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here - University of Virginia School of Law
THE FEDERALIST SOCIETY
30th Annual Student Symposium
February 27, 2009
J.B. Moore Society of International Law
CAPITALISM,
MARKETS AND THE
CONSTITUTION
February 25 & 26, 2011
Welcome
America’s economy, characterized by
capitalism and the free market, has generally
provided material prosperity for its citizens
since the country was founded. In the last few
years, however, that same economy has faced
a financial crisis and recession worse than any
other since the Great Depression. The federal
government took an active role in responding
to the downturn, favoring more intervention
over less. The results included a bailout of
major banks and automobile companies, an
$800 billion stimulus package, an overhaul
of financial regulations, and a comprehensive
health care reform package.
These measures were hotly contested,
and a vocal group of citizens responded by
forming Tea Party groups across the country.
Members of this movement placed a heavy
emphasis on the ideas of the founders and
the original meaning of the Constitution.
Opposition to the federal government’s
economic approach, primarily led by the Tea
Party movement, culminated in historic
Republican gains in the 2010 midterm elections. Shortly after taking control, the new
majority held a reading of the Constitution on
the floor of the House of Representatives for
the first time in history.
The battle over the government’s role
in economic regulation has not only been
waged in the halls of Congress, but in the
courts as well. In the past year a total of 28
states have filed joint or individual lawsuits
challenging the constitutionality of the health
care reform bill’s individual mandate.
With the state of the economy at a
historic low and the popularity of the Constitution at a historic high, now is an apt time to
examine the topic of capitalism, markets and
the Constitution. This symposium seeks to
explore the following questions: What were
the economic theories of the founders and
how did they influence the Constitution? To
what extent does the Constitution protect
economic liberties, if at all? What effect
does American federalism, embodied in the
Constitution, have on the substance and style
of government regulation? Is a welfare state
consistent with American exceptionalism?
What is the role of the courts in times of
economic uncertainty? And lastly, what were
the causes and consequences of the recent
financial crisis?
The University of Virginia School of
Law and its Federalist Society chapter are
honored to host the 2011 Student Symposium. The setting is the perfect match for this
symposium — a law school with a history of
focusing on the intersection of law and the
economy located just miles from the home
of James Madison. We hope that each of you
will approach our panels with an open mind
and insightful questions and will discuss with
each other what you learn over the course of
the weekend. Anyone who has attended past
Federalist Society symposia knows to expect
the highest degree of respectful and cordial
debate. Thank you for joining us in Charlottesville for what is sure to be an exciting and
engaging event.
Symposium Committee
University of Virginia Federalist Society
Please see the last page of this program for a
list of our generous sponsors.
2
table of contents
Friday Schedule 4
Saturday Schedule 6
Participants 9
The Federalist Society
for Law & Public Policy
Studies 22
UVA Law School
Federalist Society 24
Sponsors 26
connect with
the federalist society
27
Brief Schedule Back cover
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Friday
3:30 p.m.
Registration
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium Lobby
6:15 p.m.
Welcome and
Opening Remarks
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium
Ben Massey
President, University of Virginia
Federalist Society
LILLIAN BEVIER
Dean, University of Virginia School of Law
6:30 p.m.
Debate: Economic
Freedoms and the
Constitution
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium
Since West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish and the
end of the Lochner era, the Supreme Court
has adhered to the belief that “[t]he Constitution does not speak of freedom of contract.”
But is this commitment consistent with an
original understanding of the Constitution?
This panel will address whether the Constitution permits the extensive state regulation
of economic affairs. Even if Lochner as a
decision was illegitimate, has the Supreme
Court retreated too far in protecting economic liberties from state interference? Is the
Constitution a thoroughly libertarian document or is it compatible with a high degree of
state regulation? Does either understanding
come with any limiting principles? If so, what
are their sources? In any event, is it desirable
for a constitution to constrain the power of
the state in the area of redistribution and
economic regulation?
Randy Barnett
Georgetown University Law Center
Jeffrey Rosen
George Washington University Law School
Moderator:
Judge Debra Livingston
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
Debate participant biographies on page 9
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8 p.m.
Panel I: Economic Theory,
Civic Virtue and the Meaning
of the Constitution
9:45 p.m.
Cocktail Reception
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Pavilion
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium
Justice Holmes’ dissent in Lochner v. New York
is well known for the statement, “[A] constitution is not intended to embody a particular
economic theory, whether of paternalism and
the organic relation of the citizen to the State
or of laissez faire.” But is this belief consistent
with the original Constitution? To what extent
did the ideas of thinkers such as Adam Smith
shape the founders’ understanding of human
nature and public virtue? In what ways do their
economic and philosophical commitments
continue to shape our constitutional government today? Are capitalism and a commitment
to civic virtue complementary or antagonistic?
Does the Constitution promote a virtuous citizenry or is it simply a set of political structures
that can accommodate a pluralistic society? At
a time when the virtues of capitalism are often
called into question, it will be useful to examine
the precise place of this theory in the foundational structures of our government.
James Ely
Vanderbilt University Law School
Renee Lettow Lerner
George Washington University Law School
Nelson Lund
George Mason University School of Law
G. Edward White
University of Virginia School of Law
Moderator:
Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit
Panel I participant biographies on page 10
5
saturday
8 a.m.
Continental
Breakfast
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium Lobby
9 a.m.
Panel II: Federalism and
Interstate Competition
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium
This panel will assess American federalism as
a competitive institution that offers a marketplace of state regulatory regimes. With the
recession impacting some states more heavily
than others, it is time to ask whether interstate
competition is good for the nation. Should
state-by-state approaches to issues such as
health care, financial regulation, environmental
protection and same-sex marriage be encouraged? Does competition among the states lead
to the best outcome or a race to the bottom?
How will events such as the recent recession
and health care reform impact the marketplace
of state regulation?
Jonathan Adler
Case Western Reserve University
School of Law
Clayton Gillette
New York University School of Law
John McGinnis
Northwestern University School of Law
Louis Michael Seidman
Georgetown University Law Center
Moderator:
Judge William H. Pryor, Jr.
U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit
Panel II participant biographies on page 13
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11 a.m.
