Captive Melodies - Jewish Federation of Tulsa

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Captive Melodies - Jewish Federation of Tulsa
JewishTulsa.org
Captive
Melodies
The Tulsa Jewish Review
May 2010 • Iyar 5770
Volume 81, Number 5
Holocaust
Educators
Jewish Federation of Tulsa Annual Meeting May 26th
Incoming Shlicha Edna Lapidot
ITAI LAVI
COMMUNITY SHALIACH, JEWISH
FEDERATION OF TULSA
This month we will have a very important guest, Edna Lapidot, Tulsa’s next Shlicha (pronunced Sh-Lee-Cha). Edna will
be visiting Tulsa May 9th through the 16th
for an orientation. During her week-long
visit she will meet community leaders,
Rabbis and lay leaders.
I’m sure many of you will have an opportunity to meet her. And, I’m sure you
will greet her with the warmest Tulsa
spirit and hospitality.
When you meet Edna, don’t say “Goodbye Itai.” This is not our farewell yet (there
will be many opportunities for that).
So welcome Edna Lapidot!
Edna Lapidot
InComing COMMUNITY Shlicha,
JEWISH FEDERATION OF TULSA
Eleven years ago, I packed a suitcase full
of naiveté and youthful spirit and arrived
in Boston, MA to direct the New England
Region of BBYO. I thought my army service as an Education Officer would help
me manage the teen activities. I assumed
the knowledge I had acquired in the field
of Land of Israel Studies (my bachelors
degree) would be relevant to the program’s
content. I thought my experience as a certified tour guide would contribute to my
success as an educator in the United States.
I discovered that these experiences were
not sufficient to serve the Jewish community in the States.
For two years, I worked with the BBYO
teens, and then for three years served as
the Youth Planning Associate with the
Boston Federation. I discovered that being
Jewish in the US added a different dimension to my identity. I was exposed to the
power of the organized Jewish world; I
became acquainted with some very wise
and inspiring individuals, some of whom
became mentors and others close friends;
and I learned that coalitions generate
strength and success. From all of these experiences and lessons, my heart was filled
with gratitude.
One day I understood that I missed my
country and its landscapes, I missed thinking, speaking, laughing and dreaming in
Hebrew and that I missed my family and
friends. I returned home.
Yosi, Edna, Tamar and Arielle Lapidot.
Today, I’m packing again, that same suit- came a full-time parent and homemaker,
case, but with less naiveté and more life ex- and he is looking forward to continuing in
perience. This time it is heavier, and with it that role during the Shlichut.
We pack our suitcases with happiness,
comes a family – Yosi, Tamar and Arielle.
Yosi coordinates the volunteer educational anticipation, and with a sense of adventure and mission. We do this because we
activities for the Society for the Protecbelieve that Shlichut is significant work
tion of Nature in Israel. He is an informal
in strengthening Jewish continuity and
educator at heart, an outdoor specialist
Peoplehood, and this is of great value to us.
and the person with whom I share my
I look forward to meeting the Tulsa
life. He did not travel to South America or
community in May. Le’Hitraot!
Thailand after his army service. Instead he
crossed Israel on foot for 4 months determined not to touch a car for the
duration of the journey. Tamar,
3.8, loves to sing, jump on one
foot and sleep in tents. Arielle,
only 2.4, and is an expert in
sandbox cooking and trying on
her sister’s shoes. Our “neighborhood park” of preference is
a natural spring located in the
Zichron Yaakov hills and if we
don’t sleep late on weekends we
meet friends to go on hikes.
During the past four years, I
have guided journeys to Poland
with high school students as
well as adult groups and IDF
officers’ missions. During my
Yosi, age 2-1/2 and big sister Tamar, almost 4.
absences from home Yosi be-
Founded in 1930 by Tulsa Section, National Council of Jewish Women • Published by the Jewish Federation of Tulsa
www.JewishTulsa.org
The Tulsa Jewish Review
(ISSN # 2154-0209) is published monthly by the
Jewish Federation of Tulsa
2021 E. 71st St., Tulsa, OK 74136.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Tulsa, OK
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Jewish Federation of Tulsa, 2021 E. 71st St., Tulsa, OK 74136
Jason Brimer
Editor
[email protected]
918-852-3838
Marcia Weinstein
Advertising Representative
[email protected]
918-746-0478
Emilyn Ann Arbital
Advertising Representative
[email protected]
918-399-1661
Jewish Federation of Tulsa
Brian E. Brouse
President, Jewish Federation of Tulsa
Gloria Estlin
Chair
JewishTulsa: The Tulsa Jewish Review
Barry A. Abels
Executive Director
David Bernstein
Director, Community Relations
To Submit Story Ideas,
Letters and Opinions
to the Editor:
Jason Brimer
918.852.3838
[email protected]
Editorial Deadline
May 12th
Advertising Deadline
Reservations, May 12th
Material, May 18th
We Need To Know
Have you or a family member
participated in Birthright Israel? If so,
please contact Barry Abels at [email protected]
jewishtulsa.org with your name, and
the year you traveled.
Thanks
Federation Annual Meeting
BARRY ABelS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
JEWISH FEDERATION OF TULSA
This month everyone is invited to the Federation Annual Meeting. Those of you
who are donors will have the opportunity to help chart our course for the next year
by voting for new board members and officers. Everyone will hear about some of our
accomplishments over the last year and find out more about what your Federation
is involved in locally and globally. This year we will also spend some time thanking
and saying goodbye to the Lavi-Zohar family. For various reasons, Tulsa now has
the distinction of having the most senior shaliach in the system in terms of time on
the job. Itai Lavi and his family will have been with us five years when they return
to Israel this summer. That has only occurred one other time in the history of the
program. I will miss Itai and Miki, as well as Peleg and Yuval, but I am glad to have
someone else to visit in Israel.
