic Invitational
4th
Open
1st
1st
1st
3rd
Team members had to pay
part of their
expenses
on 2
occasions(Port1andand Calgary)
and all their expenses to Ottawa
for
the
Canadian
Open. A s a
result only 7 players could afford
to go to Ottawa (Only 4 of those
werestarters). The men’s and
women’s teamraised $700 to help
send these 7 by having abottle
POSTCHRISTMAS:
UBC Invitational
3rdInvitational
CWIAA (1st half at UVic)
CWIAA (2nd
half
at
Lethbridge)
3rd
B.C.
Canadian Open
Upeoming
Sports Events
Action in CWAA Tournament
which typified
the
spirited
performance
of
Volleyball at Uvic.
Women’s
Rowing
This Saturdaywill
see some Lure;
Lake. Beginning at 9:00 a.m. on
the 31st, theUVic Women’s crew
will be hosting Pacific Lutheran
University for two races. In the
coxed fours UVic will be
represented by Cox, Nancy
Alexander;
Stroke,
Kathy
Francis; No. 3, h a d e Lure; No. 2,
Anne Kilduff; and Bow, Pat
McLellan.
hurt
the
The UVic men’s volleyball Lundeen seriously
Women’s Rowing is somewhat
team had its most successful year Vikings chances and theyagain
of anovelty in this part of the
University
of
finished second to Calgary. Greg world, but the
ever under Coach JanosHerb.
who have
Victoria has a fine crew,
Coach Herb introduced many new Russel showed greatcourage,
concepts of volleyball; many have playing a totalof eight games with been working out stoically over
the past 6 months.
Pacific
since been copied by other teams. a broken finger.
according
to
UVic
Without Lundeen and Russell, Lutheran,
His new methods and ideas took
time to succeed, since it was an the Vikings failed to qualify for coach Wayne van Osterhaut, has
Championship.
almost entirelynew system. A s a the Canadian
probably the best girls’ crew in
result, the Vikings played Nevertheless, both Lundeen and the Pacific NorthWest.
UVic
mediocre ball during thefirst few Russell were invited to try
out for however, shouldbe considereda s
months.Finally
in January,at
the
Canadian
collegiate
team
highly rated in Canada in view of
to
the recent results. In working up
Lethbridge, the Vikings displayedwhich will be travelling
Moscow this summer.
apotentattack
which ledtoan
.
totheCanadianChampionships
People who saw the volleyball
impressive second place finish
which a r e inSt.Catherine’s,
behind University of Calgary.
team
, were
undoubtedly Ontarioin mid July, the Victoria
Thesecondleg
of theInterimpressed by their styleof play. girls want to establisha s much of
Collegiates were at UVic before Without the crippling injuries,
the ascendancy
an
over
their
huge crowds. An injuryto Ken Vikings were serious contenders competition as possible.
for the
Canadian
title.
The
In the Eights, which will follow
success that was experienced can the coxed fours, the UVic crew
be attributedtotheoutstanding
will consist of Cox, Pat Kelly;
coaching of JJanos Herb. Without Stroke, Kathy Francis; 7, Vivian
Coach Herb, it would have been a Taylor; 6,Cathy Griffin;5, Ina de
dismal season indeed.
Men’s
Volleyball
Golfers
Win
Tourney
.-
Last week the UVic men’s golf
team won its own invitational
tournament
for
second
the
consecutiveyear.Thisyear’s
opposition were U.B.C., Simon
Fraser
University,
the
University of Puget Sound,and
Douglas College.
With only one member of last
year’s team back this season, the
six-man squad won convincingly
by thirteen shots. Playing on the
veryshort GorgeVale course,
UVic completedthe first day’s
play leading U .B.C. by 10 shots
and DouglasCollege by 15. The
following day at the very windy
Oak Bay course, scoresballooned
yet UVic was able to extend their
lead further.
With a 15 the first day and a 77
the second, Gordie Rands
won the
individual honors by four strokes
over LanceMacGregor of U.B.C.
and six shots
over
Dave
Thompson of UVic.
The other UVic scores were:
Ron Bell
n , a 4 - 162
Ken Floyd
16,84
- 160
Butch
Williams 78,90 - 168
Steve’ H a ~ B l e t o n87,85 - 172
,
4, Cathy Auburn;3,Gaileen
Bow, b a n a Both.
Having defeated the University
of Oregon last weekend, the UVic
girls should
provide
strong
oppositionforP.L.U.
in this,
their last meet before a month’s
lay off for exams.
Also on the programme on
Saturday morning willbe an inter
squad race between two UViC
Men’s Eights.
drive, a raffle,
and a T-shirt sale.
Once in Ottawa theteammet
moreproblems a s itsuffered
injuriesto two of its starters. (a
broken footand a sprained ankle)
This forcedus to default 2 games
and reduced our effectiveness for
the finalmatch. But the trip Was
an experience that the players
and
the coach will never forget.
6-4 record
2nd
but
2nd
overall
0-10
Awards Night
ThisFriday, March30th,
is
UVic awards night. Tickets are
on saleat the S.U.B. and the
Athleticofficein jP’ Hut at $3.00
each. The bar will open at 7:30
p.m. and willbe followed by a
Smorgasbord
and
the
presentations
“Nucleus”
will
provide
the
music for what
promises to be a good party. It
will all be happening at
Craigdarroch College.
Ring Road Races
On Friday at 12:30lunchtime
the RingRoad
Races willget
mderway. A number of entries
have been received, but more a r e
welcome in all of the
three
categories. Sid Clarke’s Super
Lemon GT lookslikethe
hot
favorite for the
weird wagon race.
The Alumni Association
has
kindly donated some
very
attractive Copper and Pewter
beersteins
toaccompanythe
Trophies which goto the winners.
Entry forms are availableat
‘P’ Hut and the S.U.B. and
competitors will be able
to
register in front of the S.U.B. at
the time of the races. Ring Road
will be closed on Fridayfor
approximately half an hour.
Rugby
On Saturday at 1:00 p.m.the
on the
UVic Norsemen
take
University of Oregon. This game
willbefollowedat2:3Op.m.bythe
Vikings vs the
University
of
Oregon 1stteam, theDucks.
Vikings are 2 and 1 atthe moment,
having defeated U. of Washington
in Seattle, and winning over
Western Washington State by
default.Their only loss in the
Pacific. Northwest
Rugby Soccer
Conference has been to U.B.C.
Brain Hughes Soccer Vikings
Norsemen
meanwhile
are play Oak Bay under the lights At
strong contenders for the Div. I1 Royal
Athletic
Park
this
championship with a 3-0record.
Thursday evening, and then travel
They will, however,be without the Courtenay
to
.on
Sunday
to
services of full back Jim Wenman complete their league schedule.
who suffered a torn hamstring in Still with a chance of catching
last weekend’sVictoria
Rugby Cosmopolitan Royals who are in
Union game against Cowichan.
first place, the Vikings must win
their-remaining games.
L>~..7,;;*_Liw+\..
...A?.,
;rr
it
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-
-1
I3
Bad News For
Foreign Stu.dents
It goeson to explain thatthe period The employment visa is time
Since
January
1973
1, new
of admittancemust not exceed limited, specificto the particular
Immirratipn
regulations
have
post inwhich an individual is to be
months,
and that
this
controlled the employment of all twelve
visitors
to
Canada, without period may be extended by an employed, and i s no longer
applicabk if he changes jobs or
making any special provisions for Immigration officer for iurther
gets
a raise.
periods
not
exceeding
twelve
students who, unfortunately, now
It does not appear that the
Act i s
months.
fall in this general category.
restrictingself-employmentto
During
residence
his in
Section 35 (I) of
the
any greatextent, although this
non-immigrant,
the
Immigration Act deals with Canada,
also requires a visa.
unless
exempted
shall
not
engage
requirements which must be met
In view of the fact that many
by an individual in
order toqualify in employment unlesshe is in
According to a university
morally.
possession of a valid employment Universitydegreeprogrammes
for student entry into Canada.
regulation,in any course which
A simple pass, fail criterion
A part of that section states thatvisa or has permission to work extend for a period of three or four mcludes
laboratory
work,
for determiningwho may and may
years, employment restrictions students a r e required topassboth not write an exam i s too gross a
a person may be allowed to enter I from the Immigration Dept.
are particularly
harsh
when 1:helab and lecture parts of their distinction to make according .to
In order
to
obtain
an
the country, if “in the opinion of
applied to self-financed students. studies.
employment visa
Immigration
animmigrationofficerhehas
Hayward.
sufficient financial resources to must first be assured by Canada Improvements to this section of
Failure to pass lab
work means
A regulation
stating
that
maintain
himself
and
any Manpower that a Canadian citizen the Act wouldseem tobe in order. 1:hat the student concerned i s not studentsbelowthe 33rdpercentile
On the
expiration
of non- allowed to
immigrant
is not
dependents
accompanying
him or landed
sit
for the
final
wouldnot be allowed to .write
during the period for which he is available or cannot be employed immigrant status, the individual examination.
finals would be fairer, h e argues.
mustreportto
an Immigration Dr. John Hayward of Biology says
in that specific post.
admitted a s a student.”
