1-2 - The Wesley Center Online

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1-2 - The Wesley Center Online
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EDITOI%I./kL
34
January,
1959
Number
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The Preacbiqg
The
Gbal 6f Our
The Avmihian
View of Iiaspi_atioo
A Comp;}r_son
of Mini.Qerial
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of boyhood.
SO join me in a trip back
down memory lane,
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Back to the farm:' on.our farm. we.
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ran substantial
hei'ds of cattle bemdes
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having bro_d wheat: acreages.
But it
" .' : !s'the cattle and tim. pastures
I wan_
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problem, was:a
all .cattlemet_,
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The question simmered
down to this.
simple consideration
•"Why did. the
cow crawl throughthe
fence?"
'No!
until that question was answered
did
we know how to cope with the issue,
"
:
Hugh C. Bemmr
(;ell(*l;l[
S[III&*IItlI_2111JPII[_
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NAZARENE
PUBUSH[N_
HOUS_2,_3r,_,_.t_,_,,,,e.
so,s2__.,,,_..
c,_v4;_.li._,,. s._,.
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h{_sbandry for allcattle
_earing our
brand.
But
1o the
"itchyfooted"
steer along the fence there _vas just
one
goal--get
beyond
that
fence.
....
Hungry?
No
Thirsty?
No! Plain,
unexplained
wanderlust;
So tbat was
why some broke fence.
THmi others had hfid grasz-Pe_'speclive.'
Regardless
of how ample the
you'to re'visit with nee.
We tried to keep our pasture fences'
intact:
But it' was still _tot.always
possible to avoid h_ivirlg some cattle'
-crawling
through
the '-fence:.in "the
- search for other pasturage.
And our
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S_.nuc! Yodng
" D. 1. V.,_dL,rpool "
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/':dih',rs
Hard_' C. Powers
G.B. Willh,mson
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.the enclosure.
They.forgot
that we
gladly'- p.rovided
water,
protection
from 'infectibn,
and general, ariimal
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the reas°ns for his'departure
to other
. denominational
pastures
Ihave
been
taken back in my'tl_ink to experiences r
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Edilor'" ':
BOIS,
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LAUIHSTON
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'By, Norman
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ment of liberty.
They forgot that the
ac.res jusL.beyofid
our fence were
largely identical wi/h the acres inside
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(I), Rdlph Etlrh,
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Offices (I'), Ch!!tlo_ l_mh!t
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W. Touch. Jamc:_ M_'Graw
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Striving, Rcubc_l R. Welch" . . ..... i..:...
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The Call to tim Ministry
(I). Rosc6e'Persh.l(
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A M ustecs _A_rh'ePrays..Rnlh
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Sermon Workslnq3: Nclso_ G, Mini:
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enjoyed-through
the years,
So I grieved,inm_'
heart•
Bu_ in
thinl_ing and probing a bit deeper for
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of Geoi'ge
Th'e Mini_te( and the Psychiah;ist
:(I), Edwin.Fair
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Kcep.Mm_ o.n Their Feet (IVI. D.Shetb!j
Cm'lett ....
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We discovered
that
the_'e were
usually
thi'ee distinct
reasons
for
fence-breaking
cattle_
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First, _" deeply, ingrained
wanderlust was the most difficultreason
to
.explain,
Some "cattle had
"itchy
feet" and despised fences because wire
"andposts meant for thorn an ififringe-
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Why Dkl Hc Lea_ e. NE
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EEhtorlal, W.l_at Makes the Cr_t c f_ck
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.A "vzm¢ wonderfulf_:iend'of
mine"
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left the Church of the Nazarene
. a while ago and joined anothe/" de:
nomination:.
It was a personal
loss
andalsd
somewhat
of ashock,
for I
realized that there would be "scarcely
an Opporlunity
in.the'future
for the
fellowship with him that I had deeply"
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W. TeUETT (St'el Doge 7)
C )%E/_*EOIGE
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Why Did He te ave-?
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Volume
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grass
was inside our
grass,
outside
lusher
---,-Or so the), was
ithought.
problem
common to.
bolh then and noW,
Get hack to the critter's motive;
•'begin to work out a solution,
.
.
-Boo_
e.,_o..'Na_a_.._
P._i ,_n_
,,o_e.
pdsture_
the :
and
greener
Beyond-.tbe"
....
wasfenCeunmixedthe
vitamin-rich_yith
weedsPrmrmor
.brush
_'grass
of this they were "sure,. Inside-they
Weretired
bu_kb_u_
were.part
of mouthing
and" prairie
_
of every
over
sage_
pasture.
fdxtail,
_
WhiCh
So with
"
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athere
hastywasglance
around
•they.decided
'ohly one thing to do." Get
then
that better-lopking
grass though
it
meant
broken
wire, broken
posts,
-:-" fence opemngs td tempt more homeloving cattleastray: It is surprising
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"how die "'greener-grass-beyond"
phil_sophy.bl!nded
them to the folly of
their ways.
It is ever thus!
'But there was 0nebther
reason why.
our cattle broke fence_ .And this is
the one that always was tile. hardest
" - to-solve and the mos_ embarrassing-oar pasturewas
too bare. "No apold_
gi_s for drought satisfied
the cattle:
No exp|afiations
about.all other cattle"
facing the Same grass shortage: solved:
our problem.
The stark
fact re-
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mained:
there was not enough grass
to adequately
feed their God-given
hunger.
So through the heat and the
soaring drought
ave battled
the ex. hausting,.frustrating
_i'oblem of fence
breakers,
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Now
back
to nag" friend.
Who de-
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lenses, I'sincereiy
hope. he has
found that the grass.is
identic'al
the fel|owship
and spiritual care
fei'ior.
That is my prayer.
But
found no full cup.of
satisfaction
decency he is obligated
to return
say so_
.
Nokv to :reason number three.
possible thai our pasture,
in his
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abandofied'-when
he left
our
Naza-
not
and
inif he
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In Haiti there /,fas been fottnd a strange combination
of. voodoo
and Christianity.
The natives take a portion of scripture
which speaks
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of-Jesus
healing
blindness--tear,
out:that
page and bind it over afflicted eyes. (3r they brew teafr0m
shredded
pages of the . Scriptures
arid drinR the potion for a stomach-ache.
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ThePreacher'a.
What Makes
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g"_r_, oF the very interesting
out_
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growths
of the upsurge
the past
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asmuh_atched
perhapsin
the.history
of.evange_sm,,there
haslJeen
the sour
.several
years
in community_wicte
evangelism
has
been. the parallel
wave of criticism of the men, methods,
and message which have been at the
_ note in the symphony
of praise, and
that-notehascome_rom"disgruntals
inside.
Robert O.Ferm
in his recent book
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(Q{aantity
can never• substitute
foi"
quality'in
"soul culture.)
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was our- fellowship
with him too
casual?
Did he feelthat
we"minlsters"
,
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had.bedome
bare?
Had the longmgs
in his-heart
for spiritual
depth_
treatment
been violated by two easy
an approach', to the cure of sbuls?
theNazarend,
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parted from Our Nazarene chufcla for'
were quick to befriend
each other _
another denomination.
Wh_,? .Which
professionally,
and eq_aally quick to.
.of these, tlirec reasons
applied ia.his
disn_ember each other personally?
case?
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Is it possiblethat
we have been too
If.it is reason number one,.then
he
husy.planning
for fence exp_/tasion and
alone can find the-solUtion.
He will . larger
acres, while failing,to
water
haeee tbfind acure for the"wanderlust,
the grass on which he was forced to
And believe me, I know of no drugfeed foi" his owr{. soul'_ good'and
tim
stores who have a tranquilizet_
or a
spiritual Welfare of'his people?
medication for that.. And sad to say,
.I have no answers.
Who doe_?
he will' not.stay.long
where he went.
But I cannot,
avoid .'asking
myself "
'because
'the same dLqease will soon
these questions,
and I invite you to
take hold again..
: join re.that kind of s'oul scrutiny that .
But if it is because of the "greener-.:
ave call self-evaluation.
It is one rnark
grass-beyond"
".philosophy
then "my
of true spiritual maturity.
sincere
prayer
is that he found it:
Perhaps, after all, better.grass
is a
But this I knoW-_-thb Spiritual
care
s_fer solution
than higher
or tighter'
he Will receiOe will not 'likely be-as
. fences.
With.this
let me re-evalu'ate
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.I. t.
i'ene fold. His evaluation
of greener
grass was made'through
tinted glasses.
Now that he goes back to Working
center of-the movement.
Interesting,
that is, because Of who the critics are,
amusing
because
of some
Of the
things that they have said: - -
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Evangel is_nt." points out
that this criticism; particularlyin
the
case of the Billy :Graham
Crusades,
has comefrom
the "two extremes
of .
It isto be expectedthat
anyone who
Protestantism,
the'extreme
modernmoves- into the public
eye with a
ist_ on one hand:and
the "extreme
message:as
rugged as thegospelof
our
fuia'damentalists
on "the other.
It is
Lord
will
meet
with " opposition,
an unansxbe_able
parad0x
why such
Every preacher
can e_poct that.the
extremes
should be. bedfel!ows
over
world :will object to his message beany'issue
related
to the Ohristian
cause that message disturbs and. calls
faith.
But Ferm traces this pattern
.fora
change.
The more putolieity, of
and'shows
that it has been the same
course, that isgiyen
toa.minister
and
in similar'
situations
in the generathe more. widely his voice,is
heard.
' tions past.
He shows that the same
the more loudly will the carnal world
categories.of
critics opposed the evan_
• object. This is pretty much. the'pat-'
gelism"of
Jonathan.-Ed'&ards,
George
tei'n "which has "'resulted. throughout
.'Whitefield,
John-Wesley,
Charles
G.
the.history
of Christian
evangelism.
Finney, Dwight L: .Moodyi and Billy
SuOday.
"He does'not
go i.nto detail.
Paul the Apostle faced it just as do
.
the:faith'ful
prophdt-pi'eaehers
of our
to say why he think_ this pattern..is
own day.
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so 'uniform;
enough to see-that
it is
" • But in tl_e _type of evangelism
which
true.
come from within the church family,
It has'been
a criticism from the marothe'r
type:.pf
This those
has
gin', from
the" opp0sRion.
i_xtremes,"
"
from"
who are not'in step with wha/: is going
nity evangelism.
That :is being ably
done in publications
closer
to the
who
are engagedin
currentbe. commuscene'than
we'can hope'to
Suffice
it.to say thh't one may judge the Worth
on. And-while
the "world,'" a_ fepresented by.the common person and by
the press, has acciaimed the presenta-
of any enterlSrise
simply by seeing
who are th'e enemies and critics of it.
.
tion o} the gospel by these
teams, acclaimed
it with
fanuary,
1959
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evangelistic
an enthusi-
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,,_l_,_no.,oo_,,G_a,aa._, u_c,_,
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When _,ve call _the.names of the cri_;ics
in. the
church, world
of the
Billy
Graham campaigns,
for example, we
cannot help but conclude" that he and
his _ team are making
an -unequaled
contribution
to vital Chrlstianil_y ifi
. America
and in every' area of the
world:
Rather,
it.is our purpose
to .look
more getierally
at the principle
at.
criticism from those within the ranks,
criticism
directed _at "others who in
"their way'are doing the work of God,
building His kir_gdom,
We see this in. bold relief when'it
arises close to home within the family
of a denomination
or'among .the kins-. folk of sister 'churches
or
in the
neighborhood_
of churches
.within
a
given eommflnity.
What makes, the
"critic of:the cloth tick anywaY,?
Of course we can _nly guess. • And
I
above all else that they d6 not want
to get burned as'compromisers.
Hence
they lean over backwards
to -stay
awa:_ from anything which might taint
them, and they boldly'cry
out against
what appears to them to be any dcviation from .the trtlth" on .the .part of
others..
"Defenders
Of the faith," they
feel thems.elves
to be.
But too fre"t
_tuently their defen_e is not set against -.
sin and the pagan, immoral •world out/.
side hut against theho'usehold
of faith
"
itself.
And.more
frequently
than not
t he'.spirit.ofthe
critic is as far removed from the essence of the Christian message as the 'principle'that
he
. .
is attackhig.
Actually,
the faith, does
not need so much defending
as it
needs declaring.
Perhaps the positive
preaching
of _hefaith
will be its best
defense:
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- Others appear to be ci'ifical because
say dr do: because it goes counter
to
criticism
seem to be attaching
themwha_ they have•preached
in the p/_st . selves
more and more..to
younger
as being the gospel andthey
must promen. Sometimes
this attitude
begins
test, both to their own thinking
and
through _i quest to know how belt to
before their iiadividual congregations;
do._/job,
but if it is not guarded
it
or else their message will beundQne.
" snort can develop
into a spirit
of
Tlais is seefi, for example, in the case
"know it all" until no one else can do
of those who are Critical of certainanything
.quite
so Well.
And
Of
types of evangelism:
Those who have
course, this superhum_in
ability, this
a philosophy
of Christianhy"
that alsuperior
knowledge,
and this unique
loWs for salvation by growth and nurtureand
who teach their people that
spirit of discernment
the individual
there is no such thing as 'crisis expertmust attest.to
the WOrld. " This spirit
"
eneemust
of course defend that •stal/d
of criticism _can become a habit and
. when a "Ye must be born _gain" mesthat Without
too much, effprt, and
• sage is preached
in the community
habits of th e spirit have h vicious way
This. principle
might' opel'ate also. in: of becoming an integral p_art ofone's
the ease of tiaose who have magnified
disposition.
It would be well" for all
certain" of the. marginal
principles
of " of'u_ to realize that we do not particuthe Christian
religion until they.have
larly enhance
our ownposition
or
1
. becofae
central
.it] their
preaching. largeTheyandmUst
of course,
attack anyone who would try to keep
in so doing we shall • probably
be : they are p_ovincial.
_That isi they are
guilty of just the sort of Criticism
able t0 see only the "pt_ases. of..Cbris-
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about which we wish to speak.
Per-.
- haps we should, look first to the suggestion that- some Would' want their,
tinnily in _vh'ich they. have been raised
and, not having been away from home
far enough to see that the religion of
type of criticism: to be called evalua. tion. They are the vnes who, through
either real or self appointmm3t,
feel it
their duty to pass a sort of.judgn_ent
on everything
that is doric in the.
church world.
Out of this group are
-the ones who feed the press regularly
and who. (in the case of an editor)
Jesus Christ is big and inclusive a_d
made to fit men everywhere',
.they set
.about to callihquestion
everyonewho
does not work according to their pattern.
Sometimes
this provmcmbsm
_s
fenced by national boundarms,
so it
"cries out, "Can there ariy good thing
come out Of Nazareth ?" "or Britain or
must find copy for publication.'
And
of course, that which .is controversial
is. good copy. And so; with senatorial
Ame_'icaor Canada.
More:frequently_
however,
it shows in closer-knit
circl_s, in a section of a nation or in an
•.'
profundity
and. professed objectivity,
area or
• _z " " these persons, discuss the"pros
and : Within:a
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Most of Us)d0 not take such Comments•
cons of the doings of the brethren,
in a. local church
at" even
family.
These persons feel
seemed right
that because
to.their
ancestors
it is
a certain.-pattern.has
too seriousl_',.which
is the
probably
agone , - God,
the only
Wayor toi'efuse
do. the
work.
thing
for the good Of
Kingdom.
and right
they tail
to broadenof
It seems there are some who be-..their
vision to see that there are other
l_eve, no doubt sincerely,
that loyalty
Ctirlstiafis
in the world
and
th_it
to truth as they see it means attacking
6thers
may have some patterns • of
someone.
They..feel
that. they must
operation
and some convictions too.
not countenance
anything
that .ap-It seems that"there
are some who"
pears to be heresy.
,They are sure
are highly sensitive
to What others
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Preacher's
Maq_zlne
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raise
our Own
stock arouhd
'by depreciating
the efforts
of-tho_e
us. " "
It might well .be that criticism
at
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stlChrelati0nshipmarginal.to
igsUesother
inchristiantheir
proper'con_timeSset
to iSdefenda
sort one's°f
a defensemechaniSm-self
in the face of
" . "1.
cepts or modes of. conduct..
.
" This should alert all of us tO be sure
that we •preach theesse_itial's
of the
gospel and do'notlet
our not.ions get
t .
mixed up with the "musts"
of.salvation: There are.some
truths without
job done in the •work of the church is
simply trying to excuse his own fail -_
Which there would 13e no Christian
religion)
There
are •other areas of"
truth ' in which there
can he flexi-
ures.
And of course it'-is easier to
declare
another's
methods-as
being
"non-Christian"
or "unoi'thodox"
than'-
bility.
Wise is the.minister
•who can"
see the difference and who keeps each
in its" place in his preaching,
to: explain W_ay one!s, own methods
have .failed.•
This is _ related
to the
matter of hard work als0. When one *'
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.his own not too great .success.
That"
is .it is quite apparent
on occasions
that one who is lmmedmtely
cmttea
of.another
who is seeming to get the
'It...would'.
appear
that _there
are
.otherswho
are critical of everybody
cahse they are.critical
and everything
within
-.
sees another
succeed
through
sweat
" and tears and work, it ig easy for him
by nature or
the church b_-
and the. all_round pr0gram •of the latto attack_ the methods, thie messt_gel
"
rather
Sometimes
ter..In"that
he may
be :work
saved
we
have"critical
creditedby habit.
all:of
this
t0-the
from having Way
to i_esort
to Jaard
older men, those whe ha3re become
himself.
Perhaps
we are on!_, guesssour and disgruntled..
And 6f course
ing at thispoint;
perhaps such'a ranthere is a tendency for age to ferinent,
tire is 0nly a dream,
We shell hope
both cabbage and men: However,
i[
so. In any eve.at, let"norie of us ever
s!_ch develops,
it•had • its start back • - be guilty of •utilizing
criticism _of
when those men were youflger.
In
others as a defense for failures of oUr
fact. the habits Of censoriousness
and
own.
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January, 1959
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There may be other motives.
No ' ing andkindness,
doubt there are, Probably the reader
us to live together
can spot some • of which, he may-feel
. must understand
the
writerin
he kept
of this we
are some
which will enable "
as brethren.
We
tha_ none of us
has bden
guilty; thatIt in
mus!
can dodone
the whole
God
mind,
however,
all • alone
must have
in this work
day that.
and genmust remdmber
that there
oration.
While Gad may Bave a parbasic truths to the gospel
ticular work cutout
for "ehch..of us;
and some basic cdnviciions, to which
He expects us to recbgnlze the work
each of us mustsubscribe,There
is a
that others-within
the Christi_n lamtendency _in" some circles
to a_'oid : ily Ere .doin_g..also.
• ,
criticism
to _the extent
that no one
It is.rather
ifiteresting
that thdse-
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The Preacher's Maqazlno
True.
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By James McGraw*
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arc
MY man.
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"
B E r_oT ^FaAID.. You
from now. on."
expenses.
It meant that Ge_orgeW.
Truett was to.become
an eRample as
These were the words heard that. _,one'of
the great pastoral
preachers
lonely night-by a hearths:olden'young
ihat "2Lmerica has produced
in l!er
preacJaler. The.w0rds
"were,'from the
brief but rich ecclesiastical
history."
'
lips of Jesusi_ and theoccasion
was a
Borr_ the seventh, child'in
a happy
dl:eam_---a dream repeatcd three times.,
family of eight children
in the home'
The young preacher
was George W. " of Chat_les:Levi
and Mary Kimsey
Truett. who had accidentally
fired his
Truett near Hayesville
Clay County,
shotguri while hunting with one of North
Carolina,
George
inheritdd
a
his members
and warm friends, and "background
of religious tradition,
Hi.__
the shot ,fiad proved
fatal,
He had
Grandfathez"Kimsey
was -a notable"
said to.h. is wife, Josephine.
he could " preacher
before him, and._is
g_'andnever preach again;, but. on Saturday
father's younger brother hfid also dis:
night after reading
his Bible:. and
tinguished:himsclf.-as
an outstanding
praying.until
the wee hmirq, he had
pulpitcer.
The latter, Elijah Kimsey_
fallen
asleep
and .had
this • fateful
With.his strong and. powei'ful frame,
"
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By H..B Garvln
=
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":dream,
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Although
George W..Truett
rarely'
Break Thou the Bread Of Life, O Christ,
•
•ever smiled or used humbr
in the
" "
As Thou didst break in 'Galilee; •. .
•
.',
:! :
pulpit. after his friend• J. C.: Arnold.
The Bread, the"Living} Bread.of
Life;
{ :
died, this tragedy
seemed.to,
bring
.As Thou didst, give, give .now to me.
__
him to a more vital experience
of
""
.
" . . .....
dependence
upon
Christ,
for his
. .'The bread that Thoudidstgive
to them'.
'"
preaching
carried more power than
They gave to those whb'hungered
there:
ever before fromthat
time on.
"
"
And as they •_ave, it multiplied,
_'You are My man from now on"
That others, too, that bread might share. " ."
turned out to mean a 'fruitful, forty' . '
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seven years as pastor
of the First
,,
So,'lSord,Ictme
_rom thee
"
:
Baptist Church in Dallas• Texas. 'It
" The Bread, the Living Bread today
.
meant
building a congregation
that
For starmng souls and minds of men,
"was to bethe,Targest
of his denomina-:
That I may f'send tliem not away.'"
: : tion in members and in gifts.. It meant
" "
- training a congregation
in lessdns of
And break to _ne that living truth,
Chrlstianstewardship
so that for years
Fresh and warm z_ith inspiration,
they gave •more to m_ssiops and de"
That I may,tell
to men o_ earth
•
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nominationa]
causes
than
for: local
,Marvels o_ Thy great.salvatiom
.....
•
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•
•Augusta,
G.e.0rg,a
*'_',ofessor
rlazareneThe016glcal
Seml,_,,.
•
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The Preaching -of George
stands
for finythlh'g.
Tolerance
is
who are speaking
so much of.the
lifted'up as such a high vii:tue that he
qcunaerfical movemertt these days and
•
one is.to have. any personal
convmthose who are tolerant
of others el-"
tibns of his own.. This. of course, _[an- 'most to the point of -nausea,are
the
not he,
And we 'recognize
that it -lea_t tolerant
when it. comes to ccrshould not be. We dbn_t
mean•this
rain other voices within the Christian
when we are speaking of the dallger of
group.
The current successes of camcriticism.
We-are• simply trying to
munity rcvivalism
have brought this
appeal to the basic Christian
virtues
" issue into sharp focus. -But th_t is a
of love and good will, of :(mderstand.
line.dr thought fot_another time,"
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. Jonuary, 1959
golden voice, and majestic
bearing,
had great, influence
upon ,George in
his formative.years:
.
•
• : "
Powhatan
W. •James. in "his biography., of Truett,
_ells of a del_inite
crisis experience
of "conversion when
.George
Was nineteen•
It follox_ed
:what Truett described
as an increas-.
ing-awareness
of his need for salva,.
tion that had begun when he had
heard a country evangelist
preach as
a child of. six years, and which was
eli_naxed by ,his acceptance
of,Christ
when nineteen.
It was in the Baptist
coiifitry
church houge,-.as Truett describes it.."where
I attendeicl Sunda3,
School and preaching
services during
all my childhood years."
At the time
.
of the conversion, a revival was being
held by the pastor of the church, a
Rev. J. G. Washburn.
who was assisted by a young preacher, named Pul-.
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liam. Something happened tha_t hight
in the soul of George Truett when he
went forward .with
the others 'who
. sought Christ; on'the _aext-Wedriesday
evening young Truett was called uPon
. by his pastor to."exhort
these'hesi" taring people to turn to Christ for His
great salvation.and
service."
This he
did, v_ith such passion and concern
that
men .and women, came from
througheut
the audience
to confess
Truett
." l[
•_
began
to think
about
the' pus-
What of'his
pi'eaching?
How didhel_repare
his sermons,
what type
sermons did he'deliver,
what was his
style of delivery, andwhat
Was there
about hls preaching" that distinguisbes
:him from other men?
These are some
of the.questions
that concern ourin_
terest.
-.
Joe Burton.
in his biography, of
Truett, Prince of the'Pulpit,
otitlines
a typical daily schedule
of the man
as "follows: "
r
.-.
',
ule suggests nine hours a day in his
study.
Part-of this time was used in
ansv,'erihg mail andin
administrative
details, tobe sure, but the major part
of it Was spent in the study of the
Bible _ind good books, and in prayer•
Few people ha_,e loved, bobks as did
- "
- •this man, :who had no Other hobby
than books.
He. read'books
of all
f
kinds, on all subjects.
He gave'the,
"" " major part of his extensive
l_ersonal,
]
. library of Some ten thousand
volumes
after
his retirement.
. :
sibility
being called
8:_}0hea.m._b_'eakfast.
" " It is,
his practice
carChrist, of
andhisfrom.that
time to,
on preach'.
George
while,
wa£ .pastor in •Dallas.
to As
tlae toBaptist
Seminaryof answering
in.Fort Worth
It was when Truett was twenty-two
8:30-12:B0--at
home. readinf; mail,
resPondence
and reading mail, Ir_ore
thathis
family moved to Whitewright,
answeringcorresporidence:
studying,
needs to besaid..
James
inhis book"
Texas, and it was soon afterward
that
12:30--to
town, usually by taxidab,." •
.
George W. Truett, ,declares ..that at
be received
his call to the ministry,
.siv_ce Dr.-Truett
did not drive and the
'least two mornings, each' Week wei'e
His call came through the constant
family ear was used .more often by
. " "
spent in .writing
lettei_s to unsaved
and" repeated
questions
of friends
Mrs. Truett.
.
.
.. persons to win.them
to Christ. 'This
"Don't
you .think
you
ought . to
l: 00-2: 30--1unch
in town,, ustrally
he did fur"forty-four
years_ and he
preach?"
: God has manic ways' of . in conference
with some church
or
' won thousands
to Christ through this
•suggesting
His will: to'an-individdaL
denominational
worker.
This wasthe
" "
medium:
Truett himself said m" ar_
and this- seemed to be His wa_ of. heavy meal of the day, which usually
•
intervieW, "I could not ciuit.this ho}y
Causing yourig
Truett 'to turn
his included
steak,
well done,
lettuce
task if I wahted to an d when I know
• thoughts
_oward the call. to :.preach,
without dressing, apple pie Or cobbler,
.."
"how many.Ihax;e
been able:to lead.to
This series of events came to the ipoint
3: 00-4:00--conferences
in church
Christ by it and. see 'the 'ednsthnt apwhere the oldest deacon in the Whiteoffices, sometimes continuing
longer,
peals pouring in upon me, I would.not
wright Baptist church made a motion, - '6:00_lightsupper
at homei no meal
:quit it, if I could."
after some earnest remarks
concern- =.at all'if he was to sl3ealc. _"
,
All this places the accent upnn the
ing the du(y of individuals
and of
7:00-:12:00
midnight--studying,
at
. passi6n for souls that this roan'carcburctm s to do what they saw needed
home.
"
'
ried in his great heart, and it helps us
to be done, "tn call a presbytery
to..
Clifford H. Tazelaar,
in an unpub._.
understand
how it- was that his inordain Bi:other George W. Truett' to
lished thesis at Nazarene
Theological
fluence, was as large as it was.
the full work of the gospel ministry?!
'Seminary,
observes
that,, one of the
Truett's delivery was definiteiy exThe motion was carrmd, and George
reasons Truettsp0ke
with such elarit:}
temporaneoum
He used notes sparseTruett was faced _v_th. t.he pressure of
in spite of the ralJid rate of His speech, _
ly, and seldom wr0te out a sermon in
the whole church, profoundly
moved,
was that he had a deaf brother
at
full.
The sixty or.more
of his serexpressing
lheir, e0n_/ietions.
Needhome to.whom h'e had tospeakelearly
mons which are published
were all
less to say, .it was not .m_ny hou_ys' enough so that he cot_ld read his lips.
taken in shorthand
while he prea'ehed
before his own soul was.gripped
with
The training
in clear
enunciation
them, and later revised and edited 'by
. the same" 6onviCtion,- and he was or, . proved of great value to .Dr:' Truett
him. His final preparation
alien came
"dained a minister:
. . in his later ministry_
His voice, was
late in theweek,
sometimes Saturday
His entry
into. the
pastorate
at
pleasing andrich
in qtlality,had'the
night, but itmustbe.rememberedthat
Dallas is a Similar story--a
story of a power necessary tube heai_d easily by
his constant reading and'study
laid.a
church being moved With strong conlarge audiences,
and his miuneiation
- rich baekgreund
re/_ those final hours
victions
as to what they believed
was s.uperior.
These qualities proved
of preparation
on a particular
set.men,
God's will to be..and aman reluctantly
' to be assets in his preacbing
ability.
" George'W. Truett did not stray from
coming to the same conviction, after
George
W. Truett
went into the
behind the pulpit as he preached,
and
int_ch Soul searching and. prayer,
pulpit we H prepared.
Bui'ton's.sched•S
"
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The Preacher'n
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M_qazine
January,
195_
"
•
the text Revelatioii
1:17-18,
"
"Fear
not;
for I am the
first' and
last: Ifrom.:
am •
Conqxmst
of Fear,"
for .the
example,
" he that liveth, and was dead; '_ind,
behold,
I am alive for e_ermore_
,Amen; and ha w the keys of hell and
:of death,".' he uses illustrations
"that
tug,at the.emotions.
He refers to.an
ifidividual
contemplatiiig
suicide, an
encOunter With a group of students, a
talk With a.dying mother;
TWO things
may be said concerhing
his appeals to
emotions:
he did not carry'them
to
such an extreme
as .to make them
cheap and sentimental,
and he used.
enough intellectual
ahd logical proofs
as to keep them in proper balance m
his .sermons..
Many of his _ inustra-"
tions were taken from.the
Bible, 'and
perhaps
one.bf the major sources of
this type• of niaterial" was. found in
history and biography.
His otitlir[es were simple and clear,
sometimes only. two di_,isions, some" times threeor foul:. The sermon men_
tioned • above, had
three
divisions,
whichwere:
_
"
"
"
"L' Jesus bids us be:.unafraid
of
. -..life•
"
" • •
.
II. Jesus ibids us be unafraid of
death:
III. Jesus bids. us be Unafraid of
eternitY.
'"
.....
It will be seen that these three
divisions are taken directly
from the
text.
':Tl/e.Secret
•of Conterltment"
"is an.
excellent
example "of.his shorter out-
"
. ""
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Used Jew gestures." ;l:hose he did use were meaningful;
and there Were no
annoying mannerisms
to detract from
the force of his words.
His words tend sentences
were sirepie, but they carried
the tmwer of
clear i logical,'convineing,
and persua.
sive meaning.
,He did net indulge in
cheap emotionalism;
yet a. study of
his published
sermons
reveals' fre" quent-use.0f
appea_
to "the feelirigs
of his hearers;' In hm sermon on"The
.
9
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line.
From
the
text
in Philippians
Paul
4: 11. "I hax_e learned, in whatsoever
sta_e [ am..therewi{ll
to he content."
he u_es only two" divisions:
"
"
I. The victory of contenunent
;t
t
i
Hagemeier,
iri
a
study
of
' :
i
"
Geo2:ge W. Truett
capture
the atfention
knew
how to
of his hearers
in his opeaihg
sentence.
He .begins
one sermon
with the question:
.?If
you were asked the chief danger to _as
his preadhing
proved an asset:
all.
what would
.
you. soy...9,,- Another
sermon begins,
"If .yoti were asked
this morning
to name the most ira-.,
portant..comforting
passage•in
the
" 9,
Bible. what would yam answer
be..
.
"
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in his church.
"You are My man
c.
.
from
_
i
i•- ' I
bouT'in.the
morningi
"
"
seeped
the last
two and I've
spent teleaft.... .
and another
at ,eventide.
hour, at eventide• .If I see. f.will not
be able to do it at &,entide.
I" push
iJ, up ant0 the day. But it must be
preserved.
For I find Without it I'm
a bulb pulled
out.of
its socket:
. it I'm that bulb attached
10
with
would
r
ask?
After
.
a mmnent's
p./325).
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By Reuben R. Welch*
"
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embarrassed
at)d%unrebuked
in
"shortcomings.
"
I. Bt/t'still the word persists..
the plain teaching 6f the Bible is
but"
- _
Ahd
thht
-:
youahout
awOrd
/fiqart
perfection,
given
in response
to "
though each of'these
is different and
enc0mpasses-infinite
va}'iety, in each
instance
we
understand
ourselves
-completely. But when "we come to religion we
are suddenly
,:eticent"'and
fearful
about the use of.the word. Though it
in our feelings about perfection. • For
the very meaning of the wo{:d itnplies
unreachability
' _unattainability.
In
this common sense_ no one but God
is perfect.
• Perfection
means
completeness,
thaturity,
bringing a thing
to an end, filling Up'completely,
A
is usOd continually
througl 3 the'Scripsick cliild brought
to health
is perCures, we almost'instinctively
slay
fectly well, but a 10ng way from
away'fi:om
it.' I'wonder Why.
pe'rfection.
An orchestra maybe per;Wen. for one thing; We've never
fe&ly in tufie and yet need years of
seen "anyone who is .perfect.
The
practice heforc perfection.
most wonderful person we know has
Christian
p_erfeetion is something
a dozen things wrong with him.' And . like this." God can and do'es give to
,we say that no one is pei'fect,
Too.
His childrga, hearts made perfect in
we are conscious of ourown
imperfecfiiotive, and purpose
and, lo,,_e But
tions:--sometimes
painfully
cnnsci0us
there m not a soul of us but has
and we donet.like to'.give someoneiniliioff miles to go to'.reach perfection.
else
.
to talk:to
vee "use every 'day.
It is the. word
.their total &urrender-and
faith.
It is
perfect.
We-have
seen and talked
the l_crfeetiuh 9f a heart ift liarmony.
about perfect
days: perfect flowers,
. -in joint, set in right relations..
INT_OOUC'rZON:
" perfect
"
"meals: and -'" God has fo_" His people "the gif_ of "
perfect _unsetO. and
However.
in:the .maifi we are r_ght
credit
for
something
we
don't
us tlaere
is a lucking"
fear inthat,God
]mve
ourselves,
And then.
most of
wants us to be'more -l_erfeet than we
are or than we 'know we ever can he,
:Instead offacingthe.revealing
light of
"divine. scrutiny
we pass it off with
"NO one
is perfect,"
. "_,sto¢..t0n__¢_ _ ,o¢,_a.
The Preacher's Maqazfna .
:lVJ_Ol_q"_":_--I
r i ,,
. -
The Goal of Our Striving
,-
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LEsSON:/Ephesians
4i11-16
TEXT:" Let t_ go on ftn'to pcr]eetim_
{Hebrews 6:1).
I want
,"
ful
heart. [replied
I h,3ve thought
it a
thought
Give:me about
a prayergood deal, since then. and I've crone
to the conclusion
that I could' ask
nothing
better.
For
if I have the"
prayerful
heart, all else follows:"
.
(TheWa_A to Power and?else,
to the source
"
you
i
}j
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=
,
¢::):_t:_xe
.
.
now oh!"
.
S'I_2-1=_L_V_O:INT
i[
"'
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•
"
anotliei" at:noon.,
I -"
'"
-
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.
,
- . E. S_'aI'_L_'Z "JOhrES: "Nothing
cain .of'power_-;...full
of Hght and powbr,
kill our.experience
of God so deel-.-I
find I!m better or worse as I pray
" sivel_" as Pr'9:2erlessness...
And aga!n
.more or less. • Little prayer, 1 tile viewe may add Noth
ag can unbind you
tory; much prayer, much v_ietory; .no ' "
and let you.go
so wonderfully
as a prayer n0. victoi'y ....
I saf one day
daily time 'spent:_n prayer ....
I es-. in meditation
and the..questiofi
came
tablished
the.habit" in College of setIf God would offer, to give you onering aside, an hour arid a half._-a half- " thing---and
only,, one
thing_what
....
I"
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"
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The _housands who sat under the rainistry of George
W. Truett may
be
thihkful
he heard, those comforting
• ';..
ing in every other revival conducted
words in the hour of his deepest need:
And they must be quick to agre'e thai
"
the later years proved
this pastor's
'
preaching
was lndeet] owned and henored'oftheLord.
: " ' ..
-
.
.
soul passidn and his evangelistic
eraph_sis.
To these
Mostmust
of•hisbe sermons
added his
havedeep
an
14:2,
ae quotes froth
po_t_'ythe fourt'mes..
_ver.heard
b appeal,
n'withoutand beifig
hayed
Land Beyond,":
text Jolm
evangelistic
fe_v peqple
Seldom did hepl:each
a sermon with"
by'his
deep-.conceru
in the Care of
out quoting 'poetry at'-a stanza of a souls.'•' Only three.times
in his forty:
hymn.
His selectioo pf poetry being
seven yearsas
a pastor did he engage
as skillful as it wfis."and his quoting
some.other
man to coflduct.the
evan" of it being flawlessl
this' quMity in. gelistic meetings.
He did the p_each-
"_
• .
Truett's L preaching,
suggests
a cambination
of
snnplicity
of lan[guage.
singleness
of purpose,
and force• of
delivery""
as the essentials
in the
. preaching
power of this great pastor.
Truett used hynms and pomn_ frequent]y
II. The'spirit
in his of
preaching.
contentment_In_'The.
.
i i
!
lanu_i'_, i959
and.go
on un-
of life and:lctioh
and chai'acter.
If, There
mustthatbe atburned
into our
minds
the fact
the throbbing
heart of. the Biblethere
is a,desire,
a
longing,
a striving,
and a seeking.
a'fter
this. unreachable
p&'fection!
Not drily is there a heart perfection
attaitiabl6
as an experience
of divine
.. grace
but
"
there
must"follow
-
an ear.ll
I
•
.
.
•
nest, persistent,
continuous
striving
" a prayer to the.'Mafi'
upstairs)'
But
after the perfection
of life and charthere is" no love created for Jesus, no
acter. • There
is that perfection
of " deep desire for the things of God, no
heart which.is the giltof God througlt
jar to the moral life, no embarrass ....
the sanctifying
influences of the Holy
ment over thesins
of the" past, and'no
Spirit. but .there is also that goal of
dread'overthe
sins of today•
perfection
as m_iturity and completeThis is the gospel of externlalism--.
. this life but toward which
strive and worl_ and yearn!
we must
It is this
groaning
seeking aspect of perfection
which we need deliberately
t6 enness whic_ -we shall
in '
" •-courage:
" "never reach _.This' Cry is central
in the Sc/'ip,
turcs.
The ringing challenge
of' the
wonderful
Book of i_ehr6ws 'is "Off'
• v, The clear call Of our
to perfectmn.
Lord is, "Be perfect.' I Paul•urges
us
to.strive
for maturity,
stretch for the
goal of the fullness of the measure of
the stature of Christ.
Ti_ese wm'ds of
Paul to the "Philippiafis._are
immediately understood
and deeply_shared
by those of the seeking hea'rt: "This
one thing
I do r -forgetting
those
- thingswhich
are behind artd:r6aehing
. forth unto those things'which
are before, I press toward the mark for the
.O
•
.
,
•
of the gospel of the New -Testament.
Thisheart
is a deep heart relationship
"
With. the SaviOur through
His HolySpirit..And.lt
is being starved out of"
and it lea_;ds us void ofofus!
the very' heart
existeni:e.for'some
And so religion becomes idehtified
with activity . The more active in the
church, the more Christian..
But this
vital relationship
with the Saviour is
not mere ac:tivjty..
It is a burning,
real fellowshi p,
.
':Perhaps what is worse is tbat our
lack of holy desire has left us with a ....
_'ague, haunting
sense of unrealitywhich overshadows'6ur,
acts,of devo.tio_ and Woi_hip.
An tindefinable
..sense of disappointment
hovers over
" so many
t6day
in .their
Godward
movements."
H6w .many
are filled
"
with a hundred 'little 'fears'not.
eut:ed .
prize
f• the hlzh ealhng of God"inby the p_pular.gospel
of relax and
Christ J6sus"
(Philippians
3:13_14): . live Confidently!
....
"
"
:
What is the.goal?
Perf6ction!
Anothei- tragic'by.-product
of our
.
Ask the artist• "Where .do yoiar
lack of hurlger f6r God is the dulling
aspirations
end?"
"
" - of the keen edge of moral integrity,
Ask the sculptor,
"What;' is, your
We should be troubled by those Who.
" aim?"
- ,
.
can go for long periods Of time with•
Ask the scientist,
"What
is: your
out prayer and can go places and do
.goal?"
" "
things Which arc questionable--seemPerfection'!
PerfectionJ
Perfection!
ingly without the.slightest
twinges of
•Come near to the saints of days
co_fseience.
But people llke that are
_one by and you.will feel the heat of
never truly- sensitive
to the Spirit's
their hunger.for
God.
And .having
presence.
God is never close enough
" Hin/. tho_; needed ri0tlaing e:ls'e!
" tb thena for thein to knowwhether:
He
III..But
member,
ask the
average
church
"What
is your
_oal_What.
is
do not
livefrowning
With a.or.smiling.
desire
and They
a 'love
tot
are'your
deepest ]engines?"
How far
,lesus.
To please Him is not a part of '
would his "answer-be from. the deep, • their
lives.
To re_'e| in His holy
longing •hunger
afti_r, the things
of presence
is not a part of theiz" thought'
"GodY Our dangerous
and false logic
or expermnce.
There
Can thus' be
says; "Believe.
on the Lord
Jesus
wide moral margi_as and no particular
Christ. get acti£'e in the church, say . sensitivity
of conscience.
The dis12
::.
ThePreacher's Magazine
"
-
"
.
.
•
of life!
Give us again the hour of
praym: and" the joy Of the Word of
God. Let this be every man's, desire_
to'be like Jesus! .
.
.
V. But even in- our labor and our
seeking as we work olaf our own salration, '!it is God which worketh
in
I seek thee:
my sot)l,'thirsteth,
thee, my flesh longeth for thee
pleasure."it is hot ourown
s_raining
which" brings
our progress.
It is
for
in a
dl"y and thirsty'land,
where n o wat pr
rather
our releasing,
our letting go,•
is" .(Psalms 42:1; 63:1,).
ot/r surrender
to the ministry
of the '
, soul
after oh,
thee, where,
O God is.... the. earl_/will
bothHoly.
to will
to. do our
of his
good":
Whei'e,
voice of ..you
blessed
Spirit_indwithin
lives•
yearning?
Where is the heart Who is
What is the goal of our striving?
" hungry for God?
Oh_ give us again
What is the deep hunger 9f your life?
that hunger fo_"piety_ that long_ng for .' Oh, let us set to this holy' business,
perfection, which puts the sweet con_
perfecting
holiness, in the fear of the
-
of Jesus
.
•
at the very
center
Lord!
-.
"" '
.
".
"
....
_
" "
.-The
Minister
.'
"
-.
.
'
"
" :
and the Psychiatrist
"C
J.A
.
.
_" .
:"
"
" ' "
" ' "-
: " "
Basis for Co-operation
.....
•
_
"
"
-,;.,.
.....
" ....
.By
"
"
ciplines of 'the deeper life to them
seem nam-ow'ahd
arbitrary.
.
.
. IV. Oh. give to us again that heart
of longing after-God! • Give us again
the resurgence
of:the spirit of David,.
who cried: . _'As the hart pfiiateth
after the water brool_s, so panteCh my
seiousness
"
.
Edwin I_oir, M.D.*
We ere" delighted
to bring to our
emerges will largely depend upon the .
rc_aders/this
series, of "articles on the . understanding
of "the psychiatris_ as to
rerationship of the work of.the ministry
lust what is tb:e minister's principal task
anil that of psychiatry.
These are the
find an understanding
by. the minister.as"
.'basis of'a series of lectures given by the
to just. what the psych atr st is doing.
author at Nazarene Theological Semi- • In your.editors
opinion Dr. Edwin.Fair,
•,
nary in the spring of 1958 We are seeMethodist layman, to whom his own re" "ing hlst0ry.made
fn. our day as the
ligious faithisstrong
andvital, has found
medical .'profession
pioneers • With the
.thffanswei'.
the minister, He
the recognizes'the
messenger ot work
vital that
re. treatment, of the mentally ill At .no llgion,'can do.in, assisting the" mentally
.
point, doesscience
come closer to reill to find themselves.
He' is sure that
"
ligion than here. Just
what" will be :the psychiatrist with his scientific knowlthe" generally
recognized
relationship
cdgd of the causes of-mental illness and
": b_tween medicine and rdigious ;faith
with hismethodsof
corrective treatment
and experience has yet tube determined'.'
can do for many what the church cannot
In a sense o working phUosophy is being
do. He sees the working answer as the
constructed today as the psychiatrist and . two Work together as a team, eommunithe clergyman work side by side; What
eating their respective disciplines to each
other, each recognizing .the important
.
place that the other fills, yet each main"P_ythlatri_'cIInic
Ponca •CI _', C_Ea _n
,._ro,_ ,,¢t_r__,,,,,, _,_,n_ r,to,*_c_ S,m_,a,_, talning his own identity through it all."
lanua_y, 1959 ..
"
"
13
-
.which the minister
is familiar, we are
sure hethey
will be helpful toout
eachhisreader
a:s
attempts'to.work
own
•relationship with the general practitioner
and the psychiatrist
in "his own. caminanity, as"he:faeesproblcms
of mental
illness in ida own chufeil.,
vation and experiment
they may, at
Tile present state came" into. exist- .
" the same time, disagree in the interonce by the work of _uch pioneers as
pretafion or the- neanmg of a _oarticu- " Caja], Parley, Sherrington,
Kraepelln,
lar findingY
In scientific fields where
Bleuler.
Charcot,
Janet,
Adler. and
exact observations
and measurements
. Jung in addition to Freud and'Meyer.
With experiment
are easy to do. prog_
And in very recent years,,.With
the.
••
....
'{
t
• _
I
some irrelevant,
the use.of which requires insight.
While scientists agree
" on scientific method based on obser-_
"; I
! i
,
.
- W_ commend Dr. FairYs articles t? you: - .hosp)tals
in the United
States
the
While they are written, in a Iittle klifhospitaI, chapiainand
the staff psychifcrent vein from other inaterial with
.atrist work in close association.
How-
--_'_Et)ITOS
: "
minister
disorders',
first.
many There
of them'consult'
Is a.growingthe
awareness
]by the:minister
that psy-
.
