The life and battles of Jack Johnson, champion pugilist of the world

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The life and battles of Jack Johnson, champion pugilist of the world
0.22
— FOX'S
ATHLETIC LIBRARY.
OF-
CHAMPION
OF THE WORLD
WITHAHISTORY
OF PAST CHAMPIONS
PRICE
10
CIS.
RICHARD K FOX
PUBLISHING CO
»'-•'
.
FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK
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THE
LIFE
AND
BATTLES
-OF-
J ACK
JOHNSON
CHAMPION PUGILIST OF THE WORLD
Togetlier
J?mes
witli
J.
Complete Records
tlie
Corliett,
Tommy
RICHARD
Rums,
K.
of"
Robert Fitzsiniinons.
Peter Jackson
Jolin
J;iiiies
ami Jim
L.
].
Sullivan,
Jeffrie-j
Flynn.
FOX PUBLISHING COMPANY
NFW YORK CITY.
LRANKLIN SCIHARB,
Copyright 1912
BY RICHARD
K.
FOX PUBLISHING COMPANV
CONTENTS
TAGK
Johnson's Career
9
Burns-Johnson Battle
-
-
-
39
-
In the RingBattle
41
by Rounds
-
-
Battle with Jack O'Brien
-
-
KetchcU
Battle with Stanley
Fight by Rounds
.
Arranging the Fight
50
-
-
50
.
-
-
Johnson-Jeffries Battle
48
-
.
.
-
43
-
-
55
-
64
-
-
Fight by Rounds
66
-----
Statistics of the Battle
Johnson's Record
Jeffries'
Record
-
John L. Sullivan
James
J.
Burns
.
.
-
76
-
-
-
-
-
-
=
o
-
77
82
85
-
^
74
80
-
.
-
-
---'•-
Peter Jackson
Jim Flynn
73
-
.
-
.
-
-
Robert Fitzsimmons
Tommy
,
-
-
Corbett
.
-
87
28
TOE CHAMPION'S
SMILE.
ILLUSTRATIONS
----...
------
PAGE
Richard K. Fox
2
The
6
Chanipicju's vSmilc
Jack Johnson
Johnson in London
-
-
Johnson in Training
James
Jeffries
J.
John L. Sullivan
James
J.
Corbett
Burns
Joe Jeannctte
Sam McVey
Molineaux
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Joe Gans
Takes
Jeffries in
2C
30
-
------
Johnson's Remarkable Muscles
Ilis
Time
Bad Sliape
-
-
.
-
-
....
Tex Rickard, Fight Promoter
-
32
34
36
38
-
-
24
26
-
George Dixon
Jeffries
-
-
Joe Walcott
20
22
-
----------
18
-
-
-
•
16
-
-
•
-
14
-
-
-
-
Sam Langford
-
-
-
12
-
-
-
Robert Fitzsimmons
Tommy
-
-
10
-
-
-
8
4c
42
-
44
JACK JOUNSON, CHAJilPION OF THE WORLD.
JOHNSON'S CAREER
There
is
nothing spectacular about the
career of Jack Johnson, and his earlier fight-
record does not
ing"
mark
the champion.
As
in the case of Peter Jackson, white pugilists,
in
many
cases,
have drawn the color
him.
Up
really
had no chance
do.
to
the time
on
he fought Burns he
to
show what he could
But that battle and the one with Ketchell
gave the public a
He began
S.
line
Smith
in
Rocks away
line
on his real
his career in 1897,
rounds;
ten
in
kiter
four rounds.
knocked out Rcddy Brcnicr
and beat jim Cole
in four.
ability.
when he beat
he
put Jim
In
1898
he
in three rounds,
Me
fought a fifteen
round draw with Henry Smith.
He went
twelve rounds to a draw in 1899 with Pat
Smith, and the next year beat Josh Mills in
twelve rounds, and KU)n(like
In
the latter part of
in
1901
twenty rounds.
he
met Joe
JACK JOHNSON IN f-ONPON.
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON
LIFE
home town.
Choynski in his
This
1
1
battle
brought his name before the publie and after
winning several battles
was taken
win and
to Chieag'o,
to
show signs
in the
Southwest he
where he continued
of cleverness.
to
In that
year he had three knockouts to his credit, as
Charley Brooks, two rounds; Horace
follows:
Miles, three rounds,
and George Lawler, ten
rounds.
This showed that he had a punch.
The next
year, 1902, he
to his credit,
Jack
added
six
knockouts
and one of the defeated men was
Jeffries, a
who had begun
brother of the then champion,
to
show promising signs
as a
boxer, but he only lasted five rounds with the
black man.
His
first
defeat was at the hands of the
veteran boxer, Joe Choynski, with
whom
he
was matched by the Galveston Athletic Club
in
March, 1901.
start, as
He was
outclassed from the
might have been expected from a man
with his limited experience.
well, however, in the first
He
did very
and second rounds,
but in the third he was caught on the jaw with
JACK JOHNSON IN TBAININQ.
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
a right hook, and he
this contest
both
went down and
men were
stigation of Gov. Sayers,
bail,
out.
I
.^
Foi
arrested at the in-
and held
in ,*i5,ooo
but they were eventually released.
The big year
num-
for Johnson, so far as
ber of fights engaged in was concerned, was
1902,
when he was one
of the principals in six-
teen contests, losing not one, and having four
draws.
This was the year that he met Jack
Jeffries,
brother of Jim, and played with him
for five
rounds before he dropped him for the
count.
Probably his hardest battle of the year was
on October
31,
when he met George Gardiner,
the middleweight champion of
befcjrc the vSan
cisco, Cal.,
ringside
New
England,
Francisco Club of San Fran-
and he surprised the people
who came
to see the clever
New
lander hang another scalp on his belt.
son forced the fight from the
start,
at the
EngJohn-
and kept
up the pace during the entire twenty rounds,
winning the
tlecision
with plenty to spare.
This battle brought him more prominently
JAMES
J.
JKFFRIES,
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
before the public than
tests
all
15
of his previous con-
put together.
After that he met and defeated in
six
rounds at Los Angeles, Cal., Fred Russell,
and again on February
23, 1903,
Denver Ed
twenty rounds in the
]\Iartin in
he outpointed
same town.
Sam McVey, who
wide swath
is
at present cutting a
in pugilistic circles in Paris,
Johnson's next opponent.
capable of
customer,
He was
a tough
taking a good licking
and coming back, and he had a punch,
They came together
ruary
27, 1903,
in
way.
too.
Los Angeles, (m Feb-
and the bout went the limit of
twenty rounds, but from the
was never
was
in doubt, for
The man who
is
it
first
the issue
was Johnson
all
the
now champion showed
then that he had a good punch in either hand,
that he
was quick, aggressive and resourceful.
At the
finish
the decision went to him, and
justly, too.
The next day he announced
going after
Jeffries, for
that he
was
he wanted a chance
JOHN
L.
SULLIVAN
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
was
at the title that
He claimed
cal
to
come
him
to
at that time that he
17
later on.
was the
logi-
opponent for the big fellow and he was
also sure that
he could beat him.
But the
champion evaded him, having drawn the color
line since
Hank
he met
Johnson won
all
Griffin in 1901.
of his battles during the
year of 1903, beating the rugged
His
whom
first
opponent
McVey
twice.
1904 was Black
in
Bill,
he met in a six-round exhibition bout in
On
Philadelphia.
he knocked out
April
McVey in
22, in
San Francisco,
the twentieth round,
putting a quietus on the aspirations of that
boxer and proving conclusively who was the
master.
He
Chicago
in
also
six rounds,
year by knocking
Angeles
in
won from Frank
out
Childs in
and finished up the
Ed Martin
in
Los
two rounds.
Marvin Hart gave him
his first real
set-
back, getting the decision at the end of twenty
rounds in San Francisco on March
28, 1905.
Hart won, however, purely on his aggressiveness, as at the
end of the
fight
he was badly
JAMES
J.
CORBETT
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
I9
beaten and in miserable shape, while Johnson,
on the other hand, showed scarcely a mark.
He
cleaner,
hit
he showed more cleverness,
and he would have won easily had he forced
the fighting instead of allowing Hart to set the
pace-.
From
went steadily up,
that time on he
his
speed, his cleverness and his ring generalship
increasing, and he soon
began
dangerous
in
a
as
The only thing
division.
was his
color,
the heavyweight
that kept
say that
if
he had been given
chance he would have been champion long
ago,
and
Tommy
Burns would have been
the scrap heap with the rest
raters.
of
him down
and there arc plenty of sporting
men today who
his
factor
be recognized
to
The only man
of his
of
own
the
in
second
color capable
competing with him was Joe Jeannette.
They met
saw these
several times, but no one
battles
had
Jolmson was the master
game and could have
ab he pleased.
who ever
any doubt but that
at
all
stages of the
'lone with Jeannette just
ROBERT FITZSIMMONS
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
The
fact that
Johnson beat Sam Langford
in Chelsea, Mass., in fifteen
26, 1906,
showed
21
rounds, on April
his class, because
Langford
and always has been a dangerous
man
is
in the
ring in any company, as a glance at his record
will show.
At Philadelphia on July
17, 1907,
he knocked
out the redoubtable Fitzsimmons in two rounds,
and the same year he put away Charley Cutler
in
one round and Jim Flynn in eleven.
For the past
years his course on the
five
pugilistic ladder has
been steadily iipward, and
own
he has come into his
long chase of
Tommy
at last.
During
Burns he expressed the
greatest confidence in his ability to put
the
man who was
champion.
would
away
proclaiming himself the
Time and time again he
finish the battle, if
of fifteen rounds,
his
said he
ever they met, inside
and those who have seen him
box anywhere, and not prejudiced against him
on account of his color, were convinced that he
could do just as he said.
There has been a
lot of talk
about a "yellow
TOMMY
BURNS. EX-CHAMPIOK
MFE AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
Streak " that he
have
it,
but
if
he has no one has yet found
out, so there is
He
lion,
is
is
punch
He may
said to possess.
is
23
no use
in nientioning
built magnificently,
clever,
in either
scientific,
purse because he
strong as a
fought for a small
knew he was going
champion before he
left
again.
it
and carries a great
He
hand.
is
be the
to
He was
the ring.
convinced that he was the best
man and
was willing
as a
prove
to fight to
it
it,
so he
champion
should.
This big fellow heads the
list
of
famous
negro fighters, beginning with Molineaux, the
giant black
who fought Tom Cribb
the championship of
England
of the present century;
in the early part
and when you come
review the histories of the two
strangely
alike
Johnson won what he went
went from
\'irginia,
that time.
first,
He
after.
to
they are
except
that
Molineaux
alone and j)enniless, to
face the greatest fighting
at
men
everything
in
twice for
man
the world
knew
wasn't taken seriously at
but after one or two hard trvouts the
SAM LANGFORDl
:
LIFE
sporting
AND BATTLES
men
that he had
make Cribb
JACK JOHNSON.
f)F
25
England became convinced
of
enough
of the fighter in
him
to
They were matched
step a bit.
and the battle of thirty-three rounds lasted
fifty-five
Though he was compelled
minutes.
to give in,
beating, so
Molineaux gave Cribb a fearful
much
champion had
so that the
to
be assisted from the ring.