I know we will have fun sharing highlights of their time with us and enjoying
Israeli foods. But the small amount of time we will be devoting to electing board
members and officers, is something that bares reflection. Why? It is these volunteers
who help guide the course of the Federation for the next year and beyond. Board
members, officers, committee members and chairs, all have an impact on what we
do; the programs we provide, the funds we raise and allocate, and the policies that
govern our efforts. They want to make a difference in the life of our community. We
know that the Federation through allocating funds to local, Israel, and other overseas
projects and programs resettles and integrates immigrants to Israel; helps many of
our local children go to Jewish overnight camps; and at times helps Jewish Tulsan’s
with social services or financial emergencies. The Community Relations Committee
and the Council for Holocaust Education play critical roles in our community. We
fund programs that impact at risk children in Israel; we operate the CSJCC and help
keep our community fit; we provide space for BBYO meetings and programs and run
Camp Shalom. In some way we impact hundreds of people locally and thousands
around the globe. For some of us local needs are a priority, for others it is support
of Israel, and still for others there is a balance of multiple priorities. What is most
important to you?
Over the past year the board and staff have been working on a strategic plan and
one major component focuses on building better value. To that end we have held
several parlor meetings and interviews to understand what we can do to better
serve our community. We have found that people want more shared programs
between our institutions. We also heard comments that people don’t have enough
information about what the Federation does and how our funds are allocated. As
we work to address these concerns, we know that there are more opinions, concerns
and questions that you have. We will soon be scheduling more parlor meetings and
interviews. Our board and committees need your input and we hope that you will
take the opportunity to participate. We will be contacting a cross-section of the
community, or if you know you would like to participate, send an email to Debbie
O’Hearn or to me. You may also send me an email if you have a question or concern.
You will get an answer.
The Federation is here to serve the community, but the Federation is a collective:
we are staff, board members, other volunteers and donors. Together we are the
Federation, making a difference in people’s lives.
On the Cover: Tulsa-area Holocaust educators. From the left - Ruth Ann Cooper - Retired Teacher; Jean Bundy - Bixby Public Schools;
Nancy Pettus - Jenks Public Schools; Rhonda Johnson - Union Public Schools; Bob McCormac - Metro Christian Academy; Debbie Givens
- Retired Teacher; Donna Berryhill - Tulsa Public Schools; Naomi Poindexter - Edison Preparatory School.
The Mission of the Jewish Federation of Tulsa is to preserve and enhance Jewish life and well-being in Eastern Oklahoma, Israel, and the entire world.
Federation Honored by TGA
Tulsa Global Alliance
(TGA) will honor Marcello
Angelini, Aritistic Director
& CEO of The Tulsa Ballet,
and The Jewish Federation
of Tulsa, represented by
Itai Lavi, Shaliach, for their
significant contributions to
international understanding
at the 15h Annual Global
Vision Awards and Dinner
on May 25th in the International Ballroom at the
Downtown DoubleTree Hotel in Tulsa.
TGA annually presents the Global Vision Award to honor and
recognize individuals and institutions that have made a significant and lasting contribution to global understanding, world
political stability, religious accord, international trade, or cooperative efforts to solve international health, economic, social or
environmental challenges.
Tulsa Global Alliance was formed in 1995 with the merger of
the International Council of Tulsa (ICT) and Sister Cities International of Tulsa (SCIT). Tulsa Global Alliance bridges cultures
through awareness, education and opportunities. TGA provides
a world of services that involve international visitors, Sister Cities
exchanges, international business programs and global education.
In the early 1980’s the Jewish Federation of Tulsa initiated a
renewal project in Shikun Dalet, a depressed immigrant neighborhood in the midst of the thriving city of Tiberias, Israel. To
accomplish this goal, many Tulsans visited this area over the
years and became vigorous supporters of the program. In 1989
the Jewish Community’s partnership became so dynamic that it
spilled over to Tulsa as a whole and resulted in the Sister Cities
twinning between the city of Tulsa and the city of Tiberias.
The Global Vision Awards and Dinner reception and silent
auction starts at 6:00 p.m., awards program begins at 6:30 p.m.,
and is followed by an international dinner and entertainment.
Terry Hood, news anchor, KOTV The News on 6, is emcee for
the evening.
The price per individual is $125, and the 2010 sponsor levels
are from $1,500 to $10,000 and can be reserved by calling TGA at
918-591-4750. The support provided at this event will allow TGA
to continue its work in assuring that children and adults have a
better understanding of the world’s cultures through programs
like The Kids’ World International Festival, Sister Cities activities, International Business Seminars, and the International Visitor Leadership Program which brings potential world leaders to
Tulsa each year.
The Nahum Goldmann Fellowship
Guido Setton
Community Development Director
In March I had the opportunity to attend the 22nd Nahum
Goldmann Fellowship Program in Pag, Croatia. A very intense
learning experience for Jewish leaders and community workers
from all types of denominations, philosophies and religiosity. This
was my third time attending this program (I participated in one in
Stockolm and another in Sao Paulo).
I found particularly interesting a lecture by professor Steven
Bayme of the American Jewish Committee. He spoke about the
historical development of the first European Jewish communities that led to today’s Federation Annual Campaign. Initially
most Jewish councils were autonomous and the taxation of their
members was among their main responsibility. Membership in
the community was compulsory for all Jews. The king would tell
the Jewish leaders how much tax money he expected from the
community and the the Jewish council would raise those funds;
generating a surplus that would be allocated to internal operations
of the community. Surplus council funds were used for welfare,
burial services and other needs of the Jewish community.
While the Federation is not a tax collecting body, and membership in the community is optional, we still have many of the same
community needs as our predecessors.
UCLA professor David Myers, reinforced Bayme’s comments
adding that we should start thinking of a “Jewish Collective,” a
new supranational democratic structure that would represent the
world Jewry as a whole. His vision of a Jewish collective embodies
the concept of “Klal Israel.”
More details about the Nahum Goldmann Fellowship can be
found at www.ngfp.org.
