Bryan Zander - Sales Manager Blackmon Mooring of

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Bryan Zander - Sales Manager Blackmon Mooring of
Bryan Zander - Sales Manager
Blackmon Mooring of Austin, Inc.
Disaster Recovery
& Planning
Overview
ƒ What Can Happen?
ƒ Beginning a Disaster Recovery Plan
ƒ Today’s Restoration Procedures and
T h l
Technology
•
•
•
•
Water/Fire Damage Restoration
Electronics & Corrosion Control
Records & Information Media Recovery
Decontamination & Microbial Remediation
ƒ Putting the Plan to Work
• Emergency Response Phase
• Business Resumption Phase
SECTION ONE
What Can Happen?
SINGULAR
DISASTERS
Commercial Structure Fires
BEFORE
Hill County, Texas Courthouse
AFTER
AFTER
Hill County, Texas Courthouse
Oklahoma City Federal Buildings
World Trade Center 2001
Echelon Building - Austin, TX 2010
Echelon Building - Austin, TX 2010
COMMUNITY
WIDE
DISASTERS
Hurricane Season 2004 & 2005
Hurricane Ivan & Jeanne 2004
Hurricane Ike 2008
Texas Tornado Damage
Iowa Floods
Nashville 2010
Nashville 2010
January 9, 2010 Freeze
SECTION TWO
Starting a Disaster Recovery Plan
What is Disaster Recovery
y Planning?
g
Disaster Recovery Planning
(defined) –
ƒ The process of creating and
maintaining a plan that clearly
defines the processes, policies
and procedures of restoring
operations
ti
that
th t are critical
iti l to
t the
th
resumption of business, including
regaining access to data,
communications workspace
communications,
workspace, and
other business processes after a
natural or human-induced
disaster.
What is Disaster Recovery
y Planning?
g
Disaster Recovery Planning (contd.)
(contd )
ƒ A comprehensive Disaster
Recovery Plan should also
address:
dd
•
•
•
Pre-loss preventative measures
Emergency procedures
Post-loss recovery efforts
ƒ The p
plan should be read by,
y, and be
accessible to, all personnel within
the organization
Disaster Recovery
y Planning
g
Why
y do businesses need to have a
Disaster Recovery Plan in place?
g what needs to be done
ƒ Knowing
before, during, and after a disaster
strikes can:
•
•
•
Prevent p
panic and uncertainty
y
Reduce the extent of the damage
Help the business carry out an
organized recovery effort to get back up
and running quickly (i.e. reduce
business interruption)
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
1.
2.
3.
4.
Goals
5.
6
6.
7.
8.
Risk Analysis
Simplicity
Preparation
Business Impact
Analysis
y
((BIA))
Maintenance
Practice
Execution
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
1 GOALS
1.
ƒ You must determine and prioritize
the goals for your organization
that you hope to achieve through
your Disaster Recovery Plan in the
event a disaster strikes
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
2 SIMPLICITY
2.
ƒ Do not complicate the plan!
A simple plan with the
primary goals and priorities
clearly stated is much easier
to accomplish than a
complex procedural plan
•
•
•
Paralysis by analysis
Pre-loss priority checklist
“KISS” - Keep it Short and
Simple
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
3 PREPARATION
3.
ƒ
Know what contingency
plans are in place for any
local emergency
•
Community contingency plans
exist for city
city, county
county, state,
state and
regional disasters
•
Have a copy of them on hand in
order to see how your facility
fits into the overall plan
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
3. PREPARATION (contd.)
ƒ
In the case of a disaster, entry to
your building is predicated on your
personall relationship
l ti
hi with
ith
government agencies such as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
ƒ
Local police department
Local fire department
National Guard
FEMA
ATF
FBI
Having a relationship with these
officials may help expedite your
recovery effort
ff t
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
4. BUSINESS IMPACT
ANALYSIS (BIA)
ƒ What is the purpose?
•
To quantify the hard cost of
any given portion of the
business being inoperable
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
4. BUSINESS IMPACT ANALYSIS (contd.)
ƒ Looks at the interdependencies of
the departments and locations
within the organization
g
ƒ Sets priorities for restoration based
on the impact to the business
ƒ The BIA defines:
defines
•
The window of time available to
resume business operations
•
The time-line of the restoration
project
•
The need for use of alternate
facilities during the recovery
period
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
5. RISK ANALYSIS
ƒ Calculate the probability
that a loss will occur
within the organization
g
•
•
•
•
•
Tornadoes
Hurricanes
Earthquakes
q
Flooding
Freezing
ƒ Can be based upon
p
factors such as:
