(History/Geography) - part 2 (pdf 3.8 MB)

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(History/Geography) - part 2 (pdf 3.8 MB)
✃
SOURCE 7
- ‘THE CHANGING VILLAGE’, CONTINUED
Memories of picnics on the beach
with the kettle boiled on
driftwood; long walks over to
Holford. A sport for a lot of
villagers was ‘glatting’ –
catching conger eels under the
rocks when the tide was out.
Some of the men used to put up
lairs, flat stones on top of one
another, and woe betide anyone
who fished someone else’s lair.
The biggest conger I can remember
being caught was one of twenty
eight pounds by Herbert Feltham.
Quantoxhead never had a
football team, but
several played for Kilve,
or Quantock Rangers as
they were known. They
actually played in
Quantoxhead in a field
near the school. I
remember the parson at
Kilve, the Rev. James,
being in goal. He was a
great fisherman and died
on the riverbank in
Cornwall whilst fishing.
Before the First World War all the mesn were employed in
the village, either on the farms or Estate. Court Farm had
a team of three horses and a cattle [ ], Townsend farm had
two teams. After the War some of the men went to work for
the Council, on the roads, or in the quarries. Now, of
course, they’re nearly all commuters to Bridgwater, Watchet
or Minehead.
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Before the Hall was built in 1913, there was a dame school on
the site. The entrance lobby is still attached to the
cottage. This, of course, was before my timeº.kept for many
years by Miss Rossiter. The village school was built in
1889. But I do remember ‘Penny Readings’ by the Squire
there, also Band of Hope meetings. The Hall(8&9), one of the
first in the neighbourhood, was very popular for Whist Drives
and dances, as many as thirty tables for Whist and one
hundred and fifty at dances; and also socials, with Jim
Lockyer reading stories from Jan Stewer and Jim Griffiths
doing a dance.
Between the wars there was a well-patronised Men’s Club,
with billiard table and card games; also the daily paper,
as only the Court and the Rectory had daily papers
delivered, until Sam Thorne started delivering from Kilve.
Sam Thorne was a stalwart of Kilve Cricket Club – I played
with him for a number of years.
✃
28 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7
- ‘THE CHANGING VILLAGE’,
Another great difference in the
early twenties – only two of us
had radios, which started with
crystal sets with loudspeakers;
staying up until 2 a.m. to get
America on the medium wave – no
short waves then. On one
particular Boat Race day in the
Twenties, the Squire and Parson
Aldworth came in to listen to
the commentary. Neither had the
wireless. One supported
Cambridge, the other Oxford, but
I can’t remember who won. Now
nearly everyone in the village
has television.
I only once rode in Aplin’s
horse bus from Kilve to
Bridgwater, but remember some
of us had to walk up the hills
to help the horses, and passing
droves of sheep on the road
going to Bridgwater Market.
CONTINUED
✃
SOURCE 7
Another difference I
remember – the horse mail
cart going along the road
from Bridgwater to Watchet,
with a Mr. Clavey driving.
The mail was delivered
round
[ ] by Mr
Crocker, the blacksmith at
Kilve. Another character,
Tom Hurley, who lived in
the tollgate house at
Kilve, delivered telegrams
with the help of a hand
cart for parcels at
Christmas
The village pond I have
seen cleaned out by horse
and cart, then by lorry and
then drag-line [grip]. By
the way, the barn where
they made the reed for
thatching is now ironically
covered with reeds from
Poland.
✃
Also in the Thirties we had a lot of hill fires which we
put out with the help of other villages – no fire brigades
or police came to the fires in those days. It was
suspected that they were very often started by the sheep
farmers who would put lighted candles in the heather and
then went home to bed. Whilst putting out a fire in
Shervage Wood one night, we listened on the wireless set
to the Squire giving his talk in a Bristol studio about
the ghost of Shervage Wood.
SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
During the Thirties there was a tremendous gale on one
Sunday. It blew down scores of trees, several across the
roads, so that the Rev. Sheddon of Kilton, who was taking
Evensong here, had to walk home, after first suggesting
that the sexton, George Sweet, go with him in his car,
taking a hand saw to clear the road.
The Squire used to visit me most Sundays at the library
and would very often fill his pockets with apples to give
to any children he met.