SPEECH: The U.S.
Financial Crisis: Causes
and Consequences
12:30 p.m.
lunch
University of Virginia School of Law,
Withers-Brown Hall
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium
Many politicians have blamed business for
the current recession, leading to additional
measures by the U.S. government to regulate
the market. Some critics argue that the Federal
Reserve’s missteps in managing the monetary
system created an economic bubble. That
bubble pervaded the real estate market in part
through relaxed lending standards promulgated by the government-sponsored enterprises
Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. When the bubble
inevitably deflated, the crisis spread to the
general economy, resulting in high unemployment and negative or slow economic growth.
But will the measures the government took to
stem the crisis and regulate the market reduce
economic growth in the long term? John
Allison will outline the fundamental economic
and philosophical solutions to these problems
in his presentation.
John Allison
Former Chairman and CEO, BB&T Corporation
Introduction
Howard Husock
Manhattan Institute
Allison and Husock biographies on page 15
7
2 p.m.
Panel III: The Welfare State
and American Exceptionalism
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium
Following the recent passage of President
Barack Obama’s health care legislation, this
panel will reassess whether it is possible to
have a welfare state that meshes with the
American constitutional tradition. Is the
enduring presence of government entitlements
antithetical to our system of government, or is
there a way to accommodate these programs
without changing the historical American
relationship between the individual and the
government? Will the growing role of government in the United States cause the country
to increasingly mirror Europe, or can the
nation chart an alternate course? Does the U.S.
Constitution’s relative lack of positive rights
compared to its counterparts around the world
pose problems for proponents of an American
welfare state? Is the American suspicion toward
state entitlements the product of a longstanding philosophical commitment or the result
of historical contingency? Are there currently
any constitutional limits on the growth of the
welfare state? Should there be?
William P. Marshall
University of North Carolina School of Law
Jeremy Rabkin
George Mason University School of Law
Neomi Rao
George Mason University School of Law
Moderator:
Judge Brett Kavanaugh
U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit
Panel III participant biographies on page 16
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4 p.m.
Panel IV: Economic
Uncertainty and the Role
of the Courts
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium
This panel will examine the role of the courts
in an uncertain economic climate. Given the
financial troubles plaguing the United States,
how much emphasis should the judiciary place
on the constitutional protection of private
property? In a difficult economic climate,
should a judge’s empathy for those in financial
distress affect his rulings? If a state defaults on
its obligations, what is the appropriate role of
the courts? Should a refusal to pay constitute a
violation of the Takings Clause? On a broader
level, to what extent do interpretive methods
have financial consequences? How much
stock do investors put in stability in judicial
reasoning when choosing where to place their
money? Does our current law protect private
property too much or not enough to maximize
social utility, and should that be the standard
by which we judge the legal protection of
property rights? Does the experience of other
countries offer any lessons in this area?
Paul G. Mahoney
Dean, University of Virginia School of Law
Paul Stephan
University of Virginia School of Law
Todd Zywicki
George Mason University School of Law
Moderator:
Judge Diane Sykes
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
Panel IV participant biographies on page 18
participants
6 p.m.
Cocktail Reception
Boar’s Head Inn
Debate: Economic
Freedoms and the
Constitution
Friday, 6:30 p.m., Caplin Auditorium
7 p.m.
Banquet and Keynote
Speech
Boar’s Head Inn
Invocation
Fr. Luke Clark
St. Thomas Aquinas Church
Introduction and Welcome
Eugene Meyer
President, The Federalist Society
Alexander Cox
Symposium Chair, University of Virginia
Federalist Society
Presentation of Student Chapter Awards
Student Division Staff, The Federalist Society
Presentation of the Paul M. Bator Award
Presenter:
Joseph Bingham
University of Chicago Federalist Society
Recipient:
Brian Fitzpatrick
Vanderbilt University Law School
Introduction of Keynote Speaker
Lillian BeVier
University of Virginia School of Law
Keynote Speech
justice Clarence Thomas
U.S. Supreme Court
Randy Barnett
Randy E. Barnett is the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of
Legal Theory at the Georgetown University Law Center,
where he teaches constitutional law and contracts. After
graduating from Northwestern University and
Harvard Law School, he tried many felony
cases as a prosecutor in the Cook County
State’s Attorney’s Office in Chicago. He has
been a visiting professor at Northwestern
and Harvard Law School. In 2008, he was
awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in
Constitutional Studies. Barnett’s publications
include more than 90 articles and reviews,
as well as nine books, including “Restoring
the Lost Constitution: The Presumption
of Liberty” (Princeton, 2004), “Constitutional Law: Cases in Context” (Aspen, 2008),
“Contracts” (Oxford Introductions to U.S.
Law, 2010), “Contracts: Cases and Doctrine”
(Aspen, 4th ed. 2008) and “The Structure
of Liberty: Justice and the Rule of Law”
(Oxford, 1998). In 2004, Barnett argued the
medical marijuana case of Gonzalez v. Raich
before the U.S. Supreme Court. He regularly
publishes opinion pieces in such publications
as the Wall Street Journal, and appears on
such programs as “CBS Evening News,” “The
NBC Nightly News,” “Parker Spitzer” (CNN)
and “The Glenn Beck Show.” In 2007, Barnett
was featured in the documentaries, “The
Trials of Law School” and “In Search of the
Second Amendment”; he also portrayed an
assistant prosecutor in the independent film
“InAlienable.”
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Judge Debra
Livingston
Debra Livingston was appointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Second Circuit in 2007.
Prior to her appointment she
was the Paul J. Kellner Professor of Law at Columbia Law
School, where she also served as vice dean
from 2005 to 2006. Livingston joined the
Columbia faculty in 1994. She continues to
serve as a member of that faculty as the Paul
J. Kellner Professor.
Livingston received her B.A., magna cum
laude, in 1980 from Princeton University,
where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
She received her J.D., magna cum laude, in
1984 from Harvard Law School, where she
was an editor on the Harvard Law Review.
Following law school, she served as a law
clerk to Judge J. Edward Lumbard of the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.