•
•
•
Past experiences
Geographic location
Age of your building
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
5. RISK ANALYSIS (contd.)
ƒ Identify the business’
dependency upon critical
business partners such as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Utilities companies
Temporary power
Suppliers
Large customers
Disaster response company
Subcontractors
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
5. RISK ANALYSIS
ƒ
The vital documents within each
business unit must be identified, and
the locations of each written into the
plan to ensure recovery
ƒ
ƒ
Duplication or safe storage should
be considered for crucial
documents
In a manufacturing or distribution
environment, the critical assets,
equipment and single points of
equipment,
failure that can shut down business
operations are identified
ƒ
Plan should arrange
g for either
duplication or quick
replacement/restoration of these
assets
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
6. MAINTENANCE
ƒ Information needed to make
the plan work may change
over time
time, such as:
ƒ People’s telephone numbers
ƒ People
People’s
s job duties
ƒ Priorities and goals for the
organization
•
Establish
E
t bli h regularly
l l scheduled
h d l d
dates to review the plan
•
Conducting a formal review
approximately every 6
months will be sufficient in
most cases
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
7. PRACTICE
ƒ Set up
p a mock disaster
and work through your
Disaster Recovery
Plan
ƒ Practice your plan
periodically to orient
new employees
Key
y Elements of a Disaster Recovery
y Plan
8 EXECUTION
8.
ƒ Stay with the plan –
“Plan
Plan A
A”
ƒ Assume nothing
ƒ Success is often
determined by the
organization’s ability
to adapt and overcome
•
Have a “Plan B” for
backup
SECTION THREE
Today’s Restoration Procedures
And Technology
Water Damage
Restoration
Evaluating
g Water Damage
g
1. Identify affected areas
2. Determine the Category
g y of
water damage
3. Determine the Class of water
damage
4. Establish the drying plan
Categories of Water Damage
ƒ Category
C t
1:
“Clean Water”
ƒ Category 2:
“Gray Water”
ƒ Category 3:
“Black Water”
9 Note: Most natural disasters
will contaminate buildings
with
ith Categor
Category 3 water
ater
Classes of Water Damage
Why determine the class
off water
t damage?
d
?
ƒ It is used to determine the
initial rate of evaporation
and dehumidification
capacity
p
y needed.
ƒ Dehumidification needs are
most often determined by
g of the
the cubic footage
loss area.
Classes of Water Damage
ƒ Class 1
•
Least amount of
water absorption
ƒ Class
Cl
2
•
Large amount of
water absorption
ƒ Class 3
•
Greatest amount of
water absorption
ƒ Class 4
•
Specialty drying
situations
Primary
y Water Damage
g
ƒ Primary or “Direct” water damage
•
May be a singular event, easily
cleaned up and with damage limited
to precisely what the water came in
contact with
Secondary
y Damage
g
ƒ What is secondary damage?
ƒ Damage that is not a direct result of
physical contact with water
ƒ Primary cause of secondary damage?
ƒ Excessive humidity(usually over 60%)
•
Use off iimproper recovery procedures
U
d
such as dehumidification that is
inadequate to the facility size or rate of
evaporation
•
Unknown conditions that are either
missed or not accessible during the
initial assessment phase
•
Failure to respond in a timely manner
Dehumidification
Most Important Aspect of Water Damage
Restoration:
C t lli Humidity
Controlling
H
idit
Types
yp of Dehumidifiers
ƒ What are the two main types
yp
of dehumidifiers?
ƒ Refrigerant Units
ƒ Desiccant Units
Refrigerant
g
Units
ƒ Pulls humid air over evaporation
coils (works by condensation)
ƒ Work best at warmer temperatures,
high humidity, and on porous
materials
ƒ Most jobs are best served by the
refrigerant system
ƒ Two types of refrigerant units
•
Conventional
– Can become ineffective at
temperatures below 65 degrees.
•
Low Grain (LGR)
– Effective at lower temperatures
than conventional refrigerants
Desiccant Units
ƒ Humid air p
passes over a desiccant
pad that absorbs moisture
ƒ Preferable method for:
•
•
Low temperatures
•
Drying low permeable materials
such as wood flooring and cabinets
•
D
Deep
d
down d
drying
i
Large areas and more complicated
projects
j
ƒ The larger units are portable and
generally do not require an
external source of electricity
Fire and Smoke
Damage
Fire & Smoke Damage
R t
Restoration
ti
Whatt B
Wh
Burned?
d?
ƒ Wood/Paper
ƒ Plastics,
Plastics carpet
carpet,
insulation, etc
ƒ The Acidityy level of the
soot will be determined
by what burned inside
the facility
facility, the byby
products of the fire
Electronics
Restoration
&
Corrosion Control
(from water and/or fire
g )
damage)
Electronics Restoration
ƒ What are some examples of
electronics that can be
restored?
