approach - Flightline Aviation

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approach - Flightline Aviation
PROPELLE R
IN THIS ISSUE:
Ohio State Troopers
The Skycatcher
Piston Engine Information, Updates and More
2012
1 ST Q U A R T E R
DIRECT
approach
in THIS
Issue:
WELCOME FROM CESSNA
Jodi S. Noah
Senior Vice President
Cessna Single Engine / Propeller Products
technical INFO
1
MESSAGE FROM
JODI S. NOAH
5
in every ISSUE
2
As the leader of the Propeller Aircraft business unit,
I would like to introduce to you the management
team for Cessna’s propeller side:
MANDATORY BULLETINSELEVATOR CONTROL
SYSTEMS
14
CUSTOMER SPOTLIGHT:
OHIO STATE TROOPERS
16 PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT:
16
GILL 7000 SERIES
REPLACEMENT
BATTERY
TRIM TAB OVERHAUL
REQUIREMENT
THE SKYCATCHER
THE DIRECT APPROACH FOR PROPELLER IS
PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE CESSNA
CUSTOMER SERVICE ORGANIZATION.
COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS ARE WELCOMED.
20 ASK THE EXPERTS
PLEASE ADDRESS YOUR COMMENTS TO MITZIE HALL
316-517-4237 [email protected]
EDITOR: TOM RONNAU
316-517-1167 [email protected]
WHAT THIS MEANS TO YOU,
OUR CESSNA CUSTOMERS
Last summer, Cessna welcomed our new CEO, Scott
Ernest. A few short weeks later, we went through a
pretty significant restructuring of our organization
and most importantly, our decision making processes.
Cessna has historically managed through the use of
a functional structure, with organizations structured
around disciplines: manufacturing, engineering,
customer service, marketing, finance, human
resources, etc. In this structure, decision making
typically happened at the top, sometimes resulting in
Cessna being somewhat slow to react both to customer
issues as well as new opportunities.
In the new organization structure, we have created
business units and put business leaders over each of
our products. These business leaders have full responsibility for the financial performance of their respective
products. Don’t mistake this for a finance position. The
business leaders determine the future plans/enhancements for their product (i.e, engineering spending),
they set the production schedule, they establish and
manage customer program reviews, they determine
manufacturing volumes and ensure the product is
designed for manufacturability and reliability. They
have the big picture view and are responsible for
making all the day to day decisions regarding their
products to increase Cessna’s velocity.
Brad White – McCauley Propeller Systems
Tracy Leopold – Skycatcher
Jeff Umscheid – Single Engine High Wings,
172/182/206
Terry Shriner – Corvalis
Lannie
O’Bannion – Caravan
What does all this mean to you, Cessna’s
customers? I can personally attest to the changes
that are going on at Cessna that, in the long run,
should be significant for our customers. The
propeller side of our business is getting the
attention at Cessna that it deserves. We have
resources dedicated to improving our products,
R&D dollars set aside for product development, a
propeller-specific marketing strategy and a sales
team that is ready to sell some airplanes. Our team
is focused on understanding what our customers
want from us and then delivering on it. We are ready
to bring some excitement back into the propeller
business. This excitement will start the last week
of March as we have our team located around the
world at the Sun ‘n Fun, ABACE and FIDAE air shows
to bring some new offerings to our customers.
Wherever you are in the world, we invite you to come
see us and participate in this excitement. If you can’t
be there in person, you can follow us on facebook
and twitter.
I hope you enjoy this issue of the Direct Approach
Propeller. I look forward to meeting as many of you
as possible in the near future. In the mean time,
happy flying!
Jodi
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1
www.cessna.com
CUSTOMER
SPOTLIGHT
Ohio State Troopers - USE CESSNAS TO PATROL HIGHWAYS
“We don’t need a low wing that
we can’t see past. We have a
long history with Cessna. It’s a
proven product, and it works
well for the mission we
do,” says Boggs, who is a
commercial pilot with
instrument ratings for single
engine and rotorcraft.
If you’re tailgating,
making illegal lane
changes, putting pedal
to metal and generally
being a menace to
yourself and others on
the roads of Ohio, you
should know that the
law could be watching
over you and that you’ll
never see them coming.
And that’s exactly the point of
the work done by the 15 pilots
of the Ohio State Patrol’s
Aviation Unit based at Ohio
State University Airport in
Columbus. A major part of their
mission, like that of their fellow
troopers on the ground, is
traffic enforcement, and they
use a fleet of 11 Cessna 182s,
two Cessna 172s, a Grand
Caravan and two helicopters
to carry it out.
“The Cessnas are our
enforcement aircraft, our
Crown Vics in the sky,” says
Staff Lt. Randy Boggs, the
section’s commander, one
of its pilots and an 18-year
veteran of the unit. “It’s
gratifying to know that what
we’re doing here supports the
troopers on the ground. You
know that what we’re doing
saves people’s lives. The more
we’re out there the more we’re
reducing the fatality rate.”
TEAMING UP FOR SAFETY
On a typical day, five or six of
the unit’s Cessna propeller
Cessna 182 operated by Ohio State Patrol
aircraft are aloft, working
with troopers in cars below.
On busy holidays like Labor
Day, Memorial Day and
Independence Day – when
roads jam and become
more dangerous – the goal is to
get all 13 patrol aircraft up.