:
ever, the greater, number
of peoph_ .
with emotional
difficulties
are not
hospital patients,
and t'naoy Of t]mm
consult• the minister
as w_ll as the
psychiatrist:
As increasing
numbers
of people seek.help for their em6tional.'
chblogieal medicirie, has
offer such people..There
"
;_7_)3nx)¢_ THE t_aST decade" there has
x._ been a wide expansion
:in the
"
something to
is also an
increasing
realization
on the part-of
psy'chiatrists
that a'satisfyingfaith
is
. various training.programs
in pagtoral
of therapeutic
value.
It behooves.us
care and for hospital chaplains.
While
in .these- two disciplines
to -consider
more. ministers
are being trained
to" bow we can work together as we both
serve as'chaplains
in gene_'al hospitals,'
serve humanity.
As the members
of
most of the training programs
in xds: . these separatediscipl
nes ]oak to each
pitals and in schools of. theology are
other, their roles ax;e often ill defined
concerned
plyimarily
with the emoand confused..i
In
some
instances
tlona] andpersonallty
problemsof
the
there Js m_tual
distrust.
The psyindividual.
Consequently
the minis=
chiatristma*_
consider theministeras
ter is not only beco_ning more aware . purelya
moralist while the latter may
of the emotional needsof
his parishlook upori the psychiatrist'as
one with
toners but is looking for knowledge
no system of .values.
We shall exand assistance fr0'm the psycbiafl'ist
br
amine, these.respective
roles and conineeting these needs.
Likewise,
reed- - sider hdwthe two may work together,
"
icine has begun to give rcc6gnition
to
" Psychiatry,.
the medical specialty
theimportance
of religious IJeliefs'in
"dbaling, with inental .disorders,
has
the life of man.
A few scho6ls of
been rathei" slow in developing
when
medicine are" adding ministers to theii"
compared with other medical specialifaculties '.in oi'der to-help,
medical,
ties. We should.take
a quick look.at
students
gain. orientation,in
this" dis-" medical
history
in order "to undereipline as they attempt to meet the
stand the present state of psychologN
t'otal needs
of their
patients.
And
cal medicine,
,Inthehistory
of science
some _chools of theology are adding
man has sought to.find true generali=
'.psychiatrists
to their
faculties
for a
zations.- the laws of nature, arid with
• similar purpose,
these explain particular
happenings)
"
' "
• As these,two
disciplines, concerr_ed
This is done by,'the scientific method
with the welfare of man. work. more
'of inductive reasoning,.
Howe_'er; one
closely in a co-operative
effort, there
cannot consider
this a hai'd and fast
must be basic understandings
of the
method of ifiquiry because there.are
role eaehplays.
Tlfiscdnsideration
is
always variables,
some re/evant
and
an attempt
to evaluate
these roles as
:.
.
- ",
they apply to the minister Who serves
" ....
a
parish and to the psychiatrist
in
".
=
" "'
_John Tu_neG "l_ Thele a Scientific
Method?"
_'Sclrnce,"
13rivate 'practice:.
In many
mental
_:_a.
_el3tember, 6_ 1957,
'
.
14
.
"
The Preachor_aMaqazlne
-.
.
illness man dein his particular
ress
the sciences
seems tosuch
be' more
as physics
Tapid. andHence
me_
¢hanics, m which measm'eIfleh(s
and
and psychoplmrmaeology
adventof
ney¢ drugs psychochemistry
have gained
increasing recognition.
The patient is
observe tions with relatively'
ables are found, progr_s._ed
considered
few earlrapidly,
.in _ psych01oglcal. .investigati°n'.
,
. -we..
have innumerable
vai'!ables whmh..are
as a homan'bcing
living
IX :
reintegratedPainffll
way the°flife.psychePSychiatry.(mind)andhaS
the soma "(body) into" a holistic ap-
.
:
opment and the utilization of transfer'of :V'esalius..at-the
beginning
of the
ence phenomena
in therapy.Many
sixteenth
Century; dealt a blow, tothe
people,engaged
in the practice
of
humoral
theory
as it revealdd
eviclence'of the seat of' disease,'
Philosopsychological
medicine"
,combine
the
l_nowle_lge fl:om' the tw.o'main schools " pliers debated whether the mind and
with an awareness
of the cLiltural
body Were related in their function.
influence
as they seek to understand
Descartes.
perhaps the most influenthe nature of man and treat and pretial thinker
of the sixteenth
century,
believed
the mind and body were
".
"
' "
"'
-
_=l_Ifl,, 4tU,
_Hump_rey O_rn_na anti J• R,.Smythie_,
of Ptychologlca
Mediclile."
tl_e "HIbbert
42, January,
1953.
Ianuary_ 1959
"_he'P_e_ent
State
Journ;_] )+ 51:13_
.
"
often difficultto
obser/_e arid may be
preach'and
khe totalpersonality,
sdclal
even more:difficult
to measure and't0
"and historid_], of the patient is studied.
" " subject to experimentation.
In:ad,lib:
Callilig
this reintegratim)indicates
lion,
progress
is further
i_lpeded:
thaimedicine
previodslyhad,a
holistic
.heeah_e we have .no clear-cut
under_
appreacb.
But that approach was no
stariding ofitbe n'ature of the psyche
way as well developed as'is our prosand. its relatlonship
to the brain.
Tlie
erit understandi0g,
for unity
was
fact that there can be agreement:
in
achieved
at 'the cost of ignoring dithe scientific
method
but disagreeversify:
.
ment in belief is strikingly exe_nplified
in psychological..medicipe.
At the
While most primitix;e
people
represent
time there
exist two mare
lated, psyche and soma on a primitive
.schools of thought,
which m_et in
conceptual."
level
with
superstition.
many respects but in others are seem.mysticism
and magic, the Egyptians.
ingly lri_ecbncilable. '1 Orie.is the ps'yhad awell-developed
conceptof, mind.
- ehobiological_
as hdvanced
by Adolph
body, and soul. 4.'.Hipprocrates
and
Meyer, :which considers psychology
as, "Aristotle, taught that the psyche and
an integral part-of.eoritemporary
bi- 'soma
ale unity..:: The humoraltheory
elegy.
The other,
based
on the
of disease taught by Galen was also
theories
of Sigmund
Freud.
is the
,holistic:
Dur!ng
the
Renaissance
psychonalyticaI"
with
emphasis,
on
thcrb was a markedadv}nce
in natthe flncdnscious,
psychosexualdrivelura] sciences..
The anatSmical"w0rk
:
"'
"
. Vent the emotional
vel0ps ashe
lives
cultm'e.
_)larold
and.Helen
K_0tan,
ctm_nmatic
Medicine."
"'J
|;*:54&-60
lt_5_. ,
"ha
Hhtorleal
S0rvel 0_ •P_Y"
fiery
and Mental
Disease,"
" "
.
•
.
.
. 15
.
I.
.
separate,
.
distinct
in the dualism
units.
He believed
_
of, mind and body.
. source in mental healing.
Ranl_ r' considered St. Paul's r/ew-found
life "in
" '
lie_ in the
.
spiritual'realm,
.
scientific, but it examplifies
|
i i
.
. !| ..
"- _
Paracelsus,
recognized
the relationship: between psyche,and
soma, their
ideas, were
disregarded.'
since they
were not considered
to be in the realm
.
.of the ph_'sician.
In the mghteenth
and
nineteenth
centuries,
mediral
While some
science
concentrated
physicians on isolated
amopg them
local
.
of"a new_.psychological
type of man."
Blake _l, a clinical ,ps._)chalogist,
has
written on h. personality
need which
he designates
as the" spiritual:
Karl
.
T •
. Mennmger
m commenting.
on Bla k'_e s
article said,? "Some time ago I sub.Christ"alifeprinciple,
mitted_a paper to the Tdpeka
thefour_dation
Psycho :¢
phaslzed
the relationship
.to. culture
and the total personality
.functioh.
So today the whole roanis'treated;
the person, ofnotmind
ji_st and
the body
disease;ofonethe
interaetion
livlng:
in his culture,
Generally.
_peaking, psychiatry has left the concept of . the soul. or spirit to the re-,. ligionist and in treatmentthis
concept,
medicine _has
had t inthose
Who have
manifested
interes
the soul.
'Among those. "_ho have given tee-
"AH_t0,_
o__e Cu_e'o_
S0u_,"N_r_e,
• ,_oh.A.U0N,NI,
e 0th,,s H_ Vo_h
.t_.
" •
"ognition
Ma,_a,_
27 Menninger,
]956
Menn[nger
._Dr.
Karl's
Clinic. Notes
Library.on Current
.
soul
,
"recognized a persons
16
: -":
is
Jung, ".who
faith; as a'.re:
.' '
the spiritual
This therapy
,
•
.
•
there is,spiritual distress.
With.some ....
people it is Used as specific therapy
while in others it is used as nonspecific therapy.
In his concept
6f
"
the wholeness
Of. man
dimension
is'included.
the
"
as a substitute
for psychotherapy. . hut.
to complement
it forsome
people in
some sit:uations.
He ad,_ocates "the .
use of tologotherapy
tl_e patien't'
"looks
the
doctor w_ere
for help
when
is not-utilized
as a scientific•method
of therapy. •Howevei', in't_e'developments of receht
years psychological
to
.
"
.
my trouble, and forgive _11 my sins."
To the Jews disease was pmiishment
.for not having
followed
Jehovah
therefore
cure arid prevention
of disease were acconplqlished by livin_ a
life of piety
and ' fdllowing
God s
tresses.
Wishes:
Consider
.my
• affliction
and
Psycho!ogieal
medicine
has among
tionship.to
th.e religious. .and' moral.
• members
" .. those
" who add the spmlt
•
that, time • _ . . . - • ,
lts
• precept_of
.....
" "the' mind
....
'
"
Today a._ tlfe religionlgt
views the
•to
and,body as th e y -o
c nstder
the whole /nan..
As this movement
whole man the emphasis
is placed on •
progregses
the religionist
within his
the spiritual.
Sin is.c0nsidered
as an
. discipline. _can be of great :benefit to
obstacle in the search, for wholeness:
the psychiatrist
in his interpretations.
McNeill TM in Writing .on the 'religioUs
viewpoint.
0f'the
Wholeness
of man
. As we' consider
the_wholeness
of
states: : "For ?the attainment
of full
man from the religi0us point of view,
health of personality
man most find a
We_may once .again go back to pmmifive/nan,
who thought the ev'il spirit
harmonious
relationship
in.the realm
enters'the
hody and makes _t ill; He
stacle to hxs""entrance" rote' th_s' realm'
used
primitive.religion
along with
of whattheBible
is
.spiritual values. calls
Thesin.primary
When ob_
all
magic rituals, incantations,
and exor_
has been done that science can do to
eism to rid _the. body of the evil spirit:
relieve a man's" distress, the pride that
The Egyptians
held the concept
of
•
.
.
....
o
"
'
_'
"
"
.
protects
mm_,.oouy_
anu s ulanu
_levelopea
.
.
"hmother
.
, .. sms
, " may. w_thhold
,_
-. • •
. ._
".
_, oi.
m_ x morn true oeuverance,•
a renglous
system
ior ,.zreatmen_
., xne re'..:
......
:
.....
:
hgmmst
shares
the
hoh_hc
concept
alsease
_lKewlse
,the
_umemans,
•
'"
. • • . of
_._
. _ "..
.. • . . "useu
_ a _ mind and body and thmr mteraetmn,
mauyiomans;
ann ._ssyrmns
but in _iddition the "whole man" must
religious system "fdr cui'ing disease,
The .diseased person suffered because
he had sin_ied and was exhorted
to
search
his soul,
The
Psalmist
David
have:wholeness
of'spirit..Beyond
this,
he believes that .the spLrit is utilized
in attaining
wholeness,
In his view
of _an. he considers him as a product
"Me,V°hnalD_ake,Hyglefle,,,."The37:177.383,Fourth"
CategorYJuly
1953.°f
Personality. . Heeds,' .....
Reading,'"
_'Vlhto_
T,e ,oc_ a,e theSo,.' _,e_
New_._nh.
York, 1955.
Knopt
The Pr_ach_r'aMogazfno
"
"
.
describes
" international
" psychtarry
disorders ofb0dy
fluids or "humors'!
significant
development.
Gladston TM most diseases ah ai:esult
of natural
ogy and one
w.here
psychoanalysis
encounters
schools
as the most
tl_at
and
,The
not Greeks
as being;caused
arid Ror_ans
by evil
considered
spirits..
accent
the mstmctual
man
or "the The knowledge' of:medicine
they. dene.urologica]
man" or "the spiritual • velopedwasp_'eservedduringthe.earl_)
man" and so on. He continues, "The
Middle Ages,.when
Europe was uncler
over._riding evidence, however, is that
"the barbarians:
by the Church:
Durman is none of these, singly,_.but .all-. "ing this time Christian doctrine had a
of them collectively.
Man is instincmarked influehee
on medicine.
Distual, eeonomic,
neui'ologic,
spiritual
easewas associated-_ith
sin_ arid when
and much more besides.'[
one was ill he had an improper
rein-
" "
. -
During the past fifty years the pres.
combined
psychotherapy
with what
ent holistic
has developed.
: he calls logotherapy,.
Which: empha_
• . approach
Fre(ld, Jackson, Meyer, Jelliffe, Gradsizes., the importance
of human
redock, Frenezi,
Garma. Dunbar,
Can:
spbnsibility.
Among the principles.he
non, Deutsch. Seeyle; and Alexar/'der
recognizes
:is the
wiU-to-meaning
_have contributed
to' our modern con- •which lies outside .psychotherapy
as
-cept of the inter'relationship
of mind " it is generally,
understood,
in the
and body.
While Wolff, .Wolf, :and
spiritual
realm.
He " considers.logo-"
said, l_ "Relieve
the trouble
of my
heart, and bring me out of m:¢ dis-
.
psychiatrist.
"
There is other evidence that attenthen is given to the spirit in psychological circles internationany
• Roger _
in writing
on tl_e present..state
of
Eu]_opean and British psychiatry
considem
of thinkingofaprominentEuropean
therelationship
between ethel-
of the microscope,
Virchow. demon-.
the idea that medical, social, phycho,the disease.
Withthe
development
problem Qf recovery.
Init Ideveloped
disease instead
strated
th'at disease
of the 'was
person located,
who "had
in _ logical,
analytical and Society
subjectiveon criteria
the general
were
the:cells
and organs of the body and
involved it/the determination
of what
Pasteur, in bacteriology,
studied causis, health orlaCk
of- health..
I sugative organisms.
The laboratory
begested_ that' there
might be a fifth
came the canter of medical interest
category, samething for which I (iidn't
and the interrelationship
of mind-and
,have a very good name becauseof
the
"bddy continued
to be !n a remote
taboos -in scientific
circles on st_ch realm, instead of the field af scientific
terms .as spiritual."
"....
_
laboratory
medicine.
""
Recently
Frankl, s of' Vienna,-has
Mah]_ have correlated laboratory:finedtherapy
,as psychotherapy
'that not
-.ings of mind
ancl body,
Ruesch, • only recognizes the'Spiritual
but starts
•Horney, Halliday, and Mead have e_afrom the spiritual.
It is not advocated
not in the
the trend
"Amer.
_Ferguson
J, Psyc1_latry,*'.l14:97-h02,
"[. Roger,._'European
andAugust,
British 1957.
Psychiatry,"
leta9o 'Gladston
_ln_erna_l_nal
•P_y_b_atry _ _'Amer. J.
Psyrhlat,. '_ _14',103-8,
August, 1957. '.
Ianuary,I959 "
-.
_Rofy
_]b[e,
Revised Standard
Version, Thomas Hels_e
and.Son_
Sew Y_r_ 195_
Psalms 25:17-18•
o• 577.
l_John A, McSe[It, o=. C t
"
-
17:
.
:of God's"creativeness
as well as "an medicine. I:_ The-" wholeness
"the re:
individual
who
lives in particular
': ligionist
speaks of is wholeness" in
culture with" his fellow'lnan.
Clergybody, mind, and spirit, which may be
men such "as Hiltner,
Oates, Wise,
attained
through
scieriee, faith, and
"Johnson, t3ruder. Muelder, and Tillich.
prayer,
have given their interest
to the role-.
-.
tionship of religion and psychological.
Pres,'"S_m°nN,wO°"'gY0rk.
..........
195r. _: ,,,,n,_,,_,a D:_,,."As',_i_tio,
"
is recognized
to someextent
by his" What: pastor's
heart h_s not been
hearers.
.
grieved over people within his church
The preacher
must preach._to peowho are but nominal Christians
who
ples needs.
He must depend upon
once were joyful, usefuL Christian's?
the Holy Spirit to reveal to _them
But they came to face the light on
their needs. He must stress that Jesus
entire sanctification.,
and while they
alone' can meet these needs, that He
did nol: oppose it, they pasmvely ap"can d6 it now, do it so completely
a_ -proved it they neglected'it,
they did
to bring
ft/ll satisfaction
to their
not bring its: acceptance
to a point
hearts.
of issue, and hence did not enter into
]
t "
"
• .
"
_ "
I'_'i
..
•
"
"
.
"
"
"
.
,
-
|
"
.
•
IV. Keep "Men
on
'
]:heir
"
. .
Feet
."
.
.
" "
. "
Corlett*
.
_'.
-..
.
"
_. - " ....
-' "" " ""
.C_NE OF Jon's friends said to Job,
that---the 'work. 6f' an evangelist.
He
" _
'_Your words have'kept
men on . inusf, study, pray; /_reach, and work •
their 'teet'.' (Job 4 4,'Moffatt
s verwith a. feeling of. deep conce.rn to
sion).
What highel: calling
cdflld.a
bring sinners.to
Christ for salvation
,person
have than that of putting falahd.t6 lead believers'into
the experttering,
stumbling,
sinful- nmn and
ence of entire-sanctificati6n:
Nothing
".women on their feet?. •` Yet tfi!s is Will keepmen
on their feet more sub_
the calling Of every imliness preacher,
stantially
than bringing them into the .•
He is called by his'words
to put men
wonderful
experier_ce of heart purity,
on their feet by bringing to them the
or as.St. Paul' said, !_¢ be 'established"
gospel and leading them into a vitalL in holiriess, unblamable
.before
God
experience
of God in'the
new birth
(I Thess_i]oniahs
3:13).
"
and in the fu_:ther work of. the'cstabHoW: is the preacher
to preacll to
lishing grace 6f holiness.
_. wm men?
He must. pi:bach from a .
The purpose
of preaching
the sayheart
filled with love for people,
mg gospel of Chlrist is to bring, people
Unless _ preacher loves, people,be'can
to a decision" to become .saved' and
never win them. tO'Christ.
He'must
sanctified.
In this he will he renewing
love them, not en masse or as manthe exhortation
of St. Paul to his
kind in general;
he must. lo{_e_ them
helper Timothy,
"Do. the work o_ an
as individuals.
If' a. preacher• .loves
evangelist,
make Iull proof of thy
peoplehe
has faith ih them, especially
ministry"
(II' Timothy 4: 5).
in what they may become through the
The holiness preacher
i_aust do just
grace of God.
Jesus had such love
•arid faith for pe0ple---He
saw them as
they ebuld becomd through His grace,
o_s_,_,,_, c_,_o,._a:_0,,_,e,_,,,t0__f th_ "p,,a_e,'_ When
tim"
minister
l_as'such
faith, it
•
.
.
.
The Pre_cher's.Maqazine
•
.
.-
Jesus,
Christians
are .e:_hortEd -to
fo_--such
_t purpose is found in Christ
present
their:b0dies
as "living .sacrifiees._:holy,."acenptable
_o God (Re-
-
-
D. Shelby
.
.
of . th_'e:_perience.
interest, they
believers.he
led _nto the ;experience
" of entire sanctification.
No.Christian
ca_
trdly find
himself
has"
consecrated
himself
to a until
purposelie tliat_
m worth living'for,
yea, v)orth dying
"
....
By
H_ must It preach
a sense
.urgency.
is most with
importanf'that
. •
Preachlng Scriptural
HOliness
.
.
.[
.
"
"
" .:-
-
'
_
.
: 1
$.
•
.
roans .12_1)
This. is what' Jesus
meant When He said:
"Whosoever
shall lose his life for my sake and the
.gospel's,.the
same shall save it" (Mark
8:35).
"
" .
No Christian
is•equipped.to
render
full and acceptable
service to Christ.
until he has been baptized, or filled
with the Holy•Spirit:
He needs the
power that comes from the fullness of
the Hol_;.Spirit to live.victoriously,
to
he poisedunder
trying circumstances,
and to be e_npowered
for .witnessmg
for.Christ.
.
.
The'statements
of Jesus. "'Blessed
. L are the pure in heartf
for they shall
see God" CMatthew 5:8).
.
.t and.. of the
,
writer to the Hebrews
Follow ,..
holiness, without which no "man shall
see the Lord" (Hebrews
12:.14) indieate, the importance
of being pure
in heart:"
Holiness. is necessary
for
.lifE, for .death, for heaveia.. The•tragic
resul_ of neglecting
this
truth give asense of urgency to preach
the: message of holiness cIearly and
convincingly,
and to press upon the"
people the" necessity
of entering
into
the _xperience of dntire sahctifieaJcion_
.
January 1959"
As a _'esult theyabout
lost
were.negligent
we}king in the light, they drifted into
a _tate of spiritual, apathy;" and el::
tlmugh
they they.
still haye
keep up
the habits
of
r._ligion
no "manifesta:
tions of real spirituaLlife.
They are
and power.
Not'infreqtiently
'withoutjoy,
victory, warmth
- who thus neglec,t the call to
fall back.into
the old paths
::
,
do these
of spirit,
holiness
of sin.
l
The .glories of holiness should be
proclaimed.'clearly.
Entire
sanctifi:
. cation not of_ly cleanses .the-_heart
from all sin; it also brings the believer
into "a state of entire devotement
to
God, and the holy obedience
of )eve
made perfect."
In this lifo'of holiness
there are fullness of joy, abundance
of life. a united
heart to do God's
"wi!l,: a spiritual'
mindedness
Which
brings-life and'pe_ce; the whole'armor
of God'; wl_ichcauses
the Christizin to
'stand
fto keep on his feet) .the iffcreasing
yield of .tile fruit
o£ the
Spirit, a consciousness,.of..adequacy
andpower
which enables one to say,.
"I can do all things through
Christ
which stre/agther_eth fad" (Philippians
'1 13) the" blessedness
of. fellowship
or communion
with Christ nod" with
- His children
which is most satisfying;
and the glories ofhea;een
_vith Christ
for .ever and ever.
Certainly
if these
are stressed as they should be, many
people will desire to kiaow Such a life
:of holiness.
. .
A few suggest ons" [or sermons
on
.the experience
of'entire
sanctification
are given in the _[ollowing ohtlines..
_
19
"
•
..
,
,
,
. "
.
|
The High Calling Of God'
TEXT: For God hath not called 2is
" unto uncleanness,
but u_tto holines's:
He- thcrctore
tha'_ despiseth,
despiseth not man,/iut
God, wlto hath
also given unto us his holy Spirit
(I- Thessalonians
4: 7-8).
a.
cleanness
.(moral
and spir,
itual} and holiness.
1. -God is not on the side of.
uncleanness.
II.
"
"" :
"
_
"
. .
"
20
. a. Removal "of inner un_
cleanness
or pollution
• of their :hearts,.upon
•
.
.
which strong tempta..
. tion would be based...
b, Pni-ity as. an inner fortification, agaiiqst their
weakness
caused
by
" their
Cermet: indulgences in sm and un-iclehnness:
. .
3. Holiness
as spiritual
wholeness.
.
"
"
a. Inner
disease healing
:of. from
sin _ the
its
weakening
effects_its
. .
..
(Romans 8:7).
•e. A full devotedness
to
-God--_ready
obedience
to His Will_-a. singleness
of puripose--a
'
united. "heart.
The provision or source of"holiness, the H61y Spirit given unto
ofpeace
sanctify you Wholly."
II. It. is a workdone
in Christians,"
.... sanctify _¢ou whOIl3_." The im. mediate context, also the hiessage
of the whole ]et_.er,' especially
,
"
_-
•
_,wholly--body,
so¢l, and_pir_ it, the
whole
personality.
. Cleansed.
and
integrated
around the will of God.
B. They were to be sanctified
wholly before" the coming of
Christ: 'in. this
HenCelife: it is to be
• done
C.
,,
-
*
It is an instantaneous
workZ" tlae tense of the verb "sanctify"
used here " indicates instaritaneous
or
completed
action,
Something
fully ac.complished,
not demanding
a
chapters one arid.three,
indicate
- that Paul was praying for Chris .....
ti0.n people.
.
.
-
God,
•"His
holySpi*it."
depriving influences,
b. or
Holiness
as soul health
inner soundness.
4. Holiness as devotedness to.
God.
III.
The
overcbme
all 0f these, " and
"
to-makeand
keep us holy.
atti_hde,
an. alternative--
despising
or .rejecting,
but God.
" A. Which shall it be?
hess or holiness?
'.
-
"
officials
" ' mockery,
not man,
.
Unclean:
The "low
"
[ '"
the " 1.
other..
Go on to holiness" .or drift
back to uneleannd_.
_
"/
•
2. 'T6 maintain•their
present
relati0ns_aip
with"His -God
.they
must accept
call
I
to holiness.
3. Accept or reject.
.
•
- "
-'
.
.
""
By Fletcher Spruce*
":
the form of
at the idea of
'His 'saving-himself
from the .cross
would- have converted
them, Jesus"
destroying
the Man .of. Galilee, who
had caused., them
endless ".tro_ble:
After- they'.had
securely
nailed 'the
flesh of His hands" and feet to qthe
would have died on the cross in any
oase_ But they did not convince Him.
Horde men thus convince" Him today.
Would anyone believe in a Christ
cross, they.dared
Him to perform just
one more .miracle,
and come down
of' limited atdnement?_
Would anyone be content tb worship a Saviour
from _he'eross.
lieve.:
.... "
who employed
His.0wn
miracles
to
save himself?
Could God be.the God
He claims to he if He. had stooped to
Such
small
was made.'in
thus laughing
a miracle
matter
Then ._"they
be• would
"
would
for our
have
suffering
been
a
Sa_,-
tour.
He.refused.
because
of
His But
weakness
did He Not
refuse,
but
because of His strength.
He came to
.pastor,.r=_m=.=,
x_u,
Mag_v.ino.
.
,
'_
I_ he bc.'thc King oi Israel, let him
die, andit was time 'to.do it, regardnow come down..#om
the.cross,'and
less of the false promises _to.the con. we will believe him (Matt. 27: 42).
trary.
•'
•
.'
"
"
" " If the'chief priests "and scribes.and:
, This false pledge of the religious •'elders could have convinced Him that
.
' is- one
" " or
It
The Preaehor'a
They Were to be kept,, by God,
sanctified
until the coming
of
' - Christ.
.- " " •
.
level Of this age or the high
"calling of God? Man's standor God's?
]3. -ards
-2_n.'alternatlve:"
"
IV.
•TheLieThatLaughed
at the Cross
ol. ' We know Our Weaknesses,
our impurities,
our divided hearts:.our
fruitless
struggles at holiness.
2. We "may likeWise
know
" the.glori6us.power
of .the
Holy Spirit given to us to
lanuar,I.
1959
" .
. .
long pbocass or. t!me;
"
us;
.. ' :
• ' .
. . . .
...
III. It is_a complete work_°sanc.tify
A. God. not "only calls to holt.
"you xyhony."
. .
"
ness; He also gives His Holy
A. They were to "be sanctified
Spirit.'to us to. make us hbly.
' ; ' " . • ....
... •
, His presence and power are
.
' the source of man's' holiness." ' '
" _ :"
.
" "
.
B. Holiness is-thus the work of"
'_
' .....
"
.... • . '-
the way into-holiness,
2. Holiness
is purity:--purity
in heart and.in
life.
"
.
God, the Sanctifier
TEkT: The,.very Codedpc'ace
sancti_y
you:wholly£.
. Faith[ul is'he that.
eal[eth
you; who also will do it
(I Thessalonians
5: 23-24).
I. Whatever .sanctification
is, it "is
the work of God, "The very God
calL_ away from or out
from :,uncleanness;
He
calls His people t0 go all.
"
.
.
"2.. The_e people
were. chil:,
dren of light (5:5}, not of
dncleanness
of.the day.
B,. Called to holiness.
(See also
,,
I.Peter 1:15-!6.)
" " "" "
1. The very opposite to un. cleanness.
God not only
"
.
Deliverance
from'the
. double-minded
state
(James 1:8)_
Removal
of tuner antagonism 'to the will of
God, _ the carnal mind,
which is enmity to'God
:
• " -"I. Called to holiness--not
t6 uncleanness_
"
- A. Not _,o uncli_anness.
This is
i
the age-old conflict:between
Christ'and
the world:
un-
"
answer
the taunts, flung
into His face..
by
sinful .men? HeJesus
n_t a
death=dodger.
was Was
. a DeathDestroyer.'
This" is the only Saviour
"who is: able
sin stains.
.....
to cleanse
our
"
"deepest
.
"
21
1
]
,
,
t
-
.
. •
.
Just as sunlight
when
through 'a prism is broken
The
Arminion
View
of
Inspiration
"
By Ralph Earle* .
•
, :
.
"
1."_Introduction
.
•.
" .
its vario_sxays,
truth , when
"
"
.
....
GODthese
, . sublime
. hath _words
.. spoken
--wltlx
would
openday this
combinati0ia a lock•
the majestic
•'Then.one
it came--like,
light
Matterhorn
of divine revelation •opens
from heaven.
Christ. isthe combina"its. message.
The only"basis
for cer- "lion[ Heis
the divine-humaia,
living
"taihty in human life and thought
is " Word andr the Bible.is
.the di,)ine-
•
to he found'in this: God hag spoken,
huraan, written
Word.
Here is .the
We live in an age that flaunts au- ':' twofold foundation
of Our faith.
thorlty.
Relatii:ity
has not only caGod could
have sent His Son.in
throned.itself
in the'.realm of science:
adult human form without
a human:
it hassought
also to extendits
sway
birth.
Jesus' body .would thdn have
to the fields'el ethics arid'religion.
It
been simply a shell in Which was
has become: popular In assert that one
encased the divine nature,
cannot be c/_rtain of anything except
But G6d in His wisdom did_ -not
"
.
" -
that he really knows nothing.
- choose to do it that way, Rathm;. He
Is there any way out of this morass
"caused His Son to be born of a woman,
with its murky
overlmad?
.'We heJesus thus partook of the personalit3/
lieve there is. Final.authority
is to" characteristics
of His nmther--p_yeh0.
be .found
in the fact".that
God -has "logically as.well
as physieally.:_H_
- .
spoken.
must be aIn creative
any true intelligence_
universq
there
•.To
not only
His
facial bore
features
resemblance'to
but He was
her inin
Christihn'
faith
this eternal. infiriite
fluenced_by
the intellectual.a_/d
social
Creator_the
philosopher's
uncaused
_itm0sphere of the home;
He-_)as the
First Cause_l.s
the" God and Father
Son of Mary as.well as the Son of God,
of our Lord Jesus" Christ.
""
So it was with the Bible. God could
"
1
"
But how has God spoken?
Th_
have sent down the Book allinscribed
writer
of Hebrews
tells us .that in
with the con)plete, revelation,
bound
arden times God spoke '"bit by bit and ' ifi black leather, divinity circuit, go/d,
ln"many
different
ways" (Williams).
edged, s!lk-sewn.
India paper---even
But now He lms spoken "in "a .Son."
dedicatedto
King James!.
Bqt He did
For centuries
God had spoken
in
not choose.to do so. Instead the light
dreams and visions, in type and symof divine revelation
broke m- on the
r
b01:. But an impersonal
re,)elation
of " .soul of" Moses of. Samuel, of. David,
.
•a person
must.necessarily
be imperOf John.
The result, is a divinely
feet'• 'So God sent His Son. The NeW
_nsplred, humanly
written
revelation
_
Testament
is the inspired
reco_'d of
of G0d's truth for man,
•
" ....
" . 1
that revelation of,God in Christ.
The Bible is a divine-humanBook,
F0r years we sought the code that"
....
"_ r_t._,,e,t. _,_,e
....•_,_I
, ......
22
""
:
r_¢o,o_c_,
" s....
•
They wrote on sheepskin
and goatskin,- on papyrtls
and. parchment,
They.wrote
the thoughts
Of God as
•
best_ they couldunderstand
them by
the help .of the Holy Sl_irit.
The Proachor's
Maqazlno
"of confused human opinions.
Unless
a "Thus saith the Lord" soun'ds in our
revelation
in the Bible.
Him? There isoniy one answer:
The
It is unfortunate
that too often we
Bible shys so. If the Bible(is not6f
s_e only one side.of a truth, and'so
divine authbrity
then wb have no cer-.we actually
have only a half-truth,
tain k_aowledge ofa'way
of salvation
Ask. 0 c0nsei'vative,
"Was Jesus divine
we'have no gospel to preach we have
or human?"
and he Will answer em-'
no honest'basis
for telling men that
phaticany,
"Divine!"
Ask marly lib- • they can be saved by a.ccepling J'esias
erals the.qame question and the _'eply
Christ. the.Lord..Take
away the diwill be,""Human.'r
Both are right
vine authority
of the Bible and there
and both_ are wrong.
The opposition
is no firm foundation
left-.for'our
between
Jesus'
deity and' humanity
Christine
faith.There
is no more
I
.
so.the'light
of, God's
filtered
through
the
actual
_ap- : HisButSonhow'do
we know
that God HoW
gave
preach, thought-forms,
in diversity of in"ways
emphasis. of The
to savem
lost world?
_I01y Spirit used these varying, inter-'
do we know that Christ died to save
ests and.emphases
of the different
"sinners?
Howdo_veknow_that'afull
writers to convey, the total.'of divine
and. free salvatibn
]s. offered
us in
_,.
.
Without an.authoritative,Bible
we
•'shall only bog down in the quagmire
prisms
of human
personalities
took on
we shall beof lost
in theliterature,
maze of
the varying
slants
and 2nterests,
of .souls
the multiplicity
modern
those
personalities.
That
is shown
The doctrine ofassurance
bulks large
not only in the language tised--both
in the Bible. God wants His children'•
vocabulary
and style_but
also in. to be certain.
. .
"."
"
.
!
, _
1;_
_.
,
conducted
down into
-
i
_"
?
i
exists only in'false
theological
thinkcrucial'subject
that we could consider:..
• ..ing.
Jesus was_ and is. both hunmn
than that of inspiration.
"".. and divine.
.
After
this brief
introduction
we
The same situationobtains
in'rein-,
must proceed to the body of oui"ma"
tion to the Scriptures.
Conservatives
• terial.. In four artieles"weshould
like
emphasize, the dinine source "of the _to discuss four views of inspiration.
Bible Until they sometimes,
neglect
historically
speaking.
The first is that
the_httmau origin.
Liberals stress.the
of the Early Church."
Strictly,
tliiS.
latter.and
forget---:/if n6t actually deny
rMers notre a single school o_ thought "
--the former.
The Bible did l_'ave a but to n peritJd 'of time:--the
prohuman origin: it emne from the hands
Reformation
period.
The'second
will
of the .men who wrote it; " But.-its
he devoted
to the Reformation
and
ultimat'esdurce
was divine:.the
Holy
Reformed
views.
Again
we must
Spirit inspired the men who wrote it.. pluralize,
for there .are the' views of
It is, this which gives : it" its. unique.
Luther, of Calvin, and of.the so-called
authority
as the Word of God.
"
"
Reformed
theology
of our day.
The
One roan'sees 0nly.the scribe sitting
"thii_d study will deal' with the :vei'y
at a desk, pen in. hand, writing the
_ignifi'cant '. contemporary
school, of
wordsdf.scriptOre,
end he declares,
thought
known
as nee-orthodoxy.
ethersees
only the inspiring
Spir!t
hovering
overhead;
and he cries, "It:
. • |,
"
"The
is
d_v Bible
he.
is
What
.a.human
we need
book."
isle'seeAnthe wlmle picture,
not justone
part
"
of it, -
[
" " _
..
ianuary.,'lgS9
•
"
"
•
'
tentatively,
be it said humbly
and
emphaticallyl--some
suggestions
as to
Lastly,
the
Arminian
we wish
view1o offormulate---onl_/
inspiration.
(To be coati'rue'd)
. "
• "
, ,,r.
'23
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January,
19_9
"
"
"
i
|
"
•
•
.
.
. .
:I
I_
Ttie
.
Evangelist Called 0[ God
•
-
-
:
-
' !
"
--
.....
:t•
"
L A Cbmparison
of Minisferial Offices
--
' "
-
•_t
-.•By
Clay,on
"
"
Bailey*
were
the the
body?.
the eye.
cannot."
say unto
hand,And
I have
no need
of
"thee: nor again the head t0 the feet,
_
circles,
place of the
evangelist
]n the
.
church
is not to.be
151aced" upon a.
superfiEi'al :levbl of: importance,
nor
lo',k,ered' to the position, of being _i
necessary
burden
placed, upon
the
" churches
because of traditional
procedures of revivalism,
• ; ...... -ThoUgh there ]s oenntte_y
.,..
, a, separation' or'" tne" varmus' " maces--'
' .or" "the'
" ,
• , . , , ,
,
ministry,
there is a _lear/y
oe.rlneo
........
•
,
.,...
overlappmg
anti interlocKing'of
the
task of.an.
Paul spoke of.thegifts
of
the Spirit in the "twelfth chapter.of
the first
letter
to the church
in
•Corinth•
He described • the gifts as
being.like a body • .- individual mere:hal?s, and yet interdependent.
Sa the
" ' 0ffices of the miriistry are individual.
and yet greatly interdependent:
,
: .
Paul progressing
in his discussion
of the gifts of the Spirit, as resembling
in relationship
the members of a body,
declai'ed:
"But.now
hath God set the
members eVery one. of them in the
body_ as it hath pleased him.
And if
they were
all one "member.
Where
•P,_,,_,.c_o,,,_d;
26
_o_.
.
!
is the well-rounded
m_inistry of th.e
Church?
But now. arc there "several
offices, ye_t but one task. And th us it
is impossible
for the pastorto
say to
the evangelist, tIha_'e no need of you';
nor agairi theevangelist
to the pastor,
'I
have
no.need
of
you.'".
., .....
" .
,. ,.
,. There
". is
.°enmte_y an, mtermeKmg.
•
anu. an. .ever"
_appmg ano a rear sense ot mter_
_
.'
'
..
._
..
"_
:nepenuency
re.me
omces
_i
: • .
... , •varmus
_ ,
.
_ _of
"I
'
L
the mmmtry ustetl In -_pnesmns _:it.
The New Testament
procedure
for"
preaching
is foreshadowedin
the Old'
Testament:
T.he counterparts
to the
Old Testament
prophet-priest
rela:,
' tionshipare
to be found iia. the New
Testament
pastor-evangelist
relation.
ship.: .The prophet generally
represented God's cause to man, and' the
priest represented
the people's needs
before God,
Schools were established
in the Old
The Preacher's Meqdzinc
.
.
•
office.
The title ""evangelist". is used
only three times in the New Testameat.
In Acts 21_ 8 we find .the orlty
of' religiou_i-leadership
became
more
one inthe
needful as the nation increased,
Ministers
in our dispensation
similar
roles. " The evangelist
play
with
evangelist. ,Paul" entered
"the house
of'Philip?
the evangelis!."
Timothy
.was exhorted b_:'Paul to 'do the wor k
.
profitable
to all •divinely called' men
and women•
Pastors hnd:,evangellsts
.
alike:must
represent
God's cause .to
. the.people
and take the deeds of the..
people'before
God.
.
The gradual swing from:theprophet,
priest relationship'shows
up' in the
Gospels:
Je'sus spoke of His niinistry
.: in the OldTestameht
eofacept
of
_
= the
", proph'et's lot: "And they were offendedin him. But Jesus said unto them.
A prophet is not without'honour,
save
-"
•
Testament
times, to train prophets.
Priests. Were chosen
primarily
from
the heredi(ary
qualifications
from tlae
line of Aaron.
Before the Mosaic
institution,
under God. qf the" priestly
"
line, the individual
acted as his own
priest." This can be seen'in thesacri[icial offering by Abel. Sp,ecialization
Hpwevcr,
.the_e "is" not: as great a
separation
:of the pastor hnd/evangclist-today
as therewasin.the
rela-'
tionship of prophet and priest.in
the.
. Old Testament.
we
do_ not 'have
'sep'arate schools for the"i:liffereht calls
of the ministry..Ageneral
knowledge
of both offices
of the"/m'inist_'y,
is
cotfimon tasl_, as if'hath pleased Him.
Andif there is b_t oneposfti0n,where
....
.
.
Bible
who
was
called
_fh:nt_::ng:_i:t_'nc_IIisTitlmotlhiYi:g
the offiees0fthe
ministry
an
_,
"
5_f
in Ephesians
•
.
people
to .be made to. God, but they"
4:.1"1.
are living
sacrifices ". the _ndivldual
" The concept ?'pastbr'
is faund only
lifc.givencompletelyover'(o
God.
. once in the New Testament,
in the
tention."
In the listing of the special . I lmve noneed
of you" (! Corinthians
offices of "the ministry
in Ephesians
.12:18:19, 21):
.".
.
.
4:11 we _find the expression,
"and
Here we find a parallelism
.'with
some evangelists."
The subject, "The
regard
to the parts .played. by the
" " Evangelist
Called of God," reveals, a
vhriousofficcs
bf the ministry_
P_raspecial-category
and th6 source:of the
.phrasing the comparison,
the thought
"
calling." Neither the Category nor.the
reads as follows:
."But:God
hath set
calling
are strhnge
claims "in evaneach office of the-ministry
into one
gelical
The
•
.
prophetic
" offeL(S_r more
"fo'rthtellifig" utterances
than _'foretelling:'":
The
pastor .calls for. sacrifices
from the
.
_
_rl'_Ile
_PLnce..OFthe
theevangelist
]" Churchof
Nazarene
is innot.thea
"human
invention!'
but a "divine in-
_
Ephesian.4:11
passage,
A more cornmen title covering all of the offices.of
the ministry 'is the title '_preaeher.'"
This concept.is/used
in both-tile Old ....
and New Testaments.
Other phrases
are used"in- the Gospels • and Epistles
to-desc_'ibe'th6
functi0nal
importance
"of both pastor and evangelist.
•This
should show" us the _ .the strength" of
any office of the ministry
is not part!ci_larly strengthened
or we.._ened
.
by the use of the htle lrt the Bible. '
All phases of the ministry
have a
threefold
job,' namely,
sowing, the
seed watering
the seed, apd.'helplng
in the hvrvest
but it is God th:at gives
the inci'ease.
The sowing and watering of the seed 'may appear to be less
glamorous "that_ the' harvesting,
but
without them. the harvest
would be
in his own country_ and in his own
lmpbssible.
The evahgelist:lajres
out .
house" (Matthew.13:57).
_.Gradually
to:help
in the 'harvest:
The pastor
the Master
began-to
speak: of the
offers his' field of endeavor
te be
shepherdS•of
the flocks.
He_alsbsent
,,worked,
The people make UP' the'
out the disciples
in pairs .as evenharvest hands that round out the crew
gelists.
.
to be used to bring, in the" greatest
After the birth of.the Church
on
crop of, soUls that can be reached in
thi_ I)ay of Pentecost'we
see theshapa given reyival season•
. ..
, .
ing of the organizati0nal
sidb of the Some of the depth of compassion
Church and the separating
ofthe
ofand perseverance
of the•pastor
ought
rices of the ministry.
Before
this the
"to be fbund in every evangelist,'
and
disciples
Were called individually
to-some
of tli_ drive and sense of urbe ministerial Jaek-0f:an-trades.
They : gency of the e/'angelist
ought' to he
were apostles,
prophets,
evangelists,
.teaehers: had sometimes pastors,
.The few uses.of th_ term, however,
does not' lessgn the importance
of the "
January.1959 .
.
.
.
found in each pastor.
Sharing
the
pastor's-heart
cry for hispeople
will
safeguard
the evangelist
from being
too stern and sitting in judgment
on
:
"27: "
.
,
"
the people; and the pastor's feeling in
We have five offices t'o be filled by
his preaching the fer,zent spirit of the
God-called
men and women.
Each
evangelist
will save him from letting
minister has atouch of each positional
sentiment
overpower
his responmresponsibility
wrapped up in his spebility to denounce
the sins of "his
cial calling•
"
people. : B_oth. pastor and evangelist
.'As the 'church
has grown it has
ought to possess the combiriation
of
seen the development
of specialization
ruggedness
and
tenderness,
that is,
in the offices of the 'ministry,.
A.
the ability of preaching
from a heart
smaller church
pastor is assisted, to ..
6f love, yet without fear or favor, the iwhatever
degree of efficiency
that
inessage that is needed,
may'be
offered., by depalltment
lead- "
It wouldbe
well to notice that each
ers. Tile larger the individual church
•
of tat four phases
of the ministry
"becomes,
the greater,
becomes•the
listed in Ephesians has both a general,
necessity
of specializing
more and
and a particular
meaning:,
" ' '
"
more the pomtzons of the varlous leadArosrzEs:
• In the wider sense,
ers in the church.
Thus we have
"those sent to preach•"
today •the hiring of mefi arid women
APOSTLES: In the more narrow
meaning,
"those .who heard
and saw. Christ while He was
on earth."
•PaOI, HETS: In the broader meanrag, "forthtelling?'
PnOi_HETS: Inthe restricted sense,
•
"foretelling."
•
EV^NGELtST:. In the general usage,
"a preacher
of the.gospel•"
EvaN_Et_sr:
In .the
confined
" -
into full-time work' in the orgamza-';
•
..
acting business co_mpassionately, SoulOne'of
the chief mistakes
in the
tional structure
of thechurch.
Consaving in nature,
for God .and the
•pastor-evangelist
relationship
is the
. sectored
effort
mus!
also
become .
. \ Chizreh.
"
"
idea that the evangelist can say things
concentrated
effort.
What
can be
l.. •
The
concept
"evangelist'.'
comes
the pastor cannot say; This idea can
said on the local leve'l Can be s'aid on
: from the Same ro'ot wox_d that. is translead. to "a false e0nelusion
that the
the, gefieral level of the.church'sorlated "goSpel," and from the Word
ganizational
and' functional
activities
translated
"tQ " "
'
evangelist is:a "cure-all" Or a "crutch
.
preach.'
