Annual Report - The Learning Partnership

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Annual Report - The Learning Partnership
Annual Report
July 2013-June 2014
Strengthening Canada’s future:
A strong public education system is the foundation of our future!
thelearningpartnership.ca
Board Leadership 2013-2014
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Chair, Kenneth J. Fredeen
General Counsel, Deloitte LLP
Helen Burstyn
Principal, Public Projects and
Co‑Founder, Pecaut Centre for
Social Enterprise
Dennis Cochrane
Past President and Vice Chancellor
(Interim), St. Thomas University
Michael Coté
Sr. Vice President & Chief
Commercial Officer, Purolator Inc.
Deb Craven
Sr. Vice President & Chief Financial
Officer, Purolator Inc.
Akela Peoples
President & CEO,
The Learning Partnership
Susan LaRosa
Former Director of Education, York
Catholic District School Board
John Malloy
Director of Education,
Hamilton‑Wentworth District
School Board
Mike McKay
Former Superintendent of Schools /
CEO, Surrey School District No. 36
Bill Morneau
Executive Chairman,
Morneau Shepell
Andrea O. Nalyzyty
Vice President, Employee Relations,
Policy & Governance, CIBC
James Politeski
President, Samsung Canada
Donna Quan
Director of Education,
Toronto District School Board
Martha Tory
Partner, Ernst & Young
Susan Uchida
Vice President, Human Resources,
RBC
Steven Wolff
Chief Executive Officer, Nova Scotia
Pension Services Corporation
Cornell C.V. Wright
Partner, Torys LLP
Audit and Finance Committee
Chair, Martha Tory
Deb Craven
Ken Gibson
Ross Peebles
Akela Peoples
Nominating & Governance
Committee
Chair, Andrea O. Nalyzyty
Helen Burstyn
Heather Connelly
Michael Coté
Kenneth J. Fredeen
Akela Peoples
CORPORATE ADVISORY BOARD
Rick Waugh, O.C.,
Chair / Président
Former President & CEO,
Scotiabank
Gerald T. McCaughey,
Former President and CEO,
CIBC (Past Chair, Corporate
Advisory Board)
Ron Mock, President & CEO,
Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan
James Politeski, President,
Samsung Canada
Robert Hardt, President & CEO,
Siemens Canada Limited
Carol Stephenson, O.C.,
Former Dean, Ivey Business
School, University of Western
Ontario
Bill Morneau, Executive Chairman,
Morneau Shepell
Patrick Nangle, President & CEO,
Purolator Inc.
Glenn Laverty, President & CEO,
Ricoh Canada
Lloyd Bryant, Managing Director,
HP Canada
Dale R. Ponder,
Firm Managing Partner,
Chief Executive, Osler
COMMITTEES
Policy and Knowledge
Mobilization Advisory
Council
Canada’s Outstanding
Principals National
Selection Committee
Chair, Carol Campbell
Joan Andrew
Judith Andrew
Jane Bertrand
Zahra Bhanji
Fiona Blaikie
Andrew Coates
Raf Di Cecco
Paul Favaro
Usha George
Gerri Gershon
Chris Knight
David McCordic
Julia O’Sullivan
Beth Oakes
Andrew Parkin
Tim Reid
Eric Roher
Stan Shapson
Idan Shlesinger
Enid Slack
Richard Taylor
Linda White
Wenda Yenson
Marny Beale
Teresa Blum
Fred Facca
Cecilia Reynolds
Ardith Shirley
Duncan Sinclair
Vianne Timmons
Mario Tirelli
2 | The Learning Partnership
Canada’s Outstanding
Principals Advisory
Committee
Marny Beale
Fred Facca
Frank Kelly
Deirole Kinsella Biss
Paul Lacalamita
Ian McFarlane
Robert Pratt
Peggy Sweeney
Entrepreneurial
Adventure Advisory
Committee
Chair, Adrian Ransome
John Dickie
Lea Konforte
Natalie Lau
Christian Matyasfalvi
Welcome to Kindergarten
Advisory Committees
BC
Janet Austin
Sheri Brattson
Heather Daly
Debbie Desroches Fulton
Colleen Dickie
Maureen Dockendorf
Sandra Huggett
Dr. Sharon Jeroski
Christy Northway
Joanne Schroeder
Janet Tomkins
GTA
Marilyn Baillie
Denise Cave
Alan Convery
Ayn Cooney
Margaret DaSilva
Jayne Delbeek Eksteins
Fran Hill
Sandy Giles
John Howard
Diana Linardic
Heather Ma
Janet Millar
Maryteresa Nocera
Toni Pucci
Daniel Reidy
Dianne Riehl
Angie Sferlazza
Stephanie Spencer
Pat Stellick
Janine Stutt
Francine Umulisa
Rose Wegiel
PEI
Josee Alain
Tracy Beaulieu
Patricia Campbell
Paul Cyr
Lynn Hogan
Shirley Jay
Doug MacDougall
Melanie Melanson
Pam Montgomery
Laura Ann Noye
Carolyn Simpson
2013 New Brunswick
Tribute Luncheon
Committee
Co-Chair,
Dennis Cochrane
Co-Chair,
Roxanne Fairweather
Eric Estabrooks
Geoff Flood
Tom Gribbons
Larry Hachey
Charlie Harling
Dale Knox
Patrick Lacroix
Bob Neal
Roxanne Reeves
Derek Riedle
Eric Savoie
Colombe Smith
Bill Teed
Amy Webber
2014 Toronto Tribute
Dinner Committee
Co-Chair,
Kenneth J. Fredeen
Co-Chair,
Carol Stephenson, O.C.
2013-14 Results Highlights
Since
1993
ONE
MILLION
more than 5.7 million students have participated
in The Learning Partnership’s programs.
394,281
165
business, education and
government leaders engaged
senior educators across
Canada given executive
leadership training
21
Champions of Public
Education honoured
13 provinces
and territories in
2
183
official
languages
ONE
Partnership Summit
partners engaged
15
recommendations for
public education from
collaboration events
student program
showcase and celebration
events nationally
Three
4
students consulted across
hours of executive
leadership instruction
participating
schools
118
1,563
227
3,136
Canadian business
CEOs engaged
teachers engaged
students and families engaged
through student programs
donated to public education via
Samsung partnership
45
18,700
gala events
2
Business-Education
Task Forces
Calgary
Toronto
Table of Contents
Programs
Programs
for students for educators
Collaborations
Policy &
Knowledge
Mobilization
Celebration
events
Governance....................................................................................................................2
2013-14 Results.............................................................................................................3
Message from President and Chair.................................................................................5
Programs for Students....................................................................................................6
Programs for Educators..................................................................................................8
2013-14 Highlights at a Glance....................................................................................10
Financials.....................................................................................................................13
Collaborations..............................................................................................................14
Policy & Knowledge Mobilization.................................................................................16
Celebration Events ......................................................................................................18
Our Supporters.............................................................................................................20
About The Learning Partnership
The Learning Partnership is a national charity dedicated to building stakeholder partnerships to support,
promote and advance publicly funded education in Canada. We do this through five key deliverables – innovative
student programs, executive leadership for educators, knowledge mobilization and credible research, tribute
celebrations of excellence and ongoing collaborations across Canada. Since 1993, more than 5.7 million students
have participated in The Learning Partnership’s programs. For more information on The Learning Partnership,
visit thelearningpartnership.ca.