•
•
•
•
Servers
Audio components
Computers
Industrial main frame
computers
ƒ Basic approach to restoration
on each is similar
Electronics Restoration
ƒ Begins with disassembly
ƒ Followed by
decontamination of the
internal components with
de-ionized water and
a non-ionic surfactant
ƒ In the case of fire or smoke
damage, compressed air or
damage
detailing tools such as
paintbrushes or even Q
p may
y be used
tips
Electronics Restoration
ƒ After electronics are cleaned
and decontaminated, they are
placed in a special drying oven
at 125º for 8
8-10
10 hours
ƒ After decontamination, they are
reassembled, and in some
i t
instances
specialty
i lt equipment
i
t
can be recertified by a factory
technician
Measuring
g Corrosion Potential
ƒ PH – Measures
Acidity/Alkalinity
ƒ Even slightly acidic
contaminates may cause
corrosion to some
materials
ƒ The
Th higher
hi h the
th humidity,
h idit
the more active the
corrosive elements will be
ƒ Corrosive soot can be
measured with a Saltesmo
Test
Measuring
g Corrosion Potential
ƒ Most common corrosive
contaminant is hydrogen
chloride
ƒ The Saltesmo Test is a
very effective method for
measuring the presence of
halogenide surface
contamination
ƒ High humidity amplifies
the effect
th
ff t off these
th
corrosive elements
RECORDS &
INFORMATION
MEDIA
RECOVERY
What Is Information Media?
Library collections
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Books & bound volumes
Magazines & newspapers
Maps and charts
Paper based documents & archives
Film media
Photographic collections
Magnetic media
And many other possibilities…
possibilities
Do I Have Back Ups And If So Where Are They?
ƒ As companies and organizations have
become more involved in mergers and
acquisitions, the definition of what is
“vital” seems to have changed
ƒ We are seeing changes in laws and
codes governing the care and custody
of various types of information (HIPAA
& Sarbanes-Oxley)
ƒ Because of these changes… we have
noticed that many organizations are
keeping information that they have no
idea of it’s importance or even where it
is located
Recommendations
ƒ Decide quickly if you have back
ups
ƒ Do you have the time and space to
start recovery that minute
minute… and if
not do you have access to a
freezer?
ƒ What are your alternatives and
when should you call a
professional?
Freeze Drying
y g
Emergency
g
y response
p
is
essential to the success of
the process
ƒ Immediately have
documents or
papers/media frozen at
14º F to 32º F
ƒ The first 24 hours are
critical to reduce the
damage
FLOOD DAMAGE
BOOKS
AFTER CLEANING &
DRYING
Document Restoration
Documents, while
Documents
still frozen, are
placed inside the
true freeze-drying
chamber
Sublimation
The theory
Th
th
behind
b hi d the
th
freeze dry process is
called Sublimation
ƒ Converts water from a
frozen solid state to a
gas without going
back through a liquid
state
ƒ Liquid
Li id state
t t is
i where
h
damage occurs
Freeze Dry
y Theory
y
Decontamination
&
Microbial
Remediation
Mold
Conditions for Growth of
Microorganisms
Air
Favorable
Stagnant
Unfavorable Fast
Moving
Temperature
59-86 F
Below 55 F
Humidity
High
Low
Water Activity
Above 60%
Below 40%
pH
Acid
Alkaline
Mold and Odor Prevention
ƒ Remove wet, non
salvageable materials
ƒ Remove moisture from
air and structural
materials
ƒ Apply an EPA
registered
g
biocide to
affected areas and
materials
Mold Remediation Licensing
g
ƒ States requiring
q
g licensing
g to
perform mold remediation
ƒ Louisiana
ƒ Texas
Containment
HVAC Decontamination
ƒ Clean & Decontaminate All
Supply, Return & Exhaust
Ductwork, Diffusers, Grilles
& Registers
ƒ Remove, Disinfect And /Or
pp y Duct Lining
g
Seal The Supply
With An Anti-fungicidal
Coating
ƒ Source
So rce Remo
Removal
al and
Contact cleaning
ƒ NADCA certification
HVAC Decontamination
Putting
g the Plan
to Work
Emergency
g
y Response
p
Phase
ƒ Initial notification
•
•
•
•
First call
Call list/call tree
Team responsibilities
Meeting location and time
established
ƒ Command center
• Temporary
• Permanent
ƒ Communications
• Public relations
• Employees
• Customers
Emergency
g
y Response
p
Phase
Communications (contd
(contd.))
ƒ Fire department, police, hospitals
ƒ Disaster recovery specialists
• Data backup company
• Restoration contractor
• Contingency planner
• Insurance broker
ƒ Phone center/call center
ƒ Web site
Business Resumption
p
Phase
ƒ Establishing a scope of work
• The big picture is a series of little
pictures combined
ƒ Implementing the restoration
scope of work
• Should be left up the restoration
contractor after approval
ƒ Monitoring the scope of work
• Keep progress logs
Business Resumption
p
Phase
ƒ Business resumption will be dictated by
the incident
ƒ Individual job and team responsibilities
may change
ƒ Chosen liaison
• One for each discipline
ƒ Establishing
g time-lines is critical to set
expectations
• Daily progress meetings
ƒ Establishing
g budgets
g
and controlling
g costs
ƒ Daily physical presence
ƒ Understanding stress
• Smile
• Help people help you
Thank You!

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