. •With this
in the program •of evangelism.
: The
in promoting the-building
of: the kingbroad' meaning, before. Us we can see ..truth of the matter is that the evafldom of God. What God has ddne for
that all ministers
and teachers'are
to
gelist can say•what has already
be_n
the Church in its organizationalstruebe evangelists ....
"
"
ture has been divinglyintended.
Paul in the lettei- to the chureh-'at
Said in a different
way.
What the
meaning. _'a preacher
of the
We believe that the varieu_ offices "
. gospel moving from place t6 " of then/ini_try
are ordained
of God."
place.""
The apostles .in the early beginnings"
TE^CHEa:
Ifi the general mean,"
.
ing, "the offering of the word-of wisdom; teaching the .eth-
ics of the
Christian
' TEACHER:
In the
particulai"life.'usage,
""the Offering of the word
[ "
;
of the Church
probably
faced this
.
problem of the need of specializing
in
the 'Offices" of the mifiistry.
Today• ' several
other enters'
questions
are field
asked.of
When 'a man
a certain
endeavor
is the die .cast?
If one is
ofknowledge;
the teaching of
once an evangelist
ishe always to be theology_ :and .the doctrine of
an evangelist?
If one is once a pastor
the church.
•
•
is he always to he a pastor?
Or likeThe title."past0r"
is the only office..wise
'with. a teacher?
In the Early
that does not:divide
ifito a narrow
Church the disciples had a little of •
and wider, meaning.
A pastor is. a
each 'form of ministry
wrapped up
"mintster, or clergyman with'refei'ence
in their everyday
ministry:
When
to. his. flock.
One having spiritual
churches
were established, .often the ,
care of a number of people" (diction-'
m_ss[onary evangelist became the pasary definition),
tor.
As _/reas "beCame more settled
We do nothave
here a.quintet
of
for the preaching of the'gospel,
the
functions to be performed
by a man
separation
of the offices ]Sesame more
m one office of the ministry .alon&
apparent.
2fl
•
-
Some men in the'church
have abili- ,was more of an all-incluslve ministry.
ties too great to be confined
to one
Today with ehq_;ches' established
as
field of endeavor•
Philip Was chosen
they are the ev'angelist has a' more
.in'the Book of Acts to help'w|th
tendconcentrated
type ministry.
ing the tables, but on several oecaThe" evangelist
is neither
to be.
sions he was directed by the Spirit to. glamorized
nor ostracized.
He is not
do evangelistic
work:
His life and
to be thought of as a "supernatural
spirit could tal_e in the organizational
rain makm:"" with the' thundeiand
responsibility
anld : ex;angelist!e
enqightning of his declarations,
nor is he
. deavbi" as well. "
to be just put up with because he is
And
yet there is today, a specific
pushed on churches
through..the
tra"
"
'
•
place and task for the evangelL_t.
We" ditional procedures
of evangelism..
can see this inl the meaning
of the
The'message
of the evangelist ought
term ....
.
'.
to do some teachifig but his messages
The evangelist is'a transf0/aned
perin the main are geared to bring deson experientially,
.transplanted
into
cis]ons for Christ in a shortq_eriod o_
various
Settings vocationally,
transtime. "
Tho Pzeachor'nMagazine
i
i
i
1
Ephesus el:trigs out more'.clearly
the
SlSeeial officesof
the ministry.
The
meaning
we ha_'e been discussing is
evangelist
says
should
be a re, emphasis
and. not a new emphasis.
The early evangelists
were more
onlythe
functional
meaning, but now
we'see thei'e is a' vocational meaning:
All: engaged -in' the ministry, of .the
like spiritual
contractors _building a
habitation foi"God:eut of living stones,
the soul_ of men, bet today the evan,
church
fun'ctionally
the heart are.
of•their
preachingevangelists
and teach-at
: ing, but some are vocati0nally
evan-
is finding-that
more shots
• like
agelist
slsiritual
veterinarian he is
giving"
tothe
llocks in .various places.
In
i -. :igellstsas Well, ministers called of God
_"
tothe specific task of evangelism.
i
This task becomesclear
aswe
see
l
the specific message of the evangelist,
_ :
One _f. the.basic
reasons for divinely
called evangelist s. Can be ,seefl in the
• " type 'ofmessage
they are. called to
deliver:
The- first evangelists
were
world-wide
mmslonary"
' "
.evangelists:
The preaching of the first evangelists
....
.
- -
"
lanuap/, 1959
reality, he should be but another chan-.
' nel through whom the Holy Spirit can
work.to
capitalize' on eff0rts"already
used by pastor and ,peopl6 in'a local
setting for winning souls,The message of the evangelist is a
concentrated
thrust
on the part of
God and man to bring men and wbm_n
intoa
saying knowledge
of Christ:
(To he eontlyni_ed)
•
.
.
.
.
...
"
-
.
.
.r
2_
" "
,
Paul's Concept of the P'astorate
. '
• ")
:
I • The Call to the Ministry
"
"
_
"
"
'
. •
.
•
,.By "Roscoe
:
."
"
FoaEwoan
:
.
- The Apostle Paul is'thought
.'of as
a missionary
evangelist,
and rightly
so. He marched
at the.head
of the
" armies of Christ in their first sweepjng
conquest of.theknow'nworld.
Never
was there such an evangelist
as he
and probably
tat;re willnever
be
""
.
another.
,,
But tho_igh he excelled.as
mmsmn_
ary evaflgelist, he was not flint alone•
'We miss a. great heritage if wedo not
' recognize
in him a inighiy example
and teacher .to pastors. "Sir Witistofi
Churchill
is, witliout
doubt,
the
greatest
statesman
of our time.and
" "
Pershall*
.
. ,"
"-
-.
_
;:
had never seen'the Roman-Christians,
"" ]
.'let he'wrote them a lettm" of pastoral
instruction
in doctrine..He
heard of.
;
the partisanism
andthe
immorality.in
the Corinthianehurch
and wro_e to
cbrrgct these things.
And again he
wrote toreassure
them of his love,
though-'he
wrote sharply
in the first
letter_
" "
"
As a pastor.he challenged the Gala"ti0ns_return
to'Judaism
and pointed
ot/t the exclusivenes's
of the Jewish
Christians
at Ephesus.
In writing n
letter of gratitudet5
the Philip'pians
.he allowed the letter to o_erfl6_, with
.his love for his people. " HQ, wrote to
has semired himself an enviable place
in history -as a noble leader
of men,
but he'also is a historian.and
painter
of "ability.
So"Pau]_ had excellences
that, found in lesser men,:'wuuld'have
made them stand out as pastor_, and
teachers
of pastors,
"
All of'Paul's Epistles were pasto/'al
in character,
though
the three Drily
are called
Pastoral " Epistles
They "
:edify the Colos_ians
and 'to? correct
doctrinal ei'rors, and _'e]oiced'with the
Thessalohi_ans
.in" his' first letter
to
them..,Ti, tie:to his shepherd
inst_inet,
he wrote .again to tlm Thessalonlans
to correct
a misunder_tanding..con:,
cerning his. refe/'ence
to the ,second
" "
coming of.Jesus.
"'.
In his lettea's to Timothy. and Titns
he expressds his concept . of.the 15as-•
were conceived in.a pastor's heart and
horr/'of
a. burfllng desire to see the
toral"ministry
and" give_
instruction
to these young
, saints persevere:
"The care of all the
churches'"
was a big part of his in-
:
invaluable
preachers:
His devoteinent
to the" interests
"the redeemed,
is "demonstrated
of
in
terest:
"
"
classic-fashion
when he.takeL time to
One of the essential
qualities
of ..write a personal letter to a friend 'in
pastoring
is the hurture
of hell, vet's,. -the.interest
of a runaway-_lave
who.' _
as well a s wimaing .the lost.
Thehas
beensaved.
theme of'most of Paul's writings can
be found in Ephesians
4:13-16.
He
In Paul's writings _,e borg.the bulk
:
..
0f.our_0astoral
instruction.as
given us
"Director
ol Fvan9
........ 0re_onPacificDistrict
by the Bible.
There'are
d0btr_ne, in30
l When'q he _wrote. to ,the Galafian
Christians
he identified himself at the
beginnin_
of the' letter
by writing;
"Patti. an apostle, (not Of men. neither
by man. but by Jesus Christ, andGod
of.inexpressed
yisionof reservoir
thiswork:.dnd
dead;)"
(Galatians
1:1), and furtherestabli_ties'his
authbrity
tc speak on
1
"
"'_,,t
spiritual
things
by.dec
ai'mg,
_. "
_f'hen .it pleased."God,
who separated
me fi'om my..mother's
womb, and
called me by his grace, to'reveal
his
you find a sparkling
"
-"
.
spiration,
warning, ex_ortation,
tomfort, eommer/dation,
joy,,hope.
If we
had no'other
pastoral instruction
his
would be sufficient.
Add to his demonstrated
concept of the pastordte his
The Preachor'z_Mdqazlne
. " struetion
and-example.
The articles
wl/ich.'follow•
are .an
effert to draw i'rbm that reservoir
some of theinspired
wisdmhand
logic
therein, that we may. be just a.little
shepherds
of the fleck.
,
Paul's Personal
Call
.
The call. of God was indelibly
mspr6ssedupon'the
Consciousness Of the
rhighty apostle.
It was Concomitant
":vith_tlie bright
light qf eonversmn,
for as'he
told Agrippa of. his great
" crisis experience
he-declared
this to
'
be part of the mi_ssage of.God:
!'But
rme, and'stand
upon thy feet:
for I
_
have appeared
unto thee forthis
purpose, to make thee a minister and a
•
witness
both. of these .things: which
thou hast seer., and of those things in.
'- ' thewhich
I will appear
tinto .thee:
delivering
thee _rom the people, and
i".
f_
..1
better
the'FaJ:her,
Whor aised
himfrom
Son in me, that
I might
pi'each
him-
among tim heathen"
(Galatians
l:1516a).
In most of. his salht,'itions
in his
Epistles
he at_knowledges
his call.:
When he wrote
to the Romfins he
decla
was called to he an
apostle
",find that he was separated
unt6 the" gospel
(Romans
1:1).
To
the Corinthians
he decl/Ires it the will
of God that he h'e an hp6stle,, as he
does also to'the Ephesians, Col0ssians.
and to Timothy in the second.letter.
He nmkes it _till stfonger m his First
Epistle.to
Timothy by declaring it the
commafidment
of God. ' " _ •
"
from the Gentiles. unto whom flowI
"The Epistles
of 15auI bristle
witli
send thee,.to
open.their
eyes; and to
"l know," hut there is no verity.that
turn them from.darkness
to lighL and
he holds .that is more sure than his
from the po'_,er of Satan unto .God
conviction that he was called of God..
that they ma_ receive
forgiveness
of
to minister thegl:aee
0f. God.. It took
sins,," and inheritance
among
them
tl_at established
persuasion
to 'send
Which are sanctified
by faith that is
•
"
him out against the overwhelming
" in me" (Acts 26:16-18l,
" The Lord
odds that he faced. .Rejected
by his
confirmed
it when"He
reassured
the
fearful • messez_ger,
Ananias,
thus: .'fians,
Jewish .opposed
friends, doubted
by theChrlsby autho/qty,
perse- _
'.'.... Go'thy way: [or he is a qh_?sen cured by the wicked, buffeted by the
vessel unto me. to-bear
my. name
befol"e the Gentiles.
and "kings, and
-elements.
confronted
bya
wall of
the ehildi'en of Israer'
(Acts 9:15).
heathen
darkness
almost
alone, he
.needed. the prod that'made
him de- ...
At the same time. rant'tile
.White
elate. . ,, Woe ts
. unt 0,'me,
•
if I preach
light of i'evelation ex!hosed his sin and " not tl3e _ospel,!" (I'Corinthians
9:16b)
: his need of "salvation. :it a/so raised
Nothing le.ss would
have; sufficed:
.before ,him a divine .imperative
to
_
.
.. .
. .preach the gospel; at the tlmehCwas
•
separated
frnm sin, "he was sepaa'ated
All Ministers to Be God-called
:to holy servme as a mighty witness
Paul taught that a call of God was
Of the. kingdom of God.
common to all those who are to minlanuary.1959
..
..
31
I
"
•
..
'ister-.the
To 'forestall
misUnderstandingWord.
of churchrelationships
prophets?
allteachers?
are all
wqrkers of are
mirficles?'!
(I Corinthians
and thus to. insure unity_ he .pointed
" out'to the Eph_s|ans
that •there is a
coiled ministry,
Whose wdrk" is to
12: 28-29)
He seemed to be saying,
."As•it
is true of the priest, so it is
true of the minister,
'And no man
some,apos'tles;
and gome, prophets;
Notice
what he said:
"And he gave
•
:
"
i,!
I
tors and teaelaers;, for" the perfecting
of'tiae saints, for thework
of thelministry/ for the edifying
of the body
" of' Chris_". (Eplmsians
4i 11-12).
At
Ephestis
met the and
elderssore%
of pasthe
and some,.heevangelists;
build the Church up "in'holy things,
church
and recognized
their
call in
his partinginstructionto
them: "Take
heed therefore
unto. yourselves,"
and
to all the flock, over the Which the.
Holy Ghost hath made you overseers,
heard? aiad how shallthey
heal" 'wlthout a .preacher?
"And how shall they
preach, except they he sent? as itis
written. How beautiful are the feet of..
" themthat
preach the gospel of peacel
and bi'ing glad tidings Of goodthings!"
,..,
,,
" .;.
"
.
,
.
xne
t_ormtnlans,
approprmtect
to
•
T_T'J[_E:LNT
O:f
tl'le
P_80
"
-i=rl'-,:..._
"
_
.
..
(He_rewsO:4).
All are to
is .called of:God,
as was
-
Spirit; all are to' seek the full will bf
God; but there are some.positions
and.
some activities
that belong only to'a
ealled ministry.
.
,By Ruth
Yaughn*
.
.
.
DEAn Gob:
I'ni home r_gain_but
I'm .'not the.
same. I look" about me and see Bilrs
andobserved
some wer.e
others
w6re
"
'
"
the qther women, Lord,
still young
and •fresh;
the _aarks. oftime
and
"
theology books piled about, the baby's
tears--but
I could see Christ shining
Hegathered
ministers
of God
toyS, all unchanged,
but me---I am
from each of their'faces.
...
"
witness;
all are the
to be
filled with
the" "
taketh this honour unto himself' but
around him and' spoke for them all
• 11
different..
. Suddenly
the.'aching
weight
that
:when he said:
'_Now then we. are
"
We I/ave just returned
from the
was my heart diss61ved. And I kt/ew
ambassadors,
for Christ,
as .th0ugh
13reacher_ ' Conclave, Lord. It wasmy
the hot sting oftears
as I fell Thee at
God did beseech you by.us:
we pray
first: It. was a problem finding some- -my side'and felt the touch'of Thy hand
you in Christ'ssteed,
be ye reconciled
• • . •
. .
, •
"on mine. "In that instant I knew that
•
one. to keep the baby. He had a cold.
Thoti'wast with me just as Thou hadst
• to feed. the church of-God
which he
to God" (II Corinthians
5:20) L. Am-"
Thatworried
me and I thought pe_-: I_ecn witl_ ;these others.
They had
hath purchased
with his own blood _' bassadors
for Chz'ist.
Sent frdm the
hops I should just stay. athome.
But
found in Thee the strength and tour(Acts 20:28)_
The Holy Ghost had
throne" of God.
.Representative_.'of
.
_I did not.
.
.
laid His hand upon" these elders to
His government.
The'mouthpiece
of
You
know
the,problems
that
have"
age
to
go
on
and. keep I trying
in spite
• ;
of cuts ar/d bruises.
knew 'in
that
"draw them out to,a place of service to
God. The ministers of the Kingdom
loomed so large, Lordl You'knowthe
moment that I could "find that same
. God: and the Cl_tireh.. They were: a are God-called min|sters.
",_ dispeiaheartaches'that
have come. You know
reservoir of power to'o.
•
God-chosen
group to look after the
solicit of the gospeLis committed unto
the dark, dismal
picture the devil
Oh, I'm glad I we/at to-Conclave,
.
people of God.
me" (I Corinthians
9:17b).
•painted:My
heart felt almost as bleak
Lord; I made new _riends_ renewed
In Romans
10:14-15 the apostle
"
and coldl It seemed I could hot pray•
some old acqfiaintances.
But'most
of
.
.gave a beautiful
tribute to". the. min.: •
"
.
.The first morning at Conclave_ we
all, the icy fear .in. my heart Was ,_
istry while he made plain the •fact of
proachei's', wives all n'fet together•
I melted by the'rekindling.of'Thy
love•
a called fiainistry:
"How then shall
wag the youngest
of the.group:
/3ti!
In the _aee of mutual _omplexities
and
they call on him in whom the_,, have
not'believed?
howshall
they n'othelieve
in him ofandwhom
they have
,_.
' ;"
Aaron'"
he that
',
:themselves
the. prerogatives•
miriistry promiscuously.
He
them by 'saying, "And God
some
in theprophets,
chui'ch, thirdly"
first
secondarily
of the
corrected
hath set
apostles,
teeichcrs,
after that miracles,.then
gifts of healings, helps, "governments,
diversities
of tongues,
Are.an
apostles? are all
"_2
A Minister's Wife Prays
Influence
they did:not make me•feel young and
inqxpei'ieneed,
They made
me feel
warzn and happy--a
part 'of.a great
?
l spokea.word,
and no
one heard .... "
I wrote
a word,
" •
Anit
nb One
cared,
. " Or seemed to heed•
But:a_ter hal_ a score:o_ y:cars
It blossomed in a _ragrant deed.
.
' ' •
• ' ": "
Preachers and'teachers ali are._e,
"
Sowers.of seed unconsciously,
'Our hearers are beyond our ken,
Yet all toe give way come again
With usuryo_ joy and pain;
We
_tcuerone
_now
To What
little'word
may grow.
See to it, theft, that all yore:seeds
Be such as bring Iorth noble'deeds,
--in Watchman Examiner
- "
The"P_eachor's
"
".
t
._
.mutua) Utiderstanding,
I..learned
to
:look .beyond the pain into The/ dear
"face,.and.-the
problems:slipped
away
whole!
.
a weight
I .had.
n !ired of
.Throughout
the
gaiety• and laugh, • like
carrying.
'
. • grow
terr the icy problems
hung onto my
Now I am home again.
The. floor
. heart like s weight.
Then- another
"in the.bedroom
is still warped;
the
pastor's wife .began to talk. ' She' has
closet door still won't shut; Grandma
lived in a parsonage.much
longer than
Duffey Still called again this moi'ning
' I.' She isthe
kind of person.I
would
to report beraches
and ills. 'But I:am
_
"
lille to be.
not the same.
My..vision
has been
AS she talked, I began to realize
broadened,
my heart
has become
that
these tearing
t/iarts of mine
greater, my .faith made stronger, my
weren't iust mine alone. All of these .understanding
.drilled
deeper;
for -I
women faced them. All of these'wives
_have just "returned
from
Conclave,
-"
Macja_lne
had cried and ached over the same
perplexities.
As I looked about me
"_,_m r_a_. .
.
: . :
.
JanuQz7,
,,
,
1959
,i
: -
"
I
.
".
I
II
•
where
I mingled
most
of
all, where
_."hoe.
.
with friends, but .
I communed
with.
:
I
.
II
I
"1
I
33.
]
-
'
-
I
o/Workshop
.
_
_-
"-_'--_-'_"_'_'--7
"
'
"
.SIX
" •
TIIIN£1S
HOME.
.
Mark-S:
by Nelson G. Mink*
•
TO CllEATf: A Happy
I9 .
. .
- --Rzv.
"
"
-
:
.
2.
must
3.
hffbetion:mdst
the upholsterei..
heating
L Tidiness
Integrity
must. bebe the
ari:hiteet. sys-"
- tem..
4. Chem'fulness
must be the electric
power.
5. Industry
must be the'.ventilator.
6.. God must'be
the insurance
and the
assurance
policy,
.
'"
]"
_u=n.ACNXNG_OG_
,
" "
- "
NECESSAeY
Text.
.........
" "
•
"
Contributed
:
.,
"
""
/_ot
SClUPTUag: .Galatians
"
De_:eived
"
TO:
f'ead--ahsorb,
Do more
ttian
llsten2-Untlm.stand.
'Do
Do
niore than
thdn lool(--observe
berlitz]isles,
I)o more th,an (ouch--feel.
. "
Domore
thhii!plan-Lact:'
.
Do more than talk--say
something,
Do more than exlst--:live,
" --Naeogdoehes_
Texas
Calvary
Church
Bulletb_
6:7
"
III.
. DECEIVED
"
.I.text..When
MAN IS
WIIEN HE TruNKS"
is'man deceived?
HE CAN GET BY ON LESS TIIAN GOB
REQUIDES. Anti what doth the Lord
reciulro
of thee, but .to do justly,
and- to love mercy,
and to walk
h_umbly with thy God?" (Micah 6!8) . .
A. Do justly-_start
living, right,
.
BuD AT;fleet
1.
This
irapljoa
,quit
wrong,
"
'• 2.. Quit the sin business,
" B. Love mercy,
"
living
"
•
"
READY
TO _O[ Christian
An
earnest
colored
manl
who inwasthe asked
.what retu/'n
value
his Christ,
belief
had
immine_at
of
.
Brasfi those snit_
Saturday
night.
""
"
Solothat
Roast that button'.
mutton
Satitrday:*_ight.
"
tangled."
• _to,.
34.
..
"
sitting with"my'
feet: us"
" Texas,:
"
--Raymbndvillb,
Nazarene
Bfflletin
_¢_o, r_
".
..
.
:
. First
.
lowship
of the world
ratty,
with . God?"
4:4)
:
B. You
-
"
Lesson read,
Em'ly to bed,
l"
Saturday
night.
. .'
"--Corpn_
Christi,
Texas,
.
: ]
"
.
Bulletin
_'he Preacher'_ Maqazlne
.
"
mock
.
. "
:
Gdd comrnanded
of Israel to give
thechildren
"
the'land
l:ezt
every shventh
year, hut.from'
the time of Saul they did not.
It was 490 years before they
. reaped.
They were carried
into captivity-70
years :to letthe land-rest.
They reap'ed
"" long after they bad sown.
"
2. Thotigh
some. may seem to
get by, "be" n'ot deceived."
"
C., You always reap:more
tlaan you
sow.
"
1. Jacob toki onelie, add reaped
it -tenfold "in his sons.
He
.
mourned
twe0ty
year_' for a
" " son who was not dead•
to
.
Abs;albm
mm'dered
"Amnon.
, .
e. AbSalom
tried
to wrest
the kingdom
from .his fa,
ther and committed
a terrible
sin in the
king's
-
b.
-
"
1:8).
hofise.
|aauary, 1959
35
III
II
'
"
.
2." David
leaped
four hfirvests
for his sin.
*_
"
a.. Amnon
David's'son,
de' "
filed his sister,
serve'Him
while never..?,_orking
for
Him,
.
.1. _'If" ye love
me, keep my
commandments"
(John
14:
15),
The" last thihg He said
to His 'disciples
was, "Ye
" shall be witnesses
unto me
. . ." (Acts.
.
1.
is en(Jfimes
God by profesMng
3. ""Woe
to them that
are at
'ease in Zion" (Amos 5_21-24;
., 6: 1).
" "
.
MAN IS DECEEVED WIIEN HE TIIINKS
B. Because
the
sentence'
against
"evil is not executed
speedily,-.
people think they will not have
to reap.
•
• .
..
"I CAN'T KICK"
SEI';TENCE.,,
; SEaMONS.. "
"
.
.
"How are you today?"
I greeted
my
The sh'alghtest
man iri the Bible wa._
next-door
neighbor
the other
morning:.
:
......
L : Have a'heart
full of love
Joseph; becau_se Pharaoli
made a _ruler'.
" I can t kink.
he answered
chebrily_.
[• "
2. Be b.leanscd fro/n.all
sift.
of.h_im.
That was l_i.e_:ally.true,
fe_- Martin
is
3. Be filled'with
the Spirit.
"Just
when
:)off get dvcn Witi_the
cr_ppldd up withfirthritis.
Ha does not
]
.
Joneses,':they
refinance•
walk, ht_t sort.of
crawls
fllong by the •
•
-C. Walkqmmbly.with
thy God.
"It has been-.suggested
that tlie trouble
aid of two canes.
Only one leg bends 0
L Walk in the light.
with..'each
generation
is ,that it hasn't
- little at the knee. • The Other one is stiff
2..Keep
humble before God.
t;ead the mindtes
of the-test
meeting"
h'om the hip down:.
. . 3.:LiYe
at peace•with
all men..
h
'
' " '
"
-(TheBore:.Crusade,<).a
petyson who,kn0ws
the same.
So. e. can :t k ok.
--ANONYMOUS
' : IL MA_ Is DECEtVED WII_N HETItINKS
.....
" stories you do:
•
-. . ..HZ
CAN
MOCK
GOD
AN0
GET
BY.:.
"
- "..
.
. A. "_ou mock Gad hy professing
to
"They it's
probably
it 'take-home
]Day'
RECIPE"Foe GETTING TO 'SUNDAY Scuoor_
serx_e Him while still" living, in
because
not bigcallenough
to get there
by itself'.':. (Gordon
ThatcDer).
- .
. or_ TIME"
.
"
'
sin;
.
"Some of the footprintg
in the sands
"
Set that clock
"
'
" : " • 1. "If we say th//t.wc
ltave tel-:
of time were left there by 'heels'!
Iron that J'rock,
. _
lowship With him. and walk
"Most
of the knocking
is done by
. Saturday
night
"
in" darkness,
we lie, and do"
pe6ple who don't know how to ring" the
.: .
-'
not'the
truth"
II.John
1:6).
'.- he]l."--SeIeeted.
Sldrte those boots
"
_
2. "Kfiowye
not that the tel.
doeth
(Mat-
" A.
The.harvest
comes as
a necesHe CAN
Sow WITIIOUT
REAPING:
sary consequence
Of sowing.
1. Thei'e is no e.qeap'e _ro.m this
law.
"
- "
2. Others may have to reap with
"
you, but no one can reapfoi.
you.
'
" '
.
....
every,Lord,
one . Lord,
that saith
me,
shall
into the kingdom
.of
,heaven;
but he that
the will of my Fathm"'
thew 7:21),
INTItODUCT1ON: The Word of God.is filled
with v/,m'nings
against being deceived
about out. spiritual
life and out" rolE:
tionship with God.
But no 3Yarning is
more emphatic
than the words of the
'
YOU WIt,h Have
Do moi'e, than
Be
2-"Not.
unto
enter
_
,,
!
°
d.
""
3.
",
_
CONCLUSION:
thinks
Absalom
slain .with the
sword.
!'O my son _bsalem,
my son. my son
Absalom[
would
God I
hsd died fox" thee!"
If God did not spare David.
think
you. He •would Spare
you and me?
" •
Man
ls.deeewed
when he
he can
getby
dn less
than
God requires,
when he thinks
•caninock
God and get by, when
B.
.
"
-
he
he
he can sow without
reaping,
you one of those who is being
deceived?
Don't let the devil longer
deceive
you.
Get right wlthGbd
hOWl ....
•
.
--DARRELL MOOSE
-- Pastor, Abilene,
..
the • Chrisfitin
Religion:
Permit
Sinning?
"
SCRIPTURE: Romans 6_ 1-6
.
"
TEXT:
Fur'.the
grace :of God
that
. 'bringeth
salvation
hath appeared
to
all men,
tqaching
us that, de_iying
ungodliness
and
worldly
b_sts,
should
live soberly,
righteously,
godly,
ilt :this present
world
2111-12). •
IUTROVU_2ON:
• A.
"B
C.
A.
99
lee
and
(Titus
" " -
Thereideais a-popular
the
that We trend
have toward
to sin
every day in word, thought,
and
deed.
An evangelist
in Lamess, Texas,
asserted,
"About the only w_y
you can'live
above Sin is to get
an apartment
over "a honky-..
tonk:"
This
assumption
is dangerous
:
and ridiculous,
.I..BECAUSE
oF,GoD's
WORD
"
"
..............................
-.
,
-
"
hours.
•
4. Armed • services
perm, itting
AWOL.
.
B:- God could
neither
permit
nor
.
encourage
rebellion
to himself.
C" The Atithor
of salvation
is a.
"":
Partner in all He permits.
TraiT:
_
: . _
sin for us on thb Cross.
"
III. BECAUSE Or.THE WORDS INVOLVED .
A: Righteousness
and sin are opposites.
.
- 1. For "example, have you seen
__
_
"
from
(He-
"
brews9:22).
"
IV: .BECAUSE OF TIlE NATUSE OF MAN " .
:
. A. Deep within each of us, we possess a desire to liye right and be
clean.
B. Are .we to possess the inclination and he without" the ability?
"
"
The Preacher's Maqazino
"
""
}
'
III.
.
"
.
;
"
.-
,
worst
"For
.
A
Jesus
B.
gatory or second chance.
The Book of Revelation.
"He
that is .unjust.
let him be unjust still..",
(Reyelation
•22:11)."
But let us look again at the rich
knoWs
nothing
of a .pup-
man.
:
.
BEGAN
TO
TUINK,OF
ETERNAL
THINCS
BUT Too LATE
.
A.Thought
of his" soul too late-"Have mercy on me."
B .'Thought
1. "For
2. "God
,2,
eveners
too late.
I have five brethren,"
forbid, that I should
"
npwjOUr
prayerShis
willie;ever
be.Can
be answered
.
--GEossE
Pastor,
GSAWSURS.
.
Corking,
California
"
The Uplifted
Christ
SCelPTURE: John 3:14-21;
Numbers
21:
429
.
Tr.xT: And as Moses li_ted, uIJ the serpent- in the wilderness,
even so must
the Son o_ man be lifted up: that wh'osoever
perish,
in this'life..
,
ohr light affliction
"' '" (II Corinthlans:4:17).
4. A picttire
of death without
:fear.
•
' . B. The rich. man.
'
"
1. "]Purple."
"Fared
sumptuously.'.'
Meaniog
of 'these."
January,
'I
b.
.
. . .in
ceasing,
to pr_y.
" - sin
for you."
"
C. Thought
o_. prayer toci late.
1. What a wonderful
thing to
know we can still pray!
b,..Christ
is.worth itan, even
if we have tO take tlxe
.
'
Father
- . -1.=,Wretchedness--piettire.
" "" "
2. 'As Christ saw him.
a. Knew
God.Was ready
- for heaven..
b What'he
might have been
.had he had
the chance
Dives had.
"
3. 'Di_d and went to Ab_'aham's
bosom.•
_
.
.:
said,
.
I, TUEA.
LazaruwTW°
MEI_
"
i
and
..
2. Inthe
sight of Lazarus
and
" ' " " his needs, yet refused
to be
.
moved.
3..Undoubtedly
thought
himself a good man.
'
"th
" ""ed"
• 4. But
e rich nan also m .
a. No immu'nity
here for any
man.
b. Reminds
one
of. how
death
came
to tim rich
to01.
Little
warning,
Sometimes
none.
II. As DE^a'U FINDS THEM
sin.Here
" ".is a:man
who could havi_ had
this victory,
but'forgot,
about it until
it" was too' late. But there are two men
,.
in the pmture.
- :
.{
-
he cried
Christ;
_he sensitivity
el opportunity;
-that the Holy Spirit may be grie_,'ed:
: that Christ'can
be had in victory over
{_
" I
soberliar_
man?.
. .
2.. aA,dl'unkentruthful
" 3. An honest, thief?..
4.- A clean dirty man?
.
B..These
concepts
must be made
what they ought to be and kept[
C. Sin necessitates
salvation:
1. Man needs a cure for sin.
2. To permit
sin wduld
he a
breakdown
where
salvation
"
. is most needed,
And"
District "
_ibraham; have mercy on me..
Theft
he said,, I pray thee tlterefore,
father,
that thou wouldst
send
hlni to my
• father's house: for I have five brethren
(Luke 16:24. 27-28).
" "
" ""
INTRODUCTION: There'
is an urgeficy
about flib_gospel
that" only theSpirit_
• erd ghtened
and saner fed i, Christian
,
knows.
,He kndws:
the brevity of life:
the
worthlessness
of life
without
.
" "
1. Godis no Partner
in any sin.
2. God turned His head from .
His Son when He was made
•
--HtmoLD g. Gt,_m
.Evahgelist,
"
" South Arkdnsas
"
ToO Laie
:
TO permit
sin would encourage
its. practice,
Consider
the re-
3. A sinner can b_ cured
sin and kept from-sin
God hos saId:
"
1. the
"He devil"
that committeth
sin is of
(I John 3:8).
2. "Whosever
is born of :God
doth not commit sin" (I John
3:9}.
3. "Noman
can serve two mas-:
ters" (Matthew
6:24).
4.."Awake
to righteottsness,
and
.
BECAUSE OF GO#s'NATURE
CONCLUSION: No man has the right to
. - deny the purpose
or the power
of "
God tc save from sin unless he has
mot the :cbnditions
and
through
prayer
and faith proved that it. is
an impossibility:
The New Testa-ment Christian
is not unable to sin,
but is able'not
to sm..
sults of:
1. State
patrols
_permitting
speeding,
. ,
:2. Schools Permit:ting'hooky,
.',.:
3, Parents
permitting
late: ' "
Texas
Does
II.
A.
thinks
•
C.
"
sin 'not"
(I
Corinthians
15:34)
Will God close His eyes to the
truth of His Word in the judgmeat?
Can He pesmit
sin on the part
of His followers
and then say,
"Well
done.
thou
good
and
faithful"?
"
belleveth
but.have
3:14-:15).
. •
in.him
eternal
, :
should
not
llfe (John
. -...
I." _t{EMAI_KS.
A.
•
Moses
was "God's
wilderness
prophet
and lender."
" •"
B. Brazen serpent
is.a symbol of
God's power o_er'sin.
C. God hates sin and will punish
unforgi_en
sin.
1959
I
I
III
]
I
I
'
D:. Moses I_ecame an intercessor for
a sinning nation."
E. :Christ "lifted up"-mbans Christ
,SrucifiSd.
.
F. The crucified Christ is Goci's
only cure..for sin.
.
II. Tim PEOBLEM OV SIN ANn DIVlNk
FORRIVENESS..
.
A: All men without the grace of
•God are sinners,,'
B, The
hopelessr_ess
of human
remedy
for
sin,
C. God tells "man to."look" ,-it the
"
uplifted
Christ,
.
.
D. Cbnditionsof-'divinefm.giveness
of sin: godly sorrow, repentance faith, and obedience:
•
E. Christ,
the
sinner's . Fi'iend.
Hope, and Salvation.
(_od's Unspeakable
Gift
.may rest froth their )abours; and
their works do follow them"
" 'fRevelation,14:13).
Si:nWrtraE: If Corlnthi_ins 9:15
INTBOnUCTm_: Earthly gifts to Christian
brethren
are to be received
Wltt_
thankfulness and appreeidtion.
It was
true at the_time of the 'writing of this
text.
Earthly. gifts, to brethren ,in
Jud0a were welcomed, acknowledged,
and approved, but all gifts ,in the
•
apostle's mind pointed to Christ.
.I. HIs'G1F'_ m UNSPEAKAeLEBECAUSE
or mm DEPTH" OF Love Which
Pao_1_'Eo IV.
"
i "
.
C. The _reatest thing in the uniDF'FEnSS^LVX- ' " " " verse is mind. the greatest thifig •
TION TO ALL.
....
in mind islove.and thegreatest
A. Whosoever will look to the
elementinloveissacrificial
givChrist'of
the Cro_s.,
ing.--G_d
"'gavo"
His"Son (J_Jhn
B. sake
Whosoever
WilJ confess and for3:16)..
'
sin.
II. HIS GIFT, I_ UNSPEAKABLEBECAUSE
.
V. 'RESULTS OF "LooKflNO"
AT THE UP-"
L_rrm) Cnalsv..
A: It brings a godly so_:row for sin.
.
• B. _GbdlYance.
sorrow, worketh,
repent-
C..True
repentance
brings divine
forgiveness,
. .
•
D. Divine forgiveness
brings us
deliverance from sin..
E. These steps bring us into the
family of God.
--H. B. GAnVIN - "
_ Pastor, Augusta, Kentucky"
38
-_
IT IS UNSPEAKAeLEBECAUSEIr PSE-'
"
" " ".. °
PARES
US ",FOR.IMMORTALITY.',
A.. "Beloved, now are we the sons
of God. and it doth not yet appear what we shrill be: b.ut we
know that; when he.shall'appear;
we shall be,like
himi for vve
shall see him as he is" [I John
3:2)."
B'. "Blessed .are the dead which die
in the Lord from heneefortbi
Yea, saith the Spirit, 'that- they
- The P_eachor'sMoq_ztne
-_-RvPEaT CnAVENS
Pastor, Lawretteeburg,
*
Tenn.
. "
of-Them
All
fully'on the way home.
3.. Fathei: saw him a great way
.
A. BOY WANTSTO.GET THEMOST.O0I
.or LIrE-_PIeTuaZ; HIM LEAVING.
A. Things he didn't have in mind
when,he left,
1. Debauchery.
2: Lo_ing all. his posscssmns. .
3. Slavery and hanger..
_
•
"
" ,
"
_
:
B." Wanted 4o find life in: .
L: Clpthesr-jewelry:.
and" trln." kets..
_..Plenty
to:oat and drink.
•
3. A good time in ihe.w0rld's"
sense.
C. What he did get andwhat'we
all
get'_n the'same road.
"
1..A
godless life and wasted
talents ....
" . "
2. A'slave
of Satan,
"Joined
•
himself union c!.tizen bf that
" "
country . .. no man gave,..
'"
• 3. Starves body and soul,
A
picture he never dreamed he
Would see.
"
_
]
'
]
:
;
. off. Why?
a. Watched ]'oi' him daily.
.,
b. "Rey:ognized him even in
(Luk_ 15:24).
.
.
his. rags" (Buttriek: ParINTaO0"0"CTION:The story of the I_rodlg_il
ables o)¢ j.esus, p. 193),
son surpasses
allgreatstori,3s
and lives'Ill.ALL HE LOOKI_a'Foe HE FOUND WIIEN
in ore'heartsas no other."ItsVivid
-HE GOT HOME.
". ,.
strokeshave cahgh!human" history.
"A. A piclureofthehumar_ race:
Has to do with eternal issues. Shows
B. He now had all the _good things
Us _hat God is like. Jesus told it,
of-life, but in the fatherYs.house.
"i
i
being reconciled, we shall be .
saved
by h s life" "(Romans
:
5;10).
C.."He that believethon
him ,s not
condemned" (John 3:18).
.. "
.
D. He is the Bread of Life (John
.
6:35); He is the Water of Life
(John 7:37) "He is the Light of
Life (John 8:12)/
.
fir.
-
• .
Tile Greatest;Story
......
IT SAVESFI{OMSIN AND.DEATIL .
A. "For God sent Eel his Son into
thd'world to condemn the world;"
but thaVthe world through ;him " "
m_ght be sa_cd". IJohn 3: 17),
B. "We. were recbnciled to God by
. the'dealh.ofhisSon.
mucbmore,"
'
FOR FALLENMAN.
A: Was purchased
for all and is
forced upon none,
- • .
B, It is.the gift of God and unJ
merited by the" sinner,
C. For the "whosoever"
without
personal.favoritism
..
"
trast with Pharaoh, Sau, and
Judas.
4 Genuine repentance.
"Make
me as one of thy hired sereants."
B. The results.
1. Sial'ted hack' home to the
". father-:-:fa th.
2. Nevm' grit to say his _I)eech, "
undoubtedly composed care-
TEXT: For this _ty so_t mas dead. and is
alive.again; he was Iost,and is Jound
'III. At_ UPhfm'_o Cnmsa'
C. towardWh°s°everGod
willfind
.rel_entman.
el=sin
D. Whosoever
will. believe • and.
obey God.
..
E. 7"_/hdsoevei. will partake' of the
.
.
water Of life...
.
IV. T_E NATU_E oF GOO's'REz_EMpT/ON
CONCLUSmN: Lotus offer thanks to God
for the issues of*grace! Let us look
to the fountainhead
of all grace as
.summed up in John 3:16 andbe
thankful through all our days for
the gift of life through Christ Jesus.
All things are ours, thl:ougb_:God's
unspeakgble Gift!
.._"
" A. "God'is love_' (,I John 4:8_ 16}.
B The value of that gift was the
love which is expresspd;
in-:
eai:nated, and diffused. The. gif
of love is the hight_st gift.
L He thought on his ways.
""
2. _tte determined
io do sometiling about it.
3. Makes true confessiom Con-
CONCLtrSmN: Wirer a wonderful word,
home! " But how Wonderful to be
" . home in the f athei"s ho_/se!
--GEoaoE.GaAw_unG
" "
Pastor, Coming, Calilornia :
Is There an Escape?
.
SCRIPTUi_E:-Hebrews 2:1-13
"
TEXT: How'shall we escape? (Hebrews
2:3a)
INTEOOVCXI6N:'"President
Eisenhower
', seen qscaping in a'mock raid on. out'
nation's' capital.
He was seeking a
, place of escape.' Many mUlions of dol"tars spOnt-'in preparing
a place.of
escape in case of _.'_attack.
"
-.People all.about tis are looking for
a way of. escape, ' It has.been so since
the _'ll of humanity. But, in the Words
of our text, is there an escape?
II..HE AWAKENEI}TO HIs Tans Co:_mL Is TIIEEE AN ESCAPEFROMGOD?
T1oN--WAs SOMEONE PRAYING Felt
A; Godof creation.
"
HIM?
""
B. God of _preservatiqn.
A, The steps in'his spiritual pr0g,C. God of' salvation.'
•
'ross.
"
D. David said "If I ascend up into
[uneasy, 19S9
:
.
39
"
"
"..
heaven, thou are there
if I make
Th_ Seeking
Saviour
,I.
my bed in hcli .behold.
there,"
"
thou n/'t ScnIr_rul_g: "Luke .19:1-10
•
1. Adam a_d Eve tried.to escape . INTRODUCTION:
God..'
.
A. He wanted tc see Jesus--that
2. Jonah tried to escape God,
.
accounted for his being in the
II. Is.TortE AN ESCAPe FROMCREST?
crowd.
A,. Christ Rind'His love for human:
B. Zaccheus willed to see Jesus--ity.
that accounted.for
his being in
B. Christ dad His suffering and
the tree,
.
humiliation.
(Pilate is still tryC. He walked with Jesus--he wantihg to escape the Christ.)
. ed to scc Him bad enough to do
" III. -_
'.
.' . .
" "
something about it. If you want
• .
These AN.EscApe FROMTile FItCT
to know Jesus _that much,, you
or am?
"
- .too can walk .with H/m.
A. By denying'its'existence.
.
_ I: THe P_,mnr OF rne StoNES
.
B. :By cpvering of sin. (Achhn-" A'.Lost. the pleosure ofGod.
David-:-"Ananias and Sapphira)
1. Lost His smile of approval.
C. By ceasing from sin.
(Good
2. Was turned out of the garden.'
resolutions, etc.)
B. Lost the power of God._'
D By .calling sin somethifig:else
1. No longer masters of them"The soul that sinn_th, it shall
-:
selves.
die.' .......
"
:
.
.
. .
2 Sin had dominibn-over them.
.IV. Is TnEhZ AN"ESCAPeFI_OMI_RAFu?
C, Lost "_hepurity of God.
A
....
_
1. They willfully transgressed
•Hmtormally
has any . escaped
death? (OnlyErioch and Elijah)
God's law.
B. Prophetically,
is "an escape
2. They ddfiled what Gbd. itl.
.
promised?
"It:is appointed unto
tended should be holy.
men once to die."
II. THE PROWSIOS Or" SALVATIOI_I
" "
" "
C. Experientially,
is there .an escape? (E_'enyouthandehildJ?en
. die--no escape from the inonster
death.)
"
'. Bible
"
urc to redeem us:
" "2' ._,
Provided , ,. by the
Son in that
....
" 'rxe'gavemmse_r'xreelyasour
" 'lRansbni,
", '.
-"
"
"3. Prcvided by the Holy Spirit
" in that He came on the Da_,
of Pentecost to convict add
VI. Is Trtzal_ A_- Escape '_or_' E_Rn_AL
D._MrtA_ON?. " ,.
•
A.. Historically--have
any escaped?
(Lazarus--thief
.on the cross,
•etc.)
"
"
B. Prophetically-:-is
thdre an escape? .Yes,. through:the
shed,
ding of Jesus_ I_lood there i_ an,
to guide.
B., The extent of the provlsion.
1: It excludes no one. -Christ
died for all.
.. 2. God knows-nothln'g of a liE.Red atonement.
The Scrip." " turea 'say, "Whosoever will,:
let.hart" come.
• -
escape,- Mer_ accept
escapes
from
physicalfor danger,
here
_s an escape
the scul but
of man.
40
-
A_. The authority" of
.........
the'provision:
1. Provided by the Father in
"that He gave heaven's Tress-
• TIIe •JUDG"
V. Is THZhmAN "ESCAPE'FROM
_,_NT?
"
" '
A. "Shall righteous escape?
"
B.':Shall unrighteous escape?
C. Shall the i_different escape9
" "
'
_
:i
It is up to yOu to accept R or
re]oct it.
_
" "
--LKwmrsce AeLa .Pastor_La Grande,Oregon
•
-"" ......
"
"
C, The fullness of the p_:ovisloh.
1.. Christ came not " only to take
2.
us outof
sin but take sin
outof us (I John 3:5, 8).
Not only to _a_ze'us from sin,
but'also to keep us,fromsin
(IJohn I:7).
'
•
"
- "
.The Preacher'n Magazine
'
_'_II. THe "Pa_ZNCZ _F _nZ SAVXOUa.
A: He ls.the only Foundation upon
whii:h we " cad safely
build
:
(I Corinthians 3:11);
B. _e is the only Remedy .for sm
(Johrt 3:15).
C.. He is .'the' ohly One :who dan
plead "your cause before the.
Father (Isaiah 59:19}.
D. He is the only Saviour
(Acts
3:12).
,
"
CONCLUSXON:Man without God is(in a
terrible plight.. But,:.thhnk God, he
does not have to stay thei'e. There
is a fountain open in the' house of
David for sin and uncleanness,
Come arid 'be made whole.