The Learning Partnership Model
Building Partnerships
Supporting Curriculum
• Programs address curriculum gaps
• Builds relationships with educators
• Supports teachers in
curriculum delivery
• Connecting business and education
• Education Summit, Business Education
Task Force, CEO Events
Strengthening Leadership
• Executive Leadership incorporating
business perspectives
Addressing Relevance &
Driving Thought Leadership
• Strategic merger with Collegium of Learning
• Canadian and international Research and
its relevance
• Mobilizing Knowledge across sectors
• Informs, guides our programming content
and focus
4 | The Learning Partnership
Raising Awareness of
Public Education
• Canada’s Outstanding Principals
• Tribute events – Hall of Fame
• Canada’s Outstanding Employers
Message from the President and Chair
This past year The Learning Partnership has been focused on one theme: the future. So
when we reflect on last year, our eyes were firmly fixed on the future.
Our children are our future. Their future is dependent on us. This means it is up to us to
responsibly and collectively ensure that our publicly funded education system is designed
to be dynamic, relevant and ever evolving – with effective tools to prepare young people in
Canada to succeed in today’s global landscape. So what are those tools?
Akela Peoples,
President and CEO
The Learning Partnership
In search of these tools, The Learning Partnership looked closely at the key issues that impact
our publicly funded education in Canada today. Through an intensive strategic planning
process we concluded that our activities need to focus on the following four priorities:
•
•
•
•
Teaching for 21st Century Skills
Embracing a global view
Responding to the changing labour market needs
Developing leadership skills for educators
Have a look at our many outstanding accomplishments in 2013-2014. You will quickly see
that what we have accomplished this year is well aligned with what we think is important to
the future success of Canada’s students. Our programs and investments for the coming year
will focus on our four priorities identified above.
Our message is simple: public education matters to all of us. The Learning Partnership is
about business collaborating with public education leaders and government to continually
enhance our public education system.
Kenneth J. Fredeen
General Counsel
Deloitte LLP
We hope you agree with us, that the four strategic priorities we have thoughtfully chosen
address the needs of students, educators and employers – and will make a positive
difference. We hope you enjoy reading our annual report and find it informative, and as
always, please let us know if you have ideas or comments. We would love to hear from you.
Akela Peoples, President and CEO
The Learning Partnership
From our Strategic Plan 2014-2017:
The Learning Partnership’s
Teaching for
21st Century
Skills
FOUR-POINT
STRATEGIC FOCUS
Embracing a
Global View
Enhancing excellence
in public education to
prepare youth in Canada
for the 21st Century world
Kenneth J. Fredeen, Chair of
The Learning Partnership’s Board of Directors
21st Century Skills for the 21st Century Workplace
• Strengthening world-class STEM and literacy skills
• Entrepreneurship and innovation with a global view
• Future-focused teaching pedagogy and tools
Embracing a Global Perspective in Education
• Building relationships with local and global players
• Great to excellent focus in education ensuring relevancy
• Career education that integrates global relevance
Enabling Successful School-to-Work Transitions
Responding to a
• Innovative career education tools for students
Changing Labour • Advocating for relevant labour market information
Market
• Promoting multiple paths to success
Developing
Leadership
Integrating Business Skills in Education Leadership
• Incorporating global perspectives in education
• Building synergies between education and business
• Embracing 21st century complexities in education
2014 Annual Report | 5
Programs for Students
Supporting Curriculum
Our student programs address curriculum gaps, build relationships with
educators and support teachers in curriculum delivery in class.
2013-14 Highlights
I3 – Investigate! Invent!
Innovate! Instilling a passion
for Science, Technology,
Engineering and Math
394,281
18,700
students and families engaged
through student programs
teachers engaged
Entrepreneurial Adventure
Unleashing the entrepreneurial
spirit in Canadian classrooms
813
158
Take Our Kids to Work
Connecting students with
the world of work
Welcome to Kindergarten
Engaging students, parents and
communities early for a smooth
transition to school
WTK app
downloads
new Entrepreneurial
Adventure business
ventures
14,679
for more information visit:
thelearningpartnership.ca/
student-programs
6 | The Learning Partnership
$101,330
Turning Points essays submitted
donated to charity through
Entrepreneurial Adventure student
businesses
103
business and
community
partners engaged
1,543
250,000
students and
75,000
Take Our Kids to Work™ Leads
to HR career
Turning Points
Building character and
communication through literacy
for the 21st century world
21
program showcase and
celebration events nationally
Karla Cabrera accompanied her father, the
Assistant Chief Engineer at The Fairmont
Waterfront Hotel in Vancouver, to work on
Take Our Kids to Work day in 2005. The day
left her wanting to be a Human Resources
professional, which she has since pursued
through a sociology degree at UBC and her
current HR diploma program at BCIT.
“Take Our Kids to Work opened my eyes
to the different options out there,” said
Karla. “I could have gone another route and
probably would have gotten a bachelor’s
degree and not know what to do with it. My
experience that day gave me focus. I am truly
thankful for that day in Grade 9.”
new I3
inventions
businesses participating in TOKW
Leading the national conversation in
Early Learning
The Learning Partnership’s Early Years Family and Community
Engagement National Symposium, which took place on May
13 to 15, 2014, facilitated an important conversation about
the shared responsibility of early childhood learning and
development – family, educators and communities must all be
involved.
Developed as an extension of The Learning Partnership’s
Welcome to Kindergarten™ program, the Symposium gave
early learning experts, educators and policymakers from across
Canada the opportunity to share and learn from each other
about how to prepare pre-Kindergarten children for success.
Tune into VOCM, Newfoundland for
Turning Points, Live!
Fred Hutton, radio personality and news director on VOCM in St.
John’s participated for the first time as a Turning Points student
essay judge last April. He was so impressed by the quality of
the writing as well as the courage shown by the authors as
they recounted personal challenges, that he invited students of
winning essays to read their work and share their stories live on
his morning radio show.
Entrepreneurial Adventure Provides
Lasting Impact
Generating Confidence with
I3 – Investigate! Invent! Innovate!
Through the Entrepreneurial Adventure program, Grade 8
students Mavis, Amanda and their classmates left a lasting legacy
in their final year at St. Richard’s Catholic School in Scarborough,
Ontario.
Challenged with identifying an everyday problem and creating
an invention to solve it, former Grade 7 student from Tom Bains
School in Calgary, Alberta, Robin Kim, and four of her classmates
developed the Footstep Generator. The invention takes energy
created when a person steps onto a stair and transfers it into
electricity to power a small LED light – a principle the students
hope one day might even power a whole a house.
They developed and sold a student-friendly but dresscodeappropriate school clothing line, winning a BMO National
Student Innovation Award and donating all profits from their
$6,000 in sales to two of the school’s favourite charities.
That’s what they left behind, but thanks to this experience,
Mavis took with her a new appreciation for teamwork and
Amanda took with her a triumph over shyness. As for the whole
class, they walked away with a better understanding of algebra
because of the real-life application of figuring out the variables of
production.
The invention process and the I3 – Investigate! Invent! Innovate!
Invention Convention showcase, as well as the media attention
around her team’s prototype, taught Robin more than she
realized.
“I learned that you can gain a lot of confidence because you can
build anything you want, anywhere, anytime.”
Looking Ahead to 2014-15
• Take Our Kids to Work 20th anniversary
• I3 expanding to four additional provinces
• Entrepreneurial Adventure expanding to four
additional provinces
• Turning Points French expansion
• Launch of five Take Our Kids to Work online
modules
• Launch of Take Our Class to Work online career
awareness resource
The Welcome to Kindergarten App was named one
of iTunes Top 50 early learning apps in May 2014. Also
available on Android, the free app can be downloaded at
thelearningpartnership.ca/apps.
