10-24-1889 - Village of Pinckney

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Transcription

10-24-1889 - Village of Pinckney
T~>
Vol. 7.
Pinckney, Livingston Co., Mich, Thursday, October 2 4 , 1 8 8 9 ,
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COKKECTEDWEEKLY LY THOMAS BEAD.
-
Michigan.
Wheat, No. 1 white
No. 2 red..."
No. I rye,
Oats
orn
arley,
Beans
„.
Dried Apples
Potatoes
Butter,
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g
^•Village Directory.*
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Dr. £ . L. Avery of Stockbridge, h a s
A l b e r t D o d g e of F o w l e r v i l l e , h a s
decided to visit this place on F r i d a y a g a i n been elected Secretary of t h e
of e a c h w e e k for t h e p u r p o s e of d o i n g G o o d T e m p l a r s of M i c h i g a n .
dental w o r k of all kinds.
H i s office
W . J. Hicks a n d wife of Unadilla,
w i l l be w i t h Dr. S h a w , over the P i n c k w a s t h e guest of Mrs. Hick's mother,
ney Exchange bank.
Mrs. J n o . J a c k s o n , o v e r S u n d a y .
On Friday night h u t wbUe
K. C. C o b b , G e o . C o l l i n a , W i n . a n d
Jno. Chambers were spearing on Porta g e L a k e t h e y ca'ptnrdd a p i c k e r e l t h a t
weighed 2 3 } pounds.
This ttory m a y
s e e m r a t h e r s c a l e y , bxrt i t * t i m e n e v e r theless.
% ?3
73
; BEMETT, EDITOR & PUBLISHER.
87
i
20® *)
86
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY AT
FO ft 1.00
Account*.
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J. E . Forbes, w h o h a s been in D e —».
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D a v i d Roberts a n d family left f o r
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it on business for t h r e e w e e k s past,
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ir h o m e a t FatilktdO, Dakota, y e s IB o n c e .
Subscription Price Strictly in Advance:
W e n e e d e v e r y $ t h a t i s d u e is a g a i n a t his h o m e i n t h i s v i l l a g e .
terday.
W h i l e w e regret t o have this
*«*•-•
•
1»
'Jk U B ; d o n ' t p u t u s t o t h e t r o u b l e o f
M r . a n d Mrs. J o h n S i g l e r of Leslie, f a m i l y l e a v e this v i c i n i t y t h e D M P A T C *
ONE YEAR
$1-0Q Dressed Chickens
~..ob c o m i n g t o s e e y o u , b u t a t t e n d t o i t
t!X MONTHS
SO Live Chickens
visited their d a u g h t e r , Mrs. G. W . will speak t h e s e n t i m e n t of t h e i r m a n y
Turkeys
1U
THREE MONTHS
• .25
lover Sewl
$3.SCff 8.75
at once.
Yours,
T e e p l e , i n t h i s v i l l a g e first o f t h e w e e k . f r i e n d s i n w i s h i n g t h e m s u c c e t a i l l
reused Pork
%o (10 % 1,:25
l a t e r e d at the Postofnce at Pinckney, Michigan,
GEG,
W . S Y K E S & Co.
Mr. and Mrs. Christian B r a w n left their western h o m e .
Apples...
t .75 ©l.uO
aa second-tlaas matter.
last T u e s d a y m o r n i n g for a w e e k y
E v e r y reader of this paper should
Take Notice!
visit w i t h friends in Detroit a n d Sa- read t h e advertisement* that appear i a
BUSINESS POINTERS.
I w i l l b e a t t h e t o w n hall in t h e
line.
its columns, a n d bear w e l l i n m i n d
All notices under this heading will be charged v i l l a g e of P i n c k n e y e a c h S a t u r d a y
T h e DISPATCH job d e p a r t m e n t
has that it is the live merchant w h o ia
at 5 fonts per line, or 1'ruction thereof, for each a f t e r n o o n , f r o m 1 u n t i l 5 o'clock, d u r and every insertion. Where no time ia specified,
cix-criacsiassi n g t h e m o n t h o f O c t o b e r , t o r e c e i v e e x e c u t e d s o m e f i n e w o r k tor t h e P i n c k - e v e r o n t h e a l e r t f o r b a r g a i n s f o r h i t
all notices will be inserted until ordered oat.
ney Public sehools d u r i n g the past customers, a n d is a n i o n s to inform
t a x e s for t h e v i l l a g e of P i n c k n e y .
BTHODJ8T EPISCOPAL CHURCH.
y o u of tbe fact by advertising them.
week.
FLOYD REASPN, Village Marshal.
R*T. Henry White, paetor. Services every
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bunday «ominjf at 11):3(1, and alternate Sunday
A beautiful mission crucifix h a s b e e n
Mrs. W . 0 . F o o t e o f Algodon-, a n d
*venlngs at 7:00 o'clock. Prayer,meeting Thursi on Carpets.
Charles G o o d w i n of Webster t o w n day evenings. Sunday school at close of morne
r
e
cted in St. Mary's church in r e m e m ship, (formerly of Dexter t o w n s h i p ) her daughter, M r s . Mary Collins of
la?sendee. A. D. Bennett, Suoerintendent.
GEO. W .
SYKES k
Co.
ber
e n c e o f t h e m i s s i o n fidven b y F a t h e r
W a s h t e n a w Co. s a v s :
" 1 c u r e d t h e L a n s i n g , a r e t h e g u e s t s o f I. S . P .
V
a
n
d e r Erden S. J.
The Rev. Father
Y o u can b u y a g o o d s u i t of c l o t h e s worst case of t h r u s h I have ever seen J o h n s o n .
^ONUBB&ATIONAL CHUKCH.
is a n e l o q u e n t s p e a k e r , a n d t h e m i s s i o n ,
,«/ Bar. O, B. Thurston,pastor; service every f o r $ 5 . 0 0 a t F . E . W R I G H T ' S .
w i t h Curlett's T h r u s h Remedy, which
B r i n g y o u r orders for all kinds of w h i c h w a s a g r a n d success, will l o n g
Bunday morning at 10:80, and alternate Hnnday
e v e n i n g «17:83 o'clock. Prayer meeting Thursmade a permanent cure."
S o l d by F . j o b w o r k t o t h e D I S P A T C H office.
W e be r e m e m b e r e d b y t h e p e o p l e o f S t . chool at close of mc
F O R S A L E . — A s i n g l e carriage in
mornday evenings Sunday school
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rk Mary's parish.
lnfteerrice Geo. W. 6: tee. Superintendent.
g o o d r u n n i n g order. W o u l d t r a d e for
and prices.
William Connors of Dexter Towng o o d dry Ulock w o o k .
Iftqure at this
W e wish.to inform the readers o f
T. MARY'S 'JATHOwfc CHURCH.
H o n . U. M . W o o d , of A n d e r s o n , h a s
Bev. "Wm. P. donsldlne, Pastor. Services o f f i c e .
ship, W a s h t e n a w Co. says:
''Thrush
tbe D I S P I T C H that it w i l l be impossibkf
• • e r y third Sunday. Low mass at 8 o'clock,
v e r y n e a r l y a t e t h e entire frog o f m y b e e n a p p o i n t e d b y G o v . L u c e to a t t e n d for u s t o g i v e t h e D e t r o i t F r e e P r e W
high mass with sermon at 10:% a, ni CatecMsm
at
M o n t - a n d T r i b u n e , w i t h t h e D I S P A T C H ' for 1
G e o r g e H. Connors of D e x t e r t o w n - horse's foot a n d I c o u l d n o t g e t a n y the farmer's e o n v e a t i o n
nt 9:01) p. m., vespers and benediction at 7:3li p.m.
The A. O. H. Society of this place, meet every s h i p , W a s h t e n a w C o . s a y s : " I c u r e d
gomery, Ala.
the r e g u l a r price of t h e DISPATCH after'
help for it s e e m i n g l y until I g o t Curthird Surtnay in the Fr. Mathew Hall. The C.
T. A. and B. Society of this place, meet every ray h o r s e o f t h r u s h b v t h e u s e o f C u r - l e t t ' s T h r u s h R e m e d y , w h i c h a f t e r
A s p a n of h o r s e s o w n e d b y W r a . N o v e m b e r first, a s w e w i l l b e u n a b l e *
third Saturday evening in the Kr. Mathew Hall. l e t t ' s T h r u s h R e m e d y w h i c h I h a v e
Rev. VV. P. Oousedine, President.
C
o
b b of n e a r P o r t a g e L a k e , r a n a w a y t o p r o c u r e t h e s e p u b l i c a t i o n s a t r e second application killed the smell
k n o w n o t h e r s »o u s e a n d i t a l w a y s
a n d r e m o v e d t h e l a m e n e s s , c u r i n g i t t h r e e t i m e s w h i l e i n D e x t e r o n T u e s - d u c e d r a t e s a f t e r t h i s d a t e . It w i l l D6
as
produced a.cure."
S o l d bv F. A . S i g to y o u r i n t e r e s t t o t a k e a d v a n t a g e o f
BOCZSTX£Sin a s h o r t t i m e , l e a v i n g a g o o d h e a l - d a y of last w e e k .
ler.
"
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t h i s ofter b e f o r e N o v e m b e r n r s l t h y growing frog which in a short
T h e n e w e n g i n e a t T . G r i m e s & Go's,
OUNG PEOPLES SOCIETY OF CHRIS
T o r tfale R e a s o n a b l y .
time was its natural size,"
F o r s a l e flouring
A l e t t e r f r o m D r . W , B" W d ^ s o f
m i l l s w a s s t a r t e d f o r t h e first
TlAN ENDEAVOR, meete every Monday
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kson, Neb:, formerly of this place,
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•venlng
at
the
Couj;'l
church.
All
interested
in
ng i
Christian work are cordially invited to join. R. C. Ai.'LD, P i n e k n e V , Mich.
s a y s : " E n c l o s e d find $ 1 . 0 0 t o p a y f o r
work very nicely,
Mies Myrtie Finch, President.
the m u c h
welcomed
DISPATCH
ono
Y o u can b u y a g o o d overcoat for
Mrs. V . C. B e n n e t t , w h o h a s b e e n
L o s t . — N e a r l y f o u r w e e k s ago< o n e $ 3 . 5 0 . a t F . E . W R I G H T ' S .
year."
H e also says t h a t he a n d h i s
fTHHE EPWORTH LEAGUE of the M. U. church
visiting her mother a t A n n Arbor for
1 meets on Tuesday efemnna & 7 o'clock, i'n-wi- b l a c k H o l s t e i n h e i f e r c a l f w i l h w h i t e
w i f e a r e w e l l , a n d t h a t h i s b u s i n e s s ia*
Qent, Mm. J. F. Lallue. All arc heHrtily invited to s p o t s , o n e y e a r o l d .
S o l o m o n s a i d , " t h e r e is n o t h i n g s e v e r a l w e e k s , r e t u r n e d t o h e r h o m e m u c h b e t t e r t h a n
was anticipated.
F i n d e r will
•tlcnd.
in this village last T h u r s d a y .
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f M r . a n d .Mrs.please notify K O B ' T T I P L A D Y , P i n c k FIDELITY
LODGE.
NO.
,11,
I.
O.
G.
T.
V . C. B e n n e t t , w h o h a s b e e n a c t i n g W a t t s i n t h i s v i c i n i t y w i l l b e p l e a s e d
never saw a Balsom F u r Pillow. G e t
1
Meets every Wi»(ln«sday niuht in the old n e y iM 1CI1.
as
a d v a n c e airent for F r a n k B e n t l e y ' s t o l e a r n o f t h e i r s u c c e s s .
aaonlc Hair. Visiting members cordially inone with soap, a n d cure your n e u vited
Geo. W. Svki>e, U.'T.
Dressmaking.
s
h
o
w d u r i n g t h e past t e n w e e k s , reralgia, catarrh, colds, l u n g d i s e a s e ,
H O W E L L , Oct, 1 9 . — T h i s a f t e r n o o n a s
turned to this village last Wednesday.
H a v i n g o p e n e d a d r e s s m a k i n g s h o p etc., for 2 5 c e n t s , a t
t
h
e
train from Lansing w a s c o m i n g
1/-NIGUT8 0K MACCABEES.
IV Meetevery Friday evening on or before full in a p i i i l o f (J. N . P l i m p t o n ' s r e s i M
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GEO. W.
S Y K E S & Co.
d o w n tbe grade just west of the depot
ofthn moon at old Masonic Hall. Visiting brutu d e n c e in P i n c k n e y , I a m p r e p a r e d t o
O w e n s , M i c h . , i s v i s i t i n g h i s p a r e n t s it s t r u c k a n d i n s t a n t l y k i l l e d a n d b a d l y
«rt cordiallv invited.
W. A. Carr, Sir Knicht Commander.
do all k i n d s of D r e s s m a k i n g
and
PUBLISHER'S NOTIQE.-yubswribers find- a n d m a n y f r i e n d s i n t h i s v i c i n i t y t h i s m a n g l e d A u g u s t G r o s t i c , a w e a l t h y
H e is w e l l p l e a s e d w i t h h i s f a r m e r o f t h i s t o w n s h i p w h o r e s i d e s
phiin s e w i n g .
( J u t t i n g a n d f i t t i n g a ing a rod X across this notice are thereby notified w e e k .
that their subscription to this paper will expire
l a b o o t one and one-half miles east of
E X T S Z O M - E S S c-A-xaxis.
specialty.
Prices reasonable.
with the nest number. A blue X slsrnillps that s i t u a t i o n .
your time has already expired, and unles.-* arrangehere.
Mr. Grostie had a very
fiae
Mi:s. A N N F I T Z S I M O N S .
D.
P. E w e n is a g a i n c a n v a s s i n g .
ments are made for its continuance the paper will
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nbn discontinued to your address. You are cor- H e i s s e l l i n g " M a r v e l o f N a t i o n s , " a n d
SAAC TELLEK, I'ounty Surveyor. Postofdco
manageable a n d stopped on the track
address, East Cohoctah. Mich.
H e r e a f t e r w e w i l l d o a s t r i c t l y c a s h dially invited to renew.
" S u n s h i n e at H o m e . ' '
T h e y aresplejflfcj
j u s t i n t i m e t o b e s t r u c k by t h e t r a i n .
business
All i n d e b t e d to u s a r e redid books, and M r . E w e n c a n n o t help
Both horses were killed and the w a g o n
ijuesicd to call a n d s e t t l e at once,
We
P. SIOLKK,
but meet with success.
.
PHYSICIAN A N D S U R G E O N .
smashed to pieces. Mr. Grostie leaves/
must haw: what y o u o w e us.
Office next to residence, on Main utreet. TMnrkW h i l e Kit Cobb w a s o u t • h u n t i n g a large family.
RK.YSON it L Y M A N .
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
ney, Michigan. Calls promptly attended to tiny
a r o u n d P o r t a g e L a k e y e s t e r d a y , he s h o t
or night.
Star Dry Good* Store.—Oreat reduction sale.
J n o . S b n t o n o f D e x t e r , s a y s : "I
F. A. Sieler.—Drugs and Medicines.
ANDERSON.
a Gray Ea^le which measured 6 teet
Teeple & Cadwell.—Hardware.
e n r e d a v e r y had e a s e i f t h r u s h w i t h
3 £ i n . from t i p t o t f p . K i t is a g o o d From Onr Correspondent.
(i.
A.Siller.—Furniture.
W. JI :\ /I I'J, .At. I'
Curlett's T h r u s h R e m e d y ; the cure w a s
V. V, Sykes.—Life insurance
\ J s h o t and generally hits w h a t he shoots
F r a n k H o f f w a s i n H o w e l l o n ]ftfonAtti'iiils promptly all professional calls.
Mrs. Ann Fitzaimons.—Dress-making.
Office at renidence on 1'iKidilla S t , third door p e r m a n e n t . " S o l d by F . A . S i g l e r . *
day.
Rob't Tipfady.—Lost notice.
W«etof OonurtiL'ational church.
Geo. W. Sykes A Co.—L»r;il8,
MICHIGAN^
PINCKNEY,
Richard Baker,
w h o has been in
H e n r y P o o r l y of D e x t e r t o w n s h i p ,
L a u r a W i l s o n s p e n t Sutrcfay W i t h '
M
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in
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s e v e r a l of t h e w e s t e r n s t a t e s d u r i n g f r i e n d s i n L y n d o n .
W a s h t e n a w Co. s a v s :
" M y horse was
AMES MAHKEV,
the past s u m m e r , r e t u r n e d to his h o m e
c u r e d of a v a r y b a d c a s e of t h r u s h b y S t a r D r y G o o d s S t o r e .
NOTARY PUBLIC, ATTORNEY
i
n t h i s v i l l a g e o n S a t u r d a y last.
Dick
J. M. M a r b l e w a s a t L a n s i n g on'
And Insurance Ajient. Lejjal papers made out u s i n g C u r l e t t ' s T h r u s h R e m e d v . "
Sold
The DISPATCH and American F a r m e r
OnshoTt notice and reasonable terms. Also at;ent
is very m u c h pleased w i t h t h e w e s t e r n W e d n e s d a y o f l a s t w e e k .
"
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both o n e y e a r for $ 1 0 0 .
for ALLAN LINE of Ocean Steamers. Office on by F . A. S i g l e r .
country.
North side Main SSL. Pincknov, Mich.
Claude and Addie Sigler called o a
C. H . E d w a r d s , d e n t i s t , of S o u t h
Mrs. Estella G r a h a m has m o v e d i n t o
T
b
e
DISPATCH will g l a d l y
p
u
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l
i
s
h
L y o n , w i l l be a t t h e M o n i t o r H o u s e i n h e r r e s i d e n c e o n H o w e l l - s t .
Anderson friends Sunday.
P. VAN WINKLE,
monthly reports
from t h e different
, Attorney and Counselor at Law. and
P i n c k n e y o n S a t u r d a y of each w e e k
Mrs. N . B . Matin a n d c h i l d r e n o f district schools i n t h i s v i c i n i t y .
ReSOLICITOR IN CHANCERY.
Jas. T . Earn a n m a d e a short c a l l
f r o m 7. a. m . u n t i l 5 p . m . , t o d o a l l
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Office In Hubboll Block (rooms formrelv ore ti- k i n d s o f d e n t i s t w o r k .
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Orders for
on A n d e r s o n friends last Saturday.
tled by N. F. Hubbell.)
HOWELL, M'lCll.
insertion the
w o r k m a y be l e f t a t F . A . S i g l e r ' s
Mrs. J a m e s M a r k e y ia v i s i t i n g h e r a s T u e s d a y , t o i n s u r e
same week.
Miss W e a l t h y G r e e n will c l o s e a
d r u g store.
son J. B., a t B a t t l e Creek this w e e k .
Wheat, Beans, Barley, Clover Seed, Dress :
Rev, 0 . B. T h u r s t o n
will preach successful term of school o n F r i d a y
ed H o n , etc. £SP~Thn highest market price will
Elihue B r i g g s a n d sister Ella visited
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v
s
THOS.
UK
AD,
Pinckney,
Mich.
be paid
from the following
subject
at the next.
the lnfrleside, "where a m a n i n s u r e d at Parsballvilla a f e w days last week. C o n g l church n e x t S u n d a y m o r n i n g ,
his l i f e w i t h o u t t h e k n o w l e d g e a n d
L a c k i n g space, w e are obliged t o "Ceremonial T y p e s of Christ," a n d in
Miss Ettie Placoway of Bast Putc o n s e n t of h i s w i f e , s i m p l y b e c a u s e h e jjom'it a f e w c o r r e s p o n d e n t s t h i s w e e k . t h e e v e n i n g , " C h r i s t i a n a t t h e I n t e r VETERINARY SURGEON.
nam, w a s the g u e s t of Samuel Placek n e w that she h a d a l w a y s b e e n bitterp r e t e r ' s House.*'
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Graduate of the Toronto Veteri- ly o p p e s s r d t o i t .
w a y ' s f a m i l y h e r e first o f t h e w e e k .
He w a s a^o'mmernery College. Tteatment of all dot
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mestic animals in a professional cial t r a v e l e r , a n d h i s d u t i e s s o m e t i m e s
A l b e r t W i l s o n s o l d a fine flock o f
manner. All calls promptly attend- k e p t h i m for m o n j t b s ' a ' w a y f r o m h o m e ; S u n d a y .
livered by R e v . H e n r y W h i t e in t h e
ed to day or night.
and d u r i n g o n e of t h e * absences his
J . G. H i n e s o f S t o c k b r i d s r e , w a s a M . E . c h u r c h o n S u n d a y e v e n i n g l a s t , s h e e p t o I I . H a r r i n g t o n first o f t h e
MICHIGAN. w i f e d i s c o v e r e d t h e p o l i c y o f i n s u r a n c e .
KBRiDGE
T h e y w e r e shipped to eastern'
c a l l e r a t t h i s office whjlfi i n t o w n M o n - w a ? l i s t e n e d t o b y a l a r g e a n d a p p r e - w e e k .
S h e w e n t d o w n t o t h e office o f t h e d a y l a s t parties on W e d n e s d a y .
ciative audience.
c o m p a n y a n d r a i s e d n o find o f a f u s s ,
M r . a n d M r s . W . G. K n a p p o f F o w and (the policy b e i n g i n b e r . n a m e ) deM i n d your o w n business, a n d alVETERINARY SURGEON.
l e r v i l l e , v i s i t e d a t G e o . VV. T e e p l e ' s
PLAIN FIELD.
ways avoid repeating harsh a n d m e a n
GRADUATE OF THE m a n d e d t h e r e t u r n o f t h e p r e m i u m S u n d a y l a s t .