If you are interested in learning more about the fellowships or
the topics above, email me at [email protected] and I will
be glad to continue the conversation.
Jewish Federation of Tulsa Annual Meeting
Honoring Itai Lavi
Wednesday, May 26th
Charles Schusterman JCC
Barbara and Dave Sylvan Auditorium
2021 East 71st Street
2 JewishTulsa
6:30 p.m.
Reception featuring wonderful Israeli food and
music by Rebecca Ungerman
7:00 p.m.
Annual Meeting, Election of Board and Officers
Recognition of Itai Lavi and Miki Zohar
Free Babysitting, Food and Door Prizes
AIPAC 2010: Tell the Story
Stephanie Singer
Student, University of Tulsa Law
School
Before going to my first AIPAC policy
conference in Washington DC this March,
I was marginally aware of what AIPAC was
and what it stood for. As I boarded a plane to
come home to Tulsa afterwards, I realized the
power AIPAC has to shape the world for the
better, and how I now play a role.
I originally signed up to go to my first
AIPAC conference because I thought it would
be fun. There were high profile speakers coming such as Hillary Clinton, Tony Blair, and
Alan Dershowitz. I had no idea what a profound impact who I met and what I learned
Tulsa’s AIPAC contingency lobbying Sen. Jim Inhofe
would have on me. Even though there were
over seven thousand delegates attending, I
of producing a nuclear weapon with Israel in its sights. Israel is
never felt more welcome.
surrounded by foes who wish her ill. Then I had a thought - what
The conference was held at the Washington DC convention
if there was no Israel? A deep feeling of loss hit me as I realized
center. The first two days of the conference were filled with speakhow important our Jewish homeland is, and not just to Israelis,
ers and breakout sessions. The last day culminated with thousands
but to Jews all over the world. Israel is our common bond.
of AIPAC delegates heading to Capitol Hill to lobby our Senators
and Congressmen. I lobbied Senator Coburn to endorse a letter
supporting tougher sanctions on Iran. We also lobbied
Katzour repreA beautiful smile makes
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message was direct and purposeful: Help Israel.
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The most moving speaker by far was Benjamin Netanyahu. I
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I never realized how important it is to advocate for Israel until I
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Temple Israel Hosted Training on
Caring for Infants and Toddlers
Sweet
Over two dozen international and American experts in infant
and toddler care participated in six-days of intensive training on
the Pikler Approach at Temple Israel Day Schools during midApril. Organized by Laura Briley, Day Schools President and
founder of Pikler/Loczy Fund USA, the sessions were facilitated
by Pikler Institute Director Anna Tardos and French psychologist
Agnes Szanto. Tardos is the daughter of Dr. Emmi Pikler and is
also the cousin of Tulsa’s own Dr. George Pikler.
Created in 1946 in Budapest, Hungary by Dr. Emmi Pikler, the
Pikler Institute is known worldwide as a training and research
center, and orphanage. The Pikler Approach focuses on: encouraging infants to develop ease and confidence in the ways they
move their bodies; offering simple play materials that respond
to what infants need; developing the infant’s sense of security by
providing attentive, one-on-one predictable caregiving; focusing
attention and warm interactions during caregiving times.
Tooth
The Tulsa Jewish Review 3
L’Dor V’ School Door:
Tulsa’s Holocaust Educators
“I grew up in Morton Grove, Illinois. If I’d lived three houses
down I would have been from Skokie,” explained Bob McCormac, history instructor at Metro Christian Academy. “A lot of
friends had at least one parent who was a Holocaust survivor. That
spurred my interest.”
McCormac is one of the dedicated instructors teaching Holocaust Studies to Tulsa-area middle and high school students.
Like many of the instructors teaching the Holocaust, McCormac
has attended the Arthur and Rochelle Belfer National Conference
for Educators, a professional development program of the United
States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
“Teenagers are very receptive to the subject matter,” explained
Rhonda Johnson, who teaches a survey course that includes
World War II. The workshops have taught her the methodological
considerations of teaching genocide: avoid comparisons of pain;
contextualize the history; translate statistics into people; do not
teach or imply that the Holocaust was inevitable. She finds that
the students produce some of their best work when writing about
the Holocaust. “You get their best work when you are dealing with
something that touches them emotionally.”
That is something Ruth Ann Cooper recognized when she began teaching the Holocaust eighteen years ago at Carver Middle
School. She was teaching the Diary of Anne Frank in her English
class and the students had lots of questions she couldn’t answer.
That is when she received an opportunity to attend a teacher’s
seminar in Israel. “No one from Oklahoma had ever been to the
program,” said Cooper. “When I returned from the seminar I
spent the summer writing a guide on teaching the Holocaust.”
4 JewishTulsa
Eighteen years later her curriculum is still being referred to by
local instructors.
All of the Holocaust instructors agree that the continued professional development they receive through the Council for Holocaust Education of the Jewish Federation of Tulsa and the Sherwin
Miller Museum of Jewish Art, is critical. “They’re wonderful,” said
Johnson of the Council
for Holocaust Education. “From the White
Rose to the lectures to
just being a general resource, we rely on the
Council,” Rhonda said.
“On a teacher’s salary
traveling to a conference
can be a barrier. When
a teacher is committed
to travel, the Council
for Holocaust Education
has generously provided
monetary help.” To that
comment David Bernstein, Director of the
Community Relations
said “It has been the best
investment we could
Holocaust Memorial plaque outside Edison
make.”
Preparatory School.
Captive Melodies: Musical Voices From the Holocaust
An Interfaith Yom Hashoah Community Event
Thursday, May 6th • 7:00 p.m. • Temple Israel
The Council for Holocaust Education will present the annual
Interfaith Yom HaShoah Commemoration - Captive Melodies:
Musical Voices from the Holocaust Thursday evening, May 6th.
This program, free of charge and open to the public, will be held
at Temple Israel.