2014 Annual Report | 7
Programs for Educators
Strengthening Leadership
Our Executive Leadership programs are offered in partnership with
leading Business Schools Rotman and Ivey. We believe in investing in
current leaders in Canada’s public education system.
Canada’s Outstanding
Principals
2013-14 Highlights
40
118
2
National Academy of
Canada’s Outstanding
Principals
outstanding principals
honoured in 10 provinces
and 3 territories
senior educators across
Canada benefit from
executive leadership training
world-renowned business
school partnerships
65
Directors Institute
school boards across
executive leadership training
227
Victoria BC’s Outstanding
Principal, Leslie Lee
For more information visit:
thelearningpartnership.ca/
educator-programs
8 | The Learning Partnership
19
hours of executive leadership instruction
Supervisory Officers Course
Leading Learning
through Technology
24
guest speakers
including
C-level Canadian
business executives
As one of 2014’s Canada’s Outstanding
Principals, Leslie Lee (centre) from British
Columbia attended The Learning Partnership’s
five-day executive leadership development
program at the Rotman School of Management.
As “CEO” of George Jay Elementary School,
Leslie was able to network and share best
practices with colleagues from across Canada,
and learn management strategies from leading
professors and C-level business executives.
“The Learning Partnership recognition has
been an incredibly positive influence on the
reputation of the school and our work. It has
also helped with staff morale and acknowledges
the improvements in learning we have been
working on.”
Ivey School of Business Helps Re-Launch Directors Course
The Learning Partnership believes
investing in the continued leadership
and professional development of current
leaders in the public education system is
an effective way to strengthen the system.
This year, The Learning Partnership
announced a new partnership with Ivey
Business School for the fourth series of
our Directors of Education Institute on
Leadership and Strategic Impact.
The program is a leading edge executive
development course designed to develop
the knowledge, practical skills, strategies
and cross-sector networking required
for leaders in education to successfully
deliver excellence in our publicly funded
education system.
Committed to developing leaders in
education, we re-designed our course for
“CEOs” in education with Ivey’s highly
regarded and renowned “case study”
approach at the core. Case studies draw
from experiences from the business world,
the public sector and events in world
history. The newly designed program
covers, in three modules, themes of
Connecting Strategy and Leadership,
Connecting with Your People and
Connecting Action to Outcome.
A total of 22 school directors and
executive superintendents, including
representation from Ontario, British
Columbia and Atlantic Canada, attended
the executive leadership course that
began in May 2014, helping to strengthen
18 different school boards.
Looking Ahead to 2014-15
•
Refresh Supervisory Officer course
•
Build online resources for senior educators
•
Expand Canada’s Outstanding Principals
program in-class reach
•
Revamp Canada’s Outstanding Principals
application criteria to include innovation
•
Upgrade Canada’s Outstanding Principals
nomination process to online application
Through the Rotman School of Management, The Learning Partnership
offered executive leadership development to 40 principals across
Canada and 23 supervisory officers in Ontario in 2013-14.
2014 Annual Report | 9
2013-2014 Highlights at a Glance
The Learning Partnership
hosted a CEO Roundtable
for corporate CEOs and
Ontario’s Minister of
Education and Assistant
Deputy Minister / Chief
Student Achievement
Officer.
The Learning Partnership
honoured Gerry Pond
and J.K. Irving as
Champions of Public
Education in Saint John,
New Brunswick.
Sept. 19, 2013
CEO
Roundtable
Sept. 13, 2013
Saint John
Tribute Luncheon
July
August
September
Module 1 of the Supervisory
Officer Executive Program on
Leadership and Managemen
at the Rotman School of
Management.
October
November
Dec. 5-7, 2013
Supervisory
Officer Course
December
January
2013
February
2014
Aug., 2013
New Corporate
Advisory Board
Chair
Retired Scotiabank President &
CEO Rick Waugh, O.C. takes
over chair position on the
Corporate Advisory Board.
CIBC President & CEO
Gerry McCaughey stays on
as past chair.
Oct./Nov., 2013
Business-Education
Task Force – Toronto
The Learning Partnership
brought together leaders
from business and
education in Toronto
over two days to discuss
working together to
advance students’ futures.
Dec., 2013
New website
and brand
Oct./Nov., 2013
It’s My Future
Student Voice
Consultations
In the fall we
consulted students
in Moncton, Calgary,
Vancouver and
Winnipeg on their
opinions on public
education.
The Learning
Partnership launches
a fresh new brand,
website and look and
feel as part of its 20th
anniversary.
Nov. 6, 2013
Take Our Kids
to Work
250,000 students visited
75,000 organizations across
the country on the 19th annual
Take Our Kids to Work day.
M
S
E
o
M
R
M
n
nt
3
In the winter we consulted
students in Edmonton,
Charlottetown, Regina and
Toronto on their opinions on
public education.
Forty principals from across
Canada honoured at an
awards gala and attended
a five-day leadership
course at Rotman School of
Management in Toronto.
Feb.-Mar., 2014
It’s My Future
Student Voice
Consultations
Feb. 23-27, 2014
Canada’s
Outstanding
Principals
March
Apr.-May, 2014
Turning Points
Celebrations
April
Feb., 2014
Partnership with
Samsung Canada
Samsung donates $1M to
public education through
partnership with The
Learning Partnership.
Module 2 of the
Supervisory Officer
Executive Program
on Leadership and
Management at the
Rotman School of
Management.
The Turning Point
recognized outst
essay writers at c
events in Brantfo
Brunswick, Calg
Sudbury, GTA, K
North Bay, New
Nova Scotia and
Saskatchewan.
Apr. 23, 2014
Toronto
Tribute Dinner
Apr. 10, 2014
The Learning
Partnership
Partnership
Summit
brought together over
100 leaders from education,
business, government and
the student community to
the Partnership Summit
to address school-to-work
pathways.
e
Feb. 6-8, 2014
Supervisory
Officer Course
The Learning Partnership
honoured Alan MacGibbon
and Nitin Kawale as
Champions of Public
Education in Toronto,
Ontario.
Feb.- Jun., 2014
Take Our Class to
Work pilot
The new Take Our
Class to Work career
exploration program (with
experiential learning for
classes) was piloted in six
schools in the GTA.
May
Apr. 23, 2014
Invention
Conventions
The I3 – Investigate!
Invent! Innovate! program
culminated in Invention
Conventions in nearly
20 locations in Calgary,
Edmonton, Toronto, Kenora,
New Brunswick, North Bay
and Ottawa.
Apr. 23-24, 2014
National Student
Symposium
Twenty-two youth from every
province and territory gathered
in Toronto for The Learning
Partnership’s first-ever National
Student Symposium on public
education.
ts program
tanding
celebration
ord, New
gary,
Kenora,
wfoundland,
d
.
Welcome to Kindergarten’s Early Years
Family and Community Engagement
National Symposium in Winnipeg
facilitated conversation about family
engagement in early learning.
May 13-15, 2014
Winnipeg WTK
Symposium
Module 3 of the Supervisory
Officer Executive Program on
Leadership and Management
at the Rotman School of
Management.
May 15-16, 2014
Supervisory
Officer Course
The new Executive Leadership
for Directors of Education
course launched with the
new Ivey Business School,
our new curriculum partner.
The Learning Partnership
home office got more
much‑needed space by
moving to 45 Sheppard Ave.
E, Suite 400, Toronto.