--DAaaELL MOORE
Pastor, Abilene, Texds
" "
_
•
Examples
A. Faith
and obedience
march
band in hand in. God's Wol:k..
B. Unbelief. and disobedience
are
,
copartners.against.God
C. Faith pleases God and obedience
follows Him.
•
D: Faith : in God. penetrates
:the
invisible future.
E. Obedience follows faith in all
that God commands.
IV: JOSEPIIWAS AN EXAMPLeOF PURITY
"
ANDSTEADFASTNESS
....
A. Purity Will.never'take _'cfugc in
unclean shadows.
B. 3"6seph in youth proved steadfast in purity.
"
C," Life of Joseph was a model ex.
ample for youth of o:arday_.
"
D..Steadfast
purity outlives
the
gaudy pretense Of evil.
V.
of Righteousness'
ScmP'ru_e: I Thessalonians 1:1-7
• • .
TEXT Be t/ms an example cf ihc believers, in Word_ in conversation,
m
chaiity,
"in.splrit, irt ]alth, in pnrity •
(I Timothy 4:12).
DANIEL
WAS
AN
EXAMPLE
OF
Coos-
" hae AND FIDELITY." " ._. - A." Daniel .from youth was known
fordeep and steady piety,
_. FJdelity.-io God was'tljc source
of Daniel's great cos'age.
C. He remains
ah example
of
Christian c6uragc to the end.
-
I.. REM'AaXS;
.
" D. Of
Hetime,is
an everlasting pottern
'
of
A, God has,, not'left
us without
fidelity /io God,
' "
examples of righteousness,
"
B. No greater proof than examples
--It. B. GaRv_N " " "
.Pastor, Augusta, Kentucky
of holy l!ving.
.
C. Bible records aboundAn
ex-.
-, : .
..
amples.of holy character,
"
'..
:" " •
D. Christi_/nit_
transforms
lives:_
The Celiier of Rcligio'us Worship
"
"
_
into victorious personalities.
"
'.
.E. Christian virtues can he traced. , TEXT: l_nd Elijah said unto all thi_ peo.: "
_
in lives" of Btble characters,
ple, Come near udto me (I Kings
" ' ""
"
19:30).
"
II. MosEs WAS"AN EXAMPLE"OF Hu-:: MxLrr_ "ANY MEEKNess (Numbers'
INTeOOUCTtON:There ls a right time. a
12:3).
right, place to go, a l:ight manner in
:
A: Humility will bring -men into
_hich to go, and a: right person to
favor' with God.
whom to drtlW r_car.
• "
"
,
B Quality of meekness is s fundaThe age-old "contribution. the p']tiec
mental Chi-istian virtue.
.
C; "God resisteth the proud, and
of worship..
"
" " "
'- -. - . .
giveth grace
-to. the humble":' " .I. WheRe?
• "
'
I_
_1
(I Peter 5:5].
D. Moses was v type ofChrist
in
.
" humility and _meekness."
- .
=
"IlLAORAIIAMWAS AN EXAMPLE 0V FAITII
ANe Oazerm_ce.
.
|anuary, 1959
"
"
" "
I
'
..
A.To
the tbmb of some sage or
self-styled
sacred insn?
Nc.
B. Where?
Wl_ci:cver the individualor crowd is situated
who
seek God with all their hearts.
-
.
.
--'
" " 41
".
-
•
Ifi the
IL
"
'
"
.
•
sanctuary
or
anywhere
available.WHOM?
"
A. To swaying
personalities?
.No.
B.. To persons claiming lo b'e super" men?
NO
C. Only One can be worshiped:-God. The scripture
command
is:
"Worship
and "serve the Lord
:
thy GodY
IH..WHEN?'.
" '
'
'
-
A.
.._
C.
Wrong relationships
to others. Forgiveness'of
oth ers• an inexorable
condition
to
answered
prayer
(Matthew
5:24).
This" ncludes
all
resentment
and. needed
adj ust-•
meatS.
.
IlL WhEN You .PRAY, PERSmT.
A, Tl_ere is the well-known
pm.ah*le of
the .unjUst .judge
(Luke
18:1-7):
And" Elijal
•praying
for
rain
(t.Kin_s
18:42-44).
'
"
IN_mOIDUCT1ON:I want to talk to you about
how to bbhtiveat,• "church.
One of the
important
things
for
young
and all of us in fact. l_o know ispeopl/_,
what
we-call
<_ttquette.
There
are "certain
rules. 'certain
way_ of doing .things.
that we must observe
if we wish tokeep the- h'iglvJst respect of.otllers.
"
....
Tile text,does
not _oncci'n itself with
• etiqtlctte
in tile "chflrch services,
but
with an etiquette
that is high'or than
this. The true essence of woi;ship is to
come into tim presence
of God. and all
Christ
I. TOE NATURE OP THE WORD
II.
A:. "Pure
(Proverbs
30: 5)
...... B. Powerful
(Hebrews
4:12)
C.: Everlasting
(I Peter 1:23)
D. Life-giving
(John fi:63)
lI.: "W_AT TU_: Wo_e
E.
42
cuts
Things
"., B.
Promotes --MRs.
growth SADIE
(I l_eter
2:1-2),
WRmUT
Shreveporf,
Louisiana
.
tile
line
undone,
of dor_mumcation.
vows
unkept,
_
•
A.
"
_
tire-
The Proochor'a iViacjazlno
.
.
_.
l
!
•i "
-
t
stance
.
.
"
!
paid
tithes.
:
Unfaithfulness
to God's " cause--neglect of prayer and Bible reading
or of chtirch attendance--wilrhin-
18).the
people
perish'.'
(Proverbs,
29:
C. No clmrch can live without
a vi.winning
them--of
growing
sion o[ souls
that areneedy--of m
"
.metnbership.
If we- see the need _
wmqd and_do nothing about it, we
m'e failing
in Christian
sto'N, ardslaip no matter ilow much _.vc may
gi_,e or how faithful:we
may other_wise be."
.'
'
"
"B. Regl ".praying
through"
does not
consist'in
some great feelingcom.ing to our hearts,
but believing
God.
When we believe,
we are
sure of the"answer,
vcgardlcss
of
II. FAITII TO BEhIEVE
,
,any human
emotion or ecstasy.
A. Jesus
said, "Have'- faith in "God."
C. Conclhsion:
I_o not be discourGod's
Word ,decl_areS,'
"Without
aged if prayer
is .not immediately
, ['aith it is impossible
to please"
answe.rcd.
Examine.
your motive.
God.
"
your: attitude
to Gad and to fel_
B. Any church must come _othe
end
low reed.to see if'an:z tfind.rance is
of itself--its
abilityof our
to •meet
the.
cilaller,
ge'and task
day (hu-,
there.
Let, there
be an eai'nest
" .
man' ability)--mfist
recognize'tilat
submission
to tHis
m Will
.Godthanso- . .
God can do.what
we (huirianly)
that you want
will of
more
...
,
_
. :.
salvation.
Need
vision of them
,in hell unless won.
'
2. Need .vision "bf rovi_/al--possibte.
B.. Godhas
otllcr things to say about
vision.. "Where
there is no. vision,
It is not the.fact
that you are prosel_tirig your petition
to God. not'
"
- how mucia
noise you make when
you pray, It took. a pt'ayer'of
only
sixt_y-three
words
to bt:ing
fire
fromhea_'en
in ElijMes prayer,
your own desire.
Dare
OO_l for the impossible.
" del"
prayer.n ghtTo service
stay at tohome
from
Sunday
list_en
to
" TV_will block every prayer,
.
/k. Tile
ve_st."iields
•
"white alreade' to harTl_e field is our loved' ones,
_1 friends,
ncighb0fs.
They
are
lost unless
won to Cl_i'ist _and
The purpose
of true prayer is not
to change God's mind, butto
join
forces with Him to.accomplish
His
. purposes.
And sometimes
God has
to take tim0 to :dc this
{Daniel
10:12r13).
_
"
IV. WIIEN YO _d PLAY, IIRLIEVE.. '
"
ARE LIVInG'RIGhT. "if. I regard iniquity
in my heart, _.h'e Lb'_d will•not
hear
me" (P_ialms 60!18),
A. Just 6nb sih, just one disobedience,
DbES _cm MAr_.
-,B. Sets men free (John 8:32)
A.: Sustains
Sanctifies life (John
17:17)
C.
(Deuteronomy
8:3)
D, Brings healing
(Psalms
107:20;
Matthew
8:8)
"" •
that I am God."
WHEN' YO_J PRAY, BE SURE THAT YOU
Worship,
vital
and
as necessary
as .
these are, •
" "
-.. Three
things
are
needed
if the
church
is to accomplisl)
.the w.ork
Christ:intended.
I. Vtstc)_ To SEE (To be able to see Is
wonderfdl--blindness
is terrible.)
B.
centers
in pl:ayci'.: And.in.flit
prayer
• [
"
life there
are some conditions,
.some
]
.G. Worship'God
always,
attittides,
some
considerations
that.,
iV. How?
.
"
" '
"
"
must be observed
if. we would get an
1
A. Supreme]y,
.
atulience
with thi_ King of Kings.
"
t
.B. In the beauty of holiness.
.
C. With love and adoration•
:
". I. HWnEH THOU PRAYEST . . . SIIUT TIIY
D. With. all one's being:
RoDe'" {Matthew" 6:6).
.
_ONCLUSmN:
Like Elijah. let us'.live so
A. This is a command
_.o pl:ay. How"
close to God that we can call the
-mucli do we pray? Prayer is not only
people to'us and lead them to tlic
a privilege,
but an obligation.
"Men
worshipofGod.
.
ought always to pray.'.'
''
1. W. PETERS " •
B "Shut thy door."
That closet may
"
" '
--Pa_toi,
Virden,
Illinois
n_t,bi_ a.rbom--it
is yourheart.
A
. :
. "
"
thousand
"thit/gs will try,to,
break "
"in on your
praycr--odtside
dis-'
.'_
Tim. Word.
:
tractionsi,
the disturbing
'cares.of
.
•.
INTRODUCTION: The Word,identified
with
life. God says, "Be still, and know
"
.
When the throngs
of humanity.,
are moved to Worship?
Yes.
B. "When the shout of victory _'ings
out?
Yes.
"
C. Whorl right
seems
to prevail?
Yes
D. -When the days are lh'ight aiad
delight is everywhere?
Yes."
'E. When it is dark and storms are
• "
.. raging?
Yes.
F. "When all evil opposes?.
Yes.
The Etiquette of Pra_;er
•
TEXT: "When ye. pray"
(Mark 11:24).
"That tilou mayest
know,how
thou
0uglltcs( to bcimve.tl:_yself
in the house
of God. which is the church of the living God. th'c.pillar
and ground
of the
trflth"
(ITimothy-3:15).
"
of answered
prayer,
.
---W. W. Ct, AY
"
p_:erequiSiies
-
to_believ_
. i
cannot do.
:
Give in- " " C. R_al fat(l{, makes
"
"
to Aecomphshment
of the
God. Church?
Not just Toto build
save the
ourselves
kingdomor
our own--not
just to have a place-of
January,
1_59
things
l_os-
sible.1,
Jesus' said, 'qf y¢ have faith as
a grain, of mustard
seed...
-"
" 2. 'tallthings
are possible to him
'
"
•
SCaIPTURm
4:31-36
.
TEXT: John Johri
4:35-36
". : . Lift
up ;your
eyes
and
look
on
the
fields;
_
"
t" for they
•
are white alreai_y to harves.
ISTaOGUCTION: What is the real.purpose
• all
that behevetl_.
III.
COURAGE-TO DO _-AT LEAST TO AT-
TEUVT!"
A. Christ closed His•mission
on earth
with. a commission
and a- promise_rclate
the events of' the As_
.
"
....
B: cension:
Tbe Greatscene,
Commission
put'pose of the Church.
.
".
.
is the
""
..
real .
43.
. .
.
•
- .
C. It takes courage
to d.o anything,
especially
in' 'the field building
the
.
Kingdom--winning
souJs!
,'1. The disciples
faced.a
tremen-
'ing and all sense of direction
goner,
with every, moment
lookihg
as if
. it might be their last, Paul stood
before them_ the only calm, con-
•.
dous
(ask--opposition--pro
ludice--:-etc.
"
2. Jesus said, "Lo. I a_ with :,;0{1
alway, even unto the end of'the
•
" ' : world."
.....
:
.. t_ONCLUSlON: Vlslon--t
a i t h:--coul'age-prerequisites
to hccomplishmcnt_
'
"'- .
.
heart
till
passioriate
it
had
desire.
I am not, His just because
I ac.,
ccpted Him and gave Him.my loyally. That is necessary
and Is good
as far as it goes, But beyond thai.
.God has chosen us. He evidQflced
it by calling us to serve Him: He
calls.Hischoice
- .
. .
.
of us , adoption."
.
beBut
. laecaui_e it vbas God's plan,
God
carried it Out i_i His own way. Not
on foot, .with dmagcrs
of robbers
"and at his own expense, but given ,_
free/rip(with
a eordon of soldiers
B.
despite
the
other haz- care was
" '."
Tell the story of thevoyage
its danger. .Then :Paul heard
cliorus
'true.
"Safe
tho_aght, Why should this pi'isoner
be'so cheerfu.!?
Fm:.withseas
roll.
Am
'
I" is absolutely
' " "
":
to do His bidding
3, A third element
"
always,
of service
"
.
_
,
]
.."
.
Event
of
Pento-
literal
IV.
"
'
fire, etc.
":
'
"
Tile Intent ,and Extent
of Pentecost,
Fundamentals
are: needed,
prpvided
and extended
to all men
in:all
time,'and theneverywhere.
What
was.needed
m needed
now..
Tim
V.
.0f PentdedM
By A'llie'lriek
..
T_:XT: Acts
'
....
"
The
"The
highway"
of
system
is marked
peaks
of immoi'tal
significance_.namely.
Mount
Calvai'y,
and
I. The Advent
Of Pentecost.
." : ' "
"
B
"
the
by
and
"
"
P0werless
of life, libachievement.
"
Church
TexT: . A certain
man lame
f_:om his
mother's,
womb
was carried, •.whom
they
laid .daily
at the gate Of..tl_e
templc
(Acts 3:2):
•
" •
"
"
•
"
INTaOaUC'rXON:
"
"
"
"
A. Many great events in Jerusalem
in preceding
months.
"
"
to all.
gress_vcness,
s!mplicity
.erality
of success
and
*_
2:1.-4
" INTR6anCTtOS:
Christian
mountain
eternal
Sinai,
Zion.
.
:
promise
The Supreme
Provisions
of :Pente_0st. Heai't.pp(ity,
Chrlstian
unity,
• holy activity,deep
spn'ituality,
'ag-
.
...
peace
but deliverance
as .well.and Sojoy.
willto ithim,
hlways.
Give some
cpncrete
illustrations.
"
"
._-W, W. Cn^v
Essentials
I
The Preacher's Magazine
"
- " "
•I "
is
of all his'poe-
We
must Hebelieve:
1. Tllat
loves us too well to let
anything
dome •into our
lives
that will not be for our good
and His glory (Romans
8:28).
2. That
He still hears
and answors
prayer.
3. ThatHe
is still on the throne:
4. That
His • promises
still
are
true.
.
".
. .
"
•
IV. Cdr_cnnsxoN:
Panh's
F o a M tr L A-"God, whose I am, and whom I serve,'"..
"and whom'I
trust--brought
not only
means
far niore
than accepting•
Him.
"
" ' - " 1: ' That means
that I choose to be'
nermast
hear_ life and charactef'.
2. It means.also
that I am: ready
presence,
B.
" ':
has
and
rid asked, "What sball I reader
cost• Mark the s'urrounding
history,
unto the Lor.d for all his hone. " 6ircumsi,qnces_
ihcidents,
an_l apfits 4owal'd
me.'?" He gives us
proacti.
the answer:
"I will t_tke the
IlL Some "Nonessentials
Wbicla Passed
cup of salvation,
and call upon
Away--Not
Needed No((,. Because
of.
Wh6n I. Dathe God
nameis worship.
of the Lord.
will
of our intelligence,
kno,_,ledge,
and
• pay my vows unto theLord
now .
innei" experiences,
No sound, wind,
God: is tile deliberate
act of trusting God.
Not an indefinite
intelle_tual,
act.
but a power
llne
that' conncets
us with God's
re"
"
SOUI'CeS,
".
sealed.
Tile All-inclusive
II.
•
III. "I asL1_vr_ GOD."
" "
A.. Added
to'the
:two-strong
anchorh
of
possession, and
and choice
our ownof
utterdivinedegotement"
i"_
,what He. would ha'_e me.to be,;
My'outward•life?
Yes, but be-"
yond and aboveall
that, my in-
the Holy Scriptures
this day
been
symbolized,
ilhlstratcd,
lute loyalty to Him and His will.
A foui'th element of my serving
in the
pie:".
":
II.. "W|lo1v_
I SERVE:....
" A.. The. second -bond" in -the Christian_ _ relation
to God is tha( .we
" have-deliberately
chosen Him, "As
many
as
recei_,'ed
him"--that'.
"
and
from
lieaven, on*
and'the
next radiant
morning with
appeared
the scene,
good
cheeL
Doubtless
.they
44
"
B. I am His because
He bought
me
'(I Corinthians
6:20)_
". " , .
C/'I "am His" because
of His.gift
and.
impm'tation
of His own life, that
lif_ that is called eternal life, the
gift of lif6 from 4.he eternal
God."
D. Because"
[ am His, "He. is.interested in -me _/nd cares for me.. He
will put a _:harmed
circle around
me
that
Satan
cannot
break
through
Without. God's pei'mission.
and
protection
That
beautiful
"- "
"
to protect
him: And
dangers
of storm and
ards, Paul.
God's
protective
over
"
_
i
..
of tile most helpf/d-ever
.written
to
enable
people to understand
and app_opz:fate the great'truths
of holines/;
in both heart .and life: She called it
Tile- Christian's
Scere.t of. a Happy
Life.
And
in the words of our'text
Paul has given as_in three shorti_hrases everything
that is involved
in such
a life.
.
A.. Paql halt planned
to. visit Rome:
It_ was 'not s6 much
his plan as
God's..
Bat God." had breathed
it
• come
into P,_ul's
Paul's
4
L. "Wriest: I Ar_t."..A w.onderful
tl_ing to
realize
tbat
we are God's propertY,
.His possession.
.
A.'I
am`His
because
God chose-me,
•
"
" -Christian's
Secret
of
a .Happy:Life
T_xv: "God,
whose I am, and whom I
serve
. .'. I believe
God" facts. 27:.
23-25).
' "
INTRODUCTION: Many years ago a wonderful Christian
Woman wrote a book
that has been through
tile yearsone
•
.
fidcnt
man
on board,
unless
it
were
his' other
Christian
corn"
panions.
Paul felt that an explanation
of his optimism
was due
them afldso
he spoke:
"It'is
be.
cause I belong to God, I sol:re God,
" ,-n v _._:.:..._ _
;,
.
""_" _ _'_:'....
,_od,
And this must
be the threefold'
secret
of every
v_ctorious
Chi'istian life.,
--I-IEnRV HAe'rnEac.'Pastor
.. Torrington,
Wydmtng
The
open ackimwledgmant.
All. the
world shall know of my abso-
"
1: Crucifixion,
Ascension;
now Resurrection.
the Day of
Pentecost
fully come.
"2. Things happening
all around,
gouls
savett,
believers
en-.
ducdwith
power•
3. Pentecostal
power
came
to
those in the Upper
Room-not inTemple:
"
".'
•
Unde/'lying
the. glory
of the
mirach_ we see a tragic picture
- .of many churches
of today.
I.. IT Was A PROFESSING CHURi:It.
A..Had
a definite time to pray
Mount
Mount
B.
It 'was
throhgs
All through
C.
man,
It'was
"
an attractivepleasing
church,to at(ended,
,
a beautiful
church..
January: 1959
Iron
45
.............
'"
!
I II
"'
I
i
bars ,do not
a prison make;
V. WhEN '/?HEGIVER" OF POWER" CAME,
neither do stone _valls,stained
TImIR EYEs WESE OPENED.
windows; robed cboirs make a .
A, Peter aridJohn took him by.the
church,
righthgnd and liftedhim up ....
It.1T WAS
'--
IlL
"l::ROO:]_qT_ "I:R:F;_.,T'R_'2FS"
B. He was g*ven an unmistakable
testimohy.
"Immediately
his
A. No .power-=no
miracles
perfeet and antic bones
received
' •
formedwithin
its walls no constrength."
versions.
.
-'"
C. God expects
something
from us " B. No
concern_lame
man
laid
today.
daily at gate, never taken inside.
.
Why?." People
too proud
and
CONCLUSION: Where
do we stand as a
refined?
Too holy?
Too'busy?
local church
and as individuals?
. _
2. :No burden:-:-"Is
it nothing
to
--E. H. BREWl_It::
" .
"
"
•
_ you, all
ye
that
pass
by?". _
.
Pastor,
Trentott,
N.S., Canada
(Lamentations
I:I2)
There was
"
"
calloused
indifference,
for re._qe Are HisWitnesses
sponsibility
ended atthe
gate.
TEXT: Acts 5:32
IT WAS'A POPULAR CIIURCII
A.. Many attended.
.
B' Peter. and Johal were about to
enter
.also'he"
asked
Rims of
them.
" : ...
"
"
1, They fastened
their eyes m
his and said_ "Look on us.-'.',
2. Hew
long since you could
say, "Look onme'!?
_INTRODUCTIONP
I.
THEY
ENTHUSIASTIC
"
-POWER GrvEIX.
A. The seeming
absurdity
.
of pre-
tense,
"
) - .,.
.
l. _Was the beggar
doomed
to
defeat
after" having
his expectations,
aroused?
2. Are'
we "guilty
of l:aisingpeople's,
hopes
.andhaving
nothing
to give?
3. They opened to this man the
great door of faith and hope,
B.
Given
iho
gt:eatest
of
1. -WonderfulSa_,iour--He
scatters
the darkness
couragement
and
:
'
"
:"
46
.
all
,.
"
.
II.
.
gifts..ebief,
who
of
dis~
despair:,
calms thestorms
of doubts
'and
feai's, brings
peace
to
" troubled
souls
and _'oy .to
burdened
hearts.
2. It,;Ien t,oday
are
asking
tel _
someone
With something
to
satisfy
their needs... Can we
do less than point then{, to
Jesus?
"
. .
:
-C
Baptism
of. enduemeni,
"strength;"
."enabliiig,"
ALL
].i
wit-
"power;'
"authm'-
"
. -
ity."
. :'. .."
.
TuEv WzeE REckLEssLY tOE_trrrISe as
"
"
CHRIST'S VCrrNES'SES.
"
_A." The3/ .'gladly
accepted
the
title
.".witness_'.;
B. They took :their
task seriously,
C. Tlmy Would not be "silenced.
To
silence a witness
is to destroy i_is
end
[oz' existence.
"
"
Selection
Neveolher,
1958.
""
"
.'.
.
TiIE MEN OF TIlE BIBLI_
"
° " -
"
'
_
•
" :
"
.-_`-
He,'bert Lockyer
(Zondervad,
$4.95)
....
., Some months ago we recohamimded
All tl,ie.WO;ncn
ot tiie Bible..It
is quite
a classic
'in.the'
inclusivenessand thorougl__covefage. .All"the Men. el the Bible"
is
to this book:
" Y6a might.in be
to realize that
tliere
area Worthy
nlore thancompanion
threetliousand
men mentioned
the sui'prised
Bible.
One'reason
theBible
is a -ne_;er-dyifig
Book
.
isties of tb_'ir lives.
' : WIIEREARE:TIIE
"
"
""
is that:it is studded
.
"
.
with
na nes.of
people
and
charaeter"
In All theMen
el the Bible coverageis
given in proportion
to the importance
'of .the persons
bding listed.
Men are listed
alphabetically
.arid thematerial
describing
each mini is .simple enough, clear qnough; and well ' enough
outlined
dmt it gives background
material'
fro: good-preaching.
Sermons
which wou].d
"carry charactei', study willbd
remembered., longer.
,.
."
, ...
.
.III." THEY:WERE IeR_vbeARLV COMMIT'tED
_0 Cr_RIST'S CAVSE.
"
A. Cltrist needs dependable
and ti-ustworthy witnesses..
B. Today_ the cause of Chi'i_t cannot
"
-..
be separated
h.om His Church.
C. We need to commit ourselves
just
as
irrevocably"today.:
"Every
bridge is burned
behindl me."
' --L.'J
Dtr BOIS, Editor
Nazarene
Theological
.Smninary
"
Tho Preacher's 'Maqazino
Month
,
OF TIIESE IS LOVE
"
""
"
.A.A.
van Rnlcr
(Eerdnn.ms,
$2:00)
. Your'l_ook
man m ineludng
t]fis book as a selection
based on this simple.
premise:
no one has yet ever become
too thoroughlyacquainted.with
I Cornx• thians 13..'It istrue
that:lnany
writm:s covei' this particular
bit of scripture,
bu_."
- . .not too many 'wl:itei's" have gone far beneath,
the surface.. .-. Pcrhaps'tb, e.
•classic
book written
was Drummond's
book The Greatest
Thntg t!t the World.
• ,
In The G(eatcst
of Tkese
Is Love, we bring-b
contribution
written
t)y a
university
professor"from
Europe.
Tim wot.k has: been.translated
ilit0 English,
- find I assure
_/ou se'_era] houl:s of thoughtfdl,
stlniulatil/g
reading.
The author
]S certainly
p_.ovocative
and original.
You may take excelJtions
to some of his
conclusions,
but.neVer
can you.say" that the book is _mothm'ed
in "ordinariness.
_:His thought patterns
are concisive and thorough,
hnd there will be times you Will
be dn wn up short, as the author opens up vistas of ti.uth that perhaps
lmve never
been seen before.
•
' "
This desm've§ a pla¢:e on the shelf along with the.vmT
host books that were
eiJer written
covering
Paial!s famous "Hymn of Love."
RECIPIENTS
(as
the
TIlE GREATEST
-
WERE
..
:Book:of,
A. Thedeclai,,atioia:
"We are Hiff wit.. nesses,"
is one of the greatest
of
the Christian
faith.
.
.
B- They were not a _pe_ial kind of
men. There was that about them
whieh.w_
too Can be,
C. theyW°rldthinkiS
of
Watching--whatour
profession?de
P/_ Baptism of cleansing.
IV. IT LACKEa.... TIIE "PRI_SENCE OF THE'.'' B. Baptism
nesses), of. christening
' "
"
IX]'OT
A POSSESSING CHURCH.
OF CHRIST'S BAPTISM (Acts'I:8).
•
.
"
.-
CONVERTS?
Sid_Ley W. Powell (Broadman
Press, $3:00)
:.
' . " '
:
Here is a book thht .has n wealth
of practical
helle in tbe tremendously.iraportant task of weaving the new convert, into'tlm
w.'irmtli and 10ve of Christian
church fellowship.
•
• The author
_peaks from a wide background
of expe_'ienee
it/ the Baptist
dhurch.
His concept
of a work ng church
membership
is very wholesome
and
his has e concept
is that everyone
trains for-some
type of service in the church.
Ho_veve'r
his .strong
doetriiaal
position
on etcrn_al securit:¢
can be seen
thi'oughout
the book, and sanctification.is
not a el'isis, but h gradual
development.
Any pastdr rehding this book. considering
its doctrinal
weaknesses,
will yei: gain
a wealth, of praet, lcal heli_ for his local church.
• 47
- January, 1959 . "
f.
.
.
.
TIlE GOSPEL ACCORDING
TO.JES1JS
:.
k
:
Ted Hightowcr
(Revell, $2.50)
"Dr, Hightowel:'is
primarily
concerned
workable
terms of our, day,
H(_ seeks:out
TO
' "
.....
GOD'S PROVISION:FOR
IIOLY LIVING"
William.Culbertson
(Moody, $2.00) _
"
E.E. WoResw0hn_
"
_hose
hundred and oneiobs
done
-isls,'
_
I)ailg
wor bO°k
-
|"
mm J_
,.
.
....
., ,
.
•
.
,
• lIesigucd
t i¢..oh
speeilically
for
the hnsy pastor
".
.
must
.. ..
.
do
.
by his theological
bias.:
E_tnt
Sl|aCe given to a Sun( uv scheilule
"
. •"
....
• '
" "
• F rms identi('al
It).uhnual
district
report
.
MORE NEW .TESTAMENT WORDS
•
" •
"
"
"
"
William Barclay
(Harper,"$3.0O)
. A (li_l,i]_('d bl(lclc.no[cbook
co:attdnivg
year
in youl district
assemhl.'(
rcporl:
The author
is.a highlyrespected
professor
in the' University
of ,Glasgow,
.
1lear's sill i q oJ vMuldfle
ache(haleand
save
yourself
prOviously
spew
a scholar of more thafi average ability.
.
In More:New
Tcsta_ttent, Words he gives
rvcm'd shcel_,,
hours
Othbi;of,last-minute
u_eful features Wpl'k_
include a threepractical, • helpful, and warmly dqangelic_rl
insigh_ into especially
meanirigftil
and
year el
e ( ', . . st f)f•, im )errant . church.
.
.
,
.
.
.
"
.
.
"
i.
outstanding
Greek words used in die Hew Testament,
This Asdone
in such a " . :
"
" For: earh Stintlay; a full page Is pro- . d ys, ten-year
East_,r schedule,
),q.n s
way that a minister
who has nothad
Greel_ can yet obtain distinct'help,
vided for scFl_lon theme and text. songs,
sumhuu'y'
cimrt,
streets for mmaes'ma¢
.
For'the,man
who is looking
fin'.deep
insights_into
New Testament
truths
" ..
" "
special
musw,
announccmm_ts
.(both:
addresses,
Takes
standard
7UI x 4Ut'"
revealed
only'by
careful study of the drigina] language,
this is an excellent
hook.
'. "
•
mornh_4 and evening
scl:viccs),
atten(I.,:;ixyying lillcrs,
Ideal. for insct'iin.C ser• "
_mct,: ai_tl_ offering
for. all, dcpnrtmenls,
men. notes.
May. "be'used"
starting
at
NOTABLE SERMONS FROM PROTESTANT PULPITS
.
._ and SF'-;t'q: for recording,
the number
of
tl]_lI time of tile year. Annual
i.eplac_,Charles L. Wallace
(Abingdon,
$2.95)
.
"
". ", "
.....
"
• calls, ¢orK,t,ris, new.members,
weddings,
meal tillers _iwiihdile at,low
cesl,
This is a compilation
of twenty-four
above-average
sermons
from _he top' ".
"
" ftUWl'als, f(ii"that
mrfictih{r week. •.
" F lc-graihed,
".lc,athw'cttc,
six-ril_g
_reaching
names on the continent.
The theological
flavoring
varies all tim way
Am'os_ the I)ag:' is a weekday
work
binder
of blghest
quulity
will1, hand_.'
" fi,om PaUl s. Bees to Ralph-W:
Soekman.
These sermons have much to commend
"
_cl'mduh, ch 'l s dtable"for
jotting flown
storage poctcet at hack.'.
. :" Poclcet.
,,.
size. ?:_q,
..
them in tlae '_ay ofcareful
thought,content
and sdme very splendid illustrations.
:
,calls.
al)pointmcnts,
ammos,
and
the
x ,17- X 7a".* 12 -rings with
_ush op,.r_
. Howevex,
no bodk of sermons,
with as. wide a coverage
as this. can be
,
.. like. In the bat [c are lnonth!y E.xpcn¢ti-: . button at end
expected
to be Wesleyan.
Many of these,are
Calvinistic
and many are quite•
ItlFc Ri, pol'lq I|DCI Me_;.bersb.ip mul SubCut Ibis "Workbook"
be ":your m,n
scr ) on I_t,cord forins identical
to the
t ec c-and-call
s_ h gh]y,'liberal,
but it is one of the choicest sets of sermons
produced
this,year.
" ";A auml _epo_:! ?of Pastor"
Jiast col W' Fr day" . . _.lour "
"
" ' '
" ""
thL, inforn_itlon
. kept
throughout
the
rc_hr!t." ,
.
TilEY TEACll US TO PRAY
"
"
' ""
" ' " "" " ' ' " " "
.:
- .
.
bad)y
•
.
i Mi
-
"
the Greek
tense for instantaneous
cleansing
of sin, and does not make'a
eal;eful
distinctiofl.between
human frailty and Clu'istian
maturity.
-.
',
• With this the01ogiea]_ difficulty'in
his path, tl_e authoi' does the best he con
do in urging persons
toward holy ,living, but his conception
of holy living is
ge_
" -
'-
"
yOU
one
This is undeniab)y
a bool_ written
with a strong
desire on'the.part
of:the
slither
to stimulate
persons
toward"holy
living•
But his inaccuracy
of theological
distinction
does definite
barm to the ministry Of the•book•
The authm', does not carefully
define ."sin,? does not ai:cept
"
_elf_
with presenting
Jesus Christ in the
the gospel kernels
as he recognizes
For the mdst'part
it has a strong
evangelical
er_phfisis, with present£day
application.:
The book has merit and is stimulating.
' The prea(:her
will discover
some new areas of thought and:find
it profitable
reading.
,
.
them.
.
.
hampered
....
_
¢
Reginald
E. O. White
(Harper,
$3.00)
As a'book
t)n prayer,
this'is
rather
prayer "#ith illustrations
from the-Bible.'
¢'"
prayer
tone•
is given
a depth
treatmem,
i
and throughout
•
.
thm:e
is a. deeplydevotional
The eighteen
ar_'anged
of chapter
headings. chapters
Each are
chapter
isbased in alphabetical•sequence
on an outstandifig
This
becomeson aprayer.
helpful
of
sermons
a series
48
.
.
All
differdr_t in that it covm's the •field of
The studies-are
fnore'than
surface:
bit of research
material
.
.
developing
Tho Predcher's Maqazlno
' .
"
this
for all investment
Ol:dLirby
Ntmtber
Annttal
Replace!uent
"
R'-51
:
"
Order. Your
-
-
th_ matter'.
Biblein example
of
for ministers
-
-
':
.
".
. .
Nazarene
"
"
.
Publishinq
_
"
Of only.
R-52
Fillers
[_otebook
House
$3.50
_.
$1.50
-
"
..
AT" ONC E .
-
Wa_h'nqt0n at Sresee, Pasadena
7. CaId
2923T
00 , Sa_ 527"Sa,,Ia_City41.
MO
N CANADA--159_
"
Sloor
5treet..We_t,.. . Toronto
9,
.
0ntar:o
_:.
For Your
1959 Min stry
f.
",
L! t ,
"i
"_ "
i• "
""
A .valuable ';ource of daily inspiration
" STRENGTH FOR- TODAY
"
By BERTHA MUNRO
•
everywhere.'A
daily
devotional
that'has
-
.
_
become,,
increasingly..
.
.Papular
ammlq
minislers.
As you _ead Jrom these pages
Item ctay to day. you will I_d oul, as so many
others h_:Ve, how each meditation seems Io have a heatl-_earching"
way of renchinq_you_]ust Where and when you. need it most. Truly kf S_oirit-inspired book.
_"
"'
384'pages,
clgih board
"
S2.50
,TRUTH_FOR TODAY
All earlier
published
Berthc_ Munro
menis
filled
Jar everyday
clolh -
3BO pages,
daily
with
devotional
dch.'up[iftinq
Christian
"
by
corn.
livinq_
. .
•
S2.00
•
- ..
.
A resource toql o[" workable ideas
THE MINISTERS MANUAL'fo/"
1959
(Doran.'s)
Complied
by M. K. W. HE|CHER
.
r
A widely u_ed_sludy and pulpit quid? of |acts. ideas, and'suqqestions
especially
shited for Ihe busy paslor.
•.,
Included amonq.its
many leatm_s are mornin_J and evening
serman outJines for
every Sunday
of the _,ear.'illustratlve
and homiletic_l material, funeral meditations.
poems, tables of dates. All conveniently
classified*an_l
concisely
indexed, "(HA)
374 pages, cloth
"
_ •
•
,
' $3.00
Receive Full-year Benefit--:O[der AT ONCE
Nazarene
"
Publishing
H
"
ouse
IN'CA'_ADA_1592
2923 T_oost, Box 527, t(a_sa5 Cit) '41, Mo.
Washington at eresee, Pasadena 7 Calif.
Bloor Street
_/est. Tor_n(o 9. Ontario
=
_ ." "l .i
31,cl: J,.c,.
,,'?17,,
b)
- "
Volume" 34
•February,
" ;•
....
.
"
"
"
1959
"
Number
2,
""
"
(.t.iN.i.I.:N_I._
.
-
"
_
•
..L
.
.
.
.' .
• :
"
"
" -'
i
T
IS
HADDON SPURGEON (See
_,oto ,_r..... r_ .......
......
----CJlARLES
.
Editorial,
The High
TI_e Preaching
Calling
of Chaiqes
oi Mr. Average
Haddon
Mifiister
Spurgeon,
James
"
Stewards
of.God 1s Manifold Grace, Ran B6rdea
.
.....
.
" Th'e. Minister and the Psych at" st (II/, Edwifi
•
.
" ,,
"Rich m Good Works
(V), D: S ell.I Corlett
"
•
TIME
that
voices
should
go'the
call
of
Christ/men
takenfrom.
the ranks of av4ragemen..
Theseranks
of hvenago men being legion m numbe/', the _mmber
6f the ministers
be
•
]l
extraordinary.
Perhaps
we
fre-' should ....be likewise many,.
qqentl3/ in the past. have made-too
.
"The world" is:today
being saved
much of the pulpit genitts or the high:
O_,rough the efforts of the average mm-
. ......
....._.. : ....
•
MzGr._uc .....
. :.
"
1
="
.
"
.
l.u ,_.,,_
"
="
r
..................
5
:
.:.:..
:
.
)presstlre church builder or the. "frontpage-news"
individualist
"
We are gratified to. know that smile
L
8
ister. He is performing
a task.at this
very nmmerh. While he does not seek
recognition
for his service record, his
.
i in
fruitfulness
and importance
the
Kingdom of God and the church of JeFair.- M.D.., : . ......
_2
sus Christ must be l'eckoned.
.
"
.15
'
: ..................
..... .
:'Cgnsideration.of
the place and ira"
.
portance
of the .average
miriister
is
The. At:minihu View of Inspirati()n"fll)::Ralph
Earle :." ........
; ......
.1.8
.. : '. need polishing and whqse axels never
not news..In
the year 1910, a date that
A Pastot3s Wastepaper
Basket. Forresf Woodward ... ',:. i ...........
._22
. need greasing.
" giges us the remoteness
of 47 years,
•
.
.
/
.....
•
. •
.
,
"
.) •
In a message
to the g6neral
con-. Andre_'
W. Blaekwoocl
was sayingThe Evangehst
Called of God (II); Chq/fon Batlel .............
: ........
6 "
terence of the Conservative
BaPtist
things about the average minister:.-:. :
church,
a little over a.-year: ago, Dr.
t*?.it is unfai_ to judge [tie profession
Pr6perH6at:ii_g
of the Church. E. E: Wordsworllt
...:...'..:.'..-.
• .: ..... _ : .28
,
' : "
_eoyge J..Carlson)
of Chicago. deliv-,
by ithdisrnal failures o1"by.its b_'illiant
"I D.on't HaVe.n Hard Time. Mil ) L Arnold ":'. ...............
•.....
=.... 29 :
. "
ered an address.entitled
"A PhilossucceSses.
There are failures in "the
. "
,
,
'"
....
ophy of Minist61'ial. Edueation. ''l He
ministry today, as there have always
It's F'hn Being a Preachers
Wife• Pmtlittc. E. S1va!! ...............
31(
"
•
" ""
.
:
. . ••
. tre'ated" this subject ably |_ this ad- -.been; alth6ugh the percentage.is
Id',_'- Paul's Concept of thePastorate.
(II), Roscoe Persha_:l . .......
:'. .... 32
;"
."
dress..
Excerpts
from
this, While
er than any other callihg._Why,
then,
'
, • ."
• pointed
'speeifieially
to ministerial
should an Occasional misfit, a weakr
Sermori WorkShop,
Nelso.n\. G. Mink
............
...... .... .". ...........
Ib
"
training:at
a theological.school,
are •ling here and there :in l:he ministry_
" "
Book Briefs .....................................
".....................
47
,
thotlght-provoking
for every minister,
gill our young men with disgust and
. •
:
"We believe"
from.these
words of
....
. " '..
"
.
. .
.
"
(I
"
..
page 5) ,-
" -:
raised,in
praise for the .average
miriister,.the
man who:seldom
isseen
in Lhe limelight or Who seldom is called
ii
CtJVE
EDITOR
The.Hig h Calling of Mr. Average Minister
"
"
".
FROMChe
-
•
......
:
'
" •
,I o_ t_*,_. " *
•
. .
•
.G_nelal
"
" '"
Co r
itq Ectitd_'s
D..I. Vanderpool
Samuel Young
• :
- . .Hugh C. Benner
"
"
" •
SlH)el_nlendents
Churell ,*_the Nazart,rm
•
• '
.
"
....
P.b_ishe5 rllOntny oy [tie H_Z ARE_
%cr,pt_on price
_1 _Q 1 ye_r
_econfl
PUBL|SH_IV6
HOUSE, 2923
ellS% po_t I(Jt [ t,
_t 9._tl_
Troost
_lty
"
[
.
Avenue Box
I_llSIotlr*
527,
Kaalas
City
,
. .
_l
Missouri.
Printer
in
St_hI 5 t_
are awaking
to.the" fact that the 6e_
clesiastihal carriage does not move on
the revolving
of the "big wheals" bpt
'" rather upon the smaller wiieels of the'common men, those wlmse hubs never"
revelation
. _.
|
• "
Z
_"
.
•
, - .
.
G.B.'.X_]illiamson
Hm'dy C. Powers
_
Corinthians
1:26-31;
II Timothy 2:2) that the.focus
of the ......
Gospel ministry is not upon the'specEdito,%Nole:'Dr, G_orqe I. Carlson was pastor
tacularon
the one hand.ri0r the mediot the Marquette Manor Baptist Church; Chinaqo,
• acre on the other hand, but 'to]aith- • and
in Instructor
at the
Iotth3veBtem'Univer£ity.
Evanston.
Illinois, at
time the rnesaatJe re.
_itl mei_.
• .
.
lerred to her_ was delivered. He met an us.
"Thefocus
is upon average'men
who
timely
deathtoingoing
a "plane
crash In Dr.
theCafl_qn
fall el
t957, prior
to Chicago.
are caught,up
unto Christ'in this purwas pastor of the Lake Harriet Baptist Church
pose, upon men loyal_ men faithful;
in Minneapolis,
Minnesota:
"was president
of
•the
MinnesotaBaptist
Conventionand
Instructor
.men, of commitment
of heart and soul
ot NorthwgsteraSeminary. lteprinta o! the en.
__""
"-'. _
,
.
"
. . tire me_sago are. available at t_hdy.llvecents
tPrlnt_d
rn "Central
" March= 1958.
USer .w_tn
"
'
"
Ionservatl_e
permihilo,..
Baptist
Quarterty,"
each
Ave.,
"
i
from tl*o Centzal
N., Minneapolis
.
.
•
C B. Press.
11. Minnesota.
.
• .
2105
Fremont
•
cause them to enter other learned pro" fessions where failures abound? There
men tha'n
and many
at the bedside of thesic/_ and dying, in
the homes Of pa_'ishioners
who are in
!
dwarfs; hence it is well to study the
life of the ordinary pastor.' "
"
"What the world
needs is ..,more or-
trouble, in the.l/ills'and
other institutions for. unfbrtunate
.people.
Otten
they are obliged to w.or!_with meager
equipment
arid unreliable.lay
helpers.
Always the 'jabis _ot/big for rheim-too big for anyone.
.
.
,,,
" .. ,
These unsung ewmgehsts
are not
"0rganizdd into a union and tlmir pay
-scales. by'labor
union standards,
are
shockingly
lo_,v. Yet"so]nehow
they
"
of strong;
be afew
steady
giants
.The Chicago Daily Tribune, in an editorial on May 20, 1957, page 22,gave
'ati 0ff-hand "statement
of this_" it 'is
•
..
•
worth quoting,
"'While
Dr. Grahain
deserves
his
aggrandizement.
They "were discussing'alnong
themselves.v_ho.would
be.o e e u p i e d .with
their
own . self.the g_:eatest in +tlie+Kingdoln (like who
:.
"
•
left in.His Kingdom."
Unless this amazing
.. •
The Preacher's Magazine
and has
Sere-
knows, He possesses culture,- but he
lacks conviction.
He is encyclopedic.
:
"
l
cdntrast
is re-
conviction of knowledge;
£ library of
kno_qlddge rather than a specific conviction of a ti-ue and consistence
of
knowledge.
But the Gospel. of redeeming,
grace of our Lord
Jesus
Christis a'convictionadedieated
heart
- is willing to suffer for and die:
. .
"A good.and:trueph!losophyoflnin-
on any Waters.
a clear e_e, a
commentators
on a'certain
passage 6f
Scripture, but when asked for his own
•views he in_,ariably dodged the issue..
Ha knew what.others
knew, but he
did not know what he himself knew:
and'his" rich powers went much to
wastein a position of vast-opportunity.
Let ds have a revival of dogmatism.
..isterial education
sh9uld seek to help
Let it be dogmatism.of
the i'ight kind,
men- know wh.a[ they know. • This .is to be sm'e . . . '
knowing
with/a
'.conviction.
_ifty
•
"Intellectuals
have a way of taking
years--ago
an'alert,_Christian
said, _ over our world even though they do
• :'It is one thing to know and another
not have a warranty
deed. II_ts always
"
implied' .that intelligence
is _a divine
thing to:knowwhat
you)know.
The
difference
is the .difference
fietween,
general
information. "and intelligent
.rightfiie
intelligentsia:and
belongs tOThisthedoctrinearistoeracY,
is an'el"
._error. Intelligence
is democratic
and
conviction. _ 'One may have consider-
""
can manage his craft
With.a
steady hand,
" duced, .Dr.
Carlson
says, .-we .shall
china mind 'and a peaceful
heart, he
never be able. to produce
(el' be) t!_e . can say, "I know."
..
right "pastors"for
the Loi'd's work .....