Hayward says the department
Officer and w i l l be deemed to be
110 decision
has
been made i s operate
forced
to
in
seeking:. entry to Canada. Since
whether or not toenforcethe
contravention of the
rule.
immigrantvisas cannot now be ,rule- when examsstart
next Yesterday he told the Martlet
issued in Canada, the graduating month.
decision will be made soon on how
student
must
return his
to
“This is a threat that has tobe Biologywillview the regulation
homeland in order to gain entry students”,
lnade
to
says this year.
into Canada.
13ayward,. who informed
the
“In my opinion thatcalendar
In a statement issued Dec. 28, Martlet that his department has
regulationdoes
not mean too
That’swhat youhave todo if you want to geta decent education
1972 Manpower and Immigration not barred people from taking much”, says Harry Dosso, head
here atthe degree mill. It’s necessary to plan ahead too. But
Minister Robert Andras said the finals in the past two years.
of the Physics Department.
sometimes the professors you a r e looking forward to taking
intent and effect of the new laws i s
He says that
instead
of
Dosso notes
that
Physics
classes from aren’t‘ available
One of the reasonsis that faculty
to“controlthe
employment of
‘abusing studentsin any way, we students must besuccessfulin
a r e entitled to take sabbattical leaves after every six years of
visitors
to
Canada” and to have been overly nice to them”
by
both lab and lecture Sections. of
teaching.
“provide greater convenience to letting the university rule go by
courses in order to pass.
Here is a listof peoplewho won’tbe at UVic next year for this
the overseas travelling public.”
the board.
Chemistry
Department
reason.
He wenton to say that these
Hayward says lab instructors
Chairman Alfred Fischersays
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
regulations will be beneficial to
make a point of informing “We won’t be cutting off anyone
(on leave from July 1, 1973 to June 30, 1974).
the Canadian economy by making students
that
the
regulation,
who stands a chance of passing the
T. R. Warburton, Anthfopology-Sociology
more jobs available to Canadians. mentioned on page 68 of the final examination.”
R.G.B. Reid, Biology
view
In
of the
fact
that
current calendar, exists.
He termed the calendar rule “a
A.R. Fontaine, Biology
somewhat less than 36,000
In Hayward’s opinion the bit meaning’ ,”.
G.W. Bushnell, Chemistry
foreign students will be seeking presence of the “threat” forces
No infor-.l.lklon was avajlable
T.W. Dingle, Chemistry
jobsthissummer,Mr.Andras’
people to take lab
work seriously.
Biochemistry
the from
G. Shrimpton, Classics
statement appears to be of little
is Department at press time.
But hedoesadmitthatit
L.I. Bakony, Economics
consequence when applied
to
difficult
to
enforce
the
law
R.F. Leslie, English
students a s visitors.
R.G. Lawrence, English
UVic Financial Aid Officer
N.C. Smith, English
Nels Granewall told the Martlet
F. Mayne, English
that University bursary help will
C.J. Partridge, English
beverylimitedbecause
of the
J.D. Peter, English
already heavy demands on these
J.G. Hayman, English
funds.
D.S. Thatcher, English
Granewall, also foreign student
T.L. Williams, English
advisor, i s in possession of the
P.J. Koster, English
new
regulations
and
is
G.H. Forbes, English
encouraging
inquiries
from
W.R.D. Sewell, Geography
foreign students.
R. Symington, Germanic Studies
“Amiable” is the word the (CUPE Local 917) and
the
The Act
will
respect
W.G. Shelton, History
employment visas in effect beforepresident of the union local Administration.
J.F. Kess, Linguistics
inside
Union President Don Thorndick
January 1,1973. These visaswill representing UVic’s
R.A. MacLeod, Mathematics
expire September15 of this year. workers is using to describe the says this week that “they appear
R.E. Odeh, Mathematics
with the to be going for our proposals.”
Marshal Burgessof the Student currentcontracttalks
W.P. Kotorynski, Mathematics
No details are available from
Placement Office says thatas yet Administration.
B.
Ehle,
Mathematics
.
Mrs. Edna Kowalchuk, head of him because
the
union and
hedoes noknowof
any UViC
J.M. Michelsen, Philosopyy
CUPE Local 951, said Monday University have mutually agreed
students without visasforthis
D.E. Lobb, Physics
night that the feeling
among union not to release statements on the
summer.
F. Cooperstock, Physics
Speaking to foreign studentson negotiators i s that everything is substance of discussions they are
R.J. Powers, Political Science
having.
campus itis evident thatthere are going well.
N.A. Swainson, Political Science
She i s hopeful that a settlement
Thorndick says a joint release
individuals without, visas. These
P. Duncan, Psychology
in time than it may be made when a settlement is
students risk deportation three will be reached less
G.A.Milton, Psychology
months after the expiry of their was two years ago, when the reached.
current
contract
came
into
Officials from917 go into their
visas.
(from July 1, 1973, to Dec. 31, 1973)
existence.
next bargaining session on
In a reply to a petitionfrom
0. Spreen, Psychology
In 1971, bargaining lasted from Wednesday.
seven foreign student groups
at
(from January 1, 1974 to June 30, 1974)
January to June.
McMaster
University,
Andras
W.H. Gaddes, Psychology
Theagreement
which came
has indicatedthathewillstand
EDUCATION
those
talks
expires
on
firm, make no changes, and give from
Edward Owen
Sunday.
consideration only very
to
Henry Timko
The next meeting between 951
exceptional cases.
Vance Peavy
The solutionseems to lie in the and theUniversitytakesplace
presentation of a bill which will ,4pril 4.
FINE ARTS
Progress is also being made in
exempt students
from
being
no study leaves
talks between the outside workers
classified as visitors.
courses are to be part of a BA
Liberal Arts programme.
These would have
subject
matter lying outside the
bounds of
what it offered by any
one
academic department and would
be planned by individuals rather
than through departments.
Discussion
of
the
recommendations may take place
at the April 11 Senate meeting, if
the Arts and ScienceFaculty
considers them before then.
The Law
of Science
Plan Ahead
s
UVic Union Talks
Progressing
Liberal Arts
bg bill meelrog
What s
9
Lawrence: I believe
that
the
Department of English in
administering its own qualifying
.”
-
-
exam on behalf of the whole
university is passing through far
too many.
D r . R.G. Lawrence is a native
Manitoba, UBC, Victoria College
and
His
professional
ofNew IBrunswick. He took his UVic.
BA and MA at the University of interests areseventeenth century
New Brunswick, and wenton to do . English Drama, and Canadian
furthergraduatestudiesat
the Literature.
University of London, and the
A s an Associate professor in
University of Wisconsin,
where
Department
the
of English,
he
he received his Ph.D. He has teaches English 200, asurvey
number
a taught
at
of courseinBritish Literature, and
438,
Canadian
Universities,
including English
Wisconsin,
Western
Ontario,
Literature.
There hasbeen much talk lately
part of the Administration
ibout theUniversity,
both its
strength and weaknesses. The
lrop in student enrolment might
seem to indicate that the students
%re dissatisfiedwith the current
xhcational programme here. In
x d e r to find out what some of the
Faculty might feel, theMartlet
jet up an interview with three
Faculty members, and asked
:hem
what
they thought about
:hesefactors. The following is
:he result.
In the
Martlet: What do you think the
roleof the University should be?
Smith: And yet, in so far as this
place is very smallin comparison
particularly with UBC, does itnot
offer
certain
advantages
tc
certain types of students, which
UBC by its very size is precluded
from doipg?
Lawrence: Yes, this is certainly
relevant, at first
and second year
level, but I’m thinking beyond that
point,
where,
a s the
pyramid
narrows, we have courses offered
to one student. Surely, something
like this is disadvantageous to the
student body as a whole, because a
disproportionate
amount
of
money goes into serving that one
student.
and this is somethingthatthe
students seem toenjoy. The role
should also be to try to maintain
the intimacy that exists on this
campus and to
maintain
and
improve
the
quality
of
programmes offered on this
campus.
Lawrence: I couldn’t agree with
you more. On the
subject
of
numbers and student-Faculty
ratios, but what we’re basically
talking about is economics. Any
Universitycanhavea
ratio of
eight students tooneprofessor, if
they can afford it.