Jun. 13, 2014
Office Move
May 22, 2014
New Directors
Course Launched
at Ivey
June
May 6-7, 2014
It’s My Future
Student Voice
Consultations
In the spring we consulted
students in St. John’s and
Halifax on their opinions on
public education.
Apr., 2014
WTK App
Launched
The Welcome to
Kindergarten playbased learning app
launches in pilot mode
for iPad.
July
May 28, 2014
Business-Education
Task Force – Calgary
This session in Calgary
focused on how
business and education
can work together in
Alberta to support
students in school-towork transitions.
May/Jun., 2014
Entrepreneurial
Adventure
Showcases
The Entrepreneurial Adventure
program culminated with
showcase events in nearly
20 locations in Calgary,
Edmonton, Toronto, Kenora,
New Brunswick, North Bay
and Ottawa.
Financials
The Learning Partnership summarized financial information
(Year ending June 30, 2014)
Funding Sources
Corporate
26%
Other
8%
Government
24%
Expenses
Fundraising
11%
IT
2%
Administration
20%
Policy & Knowledge
Mobilization
3%
Educational
Institutions
35%
Leadership Institutes
9%
Foundations
7%
Programs
55%
Copies of the audited financial statements may be obtained on request from
Carol Norsworthy, Director of Finance and Administration, The Learning Partnership at: 416-440-5110
More than 5.7 million children have participated in our programs
… the momentum continues to enhance learning.
13 | The Learning Partnership
Collaborations
Connecting Business and Education
Build partnerships through summits, business task forces, events.
2013-14 Highlights
CEO Events
ONE
MILLION
45
donated to public education via
Samsung partnership
Partnership Summit
Calgary2
Toronto
3
Business-Education
Task Forces
employment-to-education
transitions
3 CEO
business,
education and
government
leaders engaged
roundtable events
Rick Waugh, O.C. Appointed as
Corporate Advisory Board Chair
In 2013-14, Rick Waugh, (right) Scotiabank’s
retired President and CEO and 2013
Champion of Public Education was appointed
as the new Chair of The Learning Partnership’s
Corporate Advisory Board.
For more information, visit
thelearningpartnership.ca/
collaborations
14 | The Learning Partnership
ONE
Business-Education
Task Forces
move-to-action priorities
165
Canadian business
CEOs engaged
Throughout the year, Mr. Waugh hosted three
CEO events engaging more than 25 C-level
Canadian business leaders in meaningful
conversation about the work of The Learning
Partnership and public education in Canada.
As a result, we have created an HR Intelligence
Committee with HR representatives from these
companies to inform our work on school-towork transitions.
15
Partnership
Summit
recommendations for
public education from
collaboration events
Terry Stuart, Chief Innovation Officer, Deloitte (left); Michael Fullan, O.C., author/professor (centre left); and recent
graduate Jamil Jivani (centre right) discuss critical skills needed for the 21st century workplace in a panel moderated by
TVO’s Steve Paikin (right) at the Partnership Summit in April 2014.
Collaborating to Create Successful School-To-Work Pathways for Young Canadians
Co-chaired by Corporate Advisory Board
leader Rick Waugh, O.C., Scotiabank’s
retired President and CEO, The Learning
Partnership’s one-day Partnership Summit
brought together over 100 leaders
from education, business, government
and the student community to address
the compelling challenges of creating
successful school-to-work pathways for
young Canadians.
With sessions moderated by Steve Paikin,
Host and Producer of TVO’s The Agenda
and Carol Stephenson, O.C., Former
Dean, Ivey Business School, as well
as interviews and group discussions,
attendees examined the importance
of gaining a global perspective; what
innovation disruption means to our
economy and education system;
education for the 21st century; moving
from education to employment; education
experience from students; and business
and education taking action together.
Participants and panellists included
Ontario’s Minister of Education
Liz Sandals; author and professor
Michael Fullan O.C.; James Politeski,
President, Samsung Canada; Nitin Kawale,
President, Cisco Systems Canada; Acting
Director for Education and Skills at the
OECD, Andreas Schleicher; Alberta’s
Deputy Minister of Education, Greg
Bass; Director General, Andrew Parkin,
representing the Council of Ministers
of Education, Canada; George Zegarac,
Deputy Minister who also represented
Ontario’s Ministry of Education; and Linda
Franklin, CEO of Colleges Ontario.
The information from the sessions and
roundtable discussions was captured in a
final report by The Learning Partnership to
help key decision makers develop schoolto-work transition strategies.
14
20
Report on the
Convened by
Partnership
The Learning
Partnership,
Summit 201
4
April 10, 2014
INFO-RICH
, ACTION
-POO
What are we
doing to succe
ssfully move
education to
young Canad
employment?
ians from
thelearningp
R?
artnership.c
a
Read the Partnership Summit Report at
thelearningpartnership.ca/
summit-report
Looking Ahead to 2014-15
•
Business-Education Task Forces in Winnipeg
and Prince Edward Island
•
Partnership Summit 2015
•
Protocol for developing business-education
partnerships
The Learning Partnership held two Business-Education
Task Forces in 2013-14, one in Toronto and one in Calgary,
to facilitate business-education relationships locally.
2014 Annual Report | 15
Policy & Knowledge Mobilization
Addressing Relevance & Driving Thought Leadership
Our Policy & Knowledge Mobilization department addresses the relevance
of all programs and drives thought leadership in the education sector.
2013-14 Highlights
Research
15
students consultations across Canada
1,563
Student Voice
consulted across
13 provinces and territories
in 2 official languages
School-to-Work Transition
4
reports produced
4
reports in production
ONE
National Student
Symposium with
22
student
representatives
FIVE
research projects in play
Policy & Knowledge
Mobilization
ONE
national research collaboration with Samsung
Canada Needs Consistent
Approach to Career Education
Vulnerable Communities:
Success for Boys
For more information, visit
thelearningpartnership.ca/
pkm
16 | The Learning Partnership
In November 2013 The Learning Partnership
released It’s Their Future: A Pan-Canadian
Study of Career Education. The research,
a national scan of curriculum and policy
initiatives focusing on school-to-work
transitions, was conducted in response to
Education Summit attendees wanting to
understand more about how Canadian schools
prepare students for the world of work.
The paper illustrates the various approaches
to developing the workforce preparedness of
students through Canadian public schools,
an area of challenge for public education. It
demonstrates the need for a more consistent
national approach to workforce preparation.
Students Tell The Learning Partnership What They Need from Public Education
The Learning Partnership’s It’s My Future!
initiative reached out to 1,563 Canadian
students through 15 regional youth
forums and an online survey across 13
provinces and territories in two official
languages, to ask students – as key
stakeholders – what’s working for them
in Canada’s public education system and
how can we improve.
The sessions asked students ranging from
Grade 12 to post-secondary levels where
they see opportunities to enhance their
education, how they feel it’s preparing
them for life after school and what
information they are missing in order to
make post-secondary choices.
While there were significant regional
differences in students’ opinions, several
key themes emerged which share a
common Pan-Canadian perspective
– all involving relevant, real-life matters.
Students want: experiential and outof-classroom learning opportunities;
applicable courses; individualization,
flexibility and choice; transition
information/support; financial support;
and the opportunity to have their voices
heard.
help support our youth for tomorrow’s
workplace.