“We consider ourselves a force
multiplier,” Boggs says. “We can
be very productive when we have
support on the ground.”
Stopwatches in hand, the pilots
measure how long a motorist
takes to travel between marked
quarter-mile-long sections.
Usually drivers are singled out
because they are too close to the
next vehicle or are going much
faster than surrounding traffic.
The pilots, who all patrolled on
the ground before taking to the
sky, quickly calculate the speed
and notify a ground unit. From
a couple thousand feet up, car
models aren’t discernible. So a
Chevy Suburban becomes “black
SUV,” a BMW becomes “silver
car.” The trooper will pull over
the offender’s vehicle, and the
pilot of the “Crown Vic in the sky”
will confirm that the vehicle is the
right one and make sure the stop
proceeds safely before resuming
patrol.
It involves an element of surprise,
of course, but the goal is safer
roads not speed traps, Boggs
says. “We don’t nitpick. We tend
to focus on the more aggressive
violations, the higher speeds and
the following too close that
typically lead to accidents.”
PERFECT FOR BEING ON PATROL
In addition to the time-tested
reliability of the Cessna 182 and
172 aircraft, the planes have a
key feature particularly suited for
law officers watching from above:
their high-wing design.
Other than radios for law
enforcement communications,
the patrolling Cessnas carry no
special equipment except
LoJack detection units aboard
two aircraft. The detectors
allow tracking of stolen vehicles
and other equipment carrying
the anti-theft transmitters.
“We tell them where to go, then
the ground officers can zero in
on it,” Boggs says.
2
To qualify for the unit, a state
trooper must have a pilot’s
license with an instrument rating. Some became interested
in joining the unit after serving
elsewhere with the patrol. Others
knew before joining the patrol
that they wanted to eventually
move to the Aviation Section.
Boggs is one of the latter; he
comes from a family of pilots and
earned his pilot’s license at OSU
Airport while in college.
No matter their level of
experience when joining, pilots
go through extensive training
“We are a leader in the
nation when it comes
to traffic enforcement,”
Boggs says. “We have
had a lot of other
agencies come in and
say, ‘How do you do it?’ ”
MISSIONS THAT ARE SPECIAL
Eighty percent of the unit’s work
involves traffic enforcement, but
that’s not its only mission.
While routinely patrolling and
traveling to and from their
assigned areas across the state,
pilots in the 13 Cessnas – 11
stationed in Columbus, two in
northern Ohio – watch for
marijuana.
Cessna has been a
part of the Aviation
Section for decades...
...and its fleet now consists
entirely of planes built after
Cessna resumed single-engine
production in the mid-1990s.
Most of its maintenance is done
at its hangar at OSU Airport
by state employees who also
service aircraft for two other
departments. Back in 1996, the
FAA recognized the section for
PLE A S E S E E N E X T PAG E
page
156,000 hours of safe fixed-wing
operations – and the unit hasn’t
had an accident in the thousands
and thousands of hours since.
page
3
that involves one or two weeks
with a flight instructor, two or
three months flying with a
training officer and checks at
various stages. With the size
of the Aviation Section and its
approach, visitors come from
across the country to check it
out.
“Growers will go into a corn field
and clean out a spot to plant
some plants,” Boggs says. “Those
P L E A SE SE E N E X T PAG E
Several Models Affected
patterns they create stick out
like a sore thumb. We call them
holes in the corn. It looks very
geometric.” The pilot notifies
local law enforcement and then
guides officers to the “holes.”
The unit’s 2006 Grand Caravan
was bought to give it a highflying surveillance platform.
The plane’s special camera
provides pictures – which can
stream to the ground – from up
to 7,000 to 8,000 feet. The
Caravan has been used for
more extensive marijuana
investigations, such as in
southern Ohio where old mining
areas are used for large-scale
growing. In another case, “We
helped our vehicle theft unit
work a theft ring in northern
Ohio where they were stealing
Corvettes left and right.” As a
law enforcement tool, Boggs
says, the Caravan is ideal for
any time “we don’t want them
to know we’re up there.”
Transporting commanders,
photographers, crime lab staff
and other patrol staff to crime
scenes and other locations
is another service of the unit
provides, particularly with its
two Eurocopter AStars. All of its
aircraft, fixed and rotor wing,
assist other law enforcement
agencies when needed,
to locate fleeing
suspects, to document crime
scenes and to take aerial
photos – basically anything
they can do to help.
The Aviation Section also
searches for missing persons
and those in critical need of
assistance, when the call goes
out for help. Boggs recalls
when one of its helicopters
helped locate a young child who
had wandered into a cornfield.
In another instance, a badly
injured and bleeding driver
walked away from his wrecked
car. A pilot spotted him on a
golf course a couple hundred
yards away.
“It’s gratifying to realize that what you did today probably
saved somebody’s life. The troopers on the ground have
that same feeling. You want to make a difference.”
Staff Lt. Randy Boggs
page
4
Cessna Issues Mandatory Bulletins
ELEVATOR CONTROL SYSTEMS
Cessna published Service Bulletins SEB12-27-01
and MEB12-27-01 to address an issue which was
reported through the Cessna Condition Reporting
system. A Cessna 182S experienced interference with
its elevator control system (in the neutral position).
The airplane subsequently landed without incident.
Upon investigation, a technician found the attach
screw for the control column glide had come loose,
jammed under the glide, and interfered with control
of the elevator.
