Skald - Barony of Fettburg

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Skald - Barony of Fettburg
The Skald
June A.S. XLII
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
-2-
Regnum of Barony
Badge
Office
Baroness
Officer
Mistress Cassandra Cernakova
(Kathy Rau)
Greater Officers
Arts &
Sciences
Milisandia Bychand
(Katie Blasingame)
Chirurgeon Karen of Fettburg
June A.S. XLII
Chronicler
Eric of Fettburg
(Eric Bodary)
Constable
(Vacant)
Exchequer
Mistress Tashi of Falcons Claw
(Debbie Grecco)
Herald
Mistress Ella Gajewi von Pommern
(Louise Sugiyama)
Marshal
(Vacant)
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
-3Badge
Office
Officer
Viscount Zaid al fallah hajji
Seneschal (Merced Romero)
Lesser Officers
Baronial
Archer
Mistress Cassandra Cernakova
(Kathy Rau)
Viscountess Louise de la Chatte
Chatelaine Bleue
(Donna Romero)
June A.S. XLII
Emissary
to
Mundania
Mistress Ella Gajewi von Pommern
(Louise Sugiyama)
Gold Key
Viscountess Louise de la Chatte
Bleue
(Donna Romero)
Page
School
Mentor
Umm Jibril Munisa bint al-Nadr
(Mozelle Williams)
Scribe
(Vacant)
Web
Minister
Lady Céline Dubé
(Rebecca Wilkinson)
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
-4-
Help Needed for Fettburg Japanese Midsummer Feast
By Yukiko of Golden Rivers
A feast alone requires the help of many hands, but this year's Fettburg Japanese Midsummer
Feast is much more than ever before. We've got tournaments, classes, entertainment AND a
fantastic feast by the beautiful Anna Serra. See the attached flyer. It's going to be fantastic!
…But we need some fantastic help.
Positions needed:
Youth Rapier Marshall (Run Japanese-themed youth rapier tourney)
Heavy Fighter Marshall (Run Japanese-themed heavy fighter tourney)
Chiurgeon (Fix broken people)
Event Ticket Seller for Fettburg (Sell tickets to folks near you)
Dedicated Feast Servers and Dish Washers (Note: Anna Serra takes care of her people)
All volunteer help will be given first consideration in Japanese loaner garb and garb-making
resource allocation. Please contact the autocrat Yukiko at: [email protected]
HAIKU
By Mistress Ella Gajewi von Pommern, O.P.
Aka Louise Sugiyama
“Historically, haiku stem from 12th Century
renga (literally “linked songs” or “linked
verses” – the word for poem and song in
Japanese is the same)”,(1) a literary
entertainment where an individual or group of
poets, made improvised, connecting stanzas to
form longer poem of up to 10,000 verses.
“Renga were interlocking chains of 17
syllables (5-7-5), preceded or followed by 14
syllables (7-7), with each tercet and couplet producing a poem in itself”. (2)
By the 16th Century, the arts were becoming popular with the general public. Haikai-norenga became a fad. “Haikai, from two words meaning “sportive” and “pleasantry”, meant
unusual or offbeat and is translated (somewhat deceptively) as “comic linked verse”. “ (3)
June A.S. XLII
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
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It was in contrast to the formal waka/tanka Court poetry. Haikai used ordinary language, was
often exuberant in displaying wit, and also lewd or bawdy thoughts.
The 17th Century poet Basho elevated haikai to a new plateau of dignity and sensitivity
but, there was still a sense of humor and surprise lurking about. At this time the opening 5-75 stanza of the renga, called hokku or “starting verse” became a small poem of itself- a standalone verse. The two standards for a hokku where that they were complete unto themselves
and contained a word to evoke the season (kigo). The term Haiku is a modern one. Hai means
“unusual” and ku denotes stanza, line or verse.
Haiku, by definition, is a poem of 17 syllables arranged in a sequence of 5-7-5. This
rule applies more so to the Japanese language. English word change the style, but the poet
will try to stay as close to the 17 syllables as possible. In spite of their brevity, a haiku gives
you a word picture of a moment in time, a sudden thought, a memory, or a profound emotion.