:
It’s My Future
anada
From Across C
Student Voices
Final Report
2014 September ll rights reser
Copyright © We hope the insights we gathered will
better inform critical discussions and
strategy development with leaders
and influencers across all sectors to
rning P
2014 The Lea
artnership. A
ved. Read the It’s My Future Report at
thelearningpartnership.ca/imf-report
Looking Ahead to 2014-15
•
It’s My Future Report
•
2015 National Student Symposium
•
Use of technology in schools research
project with Samsung Canada
•
Boys success project expanding
The inaugural National Student Symposium in April
2014 gathered 22 student representatives from every
province and territory to get their feedback on the
education system.
2014 Annual Report | 17
Celebration Events
Raising Awareness of Public Education
Champions of Public
Education
Celebrating exemplary education leaders in business and education.
2013-14 Highlights
Canada’s Outstanding
Principals
Canada’s Outstanding
Employers
Canada’s Outstanding
Employers
40
10
outstanding
principals
recognized
outstanding employers
recognized
4
Champions of Public
Education honoured
three
gala events
2013 AWARD RECIPIENTS:
APTN
Canadian Natural Resources Ltd.
Candu Energy Inc.
CBC/Radio-Canada
Copernicus Educational Products Inc.
Deloitte
The Fairmont Waterfront Vancouver
Metrolinx
Samsung Canada
Toronto Hydro
For more information, visit
thelearningpartnership.ca/
celebrations
18 | The Learning Partnership
1,530
attendees from business, government and education
Samsung Donates $1M to
Public Education Through The
Learning Partnership’s Canada’s
Outstanding Principals
In February 2014, James Politeski, President,
Samsung Canada (right) announced to the 350
Canada’s Outstanding Principals gala attendees
a substantial commitment to Canadian public
education, pledging $1 million in Solve for
Tomorrow school technology grants in 2014.
Samsung, The Learning Partnership’s official
Technology Innovation Partner, surprised the
award winners with the news that they would
be the first beneficiaries of the Samsung Solve
for Tomorrow program, each receiving a $20,000
technology grant for their school, which Samsung
will help them implement to most effectively
integrate technology into their classrooms.
“I want to thank Samsung for not just throwing
money at our school, or saying here’s a gift, but
for really sitting down with us,” said secondary
principal Rene Bibeau of Ottawa. “They’re going
to come to our school, they’re going to work with
us... to try and figure out what our needs are and
work as a team.”
James Politeski, President, Samsung Canada
announces a donation of $1 million to public
education at The Learning Partnership’s
Canada’s Outstanding Principals Gala in
February 2014.
Alan N. MacGibbon, former Managing Partner and Chief Executive of
Deloitte (left) and Nitin Kawale (right), former president of Cisco Systems
Canada were named Champions of Public Education at The Learning
Partnership’s Toronto Tribute event in April 2014.
Four Champions of Public Education Honoured
In 2013-14 The Learning Partnership
honoured four exceptional Canadian
business leaders as Champions of
Public Education for their personal and
professional contributions to Canada’s
public education system: innovator and
technology entrepreneur Gerry Pond,
O.N.B.; Alan N. MacGibbon, former
Managing Partner and Chief Executive
of Deloitte LLP; Nitin Kawale, President
of Cisco Systems Canada and lifetime
achievement Champion of Public
Education, J.K. Irving, Chairman of
J.D. Irving Ltd.
As The Learning Partnership’s largest
celebration events, the Tribute events – a
dinner in Toronto and a luncheon in Saint
John, New Brunswick – brought together
more than 1,500 attendees to celebrate
Business leader J. K. Irving (left) was presented with a Lifetime
Achievement Award and entrepreneur Gerry Pond (right),
Chairman, Mariner Partners Inc. was named a Champion of Public
Education at The Learning Partnership’s Tribute Luncheon event in
Saint John New Brunswick in September 2013.
of Innovatia Inc. co-chairing and the
Honourable Marilyn Trenholme-Counsell,
O.C., O.N.B., former Senator and
Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick as
honorary chair.
these outstanding Canadians and to
raise funds for The Learning Partnership’s
student programs in these communities.
The Toronto event featured keynote
speaker Rex Murphy, Social Commentator
and Editorialist, and emcee Pattie
Lovett-Reid, CTV News’s Chief Financial
Commentator. Co-chairs for Toronto were
Carol Stephenson O.C., Former Dean, Ivey
Business School and Kenneth J. Fredeen,
General Counsel, Deloitte LLP and Chair
of The Learning Partnership’s Board of
Directors.
TD Bank Deputy Chair the Honourable
Frank McKenna delivered the keynote
address at the New Brunswick Tribute
event with Dennis Cochrane, former
President of St. Thomas University and
Roxanne Fairweather, President and CEO
Champions of Public Education
Visit our
Hall of Fame atL. Jacques Ménard, O.C., O.Q.
2014
Chairman, BMO Nesbitt Burns and President
Nitin Kawale
thelearningpartnership.ca/hall-of-fame
BMO Financial Group, Quebec
President, Cisco Systems Canada
Alan N. MacGibbon
F.C.P.A, F.C.A., C.M.C.,
Former Managing Partner and Chief
Executive, Deloitte LLP
2013
Lifetime Achievement Award
Her Worship Mayor
Hazel McCallion, C.M.
City of Mississauga
The Hon.
James W. Ross, C.M.
Lifetime Achievement Award
James K. Irving, O.C., O.N.B.
Founder, Ross Ventures Ltd.
Gerry Pond, O.N.B.
Darren Entwistle
2011
Looking Ahead to 2014-15
Chairman, J.D. Irving Limited
President & CEO
TELUS
Chairman, Mariner Partners Inc.
Rick Waugh, O.C.
•
Dr. Jane Gaskell
TributeChief
Moncton
– Nov. 10, 2014
Executive Officer
Former Dean, Ontario Institute for
•
Aditya
Jha, O.C.
Tribute
Toronto
– May 28, 2015University of Toronto
Entrepreneur and Philanthropist
Scotiabank
Studies in Education
Bernard Lord, O.N.B., Q.C.
•
JohnOutstanding
Stackhouse
President & CEO
Canada’s
Principals
gala
Editor-in-Chief
Canadian Wireless Telecommunications
The Globe and Mail
Association of Canada
– Feb. 24,
2015
Former Premier of New Brunswick
•
J. Robert S. Prichard, O.C., O.Ont.
Achievement Awards
Canada’s
Outstanding Employers
Chair, Torys LLP
Charlie Pielsticker
President Emeritus
Founder, The Learning
Partnership
nomination
– Nov.
3, 2014
University of Toronto
20th Anniversary Lifetime
Gordon Cressy
Founding CEO, 1993-2000
The Learning Partnership
Veronica Lacey, O.C.
Former President & CEO, 2000-2012
The Learning Partnership
Joseph Segal, C.M., O.B.C.,
C.B.H.F., O.ST.J., LL.D. (Hon)
President
Kingswood Capital Corporation
Donald A. Stewart
Former Chief Executive Officer
The Learning Partnership
honoured 40 principals
fromInc.
Sun Life Financial
2012
across Canada
its annual
Peter E. at
Gilgan,
O.Ont. Canada’s Outstanding
2010
& CEOof 350 attendees from education,
Principals galaPresident
in front
John Honderich, C.M., O.Ont.
Mattamy Homes
Chair, Board of Directors, Torstar
business and government in February 2014.
Former Publisher of the Toronto Star
28
Program 014.indd 28
thelearningpartnership.ca
2014 Annual Report | 19
17/04/2014 12:03:08 PM
Our Supporters 2013-2014
We would like to thank our partners and sponsors whose generous support enables The Learning Partnership to deliver innovative
programs that develop research and policy initiatives that engage Canadians in discussions about how we can ensure a vibrant,
forward-thinking public education system to meet the needs of students today and tomorrow.