Livingston was an assistant U.S. attorney
in the Southern District of New York from
1986 to 1991 and she served as a deputy chief
of appeals in the Criminal Division from 1990
to 1991. She was an associate with the New
York law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton
& Garrison from 1985 to 1986 and again from
1991 to 1992, when she elected to pursue an
academic career. Livingston was a member of
the University of Michigan Law School faculty
from 1992 until 1994.
Livingston is a co-author of the casebook
“Comprehensive Criminal Procedure,” and
has published numerous academic articles
on legal topics. She has taught courses in
evidence, criminal law and procedure, and
national security and terrorism. From 1994 to
2003, Livingston was a commissioner on New
York City’s Civilian Complaint Review Board.
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Jeffrey Rosen
Jeffrey Rosen is a professor
of law at George Washington
University and the legal
affairs editor of The New
Republic. His most recent
book is “The Supreme Court:
The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined
America.” He also is the author of “The Most
Democratic Branch,” “The Naked Crowd” and
“The Unwanted Gaze.” Rosen is a graduate of
Harvard College, summa cum laude; Oxford
University, where he was a Marshall Scholar;
and Yale Law School.
Rosen’s essays and commentaries have
appeared in the New York Times Magazine,
the Atlantic Monthly, on National Public
Radio, and in the New Yorker, where he has
been a staff writer. The Chicago Tribune
named him one of the 10 best magazine
journalists in America and the L.A. Times
called him “the nation’s most widely read and
influential legal commentator.” Rosen lives
in Washington, D.C., with his wife, Christine
Rosen, and their two sons.
Panel I: Economic Theory,
Civic Virtue and the Meaning
of the Constitution
Friday, 8 p.m., Caplin Auditorium
James Ely
James W. Ely, Jr., is the Milton
R. Underwood Professor of
Law, emeritus, and a professor
of history, emeritus, at Vanderbilt University. He is the author
or editor of numerous books,
including “The Chief Justiceship of Melville
W. Fuller, 1888-1910” (1995), “Railroads and
American Law” (2001), “The Bill of Rights in
Modern America,” (rev ed. 2008, with David
J. Bodenhamer), “The Guardian of Every
Other Right: A Constitutional History of Property Rights,” (3rd ed. 2008), and “American
Legal History: Cases and Materials,” (4th ed.
2011, with Kermit L. Hall and Paul Finkelman).
Ely has also authored a wide range of articles
dealing with the rights of property owners in
American constitutional history. In 2006 he
received the Brigham-Kanner Property Rights
Prize. Ely is a former associate editor of the
American Journal of Legal History.
Renee Lettow Lerner
Professor Renee Lettow Lerner
works in the fields of U.S. and
English legal history, civil
and criminal procedure, and
comparative law. She focuses
particularly on the history of
U.S. procedure and legal institutions, how
they have diverged from those of England,
and on the differences between current
adversarial and nonadversarial legal systems.
She regularly speaks to groups of U.S. and
foreign judges about comparative procedure
and institutions. She is the author, with John
Langbein and Bruce Smith, of the book
“History of the Common Law: The Development of Anglo-American Legal Institutions”
(2009).
Lerner received an A.B., summa cum
laude, in history from Princeton University.
She did graduate work as a Rhodes Scholar
at Oxford University in English legal history.
At Yale Law School, she was articles editor
of the Yale Law Journal. She clerked for U.S.
Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy
and Judge Stephen F. Williams of the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
Circuit. From 2003 to 2005, she served as
deputy assistant attorney general in the Office of Legal Counsel at the U.S. Department
of Justice.
Nelson Lund
Nelson Lund is the Patrick
Henry Professor of Constitutional Law and the Second
Amendment at George Mason
University School of Law,
where he has served as vice
dean and as co-editor of the Supreme Court
Economic Review. A graduate of St. John’s
College in Annapolis, Md., he holds advanced
degrees in philosophy from the Catholic University of America (M.A. 1978) and in political
science from Harvard University (A.M. 1979;
Ph.D. 1981). He received his law degree in
1985 from the University of Chicago, where
he was executive editor of the University of
Chicago Law Review and chapter president
of the Federalist Society.
Lund served as a law clerk for Judge
Patrick E. Higginbotham of the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and for Justice
Sandra Day O’Connor of the U.S. Supreme
Court. In addition to experience in the U.S.
Department of Justice at the Office of the
Solicitor General and at the Office of Legal
Counsel, Lund served in the White House as
associate counsel to the president from 1989
to 1992.
Lund has written on a variety of subjects,
including constitutional interpretation,
federalism, separation of powers, jurisprudence, federal election law, the Commerce
Clause, the Speech or Debate Clause, the
Second Amendment, the Uniformity Clause,
employment discrimination and civil rights,
the legal regulation of medical ethics, and
the application of economic analysis to legal
institutions and to legal ethics.
G. Edward White
G. Edward White joined
the Virginia law faculty in 1972
after a clerkship with Chief
Justice Earl Warren of the U.S.
Supreme Court and a year as
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visiting scholar at the American Bar Foundation.
He was appointed the John B. Minor
Professor of Law and History in 1987, and
held that chair until 2003, when he became
the David and Mary Harrison Distinguished
Professor of Law. In 1992, he was appointed
to a University Professorship, which he held
until 2003. From 1990-92 and from 2001-03,
he was the Sullivan & Cromwell Research
Professor; from 1994-97 the E. James Kelly
Research Professor; and from 1999-2001
the Class of 1963 Research Professor. He
has held visiting appointments at New York
Law School, William & Mary School of Law,
Brooklyn Law School, Arizona College of
Law, the London School of Economics and
Political Science, and Harvard Law School.
He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and twice
a senior fellow of the National Endowment
for the Humanities. He is a fellow of the
American Academy of Arts & Sciences, a
fellow of the Society of American Historians,
and a member of the American Law Institute.
He received the Roger and Madeleine Traynor
Faculty Achievement Award in 2008.
White’s 14 published books have won
numerous honors and awards. These include
final listing for the Pulitzer Prize in history,
the Silver Gavel Award from the American
Bar Association, the James Willard Hurst
Prize from the Law & Society Association, the
Littleton-Griswold Prize from the American
Historical Association, the Scribes Award and
the Association of American Law Schools’
Triennial Coif Award.