What .thqchqrch
needs is not :a
. This matte.r of the efficiency of the
scholarship
that ts encyclopedic,
but
a_/el:age _ minister "fs"tied closely with
one that is expmqmental.
One [nan
adequate convictions.
It is not enough,
who knows thorbugl_ly a few.facts at "
that men be ti-ained or highly skillful
first hand i._ _;ortha
reg ment of men
" in the "use of ministerial
.tools..' Dr.
who know only whal sb?nebne
else
" Carlson points out:"
knows. A.mofig the ihst_'uetors in the
"Some. ministerial
phil6sophy.of
edsefi_inary where I took nay the61ogicaI
ucation plays down the idea of strong
Course was a man of- rich culture and
.
.
and useful convictions
in.the Gospel.
r pe scholarsh'p,_f
profound" erudtt" "on
Their emphasis is upon a versatiliiy
in
and faultless personal.character,
but
the theblogicaI
encyclopedia.'.
The
of
comparatively.
little
influence
Whole thrust
is a greaf familim_ity
among the students because he'never.
with all of..the, theological
writings,
had an opinion of:his own, He coulff
systefiis,
and:theories.
They. stress
give with mastei'ly
ability
.arid.ae=
vastness bf knowledge
rather
than a
curacy, the various, views.of
all the
thew 20:2_,28 speaks of this'cant'fast
and. its treed of reduction,
burdens
for the cause of religion,
These
are
[he ministers:and
priests
day after day',3re
also earryingheavy
whb rarely get
their names' in big
,
inary
bestowing
greater
intellectual
but w'ithout .force.' 'Anothei" knowst:
regimentals.upon
its candidates for the
what he knows. He has himself well
ministry'th'an
the others).
They wei'e , in hand'...
I-ie has.culture,
but he
", expecting
to sit on fllrones.-'Two
of
has culture
plus .convictions,
which "
the disciples 'approachcd'
Him to ask
equals power. He is always felt :..He
"
Him if t'pey might occupy the places of "has gone to the laottom of his subject,
"
honor, on His -rigt_t.]mnd and on His
and he has his factswell
in lmnd. He
on the Lord_s work,'
"We must center our sights on men
who will be forgotten'in.the
glory of
the Lord.' The contrast 'betwee_. the . ,
Lord Jesus Christ and the ideal we
•
have fro' our pastm,s
must be ,reduced. . '
It is altogether
possible that we are
.
not conscious
of the contrast.
Mat-
fame, the honors, heaped
-upon- him
should not be permitted
to dim appreciatlon for thousands of less famous
and less glamorous" clergymen,
who
2 (501
"
remain cheerful, ahd each year more
youngmcn
join' their ranks, knowing
that nefther fame nor:fortune
willever
_omefo them. Longafter'Dr.
Grahfim
and ether'famous
personalities
of.the
rehglous'"""".world ' have left the front
pages an. ai:myof faithful parish rainisters and priests willstill
he c_ir_yi.ng "
"This is a chapter.0ut/of
the training of the-twelve.
Th6 Lord Jesus
Christ was going up to Jerusalem,
.
.
•
'the foreknowledge
of death in His
- e:Ces, and set upon bec0mjng a ransorn
by giving His life.' What a contrast
He found in His disciples..They
were
.
went to the greatest seminary
the greatest
background,..one
composed
tbatthere
lo0k to the kind of person ._Pho takes
'his place in faithful service. We must
consider-Sthe.person
who represents
the
great" army of toilers, as. a result, of
"
Whose faithfulness
the milk isdelivered to our'door
each morning_ our
corner grocery has bread, 9_getablcs.
and food stuff to sen: and the.city
transportation
system deli',;crsus
to
.6ur daily work. We must direct our..
.{ " ministerial
educational
program
to"" ward him, his sp{ritual needs and per-:
,
_,
sonal salvatlon .....
. : "
"
"Ip the face of the great,New
York
i " campaign we must rememlaer the'ira:
• _,
portance
of the average
ministers,
When Gad'sends
a great personality;
• _
our danger is to lionize this gi'ealnes_.:
•
i"
.t
in their
before a
large congregation.
•
" "Theil: evangelistic
campaign runs
continuously,
altho they usually don't
call it a revival.- Sometimes they have
to work for months or'years
t0.umke
one man a convert.
Some oftheir
best
work ks done outside tl_e churches--
"'_,
•
' ._
wile never
to, preach
..
are likewise men of power in the,rainistry, as there have alway' been, for,
where will you find such orators, such
intellectual
giants;such
all-round men
of might as Brooks, and Spurgeon, and
Chrysostmn,
and Paul? It'is
,bette_.
however." that the rank and file be
dinary or average pastors.
We must
give attention
to the production
of
ministers from the ranks 6f Mr: Average Citizen inour churches:
We must
i
•_
newspapers
and
lives' are likely
.
'.
..
"_
knows,
"
-
but he does riot know what he
•
....
able information,
and lack power." He
_,_,,0_,
+Van_e,
"Chrhtlan
Worl_Pulpit,"V0t.q2
_19071,
p, I205•
' 0.1)._
February. 1959
it is where
average
peopleyouof tile
find world
it. Among
nne findsttiel
a .
great amount
of wide,awake
intelli'gence.
" .
•
-.
.(5D 3
I
I
I
"William •Warren Sweet in the vol- . many of us who are basically unhappy
ume The Story o_ Religiou in America
in our.respective
taslcs because
we
gives us a picture of the average manare so very conscious that we are only
-
aster
the frontier
West andfor Southwest
turing in the
Christ..Thesecap-evangelical
groups,
Baptists
and
Methodists, were blessed with a great
army
of average, ministers.L
Every
page of histor:_ shows thai tl_ey were
. !
average
probably which
we sonde
shall
never gainand thethatnotoriety
few preachers
have received. _ Within
another
minority
are lih0sa who'_ are
ineffective
in their present
task be:."
cause of'the time andeffortS
they are
-T he
-
his authorities
would appear
"_
i l
,•_
'
•
being repetitious.anti
shall'see
of. • Kingdom
i
When You Preach, Remember--
! "
• When ybu enter the pulpit; mal/e no apologies.
If you have a
message from God, deliver it; or hold your peace...Do
not waste .time
by long prefaces, but.say good things fr0m.the start, and do not kee_
on talking after" you have done that.- Better to" leave peopl_ longing
-than loathing : Le_ive self out bf the iaulpit and take Christ in, Dc not
':
..._
, _
preachold
sermons with6ut
trig. DO not harp .too'much
A-
..
"".
care
of your
'
,
"
"
.
"
warming them over, and never stop grow- "
on one string, hut give fhe variety. 9f :the
character,
Do n6t scold. Be a friend of sinners, hut not.of sin. Always preach.as well as you can, but do yOurbest
for.those who come on rainy days.
"
Christ preached'marvelously
• rabbi at night.
""
"
"
"
"
"
4
(52)
:
"
"
-
to one. woman at the well. ahd-to
....
:
Sent in.by Ona J. Turner
_
"
' " •
--AUTHOR.
one
UNKNOWN
Tho Proachor'e Magaztne
preacher
t'o conceaL"
happy fiftyflamed. Spur-
•.
his fii'st year
at Waterbeach,
"He ac-
' cepted the call after many hours of."
prayer.
The salary was fixed at.$225.a.
" year( insufficient
to keep him :bur
the?good
people brought
hlm.]_read,
produce,
and always thought
when" they,kdled
" "
a pig." ,
of him
"writtenhis
life across the skies." and.
After
serving
at Waterbeach'.
for
haVe'.indeed found nothing that should
something
less than three years, he
be concealed.
Conwell." Cook,. Day_
received
and aedepted
a call to the
"'r
Ellis, 'Fuller Lorimer. Needham
Pike: - New Park Street Church in,. London.
Shindlei---how and man:_
more have
Here he served
for over "
preachers,
scholars
who' "foun'd
have:
- _ .... as pastor
. " it' wort:hwhile
to record the life and . thirty, years_ and here he published
a
" .
ministry:of
Charles
Haddon
Spurweekly
sermon
continuously
from
dean? And how many'have'been
in1855 until his'.death
in 1892, without
slMred and
blessed as.
they
have -'losing his 'freshness
and originality.
learned of,his devotion.to
Christ, his
A. story went the rounds
of shop,
passion for the lost, his lo'Je of hu-:
classroom,
and parloi" during
Spur: manity, his pulpit eloquence,
his skill
geonl's ministry.
It'seems
a certain
of Biblical exp.osition?
yotmg .lad -was being quizzed, by a
Boi'n' at Kelvedon.
land let God take care of your
..
.
• _."
"
-Paul kept the faille" but 10st his"head,
but God will give. it back .
to him, gloriously crowned.
A settling star" may rose.again; btit h falling
"
star never.
Do not abusepeoplef0r
not likifig you--perhaps
you do . ....
not like yourself too well. Blame them for not loving _lesus. Do not
" " ru n away from your hearei's; and do not scream, for too much norse
drownssense
"
:' , . ..
" "
:
Empty vesselsring"leudest;
a_id when a than i_.emply
he often_"
yells. Powder is not shot, and thun(_er isnot'ligh_ning.
Yo_ are not a . " ..
preacher,: nomatter
whose hands have been laid upon you, unless:.'
"
you know the truth'had
are anointed by -the Holy Spiz'it.
. .-
'
Bible.
Take
reputation.
..
skies. I hav(_ nothing
So spoke a tired but
the
dean shortly before his.death.
And so
wrote a host of biographers
students:
Ofsoul.USataSthis'ministSrSpoint.
:Th_reSh°uld'areSeareh_ill
t0ohiS ful.headlines; He has called us to .he f'aith- - .
saying £}oorly what?Dr.
Carlson and
panse,'that
there are no " small men"
" "
"
2'
.
i_.
I
,
•
_aAY WHITE my life_a_'oss
eight-year-old
that every seeming noel& of
work is rather a |imitless ex_
have said. so ,,qell_ it. and no small tasks in the,will _f. God."
to your editor:that
each
.God has not ' called us to,:make
the,
By James McGraw*
.....
You::.
S pU rgeon:
' -.
men"
Ofconviction.
They knew'
what : a_tical
expendingladderto "move'
ee_lesi-to
they knew:
When Andrew
W. Blackinto' theup"-t_e
prominence
wbed wrote in 1910, 'The .world-is bewhich they envision they have been
ing saved largely' through the. efforts
called,
"
'
"
•
of the average minister,' he _poke.an
Let each of'us
pray. God that we
"abiding truth."
With fear'of
"
Preaching of Charles
Haddon
in Essex,'.Eflg-
stranger,
who'asked
the boy who-the
land•tn.1834,
Spurgeon
was'the'
smi..prime
minister of England was. "Mr.
"and grandson,of
preachers.
His faSpurgeonl".was'the
boy's emphatic
ther
was a businessman:
but he
reply• And perhaps the boy was carpreached
for sixteen years to a 'small
rect, for Charles
Hadden Spurgeonl
." . "congregation
.of independents.
His
was. indeed-the.
"prime" minister of
grandfather,;James
Spurgeon,
served
his country,
during
those
eveintful
as
Stambourne,
in Essex,
for thepastor
more than atfifty
years."
"
Always
religious-minded,
"Charles
nevertheless
felt deep conviction
for
abdt/t a" year before his conversion,
• "
"which took place in a definite crisis experienee
when he.was fifteen. It'was
• not=long afterward
that he .preached
his first sermon at the age of. sixteen,
-_and at seventeen
he was pastor of his
- first charge.
Richard
Day writes of
*_o[,_o_,_,,_
Fol_ruary,1959
_0_0_l:_ s_t,_,_,
years.
Opposed
vigor6usly
"'during
those
first months
of his ministry
to the
argest nonconformi.stchurch
inBrat"'ain,
Spurgeon anwonappreciation
his" critics for
slowly
but surely.to
his
"
right to. lead .the congregation.
One"
finds it difficult to'anhlyce
the oppo-.
sition, which was at times bordering
upon the" extravagant
and the emotional. Perhaps.it
was his hoyisl_ appearance,
which brnught
people to
hear him because
of the novelty
of it.
I
I
I"
.
•
/).
.i
Perhaps it was What people mistakenly'thought
was "immaturity,"
for he
married only after he had been servmg as pastor in London
for some two
years or more. But Russell E. Conwell in his biography
of Spurgeon
ohserves that his persecution
helped him
,
-
in his effectiveness
_/s a preacher.
He
quotes Spurgeon
as'saying
that it is
•often thetext,
not the sermon, that
saves.the
sinner.
In examining
(he .
"sermons of C: H. Spurgeon.
one "believes he practiced
t i s philosophy,
Most Of his introductionS,
are based
I" i
.speakitig:
No wonder such fervor had
:aheffect on those whoheard
him.
Yet another factor On the effectiveness of his preaching
was his spirit of
prayer.
Lorimer
puts it aptlywhen
he states. "He preached
well because"
he prayed
well."
Ellis says of his
.
,
IVI- Songs in 1.he night--their
Uses.
.'
Their benefits to oflrselves and others.
Spurgeon
used many illustrations.
He quotedBaxter'andBrooks,
Shakes- '
peare, Dante, and Bunyan
He gave
"pers°nal
illustrations.
He quoted po=
etry.,In
the sermon..
The Leafless
rather titan
hindered:
for: 'as many
on, .the text..and context.
Many of his
came to. scoff, yet they.recegnizt3d
in
dlustratmns
are from the Bible. His
the young'Preacher
a donfidcnce"bova
divisions.are."for
the most part. a-deS
ofconfiden'ce
in-God" as he _poke as
yelopmcnt 'of textual,
inferential,
or
one having authori_ty,
expository nature.
His knowledge
of
An " anonymous
'writer
describes
the Scriptures
is cluiekly'apparent
and
Spurgeon
as being "somewhat. below
with.the
unusual
knowledge
is seen
,the" middle height, with heavy feaalso a consuming
love for the Bible. tures and a curious inequality
in his
Tliis transfers ;itself to the readm" of "
eyes . . . the heavy eyes beamed"with
Spurgeon's
sei:mons, as it most cer_
""
benev01ence . _ . {here was a'gleam of
tainly must habe done to'the listeners
ll : "
fun _in- ahnost every glance, "and.the
who heard.him
preach,
impression
his looks created was not
A significant characteristic
of Spur• :
only that of anhonestand
kindly hagoon's preaching,
in addition
to its
ture. but 6f a genial and witty intelli-' Biblical
content,
is the evangelistic
:
gence."
"
"
fervor with
which .he delivered
his
• •
i
His hair, thick and black, was worn
sermons.
Lorimer
states that "he allong and'parted
in the middle.
The- .ways planned
fo_'.]mmediate
results:
voluminouscollar
and tie tliat.swathed
He expected someone to be renovated
his short hockdid
not lend dignity to
or bettered by the Words t.hat fell from
the wearer.
In later life .'Iris 16oks •his _lips."
.
.
•'improved
with the nellowI_ess of ex:- "
Blackwood
also sees this'factor':in'
"
per_ence, and it was.said "he was al",Spurgeon's
preaching_
point ng out
Ways pleasant
to look •upon, and:was
. "that •in a volume of twelve sei:mons b_.
always neat and,Weil-greomed
m ap-"
Spurgeon, whichwere
intended'to
be
""
pearance.
"
pastoral, they would, "in present da_/
.
_prayers that they "haVe been a-means
Tree,
there- are eight., quotations.
,,
of,
"of grhce and a re,elation
of What
poeti:y in"Songs
in the Night
there
'pra, ye_ might
more often be . . . - are seven.
prayers
Which ring in his.heart
still, * Vivid style kept the truth:fresh
and
"_
"or
and mingle with his holiest 15urposes,
powerful:
He would declare:
The
which
indeed they
mspir.ed."
His
chestra shall be composed of damned
prayers
in public Services are said to
men_ and'howling
fiends/and
yelling
have had. a.mmPhc!ty
and dilectness,
demons."
In another sormon'hc
says,
together with a subtitled fore'or and'a
"Fair professors once they-werei
they
childlike
confidence,
which made it
stood green among the,church,
like
seem that he was _'talking with God
the very leaves of'paradise;
but in an
reverently,
and humbly as became .a e_'il hour they-fell, the slaves of temptahon.
.. creature, yet bo|dly and tlzustfully as
'
"
became a saint,'_ It.has been"said that
, Robert Wilmot studied the preachSpurgeo(t
attributed'
the success" of. ing of C.' H. Spurgeon
and noted his
his ministry
to the fact that•people,
convers_itioflal
manner at the outset. /
were 1oraylng while.he preache&
"his soft, .melodious
pleadings
_ind
"Homiletically,
Spi_rgebnseemed
to strong denunciations,
with allthe vari. practice
a. system of reasoning
from
pus tone3, some of-which
cut .like a
the kno(vn t0the unknown, as Conwell • knife and others as fi:agraht and ten" , it
has pointed out. The dlwsmns
o f his
der as a'mother's
kiss. But he declded
sermons
are clear and distinct.
He
the secret of his power lay in.his satannounced
them and he emphasized
urationwith
the Scriptures.
' them; and it was easy to reproduce
them insubstance
for s0medays
after
To this nll must agree, but .to this
- listening t0 them-. The divisions served,
may x_,ell be. added one thing more-
:•
I"i
I f
I _
as a set of "pegs" up0n which tohang
his Christ-centered
of
.the
first _kords of m_/ssage.
SPurgeon Some
"in the"
" the truths
and illustl:atmns
which
Metropolitan
Tabernacle,
after the
came under their.
"
An example
of-tlie di#isions of his.: congregationhad
moved into their new
An individualist,
Spurgeon
was
never one., to be led ai'ound by the;
nose ]n his relation with his deacons,
'Soon after his coming, to London his
terms be evangehst_c..
After each of
thh twelve is a printed.appeal "
_'to the '
unconverf_ed, hearer."
.
There was an intenseomoral
earnest-
• _'-
congregati0n
fred swelled in sizd until
hess in the" preaching
of Spurgeon
- Spurgeon mentioned
in thepulpit
that
which is l_articularly noteworthy,
and
soon the walls 'would .have to be
which'doubtless
accounted,
at least.in
knocked
out and the building
en- "part, "for: a measure
:of his evan:"
larged." Afte.r the sermon one" of 'the
gelistic success
H.e was p6ssessed with
r
deacons approached
the yot/ng preach-,
a passion for souls. His voice often
er and told him they "would hear no " broke into sobs, and tears streamed
.,more of it." Spurgeon
abruptly
tel.
from his eyes, as he pleaded with the
plied that they would hear no more of
uncon_'erted
to be reconciled
to God. " '
it when it Was done!
"
One of his listeners
decla'i'es that he.:
• .
Andrew
W. Blackwood
has sug.
sometimes
preached
in such agony
gested that
Spurgeon's
use
of the" that he e6uld not keep his foo/; on.the
.played--a
.
Scriptures
signifieaflt
part
floor, hut llad to kheel on a clmir while
. . 6 (5._)
The Prectcher'_Magazino
sermons
is seep in "Songs':Jn
the
. Night,"
preached"from
the text in'Job
35.10.. But none saith,Where
is God
my maker, who gig;ell{ songs in the
'
night?"
It i_ as'foUovJs:
"
' I. Songd ifl the night--their
source.
.God .g_veth them.
" .'.
II. Songs in the night--their
mat-.
""
ter. W_at do we stag 'about in the
:night?
III. Songs _n the night--iheii"
ex..
cellencc.
They are hearty songs and
.sweet songs,
Fobruar¥, 1959
. i-
,
sanctuarYelement.in
Mareh.in
his preaching:1861"show:
this
vital
. .
. .:
"I would propose
that th e subject
of*the ministry of this'house,
as long
. as thi_ platfm_m shall stand, sliall "be
- the person of Jes,as Christ..
: if I am
asked what is my 6reed, I must reply,
'It is Jesus Christ'..
• Christ" Jesus
'who is the sum add "substance of'the
gospel, the incarnation
of•every
previous truth, the all glorious'embodi:
ment of. the. way; the truth, and the
. ".
life?'
.
.
.
:
"
.
I
"
, (55)
"
I
"I
"
.
"_
;,,
_:
-_":
-.
] i
!)
.
:,
• "
"
-
pecially
when the
tm;m's of "everything
of Cedis Manifold Gra ce _
Stewards
.
"
.
•
.
"
."
"
.
-
the si_:th verse with oui" text we ba_,e
the following: "Live aceori]ing:to
God
"terms,
.the" manifold
They _:ome out of the vivid life
one. For David Livingstone
it. meant
pre.ssmg on !ate the.unexplored
reglens of Africa. For you it has meant,
or probably will inean something else.
But whatever
tbe consequences,
we
mu.st'c0nsider
llfe to be a stewardship,
..
'
'
"
"
Sclum'un_:.. I Palter4.1-11
" . .
'T_xr:
. . . as good steWar&v el _he
maniJold,graee
el God (I Petel: 4:
10}.
" •
"
The words "
"
....
Steward.
and stewardship," 'thotigh infre0t_ently
tised by
Mental areas
of stewardship-areas
which are vitally related-to
us all.
I:'_ Stewardshlp.of
Life
Coinbining
the last seven .words.of
grace
of God.
-
' But we
the
ownefshl
;'- j
.......
-..,
p, xne earm m tee t_oro s.
and the fu'lness thereof; the world, and
they that dwell therein."
"
.
As om _text reveals. Peter conceives
of all of God's benefits to man as expresstons of grace, as'unmerited
gifts,
as trusts.
He speaks of three, funds.,
•o_t0_ s,_,,too_ s,_,. c_..,_,
olhG_ ',
.
:
.
'
"--
'by, such
statements
....
" .. y
him that sent me";
as: ""Wist
"The
a
"
ye not
Butwe haveand,fie l_ene'fits
ultimate of'life,
ciaim
. • beuse,".
.In i.hc poSseSsions
.....
.., We arc "merely trustees.
Because of
:"
tne. wi_t oz
Son of man
.
Moquzlno
"
"'
this. "to "own is to .owe, and
.t°gtve._
...
to liye is
of Christian
.stewardship
in
all
"of life.. It isthat
the, God
least isthe
possible
ac_
knowlcdgment
Owrim
possessmn.
It is an expresmon
dr" ac- ."
of all. Can we be so.:small and ungrateful
as- to deny. iwen-this
our
stewardship?
token
of
. •.
Right for
here many;
is the 1Right;here
insurmountable
It isin reality
enotigb
.'obstacle
many
to
l_i'e, and deep-,--deep,
everythingequals
rblated
,,
,.,
to hlvolve
'it. Because:of
this/]il'e
op.
"riel_ young rulers
turn aside Sorrowihg. Why else-are there some 1,565 _'cf- ' P°'r_:unity---°PP_ °rtunity
to p r o v e.
crefices
,to giving in the Bible2 Why. " worthy'of
confidence,.
to sosaying
serve
........
as to one God..
day shear
His . voice
" ,eme
uoes Jesus
more to say aoout
., ........
, .
. .mltntul
,;...
•
• nave
• .......
wen none
tnou
goou.ano
•noney and possess ons than anything
else? Why else do sixteen of histhirtyservant
. . enter tliou into the'joy
eight ibarables and "one verse in seven
of thy Lord."
.relate to anan's attitude to prpperty?"
" BUi you say, "God has:inc."
God
:II. Stewardship.of.Love
doesn't have you until He has yours.
. "If Christ is •LOrd of our lives He must
. also becoine Lord •of our possessions.'.'
" Though,we
can't serve God and.maremen, we can serve
God •with•' mare-
COmbining the firstseven
Words of
tl_c eighth verse with our text we,have
{.he following:
"And above all things
haee fervent love.. ; as good stewards
of the manifold'grace
of God." It. may
-men, and we must--:-"h_/good sie(vm'ds
of the manifold grace of God."
"seem strange
to some that love is a
Stewardship
in the same sense that a
Here.we
...five-lette_.
: "
_.nust suffer many things." Such a feel- '
mg must subordinate
all else in our
lives•
.
"
In this writer!s experience
tl_e'realizhtion that life as a stewardship
meant
refusing
a generous
partnership
in a
-.
husiness.
This was, not easy to d0, es-.-,
" Tho Proochor'n
This is an age of tips. It is proper
to tip'the waktrcss, the taxi driver, the
bellhop.
This "properness"
ha:s carricd •over into Our churches: until it is
now proper,,to
tip the Lord for the
services
He has rendered
duringthe
pers0n!,,This
car"Ttiat'belbngs'tol_ar_k
nie'aCc°unt"Tmfisn!neis
nay eepthoce
his master
sharedandhis was
thlans,
man=
The Genesi_
account.tells
that"G0d" - ......
"
aged
all his He
affairs,
"even
so
to'creed
man of
the dust Ofusthe.groun_
.close that he knew his master's mind
and' breath;ed
into his nostrils
:the. , .
.
.and. aspirations,
being', taken
cornbreath of life[ Life was given to us
151etcly into his confidence
This is
r"
by oflr. ' Mal_er and it.. is therefore "not .
clearly; .indicated
by the account of
to be ,wasted,
"The great Gieer of"
Abt'aham's
stewa_
in Genesis 24: 10.
the universe .is also the gt:eat Econo-.
There'we
read that "all the. goods of
mtzer.'"' He will,mot .'smile upon n
his master we/-e .in his'hand."
wasted life.' He reserves
the rightto
It iS with" this connotation
that the, summon _t atany time and demand an
•:
Word should be'applied
to the Chris- - account, Stewardship,
then, involves
tian's relationship
to God, True the.
life•itself• It involves not s0 mt_ela givChristian
is a child of'light,
a son of
tag.to the Lord as living for the Lord;
""
God, .a joint heir.( with Christl and h ....hwng """
a_ecordmg
to God ......
m the Spirit
"" citizen of.the heavenly
[_ifigdom bu
Jesus, of course, is the's'upreme
Exhe is also a steward..
"
ample for us.. His life.was motivated
The concdpt of Christian _steward.
and dominated
by aft o'_'erwhelmihg
ship is basic'to Christianit3).
It is not
sense of mission and purpose,
on a
accidental
nor incidental.- I[ is fundanumber of occasions He indicated this
..
_0_neteali WhcYh_Ssth
"
is so?' Because
with
wlmle.6om.mand
Yet it isstill
an
phage:the The
If Christian
stewardship
entails life
pastweek--as
though He were a hellitself it also includes the possessions of
hop oi" a Waitress_ H0w dare wetre_at
life. They too have been entrusted
to
the Infinite-like.
this!
:The. tithe-is
us. But how we love to use. those pas_" • God's,.. first and foremost,
But the
sesslve pronouns, cspct_ially in the first
tithe iff even more than -just God's
.
The gte';vard was more,than
a Servant;
us has'beengiven
as' a sacred ti'ust to
'_1 " ofthethemaSSeSorientt°daY'and
areare'.fullb°thbf
scripturalmeaning.
' areinthehereSpiritfor
a" reason."
"" as good.LifeStewardSfor
each of
°el
he was the persofial"reprcsentative
Of be
used pu/'posefully
and -usefully.
"
confuse'd
essential
co-op_ration.",
But the i:hoice had to ' stands:
':Bring ye all the tithes into
-. be made and vans, That is What was
tbestorehouse,
that.there
naybe
neat
revolved in the stewardship
of life.for
in mine house."
:
By Ran Borden*
: .
offer
was on.your
put in
depends
come face.to
word--tithe.
face.with
When
that
the
man's life and passe_sions are/ Yet it
is.a fact. John tells'us
that "God is
preacher
announces
to" his Sunday
love." As Such He is the Source of,all
morning
cqngregation
that his rues- lo./e.
The basis of this stewardship
sage. iis On the subject of stewardship,
lies in the'glorious
truth that "the love
"99 •44/100 per cent instantly
think of " of God is shed abroad in.our hearts
the tithe. This ,is bdth good and bad.
by the Holy Ghost."
We have been
The tithe is only one phase of Chrisentrusted
wi'th' His lo_'e. "If God so
tian. siewardship
and ought not to be
,loved us, we otight also to love."
Fehruh_y,
1959
""
"
" " '
.
.
L
(_7] 9
"
.
I
.
"FJ:'eely ye have received, freely give."
This'.divine
love-is to be shed abroad
in the world,
I"!
• ,
I ..
'_
,_,
•
Tire youth of today are, if' not love-.
•happy:
0ran: at lea.st leve-conseious,
Turn on your radio m" slip into a
flu et l ttle care for a sar_dwich and
what.do, you bear? Sweet, melodious
strains
of--"Only . O_e . Love.-" " " True
Love"-"Young
Love"---_"Chains
of
Love--"Love
Is _ 'Gelden
Ring"-etc., indefiflitely, ad *tauseitm.. But this
' is a far cry from tile love of God, from
the aflape-I _ve of the New'Teslamqnt
Today, as inuch as or more than ever
before, the world.must
have some liv:
iI]gobjcctlessonsof
tl:uelo{:e. It Meeds
- to have demonstrated
tile. one-and. only rove of God "and the chains o[.
love with which He wbuld draw all
men tohimself.
Tlie grea'tes_, thing in
allthe" universe
is the love of God!
And, amazing ti'u[h above all truths:
this love" has been entrusted.to
us. It
.
- faith; hope, charity,
these three; but
the greatest of these.is charity"
(I Corinthians
13:1,4-8,
13).
-
•
L
Christ." To the Corinthrans
he wrotei
"Each" man hath his o_,vfi gift from
God, one after this manner,
and an-
" "
The lo%'e ofGod is our greatest possession.
Is it:any
Wonder that Paul xv_'ote to the. Car nthian church, "It is
required
among slewards
that,a man
be foqnd (aithf'ul"?. But werflust
beware bf thinking
of this stewardship
on the level Of'duty alone---</i one day
giving account,
Love _s more on the "
plar{e el the beautif'31 than-the dutiful..
Whet love is h.etrayed a heart s"brok- - .
eu. Cal,)ary
did that,, and once .is
enough. Therefore
I'must be true to
the'stewardship
of love,
"
other after.that."
Consequently _we'ar.e
responsil_le to discover our particular
gifts: Timothy. was.exhorted
to "neg_
. ..lcct not tile gift tlw, t was m hrm and'
to:"stir up the gift of God.'! Our par- . titular
ability has.been
.
. given to us
that.wemight
make aunique contribu:
tian to the Kingdom..
"
It is time we ceased dv)elling solely
upon the extent of om_ talents and concentrated On the concept:,of service itself. Members of.the business ";.vorld
today are constqntly
striving, to ira_"prove the service 'they give" to the
public, The:/ are.:'service-conscious:"
Thus we are greeted on every hand
by such" mottos as: Serv ee with a
smile"'--"Dependab,
le" Service"_"If
serwce isn't •good, it isn't serwee _
"Qt_iek se_vice"_"Serv]ce
is our bus:,"
" iness, 'v Friends,
service.rs
also the
IlL Siew_i;dsl_ipdf
Labbr"
Verse ten: from which our text is
taken, reads: "A's every mai:l hath received . :'. [a] gift,- even so minister
:, as good stewards
of,.the marfifold
" ,.
grace of God?' ,This tl_ird area of " :
Clu'i.qtian"stewai'dsbip
_s one that bulks
.
I I
placed each one.of us where he is to
..serve with'what
he has, Jesus said,
"I am among you as he that serveth."
Can we do any less.
As ever, y man
hath received
the gift, even so mmister..,
as good stewards of the marefold grace of.God."
,
It is n6t within our power.to
alter
the fact that we are r'stev)ards
of the
.
"t'iianifold:g_'ace of God." It is within
our power to determine
what kind of
-stewards .,i.,eshall'be.
Out- motivation
should be twofold..FirsL
(re _hall one :
da_¢ g!ve an account.
Sceond. true stewardship
seeks to:
exalt God, wh_ alone is worthy.
True
sic'wardship
involves
a 'response
of
love and _doration.
True stewardship.
invOl_'cs living, and.lov!ng,
and laboring--"that
God in all things, m,ay be
glorified
through
Jesus. Christ,
to
.whom b praise-and dorriinion forever
m:Jd e%,_r. Amen." -Brethren,_let
us
be good stew_)rds of, God*s ' manifold
is apart,a s!.ewardsh_p.
of.ourChi'istifin.stewardship._
large,., inIt Ore
letlers theof use
b_/thof Peter
&nd
_
business'of : the, " Chri.%tian,
grace."
we.hi
What " a'trust i " Paul,
involves
our God"
" ,God
" .has
" . "
"
"
God forbidthat
We should ever t?e- given tale ats in ser.viee. Peter here
...........
7- .......
tray it, P_ter is so impressed with [he
_.vr_tes, "Asevei•y
rn._ri hhtli received "_,
"
' "
,
_
.
.
.
- unportance
of this that h_ says, "Anti
a karisma.or
free gift, "eveh semin""i_
CAN PEOPLE'COli|E
TO YOUR CltUltC|l???
" above all things have..fei'velt
love,"
ister the stone.". Our every endowPaul fclt it so.keenly .that-he penned
"me,ill has come from the Lord. "Every
"
'
" ' By 12.B. MeCaul* "
.
'
" tllemosfsublimelinesthat
ex/er flowed
good gift
. is from above,"
Writes" .
"
"
" "
from human pen: "Tbough 'I speak , James.
An "ownership
complex" 'is
:"
Yon say, ."O]':course
they can, if_they *:rant to." Btlt can they? . .
with the tongues o(.men arid of anver-y evident
here: ._We tend to" feel
1. ' Can they find it? Is it hidden away on a side street without
gels, and.have
.r/at cl)arity, I am .bethat if wehave.a
right •to anything
it
"
signs up as i.o where to find it?.
.
.
come as sounding.brfiss,
or a tinkling
is to our own abilities. Butin the final.
2, In)cy weather
can they get up the steps?
In damp weather
" "
cymbal. "Chhrity
suffereth
Icing. ant]
analysis we have no nero grohnds for
is the door swollen shut?, Can :they find the main entrance
since you
is kind; charity enx/ieth not; chmqty
saying that talent.is not inthe ste_vard..
retnodeled
last year?
• _
"
vaunteth
no;_ itself, is aaot .puffed tip, ship category than for saying that life
I
3. Can they sit.in the pews without sticking 'to the :earnish or
dot i ant be lave itself unseendy,
sc'ek- "itself isnrt.
eth not her'own,
_s not.easily,
fSroThis stewa/'dship'of
labor, or seryoked, thinketh no evil: rejoicoth not" • vice, is.not restricted
to a.few.
No
'i O inqulty: but l'ejoieeth in the truth;.:.Cht.istian
is exempt.."Bfit
I.don't have
beareth all tlings, believeth all. thinus
any snocinl nhillt_r " •.....
ann.l _.,
hopcth all things, endureth
all things,
Charity
never
faileth:
but whether
. .there be prophecies,
they shall fail;
whether "there he toiagues, they shall
"cease; w]aetlier thei'e be,knowledge;
it,'shall vanish away. And now abideth
10 (58}
]
.
is true tbat'a:bil ty and talents vary,
still, no one'has
been missed cornpletely,
paul sought td.impress
this"
upon the" ]_phesians .when he wrote
"Unto every•one
of usis given grace
according to the me_/sure' of thegift of
-
The Preacher,s'Magazine
tearing their, clothes on:nails end _;ough places9.. •
•
4. What-.about
thetemperature'?
Too hot? Co]dT IJrafty?
Can
. .they breathe
the air, or is Jrfilled
with fumes or empty.of
0xygen?
5. What about rest-r0om and drinking-water
.facilities?
.
6. What about acoustics?
Can they hear What is said?
7. What about lighting?
Unnecessary
noise?
Unswept
floi_rs?
Net'onl.y,in
the auditorium,
but in the Sunday sehoel.elassrooms?
Cari people i_ome to your _hurch?
Oh, I know:you
l_ave spe_.t a
lot of money on it and if'might
_be big, and yoti are praying.
But
ca_t they come?
"
.. " .
._t0,, col:,_, _a,_/_
.
.-- .....
.
.February. 1959
""
I
I
"
I
t59) 11
il
!I '
-
The Minister and-the P_ychiatrist
"t I "
"
-
.
'
Importance of Maintaining
II.
:
. .
"
By'Edwln
• " "'
"
: .......
. _s.'r_fE
TWO disciplines, of the
" _ istry'ahdpsychiatry
work in
" "
er relationsh!pi
eacl_ will benefit
keeps its identity.
The science
Fair_ M.D.*
ramclesas it
psy-
...
ligion.
pastorar
programs"A_ areclinical
extended
and
Idenfity*'i:
"
• .
""
" "
"
ing to heli_ man,find
Iris place in.the
-warhl and we are. sharing knbwledge
to tim benefit of male. The .rcligion'i_;t
act_epts theconcep[bf
tlieunc0nscious,
i! i• )
cl_iatry
progress
as
it gains
new • aknowingly
prbduct 0fscience.
and'deals
with it
knowledgewill based.on
souud
scientific
as he counsels
his parishprinciples:
As' the scientist exl)leros
it_mrs. He seeksthe
psyclfiatrist's
unmarl in the'/]eld of psyctmlogical
medidm:standbag o/' grief, love_ bate, and
, i
cini_ he may have his own reiigious
guilt• .Tim
p,syeh air st t'amiliarizes
'.'_
belief• But as hedepai,ts
train sclen,
lfimself with religiousattitudes•toward
.i! ?
rifle inquiry
into
the reahn. of religion
,,
, ....
.
,.
. ..,
these sonic • ....
naslc teens s'. ,,,
wc.e can
-umterstand . the
'": i_[" and.
the adulteratmn
weakens
sc_ericc
., attitude,
. •
gof ' each
- - dis.
religion.
The
_nature both
.uf man
is " . , .
,
clph le_ agree to di._agree, and agree"
such tlmt scientific inquiry in psyc lo- '
•
•logical fields leads into the _concerns
where possible in a spirit ef mutual
_
of. man wtlieh fall nto the field Of retrust. As we m psychiatry, realize the
ligion. As hew knowledge
t_ a_qu rod
religionists
have something
to offer.,
•
.
thespirit
may be subjected'to'.%ientiflc
and those in rehgion leai'fi to trust us,
investigation.
In this respect science
can cointribule to religion. The,science
- of phychblogieal'medicine
recognize_
psychic
energy,
which
is studied,
•°
_
"_ "
we will achieve
nmtual trust.:'Then
true co-operation
will eo:,ne,. We will
acknov01edge
differences
in opinion
and belief wbile e.gch respects the oth-
Spirithal:e_ergy:
a concept of'the re:
er.: tl:ust asi_ the scientific method, we
ligionist,
i:ould be. subjected
to the.
may disagree in belief and interpresame method of seienti/lc study,
tatiori, but .wilh this trust and respect
Religion also asit keeps'its :de it
{or theother
we can keep our identity
,
Y . . • .
. •
unadulterated,
by science
_vill ga n " and share tcnowledge.
As each keeps
now'insightswhich
can be shared v,;ith
_ts: separateidentity"
tlaere, will be
psychiatry."
If religion fails to l_eep
greater _ecurity "for both. h'a our co.
its' i:dentity it will hecom'e a hyhrid,,
•_'ith.the sterility eharaeti_r_stic Of hyhrids. The.great
thinkerff in religion
.are Challenged to•new.interpretations
in' light of'present
"knowledge.
As
" t_'ufh is sought and found in.religion,
these truths can be utilized in psychological medicine:,
in:both
"
,_Psy£h,,_tri¢
_F.o,,,
12 16(_"
disciplines.we
CUnl,
t,.,,,,
Pollen
City
.....
S¢_,,, N,_..... -,._o_,¢_ s_,,,_,_r
"
concept 0f the world, which in turn depends upon his own system of values:
training
pastoral
Everi
though
responsibility
the
does doeth.
take
for therqpist
his patient's
ca,'o ,s expanded, and as psychiatry
and religion coroperate in teaching at
sions-and purposcl2 avoids doing so.
his. dwn sense of values i_ sefised by
tl)is level, graduates
with basic orienrations will make a fertile field for fulure growth. This will be.reflected
at
the local'level
by d greater ability to
c(mal_0umcate with each oiber and _
nlore effective [email protected]
effort. On
the local level we can share knowl-
the p,qtientclufiag
the course of therapy, Ginshe'fg _', 1,-,has wri'ttenarticles
on, values
and the psychiatrist
in
,which he states that the current trend
in psyehothera/52)
js toward consider4:
'able agreemer_t
that values play an
important
r6le
in psychotherapy,
edge
those"
already.serving
in
their among
_'e.':;pective
professions..Psych
atrists can" participate
in tbe vai'i6us
denominational
pastoral schools' of in-strueliol3:
Ministers
could he invited
to aiTpear before psychological
me_tlags, and vice versn.-to considercamman problems
and points ot view.
Regular
weekly
)neetings
of small
groups,
representing
the _wo dis-
wheHaerthe
kn0w:4forit of
no|
and tbat il thei'apist
would mhke
better
i.herapy for l_im,to know it. In. pointing_out that cure cannot be divorced .
from value choices• Ginsberg _'_states:
"Every choice • th6 patient-ratlines
has
values'involved
in it. andmudh'oJ
the
work of thetherapist
will reflect in his
insight trite these values ....
Th.c an- alyst,, too, has values and must face
ciplines should be fruitful -iti shm'ing
knowledge
and" considering
areas' of
co-operat on The'third
areff is that
"
.
ef cross referral
of.patient
and parjsh 6nor
between
psychfatrist
and
ininister,
This activity " in. itself is
evidence
of mutual trust and a com_
mon-_loal.
" " " - "
them."
Bnrgunl,
17 also
writ:fig
on
values ..and
psychotherapy;
•states.
_'Tbe - trend
m psychotherapy
is increasingly,toward
tbe recognition
of
value systems."
The Group for the
Adyancdment-of
Psydfiatry_
:in a publication
on. family behavior
stated.
."There
"was no-escal_ing
.from the
When • the minister
rofei'.q his paubic_ui{ous and penetrating
effect.of
r[shioner
to .the .psychiatrist
be is
cultural
value orientations
on every
usually
interested
.in the system
of" aspget-of human behavior.
V¢e have
" '
"
no choice, but to add this area to our
,vialuds to whmh-the
psychiatrist
as.
tribes,
Some psyclfiatrists
hhve apStock ofiuformation
and'to familiar.. ,patently
caused
concern
a m o n g .ize-ourselves with the c0nceptdal tools
ministers in this respect because they
necessary to an understanding
of this
feel this is unimportant,
in the therefield so far from'home
base in psychipentic rqlatitmshi p. Since this may be
atty."..
a confrovet:siifl
point•it deserves "dis.
[
cuss:on as we_ consider how we may
co-operate.
"
"
-
"
""
operative efforts we must keep n mind "
that the best teacher ofpsycl_61dg_ for
the minister is afell6w . • minister
with
.
a'psyehological
orientation,
v;_hile tlie
psychiatrist-with
a.religious
orienta.
ties is more effective iri teai:bitig the
psycl]iatrist.
" As we develop
better
•
communication,
between the two dis-
are attempt"
Oklah0md
.co-oper_itively,
The first is in the
gradhhte
schools of medicine an d re-
• " Evdry person .has a "set of values.
Which reflects his" inner self.and
Systerd of choices as he lives in the world
"
.,s_
_v.Gimber,.I
'Waives
a
,,athe
_sycll_at,lst.
'/ "An,erican Jot_rnM'0rdl01]syOliatry,
° 20:45b-47E[,
lt/50
,.,so_w. z_,,o_,g_,__, t..,_,._, "_,,,_ a.o _¢lr
CpPelriantes."
" , e _e"Wa_lnI
-•
n
o rWOer.ke_OgeethernCO....
"
"We shall consider" " three areas• in
Witb' other, the
people.,
in the .therapeutic
situation,
g0al toward
i_vhieh the
tberapist.
and the.patient
work'w ll re-
,_fferatirmshi',,,lbidJourtml
e,ychia:'va_.,,.,_,_So,._,r_:,,,_,.
rlc.PHn¢ipltT;546:S73,,andlq53Practlce,,
thK, eri,_ul,d_..ps_cb0ther;lpy,"t°
s,r_,.
p,o_,,,,_
_n P_'/chotherapy, '_ "American
dolwnal
_[ Or_h_syt:hia[ry,'
_:J_._.
_o,i,,._ST.'-
which
fleet
_,_t,"_'°"°"_"_s_.
a_,_,,_,,t o_ P,_,_,
the
two dtsctphnes
may
work
The Pro_cher's Maqatlno.
"s
°
to some
February, 1959
extef_t
the
theral5) st's
. .
"
.
•
'
.
'
r._o_t ,0, _.
"" . "(61113
[
Values
]i
out' bfisic
attitudes
ward life anti are the printSplbs
.,
'
are
_
:It-
._
""
._
-i
to-
we use
in striving for goals.. They reflect how
we see ourselve._ in the world and in
our relationslllp
to .our.' felll)w nhan.
This. clalnol be exclud(;d
in psychotherap3L
As the ,:ninister refers his
parish(truer IO |he psycllia(ris/
he
nlay
approp 'l (e y ask. whut-is
the lasy_
-ch'atr'stssystemofwdues.
As we havee(msidertrd
how th[_ mit_-.aster az'ld tile psychiat!'ist-mav
work
' together we have seem Imw'ehch looks,
at tim wholeness of man. Thereligion
S
(st considers tlle"wh01emall"
in tdrtns
df wholenes._',in b_Jdy; mind.,_md spiril,
Since many, in'cludiog tile aldhorof
this paper in psychologidal
medicine.
also inclade the spql:it as Well os the
mind and Aledy iu the wholbness
of
mar,. furtl_eJ; consideration
6f lhe rnlcs
Of the minister and.the psy.i:h at'(st is
•necessary ....
:: . . .
.
'Once
again it is emphasized
lhat
each must ltecp "his identity. "•The
clergyman
has as his aim" the saving
of the soul. While.'the
related effects
healthy
psyche., .they
g,)tliel;wtiile
kebping
,can
,their
work
to-
1
resl_ective
"-
roles. The.individual
looks to the rainPreaching
Scriptural Holiness.
is(or fez" direction ju receiving
salva. .
t!oa and to the physician for assistance.
"
. "
:
•
• .
" . •
in gaiifing health for "tile sick spirit.
" " '
'
"
lie does not'tttrnh)tthe
mi_lister for
theral)y;
oeitheJ"
does he expect:the
....
lasychihirist
to,i_ssanue
the religious
"
"
"
role of the'nfiuister/
Aslhe
psych(a. •
"
•
131 O. Shelby
Corlelt*
"
"
fris! and
the clergyznar_
work" to-"
.