Cessna’s investigation of other airplanes having
similar designs, revealed control column glide
screws with varying degrees of security. To eliminate
the possibility of these screws loosening in-service,
and thereby preventing a reoccurrence of the
elevator control interference, all affected airplanes
will be required to replace the screws and install
safety wire at the next scheduled inspection.
PDF copies of these bulletins are available behind the
Customer Access link at: https://support.cessna.com/
custsupt/csupport/newlogin.jsp.
page
5
SHAKE OFF THE SHIMMIES – WITH LORD DAMPERS.
Takeoffs and landings – they’re all smooth sailing for Cessnas equipped
with LORD Shimmy Dampers.
LORD brings a new technical approach to fighting shimmies.
The result is dampers that are leak free, service free –
and best of all, shimmy free.
For more information or to order,
please call your Cessna Authorized Service Facility.
To locate the one nearest you,
call 866-777-6150 or 316-261-8063 (international).
Part #
Application
SE1051-2
Approved replacement for Cessna #0442512-1
and Cessna #0542119-1
150G-M, A150K-M, 152, A152, F150G-H, F150J-M, FA150K-L,
FRA150L-M,172 (46433+) 172Q, 172R, 172S, P172D, R172K, F172D-P,
FR172E-K,175-175C (55896-57119), 182B-182D (51557-53598)
SE1051-3
Approved replacement for Cessna #0442512-2
and Cessna #0542119-2
150,150A-F
SE1068-5
Approved replacement for Cessna #0743624-1
182K-N,182P-T, T182T
SE1069-3
Approved replacement for Cessna #0743624-2
206H, P206B-E, T206H, TU206B-G, U206B-G, 207, 207A,
T207, T207A, 210G-H, 210J-N
SE1070-7
Approved replacement for Lord #SE-1070-4 & -6
208, 208A, 208B
SE1076-1
Approved alternate for Beech #35-825145,
35-825145-2, 35-825145-6
58P, 58TC, 35-33, 35-A33, 35-C33A, E33C, F33, F33A, F33C, G33, H35,
J35, K35, M35, N35, P35, S35, V35, V35A-B, 36, A36, A36TC, B36TC, 95-55,
95-A55, 95-B55, 95-C55, 95-C55A, G58, D55, D55A, E55, 58, 35, A-G35
SE1088-1
Approved alternate for Cessna #1743020-3
177, 177A, 177B
SE1 1090-1
Approved alternate for Cessna #0842410-2
310, 310B-D, 310F-L, 310N, 310P-R, T310P-R, 320, 320A –F, 335, 340,
340A, 401, 401A-B, 402, 402A-C, 404, 406, 411, 411A, 414, 414A, 421,
421A-C, 425, 441
Click here for a quote.
page
6
McCAULEY CREATES
A COMPOSITE PROP
The first composite propeller product manufactured by McCauley
Propeller Systems is the Model 1L100 fixed pitch propeller, and is built in
Columbus, Georgia, at McCauley’s manufacturing and assembly facility.
The all-composite two-blade fixed-pitch propeller is
designed for the O-200D Continental engine powering
the Cessna 162 Skycatcher.
The propeller is a single piece composite design with
unidirectional carbon fibers running from tip to tip. The
outer surface incorporates layers of fiberglass cloth
which allows for reparability. A durable nickel leading
edge guard is bonded to the blades and the assembly is
finished with a coat of polyurethane paint. The design
yields an incredibly strong and durable propeller that is
5-foot-6-inches in length and weighs just 9.5 pounds, 13.5
pounds less than the comparable aluminum propeller.
Preflight and maintenance for the composite
prop is similar to its’ metal cousins
Before each flight, the leading edge guards and blades
should be inspected for any damage. If nicks, gouges, or
scrapes are present in the painted areas, reference the
MPC28 Owner/Operator CD provided with the
propeller for disposition.
Propeller mounting bolts should
be checked for proper torque
annually or every 100 hours of
operation. McCauley SB137AE
defines the overhaul frequency
as 72 calendar months or 2,000
hours, whichever comes first.
The 1L100 is covered by the
McCauley standard three
(3) year warranty. Information
on this and other McCauley
products can be found at
www.mccauley.textron.com.
The McCauley Product Support
group also provides technical
support for all McCauley
products, and can be reached
at [email protected]
textron.com or 800-621-7767.
page
7
www.cessna.com
product spotlight
Skycatcher: thrifty enough for training,
‘pilot’ enough for veteran flyers
Watson, whose planes are used
for flight training and recreational rental alike, said they
succeeded, “It’s a pilot’s
airplane. It’s got a stick
control. The visibility is just
great; the entire door is a
window and the strut is not
blocking your view. It’s very
powerful for the weight.”
The Cessna 162 is hitting
its marks: an economical
aircraft that lets beginners get into aviation but
has performance that
makes pilots new and
experienced alike want to
fly the Skycatcher.
Glenn Watson works in network
engineering for Dell Computer
in Round Rock, Texas, and grew
up around aviation. His dad was
a commercial pilot and Watson
himself earned his singleengine private pilot’s license
about a decade ago and shares
ownership in a Cessna 172
based at Georgetown Municipal
Airport.
Computers provide Watson a
living, but aviation tugs at him.
He started an aviation
photography business, Mach
Point One Aviation Media, to
fuel that interest and he keeps
looking to make a career out of
aircraft. The economical
Skycatcher provided an
attractive avenue driven by
cold, hard business facts.