White was editor of the Studies in
Legal History series for the North Carolina
Press from 1980-85, and advisor on law
manuscripts for Oxford University Press from
1986-96. He was on the editorial board of
the Virginia Quarterly Review from 19802002. He has served on the Commission for
Undergraduate Education in Law and the
Humanities, and has taught summer humanities seminars for lawyers and judges under
the auspices of the National Endowment for
the Humanities.
Judge J. Harvie
Wilkinson III
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J. Harvie Wilkinson graduated
from Yale University in 1967
and received his law degree
from the University of Virginia
in 1972.
He began his law career in 1972 as a
clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Lewis F.
Powell. Wilkinson was a law professor at the
University of Virginia from 1973-78, 1981-82
and 1983-84. In 1978, he became editor of the
Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. In 1982, he became
deputy assistant attorney general in the Civil
Rights Division of the Department of Justice.
He was appointed circuit judge for the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in
1984, and was the circuit’s chief judge from
1996-2003.
From 1992-96, Wilkinson served on the
Board of the Federal Judicial Center, and
in 2003 he was appointed to the Board of
the James Madison Memorial Fellowship
Foundation. In 2004, he was awarded the
Thomas Jefferson Medal by the University of
Virginia and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation. This award is the highest outside award
offered by the University, which grants no
honorary degrees. In 2008, he was awarded
The Lawrenceville Medal, the highest award
given by The Lawrenceville School. He is a
member of the American Law Institute, and
he was selected in 2009 as a Fellow of the
American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Wilkinson holds honorary J.D.s from the
University of Richmond and the University of
South Carolina, and an honorary LL.D. from
Christopher Newport University.
He is also the author of several books:
“Harry Byrd and the Changing Face of
Virginia Politics” (University of Virginia Press,
1968), “Serving Justice: A Supreme Court
Clerk’s View” (Charterhouse 1974), “From
Brown to Bakke: The Supreme Court and
School Integration” (Oxford University Press,
1979), and “One Nation Indivisible: How Ethnic Separatism Threatens America” (Addison
Wesley/now Perseus, 1997).
Wilkinson lives in Charlottesville, Va.
He and his wife, Lossie, have two children,
Nelson and Porter.
and constitutional law. Adler is the author or
editor of four books on environmental policy
and his articles have appeared in publications
ranging from the Harvard Environmental Law
Review and Supreme Court Economic Review
to the Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post. Adler is a contributing editor to
National Review Online and a regular contributor to the popular legal blog, The Volokh
Conspiracy. In 2004, Adler received the
Paul M. Bator Award, given annually by the
Federalist Society for Law and Policy Studies
to an academic under 40 for excellence in
teaching, scholarship and commitment to
students. In 2007, the Case Western Reserve
University Law Alumni Association awarded
Adler their annual Distinguished Teacher
Award. Adler has appeared on numerous
radio and television programs, ranging from
“Newshour with Jim Lehrer” and NPR’s “Talk
of the Nation” to “The O’Reilly Factor” and
“Entertainment Tonight.” Prior to joining the
faculty at Case Western, Adler clerked for
Judge David B. Sentelle on the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
and was director of environmental studies at
the Competitive Enterprise Institute. He holds
a B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and a J.D., summa cum laude, from the
George Mason University School of Law.
Panel II: Federalism and
Interstate Competition
Saturday, 9 a.m., Caplin Auditorium
Jonathan Adler
Jonathan H. Adler is a professor of law and director of the
Center for Business Law &
Regulation at the Case Western Reserve University School
of Law, where he teaches
courses in environmental, administrative
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Clayton Gillette
Professor Clayton Gillette
joined the New York University
School of Law faculty in 2000.
For the prior eight years, he
was the Perre Bowen Professor of Law at the University
of Virginia School of Law. Gillette began his
teaching career at Boston University, where
he served as the Warren Scholar in Municipal
Law and associate dean, and has been a visiting professor at the University of Michigan
and the University of Virginia as well as at
NYU School of Law.
Gillette earned his J.D. from the University of Michigan in 1975 and a B.A. from
Amherst College in 1972. After law school, he
clerked for Judge J. Edward Lumbard of the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit,
and was associated with Cleary, Gottlieb,
Steen and Hamilton in New York City.
Gillette’s scholarship concentrates on
commercial law and local government law. He
is the author of casebooks on “Local Government Law” (with Lynn Baker) and “Payment
Systems and Credit Instruments” (with Alan
Schwartz and Robert Scott), and a textbook,
“Municipal Debt Finance Law” (with Robert
S. Amdursky). Gillette’s numerous articles
include studies of long-term commercial
contracts, initiatives, relations between
localities and their neighbors, privatization of
municipal services and judicial construction
of contracts governing homeowners’ associations. He has also served as the reporter
for the ABA Intersectional Task Force on
Initiatives and Referenda and has consulted
in litigation ranging from the Agent Orange
Products Liability Litigation to the default on
municipal bonds by Orange County, Calif.,
and the Washington Public Power Supply
System.
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John McGinnis
Professor John O. McGinnis is
a graduate of Harvard College
and Harvard Law School, where
he was an editor of the Harvard
Law Review. He also has an M.A.
from Balliol College, Oxford, in
philosophy and theology. McGinnis clerked on
the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of
Columbia Circuit. From 1987 to 1991, he was
deputy assistant attorney general in the Office
of Legal Counsel at the Department of Justice.
McGinnis is a scholar in both the areas of
constitutional and international law. The Office
of the U.S. Trade Representatives has added
him to the roster of Americans who can be
appointed as panelists to resolve World Trade
Organization disputes. He is a past winner of
the Paul Bator award, given by the Federalist
Society to an outstanding academic under 40.
Judge William H.
Pryor Jr.
William H. Pryor Jr. is a judge
of the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 11th Circuit. Initially
appointed by President George
W. Bush in 2004, during a
Senate recess, Pryor’s appointment was confirmed by the Senate in 2005.
Pryor served as attorney general of
Alabama from 1997 to 2004. When first
appointed, he was the youngest attorney
general in the nation. He was later elected
and re-elected to that office in 1998 and
2002.