Haiku can contain “hidden dualism: the near and the far, foreground and background, then
and now, past and present, high and low, sound and silence, and temporality and eternity.”(4)
There can be deeper layers to a haiku that expands the poem’s meaning and scope. You
should look for the What, Where & When of each poem when you read them, and add them
to the ones you write.
The What is the reaction to that which affects the senses: sight (movement or object);
hearing (bird song); scent (blossom or baked bread); and taste (first strawberry). Touch can
also be expresses, but is not as common (petal-soft).
The Where can be a famous place, which evokes many thoughts and/or emotions. It can also
be a road, a chair, or a stream.
The When can either be the easiest or the most complex part of the haiku. A season can be
expresses by a single word- which has symbolic meaning in Japanese. (Plum blossom=
Spring), but a haze can also denote Spring. It can be helpful when learning to write haiku, to
make a list of words that denote Seasons and /or emotions.
The Classic Tradition of Haiku – An Anthology. Ed. Faubion Bowers, c1996
Dover Publ. Inc., Pages- VII (1), VII (2), VII (3), IX (4)
Tanka- 5 lines, 31 Syllables, (5-7-5-7-5 )
Allows more development of the thought, more expression of the impressions the moment or
emotion has inspired.
Haiku – 3 lines, 17 Syllables, (5-7-5)
To express a fleeting moment, emotion, awe, impression, or inspiration. But only that one
thing or moment!
Both styles use simile, metaphor and parallelism to help capture the meanings.
Ex- Parallelism= Individual & Nature:
June A.S. XLII
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
One cannot ask loneliness,
How or where it starts.
On the cypress-mountain Autumn evening
-6-
13th Cent.-Jakuren
Metaphors and Symbols- Japanese and Western- partial list
Pine tree and Heron- Long life or anything enduring
Moon- Nighttime, Mirror, Reflection of your beloved face.
Dragon- Wind, Clouds, Power, Rain
Spring- Blossoms, Birds, Wild Flowers, first greening of the Willow, Plum blossom (earliest
flower= new love), Cherry blossom (beauty with emphasis on its fragile & ephemeral
qualities)
Robins, tulips, lambing, nesting birds, kites
Summer- Heat, Singing Frogs (end of Spring), Cuckoo(True love), Willows, End of
summer(longing for home & family), Souls( O-ban Odori festival)
Roses, Swimming, Fruit
Autumn- Orange Moon, Falling or colored Leaf, Sound of wild Geese or flight of birds, Stag
calling, Pine Tree(nobility), Chrysanthemum (also symbol of the Emperor)
Pumpkin, Scarecrow, Harvest, Cornucopia, Bonfire, Hunting, Mask.
Winter- Snow, Ice, Crane’s call, Wind, Bare branches.
Hearth fire, Cup of Tea, Blanket.
Other western symbols- Oak tree( strength), Laurel tree or leaves( crown of nobility &
victory), Lyre or other instruments (music, singing),
June A.S. XLII
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
-7JAPANESE GARB:
An Overview
The Kimono was developed in Japan starting in the early 10th Century,
1
when the Ancient Chinese styles were supplanted by the now common kimono
style. This was derived from native work garments which better suited the
climate, lifestyles and aesthetics of the Japanese, This was the late Heian or
Fugiwara, period (897-1185). The earliest form of the kimono is the Kosode
(small sleeve garment). Originally, it was a generally worn,
plain undergarment. The farmers, crafters & merchant class
2
continued to wear their simple two-piece garments: the Happi,
a knee length top tied at the waist and loose trousers just below
the knee.(I) This was common to both sexes. Women could
also wear a mid-calf, wrap-around, pleated skirt, the Mo (2) In
cold weather, the longer kosode would be wore. They were often padded
and/or quilted for extra warmth. Through changes in decoration and sleeves,
the kosode became an outer garment of the samurai class. (1200's forward)
During the Heian period, the men of the nobility
and imperial household retained some of the ceremonial
3
3
styles of China, wearing the kosode as an undergarment- Kariginu.(3) The
women embraced the kimono of the large, open sleeves, the Osede. This
was the era of the 12-layer kimono, (Juni-hito) worn at court. They were
unlined, with wide sleeves. Care was taken that the layers blended,
matched & contrasted in an aesthetically pleasing manner. The layers
were visible at the neck, sleeves and the lower skirts. Up to 20 layers
could be worn. Underneath it all was a kosode and Hakama, long pleated
pants. The layers were tied with sashes.