The second
battle
between these
tw^o at-
tracted a great deal of attention in England,
there
as
many
were
who
believed
Molineaux could beat the champion.
this
But
in
they were mistaken, as the sturdy negro
lasted but eleven
Here
rounds.
writer of the day had to say about
"The
battle,
superiority
Molineau
at the
is
what a
it
which lasted only nineteen
minutes and ten seconds,
the
that
of
left
Cribb.
no doubt as
The
science
to
of
opening of the fight was quite
equal to that of the champion, but the condition of Cribb
was
far better, his
under control, and
question
as to
temper more
although there was no
Molineaux's courage,
which
JOE JEANNETXa
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
27
almost amounted to ferocity, Cribb was his
superior in steadiness and self-possession."
Jack Johnson, born in Galveston, Texas, on
March
listic
31, 1878, is
champion
dications
to
is
come.
now
the heavyweight pugi-
of the world,
likely to
gain the coveted
all in-
remain so for some time
He becomes
ways than one and
and from
is
a notable figure in
the
more
negro boxer to
first
title.
Never has any other boxer the world over
shown such persistency
in
following up a
champion as Johnson did when he
up his mind to go after
Tommy
would scarcely have succeeded
first
Burns.
made
He
in obtaining a
meeting with the elusive French-Canadian,
however, had
it
not been for
his
wing and
took the black
literally
chased Burns
almost around the world.
first
begun
in
Fitzpatrick,
who
veteran boxer and manager,
man under
Sam
Negotiations were
America, but nothing came of
them, and Burns went to England to gather
what
eas)'
money was
When Burns became
in sight in that country.
the idol of the
English
SAM McVEY,
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
29
and Irish sport-loving public by his decisive
victories
made another move
to
men,
best
over their
in his
England and trying
Fitzpatrick
campaign by going
to force
Burns into a
champion made
match.
The demands
for his
end of the purse, win, lose or draw,
that the
were considered unfair, and Burns
of the
lost
much
good wishes of the public by the severe
criticism of the British press.
Many thought
campaign
that the next
of evasion
that Fitzpatrick
would never get
seemed too
for his
negro
This was when
title.
set sail for Australia
point that
in Burns'
would end matters and
boxer the chance for the
Burns
move
from England, a
far off for the other
combination, whose funds were being fast used
up
in their pursuit.
Fitzpatrick and Johnson, however, did not
give up the chase, for they had the
Biirns that
lie
were acceded
champion was
Hugh
would
to.
fight
Over
when
in the
his
of
demands
Antipodes the
finally cornered, for a
Mcintosh, was found
word
who was
promoter,
willing to
MULI^'EAUX,
WHO rOU«HT TOM
CUIBB
liS 1810,
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
31
guarantee Burns $30,000, no matter what the
outcome, and Johnson was only too willing to
Mcintosh,
accept $5,000 as his end.
man
little
more than
thirty years old,
great nerve in arranging
is
a
showed
the details, as he
all
amount
stood to lose a vast
who
if
the interest did
not prove enormous.
One
of the big initial items of expense
was
the building of a stadium at Rushcutter's Bay,
capable of holding twenty thousand persons,
cost of
at a
seats,
.^i
The advance
0,000.
sale
of
however, for nearly a month before the
scheduled date assured the success from a
financial standpoint.
$50,
Seats sold as high as
and the cheapest bench
No event
in
a
be had cost $5.
generation
Australians as did this fight.
of
to
clergymen made an
aroused the
An
effort to
association
have the mill
stopped, but their attempt proved unavailing
against the outburst of i)o|)ular enthusiasm.
The Premier
athlete,
was
of Australia, liimsclf an old-time
just
as mucli
interested in the
combat as the ordinary " bushwhacker," and
JOE WALCOTT
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
many
men and
those
government showed
their
of the leading- business
identified with the
SS
eagerness to see the battle by their purchase
of choice seats long before the date set.
In place of the jibing criticisms that were
meted out
to
Mcintosh because of what the
Australians thought was foolhardiness, there
is
nothing
words of
now on
the island continent but
praise.
Rumors
of all kinds
were
rife that the fight
would be "fixed" and that Johnson would be
bought
off.
When
it
wagered $10,000 on
" wise
that
"
was
his chances
That the
the level
battle
to
many
was
some more
ot the
"The
was asserted by Mcintosh
own
fight will be absolutely
bet on
it
on
in the fol-
signature
on the
with confidence.
would not have chased Burns
craft)
to be strictly
lowing cablegram over his
You can
Bums had
sport followers were further convinc xl
Burns had been up
tricks.
said that
:
level.
Johnson
for nearly twelve
thousand miles to get a match and then throw
it,
while Burns would not
'
lay
down
'
to a
JOE GANS.
LIFE
The earning
negro.
these
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
men
in the
capacity of
either
from
its
me
of
event of victory would be
greater than by indulging in a fake.
it
35
So take
that the mill will be decided on
merits."
Now that
Fitzpairick's
campaign
in follow-
ing Burns to the other side of the world with
his
negro challenger has ended in success he
will be hailed as
one of the shrewdest handlers
of fighters in the history of the ring.
when
patrick had Peter Jackson
was the most feared heavyweight
Fitz-
that negro
in the
game.
Corbett was the only champion aspirant
who had nerve enough
even Jim
"passed up"
famous "no contest"
livan
drew
the
color
and
to face Jackson,
at
Peter
after
their
San Francisco.
line
Sul-
on Jackson, and
F'itzimmons was frank enough to admit that
he wanted none of Jackson's game.
failed to take care of himself
ard out when Jim
Jeffries
Jackson
and was down
whipped him.
Fitzpatrick also handled (ieorge Lavigne,
when he was the lightweight champion.
GEORGE DIXON.
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
The Johnson-Burns match was
the
37
first
heavyweight championship battle staged out-
Sullivan
John L.
United States in years.
side of the
won
the
title
from Paddy Ryan
at
Mississippi City nearly thirty years ago, and
James
J.
Corbett beat Sullivan in
New
Bob Fitzsimmons whipped Corbett
City, Nev.
,
and James
J.
Jeffries
Orleans.
in
Carson
defeated
Fitzsimmons at Coney Island.
Burns whipped O'Brien
and defeated
at
Squires, the
Bill
England and beat Gunner
]\Ioir,
pion of England, in London.
cpiished
Jem Roche,
champion
of
Then he went
Australia, in San Francisco.
to
Los Angeles
He
the chamalso van-
the champion of Ireland,
in Dublin.
Sullivan fought only one battle abroad while
he was champion, his memorable contest with
Charlie
Mitchell
was a draw.
in
Chantilly,
France.
It
Jackson whipped Slavin in Lon-
don for the championship of England and
Australia.
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
39
BURNS-JOHNSON BATTLE.
The
was scheduled
to take place
at
eleven o'clock in the morning' of Deceiiiber
26,
fight
and so great was the excitement and the
1908,
desire of the Australians to see
it
that hundreds
came from the outer
districts the
and
in order to be
open
slept in the
the morning.
One hour before
night before
on hand in
the bell was to
be rung for the contest every seat was taken by
a
crowd estimated
at
between eighteen and
twenty thousand persons, who had paid into
the box office a
sum estimated
at
from $150,-
000 to $175,000.
Statistics of the Fighters.
Here are the weights and dimensions
the
men when
they went into the ring:
Burns.
27 yeiirs
5
ft. 7>i in
176 poiiniifi
74^^ in
12 in
13Ji In
16 in
40Ji in
32>^ in
38
ii
23;.)
i5}i in
Johnson.
30 years
.\'4e
Height
6
Weislit
196
Reach
Foreiirna
Biceps
I'l.
l?i in.
pounds
72X in.
13 in.
14>^ in.
Neck
17 in.
Chest
Waist
43Ji In.
Hips
Thigh
Calf
33 In.
37 in.
22^
in.
16 Id.
of
JEFF TAKES HIS TIME GETTING
UP.
AND BATTLES OF JACK
LIFE
THE
IN
At
10.42
a.
RING.
his seconds, vSain Fitzpatrick,
Lang and Bryant.
Unholz,
Wild
cheers greeted him, and the big black
turned and bowed to
Jtist
as
all
man
four sides of the ring.
Johnson took
He was
peared.
4I
m. Johnson entered the arena,
accompanied by
Miillins,
JOHNSIJN.
his seat
Burns ap-
smiling and the plaudits of
the spectators were even
more
than those accorded Johnson.
his position in the
enthusiastic
Burns took up
western corner of the ring,
surrounded by his seconds, Keating, O'Keefe,
O'Donnell, Burke and Russell.
When
the cheering had died
down some-
what Johnson crossed over and shook Burns
by the hand.
The Canadian glanced
big mauleys of the
at the
Texan and noticed
both were covered with bandages.
that perhaps they
them
Fearful
might not be of the
soft
them
closely, but.
to his satisfaction,
he made no
surgical kind he scrutinized
finding
that
objection.
The announcement was made
that
if
during
LIP-E
AND
JACK JOIINSON.
BATTt,?:S OF
4.^
the contest the police should interfere and stop
the
it,
would immediately give a
referee
decision based on points scored.
When Burns
wore
stripped
bandages
elastic
it
was noticed he
about
his
elbows.
Johnson shouted across the ring, half angrily,
"You must
take
tlio-^c off."
THE BATTLE BY ROUNDS.
Round.
First
— After
a few moments of preliminary
sparring Johnson reached Burns with a sharp upper cut
and the Canadian went to
the count of eight.
was
all right,
He
tlie floor,
remaining there for
signalled to his seconds that he
however, and when he arose sailed in for
Johnsons body. Jolinson swung a hard right
and Burns staggered backward
from the impact
of the blo\.^
n( arly
to the head,
across the ring
Then Burns, rushing
planted a right of great force on Johnson's chin and
excellent display of boxing
nevertheless,
managed
to
warded
off
in,
by an
a return. Johnson,
put through a stinging
left to
the head at the soimd of the gong.
Second Round.
—When
the
gong clanged Johnson
yelled across to the approaching Burns,
"Come right on,"
and he swung his right and landed hard on Burns'
ciiin.
The champion's ankle gave way under him and ho went
down, lie was up immediately, however, and Johnson
got to close quarters with
to face
swell.
and body.
Burns'
Johnson thus
far
him and placed right and left
left eye here commenced to
had the better of the
battle.
TEX RICKARD, FIGHT PROMOTER.
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
The big black man was coming
a
little.
He was
tired.
swung
Burns' stomach.
Burns was doing but
bleeding from the
mouth and apparently
terrific left into
was
the time and he
all
45
The men were clinched
Third Bound.
—Burns
swung
as
bell rang.
tlie
right to Johnson's
his
head and then did some wonderful execution at infighting,
chopping his right
to the ribs frequently.
ing the round landed some
Fourth Round.
terrific
—When
the
Johnson dur
blows to the kidneys.
men met
in the centre of
the ring Johnson shot a heavy right into Burns' ribs.
men
The
talked wildly to each other, each seemingly intent
upon getting the other excited and landing the money
winning punch.
During the jeering they sparred
body and Burns brought right
the
fiercely,
Then Johnson swung
but few blows were struck.
to head.
left to
Johnson,
closing in, threw a terrific right and left to the head of
the Canadian,
The
found the
men
in a hard clinch.