Pryor is a graduate, magna cum laude,
of Tulane Law School, where he was editor
in chief of the Tulane Law Review, member
of the Order of the Coif and recipient of the
George Dewey Nelson Memorial Award.
After graduation, Pryor served as a law
clerk for Judge John Minor Wisdom of the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.
Following his judicial clerkship, Pryor
engaged in a private practice of litigation in
Birmingham, Ala., and for six years served
as an adjunct professor of admiralty law at
the Cumberland School of Law of Samford
University. Since 2006, Pryor has served as a
visiting professor of federal jurisdiction at the
University of Alabama School of Law.
Pryor is a member of the American Law
Institute and the Board of Advisory Editors of
the Tulane Law Review. He is a fellow of the
Alabama Law Foundation, vice president of
the Alabama Center for Law & Civic Education, and a former chairman of the Federalism and Separation of Powers Practice Group
of the Federalist Society. In 2002-03, Pryor
served as a member of the State and Local
Senior Advisory Committee of the White
House Office on Homeland Security. Pryor
has been awarded honorary doctorates of
law from John Marshall Law School in Atlanta
and Regent University in Virginia.
Pryor has lectured and published widely
including the Columbia and Virginia law
reviews, the Harvard Journal of Law & Public
Policy and the Yale Law & Policy Review. He
has delivered lectures at the Ronald Reagan
Presidential Library and several law schools
and universities. He has published op-eds in
the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times,
the Washington Times and USA Today. He
has testified before committees of the U.S.
Senate on capital punishment, environmental
law and the role of the judiciary.
Pryor is married with two children.
Louis Michael
Seidman
After graduating from Harvard
Law School in 1971, Professor Louis Michael Seidman
served as a law clerk for
Judge J. Skelly Wright of the
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
for the District of Columbia Circuit and U.S.
Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.
He then was a staff attorney with the D.C.
Public Defender Service until joining the
Georgetown University Law Center faculty
in 1976. He teaches a variety of courses
in the fields of constitutional and criminal
law. He is co-author of a constitutional law
casebook and the author of many articles
concerning criminal justice and constitutional
law. His most recent books are “Silence and
Freedom” (Stanford, 2007), “Our Unsettled
Constitution: A New Defense of Constitutionalism and Judicial Review” (Yale, 2001) and
“Equal Protection of the Laws” (Foundation,
2002).
Speech: The U.S.
Financial Crisis: Causes
and Consequences
Saturday, 11 a.m., Caplin Auditorium
John Allison
John A. Allison is the retired
chairman and CEO of BB&T
Corporation, the 10th-largest
financial services holding
company headquartered in the
U.S. Allison began his service
with BB&T in 1971 and managed a wide variety of responsibilities throughout the bank.
He became president of BB&T in 1987 and
was elected chairman and CEO in July 1989.
During Allison’s tenure as CEO from 1989 to
2008, BB&T grew from $4.5 billion to $152
billion in assets. In March 2009, he joined
the faculty of Wake Forest University School
of Business as a Distinguished Professor of
Practice.
Allison is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of
the University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill, where he received a B.S. in business
administration (1971). He received his
master’s degree in management from Duke
University (1974). He is also a graduate of the
Stonier Graduate School of Banking and has
received honorary doctorate degrees from
15
Clemson University, East Carolina University,
Mount Olive College, Marymount University,
Mercer University and Universidad Francisco
Marroquin (Guatemala). Allison received the
Corning Award for Distinguished Leadership,
was inducted into the North Carolina Business Hall of Fame and received the Lifetime
Achievement Award from the American
Banker in 2009. He was recognized by the
Harvard Business Review as one of the
top-100 most successful CEOs in the world
over the last decade.
He serves on the Wake Forest University
Schools of Business Board of Visitors, Wake
Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Board of Visitors, the Board of Visitors at the
Fuqua School of Business at Duke University
and the Kenan-Flagler Business School at
UNC-Chapel Hill. He is also a member of
the boards of directors of the Independent
College Fund and the Global TransPark
Foundation.
A native of Charlotte, N.C., Allison is
married to the former Elizabeth McDonald
of Elkin, N.C. They have two sons and one
daughter.
Howard Husock
Howard Husock is vice
president for policy research at
the Manhattan Institute, whose
Center for the American
University’s Capitalism Project
is seeking to encourage and
improve instruction in political economy
at American universities and law schools.
Its work has included the October 2010
conference, “Capitalism on Campus: What
are Students Learning? What Should They
Know?”
Husock has written extensively on a
variety of public policy matters, including
housing policy (such as “The Trillion Dollar
Housing Policy Mistake: The Failure of American Housing Policy,” 2003) and on the role
of nonprofit organizations and philanthropy
in American life. His writing has appeared in
the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times,
the Public Interest and National Affairs. From
1987-2006, he served as director of case
studies in public policy and management at
the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
Panel III: The Welfare State
and American Exceptionalism
Saturday, 2 p.m., Caplin Auditorium
Judge Brett
Kavanaugh
Judge Brett Kavanaugh was
appointed to the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the District of
Columbia Circuit in 2006. Kavanaugh graduated from Yale
College in 1987 and from Yale
Law School in 1990. He served as a law clerk
to Judge Walter Stapleton of the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the Third Circuit and Judge
Alex Kozinski of the U.S. Court of Appeals
16
for the Ninth Circuit. In 1992-93, Kavanaugh
worked as an attorney in the Office of the
Solicitor General of the United States. During
October Term 1993, he served as a law clerk
to Justice Anthony M. Kennedy of the U.S.
Supreme Court. From 1994-97 and for a
period in 1998, Kavanaugh was associate
counsel in the Office of Independent Counsel
Kenneth W. Starr. Kavanaugh was a partner
at Kirkland & Ellis in Washington, D.C., from
1997-98 and again from 1999-2001. From
2001-03, he served as associate counsel and
then as senior associate counsel to President
George W. Bush. From July 2003 until his
appointment to the court in 2006, he was
assistant to the president and staff secretary
to President Bush. Since joining the court,
Kavanaugh has taught full-term courses
on separation of powers at Harvard Law
School and on constitutional interpretation at
Georgetown University Law Center.