Featured speaker Robert Elias, Executive Director of the OREL
Foundation, is a renowned authority on Holocaust music. The
OREL Foundation, spearheaded by James Conlon, director of the
Los Angeles Opera, is devoted to re-discovering 20th century musical treasures that were suppressed by the Nazis.
Joining Robert Elias at this commemoration will be Barry Epperley, Artistic Director of the Tulsa Signature Symphony and Director of the Performing Arts Institute at Tulsa Community College. Dr. Epperley will present musical compositions which were
composed by Jewish composers in the Theresienstadt concentration camp. A String Quartet and a String Trio of local musicians
will play these compositions during the program.
The Interfaith Yom HaShoah program culminates in a Candle
Lighting Ceremony in remembrance of the six million Jews as
well as others who were killed during the Holocaust.
This year former Mayor Kathy Taylor will narrate the Candle
Lighting Ceremony. Joining her will be seven Tulsans representative of art, music and literature who will light the individual
candles. Those participating are Hannibal Johnson, writer; Noah
Spiegel, Director of Production at the Tulsa Opera; Clark Wiens,
founder and President of the Circle Cinema; Dr. Jan Finer, physician; Louis Davidson, photographer and member of the Council
for Holocaust Education; Ruth Lebow, artist, and Rich Fisher, musician and Manager of KWGS at the University of Tulsa.
Following the ceremony, those attending will be invited to tour
the student exhibits prepared on this year’s theme of suppressed
music. Middle and high school teachers from various Tulsa area
schools who teach the Holocaust encourage their students to
express themselves in creative ways through art, music, writing
and art projects. The Council for Holocaust Education provides
encouragement for teachers and students who study the history of
the Holocaust.
As part of this larger Tulsa cooperative effort, the Jewish Federation of Tulsa has donated 50 copies of Martin Goldsmith’s
book, The Inextinguishable Symphony to the City-County Library
System. This book is the story of Goldsmith’s parents who were
musicians in Germany when Hitler rose to power. Goldsmith
details their lives as they were more and more suppressed and
intimidated by Hitler’s officials until they were finally able to leave
Germany for the United States. Copies of Goldsmith’s book will be
on sale during the program on May 6.
Also available for sale at this year’s commemoration will be
Through Eva’s Eyes, an acclaimed children’s book, written and illustrated by Phoebe Unterman of Kansas City, granddaughter of
Eva Unterman, Holocaust survivor and chairperson of the Council for Holocaust Education.
Information on the Council, its programs and the Interfaith
Commemoration can be obtained by calling David Bernstein at
the Jewish Federation of Tulsa, 918-495-1100.
The Tulsa Jewish Review 5
Turn On.
Tune In.
Shvitz Out.
Couch potato? Exercise nut?
Why not the be best of both?
The Fitness Center at the CSJCC features Personal
Entertainment Player outfitted Precor cardiovascular
equipment, letting you watch videos from your iPod or
tune in shows on cable while you improve your health
and shed some pounds.
So get off of the couch and go watch some TV.
Try A Week For Free!
Feel like working out, or just catching up on your shows? Try
a week on us. For a guest pass, contact Amy Underwood at
918-495-1111 or [email protected]
The Fitness Center at the CSJCC
0ERSONAL4RAININGs3TRENGTH#LASSESs-ASSAGE4HERAPY
Lithuanian Jewry Needs Help to Further Fuel Renaissance
Sanford R. Cardin
president, Charles and
Lynn Schusterman Family
Foundation
The warmth emanating from the
conference room of the Conti Hotel in
Vilnius stood in stark contrast to the damp
weather outside. Just steps away from the
site of the Vilnius Ghetto, remnants of
which can still be found, more than 30
young Jewish activists from across Europe
were miraculously networking, studying
and sharing their dreams for the Jewish
future.
As I listened to their conversations, it
quickly became clear why the conference
organizers had decided to hold this
meeting in Lithuania: There is no place in
the world quite like Vilnius, once home
to one of the largest and most respected
Vilnius’ only currently operating synagogue was built in 1894.
Jewish communities in the world.
Vilnius in the 1700s had approximately
Vilnius on the darkest of days? Not by a long shot.
110 synagogues and 10 houses of study (yeshivot). It was home to
In a story now playing out all across Europe, out of the ashes
the great rabbinic sage, Elijah ben Solomon Zalman, the famous
and despite the current economic challenges, Jewish life in Vilnius
Gaon of Vilnius, and Yiddish was the lingua franca. As a center
is slowly re-emerging.
of Jewish life, intellectualism and culture, it was known as the
The president of the community is Dr. Simon Alperavitchius, a
“Jerusalem of Lithuania.”
white-haired elder for whom Yiddish remains his mother tongue.
By the time World War II started, approximately 250,000 Jews
His executive director is a charismatic 28-year-old named Simon
were living in Lithuania -- more than 50 percent of the population Gurevichius, who after graduating from university at the top
of Vilnius was said to be Jewish.
of his class decided that his career could wait while his beloved
All that changed, however, with the invasion of the Nazis in
Jewish people could not. Simon has molded a community in his
1941. Some 180,000 Lithuanian Jews were murdered within
image: young, energetic and optimistic.
months of the country’s fall to the Nazis. Before the nightmare
Under the leadership of the two Simons, Vilnius has developed
was over, more than 95 percent of this once-thriving Jewish
a thriving kindergarten with 40 pupils this year and 80 in 2011,
community was slaughtered. Properties were confiscated (unlike
if the necessary space can be found and funded. There is also a
in other European countries, they have yet to be returned to the
K-12 day school, among the best academic institutions of its kind
Lithuanian Jewish community, despite international appeals),
in Vilnius, in need of space and funds to be able to admit the
synagogues destroyed and cemeteries desecrated (with the
students it now must wait-list.
tombstones used for other purposes, including the building of
Informal Jewish educational opportunities in Vilnius are
steps and sidewalks).
equally impressive.