Martlet: The University hasbeen
a
degree
Lawrence: I first thought about Smith: But this is true of all accused of being
graduate education though,as well granting mill. Do you think that
this in terms of thecommunity
this is a justifiable accusation?
and that there’s a good deal that
the
University
presently Lawrence: Not at UBC or Simon
Smith: To a certain extent, yes.
shouldn’t be doing in terms Of Fraser, 1 shouldn’t think.
There’s a social pressure on a
academic
pretentiousness
or Smith: Well, a graduate student
is certain
social
class
of
institutions mimicing
much more expensivethan
an adolescent to attenduniversity
considerably larger o r more graduate
student,
under
andhe simplydoes so because
advantageouslylocated.Things
therefore, why not abolish mommy anddaddy think that he
that we’re pretending to do well, graduate programmes.
should. Afterthat I think it is
but doing them badly. We should
lot to be basically the students fault. The
serve the local community better,Lawrence:There’sa
facilities do exist, the library is
Ithink, by offering more courses said for that.
very
good, many of the faculty a r e
that are relevanttoteachers,
Again I disagree.
very good, and theopportunity
civil servants, people who will Smith:
Political
like
exists for the student to change
use’ them here. We spend an Departments
enormous amount of energy in the Science or History that can utilizethis himself. I think the onusis on
him in this instance.
University of Victoria preparing theveryadvantageousposition
young people to go away and earn that the University of Victoria is Lawrence: I don’t
understand
i n relative to
the
Provincial
theirliving
somewhereelse.
your last sentence.The onusis on
shocking
get
to
fourth
year illiterates.
Legislature,
and
so
forth,
that
Simply becausethere’s awfully
the student to do what?
littleforspecialists, in almost these are areas which should be
deve!oped
thoroughly
and
any area of our training
Frances Smith is originally
in 1970. She is presently a Ph.D.
Smith: To get an education a s
processes forthe young people, to concentrated upon. If you take a opposed to just sitting here for
candidate at UBC, and is also a
from La Jolla,California, and
department like PoliticalScience four years in order to get a piece.
do here.
lecturer in the Political Science
received
her
A.B. from
the
and you just want courses in B.C. of paper at the end of it.
Department of UVic.
University
of
California
policy
h i t h : I completely disagree, in Government and public
She teachesPolitical Science
(Berkeley) in 1962. She then
is relative solely to B.C., Lawrence: 1 sawthequestion
which
fact,
with
what
you’ve
just
said.
I
taught high school in such places
200 (IntroductoryCourse),
310
aren’t you just turning out differently, would
don’t think that itnecessarily
and
have
as New Zealand and Vancouver,
(GovtsofUKand USA), 311 (West
individuals
who
are
quite
well
should
be
relevant
the
to
answered
yes.
The
University
B.C. While i n Vancouver,she
European
Govts)
and 343
community in that kind of sense. 1 informed in atechnicalsense,
has grantedfar too many degrees
became
Research
a Assistant
at
(International Organization).
about
one
topic,
but
are
not
think
very
antithat’s
a
of amediocresort.Thisfalls
UBC,and received her M A there
intellectual kind of approach in SO political scientists?
more on theshoulders
of the
farasthis is aUniversity
as
present faculty
than
on the
I think one can students shoulders. The student
opposedto a trade school. I feel Lawrence:
that one is losing contact with the combine the two. Obviously, the is going to takewhatever is given
rationaleforaUniversity,
by student who majors in B.C. to him, whetherit is an A + or a D-.
taking this kind of approach. I politics will also be obligedto
I’m much concerned about this
think what you’ve said is very true take courses in other areas, that in my own department.
The
for Camosun College, and places tell him what Canada is all about, Department of English is far too
of this
sort,
where
I think and maybe even a course i n the lax in standards.
continuingeducation is a good politics of Europe.
idea. But education, not trade Hean: My only comment is that Smith:Were you discussing the
standards question or the degree
orientated programmes.
the Universityhas tobe looked on granting mill question?
in conjunction with other
Lawrence: 1 wasn’tthinking in institutes of education within the
terms of simple minded things Victoria area, and it seems to me Lawrence: Samething.
like English 100 and Investments thattheUniversity
of Victoria, Martlet: I was trying to tie
the two
forthe Laymen, but I see far too should be making availablethe
together.
Such
as
the
tendency
to
many courses offered here that
bestqualityeducation,thebest
make the courses
easier
if
are super specialist ones. They programmes
of
education, insufficient numbersare passing.
are relevant to a University,
of whether specialist or noncourse, but they’re offered to a
specialist within the area. I think Lawrence:This is an unspoken
grand
total
of perhaps
three
I
that the University has to be the philosophy in theinstitution,
students, and.. .
social
academic
leader
of
the think. Because of the
in this pressures on the University as a
educationalinstitutions
imith: I think thatthosethree
in allsorts of
Henn: Unfortunately,
the
high university who shouldn’t be there
students
should
be served, part of the Province. The role of whole, totake
the
University
should
be
an
students
who
should
never have
at all.
schools are pushing people into
however, and it strikesme that this
beenadmitted in the first place.
k moving into the sort of cost- institution or facilitywherea
potential student in the local area Once they’re in, it’s
almost
Denefit analysis
approach
to
could get the sort of education he impossible for them to fail out,
active
in
campus
David Henn cameto UVic in moderately
?ducation.
wants, and of a certain quality.
unless they a r e incredibly lazy,
the
pastthree
1968 from England. He took his affairs during
B.A. andM.A. at the University of years. He is presently a lecturer Lawrence: They can be ever so I’m thinking also in terms of the or lose whatever feeble incentive
nuchbetterservedat
UBC or academic roleof the University. I they had when they came. Thus,
Durham, England,and then taught in the Departmentof Hispanic and
at
Studies,
and teaches
Simon Fraser where the facilities think the size is one advantage, they automatically get a degree
in the public schoolsystem and i n , Italian
or not a DLre better, and the total economic because I think that studests can theend,whether
Adult Education institutes. He Spanish 100 (Beginner’s), 260
situation is more advantageous get the kind of attention that they degree will do them any good in
has worked a s an interpreter for (Intro to the Literature of Spain
or not I
and Spanish America) and 412
br them to study their specialist might not get at a larger thecompetitiveworld
the BBC, and also in the sales
is
a
good
deal
don’t
know.
institution.
There
(20th
Spanish
Century
wogrammes
there.
administration at the head office
of Faculty-student
interaction,
of IBM (UK).
He has been Literature).
Wrong With uvic,9
passstudents who shouldn’t be I other departments. I believe that entrance
exam,
somebody’s
of English, in mother is going to becomeawfully
passed--as much because of theDepartment
competitive
situations
a s administering its own qualifying annoyed. Gradually this is going
anything. A s I see it through my exam on behalf of the whole to affect the English teaching in
prejediced eyes, I’m one of the university is passing through far the high schools.
less popular members of my too many. I could be critical of Lawrence:
There’s
another
some of my colleagues because
department because I demand a
interesting area related to this.
great dealfrom my students, and I’ve been thesecond reader of This is the courage of an
they drift away from me in mid- some of thequalifying exams.
administrationtostand
by its
What became obvious,wasthat
September in large
droves
instructors who are unkind
looking for easier sections and some of my colleagues don’tknow enough to fail potential university
easier courses. Only a few of the bad writing when they seeit.
students who bring in fees, who
most loyal are willing to remain There’s an even larger problem. add potentiallytothoseupper
If stern people like me fail more
and take their chances.
classes that arein such jeopardy
of the qualifiers, than presently, at the moment. etc. etc .....
what happens to them? Does that
Smith:
That
relates your
to
approach tothe relativeness of higher failure rate serve any
Martlet: Wouldn’t i t be better to
the university to the community, useful purpose even if its let anyoneintoUniversity,
but
and its shortageof funds. As long reflected back through the school just not let them out until they
as one is compelled to a certain system, which I suppose is a very have passedat a higher standard?
degree toplay the numbers game, naive hope on my part. Any
hATence: There’sa real danger
in order tokeepone’s
area of comments?
in that.
interest, and
not
find oneself
being takenfromyour
area of Smith: First of all, I think if you Smith : Yes, one gets tired of the
do fail more,as long as there is a
specialty simply becausethere
same student
who
keeps
isn’t a great enough enrolment, basket into which they fall once
in other words, abonehead reappearing in your course year
failed,
alsoitaffects
the department
afteryear.Aftera
while, you
itself. If its enrolment begins t o English course or something of
begin
to
wonder
why he in fact is
this
kind.