29
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
- ‘THE CHANGING VILLAGE’,
✃
SOURCE 7
CONTINUED
We always used to make our
own entertainment – cricket
and football on Saturdays
at Higher Street, tennis
in a court at the village
hall. Now, alas, I’m
afraid the young people
prefer to have their
entertainment made for
them. Thank goodness
there are still the hills
and the sea for those who
appreciate it and have the
energy to visit them.
Hope this hasn’t been too
boring.
I don’t know that I appreciated
the beauty of the Quantocks
when, after the second World
war, there was a fire on Black
Hill at the extreme southern end
of East Quantoxhead. George
Sweet, Will Feltham and myself
started to walk there at 9 p.m.
We had no transport then; it
took us about one and a half
hours to get there in the
dark.found half a mile of
heather and gorse on fire. We
managed to get it out by 6 a.m.
and then had to walk home. We
did not see anyone all that time
Old Christmas day, January
6th, was kept as a holiday
until the Second War. Most
of the men went rabbiting,
either in the wood or on
the hill. We had to leave
early to go to a party at
the Court House given by
the Squire for all the
children – tea, games in
the servants’ Hall and
afterwards go to the dais
in the main hall for the
Squire to give us presents.
During the Thirties, Tom
Webber and myself went on the
hill with pony and cart to
fetch ‘Lousy Thorn’, which
had blown down. This thorn
was shown on a three hundred
year map at Court. We
brought the trunk back to be
kept at the Court. Parts of
it were still standing so we
staked it. I don’t know if
it has survived the hill
fires.
In the late Eighties two
carriers travelled to
Bridgwater once or twice
a week, one belonging to
Mr. Shepherd who lived in
a house near the
plantation at Perry which
has long disappeared and
the other to Mr. Boucher
who lived at Coggans. In
the cart-shed there you
can see a recess in the
end wall for the steps of
the van to go in
✃
The water supply to the
village was put in about
1890. Previous to that the
school had a supply from
Brimball, the Court and
the village from springs in
old Ash and the Rectory
from a spring in Townsend
orchard.
30 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7
- ‘THE CHANGING VILLAGE’,
The water supply to the
village was put in
about 1890. Previous
to that the school had
a supply from Brimball,
the Court and the
village from springs in
old Ash and the Rectory
from a spring in
Townsend orchard.
CONTINUED
✃
SOURCE 7
The Rev. Luttrell lived for many
years at the Rectory and was very
fond of hunting and when he was
too old to hunt he sent his
gardener, Charles Hurley, out on
his horse and he had to bring a
full report back to him. This
Mr. Hurley eventually lived at
the Priory, Kilve and could
remember, as a boy, seeing the
Chantry burnt down.
More thoughts on the changes in agriculture.
On an old map in my possession there are about 253 fields
shown in the parish. In another map, 1825, this was reduced
to 180 and now there are only 100. In some of the fields
there are large depressions. These are not the result of
bombs, but are marl pits where marl was dug and spread over
the fields as a fertiliser. This was done by gangs who
moved around the district. The men dug the marl, the wives
spread the marl from baskets.
Another thing that has disappeared is the ‘firkin’, or
miniature barrel, in which the worker carried his allowance
of cider. Now it is the Thermos flask with coffee – this
perhaps to keep them alert to the needs of modern machinery,
whereas the cider was to replace moisture lost in hard
labour.
✃
SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Another change is in the method of feeding sheep in the
winter. This was done by hurdling off sections of swedes in
the fields. The swedes had to be put through a pulper; this
was done every day, in all kinds of weather. I think the
only one left in the village who has done this is Mr. Will
Feltham. The hurdles were made by local carpenters who went
around to the various farms. They were made from cleft ash
poles and quite recently the remains of a tool they used for
clefting was found in Park Wood. Now, of course, not many
swedes are grown, mostly kale and divided up with sheep wire,
a far easier job.