. . "•
•
.
: "
.
.
. "
'
ge_ther thci'r respective
roles will 5c
.
" ....
• '
.
deli_,rmincd" by. the.competence
each
. . ".IN eI1EAClIINt; the message of hohness
exercises
of deyo_imn, pta._t_r, B_ble
p_ssesscs.
They Will realize
when ..
' _ nmch emphasis should be given to
reading, mcditatmn, faahfulne.ss, m atcross r[_f.biq'al is indicated
and what r
tile life of a 'Cht:istian
affer he .has
tendance upon the l'aeans of grade, and
treatment
Will best
help meet
tile
eutered tile experience
of entiresanto
the"like."which
are so essential
to
ne_,tls of the one wl:m stfinds in need.
.tificati0n. Teclinically
a distinction
to ,_piritualdevelnpJpent.
Timy also inThe qualified
clct:gyn_an, as wen as
": keepin
mind isthat entire sane(trice-,
elude the temperate.use'of
tile legit(the /It(el(fled psych'(artist
':viii i'ealize
tion is an e_cpcfience of divine grace in
mate powers of the piwsieal body, as
his partich, hu" competence
and re.',
-t, which the Christian
is cleansed from
St. Paul said. he dic!. b_' keel)trig.his
spansihiliti¢ in helping the" trolly(dual
"
all sin and filled with the Holy Spirit;
body undei" ( I Corinthiami"9:2"_);
receive proper care: •
" " ' ....
and holiness designates
the. coati(lion
themastery
inf 9tlr re(rids, as St. Paul
,_,
of state of :life in .which the entirely " exhorted,
in bringing
e_,,ery' thonght
" ....
. _ _, " . ....
sanctified personlives.
In other words•
into subjection
CoChrist..and
lhir_ki "
. ....
enti_'e sanctification
is the experience..ing
on those t tings wh)tcb, are lovely,
WaL/_ TaLL
_. .
...
which'brings
one into the life of.holtete, .(Ii Col'inthifius 1(1:5: Philippians
"
":floss.
4:8); and tile conqubst'0f
our inoods,
,V, "RiChin Good Workst'.
of thi's salvation
ninke for a bet(or
state" of mental health,
the ministerdoes n6t consider this.aslhe
primary
aim..As, he bee)rues )nero psychmlm....
Walletall..RegtivdtessoI
your he ght--"
w,lktall!
B_ rcachinglor
that cztra'iueh or two,
Yea. n nlal[
iaht "'j_ist lilt your eyesabove
Ore
In this "lifoof
holiness the Christian is ire be "rich in good works"
(I- Timot iy 6 18) ,Dr d. ,Aga!" Beet
said that holiness .nnphes the lnost in-
tally
sophisticated'
file m i n i.i_ t e 7
fealizes :the inq)_)rtance
(ff adeqfia|e.
preparation,
for tile practice
of PSS:ehol'ogical medicine,
fie does nol aspire to become
_ therapist
at the
expense
of losing his identity
a._ a
elergytflan.
But as he prepares
himself adequately
he comes into an understanding
of
menial "illness
"and
lVhici_ seems io b_qk morrow
Irma
_/o r wcm.
"
'
Thii_lc tall. Try st,'dtching
ou, your
tho_ghlsa
bit "
'. You Walk with freer _t :(de. Q tc soon
you'll find
:
" "
Yosr shoulders sqttared unconsciously
to.fla,
tense mental
and bodily activity
of
which \re ai'e capable.
For atis the
employment
of all our powei's and opper(unities
td Woa_k"Ol_t _God's putposes;•-aud this implies the use'of our
intelligence
to learn liow •'best to do
.His ffork, andthe
bodily eft'art _hieh
l-Its kvot'K requires."_ This -life of set:',
vice or of good ;.vorks is inspi_'ed'by"
personality
"function
and uses. th'is
'knowledge
as he cleals .with hi's.pa-'
rishioner.
While
it is true th_'tt 'healing of tbe psyche, the aim of the psyehiatrist,
and s,'ilvatien
of the soul
cannot always-be
_sharply sppat'ated,
the physician's
goal is healing.
Astile
minister
helps the .p_'rson
"receive'salvation
.of his soul az_d. the
psychiatrist
helps
t4 (62)
-
"-
him. attain
a "more
Th,t
large_, sni_ you've" tailored tar
your'mind.
:
: '
.
F,'el tall. Thiizk tall. Walk tall--as soldiets do. "
"
You'll bc i_mazcd. It really.mal_es.yo'u
taller
"
"
.I_isleie and out. You'll'l)c a bigger yon.
And anyhow,
it cannot make you
smaller.
:
--Dos
" :
' _
.
..
a consistent
prlactice
"P/,saaena.
Calaorn*a.
_ot,[er_
The Pr_ochor't_,
,
Moqollno
.
. February; 1959
"
tile Psalmist when he ':
soul. which was cast
,12: 5).
.
the obedience
tn the "
H(_ly Spirit in His persbnal
dealings
with us..in His checks upon'cur hearts
His leaclership in our lives, tile avoid-"
ing of the appeara ace of evil. the endoavbr'to
keep the unity.of the. Spirit
in'the
bond 6f peace. and any effort
required to keep our hearfs and lives
in th_ state of on.tire devotement
to
God.
"
" -
love for- Christ. of •which St. Paul is '.
This rich life is one of devotement
t|m example: "The love of Christ conto God" inwhich
" " there is a constant de. straineth
us" (II Corinthi_ins 5:14).
"' perid/anceupan
God for life arid holt" : It is a rich-life because" it is a disness, and a monteht-by-naoment
trust
ciplined life. 'An undisciplined
life is
in Him.for
,'01 things, necessary
for
ineffective,
and spiritually
impoverour life, victory,
a_ld sez'vice_ There
ish_d. The disciplines of Sueh'a
life
can be no holiness-iri hmnan lives exinclude
BLANDINGill Scieacd o_ .Mind
as suggested by
questioned,
hi_
down (Psalms
There" is also
.
to_
of flmse
eept by"a constaut
depentfimce.upon
" fine holy God to hnpart
His fioliness
'p,eacl_er's
r_a_,, tO US. 'This Hependence
was indicated
""
.
[63) 15
.
ii
i
:
.
"
" ii
"
" "
A,
A call to holy living.- There
are
D.
It is a life consistent
with" our
n
of holiness.
Jesus. our
"Patter
I }_ , life
by St.
Paullivewhen
s_id:I live ..by the
the
,1}
I now
i(the heflesh
in
pre._sing
prize
of the
"t i
_
Christ Jesus
giving" himself
faith of theSon
2"20_
•
ofGod"
"
(Galatians
"
high'
{:ailing of
God
i_?'
(Philippians
3i14)..; o{
to those practices and.
not
two Hho
kinds, has
of called
holiness:us; One
fb_"God,
un-
• .I
[
J
.
B:
ethel: for us. _.vho.are hailed.
God is the Source. "the Giver
• LOrd.
of
. . -'
Tim Ethics
. "
of lfoliness
t
.[
given
ministries
which ofmake
the - .,'|-',1
holiness,
no holiness
!I_, _I .,: The
," hie
.,. 0l,¢aevotement
..
..-.-.- lS an , active
,.
the.iaking,
advaniag_'
thoseforG0dapart fromThere
God. is His
is ahsoUsuallySt'Paulinhisdiscussi°n°f
,! '
participation
in'anti tne enjoyment
el
edifie_{ti0n of'thebodydf'Christ,
tillwe
. "[
- -.
" "
ethical
living:
Epbcsmns
4:24 is a
' ! . th_s_ activities
which nUt:tare
and.
all come in the nnity 6f the faith, mad i. 1 .
lutewitli.our
life:°Urs
sphereof
is relative
consistent
holirres,'_,follows with exhortations
on
good example.
I'Iere he uses the term ."
" i
deepen'the
life of holiness "No better
_f'_),,, l_,niol ,I,,,, rib,, _
,,t _od
l i
t
, ,
example
of tlus.relahonshlp
can he , unto a perfect man, uatu the measure
,
III. Tile paiU3ra ,o_ holiness--"As
h e "true holiness/'
then he proceeds with
•
"
'
"
which
hath
called
yt_u
is
_mly.
so
bc
ethical
iexhoctations
colisistent,
_.,,;ith
found th'an that of the relahon, of _ of tbe stature of the fulnbssof
Chrmt
devoted "married cbuple (0 .each other,
(Ephesiafis
4: 12-13).
ye l¢_ly" (I Pbter 1: 15),
.
this true holiness. These extend on-to
Their: tiear_s are open,and
responsive'.
to tmch.0ther'izi
a deep.ufld inc!'easing
few.examples
fro' preaching'ah!ng
'
A, man
Our life,is
kno,:vledge
of Jesus
God Cbrist,,
in hucbapter
5:17.
.
- 'A
.......
."
found in
A summm:y
of St. Paul',s teachings
i
devotion.
The only 1 re" s.w acre loye
these lines are given.
.
the incarnated
God. He becomes
on ethics may roilow flats'pattern.
and full confidence
pr,qwOl and legalour PaiJ, ern of'holiness,
in hu-'
"
ism is forgotten.,,a
life where" indeed
TlleWay.of
I[olin'ess
man.life.
So as Jesus is Italy, . I. In ,O e liJ'e-:-Ephesians
5:22-23:
love is .found to be ,th'e fulfilling of
Colossians 3:18-22
the law; whena
Christian truly loves
TKXT: 2/) d.aa }_gl way shall "be fl_ere,
wearc. , to he holy,
."
emde, way, e_d it shall be called • '
B, Holiness in Jesus was a life lived
-:A:. Husbands.
love your w.ives.
God, with" all of bis heart, soul, mind.Thenccz}/o_ he[ _ess- (Isamh 35 Ba),
among.reel3 of all, mortal classes.
"B. Wix}es, respect your hus;_antts.
..
and strength..
" " _
i. He' did' not "x_,ithdrfiv) himIt is a rich life because "there is" a Tms_yavo_m_n_ss'm:
.
self from any mo_:al situaC, Parent-child
.relations--Ephegenaine
desire to.manifest
the high _ I..A
Way: of devotement
to God-" " " " lion; He associated with and
sians. 6:1-4; Colossians. .18:21"
est ethical standards,
in life and to :
God is the center and all of life. " ,-helped sinners of all classes,
II Eiizplolme-emplo_/er
relations/tip-adorn the doctrine
of God. our Saw
II. A .way of sacrificial
service
illYet He himself"was
"h0];¢,.,
EI{hesihns 6i5-9; Colossians
3:22mar in all things .(Titus 2'. 10).. Every
" spii'ed by perfect love:
harmless: Undefiled',.separate
4: 1. " ,While ' these words
arc od" truly saaetifii_d pei'sor} seeks to 'live a
"
"
h'0m _innei's"',(Hehi:ews
7:
drossed to slaves and masters, they
life and to inaintain relatioriships
\vith
III. A way of joyous obetlibnce and of.
other pei'sons which willenable
hitD to
quenchless
eethusiasm:
"
. . .
26)..
apply to the el3_ployee-cmployer
reglorify God in all that he daes. Asthe
vich)ry
qrnd blessed.
2, Ittemptatior_,
was a'life.consistont
lationship_s
They alsostress
"IV. A wayof
•
for
He wi!h,
was
the kind of today.
_qor!:mansh!p
requited
te _aple of the. Holy Sprit, he will seek" - "hess.
. : .
to glorify Ga_i i_ his body. and'spirit,
"
tempted
all points
we
.
are, yet inwithout
sin as(HeIII:to please
Widd)v God.
the ehure)l.
.' .which
are "God's
(! Cp rinthians
6:
The.Life
of.I-lolincss
"
. brews 4:15)
'20). The holy person-seeks
to in_
"
.....
. A: It is a fellowship, all members
"
cret sehis knowleclge, and to impcove
TExt': I Peter
1:13-11_. INote that in
C, It was an active, ber_evald'nt life
his life in.his manner of living, his at_
the King James. Vbrsio)l thLff.eom_
": -_-He "weht about doing good."
ofthee_Chbody0therof
Christ°r'°f
one(EpliesiansbOdy-tittldes toward
others,
his spirit, or.
prises one' seate)_ce.)
D. It Was a life.in which a love of
4:4).
d 'sposition so that:ih all tbat he does
I.! The inspiratim_
]'or hol!_ livb_f/7-"' "
righteousness
p_'edol'ninated_He
B, Each is :tO endeavor" "{o keep
he may b!'ingthe
greatest
.possible i"
'HOPe to the end for floe grace thai
"loved righteousness,-and
hated
•
the unity of the Spirit in" the
glory
to Christ
and "credit .to his .
is to be bl:ough.t toyou
at the reviniquity"
(.Hebrews 1:9)._
,
ho/xffofpeace"
(Ephestans4(3).
church, This provides a.large field for
elation of Jesus Christ!'
(I Peter
IV. It" is a .life "o} holiness--"in:
all
"
_,hought
and .devclo_pment,
in the
1:13)..
"
" "
""
{.
mahner
Of conversation"
or "in
IV, Toward'societyr--allnren.
'
preaching of the.nies_age of holiness.
A. We gather mspwat on for holy
evenly department
of, your lives'.'
A. Tb_' Chu_'ch it/a holy-i_-eqlqWEh
" : "
•_ " '"
..
" ".
To he rich in the life of holiness
li_.,ing, not .from our cireuu)means the devefopment
or progress in
staaaees, not from other people,
all phases of 'that life., The sanctifi/zd
even good mad holy people,
Christian seeks fo{' maturity;
hieis:vi,
B. But'from
looking unto Christ,
_ally concerned about going on to'per: " II. The call to a life o_ !_oliaess--_'"But
feetion or maturity
(Hebrqws
6: 1) ;
as he which hath caffed you is hell},'
of following
the example
of St: P,aul'
so he ye holy" (I Peter 1:15).
(Phillips).
"
A• ,Not'after
their
living (v,. 13).
•
•
:
"
-
.
way
of
unholy society.--or as'Jesus said.
"salt" and "light."
"
. "
B. Christians
must
love
all--do
good to all (Galatlans
8:10).
B. It is a life of devotion tc God.
C: ItGod,isa .'l_fe
..... of .dependence. _upun: : . C.
"
,
16:64)
former
Feb_ai_'.
19S9'
With.ChristianSgood
must(RomansOVercome12
21) :evil
I_).l_
..
The Pzoochor'_,Maga_ine-
ill
i i
--
ill
I I
I
•
I
The Arminian
View of-Inspiration
....
•"
The
-
_
t *-
"
I_y Rglph
ii
I'I
:
' '
!J
¢i
I:i;
"!i
, _
_
.
, ,!_'._
, _
i
"..
!] i "
i_ _
_' _.
?, _
i' "
i_ ]_
- " .
. .-..
zrI'1 aECAnt_ to
Church,
"W _ Pope makes tile
thi.'iEarly
general
ob,servation:
"
. Tim Patristic age fm'nisims no defini..
tion o_ inspil.aiion,
li "
l.t _
•
-.
but;a
:very high
"
spira.on.
He says
that the then
writers
of
1
the Scriptures
presented
sel V es
pure to the energy of the Divine Spirit..
.
"
i
!_!
•. _'
•,,':_
Early •Church
"
In his Hortat6rg
Address
to the
Greeks. Justin describes what he conceives.to hh've'been the manne,r of in-
:E,a'de*
" in
order thht
self. descending
.
"7 "
:
.
fers lo the"theNewsacred
writings"
and
quotes
Testi"_ment
as "scriplores. '';L....
" "
.
This usage becomes common "in'the
.
writings
-
of the latterpart
of the sec-
ing righteous
men as an instrument
lik¢'a barpor,lyre,
might revca j to us
the knowledge
of things, divine and "
heb.venly.""
One of the most definite staten(eiats
on
tolical ticFathers(
uote the....The
Old Testa
"on._" co
• ltu'_r
.":uy. _ota
_ ann" _"t'_ew
. .testa-_
doct"
x_,.s m intained.
Apes_, .t, -,-,_q_m
• - " .'
....
_
" " meres
are
,amy
_criptures
(hal :
nent. exactly*as-t e Apost es do" with
, '
•
,
,
•
"
tile •stone
Idve
e v"
s"
-_i , SO" W ,,tl] • a¢ffpa f/re _tt_ ) •or 'sacred'
writings
''•
'
'
"
t't'l
"t
If
•
,'
.
.
the .4ame fi'eedoha _
(hzera grammata),
Sanday,
m. lns
• •
Bampton
Lectures
for .1893 on inI.
This'is clearly seen
tie of Clement to .the
A'.D, 95), the earliest
writing outside
tbe
in the First Episs_pirafion: says_
Corinth(ires.
Cea ,
extant Christian
That which gives tq the Scriptures
New Testament
this authm'itativi_ andsacred character
is more particularly the'_aet that they
and perhaps
the only such document
" .are
" insp red by.'the-Holy. Spirit. This
from the. first century.,
This letter .is.
too we find declared ifi set terms and
Testament.
filled with Frequently-one
quotations
fron findsthese
1to Old
q aerations
introduced
by such e:_-.
• Professor.
Theological of. _hrisltan
Seminary. TheoI0gy""
_W•
B. Pope, _a_at_ne
'_A Campen_ium
ed.: _ew York: lahilli0_ & Hunt+ l_0t),
I, 178
:"The E_ sue of fi. ClemenL to the Cnrlnthlan_."
P'The'Aoosto
1B (6G)
Ic Fat]_ers"
ed, d. B. kiflhtloot,
' (2nd
"
"
Chapter 45
n. 321.
",
"El_istle
{o
the
Phltiooian,
_W. Sanday,
'+Inspiration"
Green & _a:. Ifiqbl_
_. 31
_Jll_[ _• "Dialogue
ira
_d 3
"
cha0.
12
London_
"
The
LXV
(ANF,
•
.-
_oGcho_'_
(i_e6or,'uptersoftimlruth.
ing by anticipation against andguard.
theh', decelt. says by Maitta0v_. "Bat tile hirth
of
Christ
was on this
wlsc." aod that
He
is Emmanuel,
mightcolisider
Ilimlestas lwrehance
a mere.man.we
and (flit we slot < mt in K le
utatJesus
was" one, fred, Ol,rist nn~
- other,
but shoult] koew Ihefi/ to he
end century is that by Theophilus
of
one and the same.'
Antioch, a contemporary
of Irenaeu_"
In anbther'plaee
Iren,'reus declares
"
"
Eusebius
says that he was the sixth ' "tlmt "the Se'riptures
m'e indeed per-"
' bishop of Antioch
in suqcession
froin
feet. since they "werespokpn
by" the
the ap0stles, r In his defense addressed
Word of G0d:and His Spirit. TM
.
:'a h'eathefi
af least in relation to some .passages,
He h61d that the Holy Spirit guided
Matthew in selecting exactly the right
(ibld.,
M¢2_¢2z|n_
-
it" s lot h benoted,
in passing, .that
"Word of God" here does not refei' to
tile S6ripture_.
but" to Christ as the
eternal
Loges" of" God. That which
made the Shriptut;es the Word of God
was that lhey
were
God-breathed
(theopnet!_tdsl:
This Word; which" is
used of- the'Old Testament
wi'itings in
the Writers of scripture"
_;p0ke, "ins_iered books are noi_ i.he compositions
spired by one Spirit of" God. ''_' Tberd: _of men. but.tbat
(heywere
composed
is no questioning
his belief in plenary"
by inspir,qtiofl (qpipnoifts)
of t0o Holy
inspiration•
. Spirit, agreehbly, to the will of the FaIrenaeu_
(L'a. A.D. 1"80) gi'ces evithei" of all.. things
througl/.
Jesus
dence of a belief in Verbhl inspiration.
Christ_"_t_
" : ' "
"
""
I:on_rnarls ,
L 23oi.
Mattl;cw
certainly
haveon.said.
"Now the Gizl,t
birth of
des,s w,as
this
_vise_" but the Holy _3host, fm:eseeiog
.ward. tfiat'they
shotild heeon_e inII Timothy 3:16, is first appliedto
the
S].l'uments.of'God.
and hofit_iin the
New Tes,tament'by
Clement of:Alex,
wisdom _hat Is from Him. 'through
andria,
wlJb.speaks
of "the ins[_ired"
which wisdom they uttered both What" se_'iptures."J_
It is.'also'used by el'idea,
'regarded the ct:epti0nof the woO daed
who" refers to ".the divine inspiration
" all other tl_iings:_
of the h01y Scriptures. ''_ 'In'another
. " Theophil(as also says"that.tlmthings
connecti0n'he
affirms that "tile divinspoken
by the prophbts
are "divine
ity of 'Scripture
....
extends
to.the
" "
things."" And he further deelm_es that" Whole of it. ''_:' He also sh_,s that "the
I.
°
witl_ Trypho,"
to cofne out of thesee-
.
.
"
Theophil/as"
" "
"
But men of God carrying tn them a
'holy spirit[or,
being filled with tile
Holy Spirit] and becoming propliets,
being inspired and made "_ise by God,
heel(he God-taught_
find holy and
rigl_teou_.
Whm'efm'e
th_'y
deemed worthy of ree_-ivlngWere
tfiis also
re-
persuade those who imagine that the
" Scriptures
are contradictory,, to be
rather of the same b/Sin(on hs myself.:'
_. _l_fiaro,
. .
inspiration
to Antolycus,
writes:
CJwistian
from"through
the begin-_
evidently literature
implied all
the
ning of.the last q_arter of the second"
- ,,
.
as "the Holy'Ghost
sa'tb 'century Onwards:_
13),'or
G d s'aid" (chapter
Acthally._ one can find this a little
typical Nc°v Tbdtamenlt "ex- . earlier. ';In his "Dialqg_e with:Trypho,
'It.is wit(ten."
is also to'be
Justin Martyr (a.a. 150) dealswith
the
.
problem bf passages in the Bible that
the most definite statement
seem .to contradict
each other.
He
of Rome on Ibis'subject
is gives this sane advice:
"
"
as follows:
If a Scriptu_'e '._hich appears _to be:of
Ye have searched, the scriptures,
_4uch a kind be brought forward, and
which are tree. which, were given
"then if there be a pretext [fat' saying]
through tim Holy Ghost;'and ye kfiow
"'that it is contrary [to some other],,
teat'nothing
unrighteous or co(intersince I am'entirely: convinced that no
felt is written in them.'-'
" Scripture contradicts _nother. I" shall
" Polycarp.
adrrfit
thatI andS'shall
do notunderstand
Ignatius
and
both quote
what isratbm"
recorded,
strive to
frequen{ly
h'om' the Script u_:es, espoe(all3, the New Testament.
In his
letter.to the Ph'ilippians.the
latfer re-
"
l•
pressions
(chapter
" i8)'.. The
press(on.
found..
Perhaps
er Clement
timfronl
:divjne
plectrum
it]leaveu.
zmd" us-
word to confute a heresy that rose Jn
the second centm'y. The pertinent pas. sage reads as.follows:
""
"
'
"Just % "Addre_
to(he
Gree_s• ° V[a " {ANF, ' I_ 27b),
•"
;"Ecele_a}lical
tt}_ory,"
IV.
20 [Grand
Raoid_.: Baker
"
Book Hou',e lq55),
p.. 156.
_TD
A_I01YCtI$, '_ 9 .(ANF, I[_ qT)."
Ulbid.• ,a 3_ (ANF. tl, 1OGL
_]bid.,
IlL
12
(ANF_
February,1959
II,
13.41
Tertullian
(ca, n._: 195). expresses a
h gh view of inspiration.
In bis:Apof
ogy he says: "That we might attain an"
"
"
_qrenaehs,•
_'A_ainst
Hercsie_
_! lEl: ""tl_2 IAt_F
I'_lt/i_l._ II. _8,2 (ANF_
,' 399.
•
"_'_5teol_i,tl,1, + VJ/. t6 lab _.. 11. 553
H"De
Prlncloi S." IV. "1.8
rANt.
355 I ):
_JbJL_•. IV. 1-7 (A_IF_ IV_ ]_4)
_+qbid,, "Iv.
1.9
..
(ANF,
I_ "441)
IV_ 357)
.
. .
(671lfl
!
{
t'I
.
* "
if"
.
! I
f!l
;
-
,
..
A contemporary
Of Origen was'Hippol.gtus, who wrote early in the third
century.
He is.said'to'
have been a
disciple of h'enaeus.
He appears
.to
have formed 'something_ of a link he-'
'"fl o"ode d".
:Alexandria.
.
Westcott
translates
it"filled
: _i
_l
- of
the,inspiration
experienced
writers
of the sacretl
Scriptures. by tile
Eusebii_s
(ca: A.a. 326)
quotes
Clement of Alexandria
as saying that;
in the .cmnposing of his Gospel, "John "
t
,_ _-
was "divinely
"ii_
The
Greek, here
is plleumati
t_horethen}a;,
litdrhllv._
"t av n ,_otheeb-en_
God-borne
in spirit (by the Spirit)_"
The ianguage here ,is reminiscent
of
_[
,.
k t
_
} "
'-i
t!'
!'i
_
i..
_,
t' I
nmved
by the
" "Spi'it
.the
Early
_.
"
lhe
I_
atim.s
cmmsel
'
Here is what
that subje¢ u
I-Iippoly_tus
.
20 i68]
"*
to all the Scriptures.
However. some
.of these writersdc
assert that the incertain
passages'but'n°tnecessarily
spired authors
wrote without error.
We
feel
',_e: can
in the Epxly
Cbui'eh
do
no .better
than
to quote
with to which
lyre,
hi'ing
one
forth
a
part of the
Bishop
Westclosing
this conelusidh
discussion of of
inspiration
co_t's excellent
surveY, of tbis period
would
music,
throaph
accordingto
of their men.
constitution,
which tileis laws
eel
"attention,
fact that
might: .he
neutralized
His for
influence,
but
adopted _s a by
vehicle:
the full expression of tile divine MesSage[ ,...
. They teach us that'Clu, ist--:the:Word
used to stri_e_everal
l_res the i'esult" - of God--speaks
h.om first to hist.'-'_
ing Sounds would reflec't the individuHe-(hen iprodeeds to make his perality of the instruments.
However, the
sonal appraisal a_ollows:
"
figure used here is at best'very
inadeIt is possible that' objections . ;;.. may
quat_--if
not act:ually Jh]sleading--behe urged against-vhi.ious paris of-thel
. cause intelligent human beings, as the
doch'ifie,, but it cannot. I ,think, be
writers
were, are more than passive
denied that tis a.whale it,lays open a
instruments..",_ome
place must'be givview of:tim Bible ,which vindicates
. en.to the,factor
of human freedom .of
witi{ the greatest clbarncss- and con-
.says .qn
.
will.
Sandaysummarizes'this
early _eri0doftheChu/'chb_saying:
Testimonies t6 the general doctrine of
sistency
tile .claims whicli
it makes
to
he conside_:edas
bee harmomous
, of God .r],
. .
message
hl general if may l_esaid..t_aen, that
the Ea_'l_,' Church
f{tthors displayed
-- most
inupiraiion
may. any extent;
'
behut"m'ultiplied
elthere are tosome
toward" the scriptures
-
"
r
_
l
which go further and,point, to an in- _ attitude
and New asTestaments
much the
same
the writersof
theNew
sp_ration which .mighl.be .desdribed
Testament
took toward the Old: That
" as. "verbal.'.'. Nolo does :this: come in
tentatively, and by degrees: but elattitude is one of reverent:faith-in
the
most fi'om'the very first. Boti_ h;enaedivine'inspiration
and authority
.of
us and T,_rtulli,_m"regard Inspiration
these
writlngs..
•While no specific
as determining
the choice of par-', theory of inspixation is enunciated,
the
tidular words and phrases.'-'_..
Scriptures
are quoted as _words ut-:
My own mefige._:study of this subject
tered by God or. by the Holy Spirit.
m the patristic
writings
leaves me
Whether
or .not.this
involved
a be:
with the impression
that; the }'atliers
lief in what is now called "verbal ,inmentioned
would apply the idea of
spiration' i_ a matter of dispute.
The
" "
.
"
•
"
of both the Old
:
--
.
.
-
-
,
-
.
"
"'"Ag_
"_lbld,
_
]2
"
' Noe tl ," II
ANF
fAHF.
V* 227 L):
I
J_
in
ehui'eh fathers:
They teacil us. that Inspiration is an
operatlon,.ol" tl)e Holy .Spirit.acting
thenifestedatant°ngthe
testimonymen".
"ofLetserlptm:eus
look
_
:1
says.that
they:.wrote
_is the Diviho
Plectrum--who
was the eternal Loges
--Struckthem
.The p!eelrum
was ati
:
•
Church cammt be quesfidn_d.
West" "' wiili J'?spcct to the annmmcement
of
cot/ says that "Ot:igen represents, the
the future
manifestation
of tim..
doctz'ine of the Inspiration
of tJ_e Bible
Word.U:'
as taught by the universal
Church. ''z_
In his treatise
on Christ
and th'e
The principal
faults of .Origen lay
Antichrist,
H ppolytus
states
more
in the field of Biblical interprets}ions,
"specificaliy
'his "view of inspiration:.,
"wl_ere he used too'freely
the allegoriAgain lye not'e His emptiasis on the liv-:
.eel i'fiethod. Bht in hts views of ]n_. ing. Wo_:d -"as expressing
hiihself
througn tile written Word,of
the Old
spiration
he.'was at. one with'his
conTestainent:
This
Loges theory bulks
large in the :early fathers.
Here is
...._,0_,', _a i^_ • t _,
"
what Hipp0/ytus
writes:
'_fl. F, We_l_ott t _An Intr_ductlon
to" the Study o • he
Go,peW' {7th ca.; L_ndon: I_acmt/tarl aud Co. 1888_, F" ;_33
U'Eusebius,
_£c_tesia_tical
tatory,"
VI.
14_7
(_ Loeb
lsi gmdance
words--to
in his Introduction
Gospels,
AppendixiB. to tlle
He Study
says nf
oJ the
tile
It may noi be amiss, to call.
in this eommctioa,
to the
though "tile, _ame .plectruin
Acting thdn in tllese [p.ophbts], .... the
.
Word spoke of ttimsblf. Ear al "ca ty
He became His own herald, and
showed that the Wordwould he Inan- :'r "
thatment'it
ThiSwas
iSwide!_.'a
majesticheld
ir:.C°ncept"the
.EarlyBUt:
inspiratlon--_-that
ehoieeof
theexact
.
'these,scriptures
v)ere-il{tended to man- .
.,.ifest
Chi'ist..This.:'eJnphasis:was"
echoed
by Luther
. and .has .been •
.
ortbotlox
School.
Christ
is
the
.stressed:in
our day by-lhe central
neo-message'of':t
le Old Testament,
as Well
as the New:
":
.ets ....
Vcho.spake and perl'ormed all:
they did thro:ugh being filled with'ttie
what pleased
verbal
inthe,
the Writers Of of
used[that
musical
script_are
instruments,
He
-that Justin
inslrument
strike
the
•
Hipl_olytus.
"emphasizes.
the " fact
that. it was the eternal Loges
who
spoke in the Old Testament
and that
21--"Bur"men
spoke
"
"
froul God, being borne along by the
phero,henoi).
.
.Origen
says
l
..
, .hagmn
-.
Holy Spirit" (hupop_mumatos
t )at Christ,, the Word
.of God, was in Moses and. the Proph-
declare
ther°selves'"_
spake,npt
of their own power. . ....
.Hippolytus.uses
the same'figure
for
And
tie'gave
the law the,,,.
and the
cts: and
in giving
He proph=
made" •
01em speak b3/'tim.Ho|y Ghost. in of
der t 1 .. being gifted with the insl_ir_tio _ of Hie FatherLq power, timy"
'"_ " " ,end.
mightWill.'-':
dochu'e
that in IIPeterl
239).
.witl_ instruments
of music, .so hadthe y.t m Word ahvays, liketile plecbytheWordHimself;andiustasiti_'
trum,
in_union with thegn, and when
.moved .by Him the prophets'announced wh:lt God willed. For they
neither did.tliey
.
IV.
-
I
For these Fatb_el.s were "_furnished
withtheSpirit,
andlal:gelyhonourcd
and Rome.
.
Cfais]_al Library,"
'_EusCbhl'_,¢_ fl
441.
_n_0¢ PrltlCi_ll_."
_Pcetace"
l {ANF,
"_10¢], tit
p, 446.
,
.
.In his thetreatise,
Hiptween
chore against
ies of Noetus.
Asia Minor.
polytus.writes
as follows:
Spirit of Chr st. ''_' He t_ms fisserts, as
did Irenaeus
that, Ciu:ist, the eternal
_..LogosofGod
spoke by the,Holy Spirit
through the Writers of the Old Testa'
i .
counsels 'affd will, God lias added a
Written revelation."
He then saysthat
the .¢erilers of scripture " were "men
abundantly
endowed
with the Holy
Spirit?W< Tile word here translated
them.
to overfldwing. ''t_ is That
is the
"abundantly-endowed"
inu_datos.way Tertulliafi
describes the.measure
ii' _ .
:
temporaries
and
with
Churchfathersingeneral.
" ( _]
i i
_r :
.
ampler arid more authoritative
knowledge at once of.Himself
and of His
V* 227),
ThoPreacher'nMaq(z21ne
°
"
_'_tChtItt
and the
"_S_nday_op. _IL,
Antichrist,"
P. 34.
z (ANF.
V,
204L
.
_W¢'4coti.
_p. _lt,.
o. ¢t55
_libltL,
p_. 445, 455."
February.1959
'"
--
,
,.
H
i
(69) 21
"
:_ i:
evidence
ts not.definite
enough
to pre:
'_i i
., •
elude debate:
But the general
atti.tude of the Early-Cburch--a
faith in
fully.loyal
to" the" Christ, who said'of
the Scriptures:
"These are they which
carded
church
bulletins.
those.taking
part in our
;_ _
,:' _
7 I
I' i'
.....
the Bible as the authoritative
God--cannotbequestioned.
....
.
bear
witness
A:RiV.).
program•
A-nnmber
of letters from
fellow pastors..
Hospital
adniittance
notices, circulars from magazine ptib]ishers, several erupt:c: postage stamp,
books, .a package
of-literature
from
the Council of Chui'ches,
invitations
.t0 various., civic affairs, un_mswered
Word'of
And that
is still the faith 6f _all those
of
ine"
who are
personal
(John
5:39,
. . .
.
" "
?'
"
', '
_i__
_'_":
'
,,
!-!"
_,
i."
j
A Pastor's Wastepaper
'
SaSk
et
.
"'
. .
- . By Forres|
Woodward.
"
*
. :
.
.
"
""
.
.
Irnportant
evidence' is oftbt!, found
tents had .b_en previously
noted and
m a wastepaper
basket.
Of such im-- the "suggested
-itlans'/:arefully"filed,
portance
ts this "retriever"
.that in- .Then another letter frotn the Depart-
•
.
_!_1"
;'
1
_lt
._.
_: _
_°
'_i
't _
!_
!_
:i
,_
i!
'_
campaign
urging This
expediency,
in:obtaining manager
out" quota:
letter.
substitute
.yes
for
a..
much-needed,
more
appropriate
container),
I saw disearde'd letteJ.s, advertising
statementsl
Circulars. etc. that "renewed my curlosity.
""
discarded
because
we
h_d
•school,
"Past0r,
22 170)
enrollment
month.
The " con-
Wakeeney,'Kansas.
"" "
"'"
recommendation
fr0m2the Ministerial
Alliance
to the City Cot_ncil regm'ding" the establishing
of a "youth pro-.
. .,
g_'am: A lettei" from an izx-conviet,
also on0 froth a young man recently
indarcerated-Lhoth;
having
"received'
my prayerful
advice by return mail.
Some preliminary,
penciled
sermon
outlines were found.
A .number of.
A list of
Christmas
.
to an individual's
mar-
ital difficulties:
Then a letter from a
dear pastor friend who recently
lost
his wife by su_den death. _Asmyeyes
fell on this, I was reminded
6f the
many praym's o_four, church for "his
comfort and consolat.ion.
"All the above evidence frmn the pastor'._wastepapcr
basket prove'that
his
--_
"
"
• .
.'" •
"
• "
.
•
-
" .
"
:
duties'eXceed
by far t_e preaching
of
two thirty-minute,
se/'mons a week. It
reminded me of the importance
of the
minister'scorrespondence
and his allimportant
job of public relations.
" "
.
.
""
"
.
_ ,"
"
•
'
"
. , .
'
I watch'ed a pu_py plhying awkwardly
byhimself,
'playfuly
sri;ppng at-a_ytliI ng wt:th" n reach" _',
"" suuueu-'_rio
stoppeu
.
".
.
ly wtth a yelp of amazed Dam; he had
bttten'h s own ta 1 Just an immature
pup with a lot to [earn, but'sad expertonce taught him that his tail, th0ugb_
.
"
'
"
..
-
",
.The Preacher's:l_agc_zlno
.eminds
me
[
o_
an
occ_,siona
1
local
-
-
"
"
. "
_. '
:discharge his re,_ponsibil!ty to God anti
souls'ta'ougt
tm'distrct.and
gem.a]:
sctu-s
'"•
,
_
e
•
•
"
'
. '
.
-.
,
Throe _sdhat local treasme_ who fgcls
that he" s appo'fited watchdog over the
local treasury, and snarls and snaps at.
evcryrequestforfuhdSthatdocsn'toriginate
with himself.
of court.
But too He
oftenis the
thereexception.
exists a
church that. doesn't seem to realize it _s
part of a great whole Its board looks
w th complete disinterest, upon the dis'trict find the genre'el.church,
ns thbugh
philosophy
that'only
l{_cal,n_cds
are
,n_-
portent.- Budgets (representing
lifelines
to the upkeep of district and general organizatlons) .are tolerated
f they are, ,
easily paid,.but
they're not considered
the_/ were unattached and unnecessm'y,
xvo'ihy of special of sacrificial attention.
"Theyare always advOi_at n'g something,"
Times imme" in every chm'ch ivlien
says the local grump, "and we have supervision
heybnd the local level bd2
enough.to do." He fails to see that "we"
comes an appreciated'convenience:
Nazarcnes. God has given us a great
are n part of"'they."
He thinks imma"_larely, If, he were a pup.he'd bite his
work to de. and it takes all,of us every. where.to' get t aceomp sh'cd. Strengthen
own tail.
_ :
your .local work. have revivals and w n
A pastor thioks Only in terms of his
souls, pay your hills, and k6cp a good
own. local _hureh and community.
He
name in the community. But neglect not
district __.._
program, as
," w ""
" a n d -gel'l• " almost
,,.mtetlerence
- o interprets
i, wttn
. the
, ;:.
..
,
to co- o per'ate
tt] you"t ""
OlSt"r"ICL
ms weft;
xte _ans
,
"_
'
' eral leadei'ship: invest" in "s6uls amoss
to see that his rcspbnsihility extends be- - the district and arotmd the wm'ld, leave
yond 3"erusalem to Judea. and even to
no stone unturned to meet.eVery budget
the uttermost
part ,of the. .earth ' Matm:e
ob'i1 g a"on
•
.
n . You cannot do. better tiaan
th nkmg enables
. Into to see that he- can, •. veer best , bul God does _cq_aire that
=District
Superintendent,
Pittsbur0n
District.
much..
February, 1959
• l
Dog's Tail
n_ n n ad_ot*
cleat" on the other end,. was still a part
:ofhimself.
already
exceeded the quota. Here is aSighal
(our district
pap'ez:), and lmppily I:
noticed't)aat
our budgets
have .l_een
paid,. •Then a letter from the United
.while listening
A lesson, from
'
Before. taking the contents
to the
Dry F6rces,
with information
about
incinerator,
I thought it might be wise
thi_ progress,
in fighting
alcoholic .
'
"
to check through
this mallei" to de-_ beverages,
A letter.frond
tim.district
" termine
Whether or not I had g_ven
superintendent
wi'th
information
.
•
,
proper consideration,
to each before..about
the change of.speakers
for the
plaeingit
in file number thirteen.
.'preachers'
convention
A copyof
the "
Of course most prominent
was the'
material -fro_fi'our,Nazarene
Publish;:
ing House and Fieadquarters.
There
.was the.letter
frolia our. Departmeiat
Of Church Schools informing
me that
the month of March Was to,be Sunday.
dis-
" :
mdht
of meof
Evangelthe sm.
tlm secretary,
intel"in ing
evangelists
who had
.
-.
t epolted sonm open dates durmg
the
study
aiad aswas
I emptiedtim
cardboard
box (wh.ich
a "poorpastor's"poor
SOme
" ....
_,[ - cus d.
.
::,
. next .twomonths
(tln,s was arcsult'of
,
11: It is amusing, als%" to study the
a lmrried.
Chncellahon.
of another .
|
contents
of a pastor's
wastepaper
evan-elst
who l,'_-_ "
" "
'
,:_
•
"
"
.
b
,,_,_ -¢
accepteu
a ,...
pas. ".
".basket
.The
variety
of
d
scarded
ma_
totate_
A
nu
,_'I_'-....
;_,:,.
.
"x
.
.
.
.
_
.
/ '
_l_'.._
ut
x=c_-tTablt_
were
'q_
terml m as numerous
as a pastor s. f,l,_l
_h,_d,_,
'_,; ,,,,,n,,,_
t,,_ 1,
l
_'[
duti,_
.....
'
"_--_.-:- ..... _:-_ _,,,:..,s
,.a,_oeen
. ,, .
| .
,-,
"... _.
.
•
.
. pat .at tr_e.pu0.osnlng no.use. _ letter
. [
_
rteeenuy
.t was cmanmg, up. nay .hem
out utstrmt Herald of. Holiness
.
I
ilt
bills:
lettersfrom a candy .sales company,
. .wapting'our
people "to.seli candy to
" ratse money for the "poor" Lord. Then.
, .a sheet from a scratch pa,d., covered
with "doodles"•
unconsciously
made
"
fail
- vestigators
to search forand
elhesdetectives
in one at nd,,;er
the.scene
of a came or the abode of,the
ac. . :
.
, ..
, .
receipted
" ..
:
. .--
(71) 23
"
"
AnnouncinI
Strengthen
YourStewardship•
Messages
o
I Two Special Recbgnition Forms
Deserving of Your....
Atentzcn .,
•
.
..
.
"
•
•
.
"
.
'
urge .your members to read these timely books
.
"
...
r-. ,.
•..
ABC'S
•"
.of
'
i! _
In
.....
l_
-
"
;'
vtmo"e
:ry
"
"
_
God's
givin_
" By'H.H.
"
to present
wishing
to family
to give
:
and friends.
in the Easter
4_
x 3_".
HOOKER.
"
missionary
. .
..... •
"
-.
.
offering in
.
. ._c
.
.
.
"!
,
.
•
nbt_pfan
No.
now
to
for
each
some
sl3ec_al
individual
service
¢znd
mean
el
recc<Jnilion?
much
to
the
It
entire
will
he
a
.
24
('/2)
source
.
12
for
.
- _.•
.
_'_2_Trodt; B0, 527, _n a C ty 41, ',10,
Washington
at Btesee,Pasadena
7, Catlf.
IN CANADA--1592BI00rStreet.West,Toronto9, 0ntar_0
The
Preacher's
storehouse
-:,
the. great
"
giving.
..
,
.
Order
•
"J
..
'J
, •
importance
of eve_
Nazarene's
.
Magazine
,
25c
.
receiving
TRACTS
colorful four-page
....
"
loldors' containing
bz numbers below•
"
No. T-806 THE MC)NEY: QUESTION
_ro. 7-808
W//AT._ T_E BIBLE SAYS
No. T-825
No. T.940
. .Nee T;950.
"
" "
mesaages on.many
" '
•
" _"
.
_
"
'
.-
_
--
be
" "
leo
assorted
'_Se
(one
in
• "
"
DetermineYour.Needs and ORDERTODAY
" :
I'Iou.B_
.
.
(may
.
Stewardship.
"
only)
number
multiples
el
loll)'
.
•
-
$5.00
as-
By._ames H. Hunter
By A. Milton Smith
By N. 'B. Herreil
By _ugh C, Banner
ByM. Lunn
-
"
•
ABOUT .TITHING
TITHING FACTS.
- ...
A DIVINE CHALLEL'4GE _
MONEYI MONEYI MONEY!
•
....
briel but wen,presented
1OO
.
-_-
DISCOUNT
of
25c
phasq ,, o!
25c
sontiaIa oI s pwardship.
.
" .
..
.
' Wh_ not distribute a different c.ne to your congregation
each Sunday during February.
Month? It should do much to fortify your lc;cal _tewdrdship
pkoq_am_
House:
.
of systemalic,
1,O90"for
• Send terra Liberal Sbpply AT ONCE.
.
.. • . _.. you _! use them P/ten
. . .
Publish_g
the importance
_-
church_
CT.2I
Nazarene
Attractive,
.
- A cerilllcate,oi
recognition--something
that every church could effectively
use "in
honb_inq its board members, department
leaders;_Smtday
schbo] •workers, and all
-othera wh_ have.given
of their time trod:serviCes,
Printed _in- two co(ors with appropriate
lettering on_ "white; linondinish sheet. Space
provided fp_filling
in name of person, _eason Jot recognition.' dat6, and signatu_o,
S x 6_". Comes In white n_ailing envelope.
eqc6uragoment
we_ense
Stewardship
.
'
_, .._ _
_:,._.
.
.,,._--
every
ilth_g,
the vital truthsof
stewazdship,
your PublisbingHouee_
l'n "b_operat_on
with-tim
General Sinwardahip
Committee.. [s offering the abdvo books
"',
at a "epecic_l 40 per ce,t dlscount _l_lus posloge) on six o_ me_e el, e.
'- tide; when charged to the minister's pdrsonal account.
" " " ' -
=
-
.
SPECIAL';QUANTITY
.
Because
"
"-
In
Appreciation
Emphasizing
,
Came_
" edng
15c
ncial Plan for His Church
Designed
with cross and "in Me_o_:y"-'on
trois and insidel a sicjnilicant scriplum
and the "Loving.Memory"
form to be Ilil_d In with n_me ol deceased
and those.
Eontflbuting,
Printed on _a linen lintsh' in !black arid purple.mc_king
a dignified
acknowledgmenl
for he pastor
with whim mciilinc3 envelope,
May also be used for anyone
membry el some ]eyed one.