Non-credit,
drop, thell its establishment is
likely to suffer as well. So that presumably, which they are not teaching the course himself.
as aresult
of
there is a tremendous amount of forcedtotake
Lawrence: Back in the bad old
collrsepressure on an individual fai1ing;if they wish to stay and days, when theDepartment
of
carry on at the University.
to squeak people by.
English had very high standards, I
know
of
onestudent
who took
Lawrence: May I come back to Lawrence : We’ve kicked this English 200 seventimes,
and
around
a
great
deal,
what
you’ve
that economic point that I raised
failedseven times. But those
unkindly
called
a
bonehead
at the beginning?In a course that
were the badold days,letme
of three course, and one of the difficulties emphasize.
has in itapotential
Now, everybody
is
that
nobody
wants
to
teach
it.
students at the fourth year level,
passes.
or even at the graduate level,
what My colleagues dislike looking at
any kind of composition and this Martlet: How do you think we can
is the instructor of that course
most likely tobe tempted to do, to only accerbates theproblem in raise the standards here?
your third and fourth year levels.
Martlet: Doyou think that this
fail two of them? Certainly not.
There’s
awful
an
If the student has been unlucky in Smith:
whole process could be one of the
his high school or grade school temptation when youdiscover that
in Smith: No indeed!
factors leadingtoadecline
teachers, he comes to University most of the class has not in fact
enrolment?
Perhaps
students
the
text.
Therefore
you
who come tobe challenged are Martlet: Do yoc think an entrance knowing nothing about structure read
revert back to outlining the text
dropping out.
exam would solvesome of the of sentences, and obvious things
instead of giving supplementary
problems we have with the quality likethat, and he’sunlikelyto
information, which is what I feel
learn them here.
Henn: In the lastyear or so, I of the students?
lectures shoulddo.
I find the
think the
community
colleges
Smith:
I think that’s
very
overwhelming
temptation
Smith’:Well, I’m certainlyvery
in this.
have played arole
unfortunate. I think it does reflect
Perhapsthe student might find much in favour of English in most instances on the high because I find that I’m just losing
two-thirds of the
students.
I
on schools.
certain
opportunities
at
the entranceexams.Basically,
suppose one of themethods of
community colleges for learning the grounds, that I find it really
quite shocking to get fourth year Lawrence: But
trades, skills, which he couldn’t
no
student is raisingstandards would simply
that
are functional likely to complain,because we’ve be for menot tofallintothis
learnat the university, and, of students
the
course, he pays less money there. illiterates.
passed him through the qualifying temptation and during
I also feel that perhaps there
is a
exam, so if he sneaks intoEnglish examinations, to examine on the
I think that’s 120, he breathes a great sigh of
text and the lectures
as
I
certain amount of disillusion with Lawrence:
originally intended. But when one
the aftermath of University, the ‘commonplace. I think that every relief,writesecstaticpapers
Prof in the institutionwould agree about Othello, or about some is losing the students, one goes
idea of going out into the world.
What is the point in going through with your remark. How do you contemporaryverse,
and gets back into this.
screen
students
in
your
this, he might think, and getting a
passed thrmgh 120 in terms of Lawrence:You’re
in abetter
BA and then finding out I’m worse discipline?
content, because nobody is much positionto be stern in matters
off than when I started, because
in damning him for like that thanI, in that I, in a large
interested
I don’t think we do at all.
sentence structure.
somebody could have takenhold of Smith:
department,am competing for
Do You?
me at 18 and trained mein a job. I
raises and promotions with
Hem: No. We take potluck, very Henn: This is something which I
come with
out
paper
a
people who are willing to do
We teach
subject,
a
think is atthe rootof the problem- exactly that, day after day.
qualification and nobody is going much.
to look atme now. It is a real Spanish or Italian, which a r e -the high school SyStem itself. I Theytretheones who are popular
buyers
market
and disturbing really not taught in the schools,so thinkif they were a little stiffer, with the students. They,re the
from thatpoint of view. I guess we I imagine that 95 percent of our then perhaps we
find people ones who havethe glorious big
really don’t know ell the factors students are starting the subject coming throughUniversity who classes,
so should I make
leading to the declining
enrolment from scratch, and so all one can were competent in their own myself an ogre by nagging good
do is take in first year students, language, and perhaps in Other
all over North America.
students who onceinawhile
and hope that some of them work fields. Unfortbnately,
the
high
read dailythe
out to majoror honours students.
Lawrence:
I
think that
it’s
assignment?
university
who
shouldn’t
be
there
principally
outside
forces
a s Lawrence: Is a qualifyingexam i n schools are pushing peopleinto
HeM: I think it is possible to hold
you’ve suggested. It’s related to
English of any relevance to your at all.
the class together, because of the
problem
the
of all
the Department?
Lawrence: They are under even sizes here. At the same timeit is
Universities sending out too
many
larger social Pressure than the possible to work them hard, and
mediocre
graduates,
whom Hem: Yes, it certainlyis. I think Universities are.
maintain some sortof standards.
in
trying
to
teach
a
foreign
nobody really wants. I don’t hear
toomuch about “A” students not language I would find my job much Smith:
Getting
back to your Martlet: You mean in the small
student
had a
-beingable tofind jobs. Mr. Henn easier if the
(Lawrence) idea of a feed classes.
relatively
good
grasp
of
his
own
hinted at another problem that’s
backtype of system,I think it
related to the whole question of language.
would work quite effectively. If 50 Henn: Well, I’m not thinking in
standards. That’s the temptation , Lawrence: That’s reassuring to
to 60 percent of the students. from terms of 90-200, but more in the
of faculty members themselves to hear--that kind of support from
Oak Bayhigh schoolfailed the 20-30 range. I also feel that one
Henn: I agree that the institution
is to an extent a degree granting
mill. Unfortunately, because of
social pressures, and the job
market,
some
students
come
here, pay their money, put in their
four years,and they get a degree
at the end of it. But I think that one
should try tocompromise, and
improve within the system. If we
are operating within asystem,
which says that the university is
open to a fairly large segmentof
the community,and is not going to
bean elitist set up, as it is i n
Britain, where
you’re
dealing
with just 2 percent of an age group
going toUniversity, I think we
have to adjust accordingly.I think
that one can try to arouse the
student’s interests, and I think
one of the main functions of the
University is to try todevelop
critical
awareness,
their
regardless of discipline or
faculty. I think thatacertain
amount of interest shouldcome
fromthestudents, and perhaps
make faculty more aware of any
possiblediscontentthatthere
might bewith this. Now I don’t
know how students can takeon the
system, or society, or the BA key
tothe world idea, which is not
very valid these days, as they’re
beginning to findout, but I think a
strong student body has to try to
make the University alittle more
than a production line, of which
too often, the studentsare willing
victims.
~
could be completely
bloody-
minded early on in the year.
Perhaps by November, and begin
a weeding out process and make
sure that you only keep thecream,
or the very best students. But at
the sametime, I feelthat if a
student is paying a fee, to take a
certain course,even if he is only
going to get through that course
witha “D” or maybe even fail at
the end of the year,I don’t think he
should necessarily be frightened
off. You could try to convincehim
that he shouldbe doing something
else, butif he says, “no this is
somethingthat I’d l i k e to stick
with, I find it interesting, and I’ll
face the consequences at the end
of the year.” I do think that you
can work the students hard, and
make
things
interesting
and
relatively
pleasant
inside
the
classroom.
Lawrence: It’s largely aproblem
of lack of discipline in the student.
I work my students hard,and I try
tomakethings
interestingfor
them, but a s long a s they can get
the same creditin another section
ofthe same course in which they
don’t have to work a s hard, who
can blame them for transferring
out of mine into somebody
else’s.
I started one course in September
with 33 students, I now have 18. I
know where they went.
l
I
I
,
Smith: And yet, I’d huch prefer
that they did go.
if the
Lawrence:
Except
that
original figure hadn’t been 33, I
could be in averyvulnerable
position, in that if my boss saw
that I had
only
this minimal
number of students, it’s easy to
say, oh, there must be something
wrong
with
Lawrence or
Lawrence’s teaching.
From
those 33 there ought to be more
for the upper courses. Have they
drifted out to other disciplines,
Even
where life is easier?
Spanish, perhaps.
Henn: Well, I don’t think it’s
easier.
Not in lower
level
courses,wherether
‘s terrific
pressure tokeep up. wo or three
years ago during the “crisis”, 1
think theidea
of thepopular
teacher was frowned upon in
certain quarters. We heardthe
terms teachers,
flashy
entertainers. I think thereare
probably lots of good teachers on
this campus, who a r e popular a s
well. I’m sure that therea r e a lot
of good teachers who a r e not
popular. Ijust don’t want us to fall
into the trap that suggests that
students move from one person to
grade. It
another, to get easier
an
might be true some of the time,
maybe most of the time.