“It was strictly a numbers thing.
It was direct operating cost,”
Watson said of choosing 162s
– he now owns three –leasing
them to central Texas flight
schools. “I wanted to buy them
and put them into service.”
Although he crunched the
numbers to choose a Skycatcher, the planes fueled Watson’s flying passion once
he took the controls.
All photos courtesy of Glenn Watson/Mach Point One Aviation Media.
Glenn Watson’s Skycatcher fleet, shot from his Cessna 172. His aviation photo business,
Mach Point One Aviation Media, is named from the speed of the Skycatcher.
EQUIPPED WITH THE LATEST
Cessna designers and engineers
set out to design just such a competitive and “awesome” aircraft
after the creation of the lightsport aircraft category in 2005.
Glenn Watson, at the Fredericksburg Hangar
Dance; first stop after delivery of third
Skycatcher.
“It’s an awesome airplane and
people who fly it agree,” he said.
“I have a pretty good rental
following at Georgetown. It’s
new and competes well against
older planes that don’t have a
glass panel.”
They had tough parameters to
work within when the Skycatcher
program launched in 2006: less
than 1,320 lbs. gross weight, two
passengers, single engine, fixed
propeller, fixed landing gear and
a top airspeed of 120 knots. The
trick was to squeeze in maximum
performance and features along
with an entry-level price, while
crafting an aircraft proud to carry
the Cessna name.
Because it is factory built, the
162 is an SLSA (special
light-sport aircraft), meaning
it can be used for rentals and
training. Powered by a 100-hp
Continental O-200D engine that
provides good climbing power,
the Skycatcher comes with
Garmin G300 glass panel
avionics that have a single
electronic split-screen primary
flight display and a multifunction display. The G300 is a
real selling point, Watson said.
“The glass cockpit is huge,”
said Tracy Leopold, Cessna
Skycatcher business leader.
“When you fly the Skycatcher,
it has weather and it has
runways. It has everything a
business jet would have in this
little package. It’s as high tech
as anything out there.”
ties doubled to two years and
2,000 hours. A McCauley composite propeller was added. The
multifunction display and
intercom became standard
equipment. “Our customers
said those were the features
they wanted,” Leopold said.
DURABLE, WELL-TESTED AND
READY TO TRAIN
With more than two years of
deliveries complete, the Skycatcher is reaching milestones.
“We’ve gone through our
first 10,000-hour test cycle and
haven’t found anything
significant,” Leopold said. The
fatigue test article has completed
the equivalent of one life time
and will continue well beyond
the expect usage in the field. The
fatigue article helps Cessna
provide a robust product to
market.
Early in the design process,
Cessna chose to test beyond
the requirements. It put the
Skycatcher through extra flight
and structural testing. “The
airframe is tested to Part 23
standards, including the main
and nose landing gear. It
can stand up to the rigors of
flight training,” Leopold said.
Skycatcher used a full floating structural test article which
was loaded similar to a jet under
development at Cessna. Cessna
performed main landing gear
and nose landing gear drop tests
to ensure a robust design.
During the flight test program
Skycatcher completed over
400 flights while addressing
compliance test conditions.
In addition to the Cessna
manufacturing legacy, pilots-tobe can take advantage of the
company’s well-established
P L E A SE SE E N E X T PAG E
It is built in China by Shenyang
Aircraft Corporation, a plane
maker for nearly six decades,
then disassembled and shipped
to Kansas. After arriving at
Cessna’s Independence facility,
it is reassembled.
As production ramped up,
Cessna fine-tuned the plane’s
standard equipment package
for 2012 models. The engine,
airframe and avionics warran-
Glenn Watson’s first Skycatcher on the way
home from delivery in Wichita.
P L E A S E S E E N E X T PAG E
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8
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9
www.cessna.com
Glenn Watson’s three Skycatchers lined up for a formation photo
shoot in Waco, TX. Watson leases the 162 to flight training centers
in central Texas with his company, Mach Point One Aviation.
training online and at Cessna
Pilot Centers.
“You can use the online
curriculum on the go.” Leopold
said, adding that the system
allows instructors to individualize
training. “We have the curriculum
that goes along with either the
sport or the private license.
It allows the instructor to know
exactly where the student is in
the training and they can tailor
the training around the student.
It is proven that if you start and
finish at a Cessna Pilot Center it
takes less time.”
THRIFTY ON SEVERAL LEVELS
The Skycatcher requires just
a sport pilot’s license and that
license requires fewer hours of
flight training. That, of course,
means training and aircraft
rental can cost less.
Leopold said Cessna put
time-tested components –
the Continental engine, for
example – into the Skycatcher in
an effort to keep ongoing costs
down for pilots and trainers.
“The cost of maintenance goes
directly to the bottom line,
whether for a flight school or
individual owner. The engine is
tried and true. We tried to go
with known entities,” she said.
All of Watson’s Skycatchers are
used for flight training. Two of
the three are at Cessna Pilot
Centers: at Aurora Aviation at
McGregor Airport near Waco
and at Stinson Flight Training
Center near San Antonio, where
the aircraft is supporting an
aviation program at Texas
Lutheran College.
A student pilot can save thousands
training with a Skycatcher, Leopold
said.