Today, Lithuania and its Jewish community of 3,500 again are
But what the future holds for this community is unclear.
under pressure, albeit of a significantly different kind. They are
Without the continued assistance of the American Jewish
suffering an economic “double whammy.” A darling of investors as Joint Distribution Committee, as well as the infusion of funds
a leading emerging market for the past 10 to 15 years, it turns out
and expertise from other sources, it will be very difficult for
that most of the growth Lithuania was experiencing was a result
Lithuanian Jewry to keep its emerging young leaders active and
of the global real estate bubble. So when that bubble popped, so
engaged. That’s the bad news.
did Lithuania.
The good news is that philanthropists can make a big
Real estate values have tumbled, banks are in trouble, credit is
difference in Vilnius’ Jewish life for relatively small sums. The
unavailable and the economy is struggling.
key institutions are in place, the community is motivated and
As if that weren’t bad enough, the cost of electricity and heat is
the leadership is as committed today as it was when the Israeli
about to increase by 30-40 percent at the same time as people are
poet Abba Kovner, himself a leader of the Jewish partisans in the
being laid off, salaries are being frozen or cut, and state pensions
Vilnius Ghetto, vowed “to fight rather than go to the slaughter like
are being reduced or eliminated.
sheep.”
When Lithuania joined the European Union, it agreed to shut
Left to its own devices, Lithuanian Jewry has a chance to bring
down its Ignalina nuclear power plant, a facility susceptible to the
itself back to life in ways virtually no one believed possible just
same kind of problem experienced in Chernobyl. With the close
a few years ago. With the help of others, the future of this onceof the plant on Dec. 31, much more expensive sources of power
dominant and resilient center of Jewish life can be assured.
are needed now to meet the energy requirements of the country.
Is the future of Lithuanian Jewry as bleak as the skies over
The Tulsa Jewish Review 7
We’ll See You At...
CBE SHAVU’OT DRUM CIRCLE
Tuesday, May 18th
7:00 p.m. Dinner $12
Reservations 918-583-7121
8:00 p.m. Service
In it’s sixth year, the Shavu’ot Drum
Circle will again be led by local master
drummer Michael Back. After a songcycle addressing the themes of slavery,
rescue, and the experience of wilderness
wandering, the evening will culminate
with drumming designed to mirror the
power of Torah-giving at Sinai. In the final
moments, those assembled will recite the
Ten Commandments by candlelight before
the open ark in the Sanctuary. Bring your
own hand drums (BYOHD) or use the
Synagogue’s.
Temple to Confirm Six
Tuesday, May 18th, 7:00 p.m.
During the Shavuot Eve Service Temple
Israel will observe the 200th anniversary
of Confirmation, a practice that began in
1810 in Seeson, Germany. Members of this
Confirmation class are: David Clayman, son
of John and Leah Clayman; Tyler Coretz,
son of Rob and Kim Coretz; Michael Lang,
son of Lisa Lang and Chris Lang; Bryan
Vecera, son of Robert and Elise Vecera;
Britney Wambold, daughter of David and
Erin Wambold; and Bryce Warren, son of
Mark and Eileen Warren.
Jews of the Wild West
Friday, May 21st
Temple Israel
6:00 p.m. Western-style dinner
Adults $12; children 12 and younger $6
Dinner reservations by May 14th 918-3928475 or [email protected]
7:00 p.m. Service
Saturday, May 22nd
10:30 a.m. Service followed by potluck
lunch
Daniel Alford at [email protected] or 918293-1309 for lunch contributions
David Epstein, Publisher and Managing
Editor of the Western States Jewish History
Quarterly Journal and renowned storyteller
will speak about why Jews were so
successful in the Wild West. He’ll continue
Saturday morning with Rabbis of the Wild
West and will be lecturing earlier in the
week at the National Cowboy and Western
Museum.
CBE RELIGIOUS SCHOOL GRADUATION
SHABBAT
Friday, May 21st
6:15 p.m Dinner
Adults $12; children priced accordingly
Dinner reservations by Wednesday, May
19th at 918-583-7121
7:00 p.m. Service
Graduating sixth grade are: Matthew
Alexander, son of Todd and Kim Alexander;
Rachel Brodsky, daughter of Randi and
Paul Brodsky; Micah Cash, son of Sharon
and Jamie Cash; Izaiah Cohen, son of Ivette
and Craig Cohen; Nathan Coupe, son of
Deborah and Garrett Zelkind; Taylor King,
son of Alyson and Alex King; Nathan Levit,
son of Janet and Ken Levit; Max Loftis,
son of Tom Loftis; Jakob Matthews, son
of Rhett Matthews; Adam Romer, son of
Sherry and David Romer; Isabella Silberg,
son of Craig Silberg; Otto Singer, son of
Kelley and Todd Singer; Megan Browning,
daughter of Sherry and David Romer; and
Maxwell Sterling, son of Phil Sterling.
Jewish Genealogy to discuss
National Archives records
Sunday, May 23rd at 2:00 p.m.
CSJCC - Dan Room
For info Melissa Schnur at 918-492-1818
Titled Digging For Treasure In Your
Pajamas - Searching National Archives
Records Administration Using Your
Personal Computer, the meeting will teach
how to search National Archives records
using your own personal computer.
Westbrook Bar Mitzvah MAY 8th at TI
Randy and Carolyn Westbrook invite the community to join the celebration of their son Max’s Bar
Mitzvah at 11:00 a.m. May 8th at Temple Israel with
Kiddush lunch following.
Max is a seventh grade student at Edison and enjoys computers, skate boarding, music and karate.
Max plays the guitar, bass, drums, violin, piano, and
Max Westbrook
May 8th at TI
Coretz Bat Mitzvah May 29th at TI
Amy Michelle Coretz, daughter of Kim and
Rob Coretz, will become a Bat Mitzvah at Temple
Israel on Saturday, May 29th at 11:00 a.m.
A sixth grade student at Riverfield Country Day
School, Amy enjoys riding horses, playing with
her dogs, cooking and getting together with her
friends.