The transition from the Heian period to the Kamakura period (11851333), was the change from imperial control to the shogunate and samurai.
4 This changed the style of clothing to a simpler, more practical form, befitting
the warrior class. The classic crossover front of the kimono replaced the highcollared tabard of the Heian.(4) The men's Hitatare retained the large open
sleeves that could be closed with drawstrings, but were
now attached all around, instead of only under the arms.
5
Hakama completed the outfit. A similar style for under
armor and certain ceremonial activities had smaller,
narrower sleeves and short trousers, or hakama wore with
leggings.(Yoroi hitatare) (5) The lady's garments became
very simple. The basic kosode sleeve had a small opening
and less fabric hanging down. This was worn with hakama, the hem
varying from just to the floor to dragging, depending on the occasion.
2
June A.S. XLII
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
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1338-1568was the Muromachi period. This is when the tea ceremony and Noh drama
were developed, along with other flowerings of artist expression. The samurai austere
warrior's code had them distance themselves from the clothing of the court by wearing
subdued fabrics. The men's robes were very similar to the hitatare, but were made of linen,
not silk, with cords of leather, not braided silk. This was the Daimon. This garment often had
the family crest (kamon) in 5 places on the kimono- 2 at the shoulders in front, 2 on the
sleeves and 1 at the neck, in the back. There was no other decoration, only the fine woven
patterns of the fabric.
The lady's kosode was the standard for all women, but for formal
6
activities, an over kimono (Uchikake) was worn with the kosode under
the hakama. The uchikake had longer sleeves with a small sleeve
opening. In summer, the uchikake was allowed to drape over the ties of
the hakama and trail behind. This could also be
worn with extra-long hakama (Koshi-maki style).
7
(6)
During the Momoyama period (15731603), warriors and land owners assumed
positions of authority. This caused a change of
attitude toward fashion. What ever was new and novel was highly
valued. The women of the daimyo families wore richer and more
elaborately decorated kimono. The ceremonial kosode and uchikaki,
with a sash obi, became the standard.(7)
After 1603, the Tokugawa shogunate was in control. The capital was
8
at Edo, now called Tokyo. The island was closed to outsiders, except for a
few Dutch and Chinese merchants at the port of Nagasaki. In men's fashion,
they added the wing-shaped Kamishimo to the kimono and hakama for
ceremonial attire. A formal occasion would require long, dragging
hakama.(8)
The women's styles also continued to evolve as the sleeves became
much longer. Fashion was influenced by the Kabuki actors and courtesans.
A style of obi was a long, braided silk cord with tasseled ends. This was
wrapped around the waist and tied in back, so as to not detract from the
elaborate, colorful kimono.(9) Later in the Edo
9
period (1680- 1700's), the sleeves were at their
10
longest- the Furisode style.(10) The long sleeves
were often used for flirting, so this style was worn by
unmarried women and of course, courtesans and
geisha. With the furisode was worn a much wider,
stiff obi, tied in an elaborate bow in the back. This
was the Darari-musubi. (11) The samurai ladies
would also still wear the plainer styles encouraged
by the samurai code.
June A.S. XLII
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
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The obi itself became a design element, wider and heavier than
11
before. During the middle of the Edo period, the obi developed its'
now traditional size of3.6m in length by26.8cm. width. During this
time, obi were often tied in front or back, with different tying styles
coming from Kabuki actors. Men's obi were in two styles- Kaku obi,
which is stiff and the Heko obi, which is soft.
Traditional fabrics for kimono are silk, linen, cotton and wool.
Patterns are produced by many methods: weaving (hand or machine),
hand-painted, stencil & tie- dyeing, embroidery or combinations of
techniques. All are period methods. Common dye colors were yellow,
brown, black, blues, red and green. In period, white was reserved for
undergarments and burial clothing. Modern western influence has changed that tradition. The
older patterns from Japan include cross, parallel cross, check, plaid, stripe, diamond, dots,
dashes, and squares. Stenciled and block printed patterns often reflect nature: tortoise shell,
clouds, blossoms, pine needles, mums, crane, water, mountains, bamboo, leaves, insects,
birds, land & sea animals. Other designs: fans, comb, ring-yang, spiral, feather, tied ribbons,
etc. Check various Japanese picture prints and other artwork for more designs. The miniseries- Shogun, has lots of info for garb of the early 1600's.