“There’s usually a $25 to $30 an
hour difference,” Watson said of
training and rental. “And the airplane is cheaper to operate, too.”
“The Skycatcher offers opportunity
for the flight school. They can put
people in this airplane and make
money,” Leopold said.
The Skycatcher offered Watson a
reasonable entrance into the business
and he hopes his leaseback fleet will
keep growing. He’s found that
acceptance of the Skycatcher happens,
like it did for him, when pilots give it
a chance. “Sometimes they’ll say, ‘I’m
way too much of a pilot for that.’ As
soon as you get them into the airplane,
that all goes away.”
Leopold sees the Skycatcher’s
economy and flight characteristics
satisfying multiple audiences. “It’s
robust enough for a flight school but
also for the entry-level owner. It’s a
great weekend aircraft for pancake
fly-ins, for air shows, for the $100
hamburger – maybe, with the
Skycatcher, that’s just a $50
hamburger.”
SKYCATCHER BY THE NUMBERS
Price $149,900
Single-pilot certifiedYes
Maximum cruise speed
118 ktas (219 km/h)
Certified ceiling 14,625 ft (4,458 m)
Takeoff distance
1,138 ft (347 m)
Landing distance
1,369 ft (418 m)
Rate of climb at sea level
880 fpm (268.2 mpm)
Range440 nm
Weight1,324 lb (599 kg)
Usable fuel capacity
24 gal
Typically equipped empty weight
843 lb (378 kg)
Useful Load
481 lb (218.1 kg)
Exterior height
7 ft 4 in (2.24 m)
Length
22 ft 1 in (6.73 m)
Wingspan
30 ft (9.14 m)
Cabin: Height
47 in (1.19 m)
Width43.6 in (1.11 m)
Length
7 ft 7 in (2.32 m)
Baggage capacity
22 cubic ft (0.6 cubic m)
Get information or online quotes
PL E A S E S E E N E X T PAG E
A COMPARISON OF PILOT CERTIFICATES*
Requirements & Privileges
SportPrivate
FAA Medical Certificate
No (U.S. Driver’s License and Self-Certification)
Yes
Unlimited (May Require Type Rating)
Aircraft Size Limitations
1,320 lb. (Max. Gross Weight Two Seats Max.)
Fly Aircraft with Retractable Gear
NoYes
Carry More than One Passenger
NoYes
20 Hours40 Hours
FAA Minimum Flight Training Time*
33 Hours60 Hours
Avg. Real-World Flight Training Time*
Fly in Class B, C, or D Airspace
With Additional Flight Instruction Only
Yes
Night FlyingNoYes
Fly Outside U.S. AirspaceNoYes
Fly w/ Less than 3 Miles Visibility
No
Yes (In Uncontrolled Airspace)
Sightseeing FlightsNoYes
It’s easy to get Cessna Authorized Service Center information now
Need additional information or a quote?
Let us know what it is, and we’ll immediately go to work and quickly contact you.
It’s your connection to the quickest and best service in the business.
(Benefitting Charity or Community)
Click here now.
*Under Part 61
page
10
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11
www.cessna.com
CESSNA “SkyKat”
WELL WORTH
THE WAIT!
By Helen R. Taylor
NOTE: The following article
was written by a new
Skycatcher owner. When
asked if she would be
interested in sharing her
experience with Cessna
and flying the new 162, she
responded with enthusiasm
that only someone that has
taken the opportunity to
learn to fly can appreciate.
Please read, enjoy and share
with others, Helen Taylor’s
story about her “SkyKat.”
It was a little over three years
ago when our Cessna 172 was
destroyed. We quickly decided
to acquire the new Cessna 162
“Skycatcher” as a replacement.
Patiently we waited while
Cessna finalized the design,
completed engine selection,
determined exterior colors,
modified the seat and had
Garmin develop the avionics.
With only six months left to
reinvest the insurance
proceeds, or pay the recaptured capital gains tax, we were
informed a Skycatcher was
finally available to us by Eric
Neeb, of Propel Aircraft Sales in
Colorado, and we were invited
to take delivery. Eric did a great
job on behalf of Cessna, and
the transaction went smoothly.
It was well worth the wait, as
Cessna has done a terrific job
on this aircraft.
12
page
Most importantly, this is one
fun and happy airplane to fly!
Around our hangar, we call this
Model 162 the “SkyKat” to
reflect the appealing new look
and quick response characteristics. Our SkyKat leaps off the
runway, and claws toward the
sky at an unbelievably fast rate
of climb of over 600 fpm at our
higher altitude (880 fpm at sea
level). She is nimble and quick
to respond to commands from
the stick, which is easy to adjust
to from the 172 yoke. In fact, it’s
more relaxing to use this stick,
as my arm rests comfortably on
the door support. It slides sideto-side and forward-to-back in a
controlled manner, and is attached to the front panel. There’s
no tripping over this stick as you
get in or out of the aircraft,
unlike some of the other Light
Sport Aircraft we had been
encouraged to consider, in the
event Cessna was unable to deliver in our limited time-frame.
Cessna has really done an outstanding job on this LSA. The
curved lines on the cowling portray
the sleek performance visually.
Cessna chose the seasoned
Continental O-200-D engine that
delivers 100 BHP — just the right
amount of power. This solid engine
enables our SkyKat to cruise at
over 100 kts, which is comparable
to what our 172 could do at our
altitude. The final color scheme
was more conservative, with a solid
white base with black and grey
electrified stripes, which is more
appealing to us. Cessna’s
Skycatcher reassembly center,
installed the optional burgundy
accent stripes for a little panache.