From Our Correspondent.
a n d t h a t t h e p o l i c y s h o u l d be c a n c e l e d .
a
n
d
c
e
n
s
o
r
i
o
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s
t
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s
w
h
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p
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s
o
n
fflONTRAEL VETERI- T h i s d e m a n d s h e p e r s i s t e d i n , i n s p i t e
Mr. a n d Mrs. D a v i d D n n l a p , of S o u t h says of another, a n d y o u will escape
James Grossman of Brighton, w a s
NERY COLLEGE.
of a l l p e r s u a s i o n a n d a r g u m e u t , a n d L y o n , w e r e g u e s t s o f C . £ . C o s t e a n d m a n y a t r o u b l e a n d h e a r t b u r n , a n d
had xnine
years
of
in t o w n last F r i d a y .
a l t h o u g h t h e officer^ o f t h e c o m p a n y
oracneale P e r * e n c e «
so w i l l those a r o u n d y o u .
wife Tuesday.
Treatmettt-^of all Do- d i d t h e i r u t m o s t , i n a l l k i n d n e s s a n d
Several-new monuments have been,
mestic aainialaMn a proW m . McPherson, an old resident
D r . H . F . S i g l e r ' s office h a s r e c e i v e d
fessional manner. All s i n c e r i t y , t o p e r s u a d e h e r of t h e h a r m
calls promptly attended t h a t s h e p r o p o s e d t o d o t o h e r s e l f a n d a c o a t of p a i n t , w h i c h w a s a p p l i e d b y a n d b u s i n e s s m a n o f H o w e l l , i£ v e r y e r e c t e d i n t h e c e m e t e r y i n t h e p a s t
to d»y or night. Office at Parker'B Druu Store, c h i l d r e n .
ill, a n d hopes of bis r e c o v e r y a r e n o t f e w w e e k s .
A s s h e o b s t i n a t e l y a d h e r e d D. D. B e n n e t t .
Howell, Mioh.
very encouraging.
H e is o n e o f t h e
t o h e r d e m a n d , t h e p r e m i u m w a s finM r . a n d Mrs. I. S. D a v i s of G r e g o r y , oldest residents of L i v i n g s t o n c o u n t y .
Miss Fannie H u n t closed a very
ally r e t u r n e d to her a n d t h e policy
w e r e t h e g t f e s t s o f M r s . L . C. B e n n e t t
was canceled, and n o t l o n g afterwards
successful term of school in Fraction, The many friends of Mr. George
on S u n d a y last.
her h u s b a n d w a s killed by a railroad
C u l e y , w h o "lives i n W e s t H a m b u r g , a l D i s . , N o . 3 , I o s c o , l a s t S a t u r d a y .
accident. T h i s is n o i m a g i n a t i v e pictF. A. Sigler the druggist, has somefi. W. TEEPLE, PROPRIETOR.
g a v e ' h i m a h u s k i n g bee last Tuesday.
ure; it is an a c t u a l fact; a n d this t h i n g n e w to s a y i n his a d v e r t i s i n g
Chas. Langford
moved into the
T h e y husked o u t 2 0 0 shocks of corn
w o m a n , w h o so blindly persisted in space this w e e k .
f o r h i m . I t w i l l be r e m e m b e r e t h a t h o u s e v a c a t e d b y F . V e r t .
bringing sorrow
a n d trouble upon
Mr. a n d Mrs. Joseph
H o d g e m a n Mr. Culey broke h i s left a r m r e c e n t l y .
There will b e a stereopticon enterherself, did a c t u a l l y f o r y e a r s aftervisited E . W . Lake's family a t F o r e s t
wards make her living by sewing on
"The Church N e w s /
is the n a m e of t a i n m e n t of t h e
Johnstown
flood,
Hill over Sunday.
shirts, and what a miserable, paltry
a n e w p a p e r that, h a s b e e n s t a r t e d i n g i v i n g v i e w s o f a l l t h e f e a r f u l r e c o r d
The annual
s e m i n a r i a n c o l l e c t i o n t h i s v i l l a g e . I t is p u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n l i v i n g it w a s , e v e r y o n e o f u s c a n
. , , . . »
< u
u
c * AM
to-ni^ht (Thursday.)
Admiaaion 1 0
v
SLOMT Loaned on Approved Notes.
guess
H e r ignorance*,
h e r b l i n d w i l l b e t a k e n u p i n S t . M a r y s c h u r c h terests o f the C o n ^ ' l c h u r c h of t h i s
p l a c e b v t h e p a s t o r , ' R e v . 0 . B . T h u r s - grid 1 5 c e n t s .
s t u p i d l y a n d f o l l y , n o t o n l y r u i n e d h e r k u n d a y , O c t . 457th.
ton.
I t w i l l be i s s u e d s e r a i - m o n t h l y ,
o w n life, but ruined t h e happy child
T h e subject for n e x t S u n d a y m o r n F . E . M a y of Columbus, Ohio,
a
n
d
i
s
p r i n t e d a t t h e D I S P A T C H office.
h o o d of h e r c h i l d r e n . "
i n g a t t h e M. E . c h u r c h
is " T h e
T h e p r i c e of s u b s c r j n l i o n i s 1 5 c e n t s w h o h a s b e e n v i s i t i n g f r i e n d s a n d *
B e wis*, by t a k i n g a good policy i n
B e a u t v of the Beautitudes,"
per year.
W e wisr\ftte N e w s success relatives in this p l a c e a n d v i c i n i t y
the N e w York Life, a n d keep i t u p .
*
a
n
d
h
o
p
e
t
h
at its life will be l o n g a n d
C. P . S Y K E S is a g e n t f o r t h e c o m p a n y ,
D o g s k i l l e d 2 8 s h e e p for H . S h o e n COLbECltONS A SPECIALTY.
the past f e w w e e k s , returned t h W
a n d w i l l g l a d l y h e l p y o u to a n y n e e d e d hals a n d 2 0 for K. S t a c k a b l e a a d M . p r o s p e r o u s . S u b s c r i p t i o n s w i l l b e reinformation.
c e i v e d b v its editor a n d G e o . W . b y k e s . w e e k .
MtMMfti* Ticket* for Sale.
Lochlin of G e n o a last week.
Pinckney,
•>
R B P C E T .
No. 4 2 ,
C.
J
W
JF- HE. B A T E S ,
"W-
K,- TABER,
Mnckney Exchange Bank.
DOES A GENERAL
BANKING* BUSINESS.
DEPOSITS RECEIVED.
Certificates issued in time dejbosits and payable on demand.
*
......
MARVELLOUS JUOCLBRY.
IT
»
Ju D. BsarjonT, Pselisfcer.
•
•
Professor J. C. "MendenhaU,
Superintendent of the U. 6. coast and
geodetic survey, was born in Hanoverion, 0 . , In 1841, and was professor of
physic* and mechanics in Ohio university from 1878 to 1878, When the
Japanese government formed the Imperial university at Tekio, he was offered and accepted a professorship in
the same sciences. He returned In
1881 and resumed the chair in the
Ohio state university. In 1882 he organized the Ohio state weather bureau
service, and subsequently devised a
system of weather signals for displaying on railroad trains. He became a
professor In the United States signal
service in 1884, but resigned in 1886
to accept the presidency of the Rose
Polytechnic Institute at Terre Haute,
IndL, which position he held until appointed to his present important
office.
The difficulty in obtaining a jury
in the now famous Cronin case in
Chicago shows that the policy of excluding thinking and reading men
from the jury box grows like an evil
weed. It is a dangerous growth, certain, unless restrained, to sooner or
later bring trial by jury inio disropute and disfavor. Too much care
cannot be exercised in the selection of
jurors in important cases, especially
in those in which the question of life
and death is involved. But care
should be exercised in the way of
choosing men of ascertained intelligence. Ignorance should not be, as it
is apparently to become, the chief
qualification of the model juror.
Brazil is making rapid progress
towards a more liberal government.
In the general elections held In September, the liberal party elected 95
of the 125 members of the house of
representatives, thus gaining an overwhelming majority.
In May last
there was a clash between the emperor and the conservaiive cabinet, which
resulted in the dismissal of the miniate* in power, the dissolution of parliament, and an order for a new election,
With the stated result. This is an indorsement of the advanced ideas of the
emperor, and of various reform*
t n d e r contemplation.
The international monetary conferonce soon to be held in Paris is of interest to our western states, for the
reason that the relative value of silver
and gold as a circulating medium will
be exhaustively discussed.
Steps
toward forming a basis for an international coin, the character and functions of subsidiary and minor coins,
and many other topics rre to be considered. The question of silver as a
circulating medium Is of the highest
importance in mining districts, and
the results of the conference will have
no little effect on the value and future
«f the white metal.
Slam is the latest country to embrace the civilization which railroads
-bring in their train. Surveys are
now in progress for intended lines into the land which is notorious lor its
claims to the possession of a white
elephant, and it is said that the laying
of rails along the routes marked cu
by the engineer will be speedily followed by 1he formation of companies
for developing, on a large scale, the
mineral weal h of the country. Malaria Is the chief hindrance to the
opening up of the interior of Slam to
commercial Intercourse with Europe
said the Unked States.
S o m a of the incomprehensible
Thins;* D o n * In the'Sast Indies.
Bam Chunda Khan, >oew a resident
of Leadville, but for many years a
dweller in India, as his name may indicate, was in Denver, a iys the Times
of that city. Mr. Khan resembles
others of his race In figure and feature.
He speaks English with what some
Americans term ' * o English accent,"
and is fluent and interesting in conversation. Talking to a Times reporter
about the marvellous skill of the native
jugglers in India, Mr. Khan said:
4
'I was at Delhi, India, about five
years ago and while there witnessed a
jugglery or sleight-of-hand performance that was as interesting to me as
any I had ever seen. We had dined
with the chief engineer of the Punjaub,
and after dinner retreated to the
veranda The actors, as I may call
them, were seven in number, very ordinary looking Hindoos, with the exception of the leader, who WHS as fine
a looking sikh as I had ever seen, and
that is saying a great deal. He was
heavily bearded, broad shouldered, and
commanding. His attire consisted of
nothing more than a white waist cloth
and a turban.
"The ground on which the performance was given was the broadened end
of a graveled carriage drive in front
of the bungalow. Here it was not possible that there should be any hidden
stage mechanism nor any concealed
accomplice, and when the seven actors
stood up in the center of this ground,
each one as simply dressed as the
leader, one could not help but think
what little chance they had to conceal
about their persons what we look upon
as the usual outfit of the cotijurer.
"Standing in a lateral row, the leader speaking for the party, they signified their wish to be counted. We on
the veranda counted them and individually and collectively reached the
same result—that there were seven,
neither more nor less. After a few
twists and turns of a peculiar intricate
dance the men stopped arid ugain arranged themselves in line. They numbered only six. One had disappeared.
Going through the same dancing
movements ugain and lining themselves as before we counted eight A
•third time they danced and one of the
eight disappeared, leaving the original
number, seven.
You must satisfy
your own mind as to how the trick was
done; that is what we were obliged
to do.
"The next trick was even more
wonderful than the one which proceeded it. The sikh and one of the Hindoos stepped ia front of the five other
men and the sikh, by a few passes of
his hands, put the single Hindoo
under mesmeric or other uncanny influence. The leader's hands moved
rapidly over the patient's body, the
strokes ending each time at the left
shoulder. Soon from that point an
opaque mass seemed to grow. To this
the operator turned his attention.
While he did not appear to touch it
the mass took shape, following the
movements of his fingers. Thus he
moulded it into the semblance of a
human form more perfect in every
particular but apparently without life.
It was joined to the mesmerized Hindoo by a filament.
"When the experiment had progressed thus far we on the veranda experienced a curious sensation; we could
feel the concentrated wills of the leader and the five idle Hondoos centerod
on this male Galatea. It took unto itself life, and the leader, with a wave
of the hand, (Taosed the filament to
disappear. The male Galatea, or better, the Fr.inkenstein'stepped forward
of its own will. One-of the Hindoos
came to the front and threw a cloth
around the creature's waist and led it
upon the veranda where we sat, and at
the same time collected our rupees and
four-anna-pieces. We cauld see nothing unearthly in the person nor in the
action of this hand-made being. Its
eyes were open, but it did not speak,
but it seemed to notice material things
and walked unassisted and unguided
back to the group of jugglers.
"After time enough to quiet our
nerves had elapsed the leader stepped
forward holding in his hand a ball of
colored cotton twine, and retaining
one end of it in his left hand, he threw
the ball str. ight up in the air. It unwound as it ascended, and just when
the end fluttered loose and we expected to see it all como down with a run,
a bird swooped down and taking the
end of the cord in its beaK held the
line suspended. Presently the line
vibrated *nd we could see wiggling
down it a serpent which the sikh
caught and handed to an attendant
who brought it to us. It was one of
the dhadly and mu^h dreaded cobras
and .full of life. We did not dare to
touch it and the attendant hurried
back to re :eive from the hands of the
sikh an Indian baby that had come
down the string with a rush and lay
squirming in his arms.
"The ball of cotton on which these
mysterious phenomena were seen was
about the sUe of a bombshell. Bow it
could have contained a live serpent
and a live baby I am at a loss to understand. We thoroughly examined the
baby and pinched it with the usual result, and can* certify that it was a living child with healthy lungs. I may
meation that when the attendant
took the baby the sikh took the serpent and swallowed it quietly and
quickly. Ail this time the mesmerized man had stood a little apart
from the other Hindoos and was still
in the trance. Turning to him now
the leader made a few passes with
his hands and brought the fellow
back to consciousness, but we could
not see tfjjff hand-made Hindoo, nor
did any of us notice what had become of him.' 1
Transferring Landed Property in Japan.
Japan, a country in which Mexicans
must henceforth feel a special interest, says the Mexican Financier, it
having recently given the citizens of
this republic uu usual commercial privileges, has set the civilized world an
excellent example in the adoption of a
new and^greatly improved method of
transferring landed property. Hereafter land will be transferred by registration instead of by title deeds; registration books will be kept at the chief
offices of all administrative districts,
in which entries will be made fully describing all the lands in the district,
the boundaries, owners' names, etc.,
and their taxable value. A person
buying land will, ou the presentation
of the proper information, be registered as the new owner of the property. This method of land transference
has the advantage of the greatest possible simplicity, but it is not likely to
find favor with lawyers and notaries.
This remarkable simplification of the
common method of transferring landed
estates may well be investigated by the
government of this country.
• •
.
Hyenas and Bean in India.
The hyena is nocturnal, hiding away
in caves, among rocks or hills and
ravines during daylight, and as a
sneaking, cowardly, though formidable,
animal, with jaws so powerful that it
can crush largo bones with ease.
It eats carrion and animals that have
died or have been killed by other
boasts of prey. It is often hunted and
spearod, when it makes little effort to
defend itself; it has an unearthly disagreeable cry, and is so cowardly it
h;is been caught and hold by the hands
of a native shikari. It figures to a
considerable extent among the destroyers of life.
There aro two wolves in India; the
first seems to be undistinguishable
from the European wolf, and is rather
larger than other species which is
the common wolf of India. The Indian wolf in rather Bmaller than the
European species. It carries off children frequently, taking them out of the
huts, and has been known to snatch
them from their mothers 1 arms. Wolves
are cunning, cruel, bloodthirsty and
very wary. They are seldom seen in
the daylight, prowling chiefly at night.
They live in holes and ravines, and are
not often met with in the open; at
night I have seen one or two flit like
specters across the road. If surprised
by day in the open they nvi.ko off at a
long, loping gallop in which it is almost impossible to overtake them even
on a good horse, though they are sometimes run down and speared. They
seldom molest the larger animals, except when feeble, nor do they often
attack adult human beings, unless they
take them by surprise, but children
I they attack readily. They grasp at the
I throat, and I have seen children who
| h ive been seized and rescued, but were
1
found to be mortally wounded. In
! 1887, 177 persons and 4087 head of
cattle were killed by wolves in the
• registered provinces. On the other
hand, there were 6,339 wolves killed.
A BUSY W A S P .
Amount of Work P e r f o r m e d by an
Industrious Insect.
There is a circular flower bed in city
hail park situated directly beneath a
big button-wood tree on the Broadway
side. The attention of passers-by was
recently attracted by the actions of a
big black "sand" or "dirt" wasp. The
wasp was digging a hole In the ground
beneath a broad lea/. The hole was
evidently intended for a nest
After
having selected the site for his future
abode and egg repository the wasp
commenced operations by removing
small quantities of earth with bis jaws.
The earth the wasp carried away and
hid in the grass about four feet away.
The wasp worked very rapidly, and
in a surprisingly short time had burrowed out quite a hole. During these
brief operations the insect, in order to
give the hole perfect shape, kept his
body continuously moving round and
round and continuously ducking his
head in and out. In the meantime he
kept his wings moving with a jerky,
angry motion. The hole thus made
was about three-eighths of an Inch in
diameter.
After working In this
industrious manner for nearly half an
hour the wasp had burrowed out quite
a deep hole. His work seemed lighter
when he got some distance below the
surface, for he fairly forced the dirt up
out of the hole in a tiny Btreatn.
In a short time the wasp left the hole
and took away the little pile of loose
sand from the mouth of the hole. In
one of his journeys he ran across a
small shavinsr. He turned it over and
over repeatedly, and after satisfying
himself^apparently, that it would suit
his purpose, he seized it in his jaws
and carried it to the mouth of the hole.
He carefully placed the little shaving
over the hole. Then he piled a little
mound of sand upon the chip.
Later in the day the same wasp seized a worm and dragged it to the den
he h id built in the morning. When
the hole was reached the wasp relinquished his prey for a moment, removed the shaving from the mouth of his
den, and then sprang into tne hole. In
a few moments he came back and again
seized the squirming worm, which was
slowly crawling away. Walking backward, the wasp dragged the worm into
the hole. He soon reappeared and immediately began shoveling sand and
little pebbles down upon his capture.
He then replaced the door agrain, covered it with sand, took to his wings,
and flew away.—N. Y. Sun.
A Y A W K l g OIWLr
Who Can Do K v e r y t W n * . Y e t l e n t
Above Housework*
A letter to the New York Sun from
New Preston, Conn., gi
ports to be a pUia unv
count of an extraordinary y
man who is certainly oompe
vote and hold office. Her name
given, but it is stated that she is 37
years old, a native of the town, and
now housekeeper it* a< boarding house
there, fine attended a private school
until she was IS years of age. leaving
it with an award for the best scholarship in book-keeping. She immediately
took a clerkship in the local post
and, although so young, handles}*
mail and performed other duties 1fc
store adjoining satisfactorily
six months she worked in a factory k&
Watertown making ferules for um-|
brellas. After that she took a clerk- f
ship in a dry goods store in Waterbury, which she kept for three years.'
She then went to Bethel to learn the I
hatting trade, and became so expert;
that she made all the samples, and was:
appointed forewoman. The man ID!
whose store she had been employed in '
Waterbury proposed to open another I
store in Meriden and to give her entire :
charge and a good salary. Shej
accepted, and did the buying book- :
keeping, writing and general managing; but just as the enterprise became
a success, the proprietor died and she
was thrown out of employment. She
then went to Phildeiphia, where Bhe
learned cigar making and worked a t
the trade for three years. She c ime
home and obtained a situation as stage
driver, going twice a day to meet passengers at the station, five miles dist a n t She managed and often harnessed the two horses, lifted and strapped
on to the stage all baggage, and carried the mail. Mr. Kinney, the owner
of the stage, says he has never since
had his business so thoroughly attended to. At the end of eix months she
learned carriage painting here in a
factory, and for some time earned $2.50
per day.
When work gave out here she went
to Hartford, where for a short time she
did copying in the office of the fire
department. She afterward went into
the carpet-sweeper factory, and took
the contract for cutting and dovetailing
the wood work. Before leaving she
made several entire sweepers herself,
even to putting the stamp of the maker
in large letters on the top. She came
home for a rest, and a resident of the
village gave her two mustang ponies
that he had been unable to manage.
They had been harnessed but a few
times and were unshod. She caught
them in the field, harnessed and drove
them, and in a few weeks had them
completely under control.
Between
times this unusual girl has mended
shoes, planted tobacco by the acre,
ridden the horse with a cultivator, and
raked hay with a patent rake. She
has laid a new kitchen floor in her
father's house, built a veranda for her
uncle, and shingled and sided an ioe
house for a neighbor. She takes care
of the home garden and made and keeps
in order the winding walks about her
house. She is aiso an adopt at shaving
and hair cutting, and waits upon gentlemen at their residences in the
village to do this.
She is fond of hunting and fishing,
and in the fall bag.s many partridges,
woodcock and rabits, and in the season catches bass from the lake aod
trout irora the brooks. Last spring
she caught the champion trout, t h a t
weighed 2J pounds; The fish broke
the polo, but she jumped into the water
waist deep, secured the disappearing
Bection of the pole, and safely landed
the trout. She catches frogs and
dresses the legs for her own taste. She
is much interested in natural history,
and has specimens of snakes, lizards,
and many other curious things preserved in alcohol. She had a tamowater snake that came about the door/
but her mother disliked the famtli
of the visitor and killed It She al
climbed a tree to examine a crow'
nest, and took one of the young ones
home. She brought it up on Indian
meal and bread crumbs and taught it
to laugh and say "Hello." This girl
has also invented a kitchen utensil upon which steaks can be broiled, potatoes fried, and other vegetable cooked
at the same time.
San. Webster's Great Effort
A good story ia told of Daniel Webster regarding a speech he was going to make. On one occasion some Boston friends and admirers sent him, as
a present, an enormous plow, to be
be used on his place. Webster gave
out word that on a certain day it would
be christened. The day arrived and the
surrounding farmers for miles came in
to witness the event. A dozen teams
with aristocratic occupants from Boston came down to the christening. It
was expected by everyone that Webster would make a great speech on
the occasion, reviewing the history
of farming back to the time when C'incinnatus abdicated the most mighty
throne in the world to cultivate beans
and peas in a Roman, garden. The
plow was brought out and ten yoke of
oxen hitched in front. More than 2J0
people stood sround on the tiptoe of
expectation. Soon Webster made his
appearance.
He had been calling
spirits from the vasty deep, and hia
gait was somewhat uncertain. Seizing the plow handle and spreading his
feet, he called out to the driver in his
deep bass voice:
"Are you all ready, Mr. Wright?"
"All ready, Mr. Webster," was the
reply, meaning that all was ready for
the speech. Webster straightened
himself up by mighty effort and shouted: "Then let her rip!" Tbe crowd
roared with laughter, while the great
statesman, with his big plow, proceedThe Salamander.