— Apparently refreshed from his minute's
Fifth Round.
rest,
bell
Burns started the round briskly, landing
his right
on
Johnsons head and punching the body with both hands.
Johnson managad to
slip
over a few rights to the head
during the round.
Sixth Round.
Breaking
his right
loose,
—Johnson
rushed and Burns clinched.
however, with one hand, Johnson swung
a dozen times into the white man's
jolted Joluison's
body
frecjueutly
hard over the ribs and put a
several times.
stilt
Jolmson Ircatcd
ribs.
Burns
and swung his right
left
ilicsc
to the stoniucli
blows as a joke,
laughing at the crowd nnd makin;;- sarcastic remarks to
LIFE
46
his
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
opponent as be bustled Burns into a corner and scored
a couple of rights to the body.
Seventh Round.— Johnson
ring, dealing out rights in
Burns got a
left to
lump under Burns'
rushed Burns across the
which there was no mercy.
Johnson's jaw and Johnson
raisi-d
Johnson was landing
seemed to be losing strength.
a
Burns here
right eye in return.
re-
peatedly on Burns' eye, meanwhile addressing the people
about the ringside, and tlx.ugh
Tommy was
dexterously at infighting he placed several
working
terrific
blows
onBurns'ribs, dropping him to the floor for a few seconds.
Eighth Round.
—Burns'
eyes were pufTed
up and he
was bleeding from tha mouth when he emerged from his
The white man's blows apparenily had little
corner.
effect
on the Texan, who went severely about belaboring
the head of the champion.
Ninth Round.
— "Come
on.
Tommy; swing your
right!" yelled Johnson as the gong rang.
Burns
sponded by calling the negro a "yellow dog."
was not very much
fighting, probably
more
re-
There
talking, dur-
ing this roimd.
Tenth Round.
used his
fists
—Both men seemed tiring.
effectively
Burns was doing
all
Johnson
still
on Burns" head and stomach and
he could
in reply.
His blows, how-
ever, lacked steam.
Eleventh Round.
—The
body of Johnson made
walnut.
Burns
it
perspiration pouring
tried to cross his right over, but
cleverly avoided him,
ofif
the
look not unlike highly polished
Johnson
meantime hiUfrhing at the champion.
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
outclassed and Johnson apparently
Burns
is
able.
When
Burns limped
the bell rang
Twelfth Round.
is
47
invulner-
to his corner.
—Johnson continued to rushtind Burns
His jaw
took a tremendous lot of punishment gamely.
is
greatly swollen.
Thirteenth Roimd.
—Johnson continued to play for the
mouth
injured eye and the cut
swollen twice
colored
man
normal
its
upon him, and
rained
the white man from defeat, for he
as
it
of Burns, which
Blow
size.
the
was
was
blow the
after
gong alone saved
and groggy
reeling
rang.
During the intermission between the thirteenth and
fourteenth rounds the police
aad
it
officials
consulted together,
seemed probable that they would stop the fight
the next round
who
a talk with the champion,
strong.
Mcintosh
declared that he
was
asked the police not to interfere.
tlien
Fourteenth Round.
when time was
in
Mcintosh went to Bums' corner and had
—Johnson
went right
after
Burns
The white man warily backed
called.
away, but Jolmsnn, following him up, dropped Burns
"One, two, three,"
with a heavy right to the head.
slowly counted the referee, and Burns remained
until eight seconds
had been tolled
Johnsun flew at him
immercifuUy, soon
like
had
police then juni|)ed into
Hugh
D. Mcliitosli,
Johnson the winner,
best fight he ever
a
tlic
champion
referee,
both hands
tottering.
The
immediately declared
lie adiled that
fairly.
down
he arose
ring and stopped the fight.
hud witnessed
men had fought most
When
tiger, and, xising
the
tiie
off.
he considered
in Australia
it ilie
and that both
LIFE
48
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
THE BATTLE WITH
O'BRIEN.
Johnson's next fight was in the arena of the
National Athletic Club Philadelphia, Pa., on
May
when he met
19, 1909,
O'Brien for six rounds.
Philadelphia Jack
Johnson gave
his
weight at 205 pounds, while O'Brien stated
he weighed 162 pounds.
O'Brien gamely carried the fight to the big
colored fellow during most of the rounds.
in
doing
this
bumps and was
But
O'Brien got some very hard
pretty badly hurt at times, and
there was no doubt that the champion had the
better of the contest.
At times Johnson cut
and then
severely.
times,
down.
it
loose with great vigor
was that O'Brien was punished
The white man was down
although only once on a
fair
several
knock-
Once O'Brien was carried through the
ropes by one of Johnson's fierce rushes and
had
it
not been for the assistance of those on
the outside he would have fallen to the floor
on the other
side of the ring.
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON,
The blow
that
49
knocked O'Brien down was
delivered in the fifth round and
came
in the
midst of a fierce rally on the part of the colored
His
fellow.
lefts
and rights drove O'Brien
backward as wind would drive
short
right,
famous,
the kind for
chaff,
and a
which Johnson
caught O'Brien under the
is
left eye.
Jack went down as though kicked by a mule,
but came up quickly without waiting for the
count.
The mark
of the
for blood trickled
blow was plainly
visible,
from an abrasion and a
swelling about the size of a mouse slowly appeared,
O'Brien wisely tried to hold until he
could gather his senses, but the burly negro
shook him
more
lefts
or parried.
off
and
and shot home two or three
rights,
which O'Brien slipped
LIFE
50
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
THE FIGHT WITH KETCHELL.
At Jimmy
Oct.
1
6,
Coffroth's Colma, Cal., arena on
Johnson retained the heavy-
1909,
weight championship of the world by knocking out Stanley Ketchell in the twelfth round.
The end came
rolled to the floor
him out the
when Ketchell
so suddenly that
and Referee Welch counted
10,000 persons crowding the arena
were absolutely
c[uiet for a full
minute.
THE BATTLE BY ROUNDS.
First
Round.
— The men
dispensed with the usual for-
mality of shaking hands as they wallied to
the ring.
The discrepancy
in stature
particularly noticeable as they
came
towered above the white man.
The
by Johnson, who landed a hard
a good deal of fibbing by each.
feeling out the other.
tlie
together.
first
centre of
and weight was
Johnson
point scored
left to the
Each man was
cautious,
Twice Johnson landed with
as Ketchell hustled
him around
against the ropes.
Then he sidestepped out
the ring fighting cautio;;siy.
effect
the ring and forced
ger spot and the bell rang with the
men
was
stomach after
him
of the dan-
in the centre of
Ketchell looked nervous
throughout, while Johusou smiled continually.
Second Round.
— They
r.iu
to
a clinch and Referee
and battles of jack johnson.
Life
On
Wl'KIi pried tlicm apart.
straiglit left lo Ihe
the break Johnson
nose and soon repeated
it.
clinch
Ke
ach.
In a clinch Ketchell uppercut hard to the
willi short-arm
chell tried
shot a
At every
blows for the stom-
jaw with
This angered the champion, wlio rushed in laud-
his left.
Ketchell went to the floor
ing left and right on the body.
although his
with considerable force,
a slip of
rushed
qt
the;
in,
fall
was due more
to
lie was up quickly and
foot than a blow.
but had great difficulty in getting under Jack's
long reach.
Johnson merely toyed with him until the
bed ended the round.
Third Round.
then closed
in,
— They
sparred for thirty seconds and
swinging right and
left at close
Ketchell landing on the body once with his
chell drove his right
high on
the breast,
range
right.
clinched Johnson uppercut twice with the right.
They again rushed
referee separated them.
Ket-
and as they
in
The
close,
in short rights
and
left to the
The white man uppercut with
left
to the face as they
Johnson putting
broke from a clinch.
fccm
swung
corner,
kei)t
fire
fresh.
Johnson
of conversation with his seconds
respite.
Fourth Round.— After much sparring Johnson rushed
forcing his man to the ropes. Placing his arms around
Ketchell he fairly carried
Ketchell
It
Ketchell went to his
however, dancing, and looked
during the minute
in,
Just before the round ended John-
his right to the jaw.
up a running
stomach.
swung
a terrific
just missed, but
it
him
to the centre of the ring.
right intended for Johnson's jaw.
was a
close shave.
Johnson then
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
52
steadily
chcU
backed away as they sparred for a lead with Ket-
He
follov.'ing.
tlien
sent a hard right to the jaw,
but Ketchell kept constautly teasing him in an effort to
make him
lead.
It
Fifth Round.
to
was a tame round.
— Ketchell opened with a left to the body
which Johnson replied with two lefts to the
face.
John-
son sent Ketchell's head back with two straight lefts to
Ketchell again essayed to force Johnson to lead.
the nose.
Ketchell showed unexpected cleverness at blocking. John
son then
swung
his left twice
to the face
and the men
sparred at long range, Johnson working in a left to the
man showed damage as
Neither
face.
the round ended.
Sixth Round. — Each missed a left swing, and then
Ketchell landed a left to the body and followed with another left to the jaw.
the stomach.
on both hands as the
chell
was
latter
left
left to
catching Ketchell
threw up his guard and Ket-
He jumped up smiling. Johnwarm reception. He uppercut wiih right
sent to the floor.
son gave him a
to the
Johnson countered with a
Johnson shot out his
jaw and raked
lefts to the
jaw.
Ketchell's face with a succession of
Ketchell continued to force the pace but
was met with two
lefts
on the nose that started blood.
Johnson had a good lead at the end of the round.
Seventh Round.
—Johnson
swooped
in
with two
on the nose, Ketchell countering with a hard
the body.
Johnson shot another straight
left
lefts
hook on
left to the
nose
swing for the jaw.
As
they closed in Johnson uppercut with right to the
jaAv.
and Ketchell missed a
terrific left
Blood flowed from Ketchell's nose.
At
close quarters
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
Johnsoa landed several times on the nose and
swung
denly Kctchell
Lis left
with
Sud-
face.
terrific
53
force.
It
caught the champion solidly on the jaw, raising a big
lump
best
that
was
perceptible to the spectators.
blow of the
Eighth Round.
ing twice with his
it,
was
It
the
fight.
—Johnson
left
on the
immediately closed
The
face.
fighters
in,
land-
roughed
shoulder to shoulder, and Ketchell worked in a hard
The
right uppercut to the jaw.
men, Johnson landing
broke.
left
referee separated the
and right on the face as they
Ketchell missed with another of his
terrific
swings
and almost went through the ropes from the force of his
effort.
John.son forced his opponent back gradually and
landed a
left to
from
its
the jaw.
misdirected force.
Ninth Round
—They closed
rights on the face.
the
Ketchell again missed a hard
and again nearly went through the ropes
right swing
men from
in,
clinches.
Tlie
each landing short-arm
was
Tlie referee
forced twice to break
champion sent
in four sting-
ing straight lefts to the face, but Ketchell did not break
ground.
On
the contrary, he rushed
the champion's stomach, but
liis
in,
l)lows
hammering
at
were smothered.
Ketchell planted his left over the ribs and Johnson countered with a short left to the jaw.
his left to the
it
up
witli a
ately after,
jaw and
hard straight blow to the
however, the men
Johnson swung Ketchell almost
him against
Johnson again liookcd
a cliruh followed.