31
SOURCE 7
- ‘THE CHANGING VILLAGE’,
CONTINUED
Apart from the Court House, some of the oldest cottages are
at Lower Bradleys opposite the letter box. These are
thatched, with the roof trusses extended to ground level with
the walls filled in afterwards, probably about sixteenth
century. Whilst making alterations to one of the cottages
at the centre of the village we found, in a cob wall, part
of the antler of a roe deer. I later discovered that it was
the custom in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to put
bones in the walls of houses when building, bones of animals
to keep the spirits away. This particular cottage is
thatched, with rafters being rough elm poles and with split
oak battens. During alterations to another cottage a
partition wall was found to be a framework of rough upright
poles interwoven with hazel twigs and covered with mud –
that is the old wattle and daub, sixteenth or seventeenth
century.
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Of course, a lot of
the cottages were reroofed in the 1800s
with tiles, but often
the old rafters were
left beneath.
Strangely enough we
have never found any
old coins or weapons,
even while digging
round the Court House,
but I did find a Roman
coin whilst putting in
a gatepost at Kilton.
Going back to the John Hurley who
lived at the Priory and who died
in 1905, aged 83, his niece told
me that, as a boy, then living at
East Quantoxhead, he and another
boy went to the scene of a rick
fire at the rear of the Priory.
When the men had put out the fire,
these two boys were left keeping
watch. Unfortunately they were
left some cider as well. They
went to sleep and when they woke
up found that some sparks from the
embers had blown onto the roof of
the Chantry and caught it on fire.
This would put the date of when it
burned down at about 1832 to 35.
Milestones in memories were the opening of the Village
Hall in 1914; the return of Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Luttrell
from Australia, when decorated arches were erected at
Higher Street and by the pond, and the car was met at
Higher Street and towed by hand to the Court House. Also
various celebrations with bonfires on the tumuli at Dod
Hill, Jubilee celebrations in the Village hall with sports
in the field behind, known as Jim Withers’ field. I have
been told that sports for Queen Victoria’s Jubilee was
held in the hill field to the west of East Wood. This was
in my younger days known as Jubilee Field.
32 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7 SOURCE SHEET 7
SOURCE 8
- NEWSPAPER CUTTINGS 1929-42
1929
1939
1939
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
1939
1939
1942
SOURCE SHEET 8 SOURCE SHEET 8 SOURCE SHEET 8 SOURCE SHEET 8
33
SOURCE 9 - MARRIAGES
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Excerpts from Marriage Register, St Mary’s Church
Samuel Stone (West Quantoxhead) and Emily Burge ,
June 18th 1871
George Burge and Marina Anne Payne
June 2nd 1872
George Gore (Kilton) and Sarah Tuckfield
November 23rd 1875
William Wheeler? Vinmore (Bloomsbury) and Eliza Betty Jenkins
August 21st 1877
Henry Feltham (Wrington) and Eliza Bailey
December 6th 1877
John Lockyear and Fanny Case
March 6th 1878
William Enticott (Wembdon) and Louisa Venn
April 29th 1879
Henry Dyte (Fitzhead) and Jane Western
May 28th 1882
Robert Grandfield and Elizabeth Sully
May 21st 1883
William George Stevens (Williton) and Lucy Payne
November 22nd 1885
William Jones and Mary Jane Short
November 17th 1889
John Tuckfield and Sarah Jane Bennett
December 15th 1890
James Creech and Eliza Jane Tottle
Christmas Day 1890
John Henry Jarvis (Watchet) and Mary Anne Payne
February 10th 1891
Richard Moore Goddard (East Acton) and Elizabeth Ann Rawle
June 7th 1892
James Cording (Bishops Lydeard) and Charlotte Creech
November 15th 1892
James Imber (Pawlett) and Mary Ann Griffiths
December 29th 1894
James Moggridge and Harriet Jane Rowe
July 26th 1896
William Goddard (Southall) and Emma Rawle
October 20th 1896
William James Powlesland (Wiveliscombe) and Lilly Withers
February 26th 1897
George Langdon (Bicknoller) and Caroline Western
April 19th 1897