Considerable ignorance exists, even ed to rip up the soil in huge furrows.
among persons of education, as to the
Not an Expert
habit of the salamander. The mere
We weren't there, but we never had
mention of this harmless little batra- reason to doubt the veracity of the
chian recalls to the minds of most peo- gentleman who informs us that Senator
ple mystic idVeas with respect to fire- Sawyer the other day witnessed for the
eating and flre-inhabiting creatures, first time in his life a game of base
which have probably caused many of ball by professionals. At one point in
the poor little brutes to be burnt by the game the man at the bat knocked
He Tried the Three B'a
experimental philosophers who should the ball away over the heads of the
Boston
Herald: Here is a story
have been far above a belief in snch outfielders, and the crowd cheered
absurdities. The spouted salamander until Senator Sawyer felt the warmth about Senator Zeb Vance. His firft
Is thye color of lamp-black, with numer- of enthusiasm rising in his own bosom. wife was a Presbyterian and very
ive in church works. Zeb s;iys h t
>us large yellow spots and stripes, and
"That's
too
bad,"
he
finally
said
to
one of her oonverts. Some years
ia very common all over southean
him.
he
married for the second time, and
Europe, as well as in northern Africa. the gentleman beside
1
"What's
too
bad?
'
got a wife who Is a Roman Catholic
It haunts all manner of dark and cool
"Why, it's too had they didn't have One of Zeb's Presbyterian friends inplaces, such as cavities under logs of
a man there to catch that ball. By
wood, and holes in old walls, where George!" said the Senator, warmly, "If North Carolina said to him recently:
they can find a supply of insects, worms I were permanent manager of that • 'I hear your new wife is a Catholic
or slugs. All the salamander's move- club I'd put three more men out there How, in the name of coram on sense,
ments are performed with such absurd In the field if it cost $2,500 a year."— did you come to marry a Romanist?
It caused much sorrow in the church.1*'
solemnity that the most hardened rep- Washington Post.
•'Well, said Zeb. "I had tried rum and
tile-hater coifld not be uninterested.
Yesterday
came
the
romsrksble
news
rebellion and I thought 1 would try.
Sometimes the operation of swallowing
that
the
storm
was
a-bait
ing
on
the
fishing
Romanism."
a. worm will last twenty minutes
grounds,—Pittsburg Cbroaicls.
~
X
'
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I
••*;.
T^OTWSWISWB^PW
i
.M.-C'
'.••It-'
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i
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if: .7
PASSENGERS KILLED.
Hastlafs, Mloh^ Apriltt,1MH
on the Inclined Plane in Clndev Rheumatic Byrnp Co, Jaeksen, MWa.
Bfttt Break! Loose.
U n w Tats to to enrttfy tint I fee*
Y C * AMD HO.
- ^
BAT.
A terrlbl* aooident happened am the
saaUtts 1m marriage a faflorel I looked in, the ball
Of the rich; there wore shadows of UtterIf vate stare** Incline plane In Cinolamait ana
-* ~~ afternoon. A car had reacted l a s
too incline, when the oablea broke.
ware online*
todtotroaa,
—0 waa nothing to hold the track, three to six month* at a One, aad I
afailurel 1
craeainf down and ran into the oomld get about only by tho aid of
"Yen."
iv station aad office below.
oratohoa. I employed several first claaa
were nine aseeengera on board,
Is marriage a failure! I
_
were killed aid three more prob- physicians of this city, tone o f whom of* Of tho fair, humble, rose bowered cot of
looted
acmre
or
gave
temporary
relief
even.
ably fatally Injured; others were also inthe poor}
jured more or leaa seriously.
About two years ago I was iadaood to Where lives were illumined with, love's ferThe accident waa caused by the engtn- try Hlbbard's Rheumatic Syrnp, and, after
vent glow.
•tor foiling to slacken the speed of the car, taking a few bottles, I experienced relief, And heart beat for heart. The* I answered
aad it atruok the bumpers at the top with and now eonaider myself cared. I unhesme, w No."
each force aa to break both the active aad itatingly recommend this medicine for
rheumatism. 1 know what it ban done for
safety oablea.
toe, what physicians oauki not do, i, a*
si.«««
cured me of rheumatism.
TERRIBLE MINE EXPLOSION.
Unix, grohs,
a*Mk aputrjr iatfe*w«ri&
y»U tnfofniattOs
Mas. H. J. KaarauK
your druggist f o r i !
i f 97 Persona at Work Only U Are IAak
oertify to the above statement
Bayed.
FKXD L. HEATH, Druggist.
Grand Officers.
^ A n explosion occurred in the Ben tile colTho
following
were elected onVsers at
About 80,000 people a day go up the Eiffel
Jawy at Loogton, Staffordshire, at an early
tho
grand
encampment
of tho Kalghto
hour on the morning of Oct 16. There Tower. Of these between 8,000 and 4,000 Templar in Washington:
D
to
the
top.
On
an
average
a
person
were 10 men in the pit at the time, and of
J. P. 8. Gobin of Pennsylvania, grand
as to wait about an boor to go up in the
theae only 11 are known to have survived.
master,
and Hugh McCnrdy of Cornnna,
lift.
_
The pit Is completely wrecked and search
Mich.,
deputy
grand master of the grand
for the bodies is attended with great difliencampment.
Gen.
Gobin is a state senator
D
a
a
'
t
W
a
s
t
e
Tfwar
T
l
a
t
culty.
and money experimenting with doubtful from Lebanon, Pa., and general of the
remedies, when Dr. Pierce's Golden Medi- Third brigade of toe National Guard of
Pennsylvania Mourns. .
cal Discovery is ao positively certain in its Pennsylvania. Warren LaRue Thomas of
Ex-Gov. John F. Hartranft of Pennayl* curative action as to warrant ita manufac- Kentucky, grand generalissimo; Reuben
Tenia, died at his home in Morristown Oct turers in supplying it to the public, aa they Hedley Lyon of California, grand captain
17th.
are doing through druggists, under a duly general; Henry Bates Stoddard of Texas,
, Geo. John Fredrick Hartranft waa born executed certificate of guarantee, that it grand senior warden: Nicohlas Van Slick
in Montgomery, county, Pa., Dec. lo, 1880, will accomplish all it is recommended to do, of Rhode Island, grand Junior warden; H.
and graduated at Union college in 1868. or money paid for it will be promptly re- Wales Lines of Connecticut, grand treasHe served through the war of the rebellion turned. It cures torpid liver, or bilious- urer; William B, Isaacs of Virginia, grand
with distinction, comm*ndiDg a Pensyl- ness, indigestion, or dyspepsia, all humors, recorder.
vania regiment under Burrtside and being or blood taints, from whatever cause arismade brigadier general in May, 1864. For ing, skin and scalp diseases, scrofulous Hibbard'o R h e u m a t i c a n d Idvor
g.tllantry on the battleneld of Fort Stead- affections, (not excepting consumption, or
Pills.
man, before Petersburg, iu M rch, 1866, be lung-scrofula), if taken In time and given
These Pills are scientifically compounded,
w a s brevetted ma]or general. He was a fair trial.
uniform In action. No griping pain so
elected governor of Pennsylvaniatex1876.
Thousands of cures follow the use of Dr. commonly following the use of pills. They
Sage's
Catarrh Remedy. 50 cents.
are adapted to both adults and children
Snllivan's Clerk Arrested.
Henry M. Stotenberg, stenographer for
with perfect aafety. We guarantee they
I f t h e Saflferere f r o m C o m r a v p t l o m ,
Alexanoer Sullivan, one of the suspected
Scrofula and General Debility will try have no equal in the cure of Sick Headache,
murderers of Dr Cronin, w s arrested in Scott's
Emulsion of Cod Liver Oil, with Constipation, Dyspepsia, Biliousness; and,
Chicago the other day by special orders of Hypophosphites,
they will find immediate as an appetizer, they excel any other prethe chief of police, it is believed that Sto- relief and a permanent
Dr. H. V. paration
tenberg is the man who carried messages Mott, Brentwood, Cal.,benefit.
writes:
have
to Graham and Fred Smith, who were ar- used Scott's Emulsion with great"Iadvanrested a few days since lor Jury bribing. tage in cases of Phthisis, Scrofula and
A curious offer is made of a small leaseIt is int muted by the attorneys for the Wasting Diseases. It is very palatable." hold property in Worcestervile, held "for
state th t Stotenberg has made a statement Sold by Druggists.
the residue of a term of two thousand
in full, and that it also touches upon some
years, created in the year 1600." It will be
facts in connection with the murder of Dr.
Mr. Gladstone le usually the first man in sold at auction.
Cronin.
the House of Commons to come out in sum
mer garb—white hat, immaculate white
waistcoat, grey frock coat, and a marvel
Striking: Switchmen.
The
switchmen's
strike
in the ous buttonhole.
Pennsylvania yards in Toledo is still in
Would Y o u Believe
progress and neither party h .s made any
The
proprietor
of Kemp's Balsam gives When Baby was sick, we gsre her Oastoria,
-concessions. The men are holding out for thous.inds of bottles
away yearly i This mode
Luke Shore pay, which the company re- of advertising would
prove ruinous if the When she w a s a Child, she cried for Castoria*
fuse. In the meantime the business of the Balsam was not a perfect
cure for coughs When she b e c a m e Hiss, s h s elung t o Castoria,
company, as well as .of the Columbus, and all throat and lung troubles.
You will Whan aha had Children, s h s g a v s sham Castccta,
Hocking Valley &, Toledo and Ann Arbor see the excellent effect after the first
dose.
roads, is paralyzed, the two latter roads Don't hesitate! Secure a bottle to day
to
having their terminus with the Pennsyl- keep in your houBe or room for immediate
vania. The matter is far from settlement.
future use. Trial bottles free at all
The company has discharged the men, but or
druggists'.
Larue size 50c and SL.
cannot secure new ones.
E
Fatal Quarrel Over a Widow.
H e n r y Huffman and L a w r e n c e Hunter,
b o t h of P i < ) u a , 0 . , b o t h m e n o f 4 5 y e a r s o f a g e ,
courted the same woman--a young widow
n a m e d Lo.ser.
Hunter w a s the favored
auitor. Huffman became jealous and called
o n Hunter. T h e m e n excn\nnged a f e w
w o r d s , w h e n H u f f m a n d a e w it r e v o l v e r a n d
fired.
H u n t e r fell a t t h e i i r s t shot,
Huffm a n stood o v e r h i m a n d tired a second
time.
H u f f m a n 4,heu s h o t h i m s e l f i n t h e
neck, killing himself. Hunter cannot recover.
GENERAL.
'
»
•
•A
%
-'Wfc
# ' *
A taliy
kale.
A famous woodsman once boasted that he
could find his way through a wilderness
and return by the same path. Being tested, he carried with him a slender thread,
which should serve as a guide for the return trip Reaching the end of nis journey,
he lay down to rest. While he rested came
the genius of industry and breathed upon
his thread and changed it into two shining
ribbons of steel. It was a railroad.
Throngs of people whirled past him in luxurious cars, and he ,read upon
the train the
mystic legend • "'
""< ;n < Vntrail"
There is no inventor who has benefited
the hay-raiser, or leserves more credit,
than Mr Geo. Ertel, the senior member of
the firm of Geo. Ertel & Co., manufuctur
ers of hay presses, Quincy, 111. He has
brought the press which they advertise in
this issue, to its present high standard
after almost a quarter of a century's study,
and our readers who do not send for the
18a9 catalogue, which is profusely illustrated, will miss the source of useful knowledge.
Oliver C. Hosbyshell has been appointed
•superintendent ut' the mint in Philadelphia.
Several men who were throshiug wheat
near Holelville, Unt., were poisoned in a
aingular tuunncr by inhaling the dust from
.poisonouH weeds tied up with the grain.
Medical aid boought them through.
S. Davis of Providence, Pa., while showing two ludios through the works of the
Scranton irou company, was struck by a
<•
large llywlieel > mi instantly killed, his
body being horribly mangled.
Fortune's Favorites.
Adventists of the United States, fix the
Galveston (Tex.) News, Aug. 30.
date tor the end of the world for Oct. 2ft.
Three Indianapolis breweries have been
CORSICANA, TEX, August 27, 1889.—Cor
sold to an English syndicate- for $3,000,000. slcana boasts to day of two of the happiest
H. G. Gregg, many years Gen. Sheridan's men in Texas, in the persons of Messrs.
private secretary, and also a newspaper John W. O'Neal and O. P. Wimberly, the
man, has been sontenced to the Missouri luoky men who/irew $15,000 each hi The
penitentiary for live years for horse steal- Louisiana State Lottery drawing of the
ing.
13th inst. Eaci gentleman paid $1 for the
The preferred stockholders of tho one-twentieth of ticket No.fc7,S35,which
Northern Pacilic railway have voted to isto be the numbor which drew the
aue $11,0,00(),000 new live per cent bonds, proved
capital
prize
of $300,0()0. Your correspondpayable 100 years hence.
ent
first
sought
Mr. O'Neal at his restauW. H. Brown, a real estate dealer of Chicago, is a defaulter to the amount of $.">,000. rant and asked to see the ticket. •'Uncle
Fifty persons were more or less injured John," as he is familiarly called, was slow
in a wreck on the Burlington & Missouri to realize his luck, but after depositing his
railroad near Gibson, Nob., the other tickit with the First National bank for
collection and getting u receipt for the
morning.
Eight thous nd heau of cattle and 450 same he said he began to "feel like a bloathorses, the last of a Montana ranch started ed bondholder."
by Kussell Harrison, were sold at auction
Mr. O. P. Wimberly, who kept a small
the other day. butcher shop here, offered to dispose of his
Ex-Uedstar Robinson of Brown Univer- ticket for "two bits" when he heard that
O'Neal had drawn the capital prize, but no
aity Is short in his accounts ¢6,000.
0&b
buy it. imagine bis surprise
One of the first duties of the new pen- whenwould
he found that he HISO held the lucky
sions commissioner will be the recovery of number.
He also deposited bis ticket with
all money unlawfully paid on pension
the First National Bank for collection.
claims.
The tickets were promptly forwarded to
The contest over the votes in Silver Bow, New Orleans, the $30,000 collected and
Montana, which changes the complexion of
to the credit of tho happy men, less
the legislature, comes before the supreme placed
the
usual
rate of exchange.
court Nov. 4.
Hints are being thrown out at Washington that President Harrison will recommend in his forthcoming message decided
modifications of the existing tariff.
For the 11 months ending Sept SO the
United Slates has exporfed »91,214,898
worth of beef and hog products—a gain of
$21,00.),000 over the a. me time last year.
The Reading iron company, which failed
six months ago, is offering creditors four
por cent mortg ge bonds, guaranteed by
the Reading railroid comp ny, to the extent of 50 por cent of their Indebtedness.
As by the recent act of congress every
Indiiin over :.0 ye irs of Hge who receive') an
allotment of tand becomes a voter, there is
speculation as to what effect some 20,000
Indian votes is likely to have on the result
in the western states.
The headless body of A. T. Glthens, a
telegraph operator, was picked up in the
ChlUicothe, Mo., railroad yard, the body
atlli twitching. It is thought that he tried
to get onto a moving train and fell under
tho wheels.
There was a meeting of anarchists at
Turner hall, Chicago, the-other day. The
American ft. g was roundly hissed when it
waa displayed, but the red flag WHS greeted
with cheers. Ldlior Kevitoh of New York
•poke in Germ m, aad said that the hanging of the anarchists waethe gravest crime
ever committed in the .United State*, and
aredloted that * aery > revolution weald
toon break out
"Not enjoyment and not sorrow
Is our destined end or way;
3 u t to aot that each to-morrow
Finds us farther than to day."
The sentiment so «ptly expressed by the
poet ought to sound like a trumpet to
every sluggish soul, and animate them to
new and vigorous efforts to improve their
condition. To all those who have the desire to press forward, but who are not sure
of the way, we say, write to B. F. Johnson
& Co., Richmond, Va., and they will be of
service to you.
Wmh tho _
mm o» wojBdmra, i t hen
of sorprtaes, for
Web to tho length, of V*
drawn from tho body of a spider.
Catherine Lewie fainted one night la
"Olivette*" butitdWi-t cause a ripple in
tho play.. *Twas only a ooogh, nod they
had a bottls-of D*. Bull's Ccagh^ymp on
band, of
Up to 1884 t o * English pentoses bad issued 81,80300048° postage atamfa. That
would cover 8,763 miles, and would roach to
the moon and bank if placed* end to end.
This is the way tho Chicago Times disposes of another cherished' delostoa: "It
is now rumored that tho boauttfal Lady
Jane Grey of our boyhood's imagination
waa short and thin and had a mole on tho
end oft her noes."
POP Sdatioa.
£/|
m\jL
| f if
•
sn ]
7 'i
SIOBJM ffta.
A. J . TOWEK, * Boaton, Mass,
GRATEFUL-CQMFOpTtNQ.
'
^^x.**mr"^^
/««•^^#1
*I
A
There is nobody living to-day, with possibly a few exceptions, will see another year
in which tho figure •««" doea not appear.
Dr. L. L. Goranch, Toledo, 0., says: '«1
have sraotioed medicine for 40 years, h«ve
never seen a preparation that I eould prescrrbewith so muoh oonndonco of auouess
aa I oaa Hall's Catarrh Care," Sold by
Anyrgitto,tto.
EPPS'S COCOA
y
'Jihiay curat t—TatmUttf Crtppitdf
A T DRUGGIST* AVD D r A t r n s .
THE CHIALE* A V06ELEI CO,tattkeeft.lid
S J G K H E APositlvelyenred
D M S K aj
these Littte Pills.
They also teltevs .
tresa from Dy tpepci »Jn-|
digestion andTooHearM
Eating, a perfect resa-j
sdy forDiariii<Ja<Nat
DrowataMa, B a d Ta*t
In tha Mouth. Coat
TongueJPain i n tha BideJ
TOKWD LIVER. Thaj
resnlat* tha B o w e l s ^
Poraly Vagetable.
Prtoe 2 5 Cento;
BREAKFAST;
" B y a t h a r o a t H kno*l«4g« o ( t h e nataral l a w s
vhlcn soTtrn t&e operation* of 6t«eatton a n o n a *
tiitton, a a d by a carernl appUeatlon of t b a fljae
propertlaa o f we!V*«lected Cocoa. Mr. Kppt b a s
rovided our breakfast tables wtta a dalloataty
avoured beverage which m a / aa«e us many p e a v y
doctors" bills. I t a by the Judicious n»a o f s a e n
articles of d l e t t b a t a c o n n t t n t t o n may b»irradaa>
ly built up until atrong enough t" resist every tea*
dency to disease. Hundreds of subtle maladies a r e
floatJW around v« ready to attack whereTertaare
in a weak point. We may escape many a fata) s h a f t
by keeping ourselves well fortified with pure blooA
and a properly nourished frame. •—"CiStf Sfratte
Gaartte."
-. . M
Made simply with boiling water or atirk. Boat
only lu half-pound Una, by Grocers, labelled tana:
S
1AMES EPPS & CO., Homoeopathic Cbesiisif*
London. England.
ERTELS « VICTOR
CASTS& 1CSCICD7I CO., ! H W ? 0 a Z .
Small Pill. Small Dose, Small Price.l
TAMND
A naw awlhod of etaaaoaadiaf Tar.
SURE CURE for
RHEUM
P I US »**anpa
S T M L for
T t -*8wa>
a a d a l l S k t a n i o a a M a . Smd
•to with Book. Sold by all Dnif»UU «ud by T±J*QiM
H a r i i t u t , Ucao * Cw. t A««aOi,l>«a a t w l a a a , I a .
OARMENTS CUARANTCCD TO F I T
P E R T E C T W I T H O U T TMVINOON.
©
tMMrtii
by return mail full rtMcrlrtlve
circulantufltOODT'SRSWTAIL0 * BTITSX Or DRESS 0DTTIKS.
A n y lady of ordinary Intelll;ence can easily and quickly
earn to cut and m a k e any garment, lu any style to any measure tor lady or child. Addr«'M
MOODY * CO. CINCINNATI, O-
COLD IN HEAD
OB
f
CATARRH
Applr B*lm Into each noctrU.
BLY BRO.S., bt Warren Bt,, N. Y.
Most rapid, durable a n d e c o n o m i c a l . S o w a r ranted or n o s a l e . Capacity ONE t o TWO t o n p e l
h o a x . D e s c r i p t i v e circulars free.
GEO. EBTEL a CO., M a s f > .
fitincy. HI., orjLctfen, 0s4
Tba olAftat medicine In the world Is prooaibly
C
Dr. Isaac Thompson's
R
E L E B R A T E D E Y E W A T E
This article is a carefully prepared Fhynietan1* pre*
script; nn. and has been In constant use n^arlvs century.
CAUTION.—The only genuine T k o n p u a ' i E r a
"Water h u upon the white wrapper of H*ch bottle aa
engraTed pnrmi t of the inventor. DK. ISAAH THOarSOSL
with tfaoHmlif
<,f hi* signature; al«o a nott if baae
siKned Jvhu Lk Thnmp«on. Avoid all o'h»-rs. T h i j s a uine Eye Water c* : IN> obtalneJ from all Dmjfeists,
JOHN l.THOMpyON.SOWS&CO.. TRQY.N.Y.
CHICHESTER'S
ENQLI8H'
PENNYROYAL PILLS
CROSS DIAMONO
AND.
"JTO !TXT*i:RfKl»irE Ni:ria»«ART-Permanentpo«ltloni(jflaraBteed.
S A L A R Y and E X P E N S E S P A I D , £ ^ ^ ^ 7 ^ 1 ^ ¾
HROWW'
BUi"«coinpl«te^sifts«t«ellinn«pecialtiei. On 101 F r e e . ^ ¾ ¾ - ^ ^ ^ 1 ¾ ^ ^
"Keller far Ladles," in J*«*r, tj i
MMIL
.Vanu Paptr,
ilkltkmUr lkfa'1 C^, HsslMB Sv. rhUsHrs*
ISO'S REMEDY FOR CATARRH.—Best Easiest
to use. Cheapest. Relief is immediate. A cure is
P
certain. For Cold in the Head it has no equal.