Celebrating with Amy will be her brothers
8 JewishTulsa
clarinet. He enjoys his responsibilities working as
a TA in the computer lab and also assisting Cantor
Kari on guitar in the sanctuary on Sunday mornings. Max was preceded on the bimah by his older
sisters Julia and Emily as well as his older brother
Jordan.
Adam, Tyler and Ryan, sister Mindy, and
grandparents Irene & Stan Burnstein and Mollie
Coretz. Joining Amy on this occassion are aunts,
uncles, cousins and friends.
The community is invited to join Amy and her
family for services and the Kiddush luncheon to
follow.
Amy Michelle Coretz
May 29th at TI
Ungerman Releases CD
Rebecca Ungerman has long been a fixture on the Tulsa music scene. Last year,
her fans voted her Urban Tulsa Weekly’s
Absolute Best Female Vocalist of 2009.
What most locals don’t know is that Rebecca travels all over the world teaching
and working with Jewish teenagers as
both a musician and a Judaic educator.
For the first time ever, Rebecca combines
her faith and her sound to bring you The
Jewish Album. She will celebrate this with
a concert at Studio K on Thursday, May
20th at 7:00 p.m.
The Jewish Album was officially released
this past February in Dallas at the International Convention of the B’nai Brith Youth
Organization. Ungerman & her band
rocked a standing room only crowd of
over 750 teenagers from around the world.
The Jewish Album takes both modern &
traditional Jewish music and filters them
through Ungerman’s musical sensibilities.
Never before has Jewish music been infused with the Tulsa Sound, and it’s a powerful combination. Ungerman’s goal for the
music was that every song should be either
ridiculously sublime or sublimely ridiculous. Fans both Jewish & gentile alike will
enjoy styles that range from rock to Latin,
Dick Dale surf to beautiful ballads.
Studio K is located at 1212 East 45th
Place South. Tickets are $20 and are
available at the Tulsa Ballet Box office. The
Jewish Album is available now for digital
download at www.oysongs.com. Hard
copies are available locally at Sweet Tooth
Candies & Gifts or online at
www.cdbaby.com.
Faingold to Perform at OK Motzart
Abigail Bobrow
Contributor
Noam Faingold was just beginning to
explore pushing the boundaries — internationally and musically ­— when he arrived
in the United States in 1990.
Faingold, now 25, was born in Israel, the
only child of Argentinean and Brazilian
parents. He and his family ultimately settled in Tulsa in 1997 after his father joined
the faculty of the University of Tulsa as a
linguistics professor.
Faingold reflected on the musical and
creative foundation Tulsa provided via
Internet chat from his home in London
where he is pursuing a Ph.D. in music
composition at King’s College.
“When I graduated from high school
at Booker T. Washington, I was mostly a
painter, and I was playing guitar, bass and
drums in everything from punk and metal
bands to jazz groups.”
It wasn’t until he attended the University
of Tulsa, starting out first in painting then
switching to music, that he discovered his
love of classical music. He then received
his master’s in music composition at New
York University in 2009.
Yet, this conductor, performer and com-
poser never stopped studying a variety of
forms of musical expression and incorporating them into his compositions. He
combined these influences with the Israeli
and South American music he grew up
listening to.
“I consider all music to be fair game
if you think it’s interesting and it sounds
good. I think it’s human nature to want to
say, ‘this is classical’ or ‘this is rock or jazz
or pop.’ But I like combining many different genres in the same piece like Middle
Eastern music with rock and tango and
classical.”
Faingold blends this eclectic philosophy
in his own group, The Noam Faingold
Orchestra. The BBC found the sound so
unique that one of its songs was recognized out of thousands of entries from
around the world in the “Next Big Thing”
competition in 2007.
But laboring over compositions in
London isn’t keeping Faingold away from
Tulsa for long. He will be attending the OK
Mozart Festival in Bartlesville in June to
listen to one of his creations. He arranged
a jazz-rock-Beethoven piece for the Tulsa
quartet, Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, to perform at the event.
Composer Noam Faingold
“Tulsa still plays a pretty big role in life.
My family still lives here, and we belong to
B’nai Emunah. A lot of my Jewish and musical roots are there. My time in the Tulsa
music community and then my formal
studies at TU definitely played a huge part
in preparing me for what I’m doing musically now.”
Noam Faingold’s orchestration LUDWIG
performed by Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey will
premiere at the 2010 OK Mozart Festival,
8:00 p.m., Saturday, June 12th on the Main
Stage at the Bartlesville Community Center. Tickets and information are available
at www.okmozart.com.
Turn It Up To Eleven
Rocker Matt Shapiro
San Francisco singer and nightclub promoter Matt Shapiro, son of Stan and Anne
Shapiro, was recently featured on the San
Winder
Francisco Chronicle’s SFGate.com.
Shapiro, fronts the rock band Three Weeks
Clean and is the music director at the Elbo
Room, where he promotes everything from
Latin and hip-hop to indie rock and metal.
You can link to Three Weeks Clean performing at myspace.com/threeweeksclean.