P
Lawrence:
I
could
offer
as
evidence the Multi-sectioned
courses in our Department where
the final grades do demonstrate
thatstandards
are very,very
uneven.
Smi@
Is this relative
to
a
required course?
eont’d c,n I 6
k.
for instance, they found that in a
class of 30, they might get 2 or 3
replies. It finally died the death,
as aresult
of this not really
Lawrence: Yes and no. In that
indicating the general level of a
some of the courses are required course.
for a majorin the department but
not required by the University a s HeM: I would like tosee a student
a whole.
the
being given
a
form
at
beginning of the year, and if an
he
Smith: I would think thatthere
drops a course,
he would send this
would b? a significant difference form to theregistrar, and explain
in courses thatwould be required why he dropped
out.
Did the
even within a major, and courses course not tally with the calendar
which are optional.
description, w a s the teacher
boring,
etc? If you’re left with 50
ideal
Lawrence: But in this
percent
at the end of the. year, I
University which
we’ve
been
would
like
to know why the other
vaguely talking
about,
each
50 percent went away.
section of a course, whether its
required or not, should be of Lawrence: I think thattype of
approximately
the
same questionnaire would probably
difficulty.
reveal everything except the real
reason
student
a dropped
a
Smith: That’s very true.
course.
Henn: We do this in our own Henn: That’s the danger.
department. In our firstyear
courses, we have 6 or 7 people Lawrence: I’m doubtful about the
teaching, and
only
about 8 guide books primarily
for
sections, and we have a common
economic reasons. A l l the guide
exam at Christmasand in April.
books would tell the readers,
That’s not foolproof by any means presumably
in
the
because one can teach aclass the administration, is that there are
exam. But atleastitgivesa
very fewgood teachers on this
pretty fair control and the system campus, afew very bad ones, and
works
well.
a very large number of ordinary
ones. I suspectthat they know
Lawrence : We lost our common already who the best teachersare
exams years ago,when the spirit andwho the worst ones are, and
of individuality came along, and would weed them out in time. I’m
no junior instructor in my alsoafraidthat
t.he guide book
department would allow anybody would become
popularity
a
to dictate to him whathe could contest. I know exactly what I
examine his students on.
would get from my “D“ students.
eont’d from I5
-,
Martlet: One questionthat this
raises is that of academic
guidebooks. Do they fulfill a
useful role?
Smith: I would think that they’re
probably quite good. One reason
is that itmight allow for a natural
weeding out process. Those who
aren’t interested i n the course,
don’t fill out the forms. At UBC
Smith : This didn’t happen at UBC.
The studentsbent over backwards
to give theteacher agood rating.
They don’t tend to condemn a
teacher out of hand.
Henn: You use theterm “weeding
out” of bad teachers, and I hope
t h e administration is aware of
who the culprits are, andwould
If
rapthemovertheknuckles.
CINECENTA FILMS
someone is consistently panned in
the guide book then I would hope
thatthe head of department of
Dean could ask the teacher why,
and if he repliedthatit
was
because he was giving “C’s” and
“D’s” and the students know that
they canget “A’s” or something,
and that’s my reason. So I think
with
understanding,
symp3hetic head of department,
and administration, one could.
answer continual bad ratings in
the guidebook. Of course one can
refuse to be evaluated, but
perhaps it will be the bad teachers
who will refuse.
Smith: I think it’s useful also asa
feedback process. Assuming that
the great bulk of faculty fall into
themiddle area, and there are
various methods one can use to
approach any topic, then it could
be ameans for oneselftoget
information on why the course
didn’t go over well.
because I have tenure. I’m one of
theguiltyones, ina sense.I think
thatgetting rid of tenure will
createmoreproblemsthatit
would solve. A no tenure or a
heavily qualified tenure situation
would create an atmosphere of
insecurity, and suspicion among
junior colleagueswho ought to be
getting on with it, and not fretting
about whether they’re going to be
kept on next year or not. I think
this has a deliterious effect on
lecture quality. It wouldpressure
more and more young people into
more and more publication, just
to makethemselves known just in
case they get booted out of this
institution. Of course, the more
timethatgoes intopublication,
the lesstimegoes
into class
preparation, and so on.
Smith: It also raises the spectre
tenure
that if you eliminate
altogether, you never fireanyone.
There might be a tacit agreement
thatoncean
individual got in
there, therewas no getting rid of
him.
Lawrence: Maybe we’re allowing
tenure too easily.
Smith: I did raise this question
about the processes, but tenure
itself, I’m very much in favour of.
Brodr University
Fa- Cutbadks
Martlet: Just one final question,
of arather
timely nature, is
tenure obsolete?
ST. CATHARINES(CUP) -- The giving itsdepartments the choice
provost of Brock University has
of making across-the-board cuts
warned senior administrators to for all departments,
the reduction
Henn: No certainly not. It’sa
in
a
prepare
for
massive
cutbacks
of
course
offerings
in all
verynecessary
thing. I think
departments, or the elimination
tenure canbe abused both by those few years.
In a letter toalldepartment
or amalgamation of some
who grant tenure, and those who
chairmen, Alan Earp indicated programs and departments a s
receive tenure.
the current financial crisis left Nind sugRested for Trent.
Smith: I completely agree. One of
the university no alternative but
the arguments is that no other to fire faculty. His warning was
Brock
The
senate and
first
a
Brock departments have
professional has tenure, doctors, the time
responded
lawyers and so forth, but they can administrator had admittedthe
negativelyto Earp’s letter. But
gooffandply their trade all by gravity of the situation.
administration
the
appears
The university is currently adamant in carrying out its plans.
themselves.’ Who is going to hire
the common gardenvariety
of giving the departmentstimeto
Students are still active
within the
political scientist? I do think that consider ways to implement the
cutbacks
committee
and the
some
sort
of protection is firings to do “the least damage to crisis committee formed during
necessary for faculty
a
member.
the quality of education”.
the occupation of administrative
is territories
Perhaps the procedures need to
Earp hinted
that
Brock
last
January
to
be reconsidered and there should considering similar measures to protest faculty firings.
in January by
be somerecourse from having thoseproposed
The occupation ended when the
president
made a mistake. It shouldn’t be a Trent University
administration agreed to rehire
carte blanche to sit back and do Thomas Nind. Nind proposeti the five full-time
professors
nothing for the rest of your life.
massive facultycuts in certain scheduled for
dismissal
but
areas and the abolition of several refusedtore-hire
11 part-time
Lawrence: I wondered whether I academic programs.
teachers.
should make any sort of comment
The Brockadministration
is
- 1FANTASY - HORROR HE CAME BACK FROM
THE DEAD FOR REVENGE
PLUS ON THE SAME PROGRAMME
A NEW F I L M BY KURT VONNEGUT
Friday & Saturday - March 30 & 31
7:15 nightly - Mac. 144
Students: 75c General: $1.00
SEPARATE ADMISSION
FOR HORROR DOUBLE FEATURE
PLUS
BUGS BUNNY
Corning Apri I 6 & 7
Friday & Saturday - March 30 & 31
9:OO ni htly - out at 12:00
Mac. 1 - Students: 75c
%4
Students..: 75c
.tl
34 Year
of
photo by phi1 esmonde
by I . Foot
Sonny Terry and Brownie
McGhee played at the Commons
Block last Sunday night. Need I
say more? Not really, but let me
elaborate just a little bit. First,
the affair was produced by David
Oscienny and the collected
crazies you voted
in
a s the
Activities Council. Ifyou didn’t,
be glad
they’re
i n . anyway,
because I have a feeling they
might do wondersfor the musical
tats of this place. If they continue
toput on events like that one. (If
you think tee ,foregoingsounds
like flattery, you’re right. It is,
but justifiably.)
Now all we have to do i s get a
bar operating during the
show and
we’re set.
Anyway,
enough
of this
gratuitous
backslapping.
Why
anyone thought to put Victoria as a
warm-up act is beyond me,
although I hear they got her cheap.
She’s O.K.but shehastostop
playing the
piano.
The
only
woman who can sing her songsat
the piano and get away with it is
Laura Nyro. Sure Victoria has a
pretty voice,but also a badcase of
the San Francisco hip blands. A
couple of nicetunes,however,
notably “Knight of Blades”
supposedlywritten
for Herbie
Hancock,
and
a
slightly
imaginative but childish number
about computers
sitting
in
cybernetic meadows (sic).Hell,
allhersongsare
nice,she’s
sweet, charming and wonderfully a r e not thestandard“Lovein
feminist. And if she’s
been
vain- any rock’n’roll band can
said,
in
San playtheblues if they’redrunk
singing, as she
Francisco for tthe past ten yearsenough” blues we’ve all come to
and not managed to get a record know and love.Once the two of
out, all happiness to her, she’ll
them a r e gone, there won‘t be
probally sing for another ten and many others left to tell
us what it
still not
manage.