1 prencrTbe and fully ea»
doree H1K G as the o n l y
s e r i n e for the certain cure
in thU disease.
G.U.1NUUAHAM.M. Ik,
AmBtirdtkuv. If. T .
W e have sold »*•: Q (09
many y e a n , «n« it ba%
elven the OSM of saliS*
faction.
D. R . D Y O H E 4 C O . .
Ohlcago, l i t
S I . 0 0 . V>lri by Druggist*
CATARRH
It is an Ointment, of which a small particle is applied
to the nostrils. Price, 50c. Sold by druggists or sent
by mail. Address,
E. T. HAZKLTINE, "Warren, Pa.
lit U the only r«medr G H S K
I an teed by Wrlttsn Contrsct,
ALTHOS
nignvd nndt»*Hcui?d before a
li]HHiiUed otrir«<r of the law,
Permanently Cure »11 disorders
• • • ^ i a M ^ n a u i i i i i ' i l by H.»IT (ibu..* nr eice*«es,and
rpftove w^sk men. St-ulcd pilniphlt't and rontracl free.
Th^Vnn M » H r c ' . \nne-i in A E t«. ninclrtnstl.0.
Chadwlek's M s s s a l .
7 In x A l a . l O i>-«cea>
Illuminated Caver.
e C a t T C O C C o n appltcatiun enclosinir one (2a.)
9C*J I r n t C stamp, by itid e**ing T h r o j n r a
H o l a n d , 1». O. K«.x I S O . . h l i i i d e l p ' I «. P a .
URtS
BASE BALL
ftHREWD
UlU.**—wsnted
* "to- handls
w h n tour
a wextra
aat
one "enjrrarru ^IHKJS." Quiet worker* can ataka
% pot of money without r.ak. Particulars free te
rltfht part es DT express only. Name your Bear*
est express offloe. Address, "t XC LsiOR VI*
GiUVl.vQ OO.," MS S. Clark St., Chicago, Ilia.
0
Clean House
only with
a
relief ti,r
b
KIDDER'S PASTILLESs^^H
?«**.i.TOV.LLLASTHUI
A to.
I Cherltwtowo.
PENSIONS
Write J. U 9»AKKWVATHVS
IOIIMK), Vich., f.T qitwutioa
blankn. Vetoed ai.d ••ejected
Claims a Specialty. Menii<m Ui# paper.
0 C E Z A MMfrn
A?TD B O * r » n l » t ? l V
s a D a S or >fk'hrMt oomnijs.ini an>t S O P A I S 1
•F'"r
fiRt'T'tT
lo AOi.,\TSon «ur . i.<* uUUK.
J . a . B l a ; u l . £ B 4 k C O M IIS AoaiusSt..yhlca«o, 111.
No stranrer ebould visit the ctty without «w«>hH^»
"Taaalira ttiBoa" 6c, Cigar.
In India recently a baby 8 months old was
married to a man 28 years of age.
Did you ever go within a mile of a soap
factory! If ao you know what material
they make soap of. Loboins' Electrio
So p factory is as free from odor as a chair
factory. Try it once. Ask your grocer for
Ik Take no imitation.
--,
,
jtfctfthsoelyi
may a m sail Si a qpwboy e '
Toaaaal Skfcar with th» «>Mh
Mafkeaia T b a y a r s m a h n t
war SMS*. T s a r K**e m a 'ssdtfa, m s
a s m , s a d OM ridar taoraMhly dry s a g
V B a » * n t sores bvm dw gaakax e i s wst
W a t s aaed aa a wanting eoat, tha t »
boat fcsttoaa bask, saaTms SBckar i s
at s a c a to s a ordinary coat Jaw, tr*
f cast bat kais s a d wffl
U*in\ rtwn—naw. sail ethar
todtawtathar.
I m n t i a
rganafBt atastped with M Fish Braae**'
L Doa't acctpt a»r ioferior eoat whasv
t e w tha T u b brand Slicker datlauaS
whhaa* a x t a c o a v gartkulua aad iilastnnad caV
yjAcoBsoif
Ely's Crgam Balm
b t h a beat remedy for
lufferlng from
still in
who haven*
told that there
places a fow eiU
Salvation ofi.
B e c a u s e there is nothing which is harmless, that will make
things perfectly clean with so little labor in so short a time ; besides,
it is economical and makes the work easy.
Do JTOll SlippOSe—that anything could attain such popularity as PEARLINE enjoys, and hold it, without wonderful meritthat people would use it year after year were it harmful to fabric or
kands—that the hundreds of imitations are attracted by anything
bat its wonderful success?
to use Pearline—«ee that your servants use
it, and insist that they do not use the imitations which.they are
often induced to try because of the worthless prise accompanying it*
or by the glib and false argument of some peddler.
You'll do well
PaAAUMaaawrar
u*
JAMS PTim, New Totn,
OPIUM
R a b t i . T h s onlyt>er1aJa
and e,.*y cure, br, J. I*
btepheus, Lebauou, Ohio*
| | C% MM I T STBftT. Bnok-vceptnc, penmanshla,
• a \ 0 I w l Km Arithmetic, Shorthand, e t c , thoroughly taught by mall. Low rates. Orriilarsfrea,
fcBYA\.NTTT COiOJSQiB. 4il Main 8 U Buffalo, W. T.
H I H I P t > should and tnny Imew how eh lid beailua
ffjlir
•%«11 b»-etfiei«»lwithout Vu no. I>a eer. I»>
e m i t I 0 » . J . H . D Y t , B u f f a l o , U, V.
*
i s l l s < » y S a m p l e *.rrin S ?. SKaTSaV
Unea nut umier bnis^it' ive. Wr.tu » ' < # •
S5star Safety Retn HoH«r '"•••>. H >ll % otToa.
vre Hloo<H*o*»oa where
MAGIC RE'iEDYr'; O.itahs.
,' f«t.v O u. I irUfut
Nun. WrlM.
saleeagrbyuowk i^uuedyCt»^
S
W^N. U . . D
VI 1-^4^
Tfhea writing to Advartlaers please eat?
turn saw the adwert,laeasaa%. In tale.
WP
9^w T*?!*
3*'
mmem"*»Hmm
:>•
**«
iyi iWW. I
l^|W
RMMM*
^<F
» T*H
..m*"**
IF
*
*f'
4ft F t i R T N I T X J X l E &
W e have a very complete
L 0. BE1HETT. EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR
STOCK: of FURNITURE,
Plnckney, Michigan* T&ursosy, October «4,1888
«1 •
I
I Mil.
I
• • I H I . « H » i l M
I
'"
—
M i l
•
— M l
•
—
^
WASHINGTON, OCTOBEB 22, 1889.
W i t h banners waving a n d with
t h r e e score b a n d s p l a y i n g ,>*Auld
L a n g e S y n e , " a n d " T h e girl I loft
b e h i n d m e , " w i t h merry good b y e s
a n d good luck t h e K n i g h t T e m p l a r s
h a v e , as a b o d y , g o n e away. A few
s t r a g g l a r s r e m a i n b u t they are only
a l e w , a n d the conclave is over.
T h a t it h a s been a triumph for
W a s h i n g t o n hospitality goes without
saying.
Dissatisfaction h a s been
well nigh u n k n o w n a n d the visitors
d e p a r t full of enthusiastic admiration
for t h e city of c e l e b r a t i o n s a n d s u p e r b
pavements.
T h e g r a n d p a r a d e b e g g a r s descript i o n . F o r four mortal hours the procession drifted b y . A sea of d a n c i n g
w h i t e p l u m e s , t h o u s a n d s of musicians,
A cheering, excited a u d i e n c e , these
were t h e d i s t i n g u i s h i n g e l e m e n t s .
T h e flashing m o u n t i n g s of t w o score
t h o u s a n d s of swords flashed in t h e
sunlight.
PATRON8 OF HUSBANDRY
All t h e n e w e s t novelties in
^
Wsshinfftoii L e t t e r .
Meckics,Fariers,wor
d
a n d everyone iu w a n t of
Ghairs in Antique Oak, Walnut
#$or Mahogany.)^
BID BOOM SUITS. CEHTER TABLES,
Extension Tables from $3.90 up.
%
we want a
BIG TRADE
H Nine different styles of Bed Springs, M
a n d offer e x t r a o r d i n a r y i n d u c e m e n t s t o b r i n g you t o t h e
Couches, and intact anything in the
/
FURNITURE LINE.
-
at prices never before heard of. W e b u y o u r g o o d s r i g h t a n d
therefore we are enabled t o sell them right.
V\re c a r r y in
stock a full line of
Look at the
Curtain Poles, Mirrors, Frames, Pictures, Cabinet fare
of e v e r y
description.
D o n ' t fail to call and hee u s before b u y i n g .
Y o u r s V e r y Respectfully,
<3-. -£*- S i g r l e x .
C
S
V»*
FURNITURE
Bucklcn's Arnica Salve.
T H E BEST SALVE in t h e world for
cuts, bruises, sores, ulcers, salt r h e u m ,
fever sore*, tetter, chapped hands, chilblains, corns, a n d all skin eruptons,
and positively cures piles, or no pav
required.
I t is guaranteed to tfive
perfect sati^facton, or monev refunded.
Price 25 cents per box. For sale
e
0
$5 Overcoat
worth
$ 7.
k
4fc
8
*
10
10 *
"
12
Our $3 Childrens' overcoats worth $5, great
value. Our $10 Mens'
Suits worth $15.
PILES, PILES, PILES.
LOOSE'S RED CLOVER P I L E REMEDY, is
a positive specific for all forms of t h e
T o thousands of t h e K n i g h t s this
disease. Blind, bleeding, itching, ulwas t h e first vacation since t h e meetcerated and p r o t r u d i n g piles.—Price
i n g a t San Francisco t h r e e years a g o ;
50c.
For saie bv F. A. Sigler.
a n d i t m a y n o t b e r e p e a t e d until
A . T. H u g h e s , o n e of* t h e superthree years hence at D e n v e r .
They
visors of W a s h t e n a w county s a y s :
m a d e the most of i t . L i k e school
"Seven years a^o T cured a very bud
boys let loose they played to their bv F. A . SLTILT.
case of t h r u s h with Curlett's T h r u s h
Levi R. Lee of Webster, Washtenaw R e m e d y ; t h e horse h a s shown no
hearts content.
Co. savs: " I had a very valuable horse symptoms of the disease since,'' F o r
for less m o n e y t h a n a n y o t h e r
T h e reception of Monday night which was aih'ieied with thrush five or
sale by F . A . Sigler,
H o u s e in_ t h e City can sell t h e m .
was t h e l a r g e s t ever had in t h e six veais and coubl not cure it u n t i l I
O
u r store is c r o w n e d from m o r n i n g
SI cTllEftDft CK£
W h i t e H o u s e , there b e i n g over used Unrlett's Thrush remedv whhdi
u n t i l n i g h t with c u s t o m e r s a n d buymade a permanent cure; could not get
LOOSE'S R E D CLOVER PILLS Cr:*K SICK
25,000 people in line to see the Presi- half what the horse was Worth while
ers.
T h e y nil a c k n o w l e d g e t h e
headache, dyspepsia, indigestion, cond e n t , T h e crowd rcdiculously lnrge he was troubled with the t h r u s h . v
stipation, 25c per box, 5 boxes for $1
as it was, would have been g r e a t l y Sold bv F. A. Stgler.
for sale bv F . A. S i l l e r .
increased had n o t so m a n y K n i g h t s
H . M . I d e , t h e shoer of F l o r a - O T O B E T H E L E A D E R S
J i m Snuilley, a noted horse j o c k e y ,
had the good sense t o stay away.
of central W a s h t e n a w county says: Temple, D e x t e r , jmd other noted t r o t ;
Com narati very few of the visitors h a d 'C!urU ; tt's H e a v e Remedy never tailed ters says: " H a v e never known C u r a chance t o shake t h e P r e s i d e n t ' s to give relief a n d to all appearances lett's T h r u s h Remedy to fail to pro246 East Main Street, cor. of Cooper,
h a n d and only a minority ever ^aw cured the horse I gave it to and they duce a p e r m a n e n t cure of t h r u s h ;
after
a
lew
applications,
smell
a
n
d
never showed any distress while being
the inside of t h e b u i l d i n g . T h e
F o r sale b y
worked hard or d r i v e n last.'' F o r lameuess is r e m o v e d / '
crush was terrible a n d t h e lino was sale by F . A . Sigler.
F . A. Si.Mer.
so long that it was a w a y into u n e x plored back streets beyond the S t a t e ,
ft CLOSE CftLL.
Mrs.
C.
A.
Johnson of Toledo,, bad
W a r and N a v y b u i l d i n g .
every Hymptom of heart disease, shortT h e landlords of W a s h i n g t o n a r e ness o.f breath, could not lie on left
still figuring o n the K n i g h t s from t h e side, cough, pains in client, etc., y e t
after being given up to die was cured
conclave. Most of t h e m a r e fairly by J)r. Miles' Nuw cure.
Sold by F.
39&4£J7fi
IJV
well satisfied with the results. T h e A. ftigler.
liverymen have made a fortune a n d
U D E A I ^ B l i F t S I3ST
ft REVOLUTIONIZED"?. M.
are thankful, after the chaste m a n n e r
Would you whip a sick horse? N o .
of liverymen.
Then don't use ordiimry pills, salt-,
senna, etc., for sick livers, bowels, etc.,
I t was left for a San Francisco m a n only use Miles' Pills, ( M. P.) the safest
to strike the best o p p o r t u n i t y .
W h e n and surest of pills. Samples free ai F .
t h e Conclave was held in t h a t city A. Sigler's.
h e was r u n n i n g a small j o b p r i n t i n g
Deserving Confidence.
office and was over i n n with card
I t is quite Kin-prising to notice t h e
r i n t i n g for t h e K n i g h t s .
T h e s e numerous report) of remarkable cases
of nervous diseases cured, such as hem cards have Masonic e m b l e m s and the ache, fits, nervous prostration, heart
n a m e of the K n i g h t a n d the designa- infections, St. Vitas' dance, insanity,
tion of his c o m m a n d r y .
T h e cards and prolonged sleeplessness, by Dr.
Miles' Restorative Nervine. This m w
cost about t w e n t y cents a h u n d r e d nnd improved brain and nerve food, and
a n d the K n i g h t s arc glad to g e t t h e m medicine, is everywhere gaining a r- markable reputation for curing \h<
d u r i n g conclave printed, for 813.00 a worst of these diseases, as '.veil &.•; the
h u n d r e d a n d upward. T h e San ! injurious effect;! of worry, nervous irFrancisco m a n b r o u g h t t w o small ritation, mental or physical overwork.
F. A Siglot t h e druggist, will jjire"
presses with him and in less than t e n away trial bottles of this wonderl'nl
hours after he opened u p he had t w o remedy. I t positively .eelftains no
opium or niorphino.^,.--^
local j o b offices r u n n i n g presses until
A Scrap ofJ.*n"pcr Saves Her Life.
3 o'clock in the m o r n i n g . H e claims
I t wa^,jrfst an ordinary scrap of wr; pP i n c k u e y , Michigan.
to have cleared 825,000 on thenjmnlv
week p i n g ' W e i > . but it saTod her life. S h e
He;
a n d it looks p r o b a b l e
i J vwas in the last stages of consumption,
printed cards b y the ton.
So nrueif: t o i a b y p i i y s i c i u l l 8 thnt she was mcurable and could live only a Bhort tini
for g r a s p i n g an occasion
HAVE YOU SEEN THE
T h e P r e s i d e n t has J:->e'en d e l u d e d she weighed less than seventy pounds.
On a pieee of wrapping paper she rpad
d u r i n g the past werik with inquiries of D r . King's New Discovery, und got
TIME TESTED"-UVICTDR OMWNEfcS1
as t g w h e t h e r tie is or is not a Mason. a sample bottle; it helped her, whe
T h e Siun'e question has been p u t b y bought a large bottle, it helped h e r
Their Tonlo, Alterative « i Oathartlo qualities htm
PATENTED ) , 5 ¾ ¾
been
uralf several h u n d r e d t i m e s during 1 more, bought another nnd grew better
»n " t i m e t e s t e d * " «ad the thousand* of testimonial! wkUk W
have.
re, and etill reeeire, ihow that there It nothing; better on •ale.
t h e last few months a n d t o each a iast,[continued its use and is now strong,
» If 700 feel imrOTJS or DilBtBCHO,0the L1TKR no donbt It to blama, a a « *
•Ingledoie of BILE BEAIT8( «e bean) will LINK Y O U U P *
letter has been w r i t t e n ; s t a t i n g t h a t healthy, rosy, plump weighing 140 l b s .
Call on y o u Drnrglet far then. Bold everywhere. 2 8 o . FIB.BORIS.
For fuller particulars poad stamp to W.
t h e President is not a n d never h a s H. Cole, druggist, F o r t Smith. Trial
Sent by mail, postpaid, on receipt ofprie*.
—~»*^m
J.F.SMITH
A
CO.,
Sole
Proprietors,
8
T
.
LOUI8*
MOW
been a m e m b e r of any secret o r g a n - bottles of this Wonderful Discovery
^BXIIfTlLlS.-;;lwlehtoaddmyt<!iiUinoiiytotheeffleteoeyofBnaB»»s«
rbr all BlHoni and Nerron* Trouble*. Myielf and wife hare lately irvaa thorn
ization.
I n d e e d , by some chance free at F . A. Sigler's drug store.
You can repair your own Harness, Halters,
atrial,wlthmosttatltfaetoryreeulu. Weihallalwaynk**ptheinlnta«a«*Mta>"
B. T. FiKMBOl, Bpo'l Ag-I E^oiUtiU Ufa !•», 60., St. UaU, 2ST
t h e r e is no K n i g h t T e m p l a r in t h e
Straps, &c., without expense or loss of time.
Ihipepsy.
It will make a nice clean job.
cabinet nnd only two of the m e m b e r s
This
is
what
yoit
ought
to
lmve,
in
a r e even Masons of a n y d e g r e e .
NO SEWING OR RIVETING I"
fact, yon must have it, to fully enjoy
OO TO THE
The size of t h e crowd d u r i n g t h e life. Thousands are searching for it No special tools. A common hammer will
conclave is seriously estimated a t daily, aud mourning because they find do the work. It is the most simple and
handy little device known. Can be applied
nbout 100,000 to 250,000 people. it n o t . Thousands upon thousands of to any portion of a harness. They are put
dollars are spent annually by our people
T h i s leaves it, despite reports to the in the hope that they may be attain this up, one gross, assorted sizes, in a tin box,
W h e r e you can b u y a Single o r D o u b l e H a r n e s s as c h e a p as y o u c a n find
contrary, less ftian half as large as boon.
dv
And yet it may bo had by all. handy to carry in the pocket
, ready
, for any them a n y w h e r e . B e i n g compelled to h a v e some money, I will sell a t t h e
t h a t in the city d u r i n g the i n a u g u r - We guarantee that Electric Bitters, if emergency. Ask your dealer for the
following p r i c e s :
them
ation.
P e r h a p s t h e uniform good used according to directions and t h e !
PRICE ONLY 25c PER GROSS,
F o r Nickel P l a t e , D o u b l e S t r a p Single H a r n e s s , 811.00; Single S t r a p 11n a t u i e a n d absenee .of noise and'I «»e persisted in. will bring you Good For Sale by Harness Makers, Hardware and inch t r a c e , wide B r e a s t Collar, nickel w i n k e r braces, fly t e r r i t , ?-8 inch side
j
i
„ i ,;•
,.i„.,„
Digestion ami oust the demon DyspepGeneral Stores.
straps, # l o \ 0 0 t o $14 00. D o u b l e H a r n e s s , see plate, without collars, $20.00
d r u n k e n n e s s m a d , t h e n u m b e r seem ! ^
^ ^ ^ i n R t e f t ( l E l j p p p H / \$e ,
smaller than t h e h o w l i n g disorderly recommend Electric Bittern for] >yspep-, R„ff n U Qnprraltv M n n u f a r t u r i n r Co t o $23.00; also sweat pads, c a n v a s collan»/whips, etc,. I will s e l l - a n y t h i n g
m o b that distinguished President'j K i a and all diseases of Liver, Stomach | D U 1 T a l ° ^ P e c r a l t y ManUiaCWrmg I/O. in the harness fine aa cheap as c a n be affimded'. T h e harness a r e alt of m y
Sole Manufacturers and Patentees.
own m a k e . B ^ r R e p a i r i n g a s p e c i a l t y , • Those m(tebted_tojrn_e a ? $ request*
Harrison's
i n a u g u r a t i o n with its ] and Kidneys. Sold at GOo. and 81.00
J"OB.
S " Y K i B © .
gresence.
I P e * M t t ® at P . A, SigUr's drug s t o r e . 6 7 . « « W a » h i n » t o n « t . B U F F A L O , H . Y . | e d to call a n d settle*
OVERCOATS,
SUITS OR
PANTS
U. S.
Scratchley & McQ,uillan,
The One Price Clothiers,
515 C a n yJ
Jackson, Michigan.
TEEPLE ? & ? CADWELL.
& " • ' " " ' :
- G-Tins, Ammunition
S[Sl|rlilI BGODS.
Pinekney,
Michigan,
FARMERS AND HORSE OWNERS
W HER MEBS
•WEST END HARNESS SHOP
y^y w
«Wa
r M > >;•?,. *• v-3
m*m
1
''••','
V,
'4
'••%•*?-
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:
•
' ' ' v ' • ''^'L,.-^^-U*r'''- -^
•*[V
<<&
:
^P|
tlMllfl
grtirfTruk Railway Tim Table.
ltummuttrkuwt nrrwop.
NO GREAT MEN W A N T E D .
^ W e
A Parisian B a r b e r Who D o e s N o t
Desire Their Custom.
S T A T I O N S . | GOING W*ttT
"Vlctor>Hugo waa once one of your
r. K A. X.