No.. CT.2O
. ..
coo,inoiogoo
cmd-answer, p o c k e t-s[ze
booklet.
toward
°s--red
By J.u_RerrEAYCOCK.
compohoive
"
•
Here _i3 an'attractive
four-page _older. having gro_vn out o_ the trend
ma_ey fin p_aco oF /lowers) to a special mLsslc_nary fund,
Your Questions
S,oword,,ip
By D: SHBU3","
com._rT.
• .
Why
Tithlng--
February,
1959
Z':/_ rro0st, _o_'5Z7 KansasC_tV,_1 _o.
Washtnqton
at Bresee.Pasadena
7; _a ,
IN CANADA--1592BI0otStrut, West,Toronto9, Ontario
.
• '
I.
-
II III
(?_)
25
place of service
Evangelist Called o/God
The
•
_
.
Ma
t
ires for Entering.Full:timel Evangelism
.
• ."
.
.
'
By .Clay:ton
...'
"
WE
DID NOT tarry long on.the mean:
: ing.of tim term e_rangelist, nbr
with the ,nmssage
he is to ,convey,
These points are moi'e readily undci'•
L
stood and accepted.
The heart:of
p.roblem is. the motived.for entering
field of evang(tlism,
tim.
the"
The field, of evangelism
is_a hmans
toan
end.and
not an end in itself,
• Therefore
the end must be divine'and
not finite.: the go&l,spiritual
matel:ial..
and'hal
.
Perhaps
the greatest
irr_pact
can be
madeby'listing
some ,of
the. motives
for enteJ'ing ,the field of. evangelism"
which are n6t divinely inspirctt,
•
•
"
_f
Bailey _
""
" _
"
evangclism
do not take Undue advantagc of the./:hurch
in or¢ler taste
the
Country
at the expense
of others.
, Sight-seeing-temperately'andsoulwin•
ning compassionately.ought
to be the
rule foi" those who are on the move "
for God and the church. "
.
3. It is not .to be the escape route
for. the irresponsible,
There are some.who wt)uld-euter
tile field.of eva_-gclism to escape the grind and routine
of the Ffi'essurcs of a Iocalsetting,
Such
individuals of are
dangerof Often
10sing this
tim
romance
soulin winning.
condition is exposed by such.remarks
as, "The,evangelist
has .it easy. He
efforts
2, It is not to be tbe open road for
those possessing
h gy'psy spirit: Men
truly called, of God into the field of
•
•_,,t_,,'c,_ _pld_ _w,,,
.26 [74)
,,.
5. It is n'ot to be a cover-up for unr,esql,_ed pcrsouality
qu!rks."
Some
"nten.find
the field'of evangehsm
mm'e
":" symlJathetic.with
their ways and man-:,
.nerds than h local 'setting.
They are
: not willing to change whys an mau_tI
ners to be •useful in a local church,
and thus'they
hitthd
open road, The
..
field of "evangelistrl
can Lswall0xy "up
.. " such persorahlity quirk.%quicker,
than
a'local'setting,
but in time such quii'ks
" "
.
" _!i
]
_
,
of territorial
become
the
_A man who
life and rainwaiting:for
a
The Proa_h6r's Maqazlno
.
-
"l
.
material side of the field of evapgellsm
should not be tim _noti(,e for enterilag.
the field, nor should it become ,a ma-
Iiclds of evangelism
to sell
material
interest,
unrelated
_piritual niinish:y:
Thecall
gclize is not a side issue; it is
items of
to their
to evanthe main
'
issue. To think of'.thb ' field of evan:
.
gelism as a gravy h;ain is to finally
leave gravy staias on tl_e ties-between
pastor
and
evangelist,
and . some ` • _churph bom-ds:
. .
"
8. It'is not'tO be a newhoneymoon
for the disillusioned.
Some imnisters
"
lmld revivals "now and,then,
and, the
taste of'success soinetimes pl;ompts'tbe
feeling that'they
ruust enter the field.
They divorce 'themselves
fi'om their.
createa
feeling of nausea "wherever
the person goes. The philbsoph;¢ of
present
setting and -hecone
engaged
in their new-found love. A few poorly
changing
the and
place fatal
instead
per-a
son
is futile
.(-.. of
itisthe nol
"call to evangelize!
6. "It is not to be the race ti'ack'for
paid .offer
meetingsa shbck
and several
barren that
altars
treatment
awakens thiv disillusioried.'
They thenhead,'back to their former field of ser-
those.who ridehobby
horses. "Opinionvice seeking a reconciliation."
A taste
ated persons find the field of evangeof success, in a revival .ineeting is not
.lism a good outlet for their" notions.
necessarily
a call to evangelize.
They soon become devoted
to priuWhile _ the above ,motivCts arc ap_iples instead ofthe Person . . . Jesus
parent-._t:0ng
motives
for entering
" Christ. Hewho Uses the field of evanthe field 0feVangeli_m,.
we must algellsii_" as an oppm'tunity
to express
ways guh_'d our motives also for stayhis own ideas s0on'finds
that thedising _in the field, even though 'the in=
tance between
meetings.is!long
each
trial leadings were of a divkne order.
". time, and the stopping-off
places fewer.
The stri_ngth'of
the ,vmce of the
• Some ha_'e thus becot_e self-styled
_evangelist is sever(rod
by three main
martyr.%'-complalning'that
they have ' factors, namely
the 'fact' that lie is an
been put:out of circulation
because of
evangelist
called of God the fact that
their cdrivietions.
Self-pity is an aw,
pastor and people recognize
th'e iraful sitar'e, Evangelists
called of God
,portance Of such an office of the. rainare.divinely
instructed
and inspired,
istry and the fact that the _,'oices ab'ove
"_
., .;, .
"
"those
wlm want to" 'become
better
known
across the,church.
Districtphobia, the fearful pinch
[imitatiohs.
must
not
cause" for evangelizing.
creatas a demand for his
istry will not be lohg in
The
revnaling
Recognition
,eisiuthe
field..
Evaugeby leaders tous"
in the HisWill.
cJmrch caube
befle- " tivo
lists wh
shouldl'onot
take advantage
of the
ficial to one!s ministry; ,butwe
must
still remember
that divinely
called
men m'e divinely placed men. L ets'
leave the promotion
toGod!
_
better.
•
" :
1.. The field o_f evangelism
is not to
can leave
the problems
"after
tv¢o.
part-time
work for
weeks arid, go on.' . An evangel'_t fredisplaced.persorls.
The"odd
job" c6m-. quent!y, goes from one problem
setplex isdefeating'the
value that ought
ting, to another pi'oblem setting, and
to be pla_ed on thecall
to evangelize."
if he has his'lieart
in his ministry he
The "until
sm_iething
better, comes
feels a sense_of frustration
because he
along
attitude
is not a call to he an
must lea'_6"witlmut
seeing Solved the
evangelist
even for'a short'pnriod
of
problems with which he.has been dealThe evangelistic
field is not to " ins and for wiaich he has been pra_¢be"entered.in
order'fro' one to get his
ins, Each field of eddeavor
has its
bearings..Divinely
called persons are
pi'ivileges .an d responsibilities."
arid
divinely placed_ persons. No man needs
beth lmve their problems.
A desire to
to fling a coin or draw a straw'to know
flee from constant problems, is not a
tlie' will of God. for "the steps [and
call to evangelize,
stops] of-a good man are orderedby
the Lord.',' The true call .to cyange-. 41 It.is. not to be the limelight for
lizeisa
call to expend full-time
m this field of endeavor.,
•
'
Who know
othei" plan is to foUow the la_, 6f re:versed effort:s, We do not need the
guiding light of a revelatkm
from God
--
-
.
point to those
-
•
II.
For one to follow any
.
"
.Ideas to sell alone
grotinds for entering
is not sufficient
the"field of evan_
and around
him are holding .to the
doctrine and practice in their effort to
gelism.
•....
"_
" "
preach the full gospel of Jesus Christ.
7. It is not to',be thought of as,a
If this is not the case. the evangelist
gravy traiii for the materially-minded.
'. appears to be a living Sputnik
criss-"
Some.size
up the evangelist's, income
crossing the cotintry with'only a.l_eepas moztly profit, ThisAs
a laughing
" ing sound, and only the stargazers
ofFebru_r'/, 1959
"
[75) 27
•
the church will pay any attentioh'to
him, and even they Will be Watching
for him to burn out and to fail l'rom
bis'orbit
While
different
speak as the Oracles of God; if any
man minister, lei him do it as of the
ability
which God:give{h:
that God
'
inoUthin sma, glorified
through"
the offices of the ministry are
the purpose
is the same:,
Jesus Chi'ist,. to Whmh be praise and
dominion for ever and ever. . Amen'_
.
.
"For the.perfecting
of the saints, for
the work
ofthe
mihistry,
for the
edifying o1_the body _f Christ: ti]'l we
(I Peter 4: 11). "
. -•
To sum up,this_p_iper
it would be
Well to call to mind• words, from.a de-
all.come in the unity of the faith, and_
of.' the" knowledge
of ihe Son'of God,
unto
a
pei'fectman,
unto theofmeasure
of the stature'of
the.fulness
Christ"
votiona] book. Tile evangelist
of God
"Is Gob's MAt:r; '
r
I Don't Have a Hard Time
_. •
.
.
.
4: 12-_3),
Peter,
.'
hurts,
"
"
respired
"If
any
"
.
•
IN GOD'S I'LaCE.
"by tile
Spirit,
ex-
man-speak,
let
hini
.Duma
•
_
-
GoD's
..............
-,
.
.
.
•
-Pulpitand
ParishTips
WLLi.,
way.".
•
"
By E. E; Wordsworth*
:"
De.
BEvEr_hv Cane^ruNE used to say
"
that two thin_s ",viii kill any religious: meeting:
"Bad .air zmd the
:devil."" I v)as ti'aveling
on a modern
train one day when
I thought, my
Coach was a little ted cold. The coltired i_ortercame
through
in a fe(v
plaint
moments with-him.
and.I
Smiling:
registered
he co_lSaid,
my
":I'll go and see what the temperature
iS." He di:d and reported,
"It is sevemy-two
degrees". '_ And h_ never
ehaflged it for anyone,
Often churches
are 6verhi_ated
to
:
.
"
." ".
28"(76i"
'"
hidrfl0na
-,-
'washla_t0n•
"
"
.-.
.
'
.
hutI
see that
I
hmn's, Tlwy wm'k e!ght h0urs a day
drive them for every penn_, they can
oo
th 9 every
joli andhight
then-work
leog shifts
tzlake
thelri darn.
The and
"bosses
a]lno._t
for tm ehurc
_ and
thinn, impose
oil them,
often curse.
fire
Su'ndpy school. They'i'etired.
too. and ".them without
a cause...The
atmos-.
they h,_ve to get up and go to wo!'k by
phere'of their employment
is not con, •
the clock the next morning.
If I'm too . .duclve to Chi'istiah enjoyment:- I work
.
I put in long. hoil_'s,
me'help
and supp6rt and guidance.
I
checked on the people my folks work
•for and find that.they
are usually not
_
IIn,jl took.lime
their lobs.
they
t'b0..put
evenChristians."
in long-employees
off and got away
,. .
from
..
as a
They. consider
cash
investment
their
and'
in the quiet atmosphere:of
my study,
surrounded
by the best hooks, and
pretectedhymyp_'ofes_ior/frommany.
invading
not treat
distractions..My
clmreh does
me asan employee, "but'as a
leader whom th:ey revere as a man of
God. They'tr_¢ to help.me'and
seek
When a church is. stuffy mid lacks
oxygen.it
tefids to kill lbe meeting,
and deal" old Grandpa .takes his eveuing,nap
and Grandtiia
nods. Cain "
werft "to: the land .of Nod" to get a
wife. bt4t •it.is
befler
to be. widez
.'
axe,eke.
-
at
nw apeople
find that but
my_Iliving
make
financialancl sacrificb,
look
standard
is. highei" than tim average
they. enj)y
I fi'nd'that the ear Ldrive.
the clothes I wetu', the food I eat. "and
the house in which I live arc as good
..as theirs--often
better th_n theirs.
I
have trouble with payments and debts,
support
!i to"" encourage
:'
" '" me"
. and".
m every me.xizay
" IfI am_sick _or a day, a 'wee!L ova
month, the people do not dock mY pay
-check.. fnste_Jd'they bring extra things
in and do. many kind things for me.
They may .even help me "bear the
added expense of my illness.' My.folks
"' " DI'. " E. E. Zachary " once Said in a ".
-meeting:
"The Lord gave us plenty
of oxygen and He intended'it
for oui'
use, hut He did not intend for usto
•
use it twice'or
more. Open tl_e win,
dows, please," and give us sonte fresh
but
so doa they.
for.and
operate
car in I)lave
doing, to
mypay
work•
but
so do they and usually they are given
don't
havesiek_
thatthekind
treatment. andIf
they ge_.
p yofgoes-down
tile expenses
go up, with nobody to
"•
ture
about ten
"
degrees.
The Preacher's
.
,.
. "
I think smnetimes that finances ar0
hm'd and that since I am a preacher I
•
please seine "fussy", dear
old lady. • air."
.
• Th'e chances are that very lady keeps
Pastors and janitor's should have an
the temperature•of
her home at eighty
u'nderstafiding
ahout the heating
and
or eighty-five.
I have known
sflch;
both should remember
that.when'the
consequently
the church
is el.ways
church becomes filled, with people the
cold to her.
body heat will increase' the tempera-.,
"_vnnge]ist,
.
tired tomorrow
I.!n!ght: take.a
little
"lime
Off to get away from things, but
: (lzey cMnl. They wo_lld get fired if
•
Proper
Heating
of the Church
•"
....
:
too, I think
*
"
By Mile L. Arnold*
"
.
•
hard
.
-
-
"
_ r,_ t, raEaCZlEa nod I think I work
.It hard.'but
when I look at die'layinen
of my church
I see that .they work
.
. "
.
.
....
"
"
•
-
-
called
• IN Go_'s
.
,J
'.,
(Epbe'sians
,
,
"
no gasoline allowancel
'
Someti_ies
it seems that my eraplby_rs, the'churcli
and theboard,
are
"
- difficult
to please
and are un-cooperative.
but I got to looking them
over and.discbPered
that they are the
" ' • finest people, selected •from the finest
.." "
church
in the cOmtntinity._ They are
Christians
.in whom the ehui'eh has
confidence and they m.e i_ledti_d to give
.
*W_to_Mo_ L_. W_,,i,,_
....
Magazine
F_bruary,
1959
really take apersonallnterest
in.them.
Every day people.for
whom-I work
with'whom
I' mingleme, areThey
telling
: and
me that
they appreciate
are
" c°mplim_nting
me for my work and
boosting my morale in times when I
have failed. My folks don't have that
,kind of treatment. 'Most of them could
.
work for years without a single cornpliment for their .work, They just get
bawled out if they .don')_. do it, and
never praise_l if they cto it Well."
.177 29.
-
" "
I've 'been looking back on nearly
twenty-n!ne
years
of pastm'ing
in
s m all.
medium-sized
and
la
r
g
e
•
churches.
":_,
3:',
_ ,
I rove had seine hig assign" "
ments and some painful
disappointments.
I'/zc known hm'd tinae_.a ad
I've seen difficult popple, bu(d 1 in all
I t_aven't bad a hm:d time in :he "_iait_
istry. In fact I've lind it *a lot easier
- than my people tiave had it. Tt'/ey"/e
worked hm'd and so have I All in all
L guess we'ye all lind some lmrd times
and. stone pl6hsant tin:tes. If I've had
a hm'd. tiriae in life it lmsn't been becauseI
_xvas in the ministry.
Maybe
it was because I'was'out
of gear with
personage.
He has fo be shaced with
many people. But somehow it makes
me
lmpo_fant"
m6nstrosity
one bravado
parish.
have feel."rather
sucb a" popular
husband.to know
Shar l2 ._utddted
She must then
abliievc aofli/_tle
the God I serve or the people I serve
i
ing. lends to happlness_even
if it to discard, the accumulated
freight
with. Wlien Lsee the sacrifices of my
_ . . means bubby has to be loaned just at
when a call is accepted
by her huslayfimn it always puis'me under con" " n)ehltime,
when.the
clfildren are all
band to a parish .x4here the parsonage
viction to, dig a little deeper to keep up ..
clamoring
to get at the mashed pois. slightly larger than a house trailer.
with then3..When.I
see their weariness
tntoes a'nd gravy.
"
through many labors I get,aslmmed
of
. .
.
The. art of stretching
d dime is not
• how little actually, hard worl¢ I do.
. ,
Cbriainly.
tim minister
is: not- the
easily learned: however, the •necessity
." Really, when I get tlfl'ough i)i:aying
only one in the family who keep,_ impis chhIlenging:
to-say _he,'lbast. In the
for the good:folks who aremy
cbui'ch
pily occupied, eitlier.
His wife--conld'tchen this.bit-of, cunning.is
worth a
membei'._, I l:ealize that I ddn?t have a
trary to.some people's ideas--does'not
fortune.
It issnrprisfng
h9w far onq
hm'd time.
=
..
.
have
"much
time But
to "busy
spend people.
twidpouncl of ground beef
will sit'etch
dling her
thumbs,
" '
,..
A
"
""(_'T--T"=_"_'_T
"
-:'O f the
.
.
•
Being
•
. .
a
...
Preacher's
", ,
.
thdse professionals:
But in spite of
these dissuasive
reports,
consecrated
men'will continue to devote their lives
in loving service to their fellow men,
"not grudgingly,
or of'necessity,'[
cheerfully;
rernembering
that
which soweth:bountifully
"ta,_ln_,_ _,i_,,
30 [78)
shall
but"he
reap
i '
.. also bountiFally."
• cheel:ful giver?
- -
.
By Pauhne E. Spray_
• •
•
STZeK r 9 voon'scltoolte_ehi_?g!
The
•last thing in the 'world :I would
want to be 'is a preacher's
wifeY my
dbctor advised
just before in) husbm_d accepted his ._rst full-time :pas_
torate.
-.
- "
•
'
Considerable
attention has begn: fo-"
eused on the clergy m recent'months.,
Statistics
.ha,ze alarmingly
revealed
- the higti mortality
rate'.mnong
ministers. Much and
has underpaid
been.said
about'the
overworked
statias of
"-
Wife
.
For
Undoubt6dly
. the underpaid
'
1
" ' "
"God loveth a
"
.
.
prop-
thb ministry
prbfessions,
,_ wife of the parson,
is hm01lg
hilt'to the
it furnishes
golden •
i_
"
opp0rtutiiiy
for'exercising
ber'ingm'_v i uity.
"....
" " ' "
" " '' •
It lakes'a
spark, of imagination
to
remodel.a
garment of several, seasons
so it"willhppear
stylish.and
the latest
thing.in what the well-d_essed
lady is
wearing.
But it. has beeu done:,
_ "
And hats! It is amazing the variety'
"of ways one can find to redecorate
the
f_ithful:black
felt. A trip to. the five
and tefl every season,.the
purchase
of
a new flowei',a feather, 0r ribbons mad
veiling, plus some
imagination'and
a
.
And, like thousands of other women
,I like being a Ini_iister's wife too_
The. eldest of seven cbildren..I
was ..
raised in a pro'so rage. "We did not on/joy all the luxuries
of life.' but no
family
had more enjoyable
expertences than we. From a child I carried
the secret
fondness
to become
a :.
"preacher's
wife."
"
•
Only a few days ago a'friend
asked
our fourteen-year-old
. d a u g h t e r,
- W at do you want to be.'Sybd, when
.you fiuish school?"
"I want to.be a 'preacher's
wife,'"
she quickly replied in all sincerity,
" '
• Life'in the parsotlage is a busy one.
The' minister
is a much-sought-after
....
The Preacher's Maqazlne
an caster
manse
basement
every
time thefrom
notion
strikes toheratticmaje._;ty.
|
.
"
and nar/'ow"
steaks.
really bbco,neliber_l
' -
,vith-
her " cube
Personally,
I find it interesting--M• The ministerial'wage
does.not drape
_,_ ,:...... ',,_ *_,.... :..... ;., ,, ._,;_, ,,_:, nmst-intrignmg-:-t6
count nay penniei_.
ei:mifie. Neither does it refurnish
the_, _In fact. budgeting one s nmney can.be
•
Fun
•
ari_ happy people.
And since'."thd
wheit an'egg and some.ftdur are added•
"And unless the family has caught on
idle,_nind
is thb.devil's
workshola,"
perhaps
this only lnakes 'walking the " to her tr'ii:ks,.thdy will think Morn has
:"straight
osition
• , --
it's
-
"
:IP .d_.:_:_ SON.A.G'I_.'"
........ "-_'";:"_-?"* .................
of
an
i "
"
"
One. must develop a smattering
dexterity
to charmingly
furnish
:.
"
bit' of. cleve_riess,
and the "crown of
glory ''•is restored to'its-m,3_den charm
and beauty.
With skillful practice tlte minister'S
•wife can learn to arrange the furnithrc
so'that
the worn spots inthe•living
room rug are quite successfully
coneealed:
.
F_braa_'y,1959
,
m®intcre,4tingga.po.'
Ifsheis
_ seas lady can dreamup
of-sol)cams, fo: sti:etcbing
hold allowance,
Unbleached
.mu,qlin
alert,
tim
all sorts
the house_
cos_s
o n 1y
twe'nly-five cents a yard, if advantage.
is taken of the sales.- It has a variety
..n[ uses.
Percale
is .slightly
higher
priced [_ut unbelievably.ad.aptable
for. ' • m.aking a house into a ho/ne
Orange
cr,'ites are(wonderful
substitutes
foi'., cupboards,:
nigfitstands,
and. linen' closets "teat are just not
there.
Of course
tttey/h'ave"
to he
trimmed tip a bit, 'But fragments
of"
-.paint may be found in a secluded
cornei" of the basement,
and the remnant table in. the local'depart_nent
store often holds fascinating
bargains.
As'I smd;•_t.takes
a mite-of ingen_ity. But I have a sneaking idea that
I and many more women like me have
" mucb more t'fun".htretchingger allowancesthansome0ther
have--_trying,
to" find' ways
theirs.
our incawomen
to spend
.1'/9)31
II
t ,
..
Paul's Concept O[the Pastorate
""
• " -"
II. The
"
Past
Or
and
•
"
"
HiS
R
elation
•
ship
:
By-Roscoe
Persball*
.
.
.....
THE RELATIONSHIP of'pastor and peo•pl6 isthe
heartbeat
of the rainistry. It is what gix,es -life
. . and makes
foz_service and effectivenesS.;
If a pastor fails here he .cannot •succeed, no
matter how welt qtialificd he mgy be
otherwise.
'This is" the contact
thai
spells defeat or success,
. Herein the apostle gives th'e location
and dimeosions
Of a prolJer and effective relationship;
• •
. .
.
"
to
His
Peo
,
" .
'.....
"
P[ e
"
' " ' " "." .
.
""urged them:" "Be ye followers of me,
even as I also.mh of Christ."'Twice
he
.' urged tim Philippian_
to follow him. "
the members of the opI_osite sex. St.
Paul gave a•vcry'pointed
and practical injun'ction
on the matter:
"Re}Ji_ke _mt an elder but intreat_.him.as a
ren:
elder
mothe'rs;
the point;
approaching.for
father;t:heand
the :,yemen
younger asmen'as
bretJafession, never
Always
he was drivingpersonal
tc the
younger
as sisters, with 'all pui'ity_' • gain or advantage.
The consuming de(ITimothy
5:1-2). He was awa_'c.of
sir0" of his heart wasto
prese'nt the
tKe
frequent
associations
and
lh6 fact
high that
esteem
m whicl_
the-past0r
is held bre_ik do_,vn natural
barriqrs
Conduct
t. "
he threw" out to
these words: "Ye
are witnesses, and God also, how holtly and justly'and
unbl_uneably
we.behayed ourselves
among you that helieve"
(I Thessalonians
2: I0)!
What
exemplary
conduct
was his thathe
conversati_on., in charity in spirit .in
• , (I' Tidmthy
faith,. in purity.
4:12).. " '.
Titus.received
the saz'fiekind,
of in-.
"
struefion; _'!Ih all things shewing thy:
':
self a pattern
of good words"
(Titus
woomn,
sisters,
5:2).
.
2:7a).
": .
- '
No man .will successfully
Cbi'ist who does not present
Sincerity
onthe
part of the" pastor
was of great in)portance
to Paul: in
fact.it was h.inatter of consclerice.with
" dared issue such a challenge without
fear of contradiction!
The ThessaIonians.had
to :testif) to .the unqtaes-
:
_preach
Him in
tionable conduct of'their paster while
his life, nor"preach
hell'hess if ltoliness.
he was with them. His holiness was
is 19cklng in th e preaehel'.
The people
unimpeachable,,
his justice
without
.must _ee in his actions,, his attitudes,
question,
and his general
condqct
his bearing that he is a holy man. It
above reproach.
To the Corinthians
he wrote: ;'.. , must be the most obvious thingabout
we- h_ive
defrauded
"7:2). He
thai be
followhis
4:16 and
him, and
:
:
him; i_is'spirit
it must beandthecarrier
th_itto.fhc
pro: " ' :
wronged
no man: we have . jects
his mimst_'y
no man"
(If Corinthians
people• The people ba'_e a right--and
was'so s_ire of his conduct • demand it-_-that the 15reacher. demon.
called on the believers,
to
strafe that which he preaches.
Tbey " "
example..
In I Corinthians
do notwant
hollow phrases,
but full
7:7 he invited men to follow
and rich example.
. .
in I'. Corinthians
I1:1 he
"•
•
• .
Holy living demands
a proper, re"
•Directoral Ewngellsm
, 0re,leaP_clfi¢District. '
lationship
bet/veen
the.preacher
and"
32 (BO)
Tho Ytbochor'sMtzqazine
wholeinterests.
Word of AYnanmight
God regai-dless
his
own
bate ofPaul
for Iris zeal, oppose him inbis beliefs,
No one:else
is given sucbprelect
privileges
none could him'for
honestly hisquestion,
that
would ordi.n,'irily
oiher_.in persecute
preaching;his sinbut
that World of the _home as the pastor' .cerity
Sincerity'
seemed to vibrate
: ' the pmw|eges' "
" ' tempta'
-" 'm.: and
bring
through every portion of his being.' He
tions.
•
was precisely What hepretended
to:be.
.We Often he'ar of an apparently
sudTh'is was a part of his concept of the
den amral break on tile part of some
pastor, and thus lt'is vital to us topastor," II wasn't sudden.
It began a day,
Profession
is relative,
Words
long way b,qck in the degeneration
of. have. a general
connotation;
.testiput'e attittldes
toward one or,more of
mony standing alone "is."questionable.
the:opposite
sex,'What
appearsto
be
It takes genuineness,
complete
smsfldden
is the final collapse
of the
cerity, tomake
them specific, 'A ruesshell thdt has long hidden inner irasage coming from an insincere
life
. purity;. The hig!aesttyl3e.t_f
:associa - 'gives, atbest, a hazy, indefini);epicture
lion and attitudesmust
bc maintained
of the plan of salvation; the s_ime rues'by the:pastor
al all times, "The elder
sage coming from one with a'boldly
.Said be, "Brethren,
be followers •together of me, arid mark- them which
Walk so as yc have us f0ranensample"'
"
"lPh!lippians
3:17)
'!Those things,
which ye'.have
both learned, and received, arid heard, and seen in me. do: :
and the.God
of pc;ice _hall.be
with
you" (Philippians
4:9).
" "
" "
...
He expected
other mifiislers
re'he"
exemplary
it1 conduct,
Timothy
he..
exhorted
thus: ". :.. bethou.art
example of: the bel evers, in word, in
Exemplary
.What _ challenge
the Thessaloniansin
covetousness;
God : is w,it n e s s:"
(I Thessalonians
2:3-5).
His people
never
had reason
to
doub t the genuineness
of Paul's pro-
as mothers:
the younger
as
sincere life makes clear images and
with eli purity" "(I Tii_mthy
distinct
patterns•
Concepts.
crystal `•
:
". lize; convictions
gain' distinct boun:
"
- •daries;, sin is .shown aS sin; righteous:
Sincerity
'i " ness is given cardinal colors.
.Sincerity must be an integral
of _be cliaracter
of the pastor:
would fulfill his.task..
part
who
him: "For our rejoicing"is
this,, the
Gentleness
testiin6ny
of our conscience,
tlmt in
.
.
simplicity
'and. godly •. sincerity,
_ot
Gentleness
stood out.in Pafil's con- withfleshly
wisdom, but by the grace ' _:ept .- of pastor-people
_relation.
as,
of God. we have had our conversation
shown
by: his testirnony
and
his in-
in the world, (If
and more
abundantly1:32):to - structldn,
T6 the
Thessalonians
you-ward"
Corinthians
professed 'his
gentleness:
"But 'he
we
". '!'Fori'! he said, "our exhortation
w_s
were gentle among you, even as a
•
.
:
not of.deceit; nor of uncleanness,'nor
nurse
eherisheth
her
eh i ldr.e n '_
in guile: butas
we were allowed :of
(I Thessalonians
2:7)..He
pleaded
God to be put in trust with the gospel,
x;cith the 'Corinthians
in these words:
even so we.speak; not as pleasing men.
"Now I Paul myse!f beseech you by
but God, whiehtrieth
Ourhearts.
Eor . the meekness and gentleness of Christ,
' - neither at'any _ime used we flattering
" who in presimce am base among you,
"
• words, as ye know: nor :a cIoke of
but being
absent*..... am bold toward y O u I!
February, 1959
" "
(B1]33
1
•
i"!
.
•
'
(II Corinfhians
10:l/.
Ite
instructed
we. brethren,
being
taken
f_:[
:
i' i
i"l:_i_
_. _
"/t _
: .i
• _
_. _
I,.:.._
_ }_ovc
-
"_
that beat as one ?,vith the pea-
.
the
play
witl? the
0ther
children
lie
: pl6 of'his care..?Hd.v, skbd -"Who is
was hurt andweat
cryiag t'o.his mothweaR. aud I am n_t weak?, who is _fer. A chubby -fist, raised
to _ help in
fended, and I burn
riot?" (II Col'inthe Crying, smeared the tears over the
thians 11 29).
l_egrimed face. Mealier. unmindful
of
The Apostle Joh'n was :known as
t'ho dirt and grime, picked him up in:
• the apostle of love, hot it tobk Paul to
her arms and
kissed the upturned
'
ope.n
the mos_ ele-to " face.
Why dido't
did she
do it? ,She
rating, thethemost
mostsgpel:ljc
lhorough..tribute
hi_;a.She
see.dirty
hands lqved
and "
•love thht has evm, beep writter, (I Cofa_,e .tile so led clothil:_g ._-:hesaw her
rint_/ians 13).
"
"
ow_t little boy, and he. was hurt.
"
"
Only a man who had. experiencedit
The love of the pastor :mu.,::t enfold
' " . could Have. conceived
such • things. _ :the people of his care and.see'beyond,
• His zealous care of the _churehes'was
their weakness•
failures, sins. to the"
:
:theoutpouring
of his. great love for
souls for which Chris[ died. They are
lois people; his love drove him to total
his people•; the_' are hi,s.care,
if they
service.
" ....
. " .. , suffei', he suffers; if they weep, he
. Distance
and'other
respansibilities
weeps; if they fail, his heart isbroken•
"did not cool the Iove he bore for the _ He enters into tlidir expemeuces
beThessalonians.
for he declared:
"But
cause'he loves teem.
34(82)
" ""
•
"'
•
.
. ..
.
:ThePmachor's Magozino
pas:.
the
homes,
tofaults;
him.,
failures
are shared
with hbJl in a
wonderful
opportunity
to guide the u
need a_d his burde_ ff_r. souls. their
pt:bblems:and
his un'dei'standing,
their
w e a k n e ss e s 'and his strength,
their fears and his assur_uace,
" •
",
(II Corini.hians 312).
"_
St.
Paul
demonstrated
and
taught
"
Tile
15aster'of
well God.
take
-that 1eve should be a-basic elel neat.el
bis..cue:fl'ot'o
thi_ this'day
might_ can
_iian.of
•
. .the relationship:between
pastor and
The pester'does
not reach thepeople
people,
Covered.somewhat
by. an alwitli'his
head:he
reaches thein with
; _
most superhumah
found of adfivities. - his heart.. A little five-yehr-old
was
.,
•by: a coosuming'
drive, a sparkling,'
.playing iu flee dlrt--as most five-yeai .... "
brilliafi.t mind, was.a burning
love in 'bids will if'they get:a ch,_nce. Amidst :"
: a.heart
. .
as well as the doors of thdir
doers'dr
hearts aspirhtions,
are open
.The
fears,theichopes,
"
.
.
•
.
.
his:'ringing denunclatiori
of thesin
of
the Corin:thians:
"For yc,, are yet carenv3;ing, and strife: al_d divisibns,
hal:
whereasand'walk
:there is.
ye notforcarnal,
as among
men?
are
you
For
while one sait b l am of Paul andanotht_r. I am of" Apollos;
are, ye _a0_
Paul's love brooghf _m identits with
was beiiag faithful to the tr£,st God
in spiritual development.
.carnal?"
(I Corinthiafis
3:3-4)
'I-/e
his people.
"So lacing alteetionately
gave him when he uncompl:omisingly
desirous, of you. we- were. willing to
condelnne_l
tile sin of fornication
in
lmve imphrted unto you...not the gos_ .-'th_ Corinthian.church.
pel' of God on!y, but aL_o' our own
" Sec0nd. he tauglit
faithfulness
to
souls, because ye _,)ere dear" unto us
lhe.people."
Of course, faithfulne,,;s to
. .
(I Tbessalonians
2:8),
There ivould
God and to the people are interwoven
now be a eomlJletely
common ground
ul_til distinctions
are not al,/vays easy,
of their need and his hellJ, tlaeir souls'
but still they are preseot.
. ter under:stand h s 15eople and be Sell _ were not just anotlier burden, not just
approach.
Hewould
have the minis:
loliia'ns 2:1.7-18),
Tile Thessalonians
tie:in
his dealings
with '.them. The
a ,pbrtioli of the vast hordes of huharsh az_d. th6ughtless" word'Js- _nore
mm_ity t:hat mppcned
to fall Undbi"
easily _x0ken thmr reti'acted,and
t}le
the _ound of his voice. They were
one offended by it'may never re_over,
people, individuals, that were precious
would.have
to him
said. before•
while a.gelatle approaeh
,, . .. fc r'I'have
saved thesituation.
'/'he sincere Clu:is_
tl_at Ye are in our hearts to die and
- tian does not desel_ve rough treatment;,
live .frith you." ( lI Cof'inthians
7:3) 2
the backslider
can ' t endure it: had the 'There" burned
within
this heart
a"
sanner w 11 rebel.against
it If t _e anflu heof love for t lem If as'ingle.one
gels.dared
.not bring
"_"
railing accusahad been lost Pau
woiald
'
ha_'e suf.tions. agaia_t'the
devil, how much le._s fe!'ed .loss• He could trtity testify:
:
can ministers
resort to'that
methdd!
'_Ye -are 6ur epistle written'
in our
•
.
heai'ts, known and read'.of all men"
•
.
When _t people find that their
tar' loves them in this fashion,
'frola you
must not strive: but be gentle unto
hom't, endeavoured
the more abunall men, apt to teach, patient"
'
:Tiinetby:
"... the servant of the
a short
presence,
not deill .. :'
(II Lord
I' m- . for
dmltly
to see time
your .inface
with great
: -othy 2:24).
.
.
si)'e. Wherefore'we
would ]lave come
• There wasnopla'cbia
aisthia:ng
untoyo_u, evenIPaul
oaceanda
ain"
:
• r
/
•
•
g
for the -raucous. d_uwng;.ihoaghtless
but Satan hinderedus" (I Thessa-
ilt
_![i;
•
, '
"-
' - Faithfidness.
. He taught
faithful!tess
!tl hi_J re-,
laiAonship With Ills leaple:. First : he
Faithfulness
to them is seen in his
remindei' to the.Thessalooiausi
"As ye
know how we e:::horted
and camfarted and charged evm:y one oLypu,
'is a father.doth
hmchtldren,
that ye
would.x_'alk W0rthyof
God, who hath
ealled
you Unto lois kingdom
'and
glory". (I Thessalor/ian,s 2 11-J2). The
taught faithfulness
to God in 'relation:love
of a father was .reflected in ex"[o them. To Paul th 9 people to whom " horlntion" anti comfo_:t extended
to
"he'ministered
were a trust from God.
[hem, Helcould love theth and be gen-His sense .of responsibility
is v_dced
tle_ but" love..and.gentleness'
did notin I Thessalonians
2:4: "But as-we•
"hlind his eyes to tl_oir needs. Read
- " Were allowedof
God to be putin trust
Iris testimony in Acts 20: 18-21: "And
with the gospel, ex;bn so we st)oak: met
:,rhea they were come to him_ he s_iid
•
as
pleasing
men,
bat
God,
which
trieth
unto them, Ye know. from tile first
.
.
, . _
•
am hearts.
S n'lar arc tlae statementi-;
day that I came into'Asia,
aftei' what
fbund in I Corin_.hia l_ 9:17 andI _fli_:, meaner
1 have beeu with you'fit all
"
othy 1:1"1-12. 'in which, be dech!red
seasons, serving t ae Lord w_th all hutIta_t a dispehsation
of the gospel was
mility ()f mind. and with many te,qrs,
committed
to him and rejoiced that
and _emptatiorrs, which befell me by•
Gadhad
e_unted
him'worlhy
of. tile
tl_e lying in wait of.the Jews: and. now
great trust.
.
" I kept back 69thing that was profitable •.
Hisfirst
resl_onsibility
was to God,
unto.you,
but l_ave shewed yofi. and
for God..bad sere him with.'the rueshave.tahght
you puhlickly,
and from
sage to tile people.
Paul loved his
house to house, testifying bt, th to the .
people, but .there was some iron in
Jev)_, and also to the Greeks,.repentance toward God. and faith toward 0ui"
. bis blood too, He could love. yet he
'
could deal sternly with.the
people if Lerd.Jesus
Christ,"
•
. . they needed it. He watated J.helr l_lve . He expdcted his.pastors
to be faith-:
in return• "hut he didn't hesitate
to
ful fo thL, pebplb also. To Timothy he
.
.
bring the whole co/msi_l of God
the i'isl( of alienating
them
Look
Fel_mary,1959
at . wrote: "Preach
the Word;. be'instant
at" in season, out of season: reprpve_ re_.
.
•
.
' (93)35
"
.
:
.
-
.
,
•
. • *
•
.
i
•
"
b3ake exhort
with all longsuEering
andLdoc_rine!'
(H Timothy 4: 2).
No doctor Worthyofthe
name would
fail to operate
if he knew that the
call If he is to have a working team in
' tlae church, he must chhrge the people
with theh' re_/Joj_sibilitb;. He mu_t be
faithful to thole,
•
- '
""
:
":
'
""
nro .Pzm cbP
-,
•
.
"
_
•.- .
. -
'
-
"
Tuz STOa_¢OFa'HYMN ....
"
"Don't worry, Papa; God.'5,ill hikedare
o£ us!" S 9 said a little girl many years
ago to,her dffddy,, wbo was.a counti'f
preacher.
Every Sire:day '*after_mon lm.
"
L• ....
" "
.
'
bad been _:ight,:fof the mother was'mu;eb
improved.
"
'
--Stqected
.
Dr:F_NrrtoN or_ Pet:._CnXNC_
NoTmt_o WaON0
- A displaced_person
: . had
to ch'i_,e several
miles was
.to pro'sob
in
Gideon Ousley
h_ish that(_hen
preaclmi' ofheearly
his appointment'•
His wife
very sick:
Metttodisin,
once said
Was
He Wondered .this'time if.he should,leave
called to preach a .voice s,'_id Iv hi're':
her.
"Gitleon_ go preash My gospel."
7"
Encourage.d by the Words of hi_ young....
IIe answered, 'ilJow can I go, 0 _God?
.
daughter
lm hitched the horse, to the
I can0ot speak, for I an{.a child."
"
buggy and started off.- On the wayLhe
Tim voice _aid again. "Do you I_npW
began 1o thinkof the words o,r the:It*lid" the dis'dose?"
'
'.
' "
..
• girl: "God will take east{ "of us.". alad
"Oh, yes. Lord.'I do" says I.
taking a pmce o.f paper" from. bis pocket"
"And do you know the'cure?"
he wrote:.:"Be
not dismayed, whate'er
"'Iodeed I do,- glory, be toThy name!"
betide: Godwill take care o.f y0ti." Thus
"Go then.'_ said tim voice. •'tell them
a famous hymn was born.
about" the disease and the e'ure, All _he
•When Roy, C. D. Martm. r_tprned home
rest m.I_aSt,talk.
,. " '
.
".... "
•. "that ........
night.he
found that his little gii'l "
--Selected
. "-:
.
99 (94)
SZNTENCESzaMoNs
.
"Only', part .of us can learn by other
people's experience---the/ rest of us have
to be the Other people."--Hal Chadwick.
"'The trouble with doest of us is :that
.we would be ruined by praise than Saved
with'critieism.,,__,,Nuggets._'
"Life is like any other trip. Half of the
fun depefids on "thd travelling
companions."--"Redf_cld
Revimb."
.
"If
would'be
about we
whdte
we. stepa littlh
those moreearieful'
who follow
" us wouldn't stumble"" so much,"--:Anbny" roves.
"
"
"There. is someone you know who will
-
The P_oachor'sMacjctlh_o
fouiideuiranee
"
.
"
:
. •
" .
A*_E Youi* S_mRTCOMINSSR_PECT^DLE?
.
. \ •
" " .
. '.'I know I ought to |1do better..-,
but I
am not' as bad.as ;...
or, "I don't drink
to excess mr beat rOy' wife." The wife
says., .I:seldorh throw dishes.-unless
I
am provoked beyond measure."
One"
*night think I John 2:1 should be para-.
phrased like this:
. ': " • •
. -.
are permissible, especially if they arein
the .category, of those commonly accepted as respectable. This I write .unto
...y.ou:that. youconfess
them periodically,
for 'this a,v11 enhaxaee your standing as.a
-humble-.Christian
br6tbierY
(This is
not found in the Bible.)
. :
to
:What are sortie of _.heso ".respectable
shortebmiogs"?
l:'I ought to read my Bible more h'e-
.Ami._rica,
whet'e
admitted One
to " quenfly
(but Itoam.terribly-busy).
.'work
"in - the
homesheof'awasminister.
2. _I ought
_ray more. (! will Our-:
, da_; .bet' face showed she had been cry-:
ins the fall revival.)
ing. -The r_inister asked if something.
3.. I ought to witness more (if only
were. wrong.
She made :this answer:
folk wouldn't thiiak.me so queer}.
"Anyth ng. wt:ong?. Oh_ no. sit-, eves:y4. I oughtt_think
lessof self," (I try
thing is so right in this good America.
---but I am: rather special).
I have been praising the Lord'for allow- ' ' 5. I ought to give 'more• (When the
ins me to come here. I am so.grateful
children get "through college, and the
"
to Him. I love this land, and it puzzles
mortgage is paid-:-' I wlll.)
.
me that your people ai'en't more happy
Just one question• How:many
times
• " arid joyful and praising God..As for me, " can I "confess shortcomings before they
, my big .desire-is to serve the Lord, and
become.sins?
America.".
-.
" ..
--Ar'_tLur
Zahniso" in the
--C."L. Howland
"Free Methodist".
.
,.
February,. 1959
,
• .
,
.
•
•
, '.
_
.'
neverintroduce
get acquainted
witb God unless
you
him."--A_nonymous.
_he honked his horn again ar/d again,
Finally the Woman went back _o.him'and
said, '.'Mister, if'you'll go up thex;e and
start my car, 1'11 stay-here
and honk
yourhorn.",
(Editorial thbught in the
_'Free Methodist."
:. .
.
' ....
,
unable
togetbe,"
eat,
started:
Theman "Little
ohildron,
write
unto
you
in the.cat' just behind Was impatient, so you sin not, but "certain 'shortcomings'
-Contribute.db ¥ Nelson G;:Mink
. ,
. .
.
through (Lamentations
3:44).
." There are several le_sons from the
elbuds, hilt heren_'e
some clouds that
stand between us and oit_ God.
I. Clouds of-sin, (Isaah 59 1-2)':
H. Clouds of insincerity
•
III. Clouds of excusing wrongdoing.
'"
(Psalmi_ 66:18)
"
'
,
,
" "IV. Clouds of unforgi'¢ing, spirit. (Matthew 5:23)
, V. Clouds of selfishness (3"ames 4:3)
"
VI. Clouds 6f d0iabt (J_mes ]:6-7)
VII." Clouds. in the home (I Peter 3:
" 1-7)
.'.._ "
VIII. Clouds of pride
IX_ Clouds of robbing God (Malhehi.
3;1-10)
.
.'
..
--Rew C: G fl:e t 0sser
...
Elkhart First Church
- "
. - • "
NEEe OF PAT'IENCE-:--MOU_N
SEI_I'ING
At the intersection, whim the light hail
turned green the woman driver Was still
.
"
•
.,
but.'Js a by-product
of tliese qualities
in'a mmistel:. The pastor'will
lose his
people.if he tries/.o reach them across
the-wide
chasm .of assumed
dignity.
There:i_
sucli an.air.of insincerity
and
.
melt/drama
ing: Ministerial
aboutifdigniJy
that must:be,
it is revoltthe
•
natural
dignity of one*ross with lhe
people,
of .' personal
piety,
selfdiscipline, sanctified wisdufia.'a dighity
boris of pastorb.1 love for all he meets.
possibility of giving their lives or the
lives of their 'children
to I th'e great
work. If there are to be mimsters, he
must remind, them to be 19eking for a
..
A SZaMONor;r'CL0eos
.
.Texit:
•
"
" :
Thou hast covered thyself with a
clot*d, that our prayer should not pass
oper,3tion was necessary.
Neither Will
.
a pastor worthy .of the name fail to
" "
.
give the.whole
counsel of God. There
Ministerial
Dignily
are " carelessnesses
t,hdt "m us_t
be . . Out of exemplary cobduct. Sincerity,
stoppedi sins that must be rebuked,
gbntlefiess_
lo've..,failhfulness
name
blindness"
that
must
be corrected,
Paul'smifiistcrial
dignity: He showed
weakne?sesthat.must
bestrengtheued,
that _true dignity calmer he as.shined..