We ended up changing the
registration number, since our new
airplane was delivered with a fourdigit one that we all stumbled over
every time we talked to the tower,
and we matched it to the burgundy
for some added spice to the color
scheme. It was fun decorating this
airplane — a first for me!
Keep in mind that this is not a
down-sized 172 in any way, nor is
it an up-size from the classic 152.
This is a wonderful new aircraft
from Cessna, with lots of interior
side-to-side space for two people
to sit very comfortably. To me,
flying the SkyKat is like driving
a nimble sports car. It’s the light
touch that keeps me smiling and
enjoying the flight all the way.
my eyes moving outside to watch
for traffic.
Wait until you see the avionics
— they are simply amazing. We
chose the MFD (multi-function
display) in addition to the
standard PFD (primary flight
display) available on the Garmin
G300 avionics. With two beautiful
screens to monitor during flight,
and a toggle stick that simplifies
and speeds up the on-screen
selection process, the big
challenge for me was to stop
looking at the screens and keep
Did I mention the incredible
view and ease of access to the
interior? With the struts behind
the door, there’s no more banging into the strut since it’s now
completely out of the way, and the
door swings up under the wing.
Thanks Cessna — what a great
idea. Since the nose of the SkyKat
dips slightly down during flight,
panoramic visibility is wide open
and incredible!
PL E A S E S E E N E X T PAG E
13
page
The castering nose landing gear
takes a little getting used to, but
once the adjustment is made it’s
like a comfortable pair of shoes.
The seats don’t adjust, which felt
a bit awkward at first, but the
rudder pedals do, and once
adjusted, it was fine.
The G300 has an electronic weight
and balance performed during
pre-flight to verify proper loads.
If the aircraft is beyond maximum
load, the weight and balance
envelope diagram turns red and
adjustments must be made
prior to take off. This is another
fabulous safety feature of
the G300.
This is our third Cessna airplane
and we are very proud to be a
member of the Cessna family.
Thanks again Cessna, for taking
the time to design this aircraft
so incredibly well, and for
taking such great care of us as
your customer.
We purchased this aircraft for
our local flight school, Leading
Edge Aviation. They’ve been
great to work with, and students
really like the SkyKat, especially
the avionics. One student in
particular had just about given up
on learning to fly and just
couldn’t get the “feel” of it.
When he was given a lesson in
the SkyKat, he became excited
again and was determined to
finish his private license. He said
he could “fly this airplane.” The
Cessna 162 is the right
airplane for the flight school
environment, and we’re excited
for the future and are ready for
spring flying weather to arrive.
Improved Battery
Gill LT
Replacement Battery Available
Cessna Gifts
Nothing Says Style
Like a Gift From the Cessna Gift Shop
see the numerous items
available at the
online Cessna store
www.cessnagiftshop.com
Clothing, aircraft models, pilot
and cabin supplies, hats, sunglasses, watches, luggage, coffee
mugs, golf bags and many other
items perfect for the Cessna
enthusiast in your life – yourself
included – are available at the
shop. Here’s a closer look at a
few of our offerings.
Cessna Service Parts and Programs
is offering a new improved Gill
7000 Series battery to replace the
Gill G-6381ES sealed lead-acid
battery, which is being phased out.
Gill’s new 7638-44 LT Battery
The newest LT is TSO-authorized and FAA
PMA-approved for installation in the Cessna
Caravans.
The newly available battery has an improved
shelf life of 24 months of inspection-free
storage, when stored at room temperatures
between 40 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. In
addition, it comes with 24-month warranty
from date of installation. And, at 85
pounds, it is three pounds lighter than
its predecessor battery.
and once the engine has started the battery
recovers to full charge twice as fast,” says
Teledyne Battery Products Sales Manager,
Tom Jones.
Teledyne Battery Products, in Redlands
California, is the manufacturer of Gill aircraft
batteries. The Gill line of lead acid batteries is
widely recognized as a premier power source for
general aviation. The company has developed a
number of premium aviation batteries for many
general aviation aircraft.
Dependable, Durable and Reliable
“Examples of comments we hear from
current users of this battery is that the
starts are faster, the engine spools up a lot
quicker, they are not seeing hot starts,
14
page
For more information or to order,
please call your Cessna Authorized Service
Facility. To locate the one nearest you, call
866-777-6150 or 316-261-8063 (international).
CUSTOMIZE IT! In addition to clothing
and other goods already carrying
Cessna logos and model-specific
artwork – from the Skycatcher to
the Citation X – many other
items can be customized with
the logo of your choice.
A
Cessna Gift Shop
316-517-GIFT (4438)
www.cessnagiftshop.com
B
A. Nike hats:
Bearing the stylish swoosh, these
two-toned lightweight golf hats
come in a variety of colors.
B. Kanata Alpaca Home Throw:
Like many of the store’s wares,
this cozy blanket is great at
home, in the car or in your
high-flying Cessna.
C
C. “Legend of Cessna”:
Telling the nearly century-long
tale of Cessna Aircraft, this
beautiful coffee table book is
loaded with photos and vivid
stories. This third edition features
a foreword by actor and aviation
enthusiast Harrison Ford.