PARTNERS IN LEARNING
Our Partners in Learning members are critical to the continued success of The Learning Partnership. With their annual
memberships, these organizations support the core work of The Learning Partnership while receiving a suite of membership
benefits specific to their needs in the education sector. Thank you to all of our Partners in Learning members.
Corporate
Bayard Presse Canada Inc (OwlKids)
BMO Financial Group
Canadian Education Warehouse
CIBC
Grenville Printing
Ontario Power Generation
Purolator Courier Ltd.
RBC Financial Group
Ricoh Canada Inc.
Samsung Canada
Scotiabank Group
SMART Technologies
TELUS
Toy Galaxy
Education & Government
Anglophone West School District
(New Brunswick)
Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic
District School Board
Brock University
Calgary Board of Education
Calgary Catholic School District
Catholic Principals’ Council of
Ontario
Conseil scolaire catholique
Franco‑Nord
Conseil scolaire public du Nord-Est
de l’Ontario
Dufferin-Peel Catholic District
School Board
Durham Catholic District
School Board
Durham District School Board
Eastern School District, St. John’s
Edmonton Catholic District
School Board
A10
• NEWS
Ontario Principals’ Council
Ottawa Catholic School Board
Ottawa-Carleton District
School Board
Peel District School Board
Ryerson University
Seneca College of Applied Arts and
Technology
Simcoe County District School Board
Superior-Greenstone District
School Board
Toronto Catholic District
School Board
Toronto District School Board
Upper Canada District School Board
York Catholic District School Board
York Region District School Board
York University
Edmonton Public School Board
Employment and Social
Development Canada
Grand Erie District School Board
Halifax Regional School Board
Halton Catholic District School Board
Halton District School Board
Hamilton-Wentworth District
School Board
Humber College Institute of
Technology & Advanced Learning
Kenora Catholic District
School Board
Lakehead Public Schools
Nipissing-Parry Sound Catholic
District School Board
Ontario Institute for Studies in
Education of the University
of Toronto
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Folio: Education
They’re no longer the disciplinarian or just the school manager. They can be a target when standardized
test results are low. As 40 of Canada’s best principals are honoured – including the five profiled here –
Caroline Alphonso and James Bradshaw look at their changing role
A matter of principal:
at oneWhat
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.....................................................................................................
I
f the job of a principal conjures up visions of
Principal Seymour Skinner chasing Bart Simpson,
the reality couldn’t be further. Rather than the disciplinarians of the past, today’s principals have to
know and help every student, cope with parental
and political demands and ensure that their school
scores highly on standardized tests. It’s no wonder
the appeal of the job is declining.
“The research for the last 20 years is quite clear,
teachers are not attracted to the principalship,” says
Paul Newton, an associate professor at the University of Alberta who has researched the role of the
school leader. “Principals were always responsible
for ensuring efficient management of the school,
but, increasingly, the principal has become responsible for the academic achievement of students.
This is not an insignificant shift.”
Principal Lorraine Kinsman, head of Cranston
School, which she helped open four years ago in
Calgary, has experienced how complex the job can
be. She expected to run the school, set up timetables and monitor the day-to-day happenings.
Instead, she also has to contend with the involvement of parents, the community, the school board
and the province. “Instead of just knowing six
courses of study, I now need to know 575 children,
and all of the options that are available to them,”
she says.
Ms. Kinsman is among 40 principals honoured by
the Learning Partnership as Canada’s best in a role
that clearly has some exceptional leaders. But over
all, school boards are having a difficult time recruiting new people to the leadership ranks. Studies
show that school systems in Canada, Australia, New
Zealand and the United States are struggling to
recruit teachers to become principals, and research
suggests vacancies are expected to climb.
In Ontario, the number of educators receiving
their principal qualifications dropped from 1,056 in
2003 to 590 last year, according to data from the
Ontario College of Teachers. A spokesman for
Alberta Education says school superintendents
have indicated a greater challenge than in the past
in recruiting teachers to become principals.
In spite of those numbers, great principals can
make a huge difference in the lives of students and
their communities.
“I like helping people solve problems, whether it’s
a staff member or a student or a family,” says JohnPaul Elliott, the principal at St. Joseph Catholic
School in Gananoque, Ont. “And then when you
finally see some success, you know, … you finally
see somebody moving forward, it’s very motivating.”
To become a principal in Ontario, an educator
needs at least five years of teaching experience, although most have more, as well as certification that
includes the principal’s qualification program.
Lately, the role has become more political. Although test scores are not used to penalize a principal, leaders whose schools don’t fare well are still
scrutinized and questioned by parents and politicians.
“The increased hours, responsibility and public
scrutiny are not compensated for by minimal salary
increases,” says Prof. Newton, who is about to publish a paper on this topic. “Most teachers would
prefer to remain in teaching roles than transition
into administrative positions.” He added that this is
particularly acute in remote parts of Canada that
have long faced a shortage of school administrators.
In Alberta, the average salary for a teacher with 10
years’ experience is about $92,000; and at the top
end of the scale, teachers could earn as much as
$99,000. A principal at the top end of the scale in
Alberta would earn about $99,000, with an “allowance” of between $20,000 and $45,000. Principals
in Ontario are on the province’s annual sunshine
list, earning more than $100,000 annually. Teachers
at the top end of the scale earn more than $90,000.
Prof. Newton argues that while principals have
always been responsible for the management of
school, lately they’ve taken on an additional task of
student achievement. When organizations like the
Fraser Institute rank schools based on test scores,
provincial governments see principals as key agents
in educational improvement efforts and, as Prof.
Newton says, “an easy target” when a school is not
faring well. The research, however, “is less than
conclusive with respect to the impact that principals have on student learning,” he adds.
But Andrea McAuley, who is in her fourth year as
principal at R.H. Cornish Public School in Port Perry, Ont., and among this year’s winners, says
“changing the trajectory of outcomes” for students
is what keeps her energized. “The role of principal
enables us to keep one hand front-line for our students, so we see the individual faces and can support in individual conversations with kids, but also
have a wider connection to systemic change,” she
says.
John Hamilton, president-elect at the Ontario
Principals’ Council and a principal for the last 10
years, says not only are principals taking on the responsibility of student achievement, they also see
an increasing number of students coming to them
for help with mental-health issues. Mr. Hamilton,
the principal at Sunderland Public School in Brock,
Ont., says he and his colleagues spend a lot of their
time helping children with emotional needs.
“You’re trying to manage a global landscape in an
educational setting,” he says. “None of the issues
that we are expected to deal with are bad things,
they are good things. But what is our role? It
becomes difficult to define it when you’re being
pulled in a lot of different directions.”
TONIA COWAN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL
LeslieAndrea
Lee
McAuley
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LorraineMcAuley
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Andrea McAuley
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St. Joseph CatholicSt.Elementary
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Lorraine Kinsman
Lorraine
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Andrea McAuley
Holy Heart
St. of
Joseph
MaryCatholic
High School
Elementary School
St. John’s Gananoque, Ont.
Ms. Lee describes
her has
firstthe
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as a
Ms. McAuley
principalgoals
as “afor
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but the paths
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has been
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ademics was
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has
for their afamilies.