The pastor must. imt, fail. t9 chhrge his
people. If he doesnt
do it. there are
no't many people who will thke tip their
burdens
and obligations
as membei's
of the church
and the Kingdom.
If
there are to be missiofiaries,
the pastar must charge his.people
with the
.,
r
.
-
.
. {85137
"
"")o
" .dpt:_zcAcy_z:t_xc_
:t_:_oGz___.ZvX
_L._56:L_,_z,_:_A,_=._,,___..----,7
. .
" "
for
. .
OF
1.
2
,
INTRODUCTION: During
the French
and
Indian
War. a.young
Indian'named
Haldfast
Gaines was given _1 message
•, .
to
ta a genet.al )n another
umt.
- He was told. "Inyour
bands lies the
fai[c of a imtion.
Now go, and'rrtay
the
Lord qod af Hosts bless your legs."
Gredt was the trust given to him, for
iu hi.4 hand lay the fate' of a nation.,
Yet a fat" greater
-_i.ust has been cam"
mitred
to us who are called by the
uame of'Gad--"the
word of reeancilia,
t to t ._ It is ai
'
•
"
. .
.
[.
TIIEMENDOUS
A.
TSUST
It is ISmessage
"
'
"
to an alienated
.
"
3. Jesus.
Was ..not apologetic
n'eaehlng,
for Hemoant'to
sinners
from hell.
"
far
save
B.' It is.the message
tllat God was in
the world ....
.
1. Becoming
sin:fori_s.
Who knew
.
none (v. 21).
.
2. Not imputiug
out, sins unto us
(v. 19).
,"
3." Reconciling
the
warld
unto
himself
2.
:
3
:
'!But
ye
filter
that
shall
the
earle
upon
you...
"...
they.wm:e
the Holy
Ghost.
receive
/_'oly
-"
.
30 {86).
."
is
..
:all.... filled
""
with
B.
"'... they . . . went ever_ where
lh'escbing
the from
.Wqrd."
Thus toa
perfect circle,
command
fulfillment,
from God's work
ta
man's-w6rk,
""
.-'
"
A circle is not camplete
without all
parts.
"
".
4.
" "
- 1,. Command,given
tians .....
2, Promise given
to
all
I.
, PI1EPAIIATIEiN
A.
.
I.
is.
on
D o c t r i n e---undoubtedly
. the
preaching
of Christ.
find Him
crucified...
.il. "Pt'ay without ceasing" (I Tiros-'
:sal6nians
.5:17).
"II.
PUre, ONE
: .
A. On
What s0rt of plan. am I bi;i)d'ring?
"
" " " "
1 I well
remember
my "club:
" house"
built _by me. I land no
3, Power
given to tho_;e who receive cammand.
.
.4, Failure
to .camplet6
c-i r c le
The Proacher'a Maqazlno
"
On what sort of foundatia/_.hm
building?
"
1. For example,
Me'xico City
Slowly sinking¢
as though
3.
"
to all Cbristians.
" '
2; Many become discouraged
with
the time element.
•
B. it takes a lot to."go through.'_
"
I. Are you never
tested?
I]etter
check up:
2. The persecuted
Church
was a;
- vietoriaus
Church.
"
" .....
.
quicksand.
.
Jei_us. who said He was the
Rack, sfiid, n man wa_ foolish
to build on sand.
3. Tllei only" sure foundatiotVis
p
saving
experience
of grace.
"
B.= What sol'IS of materials
atu I using?"
"
Paulmentioned
four.
1.. Reading--bf
the Word,
public "
"and'private.
2. Exhortation.=-refers_
to .public
- - "
testimony
to another.
•
Chris-
causes
breach:, loss of part' or
all _f cii:cla may result:
The
Holy Ghost is givbfi that we may
Win sou s but failul'e
means
-
saith Pahl. no
My spiritual'
th'e building _
the house, btit
and tools, arid
a house,".
To
"
CONCLUSmN:
..
A, My" life is like a building
under
construction.
"
B. My t'espansibility
is In save my
soul,
: "
"
"C. John Bunyan
looked=at
the hot-
2
power,
Ghost
...farfcitt/re.
"
--RoD(:liT D. RoaEas
II. TESTED TDUS_
Pastor,
Corona,
CaliIoruio
A. B_, the first century
Church
and
.
. .
.
. •
•
since:
" ....
TtlE'.STEWARDSItlP
OF THE
1. "' ' ,, going from house
_to house .
"
"' SOUL
•
•
• . facts 2:46):
2. Converts
won: J_aul, Co'nel us,. ' TEXT: Philil?pians
2:12
the
Samaritans,
churel)es'
"at . INTRODUCTION: My-life is like a building
Tress
Philit)pi,
_Ephesus_ Co='-.
under
construction.
.The most
imlath, T|IeS.,ialonica: Rqme. etc..
portant
of all "things to me is that I
/3. S0nie of thegreatest-of
saints have
must
be saved.
That is, I must ha_,e
heen wan througti efforts of a perexpet;icnced
Christ's regene 'sting pawsnarl worker.or, and must be pursuing
earnestly
that "
•
Iv. 10)..
Besides
above: Moody,
Robinson, etc..
God lads pt:omised.
"He that
goeth forth and wgepeth
beat'-,
ing precious-seed,
shall doubtless:come
again with'rejoicing
. .
•
..
.. ,
.
brmguig
lus sheaves with hJm ' .
(Psalms
126:6),
IlL TANa_:NTfMS TAUNT
.
, A. Tafigential
i'efers to a circle, which
is esactly
descriptive
of the work
of eyange ist'n. Thus:
1, '!Go ye.into
all the world, and
p eoeh,..'
- -"
pen-
"
all is, ""Your
separated
betweenifiyau and your God . ." (Isaiah
59:2).
2. The" first prcrefluisite
_ for per:
..serial Workers is a vision of last
souls, hell-hoI'md.
"
"
" -
-
.
plp; - " _
1. Th0
wordfor
lquitie_.hnye
.
holy life without which,
man shall see the Lard.
life
is like a house in
God does not give me
gives me rock. mortar,
says, "Nowbuild
thyself
do this require.S much:
' "
SALVATION
SCltlPTUaE: I Corinthians.:lS-20
_'
February
•
2,
B.
• plan,:and
it.fell down fiat:
My blueprint
must be drafted,
:from-the
Word;
3. My bluepririt
must hD followed
systematically,
For what.sot't
of r6ason am I'build-"
!ng?
tom of a muddy stream,'and
said he
saw:
that. alike
"pure,
tbc. cleatbottomriver.
of I'the
' Herivet:,
said
the bottom of all in life is that we
should be saved.
"
"
'
CaliIornia
OUR
'
was an:old
" English
author of quaint horicsty.
His'
published',diary
_at'rie_ this.extraortlinary accaunt dated November
5, 1660,
and recto'dud"I.didfollowing
at- tendance:
give tenhis.church
Shillings and
" no more, the'ugh I belie:,:e mosl, of the
]'estdii:l
give more, and did believe
:that.I
did so, too."
Tim questiafi:
af money
has always
been the _lt/cstion that perplexedas
well ItS disturbed
men. How to-get
money, how ta hold on toit, how much
to sllcnd, and where
to spend
it m'e
some
of 'the prablem
all*time has,faunal
puzzling itsquestioris. This
way
into Christian
circles, and lads not been
left unanswered/
The Bible.teaches
these things about it.
"
"
ThAT GOD IS-TnZ Souucz or ALL FZrCANC_ALINCOMe:. •
" "
.
A. He is the On'e'who'makes
possible
the harvest.
L !'He . . , gave.us
rain
. .:and
fI'u tfu seas'ons
. ." (Acts 14:
.
1,7)..
2. ?TEe Lord gave. ; ." (Job 1:21)..
B. He is the' One Who provide/_ talents
for earning.
" ""
-
--ROBERT D. ROGERS
SCRIPTURE: Malachi 3: 7-10"
INT eDUCTION "Samuel
Pepys
•
1. Cost "of buildihg
today
pre-=
. eludes aimless construction.
"2. Cost of laxity predluddsbu
t- "
ing "castles
ifi"th'e sand."
3. Paul said,
"In whom
all.. the :I.
building
fitly framed
[plannod_
together
graweth
unto an holy
temple in the ISai'd 'i (Ephesians
2:21).
III. PEilSEVEaANCg
e
A."Or_ what sort of determination
am
I building?
"1. Many cease to huild'when.costs.
"
-mount.,
February. 1959
"
"
"
Pastor, .Corana,
" "
"
"_ 'STEWARDSIIIP.
OF
SECURITY
"
.
*
"
,
(97i
.
39
.
.
.
-
1.
"Every good gift ande(,ery
_erfect gift is'from above and cameth down from the Father.
(James
1:17) ....
2. R.G. LeTourneau,
J. C. Penney
.recognized
this.
C. He is the One who.prnvi_les
talents
for earning.
. .
1. "Fear not .
ye are of more
• •
value than many sparrows?'
(1)
....
'2.
2_. your
"But
need•
(Philippians
4:
my God ".slmll
supply
all
....
19):
II. TIIAT Gun HAS ALt,OW_:D Us "re Bt:
SrEWA_aS or MON_:Y.
....
'
His
fold: restrictions
concerningit
m'e t_o-
A.
Theacquisition
of it
1. It isto be sincere, and purposeful_--"Prdviding
for
h o nest
things . . ." (II Coriilt)fifins
8:
• 21).
2. It isnot'to
a6e miserly, or niggardly..
God called such a one
a.fool (Luke 12:20).
3. If blessed of God.one
m.ay gar-ner
plentifully,
E.g., .Job, Ab:
raham,
Solomon,
David, • Cm:'null'us..
"
•
:
4. Not dlshon_stly--Mattbew,
Zacehaeus
made
restitution.
Notmoney,, but the love of it, is the
• root,of evil (I Timothy:B;
10.).
. B. Thespending
of it
"
1. 'God is to get.the first one-tenth.
s. The very command
is:
"Honour
the Lm'd with
• •
the firstfi'uits"
(Proverbs
3:
9).
" ;
"
40 (08)
STEWA_RDSH|P
OF THE
SANCTUARY
"
•
TExa_: Psalms.93:54
" "
INTaODOCT1ON:
" God bui/ds no churches;
by His plan
That labor has been left to man. .
NO spires miraculously
arise;
No little mission
_rom the skies"
Falls _n a. bleak aifd barren place
--
_. -system_
Tithe i_ glvel_ bf purpose ofb .Offei'ings
givento
exemplify
.
love
"
"
.
IIl. TUAT Goa Is THE SOVEREIGN"Wile
HOLDS MANY BLESSINGS.FOIl. ]_AITIIPtIL
STEWAaeS.
'
"
.' '
A. Blessings
are
bontingent
upon
faithfulness•
1. _'Give, arid'it slmll be gLv'm) unto
you; good meastire"
(Luke
6'.
38]•
"
_. Englafid
/nude tithing lawand
has been an epapii'e for 1.0O0
years,
B. God
ignored
-those
who
robbed
Him,
.
"
I. Isl'ael had robbed God, and God
leftthem-_(Malaebi
3:7}.
2. This punishment"affected
every
stfzltum of their lives (Malachi
3:11).
.
.
CONCLUSION':
Ah whey. I look _tp at that Cross
Where
God's great Steward.
suffered
loss•
Yea, loss .o] li[O and blood ]or me,
A trifling
thing it seem to be
TO pa_ the tithe, dear Lord, to Thee_
"If ".the firstft:uits
be
holy . . ,".(Romans"
11:
" 16).
(2) "Bring ye allthe
tithes
• . ." (Malachi 3:10).
b. The command,
restated
by
Jesus,:is_
(1). Commends
t i t h i n g
(Mattbew
23:23).•
(g} These
do and ob.serve
(Matthew
23: 1-3).
(3) "Render
unto Caesar'r
(Matthew
22:21):
e. Command
reiterated
by Paul:
"
THE
' "-
(1):
.
"Let every one of you
lay by him in store a_
God hai.hprospered
him
" (I Corinthians
16:"
2').
(2) "God loveth aeheerful.
g ver"
(II Corinthians
. 9i7).
•
. - . "
God is. to receive
offerings
of
love.
-_,
"
•
O] time or'{alent,
wealth or store.
Full Well I k_tow I owe Thee more;
But that is jlist tl_e reason why'I lift my heart to God onhigh,
"
And'pledge
Thee by'this
portiod s_ffsll
My lile, my love, my all in aU!
This ho!y token at Thy Cross
_
l know, as gold, must seem but dross.
But'in
my heart, Lord, Thou dost see
How it has pledged
my all to Thee,
:That I a. steward
true may be!
" By Pau_ S. Reed
--ROa_T
D: aeneas
.
" .
Pastor,
Corona,
Calil&rnia
-
The Pteacher'a M_qozlna
_
.
!
'
." .
..
: i
";
'.
..
A." It is first of all a place.of worship.
1. Jesus said, "My Father's
house
shall be Called the house
of
prayerf
"
"
2. He drove out those merchandising in it.
3. He loved
its proper .function
("As his i:iastom was ....
"
Luke '4:16),
B. I't is a place of spiritual
nourish:
The
its pt/eeand grace,
1:
Jesussaid'and
Peter rei'terated,
To bechurch
a'sourcedemurrals
o] strength
ment.
In-hunia_t
toi_ add- sacrifice.
"Feed the flock.'.'
The humblest'spire
in mortal ken_
2. This specified
a double o_bliga-.
Where.God
abides, _as built by. men;
tion2--the minister
to feed, the
And if the church
is stilt to grow_
'flock to be fed.
IS still thelight'o]
hope to throuJ
C. It is' a place of salvation.
Across" the valleys o] despair,
1. WesleY, said, "You "have noth-"
Mdn still must bdild Gt_d's house el
mg to do but save souls."
prayer.
2. Halford
Luccack:
'!The aim of
God sends no ch_trches ]ram the skies;
- preaching"[s
:-.. thetransformaOitt o_ our hearts they must a'Hse,
lion of a personY
--AUTItOa UNKNOWN
We' who ha'¢e been born.from
above
IIL _V_ Mus'b CONCERN OoaSsLYEa WITtI .
have been given a tremendous
charge:
" ' TIlE• IMPLICATIONS OF FAILINO THIS
the st6war_tslfip
of the sanctu.ary-:the
STEWAaaslm'.
.building
and guarding
of the house
of
"A. To fail is inevitably
to lose the
God
and
things
holy.
The
Psalmist
presence
of God.
. spake.of
this wheh he wrote; "Holiness
L To lose God'spresence
is to lose
heeometh
thine house . ; ." The _umma.
: His protecting
hadd.
tion of the charge-then
could be stated
'2. There .came 'a time when God
_hus: The stewhrdship
of the sanctuary
turned
Is_/el
over to her enis the" maintenance
of holiness in God's
enaies. .The' reason,
'.'They have
house:
.
defiled'my
sanctuary"
(Ezekiel
_, WE MUST.'CONCESN OURSELVE;S "WITII
23:38).
THE IMPORTANCEOF THIS ST_WAaaSIIIP.
3. ? Many moderns
have defiled the. :"
sanctuary;
they ha'Je
no re-.
A. It is the house of God. It must be
.'d_eming
gospel to preach.
constantly
ready for His visitation.
1. God taught Israel that He could
B. To fail is to bring the wrath of God
.-:upon us: " •
• "
not dwell am'onE impurities,
2. Everything
brought
into .the 1. Saul
did p_est's
'it whenoffice
he inh'uded
into the
(I Sam_
Tabernacle
was.
washed
or
uel 13:8-14).:
.
anointed.
"
:
2. The. church'
at Ephesus
did it
B. It is the house
where God meets
by losing'their
zeal for souls and
His gathei_ed flock.
.1. We must have _he presence
of
becoming-,
a s o e i dl-walfare
.
God; We'eannotdo.without
it!
•
grpup'
: " .
""
2. Everything,
worshipei"s,
inIV..WE
MAY REJoxc_ xN Tim INca_ns_
eiuded, need to be clean.
This STEWARDSIIIP BRINes.
3. God will come to save sinners,
A. By "guarding
God's ho_e
We inbut h_,poerites
will often drive
sure.our
spiritual inereasd,
by this
.'.
Him .away.
"'
"
process.
-.
. .
II. WI_ MUST CONCF_N OURSELVS_ W1TII
1. We'proteetour
meansof
graceTrig. INSTI{UC_ION -RELATIVE TO THIS .
sound doctrinal
preaching•
ST_W._rtOSlIIP.
. .
- 2. Through
this rdeans we grow m
Foh/uary. 1959
......
_
"
(89) 41
I
I
I Ill
"" "
'
"
:
"
I
"
grace.
B.
Tho_e
who
fall
away
do
b.
The
Scriptures,
which
are
not.
3. Sam JOnes was asked why he
. didn't.lambast
modernists.
"I
was taught n_ever'to
speak evil
of,the dead."
"
the diagram of_ihe provision.
c. The Church,
which
is the"
testimony
of the provision,
B. It._:oncerns
itself with others,
L That is. our administration,
of
By guarding'
God's.hOuse
we insure out' numeri.¢a!, increase.
,
1. Patil sa|d, ".God giveththe
increase." ....
.
2. NO'._ he-spoke
in numbers,
bul
he also spoke 6f the-spirituality
of it.
.
" _RoBEIIT D. BoaEos
Pastor,
Cerebra, Csii]oruid
the charge bears on the destinyof others,
2. To maladminister
it is taste-',
•. mount to eatasu'ophe
foi" some.
othm" ,soul ....
;3. To properly
administrate
it is to
assure
blessing
for some other"
soul.
"
C. It carries
such
a multiplicity
• of
ramifications.
.,
1. "It finds importance
first in the
STEWARDSHIP,
A SOLEMN
CHARGE
_
TEXT:...
it is recluired
in stewards,
that _ mane, be _ound laithf.al
(I Corinthians
4:2)'.
"
• " "Nathan said,
INTaODUermN: George_Jean
"Bad afficials are elected by good citizens who do not vote."
This points
THE
•
-
,
_
..
neCeSsity of personal
salvation.
•
It finds importance
secondly
in the outliving, of a sanetifie'd life_
. 3. It finds importance
thirdly
in
the handling
of "tl'ly manifohl
-blessings.
" • -
LORD'S
IT I_ A SOLE:TiNCn:_l_GE BECAUSk OFITs
POTENTIAL .BLESStNCa.
A. There
are temporal
rewards ,for
good
ste_ardship-:_Mahiehi
3:10;.
"Luke 12:37.
. t3. There are also everlasting
rewards"
for good stewal:dship--M0tthew.25:
46b; Luke 10:25.
III. IT Is a SOLEMN CilXaOE Bi_eAUSE.OF
burdens:
Rich and poor according
t.otheir:ability
(I Corinthians
16:1).
C. Jesus
was. interestdd
in people's
giving and:that
eheei'fuliy.
IIL Ho_w CA_ I'BENEFIV pv TlrmNS?"
A. Inset eonsi:in_asness
that if pleases
. God:' makes us_partners
with Him
(I Corinthians
4:2).
IL
If
,
42 {90)
Th6 Pxoachot'n Maqfizlno
.
THE
l_et--personal
enterprises.
How SHOULD W_ Tx_rf_e?
A. Consistently,
regularly.
Church
has obligation
to meet rcgulai'ly-needs to be" nOlO to launch
new
projects.
"B.. Systematic
tithing
will equalize
ment is also made With the undet_. ITS PENALTY COS MALADM1NXSTaATION.
standingthat
the right, administratien
A. Tlmre are temporal
punishments-of.it will bring.advantage,
whilc_ the
Malachi
3:11
(by-.implicat
6n}
•maladministration
'silt
will
bring
disI
Corinthians
11:30:
Luke
15
(the.
.
" "
advantage,
prodigal.son
in.the pigpen),
God has'made
a con/mitment
t0 us:
B..'There
ard evelqasting
punishments
" of many vital principles,
whiCh.we'shall
(plurM, because there are so many
discuss in. the nextfive'
weeks.
This
degree& and variatidns
of punishis a most solemn charge"
•
rhents described
in'the Serll_tures)
.,
L "IT In ^ SOLEMN ChanGE BECAUSE or _TS
_Matthew.25:
46a: Luke:16:
19-31;
NATUaE.
,
Luke
13: 23-28: Luke .11:16-21.
A. It concerns
itself with our welfareCONCL(rStONIqThe parable of the ten vir- present and future,
gins, fotind in Ma(thew.(wenty-five,
is .
_
I. Being mortal,
eve have not the
an apt illusti'atlon
of both-the
posit!re
power over our destiny.
This
and negative
sides of the adrhinistramust be provided
for'by.Gad,
lion" of stewardship.
One •group ad2. This provision was made at Catministered
well, and was rewarded;
vary, at {he Resurrection,
and
the second group administrated
pdorat the intercessory
throne for us.
ly, arld.was'punished.
This.story
also
" 3..'The
availability
of the provision
points up" God'sserious
consideration
.to us is made wa:
- of the inilSortanee
of stewardship.
a. The .Holy Spii'it, Wire is the
"
:--RonkaT D. ROGEnSl .
: .
Ageiacy of provision.
Paslor: Corona,
Cali]ornia
•
IS
aware
of the. fact that Jesus
relates
this to the kipgdom
of God and m/m's
relationship
to himself,
Observe close:
ly what the Bible has to say about I,lais
truth.
. •
:
I. Whose Is, Tee'TITHE?
A. It is God's....
B." Man has" no authority
to handle
the tithe, and dispose
of it as he,'
seals'fit..
C. Not to use it for gainr-trade
mar-
2.
:out the fact that dnmocraey
is too. often unintelligently
unused. ' The cornmitment
of
vital
prineil_les
. by
authm'ities
to' heirs of lesser personages we eh!l stewardship."-This
dom-mitment is made by the authm'ity
with.
t!m full persuasion
that it shall
be
rigbtly
administrated:,Tiffs:commit-
TITHE
TEXT: Lay Eel-up
for yourselve_s
treesores upon earth...
(Matthew
6:19),
INTRODBCTION: How
much?
"All your
tithe---one-tenth,
Many
are ignorant
about the importance
of tithing or us-
- .
B. Free from covetousness.
Makes us
liberal and r/at stingy.
.
C. Pldy inajor
part. in God's
king•
dora.
He
maintains
His
work"
through
human, agencies.
"IV. Wear Iv WE FAiL TO TrrHz?.
A. Suffm_ spii'itual
depression.
Lack
interest
or concern ' for thin_s
of
God.
"
B. We treat'the
Bible as being "uninspired.
"
"
C. We Would' fail in reaching
the un-;
saved. " Disobey
God's command.
"Go ye into all tl/e worlff."
D. We would discount_its
binding ohligations.
"Hdlaour .the Lord with
- thy substance?'
V. Tile L_w OF _n_ TITHE.
A, .God expects
ud to. yield our tithe
as His universe
yields rain in due.
"
.
season.
...
.
B.. Honor God in obeying'
His Word
" (Leviticus
27:3(Yl."
C.
"
Giving
under
law was cornpulsory
--undeE
grace |tis rendered
eheerfully.
"
--HSNaY T. BEema, jn.
Pastor, .Baton Rouge, Ls,
"
THE
PRIMARY
IMPORTANCE
"OF CHRISTIAN
LOVE
SCULPTURE: .... blit the greatest
is love (I Coi'inthians
13: 13).
....
oJ these '
INTeODUCTION:"
A. Tlmre are various
vaiscdnceptior/s
of.love.
-" .
" ..
.
. :1. Old, clothes
Red Cross ete,
2, Sentiment
and feeling.
3." Identificfition
wlththe
sensual.
B: Love is of Qod.
. ,_
"
I. Purifying.
uplifting,
unselfish" '
"ness.
Godlikeness.
2.. A spiritual
attitude
to Christian'life-
tha[is
basic
3. .our
Love adtions
is the basic
quality for all
and service.
"In
C."
this life we.tia'_c
three great
'lasting
qualities--faith,
ho!ne, and
.' love. But. the greatest,
of them is
love"
(I Corinthians
13:13, Phil-.:
lips ' translation}:
I. LOve Is MOaE IMPORTANT 1:nAN ELO• QnENEE or SPEECU (V. 1)
"
A.
Speech
without
love
is empty
and
meaningless.•
"
'
-.
1.. Talking
power
wittmut
lo;,,e,
noise without
music.: sounding, is
•
brass, clanging
symbols.
2. "I cannot
hear
what you say .
for what you are."
3. Flattery,
insincerity--"brazenhess af words without emotion."
B..Powe/'.of
speech is-dangerous
without love.
1. Hitlerism.
2. F.aultfinding..
" .
C. Love is the key to our speech problem.
• .
II. 'Love
Is
Moite
IMI_OSTANT TITAN
KNOWLED_E"(V. 2a)
:
A, Knowledge
is a valuableand
dispensable
gift is( living
B... Knowledge
of itself is cold.
ferenti "nothing."
"
.
February, 1959
inindif(91) 43
.
.
'
'
_
"
•
[11
(I
I
. .
•
1: "Knowledge minus God equals
nothing,
2. To know about God tan become
Pharisaism,
head knowfedgc
withofit heart experience,
" C. Knowledge .without-,love
is dan::
_" " gerous.
"
' "
Dr. BOnneT in Seminary chapcl_
"You are here to'learn; but if in
"
"
THE IMPORTANCE
OF FAITH
IN WHAT WE' ARE DOING
(Sermon used at" school P.T.A,)
[NTaoaueTxom We aren0t
dealing with.physiology, sociology, and theology for
the sake. of-taking up precious time,
Our
main object and interest or the
as well" as l'or squads,
good eauffes.
Japanese.suiclde
Cornmunists.
"
• .
2.: Christ demonstrated
to us the
supreme revelation
of Christian lo,:,e CRorfians 5:8). o
C'oNc_usms: The greatest
command:"
" is to •love the Lord
.. w_th
.
Jesus •said,
.. _911thy heart, soul, mindl and strength
. and thy neighbor'as
thyself.
..
This is the oulx thing that • will save
us from legalism. Phfirisaism,
and a
worldl:¢ spirit (Romans 5:'5),
.
--C_^vDE E. Prrrra,_cza
Pastor, Chanutc, Kansas
....
•....
•
"
SIN
" "
:Sin may be clasped so close we cannot
see its face.v--'l"azNcn.
,
:
44"(_2)
"
"
L The teacher .has. _a ;superherculean task,
2. Should 'exercise joy, spirit of
.com'pfission, Understanding:
;]: Must understand
the familiar:
•
backward,
o- r overemotional
"focal point is in children.
your learning you have lost tile
E- Offa ULTIMATEGOaL
love for souls of, men and love for
*A."Tosee
children mature into'seaa great God--ryou'velost
.every.
soned citizens: morally clean, menthing."
.tally. alert, spiritually .pure: This
• III. LowlsMoasIMPoax.(NTrnAr_
F^rrtt.
is why faith is so necessary--in
(v. 2b)
.
.
God, self, child', and wbat We. arc
A, Faith may' accomplish the tropesla:ying .to do. In tra!ning the child
"
sible, miracles, etc. "
we give sebds of truths that will
B.. Love gives the proper" direction
call for. constant care--watering,
and motivation
lest" .we become
pruning, cultivating--until
meJudases.
-. '
"
turity, when child becomes well
IV..Love
Is II_IPORTANTIN OuR GIWNa
fortified toface society.unafraid:
ANDSERVICE:(V." 3)
. .
I." Three phases of democracy r_p•
A. Stewardship is based upona prln- _
resented
here today.
(home.
"
Ciple of love
churcl_ and schooD
"
1/ There may be a great devil of
2. Three'repi.esented
heads ' (pargiving with6ut love.
.
ent_home;
.principaI--sch0ol:.
2. Story of Jesus watching the
:
preacher:--church)
. poor widow glveher two mites.
3. Expt'ess purpose to project•and
•
3. Giving to be hohorable must be
"-p r e s o n t: chai_acter;: culture, '
motivated.'with lave,
Christ
.
- .
4. The ChUrch is an expression of
B..Even
though we'arc different and "
this principle,
-distincl m our particular fields, we
.
B. Self-sacrifice has no virtue • withare still dependent on each •other.
out Christian love.
We say.then
the chief responsi"
" I. Many
have
died
for
evil
causes
bility
for
the
moral,
"nien_al, and
•
'_
other uncontrollable " children,
mine'would be like a lamb."
B. School responsibilRy
. :
'
.. " "
.
'
.-.
.
, "-_
spiritual
of the and
Child
rests
i
upofi themewelfare
home,
school,
church.
Pei'mit
to give
a'few verses
of: " .scripture for the bases of oUr reniarksi Proverbs 22:6; 23:13,'25;
19:13; 13:24.
*-,, ^
_
-"
"., • .
. "
11.
NT rtESPONSIBILITy
. tJua I_aESE,
,
A, Parental Responsibility
-- 1. The home. is.primary
in God's
"
economy. It is the most potent
influerice in the development of
personality
What aperson is at
home: he is, to some extent,
everywhere..Cannot
g _:p e c t
.
:
.first-rate children from secondrate parents.
2. Tendency to delegate responsibility "-or problems
to others,
They say, "If it were not for."
The Preacher's Magazine
." dhlld, Must be impartial to all
conce/'ncd.
""
C, Church responsibility
•
1: This would include pastor, Sunday sch6ol teachers, etc.
2.•.Take personal interest in child,
consult with parents when prob_
lems oceuiZ-=try to get to the
source of the trouble,
Visit
them when lack of-interest
is
shown,
COr_CLUSmN: We all share in development of the child--_Jur combined efforts
. g_ tile job done.
'
""
--Hm_av T. BEk,Ea, Ja. .
,_
. •
Pastor, J3aton "Rouge, La.
: THE PENALTY
OF SIN
.
.
ScawvvaE: Ezekiel 7:1-9
TZXT: Nb(o is the 'end come upon thee
. . (Ezekiel 7:3).
.
INTnoaucTmN'. Inverse twet_ty-three we.
read, "... for the land is full'of bloody
crimes, and the_city ih full 01_violence."
Israel'had filled their cup of wickedhess until.it was x:unnmg over. Note
"
-
.now.1, Idol Worship prevailed every""
where.
2. The Templeof God was flefiled
_" . .
by godless priests,
.3. • Whoredoms were committed by
men and.women,in
the very
gates'and courts
of _e Temple,"
.
,
in G0d's name..
4.. The affections of_men were.un.
natur, al.
" "
. 5: The people worshiped the sun
- and other gods•of nature.,
6. The people made their ehild_'en
.pass thrmJgh fire and" offered
them to heathefi gods:
S n abounded and reached .high
heaven, until,, in verse eight, God dedared that: I_e would pour His _ury
". upon:that nation,
[
ThE Evzm_^t, GOD St,¢AKS.
A: Whenever God Almighty
we had better :listen.
B, God liad spoken in
through His prophets
'
God.
D. Gokl is speaking to Us today[
k. Bloody crimes fill " America.
Crimh is on the increase'.
2 God is cast.aside
by. million(s
and the god of self and pleasure
• is wm.shiped..
" '
".
3. "Man^; have a little form of
.worship, a little shov) of splrituality is made.
"Having.a
form of godliness, but denying
the power thereof" (II Timothy
3:5),
E.. Surely G6d Almigbty speaks to us
today. "Repent; or else I Will come
unto thee quickly, and wiU fight...
.against the_ With the sword Of m3'..
'"
mouth" (Revelation 2!16}:
II.TnzszGoo
.isDeCLaaesAN
Eso n_rroa
You,OVa
TEXT Tn^T
AI sin
Sinner,
dci and
you think
forever
get by?that you. can•
B. God' says "I see it all. It isn't hid
fromMy
cxes "When
you think
" that
y0ti:have
God
dethroned
fooled--He will come and. declareor
".
your end! of this:fact:
.
Illustration
1. God stopped PhaT_ioh in his
read-rush, against God in the
midst of the Red Sea (Exodus
" 14i27):
"
2.- God .stopped Nada/d and Ahthu
.(Leviticus 10: I-2).
.
.
3. God stopped Absalom in midair (II Samuel 18:9).
"
4. Gbd stopped. Heroc_ and declared his end as besat Off his
throne {Acts 12-21-23).
C. Do you thifik .that you.can get by,
wayward soul?
IlL GOD WILL NoT ONLY STOP" YOU BUT
Wn.L Bama To J_a_z_r.
A. "No_,.is the end come upon thee;
and I will send mifie anger.upon
(93}45
.
-
'
times past"
and seers;
through
j u.d.g m e n t s and
mercms,-through
the thunder and
!ightnings on Mount Sinai.
C. BUt-.Isrtiel. cared•not at all'about
Febranry! 1959....
•
speaks,
' '
'
.
.
II
$
"
•
thee. and will judge thee according
tothy
ways .... " (Ezekiel 7:3): "
B,
L SIN'S CONDITION
A. It is universal
In verse seyen we read, ?...
not
the sounding
again of the mountans"
God is say ng,' "You have
been hearing.
0 Israe.
the shouts
of. the harvesters
and the wine
pressers,
the. sound
of singing,
shouting_,.and
latigl_.ter
in the
m o u n t a i n s. But
now
it is-
II,..SIN'S
CAUSE ".
A. Its.cause
does
fields.
• .
•.
B.
1.
2.
" . 3.
" 4.
5.
13. I_s
1.
2.
God sp_eaks .in verse
for/r, "I will
not spard or have pity" at that day."
IV. IN Se_T_ or SIN AND TEE DEVIL rite
WORLR SilALL KNOW THAT OUR Goa Is
TIIE TRUE ..GOD.
"
A: In verse, four God says, "And ye
shall know
that.I
am the Loi'd:"
When th_ end has come, poor
ner, it is.too late_ Seek Christ
sin:hnd
pardon•
,_-'---_-"
"
-:-I_a E. Fow£Ea
"
"
_
Pastor, ChelSea, •West Virginia
SIN:!TS
CONDITION,
CAUSE,
AND
CURE
NTUODUCTION: Sin is the most ignoble
fact o}:t]/e universe,
Sin.exists
everywhere
that mortals
dwell.. "All have
sinned.'!
indictment:
is the inspired
.
Sin dro,)e the
" firstwedge,
of willful
doubt
against
God ih Ahe hearts
of
Adam and Eve inthe. Garden
of Eden.
'and has made a hobby of the.infernal
If it had no_ been' for the Cln:ist of
God. who came down
h'om' heaven,
•lived among men on this earth,
made
•
,
-
.
havesinned."
"I::::_OO:_
B. It is'all-pervasive.
1. The economic syste m
2. Tim educational
system
3. Society
4. Religion
the.sound
of _he marching
feet of.
the Chalde_ns.
the most .cruel of
all nations."
C. Hark,
O Israel!
Judgment
is
marching
with sure tread "toward
you.
.,
•D. So
God's'
-judgment
is swiftly.
marching
towardAmerica
and to-• ward you, sinner,
E.
"All
.
.
"
not
lie
a.
Sacrifice there
of himself
mankind,,
would• "forbe. theno sin
hopeOf
whatever.
But He did come and live
and die.
Moreover.
He" rose again:
and-in that resurrection
from the dead. _
Is our justification
for faith' in Him
.to effect a' remedy
and a cure. •
•
• •
46 [94)
• :
:]E_l_
"
Book
of
tile
Month
Selectimt
'"
,MARKS OF DISTINCTION
Edward
Knhlmann
(.Wartburg
Satat_, "
Adam and Eve
Any political part_,"
The woHdliness
of this world
Hypocrites
q
cause lies in the personality.
.
Don't
blame
Satah
or anyone
else foh:,your sin.
Take the blaine'yourself,
.:"
e.. To "say: "I can't live without
sin," is io blame God...
b. To say: '2 don't want [_olive
"
it," is to state'the
real cause
.
for sin.
. .
CoNcI,uslom
Yes, tim condition1 of things
sinful is awful to bebold..The
cause
of sinis
in the final sense both pres-
3:=_:E_-,I-_.
_ _
!
.in certain
HI. _IN'S CURE " '
A_ "It is net.to
be. found, in certain
areas_ .
:
1. In education'as
such.
'
_
2. In ec0nomic secta'ity
..
3: In goad environment,
4:. In good Works:
5, In monastic
living. " " ' .
"
• 6. In pr_ct cing penance
7. In purgatory
"
'_
8. Or even ir_ denying
sin's ex_
"
istenee
..
. B. -It is to be fdund revealed
in the
Bible•
' " •
.
1, 3ustifieation--Romans
5:1
2. Shnetifie'ati0r_--I
Thessalonians:
4:3
- " "
3. Prese_.vhtion.
or being •kept-3ude 24"and I Thessalonlans
5:
23
• •
for
•
December
"
Press,
$2.50)
"
-
.
.
'
.
-
.'."
"-
-
•
•
:
The brilliant
author
of ,Choosin_
Your- Mb_nories
gives'us
another "book of
distinction.",
And .this is no play on.words,
forMarks
oJ Distihetion
is brilliantly
written,
studded
With beckoning
illustrations.
Tbe "format, is Certainly
unusual[
the author uses eleven.different
punctuation
marks as the basis of as many penetrating
essays. To you th s book guarantees
several hdurs of stimnlatihg
reading.
Imagine finding so much interest
and blessing in _uel_ commonplace
things.as
a comma or a questiori.mark!.
Yet from each. there
marches
forth a parade of
fresh thbugbts.
AndI
will _e surprised
if you dbn't feel like plhhning
a sermdn
series of your own. l can see a large card.. .tacked to. your.
bulletin,
board ..With
_"
only one thing on it--a semicolon•
Under" It thin caption,'
Problems.of.Medmctlty,
add the invitation
to hear the sermon nekt Sunday
at 11:00 a.m.
.
• Kublmann
moralizes
built.
You
.
,beautifully . but his essays are not Biblically
can inject scripture
.galore.and
tbere
you will have. the ingredients'
qf many
splendid
sei, rd0hs-4deeidedly
off the_?eateu
tt:aek_
.
"
"
''
i'
"
•
_'"
"
""
"SEVEN sWORDS AND OTiIEII SEI_MoNS
:
'
:'
"
Robert G: Lee (Zondervan,
$2•00)
'
-"
ent
and personal
with Christ
each has
of usproin
_
his.natural
state; but
vided a cure, both sufficient
and satisfactdry,
for everyone
who will'accept
.:
it:..
"
.....
--S. A: S_rrli
. .
.
Pastor, Kankakee,
Illinois "_
.
The,Preacher's MacJa_lno -
Tliis is the title of the.book
and the first of five' sermons
by. the famoqs
Southern
Baptist preacher.
Each'sdrmonfis
exh'emeiy
well written,
readable,_and
warmly evangelical.
:The author has a way of making wo_ds sin_' like" s lark at
, sunset.
"Both laity and ministers
would enjoy reading
the:se serhmns
for 'the
beauty
of expression
and. the wai'mth of them. They ai'e not:heavily
endowed
" " with briginal thinking,
but arc el,early Biblical and devotional•
" " "
"
" .
..
SERbION SEEDS FROM Tile GOSPEL'S .....
- : _
"
"
WebbB.
Garrison
(Revell, $1.95) . •
° •
•
In a rather unique way tl{is author has laid open.the
four Gospels, dissecting
each one and lifting Up those bit's of Ethic _'erse that hhve within
them fertile
little thought
germs...Any
preacher
would find a lot of ideas foi" sermonic,beg/hnings.
It would haveto
besaid
:in honesty
that'the
thinking
nowhm'e in the
":b_ok'conld
be :termed
unusual
or profoubd.
But the book d6es have its'place
in the sermonic list. even as my mother'ke_t
yeast close by her breadmaking
board.
"
"
" " "
" " "
MEDITATIONS FOR YOUTII
Walter L. Cook'(Abingdon,
_$1'.75)
.
-"
.
"
"
"
Tliere have been frequqnt requests
foi _ a volume of daily.devotlonals
beame¢l
for. young"people,
in the language
of youth--that
distir_etive
flair 0f. expression
"
that youth,dearly
loves..'I;his.is'such
a book. The:titles of the brief _levotions are
themselves
intriguing
and appetizing..
The book: does not ave d the "pressing
problems
that youth faces not" does it attempt
to pass the buck. It faces up.to.the.
moral decisions that youth must make without whimpering.
Except for one farm.=
.able reference
to the use Of diamonds
(which:we
ass/lme to be basically
unwise)
these meditations • can have a whdiesome
ministry
to youth.
(85) 47
Fabruary, 1959
.
"
,
]
-
•
.
W,lE,,
Guy D.Gee
Newma_'(Zondervan,
INVAOE"
",STORY.
$2.00) "
,"
•
•
:"
•
".
_
'
"
-
_-
Eleven sin.mona that most assuredly.are
superior
and which eoinpliment
the
intelligence ofhypbthesis
the readers.in the
Wereoneit _ermon
not [oz" on
the "A
author's
tacit acceptance
tl_e
evolutionary
Philosophy
of History," of this
book might have had a more warmhearted
accept;_hce
lay us. But the sermons
are certainly
above 'the' average
!hot'have
heel) 'revieWed
by this book editor
fro; quite some time..When
you t'/.,ad, them, you.will _/crateh yam" head and perhaps
lay the'book
aside while you ponder
upop some of the penetrating
thoughts
etched on the pages..
•
.. A IIANDBOOK
FOR TIlE PREACIIER
' ' .....
AT WORK
'
- '"
" "
" "-
with
•
•
"
and.Jesus:
"
It is truly
""
""
'
STUDII_S IN MARK'S GOSPEL :
-
.
-
'
PRAISE
" .
-
•
'
"
.
'
.
WolivSwoa'rH
/]',mild]
"
"
in' ,I editions:
:" "
) I,'I)ITION
"
"
$1:60 each.
'
leather-
dellvery
EI)ITI()N
accompanists)
-
$1.75
extra
. .
"
-
IIOME
EI)I'I'lt)N
(for fan'dly u_e) .
- rinus
Samebladk
as standard
cloth
.
""
I)E I;IIXE
YA)ITION
.
" "
s(_netnary
Individualblack •pages
"heavy
Lexidein three-ring
"
.
.
(f or congrega lib nifl use. )
Durably
hbund
in m a r o o n,
edition,
.
:
binder S2.Sfi
oi
hut.. in lttxu'S1.75
. .
..
(for 3_oui'self:, pulpit,
or gift)
Black.
hand-graified,
mo_
roeeo
binding
with
goltt
" "
"
.
edges
S6.50
. : :
.
.
"
"
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-
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"
" "
,
'
_
.
- "
"•
" *:rh_2 host cont_egational
"sin!ring resull_ when every.
., person has access to a-iwmnhook.
A
dequate supply
is
a't least one-heal/ for every two peep c in the conLlregation,
" "
"
"
*
"
-
"" ioicandSin.
g
..e
Nazarene
e
Publishinq
"
- "
in every
'/']lt" l\]tlzarftld
.%."I'ANI)AII
..
"
-
:
.
.
WORSHIP
" Avoilahle
Gospol,
andwlth tsrolatiant.
•" atthew
• :"'d'.0ko.
-
"
(for
,"
An excellent and helpftll book for preacher m': layman studying this' Gospel
It is authentic
[n scholarship
and evangelical
in its interpretation.
It should he
included in any listing of acceptable,books
on the Gospel of Mark.
.
" and
Hymnal
IA)OF, I':-I,|':..\I"
Robertson
(Broadman,.
$2.50)
-"
. ..
This is a collect:ion of stfidies in Mm.k's Gospel..It
is different
fro'm most • in:uSmueh as it ls a discussion
Of the high lights rather than a chapter.-by.:chapter
"
commentary.
For example,
the author treats the revelation,
the parables,
and the
teachings
allChrist
in this Gospel,
bringihg
out strongly, the miraculous
element•
'
Dr. Robortson
also deals With John Mark as a person, with tl)e date of the
•
. .
home
grained
cloth'
12 or more,
A.'T.
49 (96)
Nazarene
o'f l?aub
"
.
"
in- ever!l
"
" trine of original
sift as we]I as infinite grace in Christ meeting man's moral deeds,
He repudiates
liberalism
and humafiism
and with psychoanalyticallskill
affirms
man and his redemption,
It is a penetrating
discussi'bn enlightened
b_ the Holy Spirit:
_
.
E.E.
"
.
,.,; '
': " '
"M_N IN NATUR'F,.AND.IN
GRACE
- '
.:
.
•
Stuiz_'t BartonBabbage
{Eerdmans , $1.50)
.
• =
.
_A'"Pathway'.'
book of real merit,
Author
Bahhage'clearly.
differentiates
be-_
_.ween "Man in'Nature"
_nd-"Man
itr Grae&" The work seeks to rehabilitate:and
re-establish
the Christian
dec!ripe
of man. The authdr defends the Biblical doe-
.
o[ Ihe
']
E, E. WoaeswoffTtl
1
Nazarene
*adeqtmle.slq_pl!!
"
-
a rare'harmonization
lhe
i
_
fiat•
el
• An
. .
"
:,
a.copy
II_lmual
. .
1959
•
•
$3.50)
and His creative
in
-
•This is a sctmlarly,
timely, invaluable
hook off Christian
apologetics.
The
author deals'with
modern schools of criticismand
defends
orthodoxChristianity
With vigor, careful resear/:h
and fiall Understanding.
He ti'cats exegetically
Paul's
Epistles 'and especially
as they are concerned
with Christ,
the Son 6f God, the
l_edeemer,
.
Regain"the singing&ur&" repotation
""
You can well _/sstlmethat'a
•book of less than a hundred
pages cannot give to
each.of these problem
areas very exte/aded
consideration.
The advice throughout
is rather
elementary,
but it is practical
and earthy.
This .is a good beginning
handbook
fro" a p_eacher s_.m'ting out in the mlnisti'y,
world's
'." l'a-zarene s,"r,
" '
deff'D.
Brown.chapters
(Baker,. A
$1.75)
.
" Ut'terlypraetical.
wealth vast
of advlco,,
in problems
a" very briefand volume.
Twenty-two
eox,era
variety concentrated
of ministeifial
needs.
PAUL AND JESUS
H. N. Ridderbos
(Baker,
,
]
.
'The Preacher's MacJaz_e
"
House
2e_23Wa'lfintaot,T
0oat, BOXer
Stereo,52"/Sa,lSaSpa_adenaCity
7.41'CalII.MO"
IN'CANADA--1592
Bloat Strcet_ West Toront_ 9, 0ntarto
." " . ....
_dl
,
I
I
.
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:

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