Charles Hurley and Sally Sparks
September 22nd 1897
Henry James Westcott Shepherd and Elizabeth Ann Howe
October 18th 1897
Herbert Feltham and Elizabeth Alma Maguire
February 16th 1898
Fred Donnithorne(Gorton,Manchester) and Bessie Elizabeth Tremlett
April 4th 1899
George Creech and Mary Ann Western
December 24th 1899
Willie George Ernest Poole (Brent Knoll) and Mary Jane Rawle
January 3rd 1901
Frank Glida Summerhayes(Kilve) and Florence Emily Rawle
February 4th 1904
Frederick James Harris (Lilstock) and Ellen Greedy
December 1st 1904
Alfred Charles Davis (Morebath) and Louisa Tuckfield
April 24th 1905
34 SOURCE SHEET 9 SOURCE SHEET 9 SOURCE SHEET 9 SOURCE SHEET 9
SOURCE 10 - BURIALS
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Excerpts from Burials Register, St Mary’s Church
SOURCE SHEET 10 SOURCE SHEET 10 SOURCE SHEET 10 SOURCE SHEET 10
35
CONTINUED
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
SOURCE 10 - BURIALS
36
SOURCE SHEET 10 SOURCE SHEET 10 SOURCE SHEET 10 SOURCE SHEET 10
CONTINUED
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
SOURCE 10 - BURIALS
SOURCE SHEET 10 SOURCE SHEET 10 SOURCE SHEET 10 SOURCE SHEET 10
37
SOURCE 11 - BAPTISMS
Date of Baptism Child’s name
Parents’ names
Surname
Place
Father’s
Occupation
Feb 22nd 1891
Florence Mabel
John + Sarah Jane
Tuckfield
East Quantoxhead
Gardener
Jan 11th 1891
Margaret Jane
William &
Mary Jane
Jones
East Quantoxhead
Carpenter
Feb 2nd 1890
(b.1888)
Herbert Walter
George + Alice
Western
Townsend
Carter
Feb 2nd 1890
(b. 1882)
Rosa
Mary Anne
Western
Perry
Single Woman
Jan 19th 1890
Florence Annie
Edwin + Annie
Hunt
Higher Street
Labourer
Jan 19th 1890
Walter
Thomas + Anne
Hurley
East Quantoxhead
Labourer
April 7th 1889
William
Robert +
Mary Anne
Tremlett
East Quantoxhead
Carpenter
August 3rd 1889 Ralph Paganel
Alexander +
Alice Edwina
Fownes
Luttrell
East Quantoxhead
Captain,
Grenadier
Guards
June 29th 1888
Henry + Letitia
Fish
East Quantoxhead
Farmer
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Ella Letitia
Helen Amelia
Mary
38 SOURCE SHEET 11 SOURCE SHEET 11 SOURCE SHEET 11 SOURCE SHEET 11
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
SOURCE 12
39
SOURCE SHEET 12 SOURCE SHEET 12 SOURCE SHEET 12 SOURCE SHEET 12
- ‘DANGER’ POSTER
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
SOURCE 13 FARM SALE
40
SOURCE SHEET 13 SOURCE SHEET 13 SOURCE SHEET 13 SOURCE SHEET 13
SOURCE 14
- INTERVIEW WITH COLONEL LUTTRELL
Extracts from an interview between pupils from Otterhampton Primary School
and Sir Colonel Walter Luttrell, recorded at Court House, East Quantoxhead, on
15th June 2003. (edited)
What changes have there been in East Quantoxhead in transport?
Q
Well, obviously enormous ones. In the very early days, I
suppose, the vast majority of people around, within a radius of
twelve miles at least, would’ve been on their feet entirely they thought nothing of walking. For example, Perry Farm is
practically two miles east towards Williton, and over quite a
steep hill. Before the beginning of the last war in the early
1900’s, the whole family from Perry would walk over the hill to
church, then walk back again for Sunday lunch. Then they’d walk
back over here again for Evensong. People always walked to
school, when there were schools here.
There were a few people who had donkeys.
Up to 1910, the woman
who did all the laundry and the washing had a donkey, or her
husband had a donkey and cart. Ships used to come in to the
beach here bringing coal from South Wales, and the donkeys used
to go down and collect it in pans. There was a ramp down there
then so they could bring it up to the village.
There were horses and carts obviously, on the farm. They had
some of the earliest farm wagons, in this part of the world
anyway. And then of course the more well-to-do had a pony and
trap. We had one which was a very fast trotter, which was what
we’d use for getting about locally. And then there was a much
bigger and more cumbersome wagon, or wagonette they called it,
with two horses, for when the family wanted to go out to visit
Fairfield.
What changes have there been in East Quantoxhead in
everyday life?