D. BrightLine Pilot Bag:
Standing on its own, this bag has
25 pockets and is tall enough for
charts and a 13 inch laptop.
E. Fairway & Greene
Pureformance 1/4 Zip Fleece:
Made of pima cotton a fastwicking and drying materialit’s perfect alone or layered.
D
E
15
page
TRIM TAB OVERHAUL REQUIREMENT
Not Specifically Defined in Every Cessna Maintenance Manual
Boot
WinCaravan
an Annual!
PREMIER PARTNER PROGRAM The intent of the requirement is to assure that a serviceable
and well maintained actuator is installed on the airplane.
Cessna configured early maintenance manuals in a General Aviation
Manufactures Association (GAMA) format, and later adopted the Airline
Transport Association (ATA) format. Section 2: Ground Handling, Servicing,
Lubrication and Inspection - is where the inspection/overhaul requirement
will be located in the GAMA manuals. In ATA manuals, it is in Chapter 5,
Time Limits/Maintenance Checks. The overhaul requirement of 1,000 hours
or three years, whichever comes first, is the most common across the model
line, although some early manuals contain an inspection and lubrication
requirement at a 100 hour or annual interval and no overhaul requirement.
The overhaul of a trim tab actuator is not specifically defined in every Cessna
maintenance manual. Cessna considers this requirement to be met when
the trim tab actuator is disassembled, cleaned, inspected, worn components
replaced, reassembled with fresh lubrication, and then tested. If a trim tab
actuator has been determined to be beyond economical repair or the
servicing facility does not have the capability to overhaul the actuator, it can
be replaced to meet the three year or 1000 hour overhaul requirement. The
actual overhaul task information is found Section 9 of the GAMA manuals,
and Chapter 27 of the ATA formatted manuals, when it is incorporated.
Skycatcher
MANEUVERING SPEED EXPLAINED Va AND Vo ARE DIFFERENT
Va is Design Maneuvering Speed. This is the speed chosen by the
designer to which control surfaces and control surface structural
attachments are sized. Hence, the remarks: Do not make full or
abrupt control surface movements above this speed in the 162
POH section 2 limitations. This speed does not protect the
airframe from over stressing.
Vo is Maximum Operating Maneuvering Speed. This is the speed
at which the airplane will stall longitudinally, prior to reaching
the maximum structural load factor protecting the airframe from
overstress. This speed varies with the weight of the airplane and
is higher at higher operating weights, since the stall will occur
at a greater speed and the controls will be less effective at the increased weight. Keep in mind that when the
airplane stalls, lift loads are no longer present and the airframe is, for all practical purposes, unloaded. This is
the speed at which the airplane should be flown through turbulent air.
The requirement to provide Va is a ASTM limitation requiring a placard. It appears on the 162 because the ASTM
standards committee adopted the Va as the requirement. Cessna includes Vo in the limitations section of the
POH, along with the placard affixed to the instrument panel, to provide the information necessary for the safe
operation of the airplane.
page
16
Tell Us About Your Cessna
Experience
2011 Grand
Prize Annual
Winner:
Cessna is excited to offer our
customers the Premier Partner
Program again this year. A few changes
have been included to allow seamless
participation, reducing the time it takes
to just five simple questions:
•
•
•
•
•
Anton T. Skoro,
customer of
Troutdale
Aircraft
Services, Inc.,
near Portland,
Oregon.
Were you satisfied?
Will you use us again?
Would you recommend us?
Comments?
May we contact you?
Everyone is a winner through improved
service, a free oil change or annual
inspection. Each quarter Cessna will
award one lucky participant an oil
change at no cost when they bring their
airplane back to their Cessna
Authorized Service Facility. (Your
aircraft does not have to be a Cessna.)
Caravan
The annual inspection winner will be drawn in
January, 2013.
Look for the winners and their pictures in each
quarterly Direct Approach Propeller.
Have your answers ready and visit
www.cessnasurvey.com today.
VHF Com Antenna Reliability Enhancement
G1000 208/208B Caravan operators have reported poor reliability of the
CI268-60 VHF/COM Antenna through the Cessna condition reporting system.
Cessna’s investigation resulted in an enhancement to the antenna
beginning with antenna serial 372480. In addition, the warranty for antenna
serial numbers below 372480 has been extended to six years from the
manufacture date for the remaining units in the field. This is a part only
warranty and does not cover labor or shipping costs. If an antenna in the
affected serial range fails outside of the airframe warranty, please file a
claim for review through a Cessna Authorized Service Facility.
To locate the one nearest you, call 866-777-6150 or 316-261-8063
(international).
17
page
www.cessna.com
CESSNA AND LYCOMING WANT YOU TO GET MORE
OF A GOOD THING.
The Lycoming Extended Warranty
Program for Cessna - one of the best
warranties in aviation.
Now available in one, two, or three year
extensions, the program offers the same
coverage – including full parts and labor –
as the original Lycoming engine warranty.
(The only coverage exception is for accessories.)
The Lycoming extension is available to all
Cessna aircraft now covered by the original
two-year warranty. For more information or to order,please call your
Cessna Authorized Service Facility,
or 866-777-6150 or 316-261-8063 (international).