Johnson broke
face.
Immedi-
were again wrestling.
off
his balance.
Getting
the ropes he sent a right wallop to the stom-
—
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
54
acli
and Ketchell winced.
the stomach with his open
Jolmsoa patted Ketchell on
hand
Ket-
as the bell clanged.
chell looked worried as he took his chair.
After a clinch Johnson sent two light
Tenth Round.
lefts to the
stomach and quickly shifted to the jaw, where
he connected twice and Ketchell started spitting blood.
Johnson wrestled Ketchell to the
rally
Johnson sent three straight
mouth and
whipped
to Kelchell's sore
iefls
— After some
desultory sparring Ket-
his left to the kidneys
swings for the jaw.
was
It
and missed two hard
noticeable that the right
uppercut that Johnson used with good
fights
had
landed a
up
In a mid-ring
ring.
nose, starting the blood afresh.
Eleventh Round.
chell
then lifted him
floor,
and placed him in the centre of the
little effect
terrific right
upon
Ketchell.
effect in his other
The Michigander
almost on the point of the jaw. The
champion immediately clinched and seemed content
to
Ketchell forced the fighting, seeking to follow
up
rest.
Ihe advantage,
but could not solve his opponent's defense.
Ketchell's battered face
left
Twelfth Round.
—Ketchell
Johnson
his right to the jaw.
tlie fall
pion
seemed
to
was waiting
jaw and then a
ward Johnson
the white
There he
a
was proof
that Johnson's constant
jabs were reaching their mark.
weak
fell flat
upon
his
back and
have injured him, but the tricky cham-
He swung
for him.
left to
to the
mat
a hard right to the
As Ketchell
the body.
but
fell
back-
to the face
as if ho
had been
blood streaming from his mouth.
effort to rise,
fell
swing
sent another right
man went
lay,
suddenly rushing in sent
and
shot.
He made
back and was counted out.
AND BA
LIKE
r'l'T.KS
OF JACK JOHNSON.
55
ARRANGING THE BIG FIGHT.
Then began
negotiations for the big battle
between Johnson and James
this
All
J. Jeffries.
while there had been talk of bringing the
two men together, and
was
at last Jeffries
in-
dncedto come out of retirement. The result of
a lot of talk
Form
of
was the following:
agreement
eleventh day of August,
entered
1909,
into
this
between Jack
Johnson, of Galveston, Tex., and James
Jeffries,
1.
that
J.
of Los Angeles, Cal.
It is
agreed between these
they
shall
men mutually
box a certain
number
of
rounds, the same to be anywhere from 20 to
100, for the
heavyweight championship of the
world.
2.
Contest to be held before the club offer-
ing the best inducements and mutually agreed
upon by the contestants.
3.
The
division of the purse shall
l)e
on a
basis of either 60 per cent, and 40 per cent, to
winner and
loser, respectively, or 75
per cent.
56
LIFE
and
25
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
per cent, or winner
to take the entire
may be
The
amount.
matter to rest with James
this
The sum
4.
of $5,000 each
permitted
decision in
J. Jeffries.
is
to
be posted
with Charles A. Comiskey of Chicago as a
guarantee of good faith and the fulfillment by
each side of the terms of this agreement.
money
It is
Said
to be posted within seventy-two hours.
further agreed that the above
named
$5,000 shall operate as a side bet on the result
of the contest.
5.
It is
further agreed that the club will be
upon sixty days
selected and mutually agreed
from date,
will be
6.
at
which time
all
further details
mutually agreed upon.
Contest to take place not later than six
months from date
of selecting club
and the
signing of final articles.
(Signed)
Sam Berger
(Signed)
Jack Johnson.
Then
this
for JamesJ. Jeffries.
there was another meeting at which
agreement was drawn up and signed.
The agreement entered into
this
day between
:
I.IKE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
Jack Johnson and James
57
Jeffries provides
J.
for the following
They agree
1.
to
box
heavyweight
for the
championship of the world.
They agree
2.
to
box
for the
club, organ-
ization or person offering the best financial in-
ducement.
Bids for the contest must be submitted
3.
on Dec.
Albany,
i,
New York
Each
4.
at
1909,
3
P.
]M.
at
the
Hotel
city.
club, organization or person
mak-
ing a bid for this contest must have a representative on the ground wIto will post §5,000
in coin or certified
and
all
stipulations of this bid.
Referee to be selected when the club's
5.
bid
check to make good any
is
6.
accepted.
It is
hereby agreed that the contest
shall
be forty-five rounds or more.
7.
to the
8.
The purse
shall be divided 75 per cent,
winner and
Each
25 per cent, to the loser.
of the contestants lierewith posts
with Robert P. Murphy, of
New
York, as tern-
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
58
porary stakeholder the sum of
this
sum each
Of
ijiiio,ooo.
wager or
posts $5,000 as a
side
bet on the result of the contest and $5,000 as a
to
guarantee compliance with these
The
contest shall take place not later
forfeit
articles,
9.
than July
10.
5,
It is
1910.
hereby understood and agreed that
the contest shall be fought under straight Marquis of Queensberry rules and with five ovmce
gloves.
11.
The
final stake
and
holder
forfeit
be decided upon when the club
is
is
to
selected.
Witness our hands and seals this 29th day of
October, 1909.
(Signed)
James
J.
Jeffries,
Sam Berger.
Jack Johnson, George Little.
Witness:
Robert
P.
Bob Vernon, William
place in
Wright,
Murphy.
The meeting
details of
J.
the
to
open the bids and decide the
match was scheduled
New York
city,
on Dec.
Commissioner Baker decided
i,
this
to
take
but Police
proceeding
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
would be unlawful and threatened
Johnson and
Jeffries
and
all
59
arrest
to
the principals
if
they met for this purpose, and the scene of
the gathering was
transferred to
Hotel in Hoboken, N.
The scenes
dramatic.
at the
Naegeli's
J.
opening of the bids were
As was expected
the stakes were
so high that only the heaviest gamblers
the game.
chance to
sit in
in the big
game.
men
Six
and
was pooled with
Gleason.
Hugh
and
Mcintosh.
table.
Johnson were on
were played by
Murphy
took his seat at the
George
]Murphy's
Little
left
McCarey and Sam Bergcronliis
that surged through the
Jack Gleason,
Graney and Phil King.
and Jack
and
riglit.
around the table or pushed about
bidders,
Coffroth
American representative.
Stakeholder Bob
head of the
Coffroth,
represented by Jack
Mcintosh's cards
Phil King, his
only sat
They were Eddie Graney,
Tex Rickard. Jack Gleason, Jimmy
Tom McCarey
had a
in the
Tom
Seated
crowd
room were the other
Tex Rickard, Eddie
6o
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
Graney's bid was read
of the
made
Tuxedo A. C,
As president
first.
of
San Francisco, he
three propositions to the fighters.
First
he offered them 80 per cent, of the gross
ceipts,
re-
with a guarantee of 875,000, the entire
picture privileges to go
to
Second, 80 per cent,
the gross receipts,
of
the contestants.
$70,000 guaranteed, with $20,000
for,
or
1-3
^;^
per cent, of the moving picture privileges.
Third, 90 per cent, of the gross receipts, with
no guarantee and the entire moving picture
privileges.
Graney's bid was accompanied by a certified
check of $5,000, as a guarantee of good
faith.
In his bid he stipulated that he would hold
the bout in an open pavilion, seating 25,000,
with a guaranteed seating capacity of 25,000,
in or
within five miles of San Francisco.
Jack Gleason, pooled with
was the next
Coffroth
to
Jimmy
be considered.
proposition
offered
Coffroth,
The Gleasonthe fighters a
purse of $125,000 with no picture privileges, or
a guaranteed purse of $75,000 with 66
2-3
per
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
6l
cent, of the inoving- picture profits, or 80 per
cent, of the gross receipts with 66 2-3 per cent,
Gleason promised
of
the picture privileges.
to
post $30,000 immediately upon accepting
his first offer, $20,000
on agreeing
ond proposition, or $10,000
his third offer.
if
to the sec-
the fighters chose
Gleason posted a
New York
draft for $5,000 with his bid, and stipulated
the bout would take
that
place in Colma,
Ocean View or San Francisco, on July
19 10.
4,
The
Mcintosh's bid was the third opened.
Australian proposition was as follows:
man
"I guarantee each
America, $37,500;
England, $40,000;
tralia,
if
the contest
is
rights reserved.
the alternative offer that
if
in
held in
Aus-
in France, $40,000; in
$50,000, all
in cither
for the contest
I
the contest
make
is
held
America, England or France, Jeffries
and Johnson may have the whole of the gross
gate, less $10,000, witli a
of $25,000 to each
me.
man,
If in Australia,
without
deduction,
minimum guarantee
all
rights reserved
by
whole gross gate receipts
and with
a
guaranteed
62
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
minimum
My
served by me.
that
I
rights re-
the pictures
privileges.
In
offer:
I
$13,000 and one-fourth interest;
England,
in Australia,
The
$20,000, all rights reserved.
take place at a date to
is
America or France
and one-third of
of $50,000
all
second alternative offer
will give purses in
"For
man,
of $37,500 to each
contest to
be named by me during
the year 1910, each contestant to receive not
less
than three months' notice.
dollars will be deposited
guarantee
my
good
by me
Murphy, and
tore
a sealed envelope
as the stakeholder carelessly
open the envelope, Rickard cautioned:
"You had
$5,000.
began
It
contains money."
Rickard inclosed $20,000 with his
It did.
offer,
better be careful with that en-
Murphy.
velope, Mr.
$1,000 bills
fifteen
When
and a check
for
Master of Ceremonies Murphy
to read, " G. L. Rickard, of Ely, Nev.,
and John
the
as a forfeit to
faith."
Then Tex Rickard handed
to
Five thousand
J.
Gleason,
San Francisco, submit
following bid," further commotion was
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
caused, for
it
63
was seen that Gleason not only
had tied up with Coffroth, but also was bound
up with Rickard.
The Nevada mine owner
and the California baseball magnate offered
the fighters a guaranteed purse of
The
privileges.
101,000,
bids stipulated that the bout
would be held on July
or Utah.
his
.f
2-3 per cent, of the moving picture
with 66
4 in California,
Nevada
Besides the $20,000 accompanying
Rickard announced that he would
bid,
post $20,000
more
sixty days before the fight
and would put up an additional $50,000
forty-
eight hours before the encounter.
Tom
McCarey's was the
A.
C,
of
last
bid
McCarey, in behalf of the
opened.
be
Pacific
Los Angeles, offered the fighters the
entire gate receipts and
moving picture
50
privileges,
per cent, of the
or a guaranteed
parse of $110,000 with 50 per cent,
moving picture
privileges.
If the
articles
four hours.
of the
contestants
accepted the McCarey proposition,
final
to
new and
must be signed within twenty-
LIFE
64
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
Berger and Johnson both asked Murphy to
read
agam
the
Graney and Rickard propo-
The two
sitions.
discussed the bids for a
time and then asked for twenty-four hours
in
which
On
to consider
the following day
Hoboken, and
in
them.
all
the principals
without
any
formalities
accepted Rickard's bid, carrying with
it
greatest gambling proposition ever heard
Tex Rickard, who was
met
the
of.
the promoter of the
record-drawing fight between Joe Gans and
Battling Nelson at Goldfield, Nev., on Sept.