Q
Ordinary people were doing other sort of work: we had a cobbler,
we had a miller, that’s just over the last hundred years
actually. We had two fulling mills where they were making cloth
and things like that. They all started work at eight in the
morning, and they used to go on until about six in the evening.
We had two thatchers in the village – they worked as soon as it
was light. The ordinary farm workers who weren’t actually going
milking, they started when it was light and finished at six in
the evening.
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
People with their own cows used to get up at any time from 5
o’clock in the morning, all through winter, to milk them. Very
few cows were kept inside, they were out in the fields, so they
had to be brought inside in the pitch dark, and milked by hand,
and then fed and turned out again.
41
SOURCE SHEET 14 SOURCE SHEET 14 SOURCE SHEET 14 SOURCE SHEET 14
SOURCE 14
- INTERVIEW WITH COLONEL LUTTRELL
CONTINUED
But of course it’s a bit different now, I mean people start at 8
and finish at 5. Two hundred years ago they all worked on a
Saturday, a hundred years ago they had Saturday afternoon off.
Sundays were always off, except for the poor wretched men who
had to milk the cows.
Has East Quantoxhead ever had a school?
Q
Had a school? Yes, in one of the bigger cottages down here,
there was a lovely old lady, she ran a so-called school for
children up to about eight or ten. And then my greatgrandfather, he built schools all over the place, he built one
at Williton, and the one that’s on the road here between Kilve
and here, that was the schoolhouse.
There were many more children in those days. I mean, in
Quantoxhead at the moment, I think there are eleven under-tens,
whereas in my grandfather’s time, eighty or ninety years ago,
there were about thirty. So it was a bit of a squash down there.
How many people does it take to man the estate, and is that less
or more than years ago?
Q
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Oh, much less, gracious. On my books there are two what you
might call maintenance men. Well they do everything, builder,
joiner, plumber, they do the lot, two of them. One chap in the
woods, and me. But in my grandfather’s time there were, well
let’s see, there was a head maintenance man, then there were two
labourers, there was a wheelwright who looked after all the
carriages and the carts and so on. They’re called wheelwrights
because they actually originally made and shod the wheels around
hoops, but they also look after all the carriages.
There were two men in the saw pit. Up to sixty years ago, one
of the cottages had a saw pit, it’s still there, and that is
where the men cut all the timber. They’d bring out a tree and
they’d put it into this pit. One poor chap would have to be
down below, and one up above with an enormous two-handed saw, oh
about seven feet high which is much taller than me. One chap on
top moved the handles and the chap underneath did the same
thing, because there were no circular saws.
The two people in the saw pit did the woods as well. There were
two gamekeepers. There were two carters because there were four
big shire carthorses on the estate and on the farm. Oh and the
thatchers. So it was quite a large body of chaps. And of course
they had a mere horse and cart to take everybody everywhere, no
tractors, no power saws or anything like that. Just man-power.
42 SOURCE SHEET 14 SOURCE SHEET 14 SOURCE SHEET 14 SOURCE SHEET 14
SOURCE 14
- INTERVIEW WITH COLONEL LUTTRELL
CONTINUED
We found out that not everyone in the village had their own
water supply, and some people went to the village hall for a
bath. When did that change?
Ah, well we’ve been doing it gradually. We’ve been here, well
I’ve been here fifty-three years now. When I came here there
were five cottages that did actually have water, but only one
cold tap inside at the kitchen sink.
Not very long before
that, there were little groups of cottages built in threes,
outside the village hall for instance. Each group had a sort of
alcove, with a little stand pipe in it, and those chaps in the
village had to go get water from there.
But apart from that, two or three years and we’d got them all
done. A few have still got bathrooms downstairs, because it was
the easiest way to do it - we didn’t know if we’d have enough
pressure to get the water up to the tank. And now a lot of
people have put in their own showers with an overhead tank
There was no electricity in the village when we came here, it
was all a lot of lamps and candles, including here.
What did people do before television?
Q
The children of your age did far more out actually in the
country. I mean birds nesting, which now of course isn’t
allowed. Coming swiping my grandfather’s apples when they had
half a chance in the orchard, fishing, chasing about on the
beach. climbing in the trees. And all the sort of things I used
to do too believe it or not, when I was a child. They made their
own amusements.