9:26
LENOX
patrons, I believe," said a k reach
ft &i 9:50
Armada
writer,
M. Planche, t o Brassier, a bar:lo
Borneo
:8U 10:16
Bochuter
7:05 10:00
b e r of Paris.
"Alas! yes," answered
1
:!4
t
h
e
barber.
J
h
e
word and the accent
JfPoattaejJ;
2:14
" W a s it not
2:4f. surprised the inquirer.
Wlxom
l»:10
4.(
la.
2:51 agreeable, then, t o have t h e greatest
-< S. Lyon-{
9:90
man In France —the greatest poet of
•:1«
6:0«
I *
i:38 hh? century, perhaps—for a customer? 1 '
Hamburg
9:58
5:4» PINCKNEY 10: ta
14:17
&:3D
10:30
4:40 T h e barber shrugged his shoulders.
vat
Gregory
6:17 atockb ridge 10:48
5:-«.
4rM
6:33 "Ah, monsieur, it is one of t h e worst
Henrietta
11:02
4:80 JACKSON 11:30
K:40 things that can happen to you, t o have
6:1»
11 trains ran o y ••central standard" t i m e .
a great man for a customer. You see,
U trains r a n dally .Sundays e x c e p t e d .
they are not like other men."
Then,
DPIEB,
JOHEFHHICKHON,
in
order
to
justify
his
paradox,
h
e reite&dant.
General Manager.
lated a chapter of pergonal experiABU Arbor & Northern Michi- ence.
gan Railroad Time Table.
"One day a groat lady, Mine, do
, whose hair 1 had dressed, a n d
tat abort Line between Toledo and Kaat 8agl- X
a a w , and the favorite route between Towho was much pleased with my work,
ledo and Grand Kuplds.
said she would recommend me to thirty or more of h e r friends; and in a day
Trains ran o n Central Standard T i m e ,
or two she sent mo a- p a p e r containing
F o r all points in N o r t h e r n miohigan ail the names and addre sscs of the peot a k e t h e Toledo, A n n Arbor •& North- ple, with her recoinmondatioa of m e
e r n miuhigan Railroad. T r a i n s lor at the bottom."
t h e n o r t h leave (Federman) or mon- " T h e recommendation of Mine, dc
r o e J u n c t i o n a t 6:19 a. m . , 4:0G p. m . X
! why, that wad as gnod as a fora n d 8.00 p. m.
tune to you, ray good man, 1 ' said M.
South bound t r a i n s leave monroe Planche.
J u n c t i o n a t 12:24 a. m. 10:20 p . m. and
" I t might have been, sir, but for SL
4d06 p . m. Connections made with Victor Hugo. Ho was hero the day I
taichigan
Central a t A n n Arbor, received it; he" had sat down in t h e
G r a n d T r u n k a t H a m b u r g . Detroit, very chair you a r e sitting in now. 1
7
L a n s i n g & N o r t h e r n a t Howell, Chihad
just
put
a
towel
round
his
nock,
cago & G r a n d T r u n k a t D u r a n d , Det r o i t , G r a n d H a v e n & milwaukee a n d when he seemed to bo seized with some
lnichigan Central a t Owosso J u n c t i o n . great thought and beckoned i m to l e t
F l i n t & Pere rnarquette a t nit. Pleas- him alone. He drew a pencil from his
a n t , Clare and Farwell. a n d Grand pocket, took a s l e e t of paper from this
Rapids & I n d i a n a a t Cadillac, a t To- table here and began writing.
ledo with railroads d i v e r g i n g .
"Ho h a d boon writing about flvo
minutes
when another customer eamo
H. W. ASHLEY,
A. J. PAISLEY.
G e n . P a s s . Aaeut in.
My men wero all busy, so, seeing
Gen 1 Manager.
t h a t M. Hugo h a d stopped writing to
sharpen his pencil, I supped u p to
him and said:
" 'M. Hugo, if you will pormit mo to
r-V
begin with you—I am in a h u r r y . '
We would invite you to call and
1
"Ura! I ' m in a hurry, too, said ho.
examine our large stock of
"Then ho got up all at once, paper
Fall and Winter
and pencil in hand, and started out of
the shop. I called aftar him t h a t h e
had the towel round his neek^arru ho
took it o!Y. Hut I did^rtr'mhicl the j
paper, because I •lUtPlfknovv what it j
C o m p r i s i n g all t h e latest Novelwas.
,,.---^'"
!
ties t h a t can be found in t h e
"
B
u
t
.
in'tho
afternoon
I
wanted
.
tho
j
Eastern markets.
papOr which M a o . do X
had given
mo, and couldn't find it, One of my .
men said it had been lying there on i
tho table. T h a t was tho paper that
i poBmrpiTccEsa
W e have no r e ^ u b i r opening d a y . M. Victor Hugo had tdten fijr hid
IBBlCriT SOI3E*St.
b u t will b e jVleuscd t o h a v e you
not's!
(
'• 'Ah, yes,' lie : aid. 'I remember; I f. mtmttt
had no soon ;r got into t!;e house liian
I had another and maca hotter idea,
AND K I D
« Y DISEASES.
and as I had, ther-'.ora, no further SU'MXEBUVER
h itlFuKMATIOH 8 » o « l o C . l . A»k Dr Ufl :fl»t or write
1
need of your paper, I \
A n d inspect o u r styles
jS M;iUa FSEEJ
WM. T. LIHE3LEV it CO.,
".'Tio' w it into Hie fire?'
^
u
^
i
n
M
J
w
a
t
f
c
i
'
V
B a * L» SoUe 8 1 ^ Chicago, 111.
1
and pricL'.s.
'I am sorvy to sa .- 1 <l:,i!' '
F PV.T-OTTTSJMO., /\i;e, 1/88. BniGHTiN-Kcnrcdnio
wish to inform the people ofr5&
T h a t w e h a v e a v e r y fine line of
•. t
Clinton Mills, All Wool Shawls
u.
*
We also have a very complete line of
&
at prices within reach of all.
:;*,
Special closing out sale of
HATS
*
AND
»
»
CAPS»=
Having conluded t o discontinue dealing i n H a t s a n d Caps, we'
will sell t h e remainder of our stock regardless of cost. I t
^ i l i pay you to call and examine this stock a t once.
W e also have a large line of t h e
OOLGE CELBRATED FELT SHOES!
Ill jLadies', Gents'. Misses and Children's sizes,
which w e will close out a t very low prices.
H i g h e s t F\ ic2.2*[email protected] p r i c e p a i d , f o r a l l h i n d s o f P r o d u c e ,
i n c l u d i n g HSutter a n d E g g s .
B A R N A R D & C A M P B E L L , Pinckney, Mich.
Well, W a r m Weather h a s Disappeared I
and so has our large stock of
\rs
m
at tuf
LADIES!
^
^
0i£!
paid a large and complete stock of
MILLINERY,
OODB will take its place.
Such a s Overcoats, Suits, Over Shirts, Underwear, Mittens, Gloves'
Socks, all kinds of Neckwear, which w e will sell as cheap if
not cheaper t h a n a t any other place in
Livingston County. ,
1<'\ i : . W I l f O H T . rJ?lB«> OTot^|<3is. l ? i i i c ? k i i e y , M i c h .
\
Respectfully,
G. L MARTIW,
Pinckney.
W h a t ] Serlinors E a t
The amount of aniin:il food di=iposed of in tho (h'nnan capital \A -^ich i; Jos.M.lNoniri, Aut. ('., R. I. &p. R. R.
'rrTAT.o,N.Y,.K?as J ' u ' s d . SuiTeren f r o m L n n i 'J.
th;il, tlividoa u[) ci;nalfy a.mo:i^ t)vo j! li.;; ) s v c r i t l v ••.. -H. >'ruc.uTiNECureil m o . Shanpopnlatir)n of tho city, itvyiohis an al- S ' u a , L a p t . SL< .•au:'r<.'h.::nunc, U h . S t ' b o a t Co.
3 F T . T . o n s , April *ii,'!>,s. B f U G n T I N E p h T s e n t lowance of two and a half pounds of ?j;I . ' i i a i o u . feT^v>ii)'u Imvc: Co. 'JCOFrauklinAv.
moat a week to every man, woman ?: f t . Louis, Drr.. ] . \ M." i : i : h i l I T I N E l n \ n a l M r i e | l
and child in the plac', including in- ',[ \ '..Uu'acldsK'd.riu'.sTTiunnK, ZYgA 1UD8. I l ' w a y .
•k-v;nr,,Tnd. V.>v, 1^,
Can r c r o m m e n d
fants in a n u s , moiuhers of the legis- ;: M t i U l U ' . ' N E hi^iil;/._J»rv.
oons I I A W K L A .
lature and ])".uioor.-!. hi other' w >rds, r, Ch:r.a.p;o TiiTlPn.AIarLli 26, X-i-Glnbc, N o v . 1 7 , ^
i'l.aitr.ited Ccnturv, ,>uu. IS, 'Ky,— Con:inorci:il
s iy.s tho London Tel"^'rnph. each and 'if
K TL-aveilei'.Feb. 1D/;SS, TRAIrfL U U I G l i 1'INK.
every liadinor, irro••'.p.-etlvo of a^o, or ^ r.«fer t o M a t I n v . .s. Lo,,\\ A ? P I I . , B u l l c c k Pro--!%
sex or politieal opinions is olheiaUj i J.bui-pai'djiJi'.i/t.U.S.Ex. G.r.Klrubal'lC.a-idl]un>. 1
credited with tho consumption of 111
pounds weight of beef, mutton, veal,
pork, lamb and horse-ilesh per annum.
No fewer than 7,00') horses are slaugh- The 1V.11 ^en?op of t h e I m p o r t e d
tered yearly for tho llerdin
meat
Cleveland Ihiy Stalliori.
market, their llcsh hoin^ parlly sold
I wish t o inform t h e people of Pinck- as "bnto'ner's meat, M in shops so'.'eially • V ; H O M E - : - I R . X J X , 3 ^ ;
ney a n d s u r r o u n d i n g c o u n t r y
aiTected to th.e r e t i i l ti'aao in "pfordo*
W i l l be a t the o h ! (loodrleh Livery
t h a t I h a v e j u s t opened a
ilcisch," and partly "vvoj-ko.l up" into
-newsausages,a popular variely of which'is b a r n , except, durimj; t h e "tate,v OUIM;
hawked " a l l hut"1 aho.it tho streets Powlet'ville ,1111 IM'l on l-\.irs.
lato in t h e evenini,-'
nnd during
Glares nt th
tho smaller hours of the early morn.
a. res
l'ol\
caM
Poor lVu-sians a r e niiicli addicted
ao
ue
in m y b u i l d i n g , 2d door south of
i Ml
L V.
are.
.ykit - t h e Monitor H o u s e , a n d would s;iy to hor.-e-llo.-di slewed in ;i savory
saufo;
n:)\'
do
!he.
we.r-to-l
>
d
i
;
lain
it
*<•••*;"' t h a t I am prepared to soil all kinds
3» \ '•» •
i : < t V-ell
>i>h.
ING FINER.
W o (oler vru'. • !',i< I);1-,}.
<ALL AT ANY TIME-
f -.il: Dinbetc^, air.I to-day am hcn-ty and well.
>VMn3.A.A.(iiLu.\:!,Tve:w.\Vonian'a i i x e b a u g c .
K ("HICAOO, T>to. 1. 'h7. My Kitlnpya t r o u b l e d me
ji^Vvjriil ycii'y, TSUKIHTIXK entirely c u r e d m e .
p
A. C.^.MITII, WfstorujN'ewrt Co.
'T.
1
-A
H
A PURE FRESH STOCK GF
'DRUGS AND MEDICINES.Z) r~
DIXON'S "StISXX?
STOVE POLISH
18 THE BEST.
j V n e i e L T a : , i ci . . e ,
11 <
•v :ui'.
.®FALL SEASON.-' :-;< A fine line of Stationery and F a n c y Goods.
New Harness Shop!
1
— — o - * - « ,i
Dl rerents
our
STC
T ^
HARNESS SBPE
l l ^ H A K N E S S GOODS !
'?!*'
( C H E A P E R than you c a n purchase
t h e m in a n y other place in Livings'ton county. Those desiriug t o buy
harnesses will find i t t o - t h e i r interest
to call a n d e x a m i n e my stock and g e t
prices on
SINGLE AND DOUBLE: LIGHT
AND HEAVY HARNESS
)
a;" a s o•>(• a.•e.onal v . a : i
own
even
name.
• ' . • / ! u a 1 -.• l i s
I n (lo.aaany.
Italy
F r a n c : t h e !;,•'.1 of f . o i ' s o s
a s s e s i n u a ; u e -1 ' e i . .
;;u 1
a ad
••• ' ' e s e i v e r t . e e . i u -
ei
TAT,
Kj i
t o s n e e n r e ; ' ; , " ' I P : > ia ' a t i i o a .red h e r . - )
of o n e S a . n u d \\r[\ r ' s ; : a i « t u n a ^ e i i i e * ^•a.
N"e-1"e•'
a n e e d a t e s , i n va.st i u u i l i t i e s . , , a d i m MfU'ts t o t h e m
:
r o>e
teAture, rie'i e o l a r o n m i i e i'a a i r , i n p a r i i c u i a r
t o B r u n s w i c k "\vur.>!
' n n r t a d e l l a of
o r , iuvd
' e e<' ^ r a i . > I a ! e .
: :; ' • V
i i'. I . v . i ,
•'•;
ti»e
' '
<
e
li ' \
Ml
iMnmuiei',
v ^
^v
OF A L B U M S
u s a e a II,
no trouble t o
A. SIOLER.
<">'(•/'' >)ti'>:
•/V.
T'.V1-
KiSESCBZiOtiZ
r>
;> .?
4
EEBYr>
I.
i> !i'M'el,y irivaa. tli.it in ;a'i'.- ua nci' i 1 an o; i.er ^.'ra;.' eu 1 o the n ii d' i i i t i l l e d . e x e i ' U t o r o ! ;ia« evieM • e l ' S;t;ii
d e e e n s e i l , '. >v t i l e l i o r . • ' ! : ' ! •{• OL 1 ' r o e i t e . l o r t l i e t ' o e n ' v e l ' L;v i m r - i e a , i i ;
t i n - . . i h i i d a y e , .!>,; .-. A . l b . 1>->''J. t h >:•»
w i l l u e M">!d a • p l C ^ a v " v . ; e t o i h e
!i i'^lie.-t b i d i e e r . a t 1 i e ' 1 ' l a e a i t e \ .•;":, >\
in t l i e C o , ; : : ! y o t L i \ i n u - t a i . i;t s.-.:-M . i t e , o n : ! e a d a v . ( l i e i l t h r];iy < f
N o V i a d ' e r A . 11 . i >'.';), a t H ' l l i e e A
ill l i e ' l e e . ' e u o e i l > U i ' . i a t t:, t >' | s n l i j " e t t o
;A1 i ' ! i , : i e'i ' M ' a n ' " N s
i ^ ' iiii'Vt ' . a : . e e i
i i in ;• ,\ A c e \ ; - ' i u y a t 1 1 , " 11'aie o l ' \ l i e
,i,
Boh) ma," a/ul "sa.u••isson oe
i.yoa.'
This hulk- of the sahs'emee to which
these
dainties owe their beine;, how.^efore purchasing elsewhere. Wcalever, is pork, fro.ih o r s i l t e . i t and in
. so keep in stock a full line of all
w
n
^Idttla of good needed in a first-class all probability the -170, d;> piv-a that
ttrfness
shop. We are also prepared annuallv pay the debt of nature in
f
tribute to Borlineso appetite-* iind their
to do all kind* of
way to the table in the shape of either
sausage
ham; for Prussian;* rarely
Repairing Neatly and Promptly. eat roast or
d e ; i t a e l ' S'l e l oeee.j-M ; ! . . , . ' a t I lie t: l i e '
pork Or fried bacon, wnor.ias o!' v;Aid s a l e . ) ! lie ' e , .•• • : r,..' A " - i a A; d
W e i n v i t e a l l t o call a n d w e will be they never weary of smoked and cured
real e>!ai •• t, -^v ,; :
i'ee - " u : ii rait
pleased t o show goods.
preparations of •ph.;. Besides devour- ( | U ; i r t " r [\ ' e ! i 1," n o 1 ' ' h , ' ' e - t v-U.iVeaing thin porcine ho^t, Borlin stands :vc- \\) o f s e c t e-'u t v. «-nt v i _ " . : ! e i-i'ii o n e ( 1 i
countant yearly for the violent doath n e v t l i o f r a n e e f m r ; p ) e ; i i | . c o n t i i . n We will continue our «*hoe shop in
for: v ( lOi a, r e , mere or
Connection with the harness shop un<1 Of ]*J7,.*H)0 head of cattle, 13L500* Im«,'
ft,ld
s;:uat"d in toe imvi
iftll do all kinds of repairing neat e a h e s , nud ol(),tX)0 shoep, hoside,s a ! i ' u l n nh.-inu
n i I M V I 01111111-. a n d i ! a t e a i o i ' e s a i d .
rauititu^o
of
minor
animals,
all
of
•fid cheap. Give me a call.
d o e i a a i W . l b . 1 V.MI:U.
which vanish in duo '•course Jowu hor
Executor
i
flilw.T.l
capaelou* m*w.
ThOB. Clinton.
of all khickfcrBirthdays.-
S3
m GREAT
LOSSOM
Bleed Purifier.
~
General Blacksmith.
S'.e p - M e A by D.i;iu 1 R i c h a r d s a n d
iArm.Tiy oeeupied by E d . P a r k 0 n Mill street.
CO
TRACE MARK •
I T CUTRSSS
C a n c a n , Humors, Sores, Ulcers, Swelling*Tumors, Abscctses, Blood PoisoninR, Salt
R h e u m , Catarrh, Erysipelas, KhpumatUm,
a n d all B l o o d a n d S k i n D i s e a s e s .
I ^ i c s , $1 pt>r Pint Bottlo, or ti U o t t l e s for $Sk
1 lt>. CAO Solid F A tract ¢2.30
J . M. LOOSJ2 HED CLOVEit C O - k
iwtroit, Mich.
f
r i i \vb
M1 L i
AIO
MICH.
;;ORK GUARNATEED,'
i'RICl^S KHASONABLE.
. .>e
*$*Horse Shoeing a Specialty.'
*Wrimr-
THE STATE.
Horrible Accident at Lansing-.
A terrible accident, resulting in the almost instant death of three men, occurred
' U Lansing on the 13th Inst, while a Michigan Central wrecking crew was engaged.
in
clearing
up
a freight
train
wreck
ou
the
Lansing
Transit
railway. T h e killed are: P e l e r Ouinn
of West Bay City, conductor, iged 42,
George Ruby, of Jackson, machinst, age SO,
J o h n 'f antilevish, of Bay City, brakomau,
ageSJ.
While the mon were engaged in lifting a
wrecked switch engine upon the track the
Iron hoisting beam of the steam derrick
broke off and tell upou a group of over a
do/en workmen. All but the three abovenamed jumped aside in time to escape
serious in. ury.
T h e skulls of Ruby and Quinn were terribly shattered and Tautileviih's chest w a s
crushed.
Despite his terrible injuries
i^uinn lived nearly an hour. The accident
occurred iu the presence of a large crowd
who were witnessing the crews work.
Both Kuby and (,v»uiun leave families. T h e
latter was oouduotor of the construction
t r a i n on t h e Sagiuaw division and w a s rearded by the company as almost invaluale at wrecks, owing to his coolness and
experience. Kuby had been in the service
of the company lor 30 years.
f
Mictaisrau I. 0. (i. T.
T h e annual session of the grand lodge of
•Good Templars was held in Grand Kapids
t h i s month.
T h e report of the grand chief templar
• t a l e s that he h.<s traveled over 1^',000 mLes
the past year visiting lodges by rail, 7S > by
teams, 2tt0 miles by water and 34 miles on
foot. Ho attended 4« d i s r i c t lodges, U
subordinate ledges, delivered 1S1 addresse s , organued iy lodges, reorganized two,
and wrote ne.irly 1,.)00 loiters.
"The
•order," ho says, " i s not as strong as it w a s
a year ago numerically. The last two c^mp . i g n s have done much to weaken t h e
•order. During t h e months of August, September aud October, ISSs, wo lost upwards
of 600 members. Tb'.s was duiiug the heat
of the campaign. We not only have checked the failing off but have turned the
*ide."
The election of officers resulted BB follows: G. L., Allien Dodye; G. T., P . J.
Connell; G. C. T., O. W. B U i r ^ G r a n d
Kapids; G. V. T., Eda Langwortby, Spencer Creek; G. S e c , Albert Dodge,. Fowlerville; G. Treas., P . J. Connell, Muskegon;
G. Counselor, C P . kussell, Detroit; grand
superintendent of juvenile templars, Mrs.
T B . Knapp, Howed.
A Cowardly Murder.
F r a n k b r o w n , son of Justice P a r l e y
"Brown,who lives three miles souih of Heading, was alone with his wile at his house
Wednesday evening when, at nine o c o c k ,
he wus called to the door by some one who
rapped for admission. On openmg the
door he was shot dead by an assassin, who
is as yet unknown. The ball entered one
eyo and penetrated the braiu. The greatest excitement prevails in tho neighborhood. No trace of the assassin has been
ifound beyond some tracks in the muddy
• road leading to t h e depot in Heading und
then into t h e village where they were lost.
I t is supposed the villain, fearing he
would be tracked, hope to muke it appear
t h a t he took a train out of town, but returned and is st 11 in the village or has gone
out into the country again. There is not a
hint of any possible motive for the dast irdly deed. Every nerve will be strained to
solve the dreadful mystery surrounding the
crime. Mrs. Brown, wife of the murdered
• man, who"was the only one in the houso
with him when the shot was tired, ran to a
neighbor's and gave the alarm. She did
not soe the murderer.
The Jiips Try It.