An was (is)liketobeblackin
anachronistic lady.
America when they were younger.
Sonny Terry and Brownie
Sure, they deal in things that we
McGhee have been on theroad
can all (I hope) relate to; anyone
togetherforbetter
than thirty who doesn’t get offon “Roll me
years, and they make you knowit.
honey justlikeyourgrandma
They a r e two of the veryfew well- rolls the dough” needs a definite
known blues men travelling now, shot of something; on the other
and they’re getting on. Brownie,
hand we a r e universes away from
theguitar player and vocalist, is theirsituation,
and what lies
in his middle sixties,and harpist beneath those
blues,
however
in
his happy they might be, is simply not
Sonny must be well
seventies. And the bluesthey sing part: ofus. Like1 said, need I say
more? Just be thankful yuu saw
them, and v e r y sorry if you didn’t. Only one
thing
irks
me
personally: I wish I’d had the
chanceto see them about ten
years ago in some smoky little
somewhere,
club everyone
drinking whiskey and screaming
upa storm:they were supposed to
have reallyraisedthe
roofin
places
that.
like
Sunday’s
audience
was
positively
congregation-like at times. And
the blues,of all things, a r e not to
be worshipped.
Sonny Terry + Brownie McGhee
We went intothe Lansdowne
Lounge shortlybeforeVictoria
left to go on stage. It was fairly
informal with Sonny and Brownie
speaking when they wanted to and
asking us questionsalong
the
way. Sonny was the quieter, less
forceful of the two
but
came
across with conversation thatwas
interesting,
intelligent
and
entertaining. Brownie wasn’t
interested in having too much of
what he was saying recorded. As
heput it, “this talkis too serious .
for an interview...I talk this wayi
before most shows
...I have to get’
relaxed.” He was referrhgto the
stories he was t
e
- a&mt how
he thought children sboald be
taught and his philosophies on
life. He spent a great deal of time
tryingtopersuadeone
of the
individuals back stage that “life
is a dream”. Brownie and Sonny
didn’t talktoone another much
duringtheconversation.
Sonny
had probably heard a lot of it
before and I imagine Brownie
knew what Sonny
was talkingabout
anyhow.
SONNY: Very many peopleout
there?
MARTLET: Yeah good crowd.
SONNY:How many will it hold?
Oh
MARTLET:About 600.
SONNY:Oh good.
the
MARTLET: Do you mind
smaller audiences?
SONNY: No ...ohno...Weplayedin
Paul
Santa Barbara with
Butterfield at about 5,000 people
there (laughter)
MARTLET: Itlacks
a bit of
personal communication with the
audience, doesn’t it?
SONNY: 6 years
....I quit
SONNY: Oh yeah ...but they had a
drinking bout 7 years ago. Going
goodsound system all over the
to good for me. Decided to quit
place you know.
before it quit me.
MAHTLET:When
was the last
MARTLET: I remember Brownie
time you were here in Victoria? had quite a taste for Scotch then. ..
SONNY: Year before last.
BROWNIE: (yelling from
the
MARTLET: HOW do YOU like
other side of the room) Still got
playing in Canada?
it!!Long liked that 40!!
SONNY:
Fine ...I
like
Canada...Vancouver. I may buy
me a place here. You knowhow
it’s different from thestates? It’s
clean. You know I’ve been coming
here since 1945.
MARTLET: How long have you
been playing?
SONNY:
About
45
years. I’m
going on 60 years old ...Maybe 60
years in age but not in mind!
MARTLET: How long have you
by dostyles
been playing with Brownie?
SONNY: 34 years.
and
MARTLET:What sort of places
were you playing in when you first
nohallpatch
met up with Brownie?
SONNY: Oh we were playing light
parties down south.. .notno clubs
like they use
now.. .weekends we’d SONNY: We just had a nice week
play for parties ...p lay on the in Vancouver.
street too.
MARTLET: You used toplaya lot
MARTLET: They weren’t sitting at the Bunkhouse.
down like
your
audiences
do SONNY: Yeah. We hadtwo or
now ...did they get up and dance? three different clubs. We played
SONNY:
yeah, atthe Bunkhead, River Queen,
(laughter)
yeah.. ..drinking
Gassy Jack’s.(laughter) yeah I
...hoopin’ and howlerin’ ...
played therebefore they threw
MARTLET: Do you get that him out of business!!
response ever nowadays?
MARTLET: Are you touring with
SONNY: Oh yeah ...they do it anyone besides Brownie these
sometimes ...in a place where days?
they cando it. That beat hits
them SONNY: Nojust with him.. .and we
and they get goin’.
runintootherpeople
and book
MARTLET: You had a good crowd them up. Like we just played with
when you were here 6 vears ago. Paul Butterfield
martlet
interview
THE PROBLEM OF LITERACY
The Cynic
by Fred Mayne
(Department of Literacy)
(sometimes English Literature)
The present educational revolution with its stress on
the student rather than the subject, on the personality
rather than the discipline, although admirable, has its
dangers. It couldlead toa spiritually and --- even worse --a psychologically damaging preoccupation with the self,
with thecult of personality. H could evenleadtoan
exaggerated emphasis en cummunicationanda neglect of
the meansby which communication can be achieved.For
thought andthe communication of thought --- even thought
on the pressing problems
of 20th century life- - - may sound
rather sterileif the student can only express himself by
means ofgrimaces, gestures,“you knows”, “ I means”,
and “ughs”.
But if we allow ourselves tobe seduced by the argument
that the mastery
of the mothertongue is necessary for the
higher flightsof thought and expression, we shall provide
a breachthrough
which warmongeringnegrophobes,
peddling the 3 “R’s”, will come pouring back info ohe
educational arena. What i s needed i s not a reactionary,
brain-washinginsistence on the kind of stilted, mindconstricting language whichdestroys full consciousness,
freedom, creativity,and spontaneous joy,and which leads
to desexualization and, of course, to a loss of personal
identity -- in short, the kind of English which Freshman
English tries in vain to inseminate. What is needed is a
simpletest,success inwhichwill
guaranteethatthe
students have sufficientabilitytocomprehend
and to
communicate so that they may brouse in the groves of
academe where they candiscuss life and so on, until they
are ready to go out into the World amongst the people who
have spent sucha longtime making civilization what it is.
However, if I continue to dealin abstract admonition, I
shall have failed inmy own attempts tocommunicate. Let
me rather give you examples of the kind of questions which
I would include in a test designed to ensure satisfactory
standards in the home language.
1) Read the following withgreat attention and say what is
happening:
Pow!
“Pouf!”
Splat!
“Awrrk!”
Bam!
“Aaaiieee!”
Do
you
think that thisdialoguebetrays
communication?
a lack of
2) Make alist of one word which will shock the grownups.
3) Arange the following words in a complete sentence:
a) 1
b) sex
c) like.
Do not worry more than usual if you do not like sex.
4) Cross out any of the following words which suddenly
make you feel funny: elephant, rhinoceros,hippopotamus,
And it came topass early in the morning of the last day
of the semester, there arose a multitude smiting their’
books and wailing. And therewasmuchweepingand
gnashing ofteeth, forthe day of judgement was
at hand and
they were sore afraid. For they had left undonethose
things which they ought to have done, and there was
for them.
And there were many abiding in heir rooms whohad
keptWatch overtheir books all night but it naught
availeth. But some there were who arose peacefully for
they had prepared for themselves theway,andmade
.,
crocodile,tiger,lion,rocking-horse,leopard,
work.
buffalo,
5) Shorten the following sentences:
a)“Ohdear,dear,dear,dear,dear,dear,dear,dear,
dear, dear,” hesaid with a long pause between each
“dear”.
b) “No, no, a thousand times no,” she cried.
6) Place thefollowing spellings in orderof preference:
fotograf, fhotowgraf, phowtowgraph, photowgraff,
fphohtohgrapfh.
Do not be narrow-minded.
7) If I gave you six oranges and somebody else came
along andgave you ope orange, how many oranges would
you have?
N.B. All the oranges a r e the same size.
8) Rewritethe following letter in impressive language,
using as muchvivid excrementalimagery as you can
scrape together:
Dear Joe,
I am sorry to hear you gotan assignment which is
choking up your mind.
Yours infectiously,
Tom.