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background
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says.
thinking
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Her school
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and numeracy
Learning
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Lee
has full-time
family
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That
means
principals
like her
parent-liaison
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reach
less ofcounsellors
their time being
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out to families
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students’
par-setting a
more being
instructional
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ents – one
of the few
schools
herstudents
disdirection
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way in
their
will
trict to do
so. down to a personal level. And it
learn,
She hasmeans
also embraced
technology
as a partnerstriking more
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way of tailoring
closely
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ships tolearning
keep themore
education
taking
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each year
who haveoutside
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nated special needs. “You can set up different levels of learning by using the tech
tools,” she says, noting it helps engagement too because “the kids love it.”
These initiatives have already helped
transform the school’s performance on
provincial benchmarks and drastically
reduced the number of behavioural incidents. But
Ms. Lee
thinks
her school
What
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and others need more funding to support
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es is helping
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examples
pal
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and this
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script.”
.................................................................................
with a little
thatmore
you might
effort,’know
” he says.
in your head, but
that you might know
that you
in your
might
head,
know
butin your head, but. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................................................................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
It isn’t knowing
an easy pitch,
it in practice
but mostissuch
a different
con- thing
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is aitdifferent
in practice
thing
is a different thing
James Bradshaw
James Bradshaw James Bradshaw
versations
altogether.
“go reallyBeing
well.”in charge isn’t being the
altogether. Beingaltogether.
in charge isn’t
Beingbeing
in charge
the isn’t being the
boss, it’s about collaboration, it’s about lisboss, it’s about collaboration,
boss, it’s aboutit’s
collaboration,
about lis- it’s about listening,” he says.
tening,” he says. tening,” he says.
educator is that we’ve moved from
preparing kids for a workforce that
we fully understood to preparing kids
for a workforce that we haven’t yet
seen. So the challenge becomes, what
One of the
things
have beenfor a world
is the
best we
preparation
workingthat
on is
a focus
on language
our
kids will
inherit that we
objectives
– that
is, whenourselves
we’re
didn’t
experience
as kids?
teaching, we are proactive in
ensuring that the children
understand the vocabulary of what
they’re doing. ... When you have
English-language learners and
vulnerable learners, they learn
language in a different way.
educator is that
educator
we’ve moved
is thatfrom
we’ve moved from
educator is that we’ve moved from
It’s an unknown
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an unknown
but we future,
know but we know
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preparing kidspreparing
for a workforce
kids for
that
a workforce that
preparing kids for a workforce that
In Newfoundland, we’re seeing a very
that if you have
that
literacy
if youskills
haveand
literacy skills and
that if you have literacy skills and
we fully understood
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to understood
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to preparing kids
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big demand
for love
skilled
labour.
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to see
moreAnd
support
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more
love
support
to see staff
more support staff
numeracy skills
numeracy
and communication
skills and communication
numeracy skills and communication
for a workforcefor
that
a workforce
we haven’tthat
yetwe haven’t yet
for a workforce that we haven’t yet
years ago
[there
was] And
a lotI’ll
of leave
focus it at that
in the
schools.
in the schools. in
And
theI’ll
schools.
leave itAnd
at that
I’ll leave it at that
skills, you can skills,
go most
youanywhere.
can go most
Theanywhere. The
skills, you can go most anywhere. The
seen. So the challenge
seen. So becomes,
the challenge
whatbecomes, what
seen. So the challenge becomes, what
on university
being
the postsecondary
– trained
support
staff, supporting
– trained support
– trained
staff, supporting
support staff, supportingbiggest changebiggest
is a social
change
change
is a to
social change to
biggest change is a social change to
is the best preparation
is the best
forpreparation
a world for a world
is the best preparation for a world
choice for
students
for success.
Now
kids
with autism,
mental
health
kids with autism,
kidsmental
with autism,
health mental health talk to parentstalk
whotosay,
parents
‘But itwho
wasn’t
say, ‘But it wasn’t
talk to parents who say, ‘But it wasn’t
our kids will
thatinherit
our kids
that
will
weinherit that we
that our kids will inherit that we
it’s not necessarily
– There that
issues, thoseuniversities
sorts of things.
are
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issues,
of things.
those sorts
Thereofare
things. There like
are that whenlike
I went
thattowhen
school,’
I went
andto school,’ and
like that when I went to school,’ and
didn’t experience
didn’t
ourselves
experience
as kids?
ourselves as kids?
didn’t experience ourselves as kids?
there’s other
options
... so
itinerants
thatavailable
come back
and forth,
itinerants thatitinerants
come backthat
andcome
forth,back and forth,
it wasn’t. ... To itget
wasn’t.
to the...point
To get
where
to the point where
it wasn’t. ... To get to the point where
keep keeping
theinstudent
motivated
that are
your school
one day, not
that
school
are in
one
your
day,school
not one day, not
society can accept
society
some
canofaccept
those some of those
society can accept some of those that are in your
to achieve
potential,
the their
next. top
I would
like to see more
the next. I would
thelike
next.
toIsee
would
morelike to see more changes more changes
willingly.more willingly.
changes more willingly.
whatever
that
might
be,
is
a
constant
consistent support for those students.
consistent support
consistent
for those
support
students.
for those students.
battle. Staff want it, parents want it,
Staff want it, parents
Staff want
want
it, it,
parents want it,
students need it.
students need students
it.
need it.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cranston
School
R.H. Cornish Public
R.H.
School
Cornish
Public School
Calgary
Port Perry, Ont. Port
Perry, Ont.
John-Paul John-Paul
Elliott
Elliott
George Jay
Elementary
SchoolSchool
R.H.
Cornish Public
Victoria Port Perry, Ont.
Cranston School Cranston
School
R.H. Cornish
Public School
Calgary
Calgary
Port Perry, Ont.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................................................................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................................................................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................................................................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What has beenWhat
a major
has change
been a major
in
change in
education just education
in my timejust
as an
in my time as an
Lorraine Kinsman
Cranston School
Calgary
As far as Catholic education is concerned,
the school where John-Paul Elliott has
spent all six of his years as a principal is
the only game in town in Gananoque. It is
part of a community he calls beautiful,
cultured, close-knit and supportive, but
also one that has its share of challenges
born out of unemployment and demographics. To succeed in his job, he has to
be flexible and adaptable, or as he puts it,
“you need to have all your skills.”
He gets the students he shepherds, who
come from a variety of family backgrounds and with different abilities,
involved in fundraising efforts for the
school. And he has set up initiatives that
are pushing the school past the underachieving label it once bore, including an
intensive French program for Grade 5 students and his district’s pioneering full-day
kindergarten program.
His mantra is to keep things simple. He
looks to signals from Ontario’s education
ministry and his local school board to
gauge where educational priorities are
shifting. But that big picture is sometimes
subsumed by “the very specific needs that
are right there at your door.”
Staff and parents look to him to be the
decision-maker, but in six years as principal he has learned to work closely with
staff to make changes. “That’s something
that you might know in your head, but
knowing it in practice is a different thing
altogether. Being in charge isn’t being the
boss, it’s about collaboration, it’s about listening,” he says.
Nothing stands still at Ms. Kinsman’s
school, whether she likes it or not. For the
last four years, she has been the inaugural
principal at Cranston School, a brand new
institution she took over when it was still
under construction, and where she helped
choose everything from the furniture to
the philosophy, which focuses on creativity and world issues like the environment.
The chance to start a kindergarten to
Grade 4 school from the ground level is
“the opportunity of a lifetime,” she says.
The school opened with 300 students and
will reach its maximum of 620 this fall,
“bursting at the seams” – some families in
the community have even had to be
turned away.
“For the last two years, I’ve added five or
six classrooms every single year, five or six
teachers, changed the complexity of the
school,” she says.