T h e secretary of the stato board of
health has received from Kimurs, prol'ess• or at the navy medical school, Tokio, Japan, a medical journal published in Japan
• in bo«h the Japanese aud English languages, in which is tho report of the investigation of a malignant disease, which
caused irreat excitement, and some cl the
people lei t their homes in order to escape
t h e ''horrible pia^uo." Dr. Ivimura received instruction at tho university of
Michigan and was familiar with Prof.
Vaughan s researches, by which ho d i s
covered tyrotoxiconThis en b ed the
• Japanese medical ameers to carry on an in
"vestigation, which resulted in proving that
•the disease was due to tyroto\icon poison
ing. Theie was an unusually large amo.int
of oysters in toe bay and these the people
discovered and at..s in large quantities. T : e
oysters cont i n e d t h e poison. The people
who ate them were made sick and many
died. When they learned that tyrotoxicou
in the oysters caused the disease they stopped eating the oysicrs and the ''plague''
ceased miraculously.
Itassemer Has a Sensation.
Joseph Uust nnek, a German shoem iker,
>f Bessemer, has for some time quarre.ed
•with a Hung irian named John Pustore,
and on three occ isious had the latter arrested.
At au early hour the other morning P a s tore threw a stone through Custannek's
bedroom window. Custanuek then went
outside to r e i n o n s t r d e with the Hungarian,
when the I. tter attacked bitn with a club.
Custaunek bred three shots in the air to
frighten Pas'.ore, but when the latter drew
a knife the German shot him in the head,
killing him instantly.
The sympathy oi the community is with
C u s t n n e k , as Pastore was qu rrelsome
and revengelul. Custannek wus arrested
and lodged iu jaiL
«.
A Life Prisoner Acquitted.
The second trial of Oregon Hamilton in
Newaygo, for beating his infant child to
•death, resulted in his acquittal.
The first trial of Hamilton for the crime
occurred in M rch, 18>vj, and resulted in a
v e r d i c t for conviction, and he was sent to
t h e Jackson prison for life. The conviction
was brought about through the testimony
of Mary Mars!on, a woman whom Hamilton had hired t<i care for the child. ?>he
swore that the father had repeatedly beaten the child in the most brutal manner
At the present trial Hamilton introduced
a flood of testimony showing the g r e a t affection be had for the child, and the trial
Oecame so sensational that standing room
i n tho opera house, where the trial occurr e d , could hardly be-obtained.
The Law to be Tested.
Under the new liquor law the county
•treasurer summoned Dunham <& Treat, a
Nashville saloon firm, to provide a new
bondsman, as the treasurer claimed that
one of their bondsmen had become a nonresident.
T h e saloonkeepers' attorneys have appealed the oase, and base their appeal upo n several different points, i m p o r t a n t
among whioh a r e two which claim t h e law
40 60 unconstitutional. One claim is t h a t
•the law signed and approved by t h e Gove r n o r is not t h e one pasted by the legislat u r e , and another is t h a t t h e law confers Judiciary powers upon t h e county
•treasurer.
Rev. Edwin Shaw bee beta adjedged
A new savtnge aad commeroiel beak It
ineeae end seat to the Kahtrassoe asylum.
to be established In P o r t Huron.
George Tripp end his brother Joseph of because be took an nndee Interest bi card
Geo. W. Watson, formerly landlord of
hotels in Coldwater and Ann Arbor, died Freeland, w e s t eoon hunting, aad in get- playing and boree racing.
Mrs. Biokard, who wee abet in the heed
the other afternoon at Marshall of Bright s ting over a fence Joseph's gun discharged,
disease. H e had been ill for a long time, the contents bitting his brother in the side by her husband in Grand Beside a abort
time ago ie recovering at the home of her
and recently his hotel offices were taken oausiag death a few hours later.
on a mortgage, so t h a t he died almost penWork has been resumed at the Cochrane brother in Traverse City* T i e ballet bee
niless.
miUuMT company's works iu fiseanaba, the
The planing mill of Sailing, Hanson A Co.
The university regents have appointed oitisens having raised the $10,000 required
was burned the other day at Grayling.
President Angeli, Hegents Draper and by them.
Whitman and Profs. Demmoo and Patteea
A poet-graduate course Is to be e stab Lose $1000, no insurance. One of the firecommittee to get up a book that will con- liahed in the law department of the un iver fighters was seriously burned.
tain the names of all those who have tuken sity.
S t Augustine's (Catholic) church society
a degree in any p a r t of the institution since
of Kalamaioo has purchased 8S acres of
W.
K.
Fullmer
of
Kalamasoo
was
robbed
its organisation, t o g e t h e r with a full list of
land lust south of the city for $2,100, upon
murtiouiated students whodid not remain a t Of *itt& und a gold watch in Grand Rapids whioh it will erect a chapel for Sunday
the
other
n
i
g
h
t
His
room
was
on
the
the university t h e full period for time need*
school work in that district, which includes
ed to complete t h e requirement!! of a de- ground floor and the robbers gained en- the paper mill workers, e t c
trance
through
a
window.
gree. Tne work will give t h e present resiVan Buren county is taking steps t o be
Feed Felton and his wife of Jackson redence of the living und the last residence
the
first county to vote under the new
and date of death of t h e rest. It will fur- tired the other night and left t h e water gas
nish all academic degrees that any gradu to burner open. About three o d o c k he woke local option law.
G r a n g e r s of Van Buren county are t r y may have received, his civil war record, up and found his wife nearly dead. H e
and note high official position he may have managed to o r . w l to a window and open it, ing to break up t h e coffee trust, and bring
the price of that article down to such a
held.
t h u s saving their Uvea.
price that all may enjoy a oup of t h e beverBen.
West
of
CroasweiL
broke
his
leg
John L. Frisbie, eight years clerk of
age
that "soothes but does not i n e b r i a t e . "
Hillsdale county, wid six years United while playing base ball a few days ago.
A petition will be circulated throughout
Mary Race of Riga, is looked u p in the state, by which the signers agree to
s t a t e s counsel at Kheims, France, is now
landlord of the Lawrence house in Adrian. Adrian jail for trying to kill J. J. Jones.
abstain from the use of t h e article until it
Rumored t h a t the Lake Shore oar shops is sold ut a reasonable figure, which t h e
J u d g e Cooley, chairman of the interstate
commerce commission, is now aft his home in Adrian are to be moved to Elkhart, Ind. grangers think is about 12 to 15 cents.
in Ann Arbor, suffering from nervous prosThe trial of John H. Bush und Michael
Lightning struck the barn of Mrs. Willis
tration.
Weliban, for manslaughter in connection Parks, near Novi, the other morning. T h e
Chas. B. Keehne, the slick young man with the collision of a street car and loco- barn w a s burned, aad one horse killed.
who shot and robbed Grocer Grove W. motive at Kalamazoo last May, will not
The Canadian customs department has
Griffin of Muskegon the night of Sept. 1!<. come off until t h e December term of t h e refused permission for American wrecking
w a s caught a few days a^o, confessed and circuit c o u r t
apparatus to be used in raising the Armour,
pleaded guilty, aud Judge Dickerman senThe foundations of t h e new court house sunk in 75 feet of water in St. Clair, on t h e
tenced him to 15 years a t the Michigan of Sanilac county a r e said to be unsafe.
ground t h a t all the necessary appliances
state pris m. The fellow took it very grateThe prosecuting attorney of Delta county, can be obtained a t Windsor.
fully as he expected a much more severe has been ordered to investigate the charges
The supreme court has denied a manseutence.
of malfeasance in office on the part of C. damus in t h e Detroit election case.
A. H. Buel a Grand Rapids salvation W. Lightfoot and A. C. Zierath, aldermen
At Watersmeet Engineer Kelly of t h e
of that place.
army man. ; ged 2» years is missing.
Milwaukee, L a k e Shore & W e s t e r n railJ. R. Wadsworth of P o r t Huron,, and E. road, ran his engine into a number of box
Ameil Gosch has been sentenced to JackA.
Wildy of P a w Paw, a r e members of the cars standing on a Bide track. The engine
son for I'J ye.irs for the murder of Dan Sinc a i r of Boono township, Kent county, in Michigan contingent at t h e farmer's con- was thrown completely over, and t h e enAugust last. Gosch says that he would not gress iu Montgomery, Ala.
gineer and fireman were both severely inhave ured had he not been in fear of his
The burns of George T. Burroughs near jured, and perhaps fatally scalded by steam
owu and his f.mily s safety. He also says B e l v i l l e , together with their contents were escaping from the boiler.
th.it he was convicted on f dse testimony, burned the other day, at a loss of $4,000.
P a t r i c k Clansey, one of F l i n t ' s respected
and was as good a m m to day as any of his
J. M. Allen of the Dexter Leader, drives farmers, while attempting to dodge by a n
prosecutors. His case will be appealed to a 2:30 horse, and it s a beanty too.
F. & P. M. engine which was switching a t
the supreme court.
A* B. Keehne, the man who shot and the crossing, was struck and thrown upon
Higgins s pinning and saw mill, cider robbed Grove Griflin, a Muskegon grocer, the main track and run over by a second
and jelLy worksaudeviiporatorin Belleville, a few weeks ago, w a s arrested in t h a t city engine, one of his legs being so badly
were burned tho other morning. T h e tire the other night. H e was arrested en an- crushed that it had to be amputated.
probably caught from the burning sulphur other charge, and the omcers succeeded in
F r a n k Hames was p u t off t h e train on
in the bleacher. About 10 h aids a r e frightening him into confessing t h a t he the T r a v e r s e City branch of the Gr.md
thrown out of employment. The loss is shot Grimn.
Kapids & Indiana railway, and it is alleged
about *>,000; insurance *.">00. During the
t
h a t in reveuge he placed a b a r of iron in
J. W. Kelley, a noted Irish politician of the
progress of the fire a gang of men men atfrog of a switch at Keystone;. The enLenawee
county,
died
at
his
home
in
Hudtempted to move a cider press, which fell
gineer
of an approaching train s a w it and
ou i'uil. Talbot, a young married man, son recently.
stopped before any damaee w a s done.
crushing his skill.
Horace Sebring, the Three Oaks young Hames w a s arrested a t S l i g h t s station,
Judge O. A. Smith has appointed a s a man who attempted to poison bis family so aud, having waived examination, his case
soldier's relief commission for Ingham he might marry the girl of his choice and will be brought up at the circuit court.
county Dr. K;.sh J. Shank of Lansing, Dr. have money to keep her on, has been senA Lake Shore & Michigan Southern
W. W. Hoot of Mason, and Chas. A. Ninis tenced to 25 y e a r s in the state prison at
of Stockbridge, all o.d soldiers. This is in Jackson. Sebring confessed the crime re- freight train collided with a Michigan Central engine on the Belt railroad in Lansing
accordance with the law enacted I st win cently, and its motive as well.
ter, authorizing the levying of a special
A nine-months old baby of Joe Laberge the other night. Both engines and three
towuship tax of uo> to exceed one tenth of of East T a w a s w a s burned to death t h e cars were wrecked, but they trainmen esa mid . nd requires the judges of probate to other day. An older child upset a lighted caped by jumping. T h e loss will exceed
$20,000.
appoint a relief commission of three per- candle, setting fire to the baby's clothes.
It is proposed to consolidate t h e W e s t
sons in each county.
George S. Boss of Ridgeway was killed
Michigan
and Kent county fairs.
by
a
Wabash
train
near
Hallo
way
t
h
e
Addie Peterson a 10 year old girl of LanLumbermen
say that very little- work
sing, who has been ste ding from stores in other day.
will
be
done
in
the cedar camps this y e a r
thut city for some time, has beeu arrested.
Albert J. Huggerth of Battle Creek, and
Mrs.
Freelove
Barnes, wife of a revolulC.
M.
Wood
of
Anderson,
have
been
apA library association has been formed by
P o r t Huron lawyers, with a capital of pointed delegates to the F a r m e r s ' congress tionary soldier, died in Morric,e a few d a y s
ago, aged y» years.
in Montgomery, Ala., next month.
¢1,500.
A ye.ir and-a-half old child of Joseph
Albion wants the Michig n bath tub comTwo insane criminals escaped from the
Thomas
of Marine City was sittiug in a
pany
to
uaovo
from
Homer
to
that
place.
louia .:sylum the other night.
chair by the stove when its clothing caught
Chris.
Buschhis
of
Sebewaing
Jost
his
Uapt. John Miner of Detroit is said to
fire. The mother, attracted by t h e child's
contemplate the construction of a ferry bain, a separator, two threshing engines screams, ran to its a d and found it comund
two
years
harvest
of
wheat
by
lire
the
bo t IOO feet long and '&) feet wide, to be
pletely enveloped iu flames. She t h r u s t
modeled at er the Detroit river boats and other day. Loss, $.{,000.
the
little one into a barrel of w a t e r to ex10 have great speed, all for summer use
W. J. Stafford has been appointed road- tinguish the flames, burning her hands and
between Mackiuac island and neighboring master of the Duluth, South Shore & At- arms in a frightful manner. The child w a s
ports.
lantic railway, from Mnrquette to the Soo burned from head to foot.
Samuel W. Dorr, a resident of this state aud St. Iguace, vice C. H. Watson resigned.
Judge Chauncey Joslyn h a s presented
since 18 2, died at his home iu Manchester
Rumored Unit a $2,000,000 company will a claim agianst Ann Arbor of ¢10,000 for
a few days ago.
furnish water power, canal and build eleva- permanent injuries, pain, suffering, loss of
Celery growers of Kalamazoo estimate tors at Sault Ste Marie.
time, medical attendance, nurses and meditheir loss by frost at $300,000.
Mr. Wiley and Mr. Clark of Wileyville cine, occasioned by falling on a defective
John Fuller of Oscoda aecidently shot went out coon hunting the other night. sidewalk.
Leonard Snii'h, whj.e fooling with a re- Clark climoed a tree, aud soon after Wiloy
John Hose foil under a railroad train at
volver the other morning. The bull enter- shot at a coon in tho same tree. Instead of Bessemer the other day and w a s cut in two.
ed Smith s head near the base of the brain hitting the coon he shot Clark, and the poor
Under the state banking law, Kalamazoo
a. tho back aud lodged in the forehead, fellow fell from tho tree, dead.
and Lansing have been made reserved f
breaking tho skull, but not coming through.
Marcus Budlong esc iped from t h e cities.
Sm.th lived from 11 o'clock, when the ac- asylum lor tho insane at Ionia ttie other
P . C. Biildwin of Lakoview was t h r o w n
c dent happened, uutil li o'clock in tho night. A reward of $20 is offered for his
from
a horse and killed a few days ago.
afternoon.
capture.
John
Woinhart, the Jnaian horse thief
Mrs. Brotherton of Jackson was seriousThe man, Goodison, who mysteriously who was
in jail at Benzonia, sat quietly
ly burned by a gasoline stovo the other disappeared from Hochostor, and was
day.
thought to have been foully dealt .with, is reading a paper the other noon, w h e n he
was seized with an cpiletio fit, a n d ten
A two years old child of N. Ackley was now said to have eloped from a New Jer- minutes later ho was dead.
sey
city
with
his
cousin
and
about
$1,200
©*
burned lo death in h-s farm house in ColAugust Dahlman, employed at t h e Ropes
fax township,
Wednesday, while the someone's else money, and is living in Mex- gold
mine, foil 200 feet down a shaft and
ico.
mother was absent. Her return prevented
was
insiantly
killed.
Emerson
Chamberlain,
an
Allegan
coun..uother child from meeting a similar fate.
James
S.
Hooker,
father of F . A. Hooker
Joseph Roberts, a h irnessmaker of L;ike ty inmate of the Michigan asylum, Kala- who died at Char.otto
recently, wus a dimazoo,
hung
himself
the
other
night.
His
Odcss , w is found dead in his store the
rect
d
e
p
e
n
d
e
n
t
of
Rev.
Thomas Hooker,
lather
and
brother
committed
suicide,
and
other day.
in l.>&i Chamberlain drowned his daughter who came to America iu the Mayflower,
McLaughlin, an escaped prisoner from aud threaumed to kill his wife. He was and who is mentioned in history as the
Negaunee, was captured in Winnipeg tho 40 years old.
ie dor of the brave colony t h a t settled in
other day.
i
The losses by tho Grand Haven tire are Hartford.
The annual reunion of the Twentieth
fixd
at $500,000.
Michigan infantry was h o d in Battle
THE MARKETS.
Richard Wert, for over 30 years a resiCreeK Oct. 17. Chester D. Berry of coinpuny I, was elected president; George S. dent of Saginaw is dead, aged SO years.
Smith of company 1, secretary and treas- I Tho quarry at Stony Point has been
New York Gram Market*.
u r e r ; L. A. liaker of company B , orator. abandoned, and o0 men are out of work.
Wheat.
87^@ 87½
The next, tho twenty fifth reunion, will be
Corn
80% (g 40
There
are
470
veterans
in
the
soldier's
held in Marshall in October, 18'. 0.
Oats
25;Ji\u}
home at Grand Kapids.
The Twenty-seventh Michigan volunteer j Mrs. Judson W. Hopkins, an old resident
Chicago Grain Market.
infantry me., in L .ns.ng Oct. 17. T h e fol- of Lansing was burued to death the other Wheat..
[email protected] 83
lowing regimental o.hcers were elected: night. Mrs. Hopkins was alone in the Corn.,.
»1 ($ 8 1 *
President, Oscar Hancock, Hillsdale; vice bouse and the sleeve of her dress caught Oats.!
16¾¾ 19
president, .lames i ainpbe.l, Lansing; sec- <lire from the kitchen stove. She attempted
Toledo liralu Market.
retary and treasurer, John Vim Horn, Port- to run outside for help, but finding the rear
Wheat
81
82
laud The next reunion will bo hold in door locked sank down upon the floor and
Com
83
Lansing on the Wednesday of state fair slowly roasted to death. The flames comOats
20 &
week.
municated to the house and her body w a s
Detroit Market*.
William Neal aged 99 years, died in the found by the firemen burned to a charred Wheat, No. 2 Bed
81 (¾
%
Kalamazoo county poor houso recently. and almost unrecognizable mass.
"
"u 3 "
75 @ 7 5 *
He has lived in that county since 1840.
J Judge Hugh McCurdy, newly-elected
"
1 White
81 (S 8 1 *
Five brick >; relies of the new library deputy grand commander of the Knights Clover seed
8.H6 (& 3.70
building of Olivet college fell to the base- Templar, was given a rousing reception in Oats
22 ($ 23
ment the other day. Georee Kr.tzier and C o r u n n a t h o other night.
Corn
,
S3
34
•lames Hock were buried in the debris, and
1.50 <4 1. 75
Potatoes are bo ing shipped from Petos- Apples, per bbl
seriously injured. Frazier died the next key at the rate o* 1,1)00 bushels per day for Butter
18
19
day.
Beans, hand picked, per bu l.bO
23 cents per bushel.
*5
11 <8 12
Robert Oaks, under indictment in DecaMrs. William Clifford, of Htllsdsle, Cheese
3%(<3
6
t u r for conspiracy, who escaped from an dropped dead while preparing breakfast Beef, dressed
>4
Veal
6Hi4
9
officer recently, has been re captured at the other morning.
Mutton "
,
4¼^
S
St. Joseph.
The "Deaf Mute Cadets" i s the name of Lamo •*
12 @ 12
T h e house, barn9 and sheds of S. C. Boy- a military company organized a t t h e deaf Kggs..
19 & -0
Ian, in B ittle Creak townsh p. wero burn- and dumb school in Fliut,
.
Timothy, per ion
11.00 (¢¢13.00
ed the other night, a t a loss of fo,500, with
The case of Chris. Johnson/against War- Clover
"
7.00 (¾ 8.00
¢.3,0()0 insurance.
den Watkins of the Ionia house of correc- Timothy straw, per t o n . . . > 4.50 § 5...0
T h e barns and sheds of the L a k e Super- tion, for damages, for injur.es sustained by Clover straw,
'• . . . \ 7.00 (^ 8.00
ior iron company in Jshpomlng, w e r e a flogging given while Johnson was a con- Hides, No. 1 Green
L 4 (g
4
vict in that institution, resulted in a
burned the other night. Loss, $ ,000.
"
"
Cured
iUtit
5
«
"
Calfskin....
4 ft
4
Postmaster Bennett of Jackson, who verdict for Johnson of $ i33.
'•
••
Veal k i p . . . .
4
was reoently removed by the postmaster
It is said that 60 men are killed every
'
75 @ 2.00
general, proposes to fight the matter. month in the iron and copper mines of t h e Sheeppelts
Onions, $ h e
1.75 (g 2.00
Bennett, says no one but the president has Lake Superior district.
Potatoes, V bu
45 « .88
authority to remove him.
Samuel Hurd, an alderman, of Stanton,
9
Fowls
8 @
Chas. M. (irow has sued ex Sheriff Mo- Is oharged with neglect of official duties,
(4
9
D
u
c
k
s
.
.
.
.
7
and
the
Governor
is
asked
to
remove
him.
Caull of F d n t for I10.0J0. MoCaull had
11
10 (
occasion to lock Grow up two years ago, T h e Governor hus directed the prosecuting T u r k e y a
4
attorney, of t h a t county to investigate t h e Tallow. V l b . . . .
hence the suit.
8W
.80
matter.
.29 _
T h e new town of Cnpemlsh, lies & miles
The supreme court has rendered a de- Woor,*1ft
L1VS STOCK.
from Traverse City, 30 from Manistee, 34 cision to t h e effect t h a t the Detroit city
Hogs—Market fairly active, light, »4.05(¾
from F r a n k f o r t and 40 from Cad 111 ao. railway company la exempt from taxation.
4,50;
rough packing, t8.U(Kd4; mixed,
Being a railroad center and h ving a baokThe national prison assooiatioa meets at *4<ibL40; neayy packing and shipping, $4
ing of good farming lands, the outlook for Nashville,
Te|in,.November 16th, A m o n g , (SK30.
the town is very promising.
the addresses will be one by Warden Hatch,
Cattle—Market steady; natives, 18(38.78;
Business men of Big Rapids have organ- of Jackson, on "Discipline," and one by
ized t h e Big Rapids highway association, Warden Watkins, of Ionia, on "Aid to d i v .eesxa, [email protected]; stockers, 11.90^2.96;
Takes steers, [email protected]
for t h e purpose of grading end gravelling oharged prisons re.' *
StopHferkeAttseAy^uUves, ISQiM;
all roads leading out pf that city.