William P. Marshall
William (Bill) Marshall is
currently the Kenan Professor
of Law at the University of
North Carolina. Marshall was
deputy White House counsel
and deputy assistant to the
president of the United States during the
Clinton administration and also served as
the solicitor general of Ohio. Marshall has
published extensively on First Amendment,
federal courts and presidential powers
issues and is also a leading expert on judicial
selection matters. He teaches media law, civil
procedure, constitutional law, First Amendment, federal courts, church-state, and the
law of the presidency. Marshall received his
law degree from the University of Chicago
and his undergraduate degree from the
University of Pennsylvania. He is a native of
Nashua, N.H.
Jeremy Rabkin
Jeremy Rabkin is a professor of law at George Mason
University School of Law.
Before joining the faculty in
June 2007, he was a professor of government at Cornell
University for 27 years. Rabkin is a renowned
scholar in international law and was recently
confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a member
of the board of directors of the U.S. Institute
of Peace. He holds a Ph.D. from the Department of Government at Harvard University
and graduated summa cum laude with a B.A.
from Cornell University.
His full-length books include “Law
Without Nations?” (Princeton University
Press, 2005), “The Case for Sovereignty” (AEI
Press, 2004), “Why Sovereignty Matters”
(AEI Press, 1998), and “Judicial Compulsions,
How Public Law Distorts Public Policy” (Basic
Books, 1989). He also co-edited (with L.
Gordon Crovitz) “The Fettered Presidency,
Legal Limitations and the Conditions of
Responsible Policymaking” (AEI Press 1989).
Rabkin also has written numerous
chapters in edited books, articles in academic
journals and essays. He received recognition
as “Best Professor” in a 2002 Readers Poll of
the Ithaca Times.
In addition to international law, Rabkin
has a particular interest in national security
law and early constitutional history. He
teaches George Mason Law’s unique course
Constitutional Law: The Founding, as well as
international law.
17
Neomi Rao
George Mason University
School of Law assistant
professor of law Neomi Rao
teaches constitutional law,
comparative constitutional
law and legislation. Her main
research interests are in comparative constitutional law and jurisprudence.
Prior to joining George Mason in 2006,
Rao served as associate counsel and special
assistant to President George W. Bush. Rao
also served as counsel to the U.S. Senate
Committee on the Judiciary, where she
was responsible for judicial nominations
and constitutional law issues. In between
government service, Rao practiced in the
London office of Clifford Chance, specializing
in public international law and commercial
arbitration. Rao received her J.D. with high
honors from the University of Chicago and
her B.A. from Yale University. She clerked for
Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III of the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and for
Justice Clarence Thomas of the U.S. Supreme
Court. Rao is a member of the Virginia State
Bar and a qualified solicitor of England and
Wales.
Rao testified before the Senate Judiciary
Committee on the Nomination of Justice
Sonia Sotomayor and is a regular commentator in print and broadcast media.
18
Panel IV: Economic
Uncertainty and the Role
of the Courts
Saturday, 4 p.m., Caplin Auditorium
Paul G. Mahoney
Paul G. Mahoney became dean
of the University of Virginia
School of Law in July 2008. He
is a David and Mary Harrison
Distinguished Professor and
the Arnold H. Leon Professor of
Law. Mahoney’s teaching and research areas
are securities regulation, law and economic
development, corporate finance, financial
derivatives and contracts. He has published
widely in law reviews and peer-reviewed
finance and law and economics journals.
Mahoney joined the Law School faculty
in 1990 after practicing with the New York
firm Sullivan & Cromwell and clerking for
Judge Ralph K. Winter, Jr. of the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Justice
Thurgood Marshall of the U.S. Supreme Court.
He served as academic associate dean at the
Law School from 1999 to 2004 and has held
the Albert C. BeVier Research Chair and the
Brokaw Chair in Corporate Law. He has been
a visiting professor at the University of Chicago Law School, the University of Southern
California Law School and the University of
Toronto Faculty of Law. He has also worked
on legal reform projects in Kazakhstan,
Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia and Nepal.
Mahoney is a member of the Council on
Foreign Relations and served as an associate
editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives from 2004 to 2007 and as a director of
the American Law and Economics Association from 2002 to 2004. He is a past recipient
of the All-University Outstanding Teacher
Award and the Law School’s Traynor Award
for excellence in faculty scholarship.
Paul Stephan
An expert on international
business and Soviet and
post-Soviet legal systems,
Paul Stephan has advised
governments and international organizations, organized
conferences, edited books and lectured to
professionals, university groups and high
school students on a variety of issues raised
by the globalization of the world economy
and the transition away from Soviet-style
socialism. During 2006-07, he served as
counselor on international law in the U.S.
Department of State. Other interests for
Stephan, who joined the Virginia Law School
faculty in 1979, include international law,
taxation and constitutional law.
In law school, Stephan was executive editor of the Virginia Law Review and a member
of the Order of the Coif. During the two-year
period between his graduation and return
as a professor, he clerked for Judge Levin
Campbell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the First Circuit and for U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. He has taught at
the University of Vienna, Münster University,
Lausanne University, Melbourne University,
University of Pantheon-Assas and at Sciences
Po, in Paris, at the Interdisciplinary Centre,
Herzliya and at Sydney University.
Since the collapse of the Soviet Union,
Stephan has worked on a variety of projects
involving law reform in former socialist states.
He has worked in Russia, Georgia, Ukraine,
Albania and Slovakia on behalf of the U.S.
Treasury and in Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan
on behalf of the International Monetary Fund.
He also has organized training programs
for tax administrators and judges from all
of the formerly socialist countries under the
auspices of the Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development. His casebook
on international business is used at law
schools both in the U.S. and abroad. He has
written extensively on international law, cor-
ruption and the history of the Cold War. Most
recently, he is the co-author, with Robert
Scott, of “The Limits of Leviathan: Contract
Theory and the Enforcement of International
Law” (Cambridge University Press, 2006). His
current research interests include books on
the political economy of international lawmaking and on the collapse of communism.
Judge Diane Sykes
Judge Diane Sykes was nominated by President George
W. Bush to the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the Seventh
Circuit. She was confirmed by
the U.S. Senate on June 24,
2004, received her commission on July 1 and
entered upon duty on July 4. Prior to her appointment to the federal bench, Sykes served
as a justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court.