9) A member of faculty is observedwalking along a road
without casting a shadow. Is this because
a) The sun i s not shining?
b) He is an evil spirit?
c) He has
achieved
a state of complete
unconsciousness?
d) He i s upset because students
a r e too independent to
laugh at his jokes?
10)
At
what
point
in
British Columbia doesthe
distinction between ends and means become lost in the
intrinsicality and immanence of the Universe?
11) Write a long sentence of at least twelve words and
punctuate it by putting in dashes whenever you get an
empty feeling.
12) Explain the following sentence:
He gave a lusty laugh.
N.B. Be as delicate as you can.
13) To which of the following places do you think it best to
go to learn about Life:
a) The Sunbeam Toddlers’ School?
b) A meeting of the Suburban League of Married
Women?
straight thepathof knowledge.And those wise ones were
h o w n to some as the burners of the midnight oil, but by
others they were called curve-spoilers .
And the multitudesarose and atea hearty breakfast;and
theycameinto the appointed place, and their hearts were
heavy within them.And they hadcome topass, but some to
nopass
helpout.
And some of them repented of their riotous living and
bemoaned their fate, but they had not a prayer. And at the
last hour there cameamongthemoneknown
as the
instructor, he of the diabolical smile, WKI passed,paper
among them and went upon his way.
c) The New York Stock Exchange?
d) The sewers ?
e) Political’conventions?
f) The cafeteria?
g) The cemetery?
14) Gibbon, thehistorian,wrote:
“Unprovided with
originallearning, unformed in thehabits of thinking,
unskilled in the arts of composition, I resolved --- to write
a book.”
Say why a creep like that could never hope to amount to
anything.
15)Read the following passage and answer the questions
below:
He was overlooked by the selectors because he did not
keep to his training schedule.
a) Would he have been overlooked by the selectors if he
had been taller?
b)Howdo you think the selectors knew that he kept on
missing his trains?
c) Doyou think he would have been selected if he had
bought a car?
d) Writea short character sketch
of (i) the selectors (ii)
the man who kept on missing his trains.
16) Place the following authors in order of merit:
a) James Bond
b) Tarzan
c) Batman
d) Portnoy
17) Which i s grammatically correct:
a) Woe i s me!
b) Woe i s I!
c) Woe am I!
18) Write a research paper of not more than 25 words
showing how the abolition of examinations in Canadian
universities will prevent ecological disaster.
N.B. Acknowledgeall sources except the one from which
you copy your answer.
In healthydemocracy, however, there is no such thing
as failure, only different degreesof success; and if some
freshmen cannot pass the test I wouldnot have them
excluded from the University
but onlyplaced ina separate
grove,
perhaps
with moretrees,where
they
can
communicate with each other,not ona lower level,
but ona
level which may well achieve a spiritually higher levelof
consciousness, giving rise to a degree of communication
which the more conscious forms of consciousness can
r achieve. But I must conclude hastily, for in the light
t confess thatdoubts as to the
guarantee of an abilityto
assail me. And doubts can
will, to a breakdownof action
And.many and variedwerethe answers which were
given, for some of his teachings had fallen amongthe
fallows, while still others had fallen among fertile minds,
andstill others had fallen flat. And some there were who
wrote foran hour,others wrote for two, but some turned
away sorrowful. Andmanyof these offered up a little,
“Bull” in hopes of pacifying the instructor these
for were
the ones who had nota prayer. And when they had finished,
they gatheredup their belongings and went away quietly,
each in his own direction, and eachone was vowingto
himself in this manner: “I shall not pass thisway again.It
is a.long road that has no turnings.”
LH3
M3a
c .2
23
n
dQ
The Critic
by Ronald Stoweycork
One of the oversightsof literary criticismis that it has
often neglected those works which are or have been of
primary influence on the formative years of writers.
Much of the pessimismof modern literature can,
I think,
be traced through a look at these disregarded works.
I propose to deal
with the originsof certain symbolsand
recurringvisionarythemesinthe
modern genre by
examining the work of one of thesupposedly lesser
luminaries in the cosmus literati, namely that of A.A.
Milne, and more particularly, the Pooh cycle.
begin atthe
Perhapsit is best, as Alicesaid,to
beginning, or, inthis instance, with the first introduction
by Milneof the Pooh Bear. Before doing so I might just
digress to comment
upon the significanceof Edward Bear
being described a s “the” Pooh Bear.
The
...
...p re-sexual or anti-sexuaZ ?”
66
particularization of thenominative
i s animportant
development
Milne’s
in grammatical
theory.
By
modifying the word “bear” with the specific article he
given the word “Pooh” an adjectival connotation. This
factoris of primaryimportanceinexplainingthe
alienation of modernexistentialistwritersandtheir
characters;
characters
often nameless or named
absurdly. How much more certainty there would be if
Beckett’s men knew they were waiting for a Godot, or the
Godot or even those Godot;
At any rate, theintroduction of Pooh Bear is described
a s follows: “Here is Edward Bear, coming downstairs,
bump, bump, bump, on the back of his head, behind
Christopher Robin.”
We a r e fold he perhaps knows no other way of coming
down the stairs and then perhaps hemay. Uncertainty is
rife. And yet, becausePooh is the victim of authority, in
the presenceof a creature olderthan himself, a link in the
hierarchical orderof society, onewho pose:j as a friend,
Pooh i s not even aware of his uncertainty perse The
reason is that thehappy life and the normal life are,with
this attendant unsurety, one.
The existenceof unspoken numinous forces is indicated
throughout the book by a tome of understatement, or more
correctly, non-statement. Nowhere in Pooh will you find a
mention of God. Pooh-Bear lives in a spiritual vacuum
where the placeof God i s taken by ascending links in the
hierarchical structure of his society. Thus, the classordered natureof Pooh’s world i s intimately interwoven
with the ethical foundation it is built upon.
“Here is Edward Bear”. How like thenouveau roman of
Robbe-Grillet that line reads. And indeed, it is no mere
co-incidence, forPooh has been translated into most
of the
languages of the world and i s now perhapsjust a s
importanttothedevelopment
of modern literature in
Europe a s he is in Britain and America.
The attitudein Pooh to sex isnot so much :pre-sexual a s
anti-sexual, I would answer to my Freudian critics.
‘,‘Coming to see me have my bath”, Christopher Robin
asks.
“I might.”
“Was Pooh’s pencil case any better than mine?”
It was just the same.”
To what does the last line refer?What was the. same?
What i s the
significance
of pencil cases?
What
connotations does the word “coming” carry? While of
passinginterest,thesequestions
a r e probably not of
central importance.What i s important i s that the attitude
todards the ritual
of the bath i s one of nonchalance, of total
indifferencetothesexualquality
of theevent.
It i s
presented as an imageof a sterile, non-productive world,
one where sexual desire does
not exist, and where this gap
is consequently filled by a scheme of human relationships
based upon a shared sense of indifference to physical
dependence.
In Pooh’sworld,theexpression
of in’dividuality i s
sublimated to soeial utility. Expressionsof individuality
a r e permitted only insofar a s they do not contravene “the
needs of themajority”.Theseneedsfallintothe
utilitariancategory of “thegood”.
Absurd events,
“ridiculous” conversations, a r e countenanced because
humans themselves a r e illogical creatures. The basic
hypocrisyof Milne’s world, that of Edwardian Christian
liberalism, is thus revealed.
“The only reason formaking a buzzing-noise thatI know
of i s because you’rea bee.. .And the only rea,sonfor being a
hasbee that I know of i s making honey ...And the only reason
for making honey i s so a s I can eat it.” So he began to
/
IOOOO BC. The Inhabitants of the paper square
haw no conception of the true natwe of the
unwese they Inhabat.
1960 AD. Physicists’conception of their
u n w c r ~IS further clouded by new dnxowries:
the rhombus. the parallelogram. the
antoparallelogram. the nonalateral and many
others. It is unclear what these dlscovcries
Wify.
/ \
climb the tree.
Motivation is a culturally IPavlovian phenomenon,
ostensibly with its roots in the Western Christian ethical
framework of means and ends.But in fact,it operates in a
repressivemanner,becausethoseverymeans
are
inimical to the unrestricted expression
of natural human
desires.
When Pooh Bear fails to ach the honeycomb at the top
of the treeand falls into a g .se bush, he attributes his
downfall, a s it were, to too great a liking for honey. He
places the blame for his failure on the very form of his
motivation. By mistakenly doing so, hedrawsthe
conclusion of all self-defeating victime of authoritarian
society:hebelieves
he doesn’t know anybetter.
Moreover, a s authority is never present inits full array,
a link in the
he canonly go for aid to his friend, in reality,
chain of power. Iti s nbtural then that “after falling off the
tree”, “the first person hethought of:was Christopher
Robin.”
“Was that me?” said Christopher Robin.