1906, is a celebrity of the gold fields of
6,
Alaska
and the mining camps of Nevada and the
Southwest,
who has
lost
fortunes time and
again only to win them back on another turn
of Forttme's wheel.
JOHNSON-JEFFRIES BATTLE.
The
battle took place as scheduled, but not
Governor
in California.
best
known
to
Gillett, for
himself, stepped
in
reasons
at
the
eleventh hour and prohibited a continuance
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
of the arrangements,
he would
call
65
and also announced that
out the militia in case an at-
tempt was made
to pull off the contest in Cali-
Rickard then went to his home State,
fornia.
Nevada, and within a short time procured
assurances from the business
men
of
that the license w^ould be subscribed
would be helped
able arena.
in
Reno
and he
every way to erect a
suit-
Both training camps were then
transferred to quarters in the neighborhood
A
of Reno.
day or so before the Fourth the
purse was cut to 60 and 40 instead of
25
75
and
per cent.
It
was announced that Charley White,
of
New
York, would act as second referee,
to
take the place of Rickard in case anything
occurred before or during the battle to require
the substitution of another man.
The men were examined by
physicians,
according to the laws of Nevada, and pro-
nounced
to
be in the best possible physical
condition.
On
July 4 the great arena was
filled
with
66
I,TFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
20,000 people, and shortly after two o'clock
the principals were in their corners.
entered the ring at
two minutes
Jeffries followed
In Johnson's corner were
later.
Billy Delaney,
and
2 130,
Johnson
Tom
Flanagan, Barney Furey,
Kid Cotton and Frank Sutton.
Behind
Jef-
were Jim Corbett, Joe Choynski, Sam
fries
Berger, Farmer Burns,
Abe
Timekeeper
George Harting.
;
Bob An;
-
Timekeeper was
strong and Roger Cornell.
Stanley Ketchell
Attell,
for Johnson,
for Jeffries, Billy Gallagher;
Announcer, Billy Jordan, of San Francisco.
Referee,
of an
Tex Rickard
;
second referee, in case
emergency, Charley White, of
New
There were no preliminary bouts.
York.
Time was
called at
2 137,
and both advanced
to the centre of the ring.
THE BATTLE BY ROUNDS.
First
Round — Jeff walked
ground.
followed.
in
Jolinson led a straight
Jelf
hooked a
left
on
and Johnson gave
left.
tlie
Then
a clincli
ueok and in the
clinch sent a left to the body. Johnson responded
a left
and they continued
Avitli
to stand breast to breast,
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
trying for inside blows.
to
As they broke
Johnson's neck and crossed
to the
Jeff sent a left
body. The round
was tame. As they turned to their corners,
Johnson on the shoulder and smiled.
Second Round
— Jeff assumed
his first attempt.
crouch, but missed
liis
left to Jeff's face,
they clinched ripped a hard uppercut
left
and waited
came
to give
Jeff sent a right to the
on the face at close quarters.
for Johnson, but
as
Jeff'
rilis
each
and
crouched
he was not willing. They
together without a blow
uppercut but missed.
and
Jeffs chin.
to
They held together and were unwilling
other any chance.
took a
Jeff tapped
Jack forced the pace and Jeff stepped
Jack sent a
nimbly away.
6?
and Johnson
Jeff put a
shoulder and pushed him about.
right
tried his
on Jack's
AVhen they broke
and tried his upThen there was a lot of
wrestling and not much fighting. The gong rang with-
Jack shot his
left
hard
to Jeffs face
percut but missed again.
out a good blow having been struck.
Third Round
stomach.
— Jolmson fell
Tliey clinched.
into a short left to the
Jack dashed a
left to the
nose and they clinched again.
right
and
left
Johnson missed with
uppercuts and then Johnson tried a
ducked and
Johnson was very cautious in tiie breakJohnson sent two liglit rights to tlu' liead and
vicious right to the head, but Jeffries
clinched.
aways.
At the bell Jellrics
Tne round was even.
liiey clinched.
the head.
Fourth
fries
Round— Johnson
blocked Jack's right
s<'nt a light left to
sent a left to the head. Jefto tlie
same place
anil
a
68
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
clinch followed.
Jeffries sent three
Johnson put a
stomach.
nose Avas bleeding.
son sends a right
hard rights
left to the
head.
Jeffries goes into a clinch.
to the
to the
Johnson's
Jolin-
kidneys. In the clinch he sent
a straight left to the head and then took one in return.
They
Johnson held
clinched.
John-
in the clinches.
son Avent against the ropes and took three jabs to the
The crowd
stomach.
Avent Avild at Jeffries' shoAving.
Atthe break Johnson sent a right
damage.
Jeffries
without
to the ear,
had a shade the better of
this
round.
Round — They sparred and Johnson kept talkJeffries.
He kids Jim in the clinches. Jeffries
Fifth
ing to
rushed in
left to
Jack Avorked a
left
was
John-
uppercut
to
jaw, and Jim's mouth
in
and sent two
lefts to
They sparred and Johnson backed away.
appeared
sive.
a clinch.
the stomach, but did no damage.
He dashed
slightly cut.
face.
Then
Avith left to the ribs.
son sent a long
to
Jeffries sent a
straight left to mouth,
other to the nose, increasing the
that organ.
He
be very cautious and played on the defen-
They
floAV
and an-
of claret from
Avere clinched at the bell.
Kound
even.
Sixth
Round
out doing
to Jeff's face
two
rights.
When
— The pace was slow up to this time with-
much damage
to the
and closed
Jeff's
men.
Johnson shot a
left
Jack missed
Jeff's right eye..
nose was bleeding when the gong rang.
Jeff took his seat his seconds got
but Jeff told them that
it
Avas O. K.
busy
It
Avith bis eye,
Avas Jolmsou's
round.
Seventh Round
— Jeff walked
right
in.
Jack led right
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
and
left
rubbed
and missed.
it
Jefif's
draw Johnson
on the head.
hooked a
Jeff
but
left
it
and
tried to
eome
Jeff
in.
and took a
left
Johnson
to the jaw.
way into another
He drew Jack into a lead and
Jeff pulled his
failed to land.
shot a left to
to
body, but missed
left to
sent in lefls to Ihe face.
clinch,
feinted about
but the negro declined
on,
stepped in with
eye was badly swollen and be
He
with bis glove.
O9
In a close quarter mi.x;;p Jack
tiie face.
sent his left to the face.
Eighth Round
to the ear
— Thej' sparred at the opening and John-
They rushed
son feinted.
with a
left.
head and repeated a moment
beautifully.
ach.
Jeffries
and Jack hooked
into a clinch
Johnson scut two rights to the
Johnson 'blocked
later.
pounded the stom-
In a half clinch
Jeffries
ducked a
and took a right on
They clinched
Johnson sent a
again.
Johnson held in the
Johnson forced a
left
clinciies
clinch,
left to the
and referee breaks them.
hanmieiing the kidneys.
a right, but
was blocked.
tried rijiht to head,
at the bell.
Jeffries
They
but was short.
Johnsons round by a
Ninth Roimd
the chest.
the head.
h'fc to
it
— Jeff stood up
"Make him
tried left for body.
dashed
in
with
clinched and Jack
They were
clinched
slight margin.
and walked into a left
fight," yelled
mind, just wait," said Johnson.
John-
jaw but missed.
son tried a terrific right hook to the
Johnson sent a
chest.
stomach.
Johnson walked
Jeff got inside of
it
and put
to
"Never
C'orbett.
in
and
his head
against Jack's chest and shoved the black fellow back to
the ropes.
Jeff took it all in calmly
and seemed
waiting the opportunity to land a good one.
Jeff
to
be
walked
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
70
into
two
on the
left jabs
They
face.
did no damage. His
wrist landed hard on the ribs and Johnson did not appear
to like
It
it.
was
Tenth Round
Jeff's
round.
—They came up slowly.
but Jeff brushed
to the face,
Jeflf
put his shoulder against Johnson's body
and shoved him back.
uppercut to
left
Jack again missed a lightning right
a left to the body.
to the jaw.
Jack shot a
away and responded with
it
At
Jiff's face.
close range
Jeflf
Johnson sent a
left
got under a left lead and
seemed to want to wear Jack out by bearing his weight
and shoving him.
Jeff struck out
two
lefts
and shot a
left to the
Eleventh Round
body
as
— They
two
quickly
gong rang.
up
walked
finally trying his left only to find
left in face three times,
Jeff took
He stepped in
on the face when they broke.
from
lefts to face
a clinch and got one of the same kind.
it
carefully,
He
blocked.
Jeff
took a
but smiled and talked to Jack.
They broke away from a
and Johnson sent a
stiff
left uppercut to the face and a right to the body.
He
kept
Jeflf
clinch
bobbing his head to keep away from the right
uppercut whenever they came together. In a cliuoh Jack
sent
two uppercuts
shoved about,
Jeflf
to face
and
Jeflf
Jeff
appeared
tired,
before the call of time
right
tired.
with his head on shoulder and
they finally broke Jack hooked
blood.
appeared
Jeflf
left
They
when
drawing
to nose,
compared with Johnson. Just
rushed in and sent
to body, but Jack was going away and was
left
and
not hurt.
Decidedly Johnson's round.
Twelfth Round
chance
to
— .Jim
walked over waiting for a
Jack simply
get inside Jack's defense.
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
71
waited and then drew back and hooked a left to lace.
"Thought yon said you Avere going to have me wild,"
said Johnson to Corbett's taunts.
reward.
JelF bored his
way
on the sore nose
for his
His nose bled freely and as he turned
to take
to close quarters,
but got a
left
gong he spat out a mass of blood.
his seat at the
was not worried apparently and looked
Round — When they broke Johnson
Thirteenth
a left to the
body and a right uppercut
"Stick there. Jim," shouted Corbett.
he was forced away.
right uppercut to the
Jetf
fresh.
to
sent
the chin.
Jeff stuck until
Then he took two lefts and a
jaM'.
Holding him with right on
shoulder, Johnson sent in three lefts to face in quick
succession and then an uppercut to the face.
seemed
to be slow.
He could
Jeff
not solve Johnson's de-
and took all the blows that came his way. Jack
swung a left to the face and then calmly clinched.
Jetf continued to come in. The round was all Johnson's.
fense
Fourteenth Round
Jeff
walked into a
fellow on
tiie
—JeflTs
left to
face twice
close fighting.
eye Avas almost closed.
the ear. Jack tapped the big
and blocked
Jeff's att(unpt at
Jeff took three straight lefts to face
and got in a left to face. JetFs lefts Avere blocked by
Johnson before they could get Avithin six inches of his
"How you
and clinched.
face.
in
sober look and
more
lefts.
Fifteenth
was plain
feel,
Jim?" said Jack,
"How you
made no
like
as they closed
'em?"
response.
He
Jetf Avore a
took three
"They don't hurt," said Jeff.