Growth is the big story at many Calgary
schools, where the youth population is rising fast, and that puts pressure on schools
at a time when new ways of learning
brought about in part by technology, and
when learning to sort and use information, are becoming paramount skills.
That is forcing “huge changes,” Ms. Kinsman says, “because we’re educating children for a world that none of us can really
script.”
.................................................................................
.................................................................................
.................................................................................
James Bradshaw
What has been a major change in
education just in my time as an
I would love to see more support staff
in the schools. And I’ll leave it at that
– trained support staff, supporting
kids with autism, mental health
issues, those sorts of things. There are
itinerants that come back and forth,
that are in your school one day, not
the next. I would like to see more
consistent support for those students.
Staff want it, parents want it,
students need it.
It’s an unknown future, but we know
that if you have literacy skills and
numeracy skills and communication
skills, you can go most anywhere. The
biggest change is a social change to
talk to parents who say, ‘But it wasn’t
like that when I went to school,’ and
it wasn’t. ... To get to the point where
society can accept some of those
changes more willingly.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
us
Online
what you
Has think
a principal
makesmade
a good
a difference
principal in
and
your
how
child’s
they can
life –change
or yourschools
usown?
whatTell
for
youthe
us
think
what
better.
makes
you
tgam.ca/principals
think
a good
makes
principal
a good
and
principal
how they
and
can
how
change
they schools
can change
for the
schools
better.
fortgam.ca/principals
the
us what
better.you
tgam.ca/principals
think makes a good principal and how they can change schools for the better. tgam.ca/principals
G&M_23x23.indd 1
Hon. Liz Sandals, Ontario’s Minister of Education
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St. Joseph Catholic Elementary School
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11/03/2014 4:33:43 PM
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PROGRAM SUPPORTERS
Canada’s Outstanding
Principals™ and Executive
Leadership Programs
Alberta Education
Borden Ladner and Gervais LLP
CIBC
Deloitte LLP
Manitoba Ministry of Education and
Advanced Learning
New Brunswick Department of
Education and Early Childhood
Development
Newfoundland and Labrador
Department of Education
Nova Scotia Department of
Education and Early Childhood
Development
Nunavut Department of Education
Ontario Ministry of Education
Prince Edward Island Department of
Education and Early Childhood
Development
Samsung Canada
Yukon Education
Entrepreneurial Adventure
BMO Financial Group
Hamilton Community Foundation
Ministry of Economic Development,
Employment and Infrastructure
Gifts in-Kind
First Canadian Centre
First Student Canada
I3 – Investigate! Invent!
Innovate!
Honda Foundation
NSERC
Ontario Ministry of Education
Samsung Canada
Toronto District School Board
Gifts in-Kind
Stock Transportation
It’s My Future
Canada Post Foundation
Leading Learning through
Technology
Peel District School Board
Samsung Canada
Simcoe County District School Board
Toronto Catholic District
School Board
Toronto District School Board
York Catholic District School Board
York Region District School Board
Gifts in-Kind
Gifts in-Kind
Pearson Canada
Nipissing University
Tipper Pruden Holdings
University of New Brunswick
Partnership Summit
Deloitte LLP
Ernst and Young
Samsung Canada
Scotiabank
Torys LLP
Take Our Kids to Work™
Employment and Social
Development Canada
Manitoba Ministry of Education and
Advanced Learning
New Brunswick Department of
Education
Nova Scotia Department
of Education
Ontario Ministry of Education
Prince Edward Island Department of
Education
Scotiabank
Turning Points
Anonymous Corporate Donor
The Calgary Foundation
NPAAMB
Ontario Ministry of Education
Welcome to Kindergarten
Conifex Timber Inc.
Healthy Child Manitoba
New Brunswick Department of
Education and Early Childhood
Development
Ontario Ministry of Education
Sussex Area Community
Foundation Inc.
TD Bank Group
Toronto Catholic District
School Board
Township of Langley
Prince Edward Island Department of
Education
Winnipeg Foundation
Gifts in-Kind
Cisco
Owlkids
Rubicon Publishing
Toronto Public Library
TRIBUTE SUPPORTERS
2014 Toronto Tribute Dinner Sponsors
Bank of Montreal
BDC
Bell Canada
Bombardier Inc.
Borden Ladner Gervais LLP
Bruce Power
CIBC
Cisco Systems Canada
Council of Ministers of
Education, Canada
Compugen Systems Ltd.
Chartered Professional
Accountants of Ontario
Deloitte LLP
Dentons Canada LLP
Ernst & Young
George Brown College
The Globe and Mail
Hamilton-Wentworth
District School Board
Heinan Hutchinson LLP
Humber College Institute
of Technology &
Advanced Learning
IBM Canada
Ingram Micro Inc.
Intact Foundation
Integra Capital Limited
Ivey Business School
KPMG MSLP
Alcool NB Liquor
Ambir
Assumption Life
Atlantic Education
International Inc.
Bell Aliant
BMO-Bank of Montreal
BCAPI
Canaport LNG
CIBC Wood Gundy
Cisco
City of Saint John
Cox & Palmer
Deloitte
East Valley Ventures
Emera
Ernst & Young
Grant Thornton
Innovatia
Irving Oil
J.D. Irving Ltd.
KPMG
Landal Inc.
Mariner Partners Ltd.
McInnes Cooper
Moosehead Breweries Ltd.
NB Power
The Learning Bar
Mackenzie Financial
McCarthy Tétrault LLP
Morneau Shepell
MTS Allstream
Nidea Corporate Real
Estate
Norton Rose Fulbright
Canada LLP
Ontario College of
Teachers
Ontario Ministry of
Education
Ontario Teachers’ Pension
Plan
Osler, Hoskin &
Harcourt LLP
Purolator Inc.
Ricoh Canada Inc.
Rotman School of
Management
RBC
Ryerson University
Samsung Canada
Scotiabank
Seneca College
Sheridan College
Spencer Stuart
Donald Stewart
TD Bank Group
Tech Data
Telus
Toronto District
School Board
Toronto Hydro
Torys LLP
Yellow Bear Studios
York Region District
School Board
York University
2013 Saint John Tribute Luncheon Sponsors
New Brunswick
Community
College‑Saint John
New Brunswick Innovation
Foundation
New Brunswick Youth
Orchestra
Propel ICT
Prospectus Associates
PSAV
Révolution Strategy
Rigel Shipping
Robyn Tingley & Brent
McGovern
Ross Ventures
Royal Bank of Canada
Saint John Airport Inc.
Saint John Energy
Saint John Hilton
Saint Thomas University
Scotiabank
Softchoice Corporation
Stantec
Stewart McKelvey
T4G
Tabufile
TD Bank
Université de Moncton
University of New
Brunswick
University of New
Brunswick
Pond‑Deshpande Centre
Velante
Ville de Bouctouche Inc.
Warren Squibb
Windigo Consulting Ltd.
Xplornet Communications
Inc.
2014 Annual Report | 21
Annual Report
July 2013-June 2014
Carpenter
College
President
Environmental
Engineer
Prime
Minister
App designer
Entrepreneur
Banner
The Learning Partnership
Head Office: Toronto
45 Sheppard Ave. East, Suite 400, Toronto, ON, M2N 5W9
Tel.: 416 440 5100 1 800 790 9113 Fax: 416 482 5311
Email: info[email protected]
Website: thelearningpartnership.ca
@TLPCanada
/TLPCanada
/company/TLPCanada
/TLPofCanada

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