The Tulsa Jewish Review 9
Fitzgeralds
Kumon
David Dopp
Boulder at Fourteenth
585-1151
Eye Institute
Craters
'Call Charles'
'Call Charles'
'Call Charles'
Charles Pest
TM
Maximize
your
day
Personal &
Errands
Business
Services
Bobbi and Bob Warshaw
Office 918.747.3807; Cell 918.852.5302
www.errands-to-go.com
Schrier
American
Passport
10 JewishTulsa
Terry and Madelyn Rosenthal
(918) 584-3323
Fax - 918 584-7378
[email protected]
McGraw Burger
P.O. Box 471100
Tulsa, OK 74147-1100
7647 East 46th Place
Honoring Donors to the
Tulsa Jewish Retirement & Health Care Center
Butterflies
“Light to Life” Tribute Fund Helping to Keep the Light Burning
CONTRIBUTIONS
RECEIVED FROM
TJRHCC
Sandy Cardin
Iris Chandler
Janet & James Deam
Jeanette Frieden
Sharon & Raymond Gordon
Frieda & Marty Grossbard
Diane & Jim Jakubovitz
Sue Riggs-Jensen
Carol A. Kallmeyer
Shirley & Norm Levin
Paula & Malcolm Milsten
Tanya & Florin Nicolae
Saitong & Roger Pickering
Mindy & Harris Prescott
Genya Reichman
Lynne & Michael Rosenstein
Leslie Sanditen
Jolene & Jim Stephens
Susan Surchev
Martha & Fred Strauss
Isrella Taxon
Eva Unterman
Gertrude Weisman
Ellen & Robert Wolitarsky
James Wolitarsky
SPEEDY RECOVERY Martha Strauss
IN LOVING MEMORY
Alena Horska Molly Katz
Bill Meyer
Barbara Pappan
Dorothea Rozen
Steve Sanditen
Helen Stern
Alicia Urban
Joe Winsten
BIRTHDAY
Isrella Taxon
HONORING
Lynn & Stacy Schusterman
Isrella Taxon Florence Jacobs
Florence Jacobs, passed away April 15, 2010. She was 93 years
old. She was preceded in death by her husband of 63 years,
Charles Jacobs. She is survived by her children, Lawrence Jacobs and wife Bonnie, Rosalind Quigley and husband Tony, her
grandchildren, Bradley and wife Shanna, David, Michael and
wife Jennifer and Benjamin Jacobs and her great-grandchildren,
Ashley, David, Brian, Lilah and Zeki Jacobs. Florence was born
January 12, 1917, in Tulsa, OK. She graduated from Central High
School and attended University of Tulsa. She was a lifelong member of B’nai Emunah Synagogue and participated in many community and national organizations. She was a loving and caring
wife, mother and grandmother who enriched the many lives she
touched.
Treasures in Your Attic-Appraisal Day
We’re not calling you an antique, we are simply calling for your
antiques and collectables during the TREASURES IN YOUR ATTIC-appraisal day, Sunday May 16th, from noon until 5:00 p.m.
Have you ever wondered what your “treasures” may be worth?
Based on the popular TV program Antiques Road Show, the
Sherwin Miller Museum is bringing a panel of experts led by its
director, Arthur M. Feldman, to the Zarrow Campus to appraise
objects and items of memorabilia. Experts participating this year
will be: Mike Anderson (Gold Coins & Coins); Linda Greever
(Native American Art); Laurie Nidiffer (Jewelry); Mike Ratcliffe
(American, Furniture-Victorian, Glass, residential contents, Victoriana); Lottie Stevens (Art glass, silver and art pottery); Phillip
Ward (European & American items and glass) and Gary Piatoni,
who is a regular on the Antiques Road Show, ( Fine Art and Antiques). The Museum’s own Dr. Karen York will also be appraising
objects.
The cost is $15.00 for one item and three items, for $40.00.
Appraisals will take place in the Barbara and Dave Sylvan Auditorium at the Charles Schusterman JCC. If you have something
examined you will also receive free admission to the Museum
during the event.
We look forward to seeing your objects as well as the stories
which usually accompany them.
Museum Revisits the Story of Anne Frank
Arthur M. Feldman
Executive Director
The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art
More than a half a century after her death Anne Frank’s words,
translated into more than 60 languages, still echo throughout the
world.
The teenager’s diary, a recorded history of both her own adolescent awakening and her time spent in hiding during the Holocaust,
is the theme of a new installation at the Museum.
This new permanent display in the Herman and Kate Kaiser Holocaust Exhibition is in response to a myriad of requests by schools
and individuals who saw the original exhibition at the Museum in
2005. Anne Frank is the Shoah’s ‘most famous victim’ and her face
with the sad shy smile is one of the icons of the 20th Century. Anne
Frank’s story resonates in the life of every human being, as well as
highlighting what went on historically during the years of WWII.
The message in this new installation is for our audience to view a
reiteration of her story and to refocus thinking about how individuals can make a difference when confronted with issues of human
rights and genocide.
BovassoandBeal.com
Sharna B0vasso
[email protected]
918.605.2995
4105 S Rockford Ave
McGraw
Tulsa,Bavasso
OK 74105
(918)592-6000
fax (918)398-5396
Dee Ann Beal
[email protected]
918.688.5467
McGraw
R E A L T O R S ®
B o va s s o & B e a l T e a m
The Tulsa Jewish Review 11
Teach Me To Number My Days
Rabbi Charles P. Sherman
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Psalm 90 says, rather despairingly, “All our days pass away; we
spend our years like a sigh. The span of our life is 70 years or, given
Eliyahu Krigel, MA
strength, 80 years. But the best of them are trouble and sorrow.
Director of Education, Congregation B’nai Emunah
They pass by speedily, so teach us to number our days that we may
acquire a heart of wisdom.”
Shavuot
Life can be like the Psalmist describes in a moment of depresDID YOU KNOW?
sion – too short, too fleeting. And even if our years are long, there
is too much suffering (or as Woody Allen retells in Annie Hall: two
• Shavuot is like the anniversary of the giving of the Torah
women are sitting having lunch in a Catskills hotel. One says to the
• Shavuot is one of the three pilgrimage festivals. Jews from
other: “The food here is terrible.” To which the other one responds:
all over used to travel to Jerusalem to celebrate the giving of
“Yea! And such small portions.”).
the Torah.
The Psalmist seems to think that the antidote to such despair
• On Shavuot we remember our relationship with holiness and
is the prayer to God to help us “number our days.” One way to
the Divine is not only like a King and servant but more like
number them is to count down, to cross them off, to obsess about
mutually respected partners engaged in an ongoing dialogue
getting older and how little time we might have left. This is the
and conversation.