Round— When the men faced each
to all that Jeffries
was
in distress.
other
it
His face was
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
72
puffed and bleeding from the punishing lefts and rights
He
he had received, and his movements were languid.
shambled after the elusive negro, sometimes crouching
low with
his
hand stuck out
Stooping or
ing erect.
in front,
erect,
Johnson simply waited
son's accurately driven blows.
for tlie big white
They came
pieces.
by
to
come
away Jack
and chopped
his face to
hand blow on the body, and as
shot his left and right to the
Jeffries staggered
flash.
in
into a clinch after a feeble attempt
Jeffries to land a left
they broke
a
man
and sometimes stand-
he was a mark for John-
jaw
in
His
back against the ropes.
defensive power seemed to desert him in an inslant. John-
son dashed at him like a
A rain of
tiger.
lefts
and rights
delivered at close quarters sent Jeffries reeling blindly.
Another
series of short,
white giant went
He
fell
down
snappy punclies and the big
for the
first
time in his ring career.
under the top rope, over the lower one and onto
the overhang of the platform.
and right elbow
and got up
Resting on his haunches
around in a dazed way
Jeffries looked
at the coimt of nine.
While he was down
Johnson stood almost over him until Rickard waved him
back.
He
stood ready to strike, and
from his knees he dashed
and
old
tried to clinch,
in again.
when
Jeffries arose
Jeffries reeled
about
but Johnson eluded him, and as the
champion swung around
to the
he jolted him twice on the jaw.
South side of the ring
Jeffries sank to his knees
but got up again at the count of
weak and
tired,
was then
that Jeffries' friends began to call to Rickard to
nine.
It
stop the fight.
Rickard gave no heed to these appeals,
Jeffries
was
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
DOW, and as
was waiting for him.
hi Iplcss
short,
lie
73
staggered to bis feet the negro
A
left, a right and another left,
snappy, powerful blows, found their mark on Jef-
fries" eiiin
and
lie
went down
for the third time.
Again
he sprawled over the lower rope, hanging half outside the
ring.
The timekeeper rai.sed and lowered his arm, tolling
off the seconds.
some of
Jeffries'
He bad reached the c lunt of seven when
seconds put foot inside the ropes and
Rickard walked between the fallen man and the negro
champion. Placing his hand on Johnson's shoulder he
declared bim the winner.
While Jeffries was not counted
out, this was merely a technical evasion.
It was evident
that be could never have got up inside ten seconds.
STATISTICS OF THE BATTLE.
Johnson's share of the
money was
per cent, of the purse
Sixtj'-
.
§145,600, as follows:
-
-
-
§60,600
Bonus
10,000
Share of moving pictures
50,000
Total
§120,600
Earned after signing
articles
and before
fight
-
Total
25,000
§145,600
Jeffries'
end was as follows:
Forty per cent, of the purse
.
.
.
.
§40,400
Bonus
10,000
Share of moving pictures
66,666
Total
--------
Earned after signing
articles
and before
§117,066
fight
-
-
-
§192,066
Total
Total earned by both fighters
Tlie gate receipts
amounted
to Kickard
-
-
to $270,775;
§;3;:37,666
there were
the profits on the battle which
and Gleason were about §120,000.
15,760 i)aid admissions;
went
75,000
LIFE
74
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
JACK JOHNSON'S RECORD.
Born Mar.
31. 1878,
Galveston, Tex. Height 6
tt.
Beat— S. Smith 10 rounds. Jim Rocks,
1898: Knockout— Rediiy Breuier. 3 rounds.
Draw — Henry Smith, 15 rounds.
1897
1899
:
:
1900:
1901:
Draw— Pat Smitli,
Beat— Josh
1%
i
J.
Weight, 195 pounds
4 rounds.
Won— Jim
Cole, 4 rounds.
12 rounds.
Mills, 12 rounds.
Knockout— Horace
Miles, 3
Draw— Klondike,
rounds.
20 rounds.
Charley Brooks, 2 rounds.
George Lawlor, 10 rounds. Won— John Lee, 15 rounds. Jack McCormick, 7 rounds.
Jack McCormick, 7 rounds. Knocked out byJoe Choynski, in March, 1901, 3 rounds.
1902
Ml'K
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
75
l.IFK
76
AND HATTLK.S
JAMES
J.
James J. Jeffries was born
record was witn T. VanBuskirk,
f)F
JACK JOHNSON.
JEFFRIES.
in Carroil, Oiiio.
His
first
battle of
whom lie knocked out in two rounds.
Peter Jaeuson in three rounds, Tom Sharkey in twenty rounds,
and then came East to show his calibre. He was a failure, ior he was
He beat
box two men at the Lenox Athletic Club, in New York. Armstrong and Steve O'Donnell. He beat the former in ten rounds, but
claimed he had hurt his hand and could not go on with O'Donnell. That
was on August 5. His next appearance in the ring was when be gained
the title by knocking out Bob Fitzsimmons. He won again in the same
year from Tom Sharkey at Coney Island, the contest going the limit, but
it was a questionable decision, the sailor forcing the fight all the way and
mixing It at the finish. Many of the leading sporting men who witnessed
the battle were of the opinion that it should have been a draw at least.
For twenty-three rounds before the same club, on May 11, 1900, Corbett made Jeffries look like a novice, punching him when and where
he pleased without a return, until the big fellow ended matters by catching the ex-champion on the jaw with a left hook and putting him down
billed to
for the count.
Jeffries met Hank Griffln, Joe Kennedy and Gus Ruhlin in 1901
taking on Old Fitz in San Francisco on July 25. 1902, and knocking him>
out in eight rounds. He agreed to put Jack Munroe, the Butte minen
oul in four rounds at Butte, Mont., but failed, and so lost the decision.
He knocked out Corbett in ten rounds on August 14, 1903, in San
Francisco, and beat Jack Mu'rne m t'^'^same city the year following.
RECORD.
Born
1875, Carroll,
Ohio.
Height
Knockout— T. VanBuskirk,
6
ft.
1!4 in.
Heavyweight.
White.
2 rounds.
Dick Baker, 9 rounds.
Ruhlin, 20 rounds. Joe Cnovnski, 20 rounds.
1898; Won— Joe Goddard, 4 rounds.
Peter Jackson. 3 rounds. Pete
Everett, 3 rounds.
Tom Sharkey, 20 rounds. Bob Armstrong, 10
rounds.
1899: Knockout— Bob Fitzsimmons, 11 rounds.
Won— Tom Sharkey,
25 rounds.
1900: KnocKOut— Jack Finnegan, 1 round. Jim Corbett, 23 rounds.
1897:
Draw— Gus
1901
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
JOHN
They
him "The
rail
L.
SULLIVAN.
Roman
Nolilest
Them
of
John
nnpeared
I
was born on October
many boxing
in
man.
The
In his early days he
15, 1853.
battle
first
which brought him
n.Ticecfthe seneral public was with Donaldson,
him
i^n't
it
a great
and around Boston, where he soon
contests in
a popular favorite.
ej.iriio
is
His popularity « ill never fade nor wane.
the level.
L. Sullivan
And
All."
without reason, either, for he was a erent man. and he
who was always on
77
to the
nt Cincinnati, Ohio.
was not satwtied and challenged
Boy to meet him with hrd uloves for $500 a side.
They met in a room in Cincinnati on December 28, 1881. By running
awav Donaldson lasted ten rounds before he was knocked out. Later,
wlien Sullivan came to New York, he made the announcement that he
S
i.livan beat
easily, but the loser
the Boston Strong
man
would give any
in
The
for four rounds.
but his seconds threw
It
the world $50 wlio would stand up against him
first
up
man
to try for the
money was
Steve Taylor,
the "ponge in two rounds.
was then that Mr. Richard K. Fox
an
l^egan to taUe
interest in
pugilism, and he expres.sei his willingness to back Sullivan or
else against
him
in
oSered, also, to have
10 be
handsome
valuab'e and
Paddy Rynn,
It didn't
take very long to arrange matters,
5,
(iAZKTTE
and the match was made
cilice
1881,
one hundred miles
The
figlit
WHS held
of
New
A moment
Over
before tmie
the sporting editor ol the
gave Ryan
himself.
Harry
bet
the
a
.500
side, to be held
7, 1882.
Citvand was the beginning of a new
persons were present at the
15,000
was
culled,
William
II.
Police (Gazette, stepped
Harding, then
into the ring
and
presented by Richarl K. Fox. with which to bet on
gl.OOO
Tne
Hill,
for ?2
Orleans, Ln., on February
at Mississippi
era in i)Ugili<(m in America.
ringside.
emblem-
Sullivan's representatives were in the Poi.rcic
and on Octoher
witliin
belt to be
At that time the only suitable antagonist for Sullivan
otic of the title.
seemed
made a
anyone
Mr. Fox
a battle for the championship of the world.
was taken and the monev placed
ofTicial
stakeholder.
pugilistic history, anil created
of the other pugilistic battles
Then began
more excitement
which had preceded
in this
It.
in the
hands of
fight that
a
made
connt-y than
The
e".
contest lasted
nine rounds and started Sullivan on the road to success.
After a short tour in which be met
comers, agreeing to stop ther>
all
In lour
rounds, Sullivan, at a benefit In Washington Park,
July
1882,
4,
agreed to give
|5<X)
to
Jimmy
New York,
Elliott ar^d f250 tc
any other
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON,
LIFE
78
man
No
one but
change.
Elliott
wlio would last four tliree-minute rounds against him.
appeared
Elliott
lasted a trifle
be was
hit so
With the
to claim
tbe chance to
make
a
little
In the early part of the fourth round
over three rounds.
hard that his handlers thought he had been
object in
had a short time previous sent
Tug Wilson,
killed.
view of fostering the boxing game Richard K. Fox
England for Jim
to
to
the matter was arranged and Madison Square Garden,
secured for the purpose, on the evening of July
minute rounds, and
gate
money.
By
if
New
17, 1882.
Wilson was
resulted in a record-breaking crowd.
known
Collins, better
come over and meet Sullivan. The latter
make a match with him until he had first had a hout with the
as
refused to
gloves, so
York, was
The
occasion
to stay four thrie-
be succeeded be was to get fl.OOOand half of the
not standing up and fighting, and falling to avoid
punishment whenever tbe opportunity oQered, and by taking the
count every time, Wilson managed
won the money.
But
J5.000
a
side, but the
it
Fox
After this aflair Mr.
wasn't a
1883.
fight,
to
ofifered
of Eng'and, at
by any means,
it
fu;l
rounds and
was a
farce.
back Wilson against Sullivan for
champion refused
Sullivan's next contest of note
champion
to stay the required four
to
even consider
it.
was with Charley Mitchell, the boxing
Madison Square Garden,
New
May
York.
Mitchell was quite sure he could stay four rounds with the
4.
cham-
The Boston Boy bad the Englishman beaten in three rounds
when he fought him down and bad fallen on top of him. But when
Mitchell got to his feet, apparently dazed, Captain Williams jumped into
pion.
the ring and stopped the battle.
As
in
in the case of
Tug Wilson Sullivan refused
a twenty-four foot
to
meet Mitchell
later
ring.
After this fight Mr. Fox sent for and backed Herbert Slade, the
Maori,
who was
then in
New
Zealand with
Madison Square Garden on August
Maori away inside of four rounds.
rounds were enough for the
New
Jem Mace. The men met
6, 1883,
Sullivan agreeing to put
He bad no
at
t'.e
trouble this time, as three
Zealander.