WOLVERINE ITEMS.
it . U.k -
NEWB SUMMAB1
A TABERNACLE IN ASHES,
Ikt Famous BrooUm
Burned.
The fansona Brooklyn
which ttev. T. DeWltt Talmage,
pastor, w e e on Sunday the lbth, —
second time in its history, totally destroys*
by Are. At 9:1ft o'clock in the morning a
policeman discovered flames issuing from
t h e small windows over t h e main entrance,
and rushins: to the nearest signal-box e m s
in an alarm. The hremen found the J i n
had Hssnmed large proportions, and additional alarms, calling all available apparatus, were at onoe sent in. I t became
evident t h a t t h e edifice was doomed t e
destruction. I t burned like a tinder box
and in an hour w a e a heap of ruins.
The origin of the Are is unknown. The
sexton denies t h e rumor t h a t tiree bad
been lighted the night before in the
naces and t h u s explodes the defectiv
theory. Edison's men were in t h e bull
until 5:80 t h e day berore arranging a
electric plant, and it is thought that
ing t h e t h u n d e r shower which prevailed
during t h e n i g h t lightning h*<d been car*
ried into the building by the wires they introduced and which rau around t h e gal*
lery about on a level with where t h e flames
were first seen.
The loss on t h e church building, including the organ, which w a s one oi t h e finest
in the country, is 1250,000, on which there
is an insurance of *129,-t50. I t is said to be
covered by insurance on a number of companies. T h e building was of fourteenth
century gotbic architecture, and w a s dedicated F e b u r a r y 22, 1»74. It was of brick
with stone trimmings, with a frontage of
150 feet and a depth of 113 feet, to
which had recently been added a n ex*
tension sixty feet wide and twelve deep.
The seating capacity w a s 2,soo. and it was
always fully taxed at tho Sunday services.
The previous structure, which w s built
of corrugated iron, was destroyed by Are
ou Sunday morning, December 22. Ia73.
That lire w a s also oi unexplained origin.
Loyal Legion Officers.
The annual meeting of tho military order
of the Loyal Legion of t h e United S t a t e s
was held in Philadelphia a few days ago.
Gen. Hayes w a s unanimously re elected
communder-in-chief.
The other officers
elected w e r e : Senior vice commander-inchief, Bear Admiral A. Ludlow Ljase. New
York; junior vice cominu-ader-in-chief,
Gen. Nelson A. Jliles, California; recorderin chief, L i e u t . - C o ^ John P . Nicholson,
P e n n s y l v a n i a i ^ - f e g i s t r a r - i n chief, Gen.
Albert Qrdway, District of Columbia;
treiiSuretMn-chief, Gen. John J. Milhan,
New York; chancellor-in chief. Captain
P e t e r D. Keyser, P e n u s y i v a n i a ; chaplainin chief, Chaplain H. Clay T r u m b u l l ,
P e n n s y l v a n i a ; council-in-chief, Gen. Orlando M. Poe, Michigan; councilmen, Maj.
John Kea, Minuesota; Bvt, M a . Gen.
Eugene A. Carr, Missouri; Maj.-Gen.
Lew Wallace, lndi u a ; Col. T h o m a s L.
Livermore, Massachusetts.
The Standard Kiisintr Rates.
O n t b e 9 t h of this month circulars were
sent out by t h e general freitrht departments
of all of ttie lines leading into Lima from
the west notifying their agents that a t the
close of business on the ' 0th all tariff on oil
from Limn, O., will expire, and a new tariff
will be issued, t o take'etlect on the 21st inst.
The Standard company has succeeded in
getting all of the western lines to agree to
a raise in tariff on oil to all points west of
Chicago.
The S t m d a r d company, with its pipe
line to Chicago, can pour 3,000 barrels of oil
per day into that city at a cost of less than
three cents a barrel, whilo the independent
shippers must pay tho railroads 2:-V£ cents
per b.rrol, and according to the new tariff,
the price will be advanced over one-half.
Ohio producers havpBigned a protest to t h e
advance, which has been forwarded to the
chairman of t h e centrul tariff committee.
Democratic Ladies.
The Indies' democratic' association of
Ohio, held a mci.-ting in Columbus the
Other day and elected as omcers: President, Mrs. ,1 nines K. Neal, of H a m i l t o n ;
Secretary, Miss Belle Armstrong, Cleveland; Corresponding
Secretary,
Miss
Josephine liruck, ^ . o u m b u s ; T r e a s u r e r ,
Mrs. John C. P u ^ h , Coiuuibus; Executive
Committee, Miss Emma C. VVirth, Miss
Emily Beck, Miss Margaret Heinmiller,
Miss Pauline Eritsche, Coiumbus. T h e
association is formed for the purpose of
raising funds with which to purchase a
banner to he presented to tho county showing t h e largest per cent of gain for Hon.
Juiues E. Campbell over the vote cast for
Grover Cleveland in 1SS8,
•
•
To Look Alter the Destitute.
By tho advice and assistance of Miss
Clara Barton, there has been organized in
Johnstown, P a . , the Benevolent Society of
the Conemaugh \ ' a l ey. Tho purpose of
the society is to t a k e up the work of relief
after Miss Barton goes away, the intention being to look after cases of destitution.;
The goods on hund when Miss Barton,'
leaves will be t u r n e d over to t h e society a a
well as a large amount of goods in t h e
hands of committees throughout t h e coun*
try. All of the employes of the stato forces
who wanted w o r k have been engaged by
contractors on the Pennsylvania railroad
and will bo engaged in filling e m b a n k m e n t s
along tho track.
Three in New York—Three in Texas.
Three young men, Jerome Race, John,
Lewis and Thomas Cooney, were struck bjf
the locomotive of a freight train a t Huj£»
son, N. Y,, t h e other morning and inst
ly killed. They were w. Iking up t h e
and wore intent in getting out of t h e .
of a passenger train when they stepped'
front of a train ou another track,
'• j .
A freight train on the Tex s & Pacifre
road w a s thrown from the track a t Madden, Texas, tho same day and R, J. Bible,
engineer, Chas. Jone.s, fireman, and G. W.
Mansfield, brakeman, were killed, tho t w o
former being roasted under t h e engine.
The SitnatimTin New York*
A canvass of the st ite by t h e New Y o r k
Herald correspondents shows t h a t t h e
campaign is characterized by a general
dullness in all sections, and t h a t there la
little prospect of any marked changes, A
very light vote is probable While the
chances favor the election of the democra
ic Btate ticket, the republicans a r e c e r
to carry both branches of t h e legisl
by a good majority. The Hill Clevel
controversy w o r k s unfavorably to t ' ,
democrats, and t h e contest for supremacy
between ex-Senators Piatt and Miller t k
likely to effect t h e republican vote.
Standard Oil Defeat Sustained.
The Toledo.circuit court hse. sustained,
the decision rendered recently by JudgePencHeton, In common pleas court at Find*
lay. The suit was brought by the Standard Oil Co. to prevent a railroad being
built along territory which had beet leased
by thai company for gas and oU purposes,
Ihe Standard company olalmlacr to own IM*.
•nitre right exoept for agricultural on>.
(xaua. Thiawaa denied.
•/T
• * * • • ,
Tp.'W.'V
it
•f
^
"ft
FRIIOHT BRAKEMAN. I think—just after she h a d completed n e r equally with myself, a n d it was of
•fc
I*/-.
.•grimed features'
that show the sears of toil;
Do yov envy him bU 91*1100,
~ knttQlerof thssoUt
storm or in the mirubiae
1 must mind the speeding train,
^outside at post of duty;
not too drenching rain.
the pleasant summer weather,
Standing on the car-top high.
B o oaa riew the changing landscape
Aa he rashes swiftly by.
As he riews the changing pictures
Th*t the lovely landscape makes,
Suddenly across his drownings
Comes the quick, shrill cry for brakes.
B u t when winter's icy fingers
Cover earth with snowy shroud,
And the north wind, likea madman,
Hushes on with shrie&ings loud,
Vhen
behold the gallant brakeman
* T aste to heed the engine's call,
ining on the icy car-tops—
!od protect him if he fall.
Do not scorn to greet him kindly,
He will give you smile for smile;
Though he h nothing but a brakeman
Do not deem him mean or vile.
Speak to him in words of kindness,
Though h a clothes are coarse and plain,
For Lib heart can beat responsive
To the touch of joy or pain.
Daily facing death and danger,
One misstep or slip of hand
Sends the poor, unlucky brakeman
To the dreadful, unknown lund.
As we read our evening paper,
Noting what its columns say,
One brief line attracts our notice,
"One more brakeman killed to day."
fie may have a widowed mother,
He may be her only joy;
Maybe in her home she's praying
For the safety of her boy;
F o r be loves that dear old mother,
Toiling onward day by day,
Always bringing her some present
Every time he draws his pay.
In the little lonely cottage,
. Sitting in the waning light,
Sits the luckless brakeman's mother,
Who expects her boy to-night.
Some one brings the fatal message—
"tipd have mercy !" hear her pray,
As she reuds the tearful story:
"Killed while coupling cars to-day."
TESSA.
CHAPTER IV.
Tessa was standing by t h e window
in her favorite primrose gown, with a
ribbon of the same hue in her d a r k
h a i r , cutting t h e dead flowers off h e r
plants. She greeted Austen with such
a sweet welcome, such eager t h a n k s ,
t h a t he felt amply repaid for his
trouble.
" W h a t have you been doing with
yourself to-day, Tessa?" h e asked, as
he watched the white fingers placing
the flowers in the vases. 4 'Did you
p e r s u a d e my mother to go o u t ? "
44
No, I could not;" and Tessa looked
a little troubled. " W h a t is the matt e r wLh her, Mr. lievan? Is she
always so quiet and sad? I fancied
t h a t she looked a little b r i g h t e r and
h a p p i e r a week or two ago; but lately
she has ceased to take any interest in
a n y t h i n g , and I can't rouse her at all.
A r e people always like that, Mr. Bev a n " — a n d Tessa dropped her (lowers
and looked up wi hquestioning solemn
eyes—"old people, I mean?
When
one gets t-o near the end of life, does
e v e r y t h i n g seem trivial and worthless?"
" N o t always;" and Tessa's troubled
look was rejected in Austen's eyes.
" T h e n why should it be so with
h e r ? " Tessa persisted.
" S h e told mo
only yesterday that she was very
t i r e d " — a n d the girTs voice dropped,
and t h e r e was a mist of t e a r s in her
e y e s — " t h a t she was only wailing
DOW."
*!-'
m
" W a i t i n g ? For w h a t ? "
" F o r d e a t h , " Tessa answered softly;
and thon t h e r e was a long pause.
"You do not think she looks worse
t h a n usual, Tessa?" Austen said at
last.
Tessa hesitated a moment.
" I t h i n k , " she said, very gently, and
gravely, " t h a t she looks as if her
h e a r t was broken."
A u s t i n looked at h e r in surprise,
and gave a short uneasy laugh.
••Nonsenser' he said impatiently.
" W h a t can a child like you know of
broken hearts, or of how those look
w h o bear t h e r a p "
" A h , but 1 do know!"—and l e s s a
gave a quaint little nod. " I rememh e r Sisier Ursula. She was one of
t h e nuns in t h e convent near Charente.
Jnladame Frejus, my old governess,
a sister there, and I used often,
holidays and taint-days* to go up
t o t h e < onvent and talk to t h e sisters
e n d play with the pupils, and I knew
s i s t e r 1 rsula very well; she was so
good—whe best wo nan t h a t ever lived,
I think. Eyery one loved her. The
girls always went to her if they were
in disgra e or trouble, and t h e people
in t h e village used to beg for h e r
p r a y e r s . But for all that—for all she
was so sweet and saintly, and so near
h e a v e n " — a n d 'lessa'a voice sank and
k e r eyes grew m i s t y — " h e r h e a r t was
,»||tokeu—I know that well e n o u g h . "
^ ^ u s t e n looked' at t h e girl's g r a v e
curiously.
•'Why? Had she some g r e a t trouDle? w h e questioned.
••She had been engaged to a young
offlcei\"Tessa answered quielly, " a n d
j u s t about t h e time fixed for their
m a r r i a g e , t h e Franco-Prussian war
broke o u t
H e of course went with
h i s regiment to the front, and, on the
very day which was to h a v e been h e r
w e d d i n g day, she heard h e had been
killed a t Worth. She was ill for same
t i m e ; a n d then she took t h e veil, and
Is t h e saddest p a r t of t h e story,
h e r novitiate and taken t h e final vows,
s h e found s h e h a d been deceived—
t h a t h e r lover had not been killed,
only severely wounded a t W o r t h , and
t h a t h e r p a r e n t s had k e p t b a c k t h e
news until it was too late. They said
even t h e n she was yery good and patient, and never uttered a word of reproach, and she prayed always; but
somehow I know"—and Tessa's voice
grew very low and a w e d — " t h a t she
had been as near despair in those days
as any one can bo and live on. And
it was t h e n t h a t t h a t look came into
h e r face. '
" I t is a sad story* Is she living
still?" Austen asked.
" N o ; she died six m o n t h s before I
left
Charente,"
Tessa
answered.
" M a d a m e and I had been away for a
few days, and when we came back
they told us she was dead. W e went
up to t h e convent in t h e evening.
T h e r e was g r e a t trouble t h e r e ; t h e
girls were all crying bitterly, and in
t h e chapel the* nuns were weeping and
praying, and Madame cried, too; but
I was g l a d , "
"Glad—whyP' 1
" O h , because I had been so sorry
for h e r ! My h e a r t used to ache BO
when I saw t h a t hopeleus look on h e r
face; and I knew it must h a v e go^e
then. Sister Mary took me into her
cell, and I was r i g h t — i t had quite
gone. H e r face looked very white
and worn and wasted; but t h e look
had left it. T h e r e was even a faint
smile on her lips. They had crossed
h e r h a n d s upon her breast and placed
a cross of flowers over h e r h e a r t ; but I
took it away and placed it low down
on the mattress beneath h e r feet.
Why should they put a cross when it
had fallen from her for evermore? So
I took it away, and I placed a crown
of great, white, s t a r r y flowers just
over t h e place where it had lain on
her heart. Sister Mary was kneeling
by the bed crying passionately; but I
could not cry—I was far too glad.
And, while we were t h e r e , a little
robin, which she had trained to come
morning and evening for its food, flew
into the room and perched itself upon
t h e bed and sang—Oh, I never heard
a n y t h i n g like its song before—it was
so beautiful, so full of happiness and
hope!
And
I
could
not
help
thinkin'g," Tessa went on, with a wistful look in her eyes, " t h a t t h e robin
knew and was glad as well."
A short silence, which neither of
them cared to break, followed the last
words.
Tessa stood, with her hands
clasped loosely together and a thoughtful far-off look on her mobile face,
watching the sunset clouds.
WThi!e
she had been speaking a change had
passed over the sky.
The vivid blue
had faded into a softer gray-green
tint; t h e streaks of vermillion and
o r a n g e were almost lost in a dark
purple cloud; and clear and dark
against the primrose sky the iir-trees
lifted their tall heads.
Tessa's dusky
head had caught a gleam of gold; her
face was flushed, h e r eyes soft and
luminous.
Austen felt his h e a r t beat with delight and wonder as he looked at her.
Even to his practical unsentimental
mind t h e r e was something very pathetic in the picture she had drawn of
the dead nun lying in her cell, with
the wreath of white flowers on the
poor h e a r t which had fought and
struggled, and found peace at Inst—
something
very
touching,
too,
in
the
robin's
requiem.
Was
this
the
girl
whom
his
sister had called vain and frivolous—
who cared for nothing but dress and
amusements—who t h o u g h t of nothing
beyond the pleasure of t h e passing
moment? She might be all these, and
yet she had seen what he had failed to
see—understood what he h a d failed to
understand.
He had lived with his
mother all his life, and day by day
during t h e last seven years he had
seen t h a t look deepen on her face; but
he had never understood till now what
it meant.
And he knew t h a t Tessa
was r i g h t — t h a t his m o t h e r ' s heart
was b r e a k i n g for her youngest, bestloved son, who had gone from her into outer darkness—gone
with his
father's curse upon his head.
His face grew h a r d and cold as he
t h o u g h t of it. Tessa looked at him in
surprise.
" I suppose auntie must h a v e had
some g r e a t trouble too? 1 ' she said
gently. " W h a t was it? H e r husband's death P"
" N o " — A u s t e n shook his head and
his brows c o n t r a c t e d — " i t was worse
trouble by far than that.
Shame for
t h e living is ten times worse to bear
than any sorrow for the dead can be*!
See, d e a r , " — a n d he took Tessa's little
fingers gently in his o w n — " I will tell
you now, BO t h a t you may understand,
and then we will not speak of it
again.
" I have a brother, much—indeed
ten years—younger than myself.
He
was a very handsome clever lad, and,
being so much younger t h a n either
Prudence or I, was much petted and
indulged by our mother.
Even as a
boy h e was always in scrapes and
trouble; and it required all my mother's ingenuity to screen him and prevent t h e stories of his escapades from
r e a c h i n g my father's e a r s .
" W h e n h e was eighteen h e was
placed in the bank—in t h e same position t h a t I h a d occupied when his age.
Eventually h e would h a v e been a part-
SCIENCE AMP INDUSTRY.
w i l l ; stand a good degree, b u t erumbts> #
course necessary t h a t h e should underI m p r o v e m e n t in R lilway Appliances like/limestone and sandstone under t o o
stand t h e routine of t h e work.
Then
intense h e a t
t h * troubles a t h o m e began.
My —In 1868 t h e Boston and Providence
m o t h e r h a d contrived to screen h i s railroad r a n a flat c a r with a water ' Rapid Transit Schema J—There is>
faults when a boy; b u t t h a t was im- t a n k ahead of its passenger trains with considerable activity just now on tbe>
possible when he became a man.
I which to sprinkle its t r a c k for the com- p a r t of promptors of rapid t r a n s i t
don't much care to recall those days, fort of its patrons; this r a n for three schemes.
The
bicycle locomotive,
Tessa; they were very miserable for us *>r four years. Somewhat later the designed to take a single c a r weighing
all, especially for my mother, whose Housatonio road put canvass across seven tons, Beating 10D p a s s e n g e r s .
favorite chitd Antony h a d always
from one end of t h e c a r to t h a t of the [ ninety miles an h o u r is to be t e s t e d
been. My father was a very h a r d
stern man—one of t h e strictest mem- n e x t one throughout the entire length 4 on an experimental t r a c k on Sea B e a d s
bers of our society; h e had no sympa- of its trains t o keep out t h e d u s t As Island, and preparations for f u r t h e r
thy with youth's follies—could find no a contrast to this, a practical test was testing of the We ems system, which*
excuse for Antony's e x t r a v a g a n c e and made recently of a new ventilator, proposes to attain for mail and e x which, it is claimed, will ventilate cars press purpose* a speed of from t h r e e
reckless ways.
" F o r more than t h r e e years this without letting in dust and cinders. to five miles a minute, a r e progressmiserable state of t h i n g s lasted; then Whenever the car moves a constant ing at Garden City. T h e portelectrio
the final r u p t u r e came.
c u r r e n t of air is secured, even when ' system, which it* inventor claims will
"Antony contracted a friendship doors, windows and all other apertures transport even in its p r e i e n t s t a g e , p a r with some actors, then playing a t the
; eels at t h e rate of t h r e e miles
a
t h e a t r e in Pennington. H e fell in love a r e closed.
!mi
te
la
Wood-Bending as an I n d u s t r y - T h e r e
™ to be put through a s e r i e s
with one of the women, and announced
of o a r e ( u l
te9ta
at
Dorchester, w h e r e
his intention of m a k i n g h e r his wife. are comparatively few persons outside i
You can imagine my father's wrath. the carriage and boat-building i n t e r e s t s . »n experimental line h a s been built
He held actors and plays and every- that know to what extent the wood- • for the purpose. T h i s schema hast h i n g connected with t h e theatrical bending business is carried, and the been received with much favor by t h e
profession in the deepest abhorrence.
• electrical fraternity, who seem to r e I h a d never seen him so deeply moved management that is necessary in carry- 1 gard it with unusual confidence. I t s
ing on a well-arranged wood-bending
before.
inventor states t h a t t h e r e is every
Antony might do as h e liked, he e s t a b l i s h m e n t Few know t h a t the probability th it t h e next application
said; he was of age, and could please fine carriages they ride in are very
The of the system will be to the throwing'
himself; but, if h e persisted in this largely made of bent wood.
act of suicidal folly, he should never felloes of their wheels a r e bent and of projectiles. If this statement ise n t e r his house again. H e spoke very made in two parts. Tue framework of based on s o u n i premises, it is- a signiquietly and decisively- -and h e kept coaches nnd heavy carriages is nearly ficant ausjury of w h i t inty by a c c o m his word.
all made of bent stock. They are not plished iu the rapid transit of t h e
" A n t o n y left home suddenly: and only better, but more cheaply made. future.
t h r e e days af erward, in spite of my F u r n i t u r e of many kinds has bent
Tae Xa:bl3 Pjndt of Pjrtia.
m o t h e r ' s tears and p r a y e r s , he marframes. The objects of bending are
T> ;se wonders of n iture consist of
ried this girl—who did not bear
t h e best of character—openly at saving of time and stock, stability and pools, or " t h g e z , " as t h e P i r s i a n s s e a U
the parish church. T h e news was strength of the work and beauty of them, where the indolent waters, by a.
b r o u g h t one evening as we were sit- form. I t is a business t h a t needs to be slow and regular process, s t a g n a t e ,
ting down to dinner. I t had been well understood, however, to make a concrete and petrify, producing t h a t
known of course long before by every success of it.
beautiful t r a n s p a r e n t ston 1, commonly
one but ourselves: but I had been laid
New System of Storing Grain—A called tabriz marble, much used in t h e
up with a strained ankle just then and
New York inventor proposes to revolu- burial places of Persia and in t h e i r
had not been to business, and no one
had dared to tell my father. 1 shall tionize the present system for the best edifices. These ponds a r e connever forget his face as he looked at storage of grain and feed products. If tained within the circumference of half
my mother and told her fiercely that his plan is found feasible, the elevator a mile, and their position is distinthis was h r doing—that her indul- now in use will be permanently done guished by heaps of stones which haver
gence had ruined the boy. She has away with, and each farmer and pro- accumulated as t h e excavations h a v e
never been like herself since," Austen ducer will be supplied with a substitute, increased. The process of petrifaction
went on with a break in his strong i in which he will be able to store his m a y be traced from its c o m m e n c e m e n t
voice—"never lost the scared fright- : grain for years at small cost and wtthened look t h a t came into her face at j out risk. The cost of working will to its termination. In one p a r t t h e
water is clear; in a second it a p p e a r s
the fierce words. Then he called for
j average from four to five cents for thicker and somewhat s t i g n a n t ; in a
the Bible where all our names were
written, and blotted out Antony's each bushel of their capacity, against third stage quite black, constrastiojr
forty to fifty cents 'now expended on strongly with the fourth and last stage,.
n a m e with an unfaltering hand.