She was appointed to the Supreme Court in
1999 by then-Gov. Tommy G. Thompson and
elected to a 10-year term in April 2000.
Born and raised in the Milwaukee area,
Sykes received a bachelor’s degree from the
Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern
University in 1980 and a J.D. from Marquette
University Law School in 1984. Between
college and law school, Sykes worked as a
reporter for The Milwaukee Journal. Sykes
was elected to the bench in Milwaukee
County in 1992 and served there in the
misdemeanor, felony and civil divisions until
her appointment to the Wisconsin Supreme
Court in September 1999. Prior to her election
to the Milwaukee County Circuit Court, Sykes
practiced law with the Milwaukee law firm of
Whyte & Hirschboeck, S.C., and served as law
clerk to Judge Terence T. Evans. Sykes is the
mother of two sons.
19
Todd Zywicki
Todd Zywicki is the George
Mason University Foundation
Professor of Law at George
Mason University School of
Law and a senior scholar of the
Mercatus Center at George Mason. He is also co-editor of the Supreme Court
Economic Review. From 2003-04, Zywicki
served as the director of the Office of Policy
Planning at the Federal Trade Commission. He
has also taught at Vanderbilt University Law
School, Georgetown University Law Center,
Boston College Law School and Mississippi
College School of Law.
Zywicki clerked for Judge Jerry E.
Smith of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the
Fifth Circuit and worked as an associate at
Alston & Bird in Atlanta, where he practiced
bankruptcy and commercial law. He received
his J.D. from the University of Virginia, where
he was executive editor of the Virginia Tax
Review and a John M. Olin Scholar in Law and
Economics. Zywicki also received an M.A. in
economics from Clemson University and an
A.B., cum laude, with high honors in his major
from Dartmouth College.
Zywicki is also a senior fellow of the
James Buchanan Center Program on Politics,
Philosophy, and Economics at George Mason
University; a senior fellow of the Goldwater
Institute; and a fellow of the International
Centre for Economic Research in Turin, Italy.
During the fall 2008 semester Zywicki was the
Searle Fellow of the George Mason University
School of Law and was a 2008-09
W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell
National Fellow and the Arch W. Shaw National Fellow at the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace. He has lectured and
consulted with government officials around
the world, including Iceland, Italy, Japan and
Guatemala. In 2006 Zywicki served as a member of the U.S. Department of Justice study
group on “Identifying Fraud, Abuse and Errors
in the United States Bankruptcy System.”
20
Zywicki is the author of more than 70
articles in leading law reviews and peerreviewed economics journals. He is one of
the Top 50 Most Downloaded Law Authors
at the Social Science Research Network, both
all time and during the past 12 months. He
served as the editor of the Supreme Court
Economic Review from 2001-02. He has testified several times before Congress on issues
of consumer bankruptcy law and consumer
credit and is a frequent commentator on legal
issues in the print and broadcast media. He is
a contributor to the popular legal weblog The
Volokh Conspiracy and The Atlantic Business
Channel of The Atlantic magazine.
Zywicki is a member of the board of
directors of the Bill of Rights Institute, the
governing board and the advisory council
for the Financial Services Research Program
at George Washington University School of
Business, the executive committee for the
Federalist Society’s Financial Institutions and
E-Commerce Practice Group, the advisory council of the Competitive Enterprise
Institute, and the program advisory board of
the Foundation for Research on Economics
and the Environment. He is currently the chair
of the academic advisory councils of the Bill
of Rights Institute, the film “We the People in
IMAX,” and the McCormick-Tribune Foundation Freedom Museum in Chicago. Since
2009 he has been a member of the board of
trustees of Yorktown University. From 200509 he served as an elected alumni trustee of
the Dartmouth College Board of Trustees.
Banquet and Keynote
Speech
Saturday, 7 p.m., Boar’s Head Inn
Justice Clarence
Thomas
Clarence Thomas was born
in the Pin Point community
of Georgia near Savannah on
June 23, 1948. He married
Virginia Lamp in 1987 and has
one child, Jamal Adeen, by a
previous marriage. He attended Conception
Seminary and received an A.B., cum laude,
from Holy Cross College, and a J.D. from
Yale Law School in 1974. He was admitted to
law practice in Missouri in 1974, and served
as an assistant attorney general of Missouri
from 1974–77, an attorney with the Monsanto
Company from 1977–79, and legislative assistant to Sen. John Danforth from 1979–81.
From 1981–82, he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the U.S. Department
of Education, and as chairman of the U.S.
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
from 1982–90. He became a judge of the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
Circuit in 1990. President George H.W. Bush
nominated him as an associate justice of the
Supreme Court, and he took his seat on Oct.
23, 1991.
21
The Federalist Society
for Law & Public Policy Studies
Founding Directors
Hon. E. Spencer Abraham
Steven G. Calabresi
Hon. David M. McIntosh
Lee Liberman Otis
Directors/Officers
Steven G. Calabresi, Chairman
Hon. David M. McIntosh, Vice Chairman
Gary Lawson, Secretary
Brent O. Hatch, Treasurer
Eugene B. Meyer, President
...