After that Sullivan appeared in minor contests, meeting such
men
as Dominick McCaflfrey, Patsey Car Jiff, Alf Greenfield and others.
In July.
1387,
Mr. Fox posted §1,000 with the
bind a match between Jake
Gazette diamond
belt. |5.000
Kilrain
and
New York
Clipper to
Sullivan, for the
Police
a side and the championship of Amerii'ii.
but Sullivan refused to meet ICilrain.
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
On November
79
Sullivan met Paddy Ryan in a tour-round
Ryan was knocked out in the third round.
and Charley Mitchell met at Cliantilly, France, on March
battle for $2,500 a side, under the rules of the London prize
23, 1888,
coniesl lor gate money.
Sullivan
a
10, 1886, in
After thirly-nine rounds,
ring.
II
And now came
that time, $20,000
took three hours and eleven
the battle for the largest stake ever fought for up to
and the Police Gazktte diamond
Richhurg, Miss., July
oft at
vvhicli
was declared a draw on account of darkness.
inutes, the battle
belt.
It
was Jake Kllrain, who represented the Police Gazette.
case of Ryan, Mr.
Under a
Fox had
As
in the
given $1,000 to Kilrain to bet on himself.
men
broiling sun the
was pulled
Sullivan's opponent on this occasion
8, 1889,
fought seventy-five rounds, Kilrain
tieing
unable to appear for the seventy-sixth.
Sullivan's Waterloo
came
Orleans, La., September
in
7, 1902,
the ring of the Olympic Club,
when he met James
be told in a few words, this downfall of a great
his
own
J. Corbett.
New
It
can
champion who had held
For twenty-one rounds he stood up against
for twelve years.
down on
youth and cleverness, and then he
settled
losing a purse of $25,000, a side
of $10,000,
popularity,
tiel
ti:e floor of
and the
title,
the ring,
but not his
RECORD.
Born
Oct. 15. 1858, Boston, Mass. Height 5 ft. 10J| In.
Heavyweight.
Color, wliite.
1880: Knockout— Oeorge Rooke. 2 rounds.
J. Donaldson. 10 rounds.
Exliibition— Joe Ooss, 3 rounds.
1881 :
Steve Taylor, 2 roumls. John Flood, 8 rounds. Knockout
—Fred Crossley, 1 round. James Dalton, 4 rounds. Jack Burns, 2
Won—
rounds.
Won— Paddy Ryan, 9 rounds.
1882:
out—Jimmy
Klliott, 3
rounds.
John McDermott, 3 rounds. KnockK.xhihilion- Tug Collins, 4 rounds.
Joe Cohurn.
Won— Charlie Mitchell, 3 rounris.
Won— Fred Rohinson, 3 rounds,
Herbert A. Slade, 3 rounds.
(ieorge M. Robinson, 4 rounds.
Alf Oreenlield,
.lohn M. Ladin, 3 rounds.
2 rounds. KnocKOUt— Al Marx, 1 round. i)an Henry, 3 round. William
1883:
1884 :
Rnos
Pliillips. 4
Fleming,
1885:
1
rounds,
round.
Won— Alf
Oreentield. 4 rounds. Jack BurUe, 5 rounds.
Police Interlerence— Paddv Ryan.
Dom.
McCaftrev, 6 rounds.
"
Rounds
1888
Sept.
Nov.
18
13
Dec.
28
Frank Herald
Paddy Ryan
Duncan McDonald
1887
Jan.
18
Patsy Cardifi
Mar.
10
Charley Mitchell
18H9
July
8
Jake Kilrain
7
Jim
1892
Sept.
Cortiett
1896
Aug.
31
Tom Sbarkey
Won
KnocKout
Draw
AND
LIFE
So
TLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
liAi
JAMES
James
CORBETT.
J.
Corbett was horn in California September
J.
tnenty-six years old wlien he became
His
Sullivan.
whom
Dailey,
He won
of a:je.
in
two rounds.
He
he beat in four rounds.
Duncan McDonald, but his
of
it is
first
in
said that
however,
contest at
New
Tl.en he
met James
and
Tiiey fought with
more money was wagered on
in California.
twenty-seven roumls.
eral public notice,
\i
l.eatim^
important contest was with Joe Choynsui
than on any that ever took place
and was beaten
and
bested Buffa'o Costello
on a barse in the middle of the Sacramento Kiver.
small gloves, and
1, 1866,
America by
any note wag with David Kiseman wlien he
first battle of
was eighteen years
champion
ChoynsUi was
Corbett did not
this fisht
out-clai?sed
come
into sen-
he met Jake Kiirain in a six-round
until
Orleans. After that he bestPd Dominick McCafirey easily,
Returning to the Coast he made a match with Peter Jackson for a puree
of $10,000.
stopped
Jackson was the favorite, and the California Club
tiie battle
at the
end of the
sixty-first
officials
round with a decision of a
draw.
After a successful theatrical tour he met Charlie Mitchell in 1894 at
Jacksonville, Fla.
the
It
Englishman cold
He
fought
Tom
then on March
17,
was a
short, sharp, fierce battle, Corl.ett
knocking
in three rounds.
Sharkey a four round draw
1897,
in
San Francisco, and
he went down to defeat at Carson City, Nev.,
The battle lasted fourteen rounds, and a
made the Australian champion of the world.
On November 22, 1898. he met Tom Sharkey in New York for the
second time, and was heins; beaten by the rugged sailor wlien McVey,
before
Bob Fitzsimmons.
punoli on the solar plexus
one of Corbett 's seconds, jumped into the
t:je
fight
on a
Corbett and
1900,
i
in;,
and Sharkey was awarded
foul.
McCoy met
in
Madison Square Garden on August
and McCoy was knocked out
in five
rounds,
claimed that this contest was prearranged, and that those
right"
knew
in
advance what the outcome would
30,
Jt has always been
who were
in
be.
RECORD.
Born
Sept.
1,
1866,
San Francisco,
Cal.
Height, 6 ft.
1 in.
Heavyweight.
Color, white,
1886:
Knockout— Billy Welch,
1887:
Draw— Jack Burke, 8
Draw— Frank Glover,
1888:
1
round.
rounds.
3 rounds.
Lost — Billy Welch, 4 rounds.
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
gl
CORBETT'S RECORD-Contiiined.
1889:
Won— J(ie
rounds.
Clioynski,
Draw— Dave
4
Knockout— Joe
rounds.
Campbell, 10 rounds.
Cliovnski,
27
Police interference— Joe
Clioynski, 4 rounds.
1890:
Won— Jake
liibilinn— Mike
1891
:
Won— Ei.
Kilrain, 6 rounds.
Donovan,
Kinney.
4
Dom. McCaflrey,
rounds.
Draw— Peter
Exbibition, Jobn L. Sullivan, 4 rounds.
1892:
Won— Bill Spillings. 1
livan. 21 rounds.
No
Knockout— Cbarlie
1896
Draw— Thomas
1897
rounds.
Ex-
round.
Bob
Jim
Jackson,
Hall.
Caffrey,
1
4
61
rounds,
rounds.
round.
John
L. Sul-
decision— Joe Lannon.
1894:
•
4
3 rounds.
Mitchell, 3 rounds.
Sliarkey,
4
rounds.
Peter Courtney, 6 rounds
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
82
ROBERT FITZSIMMONS.
Robert Fitzsjmmons, when he met Corbett, fought for the Champion,
ship of the World, and
He was
the
it
Champion
was so
speciflei in the articles of agreement-
of Australia,
and the English
title
at that time
WHS divided between Peter Jackson, Jem Smith, Slavln and Charley
winning from Corbett he
Mitchell, 80 that in
champion
spent most of his early
1862. Ijut
so tiiat
He was
of the^world.
it
him long
did not take
When Jem Mace
born
life in
in
really
became the
He was a born
Australia.
to learn the science of the
later the
men
one night.
in
That whs
young blacksmith met allcomers
men away
five
ofl
the
4.
fighter,
game.
reached the town of Timaru with his troupe of
boxers, Fitz presented himself as a candidate for tistic honors and
out four of Mace's
tirst
Cornwall, England, June
reel,
at
knocked
his beginning.
Mace's second
even offering to fight Mace
visit,
tiimself.
A
year
and put
After a
few battles he wentto Sydney, where he added to his reputation by knocKing out half a dozen men. It was there that he was beaten by Jim Hall, but
there
a question as to whether or not that go was on the level.
is
money he
His
who
got out of that contest brought
first fight in this
him
country was with Frank Allen, in San Francisco,
quit with his wrist broken.
After demonstrating his superiority, he
The match was made
decided to go after Jack Dempsey, the Nonpareil.
the Olympic Club of
At
14. 1891.
It
was an
New
that time
championship
belt
Orleans getting
and the men met on Januflry
Dempsey was the holder
and
to
of the middleweight
him by Richard K.
attracted a great deal of attention.
Dempsey was an overwhelming
cifully, and knocked him out in
to quit,
it,
which had been presented
historic battle
The
America.
to
favorite,
Fo.v.
Although
Fitzsimmons beat him unmer-
the thirteenth round, after begging
him
gaining the middleweight championship.
Then arrived on the scene Peter Maher. "Champion of Ireland.
The Olympic Club of Nca- Orleans got the bout for a $10,000 purse, and
the men met on March 2, 1892. It looked like a good fight for a while
but Fitz Bhowed his superiority and Maher quit at the end of the twelfth
round. Then, on March 8, 1893, came his fight with his old opponent'
'
Jim
Hall, of Australia.
Athletic Club of
on HaH.
New
was
held in tbe arena of the Crescent City
Nearly
all
of the
New York money went
In the fourth round he was hit flush on the Jaw. and knocked
out so thoroughly that
many
It
Orleans.
it
was twenty minutes before be revived, acd
thought be was dead.
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
His next important battle was
f
Muss.) Theatre, June
It
17, 1894.
at the expiration of tliat time,
Jos Cljoynski at the Boston
was carded
to ao eiglit rounds,
men were on
both
Choynski was badly beaten
draw.
witli
gz
in tlie fifth
their feel,
it
and
if,
was to be a
round, only the
call of
time saving him, and in the sixth the contest was so one-sided that the
it was called a draw anyhow.
The next to come along was Dan Creedon, who called himself middleweight champion of Australia. He got his in two rounds in the
OljmpicClub of New Orleans on September 25, 1894, and it was five
minutes before he l<new what bit him.
police interfered, so
Then
nesotiations were entered into with William Brady,
who
rep-
match
nitti
the
resented Corbett, with the object in vie v of securinj^ a
champion, but nothing came
of
them.
Fitz while
showing
at Syracuse,
N. Y., accidentally killed Con Kiordan, his sparring partner, but at the
subsequent
He
trial
was discharged.
fought Peter
knocked him out
Maher
at Langtry, Texas,
on Febrnarj'
21, 1896,
and
in exactly ninety-five seconds.
Fitzsimmons met Sharuey at the Mechanic's Pavilion, San Francisco,
December 2,
Wyntt Earp, a gun man,
1896.
round Fitzsimmons had
his
man
down and
cut him and sent him
out.
and the referee gave the decision
not,
In the seventh
wiis referee.