“hourglass view” - with each passing minute more grains of sand
• We are encouraged to eat cheese products on Shavuot
will have dropped through the middle, emptying out the reserve on
and to stay up studying Torah all night to remind us of the
top. This hardly sounds like an antidote to despair.
nourishment we receive each and every day from our sacred
Rabbi Harold Kushner suggests that another approach is to view
teachings.
life not as starting full and every day having less, but instead to
Sites to See
view life as starting empty – like an empty treasure chest. Each mowww.babaganewz.com
ment fully lived, each encounter, each new insight is like a jewel
www.myjewishlearning.com
added to the chest. Each day then reflects more and more, not less
www.torahtots.com
and less.
www.akhlah.com
“Teach us to number our days” – to make each day count. If you
are like me, many days go by barely noticed, taken for granted.
What if I could find a way to count the day – to make the day count
– to bless the day?
Judaism provides countless ways to do this. But these days, one
in particular stands out. We literally count the days from Passover to Shavuot (from Exodus to Mount Sinai; from liberation to
Torah). We count them day by day; they total 49 (a perfect seven
times seven). We remind ourselves that our liberation from slaveryBrouse's
is not the end of the story; it is the beginning. It is the chance to
think about living a life that matters. We start that by learning how
to count the days, one by one – to not let a day go by without noticing it.
We call these days “the counting of the Omer.” Whatever their
JOEL PARKER
origin, they offer us the chance to learn an elemental spiritual lesCrafted in Italy
son – day by day, to simply count the day, to notice it, to bless it.
I’m grateful to my colleague Rabbi Shira Milgrom for this lesSee the Spring & Summer Collections now at
son. I hope that this spiritual exercise will help open our hearts and
souls to the gift of each day with which we are blessed to live.
1718 Utica Square
New Equipment Donated to the Fitness Center
742-3301
Brouse’s
Through generous donations by The Frank Family Foundation and
Mr. Grady Ash the CSJCC Fitness Center has been outfitted with
new state-of-the-art cardiovascular, free weight and circuit training
equipment.
The cardio equipment, manufactured by Precor, features Personal
Entertainment Players, allowing you to watch videos from your iPod
or tune in shows on cable while on screens mounted in front of you.
The Precor circuit training equipment is user friendly, and is engineered to move smoothly with the body.
The Fitness Center also offers personal training, strength classes and
massage therapy.
If you’re interested in a free one-week pass at the CSJCC Fitness
Center, contact Amy Underwood at [email protected] or
918-495-1100.
Advertise In
JewishTulsa: The Tulsa Jewish Review
918-495-1100
&
ar na
Irvin Frank Aquatics C
ent
er
EN ING DAY
P
O
Sh
Saturday, May 29
TWO WEEKS LEFT
to save with early bird prices!
w w w . c s j c c . o r g
EARLY BIRD
PRICES END
MAY 14!
Memberships Available!
YOU CAN SAVE
15% ON CAMP PRICES
BY JOINING THE JCC!
Contact Shelly Callahan at 495.1111
for membership information.
Call Shelly at 495-1111 for more information.
BABYSITTING
AVAILABLE
WHILE YOU WORK OUT
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. (2 hour max.)
Call 495-1111 for details or reservations.
Charles Schusterman JCC • 2021 E. 71st Street
Schusterman
Visiting Artists
Program
welcomes
2010
For more information, contact the Camp Shalom
office at 918.495.1111 or visit www.csjcc.org.
Give the “GIFT OF LIFE”
Amir
Gwirtzman
JEWISH
COMMUNITY
BLOOD DRIVE
Gwirtzman, a veritable Pied
Piper, will perform with his
20 instruments at the
IN COOPERATION WITH
Oklahoma Blood Institute
Oklahoma Jazz Hall
of Fame
on
Saturday, May 15
8:00 p.m.
For ticket information,
please call the
OK Jazz Hall of Fame
at 918.281.8600
in cooperation with:
Jewish
Federation
of Tulsa
WHOSE LIFE
CAN YOU
SAVE?
C h a r l e s
a n d
Ly n n
SCHUSTERMAN
FAMILY FOUNDATION
TO REGISTER
CALL MINDY
AT 495-1111
Sunday, May 16
9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Temple Israel
2004 E. 22nd Street
Sponsored by the
TI Brotherhood
CHARLES SCHUSTERMAN JCC
MAY EVENTS
Check out the events happening this
month at your local JCC! For more
information on any event, call 495.1111
or go online to csjcc.org.
S
M
T
2
9
16
23
30
3
10
17
24
31
4
11
18
25
MAY
W T
5
12
19
26
6
13
20
27
F
7
14
21
28
S
1
8
15
22
29
Day Event
Description
Location
Time
6
YIDDISH
BUDDIES
Yiddish with Jack Zanerhaft.
CSJCC
3 pm
12
RETIRED MEN'S CLUB
Guest speaker and luncheon.
CSJCC
12 Noon
14
REGISTRATION
DEADLINE
Last day to receive Early Bird Prices for
Camp Shalom!
CSJCC
16
JEWISH COMMUNITY
BLOOD DRIVE
Sponsored by TI Brotherhood in cooperation TEMPLE
with Oklahoma Blood Institute.
ISRAEL
26
JFT ANNUAL MEETING Reception, Annual Meeting and honoring of JFT/CSJCC
Itai Lavi.
6:30 pm
29
SUMMER SWIM
SEASON BEGINS!
Sharna and Irvin Frank Aquatics Center
opens for the 2010 season.
AQUATICS
CENTER
12 Noon – 8 pm
30
CAMP SHALOM
OPEN HOUSE
Come and see what Camp Shalom is all
about!
CSJCC
2 – 4 pm
30
HEBREW CLUB
Meet and speak Hebrew!
For more information, call 495.1111
CSJCC
1 – 2 pm
31
MEMORIAL DAY
JFT/CSJCC Closed. Sharna and Irvin Frank
Aquatics Center OPEN.
AQUATICS
CENTER
12 Noon – 8 pm
9:30 am –
12:30 pm

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