Hon. T. Kenneth Cribb, Jr., Counselor
board of visitors
Hon. Robert H. Bork, Co-Chairman
Hon. Orrin G. Hatch, Co-Chairman
Lillian BeVier
Hon. Elaine L. Chao
Christopher DeMuth
Hon. C. Boyden Gray
Hon. Lois Haight Herrington
Hon. Donald Paul Hodel
Hon. Frank Keating II
Harvey C. Koch
Robert A. Levy
Hon. Edwin Meese III
Hon. Michael B. Mukasey
Hon. Gale Norton
Hon. Theodore B. Olson
Andrew J. Redleaf
Hon. Wm. Bradford Reynolds
Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz
Hon. Gerald Walpin
22
Federalist Society staff
Eugene B. Meyer
Leonard A. Leo
Lee Liberman Otis
President
Executive Vice President
Senior Vice President and
Director, Faculty Division
Student Division
Lawyers Division
Faculty Division
Peter Redpath
Dean Reuter
Anthony Deardurff
Vice President and Director
Vice President and Director,
Practice Groups
Deputy Director
Deputy Director
Lisa Budzynski Ezell
Associate Director
Kate Beer Alcantara
Vice President and Director,
Lawyers Chapters
Development
Daniel Suhr
Barrett Young
Associate Director
Juli Nix
Alexandra Bruce
Assistant Director
Administration
and Support Staff
Deputy Director
Ken Wiltberger
Assistant Director
Deputy Director of
International Affairs
Douglas C. Ubben
Vice President and Director,
Finance
Emily Kuebler
Deputy Director of
Practice Groups
David C.F. Ray
Associate Director
Sophia Mason
Independent
Contractors
James P. Kelly III
Director of International Affairs
C. David Smith
Allison Aldrich
Vice President and Director,
Information Technology
Associate Director
Peggy Little
Hannah De Guzman
Director of the
Pro Bono Center
Paul Zimmerman
Assistant Director
Director of Publications
Thomas Kraemer
Matthew Daniel
Assistant Director
Director of Membership
Kendra Kocovsky
Alumni Director
Rhonda Moaland
Office Manager
Matt Nix
Assistant Office Manager
State Courts
Jonathan Bunch
Vice President and Director
Maureen Wagner
Deputy Director
23
UVA Law School
Federalist Society
Symposium Committee
Alexander Cox, Symposium Chair
Brinton Lucas, Symposium Vice Chair
Vladimir Shklovsky, Symposium Vice Chair
Speakers and Panels Vice Chairs
Joseph Clark, Joseph D’Agostino, Devin DeBacker,
Matthew Glover and Lauren Prieb
Laura Jenkins, Events and Facilities Chair
Events and Facilities Vice Chairs
Stacy Chung, Sarah Cummings and Jessica Garcia
Ashlee Sawyer, Public Relations Chair
Sean Twomey, Finance and Registration Chair
Brian Polley, Finance and Registration Vice Chair
Peter Trentman, Travel and Accommodations Chair
Andrew Head, Travel and Accommodations Vice Chair
24
UVA Law School
Federalist Society
Chapter Board
Ben Massey, President
Allison Harnack, Executive Vice President
Chris Schandevel, Vice President for Speakers
Kim Paschall, Vice President for Special Events
David Merritt, Vice President for Administration
Amber Williams, Vice President for Communications
Milad Emam, Vice President for Professional Development
Greg Heinen, 1L Committee Chair
Matthew Glover, 1L Committee Vice Chair
1L Committee
David Colquitt, Jessica Jones, Alex Royal, Garrick Smith,
William Stephenson, Jonathan Urick and Annie Wang
25
sponsors
The UVA Law School Chapter of the Federalist Society would like to thank the following
sponsors for their generous support of the 2011 Student Symposium
Symposium Sponsors
Holman Supporting Foundation
The Jefferson Trust, An Initiative of the UVA Alumni Association
Richard and Helen DeVos Foundation
SPONSORING LAW FIRM
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP
GOLD SPONSOR
Sullivan & Cromwell LLP
silver SPONSORS
Alston & Bird LLP
King & Spalding LLP
Bartlit Beck Herman Palenchar & Scott LLP
Kirkland & Ellis LLP
Bracewell & Giuliani LLP
Mayer Brown LLP
Cooper & Kirk, PLLC
McCarter & English, LLP
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
Ogletree Deakins
DLA Piper
Patton Boggs LLP
Goodwin Procter LLP
Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker LLP
Greenberg Traurig LLP
Sidley Austin LLP
Hogan Lovells US LLP
White & Case LLP
Hollingsworth LLP
Wiley Rein LLP
Hunton & Williams LLP
Partners of Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP
Jones Day
WilmerHale
bronze SPONSORS
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, LLP
Dechert LLP
Covington & Burling LLP
Steptoe & Johnson LLP
Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati
26
Connect with
the Federalist Society
This symposium is part of a larger effort by the Federalist Society to educate lawyers, law
students and the general public about the important role of law in our society. The discussion
of the ideas you heard this weekend will continue at our chapters, in our journals and on our
website. We invite you to connect with us to continue the conversation.
www.fed-soc.org
Find your local student chapter
Calendar with local and national events
Podcasts
Policy briefing papers
Publications
Debates
Facebook.com/Federalist.Society
Twitter.com/fedsoc
YouTube.com/TheFederalistSociety
(888) 489-8138
[email protected]
27
schedule
Friday, Feb. 25, 2011
3:30 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011
8 a.m.
University of Virginia School of Law,
University of Virginia School of Law,
Caplin Auditorium Lobby
Caplin Auditorium Lobby
6:15 p.m.
9 a.m.
Registration
Continental Breakfast
Panel II: Federalism and
Welcome and
Opening Remarks
Interstate Competition
University of Virginia School of Law, Caplin Auditorium
University of Virginia School of Law, Caplin Auditorium
6:30 p.m.
11 a.m.
Debate: Economic
Freedoms and the
Constitution
SPEECH: The U.S.
Financial Crisis: Causes
and Consequences
University of Virginia School of Law, Caplin Auditorium
University of Virginia School of Law, Caplin Auditorium
8 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
lunch
Panel I: Economic Theory,
Civic Virtue and the
Meaning of the Constitution
University of Virginia School of Law, Caplin Auditorium
9:45 p.m.
Cocktail Reception
University of Virginia School of Law, Withers-Brown Hall
2 p.m.
Panel III: The Welfare State
and American Exceptionalism
University of Virginia School of Law, Caplin Auditorium
University of Virginia School of Law, Caplin Pavilion
4 p.m.
Panel IV: Economic
Uncertainty and the Role
of the Courts
SCOTT
COMMONS
CAPLIN
PAVILION
6 p.m.
Cocktail Reception
CAPLIN
AUDITORIUM
CLAY HALL
MAIN ENTRANCE
MAP IS NOT TO
SCALE
Boar’s Head Inn
SIDE ENTRANCE
SIDE ENTRANCE
SPIES GARDEN
WITHERS-BROWN HALL
SLAUGHTER HALL
University of Virginia School of Law, Caplin Auditorium
7 p.m.
Banquet and Keynote
Speech
Boar’s Head Inn

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