Application
172R/S IO-360-L2A
182T IO-540-AB1A5
T182T TIO-540-AK1A
206H IO-540-AC1A5
T206H TIO-540-AJ1A
** Pricing subject to change
SCAN WITH YOUR SMART PHONE
Part Number
Retail Price**
Part Number
Retail Price**
Part Number
Retail Price**
Part Number
Retail Price**
Part Number
Retail Price**
1 Year
2 Year
3 Year
LXW172-1
$1,237.00
LXW182-1
$1,379.00
LXW182T-1
$2,053.00
LXW206-1
$1,788.00
LXW206T-1
$2,557.00
LXW172-2
$2,622.00
LXW182-2
$2,924.00
LXW182T-2
$4,352.00
LXW206-2
$3,790.00
LXW206T-2
$5,420.00
LXW172-3
$4,215.00
LXW182-3
$4,701.00
LXW182T-3
$6,996.00
LXW206-3
$6,092.00
LXW206T-3
$8,713.00
Skycatcher
Mandatory Bulletin Publishes Secondary Door Latch
Cessna has completed an
extensive study of the ergonomics
involved with operation of the 162
cabin doors. The initial results of
this study, Mandatory Service
Bulletin SB11-52-01 Cabin door
secondary latch installation,
provide an added margin of latch
integrity to assure the door latch
is properly engaged on the latch
striker. The secondary latch will
not travel the full 90 degrees to
the lower stop if the forward latch
is not properly engaged.
Use of this modification requires
a second action on the part of the
pilot when assuring the doors are
closed and latched prior to takeoff.
This step is very important and has
been included in Revision 4 of the
Pilots Operating Handbook (POH)
as well as Revision 4 of the abbreviated check list. A pdf copy is
available at https://support.cessna.com/docs/custsupt/cessnasupport/documents/162PHUS.pdf.
Please make sure you have the
Skycatcher
19
Cessna has determined that the
difficulty experienced with the
operation of the door latch has
its origin in the top hinged door
design, the flexibility of the
latch, and the door structure. The
secondary latch will assure that
the primary latch is properly
engaged, and maintain the closed
condition of the door, should the
primary latch be opened inadvertently in-flight. Cessna will cover
the costs involved with repair of
those doors which have opened
during operation of the airplane.
Please contact a Cessna
authorized service facility for
details, or: cessnasupport.com
for a copy of SB11-52-01 and a
link to the Cessna YouTube
channel, where a video on door
operation is available.
LATCHED
OPEN
Anti-Collision Lights
For Cessna’s Skycatcher, Whelen®
Engineering Company makes the
LED position/anti-collision/tail
light assemblies at each wing tip.
These are comprised of light
emitting diode arrays: three
emitters are used for the position
light, and three are used for the tail
light. The anti-collision light is
designed with 26 LED’s, and flash
at a rate of approximately 45 cycles
per minute. The intensity of the
light and the flash rate of the
anti-collision array prevent
inspection for failed elements,
so Built-In-Test (BIT) circuitry is
employed to assure proper
operation.
page
latest version of the POH and that
the doors are properly closed.
Close, Latch and Lean should be
part of everyone’s before takeoff
check.
This BIT circuitry measures the
power used during the on cycle,
and will automatically shut off
the strobe function after 9 or 10
flashes if a failure is detected.
This same functionality will turn
off the strobes if the system is
operated with low voltage, less
than 11.3 volts, on the buss.
Most operators will not notice
this issue once the engine is
started since the alternator will
be supporting the buss voltage
and charging the battery. It is
possible, however, for the engine
throttle to be reduced to a low
idle condition and the voltage to
drop below the spec on a cold
day. If this occurs, cycling the strobe
switch to OFF and then back to ON
with the engine above idle RPM will
reset the BIT circuitry, and return
the anti-collision function of the
position lights.
www.cessna.com
ask THE EXPERTS
ANSWERS
EXPERTS FROM THE CESSNA SUPPORT TEAM
SHARE ADVICE AND SHED LIGHT
Question: Flap Track Wear
What are the wear limits for the wing flap tracks on most Cessna Single
Engine aircraft?
Answer
The maximum inside vertical slot wear is 0.6035 inch. The track side wear must not exceed 10% of the
total width of the track. Most of the flap tracks on Cessna Single Engine aircraft measure 0.250 inch
wide from the factory, which means the side wear on the track must not exceed 0.025 inch in depth.
FLAP TRACK ASSEMBLY
(REFERENCE)
FLAP TRACK ASSEMBLY
(REFERENCE)
MAXIMUM 0.6035 INCH
SLOT WEAR - APPLIES TO
BOTH SLOTS
MINIMUM THICKNESS 0.225 INCH
DUE TO WEAR ON SIDE OF TRACK
REAR SPAR
VIEW LOOKING AT SIDE OF FLAP TRACK
VIEW LOOKING DOWN ON FLAP TRACK
How To
submit comments and
ask THE EXPERTS
THE DIRECT APPROACH IS EMAILED QUARTERLY BY THE CESSNA CUSTOMER SERVICE ORGANIZATION.
ASK THE EXPERTS AT:
[email protected]
And put Ask An Expert in the subject line
Cessna hopes to make this a regular feature of this newsletter, but needs help to make it worthy. So if a question has
been nagging or you just thought of something that others might be interested in, please Ask An Expert. Cessna experts
will do their best to answer all submissions. If the responses do not appear here, an answer will be sent by email.
THANKS for taking time to read our publication!
We appreciate your readership and will do our best to continue to present you with the
latest piston related news, products & happenings throughout the year.
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