In the eighth round he upper-
beaten.
Sharkey
tried to rise, but could
to the sailor
amid the
hisses of the
crowd.
There was a contest
$10,000,
but
it
For the second time
sirtimonsandCorlaett.
13,000
I
Dan
Diamond
over the payment of the purse of
in the courts
was eventually given
to Siiarkey.
articles of
who were
agieemeni were signed between
to fi^ht for the title
At a meeting held
Belt.
in
the Police
The
date was set for
stakeholder.
March
17, 1897,
ana Mr. Fox was
At the second meeting Cnrson
the battle-ground.
The
City, Nev.,
office,
decision, he
wanted
continue the
to
battle.
him
side,
when
ad received the
chall-
but the crowd didn't
seriously.
Fitz^immons held
raaiched to meet
np
i
Brady was wild and
enged Fiiz to meet Corbett again for $20,000 a
take
selected us
was named as
result bus i.lready been told, except that
Corbett found that he had been beaten and Fitzsimnjons
ut
Gazette
Stuart was present, prepared to give a purse of $15 000 for the con-
test.
I
Filz-
und the Police Gazette
his title a trifle
James
J. Jeffries
a good, gtime battle, but the
over two years, and then he was
on June
9, 1899,
at
Coney Island.
He
bollermaker was too heavy for film.
AND RATTI,ES OF JACK JOHNSON.
^AFK
84
He absorbed
punisLiment
a glutton, and
lii^e
in ti.e
dropped the Australian for the count and ended
his
eleventh round Jed
championship career.
He
After that Fiiz met JefllThorne in Chicago, and put him away.
Jim Daly; knocked out El. Dunkhorst in two rounds; Gus
Rulilin in six rounds; and then got square with Torij Sharkey y putting
him away in tno rounds at Coney Island. On July 25, 1902, he fousht
also heat
I
spcond time in San Francisco, and was knocked out in
Jeffries a
ronnds.
His
He lost
Francisco.
was
last light
Philadelphia Jacic
witli
eii^lit
O'Brien in San
rounds.
in thirteen
RECORD.
Bern June
1890:
Won— Billy
rounds.
Won— Black
1891:
rounds.
1892:
Lost— Jim
Elston, Cornwall, England.
4, 1862,
McCarthy,
rounds.
9
Knockout— Arthur Upham.
5
Hall, 4 rounds.
Pearl,
Abe Congle,
4
rounds.
Knockout— Jack Dempsey.
13
2 rounds.
Won— Peter Maher, 12 rounds.
Knockout— James Farrell,
2 rounds.
Joe Godfrey, 1 round. Jerry Slattery, 2 rounds. Millard Zander, 1
round.
1893: Won- Jack Hickey, 3 rounds. Knoci<out— Jim Hall. 4 rounds.
Phil Mayo, 2 rounds. Warner, 1 round.
Dan Creedon, 2 rounds.
1894: Knockout- Frank Kellar, 2 rounds.
Draw— Joe Choynsici, 5 rounds.
1896: Knockout- Peter Maher, 1 round. No decision— Peter Malier, 3
rounds. Lost on Foul— Tom Sharkey. 8 rounds.
1897:
Won— James J.
1899:
Knockout— Jeff
Corbett, 14 rounds.
Tliorne,
1
round.
Knocked out by—Jim
Jeffries,
11 rounds.
Hounds
1900
Won
Aug.
10
Au^'.
24
Jim Daly
Ed. Dunkhorst
Gus Ruhlin
Tom Sharkey
25
Jim
Sent.
30
Ojf.
14
N'lV.
25
Con Coughlin •
Joe Grim
George Gardiner
23
Phila Jack O'Brien
20
Phila Jaclv O'Brien
17
Jack Johnson
Mir.
27
April 30
•
Knockout
Knockout
Knockout
Philadelphia
Brooklyn
New York
-
Coney Island
1902
June
Jeffries
Knocked out by San Francisco
-
1903
1904
July
1935
Dec.
1907
July
-
Knockout
1
•
-
2
6
-
2
AND RATII.KS OF JACK JOHNSON.
I.II-'K
85
TOMMY BURNS.
(NOAH BRUSSO)
Tommy Bums
never fought for
the
17, 1881, at
whom
Fred Thornton,
He was
After
Lang
but
it IS
title
tie
Hanover, Ont., and
had become a
lot of
all
his first battle
He
did
them
easy marlcs, knocicing
with Jacic Johnson.
That
is
a well-known fact that from the time the
never had a look
champion,
self-stj'led
was with
tlie tru-ic
men
in
lie
his
went
all out,
one
Bill Squires
went down before him, and then he was
make a match
He
He
on the road.
Jack Palmer, Jem Roche, Jewey Smith,
after the other.
Bill
picked up his
after the retirement of Jefifries.
linoclced out in five rounds.
lie
abroad and picked up a
forced to
It
a hard worl^er at the game, fighting ten
second year out.
and
man who
but annexed
it,
was born on June
twice.
ia
practically
an old story now,
first bell
rang Burns
in.
RECORn.
Born June
1900
:
1901:
17, 1881,
Knocko:it— Fred Thornton,
Knockout— Billy Walsh,
Sholtreau,
Reddy
1
round.
rounds.
Billy
Phillips, 9 rounds.
Smith. 10 rounds.
1903
Hanover, Ontario.
Height. 5
twice, 5
5 rounds.
7 in.
Color white.
Archie Steele, 2 rounds.
Walsh, 6 rounds.
Jack C'Donnell,
Tom McCune, 10
ft.
rounds each.
rounds.
F.d.
Dick Snaith, 9 round".
8
rounds.
Won— Dick
Lost— Mike Schreck,
10
86
I-IFE
AXD BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON.
LIFE
87
PETER JACKSON.
Born July
Draw— Jack
1882:
Heiulit, 6
3, 1861.
Heavyweislit.
Knockout— Jack
Hayes.
Uriton, 20 minutes.
ft. Y^ in.
Mick Dooley,
Color, black.
RouiuN
1884
July
26
'
-
Sati
Haye.s, 7 romids.
3 rounds.
-
Bill
Farnaa
Bill
Farnan
Lost
•
Melljourne, Aus.
Draw
Melbourne,
Won
Sydney, Aus.
-
3
6
Au.s.
1886
Sept,
25
Tom
Leea
Aui,'.
24
George Godfrey
Dec.
27
Joe WcAuliffe
Apr.
26
Patsy Cardill
•May
1
July
U
July
30
Aug.
5
Paddy Bren nan
Aug.
9
Ginger McCoriuick
Aug.
19
1889
Oct.
.5
Sailor
Brown
Jack Fallon
Alf Mitcliell
•
Jack Partridge
-
Jem Young
•
Coddy Meddings
-
-
-
MikeLyncli
Jack Watts
Ocr.
.
Shorty Kincaid
Alf Ball
-
-
-
SO
88
LIFE
AND BATTLES OF JACK JOHNSON
JACKSODT'Si RECORD-Continned.
KouiKls
1891
Jlay 21
Jim Corbetl
-
Draw
Shu Francisco
Won
riiicago
Knockout
Knockout
London
-
61
-
1892
Al
Jan. 12
Jan. 12
Jack Dalton
May
Frank Slavin
30
Fisli
-
-
-
-
-
-
ChiCHSio
.
.
2
-
10
3
-
.
-
1893
-
-
-
-
Jim JeSries
-
San Francisco
Lost
-
-
3
JIM FLYNN.
(ANDKEW CHIARIGLIONE.)
Born Dec.
24, 1879,
Height, 6
Brooklj-n, N. Y.
1901:
Knockout— Chambers,
2rounif8.
Won — Fred
France, 6 rouiKls.
4 rouncis.
9>2 in.
Heavyweight,
rounds. Ray Condy,
Pat Malloy, 6 rounds. Fred
Ed Seaman, 4
Davis, 6 rounds.
Kid Dawson,
ft.
Color, White.
Italian-Americnn.
3 rouiids.
Knorkoul— Jack
Lavell. 2 rounds. Georstp Condie, 2 rounds. Joe
rounds. Biirnt'y Passow, 12 rouncJs. Ed Burns, 11 rounds.
Jack Graham, 7 rounds. Won — W^illard Bean, 20 rounds. Won-toul —
Draw— Joe Cotton, 20 rounds. Dummy
Jack Graham, 5 rounds.
1902:
Tracy,
15
Rowan,
1903:
20 rounds.
KnocKout— Wm.
JJalloy, 20 ro'inds.
Kid Rowley,
2 rounds. Austin
Yale. 7 rounds. Eddie Kellv, 20 rounds. Lost— Jtck Root, 8 rounds.
Kinslev, 15 rounds. Tom Kinsley, 20 rounds.
Draw— Tom
KnotKOUt— Tom Kissile, 3 rounds. Ed ilcCoy, 3 rounds. Tim
Ed coolev, 8 rounds. Ed Cooley.6 rounds, ^\on —
Cyclone Kelly, 20 rounds. Won-foul— Tim Hurley, 7 rounds. DrawAndy Walsli, 20 rounds. Harry Peppers, 10 rounr.s. Morgan Williams,
1904:
Hurley, 6 rounds.
Tommy
Geortie Gardiner. 10 rounds.
Williams, 4 rounds. Dummy Rowan, 4 rounds.
Andy
Malloy,
2 rounds. Draw— Tom Riley,
Jimmy Rowan, 6 rounds.
10 rounds.
Draw— Jack (Twin)
1906: Knocke out by— Tommy Burns, 15 rounds.
Sullivan, 20 rounds.
Dave Barry, 7 rounds.
1907: Knockout- Georue Gardiner, 18 rounds.
Bill Squires, 6 rounds.
Knocked out by- Jack Jolinson, 11 rouncis.
Won— Jack (T^.in) Sullivun, 20 rounds. Won-foul—Tony Ross. 18
rounds. Draw— Jack (Tnin) Suli van, 20 rounds.
Sam LauL'ford.l round.
1908: Knocked out hy— Al Kauflman, 9 rounds.
Draw—Jim Barry, 10 rounds. No decision— J. (Twin) Sullivan, lo
rouiiiis.
Jim Barry, 10 rounds. Batilins Jolinson, 10 rounds. Won —
Battling Johnson, 10 rounds.
Ralilini; Johnson, 10 rounds.
20 rounds.
1905:
Rilev, 20 rounds.
Knockout- Mor<;an
i
LIFE
AND RATTLES OF JACK JOHNSOX
ALL SPORTING RECORDS
GREATEST OF REFERENCE BOOKS
ACTUAL SIZE OF BOOK
SX-lJj
INCHES.
Mailed for Six 2-cent Stamps.
THE STANDARD SPORTING AUTHORITY
PUBLISHED EVERY YEAR.
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The BKST BOOK
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Plain
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WRESTLING
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The
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N?20-FOXS ATHLETIC LIBRARY'
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wish
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SENT ON RECEIPT OF SEVEN
2 -CENT
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n
Here's a Standard Authority
N9 4-FOX'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY.
!
THE AUTHORITY ON CARDS
When You Get
lfT7
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1
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HOW TO WIN
ornciAL
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HAINDV VEST POCKET SIZE
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AA 000
891 494
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University oi oaiiiornia, San Diego
DATE DUE
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