“That was you.”
For he can scarcely believe he is himself
a part of the
established order.
%
Perpetuating the social system?
Later, Pooh Bear returns tothehoney comb, dressed in
mudandholding a balloon, the Milne-esque symbol of
aspiring hopes. The bees (symbolizing the thwarting of
internal revolution) surround the nest (symbolic
of the
institutionalized means of persuasion in the state) and
drive off Pooh Bear.
The
bees
buzz about Pooh
suspiciously until Christopher Robin comes along.
Exercising his authority a s guardian, being one whom
Pooh trusts, and cannot visualize as the real source of his
political dilemma, C.R. shoots Pooh down.
Ergo, the perpetuationof a social systemin which time
has no intrinsicvalue.
Hence thefactthatthese
characters live in a cosmic present; they do not age.
Christopher Robin, in all his adventures continues toof be
pre-school age (symbolicof the intrinsic stupidity of the
lower classes, in the view of those in power).
\
1900 AD. Physicists ofthesquare discover a
basicsubdiwrionofthewuniverse.They
callit
the “tnangle” andconsider R to be-the
fundamental buildmgblock of the Universe.
1970 AD. A newconfiguration. the
“hemidemisem~tr~an~le.”
IS hypothesized. out
of which all known confbguratlons of the UnweM
can be constructed. The hemidemisemttriangle
IS thought to bc the fundamental building block
of the unmrse.
1930 AD. Physlcirtr discover thatthetriangle
can be rphtItspartsaretermedthe
“hemttrlangle”
and
the
“demltrlangle.”
These
are thought to be the fundamental buildlng
blocks of the Unhlerse.
1950 AD. Morror images of the hemitrungk and
thedemRriangk are discovered. Then are
termed “antihemitriangle” and ,
“antldemltr,angle.“
2ooo AD. The mhabltants of this paper square
have no conception of the true nature of the
Unlwrse they mhabtt.
.
24
only
slightly
marred
by
Victoria over the past decades occasional pitch problems. Judy
has been very active in choral Mahlers
tackled
Temple
music, but it is only recently that Kindertotenlieder,
rather
a
the cityhas spoken of its vocalists autobiographical
song
on
with any degree of pride.The
reflection of a young child’s
firstconcert to be discussed heredeath, with maturity
and
presented
very
a interesting
sensitivity.
sombre
This,
contrast to that
of Viktoria Spans. melancholy
was
broken
by
Greatattentiontoclarity
and several
lighter
songs
of the
diction
was
demonstrated
by Spanish composer deFalla, sung
Robin Powell in her performance by Pierann Moon.
Here
an
of several songs by the interestingcontrasting
can be
Elizabethan, Dowland,but
less made
because
Viktoria
Spans
considerationwasgiventothe
sang several of the same deFalla
dramatic quality of the songs -- songs; Pierann Moon managed a
they were too lyric to capture the more
lively
and
exciting
pictoral
rhetoric;
greater
performance of dramatic impact.
dynamicflexibility and perhaps
rhythmic contrast might enliven
A very good standard of
all these songs.The two songs of accompaniment on both guitar and
Brhahmssung by Jean Goddell pianoenhanced thisfinevocal
were very dramatically executed,concert.
equally diversified
collage
of
balanced performance of the compositions.The brass choir
Strauss
Serenade
but a less rendered Andrea Gabrieli’s
agressively,
rather
thrilling
performance
of Ricercar
than
with
simple
vitality, and the
Britten’sMetamorphoses
after
its flow.
Sandra
piece
lost
Ovid by oboeis! EileenGibson
a
lacked
tonal
variation
or Pumfrey, oboe, presented
precision of phrasing -- the controlled yetnot polished Sonata
bass
sections all seem nearly vocal, by Telemann;thefigured
was
realized
by
monotonous
and abrupt phraseendings lacking
i n any
in slight decresendi do not seem chordsequenceslacking
imitation,
or
life
and
thus
was
apt.TheDvorakSerenadewas
repeated by the ensemble once rather boring. To the contrary,
again this season, and though well RolfGilstein’s performanceof the
praised by an appreciate BachCello Suite No. 3 was filled
audience,
still
evidenced withlifeand emotion,though here
was
the
problem.
Most
occasional lacking of rhythmic pitch
enjoyable
were
the
Chansons
cohesion, dynamics and balance;
Bilitis of bebussy sung by mezzo
it was notable for its rythmical
Arlene Salvadorand accompanied
vitality.
by pianist
Winifred
Scott
-The Tuesday concert featured
sensitive
and
controlled.
The
numerous performers in an
A Faculty Recital presented a
concert concluded with the brass
ensemble playing two pieces
(Dukas and Tomasi) which, while
there
were
some
technical
errors, were lively.
Nextweek and in succeeding
articles I would like to make afew
comments on recordings in which
local
musicians
have
been
featured -- either as composers
or as performers -- and wouldlike
to be given recommendations for
any of which you may be aware.
-
Yours,
CORNEZ
Next week’sMartlet will be the
last one of the year. An important
staff meeting to discuss the paper
will be held Sunday night at a
secret rendezvous somewhere in
thedepths of wildestSaanich.
Bring lots of fluids to ease the
difficult chore of planning thelast
edition.
Lastyear, in New YorkCity
atone, 7 nursing n u n s made
6,322 patient visits. Not in haspitals, but
in the patients’ awn
homes. Fantastic? Not s t ail,
Not for the Dominican,Sislers of
the Sick Poor. Eversince they
were founded in IW6. # h e Siters
have been doing the-imposshie
What on earth ir lloIc?
Among other things, it’s a little house in
Toronto that is the rock bottom place to
buy travel.
AOSC stands for Association of Student
Councils, a non-profit organization owned
and operated by the student bodiesof 60
Qnadian campuses.
As a student who may be thinking about
going somewhere sometime, you areeligible for all kinds of special privileges and
services you probably don’t even know
about.
You see, AOSC‘s principal function is to
make availableto students thebest, most
economical travel arrangements possible.
The idea is to provide a service, not make a
buck.
And it shows.
You’re offered the lowest dependable
airfares available, on 40 charters flying between April 30 and October 5. For example
jet Toronto to London from $86 one
way, or $155 return; Vancouver to London
from $225 return or $125 one way.
of land arAOSC also offers a wide variety
rangements, all specially designedfor students, all ridiculous bargains.
For example, you can spend 22 daysin
Turkey for $235 . . . sail the Greek Islands
for a week on $54. . . or go on a 72-day
Through AOSC‘s affiliation with the intercamping safari from London to Katmandu,
national network of student organizations,
10,OOO miles, for about $400.
you have access to another 5,000 special
flights originating all over the world.
If you’re thinking of travelling, there is
All in all, this results in some fairly incred- more you should know about. A whole lot
more: lists of student restaurants and
ible deals.
hotels, Eurail pass deals, special car-leasing
Say, for example,you wanted to fly Toron- arrangements, overseasjob opportunities,
to-Hong Kong return. A normally-routed
the International Student Card . . .
ticket would take you westward and allow
one stopover. . . for about $1,200. AOSC
AOSC. It’s your travel bureau. Use it.
can fly you the long way, through Europe,
with stopovers, for $600.
Why not pick up more specific information
from your studentcouncil office.
Such fare savings of up to 75% make your
flying a dirt-cheap proposition.
Or, contact us direct.
-
daify.
Long beforethere were relief
agencies or visitingnurses, the
Dominican Sisters were deditated
to nursing t h e p o o r in their own
homes thus keeping the familits
together.
Today, the Dominican Sisters of
t h e S i k Poor are still on &e job.
Although. their primary work is
stitt in nursing, it has been expanded to include sociaf work,
physiotherapy, dietetics, and almost all health relatedprofessions. Each woman has her own
skill, her own special ability to
offer. In this Order, which is
small in size, there is both freedom and flexibility.
Yet the Sisters are not merely
visitingnurses but religious
nurses who thinkof their patients,
not as cases. but suffering members of the Mystical Body of
Christ whoneed,evenbeyond
materialand physical heip, the
healing unction of Christ’s love.
Ta learn Low you can stwe as B
DominiranSis#eroftheSkkPoor
VANCOUVER:
TORONTO:
AOSC,
Room 1008,
University of
British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
( 6 0 4 ) 224-01 1 1
AOSC,
44 St. George Street,
Toronto 5 , Ontario
(416) 9628404
HALIFAX:
AOSC,
Dalhousie Student Union,
Dalhousie University,
Halifax, Nova Scotia
(902)424-2054
write to:
Siaer Maqocrite MitcbeU,
Vocation Director
Room 1W
Mariandule,Ossinlag,N. Y.10562

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