The Yukata is an unlined cotton kimono originally
12M worn after bathing. It became a garment for casual
12F
home wear, especially during the humid summer
months. The colors are usually a dark blue and white
pattern. A simple sash obi is wore with this style.(12)
Another summer kimono is the Jofu, made of
lightweight linen. This is worn with a light cotton
kosode and an open-weave silk obi.
Japanese kimono fabrics are about 13"-15" wide,
some can be 28" wide. Standard fabric of 44" can be
used, but the pattern layout has to be adjusted.(13) A kimono is traditional hand- sewn to
make it easier to clean. A simple set of running stitches is all that's needed.
By Mistress Ella Gajewi von Pommern, O.P.
Aka Louise Sugiyama
May 2007, AS XLII
1. The Book of Kimono- Norio Yumanaka, c1982, Kodansha International Ltd.
2. Folkwear Patterns- # 113- Kimono, cI977,1982, #151-Hakama & Kataginu, c 2003,
Taunton Press.
3. Japan: National Costume Reference, Marion Sichel, c1987, Chelsea House Publ.
4. Make Your Own Japanese Clothes- John Marshall, c 1988, Kodansha International Ltd.
June A.S. XLII
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
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Baronial Calendar
JULY A.S. XLII
Sunday
1
Monday
2
Tuesday
Wednesday Thursday
Friday
Saturday
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
College of
Heralds
10
11
12
13
Cynagua
Summer
Investiture
Woodland
14
Cynagua
Summer
Investiture
Woodland
15
16
Cynagua
Summer
Investiture
Woodland
17
18
19
20
21
22
24
25
26
27
Kingdom
Arts &
Sciences
28
Kingdom
Arts &
Sciences
West/An
Tir War
23
Pennsic
War Starts
29
Kingdom
Arts &
Sciences
30
June A.S. XLII
31
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
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August A.S. XLII
Sunday
5
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
6
12
13
Silver Desert
Championship
Tourney
Friday
Saturday
1
Deadline September
Page Copy
2
3
4
7
8
9
10
Silver Desert
Championship
Tourney
11
Silver Desert
Championship
Tourney
14
15
16
17
18
Midsummer
Feast
25
Purgatorio
Coronation
Pennsic War
Ends
19
20
21
22
23
24
Purgatorio
Coronation
26
Purgatorio
Coronation
27
28
29
30
31
Ducal Prize
Starts
KHTI
June A.S. XLII
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
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Fettburg Japanese Midsummer Feast
The Barony of Fettburg invites you to join our celebration of Tanabata, the Japanese wishing sta
festival!
Early in the day, enjoy Heavy and Rapier Tournaments in Japanese style for adults and youths,
followed by a Japanese Boffer Tourney for smalls. Escape the heat of mid-day by learning about
period Japanese arts and sciences at the mini-collegium. Relax in the afternoon while being
entertained by a Kyogen puppet play before partaking in authentic Japanese cuisine masterminded
the critically acclaimed medieval chef, Anna Serra.
Date: August 18th, 2007 9:30 Am-8 pm (doors to feast hall open at 11 am) Tournament inspections
will be held 9:30-10 Am
Location: Manteca Senior Center, Manteca, CA
Site Fee: $10 members with feast $13 non-members with feast. $5 members without feast $8 nonmembers without feast Children under 10 years: Free!
Feastgoers: Please bring at least 5 small bowls or trays (up to 20 if you have them) and your ow
chopsticks. Kindly reserve your place at the feast by contacting feastocrat Anna Serra at
[email protected]
Autocrat: Yukiko Hosokawa
(Elizabeth Leonard)
2808 Honeysuckle Way, Sacramento, CA 95826
(916) 475-4651
[email protected]
Directions: From Hwy 99, take the MANTECA exit onto N MAIN ST. Turn RIGHT on W LOUISE AVE. Turn
LEFT on HACIENDA AVE and continue on N WALNUT AVE. Turn RIGHT on DAVIS ST. Turn RIGHT on CHERRY
LN. 295 CHERRY LN, MANTECA, will be on your left.
June A.S. XLII
Volume XX, Issue II
The Skald
June A.S. XLII
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Volume XX, Issue II