SOURCE SHEET 14 SOURCE SHEET 14 SOURCE SHEET 14 SOURCE SHEET 14
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Oh, gosh, we used to have terrific fun. The village hall
itself, you could pull out the stage at one end, and they used
to have lots and lots of parties. They had a play in the summer,
all done by people from East Quantoxhead and Kilve… and in the
winter just before Christmas they always had a wonderful
pantomime.
And they did much more, I mean they had their own
band, a brass band, I think there was eleven of them, including
Mr Jarvis. And, oh I don’t know, they had skittles, they had
their own football team, they combined with Kilve for cricket.
43
KILVE TO EAST QUANTOXHEAD I SPY SHEET
Name:
Follow the route from Kilve to East Quantoxhead, and put these views in the right order.
WATCH OUT the photo are not in the right order.Tick them off as you see them.
1
2
4
3
5
6
8
7
9
10
12
11
13
15
14
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
16
44
17
19
18
PUPIL SHEET 1 PUPIL SHEET 1 PUPIL SHEET 1 PUPIL SHEET 1 PUPIL SHEET 1
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
BUILDING SURVEY
45
What do you think this building was used for?
What else have you noticed about it?
6.
7.
Done
PUPIL SHEET 2 PUPIL SHEET 2 PUPIL SHEET 2 PUPIL SHEET 2 PUPIL SHEET 2
East Quantoxhead old photographs
1.
Show on the map where your old photo was taken.
2.
Take a photo from the same place.
3.
List the changes you have noticed:
Has anything been altered or added?
chimneys
5.
windows
How many: doors
4.
chimney
windows
doors
roof
walls
East Quantoxhead Buildings survey
Names:..................................................................................................
TASK
1.
Show where your building is on the map.
2.
Make a large, drawing of your building.
3.
What building materials have been used for the:
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
GRAVEYARD SURVEY
46
PUPIL SHEET 3 PUPIL SHEET 3 PUPIL SHEET 3 PUPIL SHEET 3 PUPIL SHEET 3
Name:
GRAVESTONE SURVEY
Name:
EAST QUANTOXHEAD GRAVE STONE SURVEY
Recorded by:
Shape of headstone, showing description
Date recorded:
Made of:
State of preservation:
Number of people
remembered:
First names(s)
Surname
Male or
Female
Year of
birth
Age at
death
Relationships
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Epitaph
PUPIL SHEET 4 PUPIL SHEET 4 PUPIL SHEET 4 PUPIL SHEET 4 PUPIL SHEET 4
47
WE ARE HISTORY DETECTIVES 1
Name:
We looked at information sources in our classroom. These included...
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
This told us...
48 PUPIL SHEET 5 PUPIL SHEET 5 PUPIL SHEET 5 PUPIL SHEET 5 PUPIL SHEET 5
WE ARE HISTORY DETECTIVES 2
Name:
We searched for clues from the past in East Quantoxhead.
We found/ saw...
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
This helped us to find out...
PUPIL SHEET 6 PUPIL SHEET 6 PUPIL SHEET 6 PUPIL SHEET 6 PUPIL SHEET 6
49
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
OTTERHAMPTON PRIMARY SCHOOL VISITS EAST QUANTOXHEAD
50 EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES
EXAMPLES OF PUPILS’ WORK
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Comparing Census entries for the Rectory from 1891 and 1871
EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES
51
EXAMPLES OF PUPILS’ WORK
- CONTINUED
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Completed grave stone survey sheet (calculation shown working out age at death).
52 EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES
EXAMPLES OF PUPILS’ WORK
- CONTINUED
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Completed history detective sheets (Using Pupil Sheet 4)
EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES
53
EXAMPLES OF PUPILS’ WORK
- CONTINUED
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
Completed history detective sheets (using Pupil Sheets)
54 EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES
EXAMPLES OF PUPILS’ WORK
- CONTINUED
Example of a ‘person sheet’
recording details of one East
Quantoxhead individual. These
were posted up where
everyone could see them and
add further details as they
were discovered, thus avoiding
duplication of records.
EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES EXAMPLES
EAST QUANTOXHEAD
List of jobs mentioned in Bert Jarvis’s memoirs.
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