" 'He is dead to me—to us all,' he wooden elevators. T h e system involves j {'n ^ h i c h ' i t i s ' a s white as hoar frost!,
said: 'I would not lift a finger to the use of steel tanks, which will be , J n fche t h i p d g t a f f e > w h e n t Q e B l i r f a c e i f r
bring him back now. Let him go, filled with grain by a simple and new | q u i t e b l a L . k ( u c a n b e i n d o n t e l b y t o S 3 _
with his father's curse upon his head, novel process. When one of the tanks ing a stone on the surface; but in walkand reap the fruits of his disobedience is filled a persentage of the air is exing across it it will no more stick to t h e
and wickedness!'
hausted, and a quantity of carbonic ^
„ r e f t s e d taffy will to* t h e
tQ
" T h a t happened seven years a&o," acid gass admitted. The valves are
hand*. Such is the constant t e n d e n c y
Austen continued gravely; " a n d we
then closed and the grain is in condi- of this water to become stone t h a t ,
have neither seen nor heard anything
of him since then. I do not know tion to keep uninjured for years. There when it exudes from the ground inv.
is no decay where there is no air, and bubbles, the petrifaction ussumes a .
whether he is living or dead."
j
Tessa drew a deed sigh. There this principle is the keystone of the globular shape, as if the bubbles of A.
were tears of pity standing in her new system. Work is soon to be com- spring, by a s t r o k e o f magic, had been
eyes.
menced iu machine shops in Chicago arrested in their play and me^amor-" O h , poor auntie," she said softly— for the manufacture of these tanks.
phosed into etone.
" n o wonder she looks sad! W h a t a
American and English Skill—There
The substance thus produced is brith a r d , hard man your father must have
is
an
amicable
rivalry
between
tle, transparent, and sometimes richlj
been!"
,
English
and
American
engineers.
The
streaked with green, rod and copper"Hard!
He only did what was
j
skill
which
they
exhibit
is
the
same,
colored veins. It admits of being cut
r i g h t ; I would* have done the same
myself in hie place," Austen said, j but its application differs in the two into very larire slabs, and t i k e s a good
looking down at the girl with a little j countries to build. Where American polish. So much do the [Jeoplo in t h e
surprise.
\
J engineers have been compelled for the land of the Shah loo^c upon this stone
His face grew so stern and hard as day or the morrow, English tfn'jineors as an article of luxury, that none b u t
he said these words t h a t Tessa invol- have been able to build f.>r the next
the Shah,
his sons and
persons
untarily shrank a little away, and her generation ;ind the century. Hut the
privileged
by
special
rhadtnas,
aropei*h e a r t beat with a feeling of t i m i d i y extempore s^ill of the American enraitted to use i t
quite foreign to her fearless nature.
gineer has, in turn, muJiiied the m i s " I should not like to ofTend him sive conceptions of their English
Fair Play.
deeply," the girl t h o u g h t ; " h e would I brethren, and English structures, such
Ah, husband, do not sco'd your wife*
not forgive very readily I t h i n k . "
! as t h e Forth Bridge, are l a g o l y ini
And m;ike tmr poor heart aiiho,
Auston noticed the changing face
Because
she em't build pies line tboae>
|
fluenced
by
American
ido:is
and
exand shrinking gesture. He put out
Your mother used to in.ike.
I
perience.
The
cantilever
principle
is
hand and touched t h e pretty soft hair
I borrowed from the United Suites, and
Th.it is, untesa you're q lito prepared.
gently.
To see tho whole thin,' thvouph,
,
is
the
product
of
American
conditions
" T h e r e , lftSfele woman—now you
And
buy bar hats and dresses as.
know all our secrets.
I have opened j of work and Americ m fertility of inHer
father used to do.
the secret cupboard and shown you j veniion and audacity of construction.
-Ripley
Tribune.
our family skeleton," he said, in a T h u s the genius and skill of each
half-serious half-jesting tone. " L e t country supplements t h a t of the other.
An Animal Flower.
us lock the door and hide the grisly
T h e inhabitants of St. Lucie* havet h i n g from sight a g a i n . "
Jasper—Within two years the jasper
lately
discovered a mo>t singular p l a n t
TO BE CONTINUED,
industry has been developed, and there
are now four quarries employing near- In a cavern on t h a t island near t h e
The Loaded Valentine.
ly a thousand men, in operation about sea, an immense b sin of brackish
Fifty years ago J a m e s Martin, a
water has collected.
The waters of
well-to-do farmer living near Balliet- Sioux Falls. The market extends from
Sioux Falls the basin --re clear .-.s crystal »nd r e ville, Pa., refused to p u r c h a s e his 15- Chicago to Kansas City.
streets
are
paved
with
jasper,
and h e r veal millions of varied-colored pebblesyear-old d a u g h t e r a dress she very
much coveted. T h e d a u g h t e r was a four-story buildings are constructed of on the bottom. Each of these pebbles)
quick-tempered girl, and on St. Valen- i t The stone is susceptible of a h i g h furnish a resting place for from two t o
tine's day she sent him a valentine degree of polish, and when finished five of a most r e m a r k a b l e species of
representing him to be a miser. From looks much like t h e red gr nite of animal p l a n t
T h e shallow w a t e r *
t h a t day h e never spoke to her. She Missouri. The pioneer in the jasper around the edge of the pool look for
m a r r i e d and lived on a farm adjoining industry discovered not long ago t h a t ail thu world like well-kept beds of
h e r father's. WTith h e r husband and t h e dust of t h e jasper, which is half as r a r e and wonderful flowers; all b r i g h t
h e r children F a r m e r Martin was on
h a r d as diamonds, would polish the and shining in color, the majority of
the kindest and most familiar terms,
t h e m reminding one of the marigold*
but he never noticed his daughter. famous petrified wood of Arizona, and
Last week h e died.
He left an estate m a k e of it table tops and ornaments family, only that t h e i r tint is more?
valued at $45,000. To his aged widow more beautiful than agate or onyx. lively.
he left $30,000. To his son-in-law h e T h e petrified wood is now brought from
These seeming flowers, on tho a p Arizona
to
Sioux
Falls
by
the
car
load,
bequeathed the remainder of the estate,
proach of a hand or a stick, retire, l i k e
provided he survived his wife, t h e and polished in a variety of forms. To a snail, out of s i g h t On examining,
farmer's d a u g h t e r .
If t h e son-in-law the jasper industry, the city has added them closely, the middle of the disc i s
died first, then the $15,000 was to be the manufacture of chalcedony. T h e r e found to be provided with four b r o w n
divided among his t h r e e children. To is a scientific mystery about this sofilaments
resembling spider's legs,
his d a u g h t e r F a r m e r Martin bequeath- called jasper.
Practically it is all which move around the petals with ts
ed " a package to be found in his t r u n k ,
r i g h t Its utility has baen established, brisk, spontaneous motion. T h e s e l e g s
tied with a green ribbon and sealod
with green wax.''
W h e n this was but geologically there is no little un- or filaments have piucers with whicts
opened it was found to be the unfor- certainty Hbout i t Those who know to seize t h j i r prey, arid, upon seizingthe most are the least positive in dis- i t the petals immediately close so t h a t
t u n a t e valentine.
cussing its character.
Some of the it cannot escape. Under this e x t e r i o r
A bride in mourning has no bridesmaids, scientific men who have looked at it of a flower is a brown stalk about t b a
wears a traveling frown of pale gray CiOta
or camel's hair, may have a bouquet, call it red quartzite. Professor Wln- size of a Faber pencil, w h i c h is* liftthough it is not de rijrueur, and roust be all chell says it is t h e hardest stone in the reality, the body of t h e animal. T h i s
white, or el*e of purple lilacs, she must go
quietly to church at 12 o'clock with the United States for building purposes. strange c r e a t u r e lives on the spawn of
very smallest possibls amount of bridal T h e grain is very close. The only ele- fish and marine insects thrown. Into the)
flummery.
m e n t to which it succumbs is fire. I t basin by t h e tides.
1
•
I
PiKhei Puttie School COIUB.
Echoes,
Edited
Items
by
and
the
Opinions.
Principal.
iUighborhwd $tw.
UNAD1LLA.
From oar Correspondent.
Daniel Barton is very il:.
,JC.....JK~:..2C:*JK
• * : > * •
W i l l Mills is w o r k i n g near J a c k H a b i t s a r e soon assumed, b u t when son.
vte strive t o s t r i p t h e m off, 'tis b e i n g
George L e t t s of Central City, is
ilayed alive. Cowper.
the g u e s t of his father, Isaac L e t t s of
P r o p e r l y t a u g h t , g r a m m a r g i v e s Unadilla.
t h e p u p i l a discipline that he can
Q u i t e a n u m b e r of little folks atg a i n in no other way.—Prof. 13. A.
t e n d e d t h e birthday p a r t y of Miss
H i n s d a l e , U n i v e r s i t y of Mich.
Cora H a d l e y on Monday last.
T h e r e p o r t cards are ready a n d will
Born, on T h u r s d a y last, to Mr. and
OUR
TJTTS
eoon be issued for t h e school month
Mrs. G e o . Harris, a d a u g h t e r , and to
e n d i n g Oct. 4 t h .
P a r e n t s are reMr. and Mrs. Lester Williams, a sou.
q u e s t e d to examine carefully and
A
J
o
h
n
S
t
e
d
m
a
n
,
Sr.,
died
at
his
sign the s a m e . Certificates of proN
D
motion also will soon be given to all home near this village on Monday
H e leaves
who passed the studies of their g r a d e last, after a short illness.
c.iust move at the above proposition. Look the price list over carefully, farmers, p e n d e r upon it
a
large
n
u
m
b
e
r
of
relatives
and
last year.
a n d when you come to town, come in a n d be convinced that such prices were never given
friends to mourn their loss.
Visit y o u r schools, patrons, a n d see
to the people of P I N ' J K N E Y a n d V I C I N I T Y before.
t h e children at work u n d e r their
PETTEYSVLLE
t e a c h e r s ' g u i d a n c e a n d instructions. from our Corr«bi>unileiit.
XI is both a privilege and a d u t y to
T h e cider mill at this place is in
do # so. W o d o n ' t want} formal visits.
full blast.
Come in a n y t i m e and d o n ' t s t o p to
Miss Rola P e t e r s is the g u e s t of
k n o c k — w e are always ready for comp a n y . B r i n g somebody with y o u ; her sister, Mrs. Burroghs.
O u r station a g e n t took a t r i p to
come on business; sit wherever you
p l e a s e ; g o about wherever you please. Ann A r b o r S a t u r d a y last.
O b s e r v e , question, suggest.
Your
Miss Cora Whitlock visited relamoney built t h e school house; your tives in Leland the past week.
money supports the schools; you have
Miss Rose Nash s p e n t S a t u r d a y
fc4
u
a r i g h t to k n o w how the g r e a t and and Sunday with Howell friends.
g e n e r o u s trust y o u havf| confided to
u
Mrs. Travis and d a u g h t e r Lizzie,
our hands is b e i n g discharged.
are visiting relatives in Chicago.
U
U
I t is s t r a n g e how m u c h wool can
Mrs. B u r g e s s of Howe ', was the
it
b e pulled over the eyes of an ordi- g u e s t of her sister, Mrs. Mercer, last
a
n a r y c o m m u n i t y by a judicious week.
u
a m o u n t of promotions, g r a d u a t i o n s
Messrs. Farn< worth & Cook are
u
a n d s p l u r g e . P e o p l e , as they aver- shipping a larg.> a m o u n t of "apples
u
age, are n o t discriminating j u d g e s from this vicinity.
u
of real thorough school work.
Miss Winfred Peters closed a very
ii
M I C H . SCHOL MODEKATQR.
successful term of sehool in the ijeurW e think there is a good deal
tnan district T u e s d a y last.
of t r u t h in the above.
T h e fussy,
u
u
Harry
Whit
look
concluded
t">
spread-eagle kind of school, with
endless devices, and biir g r a d u a t - take a holiday last week and tried
i n g classes, is usually very p o p u - his skill :;s a ••marks-man," which
lar with the crowd, but it t u r n s proved p r e t t y •••good as he made an
off a n n u a l l y much, more conceit and attack upon some sain^ck tni-hes,
polish than it does sound mental and has I n u l a h<>lidav ever s'nee tryt r a c i n g . In this school, however, we i i n g to recover from the effect of the
intend that all diplomas given shall poisonous bushes.
oost the s t u d e n t plenty of hard Work
Ann A r b o r parties hnv«» purchased
and shall M E A X S O M E T H I N G .
A S to a lot near the shore of Zooky, south
t h e ability of the average sehool of the A n n Arbor sporting cln!>, and
*L\2o, formerly # 3 . 0 0
patron to j u d g e of "real thorough are m a k i n g large preparations for I) oiiL'ola Button Shoos, Opera Toes,
I.ji).
2.,50
school work we g r a n t it is not very e r e c t i n g a loir cabin.
The same
A
fine
Shoe
for
2.(It),
8
.00
u
high, li .* -liould it be when he party will launch a steamer upon the
1
A
nir<
K
i
d
Shot
for
1
7o
2 2:>
u
n e v e r sees the school wor-k jjoinc on, lake the coining summer. It hegins
:
l
.(•,!)
2.(Hf
-never even t h i n k s of it?
W h a t an to appear that Mr. Bergens nrnphecvj
] .'.'5
1.75
i m p e t u s the schools would receive if would he fulfilled, already it lias be- 'hihlren and Misses' Shoes,
1.00
1.50
p a r e n t s would exhibit as much inter- come a famous s u m m e r resort.
tidies'
Kni.lxMs,
host
quality,
O
p
e
r
a
Too
;};>
p
e
r
pair
est in them as they do in their docents
"Forethought is e;i«y; repentance is
mestic or business affairs, and howhard."
T h u s runs the nroverh, and
soon the}' would learn to K N O W good
it
voices
a t?rnnd truth. How many
work when they see it.
calamities m i g h t he prevented by (loExtracts From High School Work for ins? what every one sees is a prudent
tiling! ' T h e forethought is e;e-y. hut
Tuesday.
the fore-doing requires, nnssiMy, rr
INTROIH'DOKY ALOKIUIA.
certain amount of energy and -elfClass reported answers to examples denial. But self-denial is easier than
O O A * • e~y
in factoring placed on board the day repentance. It is iiard to confess one's
previous. E x a m p l e s illustrated the self in the wrong ar.d to hear the
These (roods must bo sold to make room for the finest and larjrp-st stock of coods ever
penalty
of
a
neglect
of
duty.
In
pracprinciple t h a t the product of the sum
shown to the people of Pincknoy a n d at prices which will certainly suit.
ticing self-denial for the sake of some
and difference of two q u a n t i t i e s good to he attained, one feels that he
equals the difference of their sqirares. is tree, and master of circumstances;
Nearly all had correct results. After but to suffer because of duty and opthe lesson fresh problems u n d e r the portunity neglected, is the doom of a
same principle b u t of g r e a t e r diffi- slave.
culty were placed on board and
Life insurance is one of the Uiings
that require forethought. It, must alpromptly solved by class, i.. w. M.
ways be secured when the need of it,
U. ft. HISTORY.
| (in the ordinary sense) is not apparent.
Class g a v e in their own lann-uao-p I One must insure against, death when
He, must cona condensed sketch of W a r of 1812, death'seems afar off.
sider the risk and provide against it.
i n c l u d i n g causes, principal e v e n t s , Like the anchor and the life-boat—
t e r m s of peace, and results, x. v. /..
which must be provided in fair weather—the
Life Policy must be taken
GEOMETEY.
-vhen the skies are full of h o r e and j
Class g a v e original d e m o n s t r a t i o n s life seems likely to be long.
To ho\y.d
of the following propositions:
many widows repentance comes fori
I. If t w o lines intersect, the line having opposed life insurance! Their i
which bisects one of the angles will, husbands would have insured b u t for
if produced, bisect the opposite a n g l e . their opposition. But they could n< :
II.
If one line meets another the bear to think of receiving money hecause of their husbands' death. "They
. t w o lines bisecting these supplemen- see now that insurance would not
tal angles are perpendicular to each have hastened death, and that it would
other.
have prevented poverty—the poverty
This is the class 'verdict on that is so hard upon the children—his
i
"original d e m o n s t r a t i o n s : " To draw children.
the figures from the data is easy; to
To all who object to life insurance
c
construct t h e demonstration is also because the benefit it contemplates is
conditioned upon the death of the ineasy—if you k n o w how.
L.
jO^frOGH
****
sured, we commend tin* advantapes of
the NEW-YOKK LIFK'S E n d o w m e n t ami
CIVIL GOVERNMENT.
Tontine Policies. These contracts proClass discussed the military system vide benefits to the living at t h e end
of the states arid the nation.
T h e of certain selected periods, and to the
points n o t e d were the state militia, family, in case of death before the pi ;•active and enrolled, its composition, iod ends. The chances of living* and
organization, and officers; the relation the chances of dyinpr, added together,
• of the active militia, or " v o l u n t e e r equal a certainty,you may believe the
relative values of each to be whatever
r e g i m e n t s , " to the national g o v e r n you please.
G L O Y K S and M I T T F A S .
We have t h e m ; a new t h i n g for h u s k i n g , o n l y 50 c e n t s , j u s t w h a t you w a n t ; n e v e r
m e n t ; the power of the P r e s i d e n t
Hut use your forethought, and so
seen
IMMV
before.
„-.•/
We.
w
a
n
t you to call a n d look us t h r o u g h a n d we will c o n v i n c e you t h a t we can save y o u
over the milita.
T h e contrast be- preclude the necesity for 'repentance.
,
t w e e n our g o v e r n m e n t with its in- For example: repentance would he some monoy a n d give you goods t h a t are all r i g h t .
significant and inexpensive s t a n d i n g doubly hard if one should delay ina r m y , r e l y i n g for its 'defens? upon suring until he was uninsurable.
These observations apply to ail and
t h e patriotism of its citizens, a n d the
those
who are seeking t hts s n r ^ t , means
n a t i o n s of E u r o p e with their power*
of
safety
for themselves and families
ful armies m a i n t a i n e d at vast expense,
should c o n s u l t C . P . Sykes and agent
was a p r o m i n e n t feature of the reciof the New York Life, and see what
tation.
P. G. T.
t h e company will offer you.
Would you be willing to pay the freight upon the goods, if you could
buy them at wholesale prices? For the next
TEN
OF
KD©T
r
All solid Kip Boots, double soled, $2.50. Don't forget our $2 Boot
the best in the County for the price.
An extra All Calf Boot for
¢2.50. Boys' Kip Boot, double sole, $2 25, Boys' Kip Boot, double
sole, $2 00. A lull line of Rubber Boots, don't fill to price them.
M-rs' Felt Boots, $1.00, all complete, $2.40. All wool Alaska Socks
9 J cents per pair.
A Cordovan Calf Shoe,
An extra fine Calf Shoe,
A Lace Calf Shoe,
Eclipse Buff Seamless Shoe,
Boys' Buif Seamless Shoe,
Congress Calf Shoes,
Boys' Calf Shoes,
Boys' Shoes,
Boys' Shoes, Boot style, just t h e thing
for winter wear,
•
'
!
*
83.25, former price, $4.00
2.75.
3.75
2.50.
3.50
2.00,
2.50
1.75,
2.5a
3.00
1.40,
1.75
1.65,
2.25
2.75
k mwMt I
Sim m
Ladies
ro-
<.
A full line of Underwear from $ L l o $3.50.
S t r i p p e d . FlSbrLrxGl ZDresc C-oocls.
Ecn't forfeit cur closing out sale of PRINTS. Rats and C ps at a
ice. A large assortment of Gloves and Mittens at abaigain.
v
WAS B I T &0GBB Sf 0 1 ¾
-
KWGIIIX
2¾¾^
We iiave and are constantly receiving: a very choice stock of everything desirable. Fine lines of
,wt'!
The new things in Suitings, Flannels, etc. All the novelm I
es' Skirts, Headwear Ties, Handkerchifs, Gloves, dEosie:
J
A N E W DEPARTMENT !
.-,*
RUNKS,
VALISES
AND
TELESCOPES
i ^at prices that are all right,&&>~
HATS AND CAPS!
!
r
'
•
^
Iii all the leading styles; finest line of Velvet and Seal Plush Ca
ever shown here.. We have Caps and Hats for Father and
Mother, Boys and Girls, and all the rest of us.
\
M
BUTTER AND EGGS are worth 100 cents on the $ in trade or cask
and please remember we have paid you cash for both for years, at
"THE WEST END DRY GOODS STORE."
"
I
Geo.
W. Sykes & Company.
•V
••jH»n
• .,,; i t t M *
«
• 3lm.
mm
mtm
»nmy n%vf
mmm

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