The Blue Beret - Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association

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The Blue Beret - Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association
The Blue Beret
Volume 8, Number 34
ISSN: 1488 – 1799
©
January 2009
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING VETERANS ASSOCIATION
CPVA National Headquarters: PO Box 905, Kingston, Ontario, CANADA, K7L 4X8
BRINGING VETERANS TOGETHER
FEATURE ARTICLES
IN THIS ISSUE
•
•
•
•
•
•
A Symbol of Peacekeeping:
The Blue Beret
Parades & Ceremonial:
The Flags of our Veterans
Peacekeeping by Proxy:
The Multinational Missions
Terminology: Piecing the
‘Peace’ words together
Honours & Awards: 1988 Nobel
Peace Prize Recognition
The Peacekeepers Kit Shop:
Accoutrement Suppliers
A SYMBOL OF PEACEKEEPING
The Blue Beret
How proud our United Nations
Peacekeepers are of their beret of
blue! It is such a powerful and
visible symbol of peacekeeping that
it is known the world over. But not
all peacekeepers wear blue, some
also wear green, white, or orange.
THE COLOUR BLUE ►The United Nations Organization (UN) adopted light
sky blue as its "trademark" colour for headgear. The beret is the most
common headwear issued, although the blue helmet and the blue ball cap are
just as often seen as is the blue “Tilley” bush hat. THE ORIGIN ►The blue
headdress may be traced to the 1956 Suez Crisis where classical
peacekeeping was born. Although the UN employed military observers from
1947, they had no common dress or insignia. The need for distinctive dress
and insignia arose in 1956 because the large Canadian contingent wore
uniforms which were practically the same as one of the belligerents, the
British Army. To identify themselves as non-combatants, the UN troops
painted their helmet liners light sky blue and their vehicles white, the same
colours as the United Nations Flag. The billed caps which were standard
Canadian Army issue at the time were dyed blue and issued to Canadian UN
troops. Later, a common headdress was provided to peacekeepers, thus was
born the Blue Beret. It has never been determined that the Blue Helmet
(Casque bleu) idea came from the Canadian Contingent of the United
Nations Emergency Force (UNEF) but it was likely a decision made by the
mixed UNEF General Staff. What are distinctly Canadian are the term and
the concept of “Peace-Keeping” coined by Lester B. Pearson, who was
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1957. All UN Peacekeepers became
Nobel Laureates in 1988 and this eventually inspired the Canadian
Peacekeeping Service Medal (CPSM). To this day, Peacekeeping and the
Blue Beret have been equated with Canada. We honour this tradition as can
be seen on our Ten Dollar bank note; “Peacekeeping and Remembrance”.
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
A SYMBOL OF PEACEKEEPING
The Blue Beret
THE BLUE BERET WORN ON UN SERVICE ►All United Nations Peacekeepers wear the
Blue Beret, the Blue Helmet, the Blue Cap or the Blue Hat with the UN insignia in
accordance with the UN Mission Commander’s dress instructions. It is a given, that a UN
Peacekeeper wears blue headdress for purpose of identity and for obvious safety reasons in
the mission area as elsewhere on UN service anywhere in the world. THE BLUE BERET ON
ACTIVE SERVICE ►For active serving soldiers and police officers, the Blue Beret may only
be worn during a UN Peacekeeping Mission or at UN Headquarters in New York if posted
there. In the past, members of the Canadian Forces were allowed to wear the Blue Beret on
Remembrance Day but this exception is no longer in effect since 2003. Certain police
services do permit the wearing of the Blue Beret by peace officers on Remembrance Day.
A UN Peacekeeper
UN VETERANS MAY WEAR THE BLUE BERET ►Non-serving United Nations Veterans are
not subject to any dress restrictions. Veterans may wear the Blue Beret at any appropriate
commemoration ceremony or official occasion where the United Nations Flag is displayed. A
UN veteran’s association may adopt the Blue Beret as its official headdress. There is no law or
regulation in Canada prohibiting the wear of a light blue or any other colour of military style
headdress. The United Nations Organization has no policy on the wear of the Blue Beret by
Veterans and has never officially restricted the use of the UN insignia to its active peacekeeping
forces. Members of peacekeeping veteran’s organizations in countries such as Norway,
Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Brazil, Ireland, France, Ukraine, Australia, and New Zealand, wear
the Blue Beret and the UN insignia for official ceremonies; have adopted the world famous
headdress an obvious symbol of identity. Two Canadian veteran’s organizations and another in
France have adopted their own official insignia to wear with the Blue Beret.
LIMITATIONS ON WEAR ►The Blue Beret is synonymous with UN peacekeeping. Indeed, the
term “Blue Helmets” or the official UN name, “Casques Bleus”, is often used to describe UN
Peacekeepers. Veterans must therefore use common sense when wearing this international
symbol. The Blue Beret should be worn on appropriate occasions where the United Nations or
its Peacekeepers are honoured. It may be worn with discretion as part of a legitimate veteran’s
association’s official dress. A Veteran should never wear a Blue Beret in an active or former
UN Mission area or wear any other official military insignia with it. Veterans who have not
A UN Veteran
served as United Nations Peacekeepers or Observers should not wear any UN insignia.
UNITED NATIONS BLUE HEADDRESS
UN BLUE CAP
UN BLUE HELMETS
BE A PROUD VETERAN
UN BLUE TILLY HAT
UN KEVLAR HELMET
WEAR YOUR BLUE BERET!
THE BLUE BERET©
PUBLICATION ADVISORY
The Blue Beret © Newsletter is an official
publication of the Canadian Peacekeeping
Veterans Association (CPVA) registered with
Library & Archives Canada.
PUBLISHING
The Blue Beret © is published in January, July and
October. We welcome all items or interest to
veterans. Articles should be provided at least two
weeks prior to the month of publication and be
submitted in electronic format. Please address
queries, comments and articles to the Editor at
[email protected] The Blue Beret © is
available on the CPVA website at www.cpva.ca.
The Blue Beret © may be obtained in its French
version; Le Béret Bleu ©.
VETERANS
SUPPORT
OUR TROOPS!
DISCLAIMER
Opinions expressed by contributors in the Blue
Beret © are not necessary those of the CPVA. An
Editorial Review Board reviews all articles for form
and content.
CPVA EDITORIAL REVIEW BOARD
Karl O. Morel CD
Ray Kokkonen CD
Ed Oursien CD
AUTHORIZATION FOR REPRODUCTION
Unless otherwise indicated, the information
contained in the Blue Beret © may be reproduced,
in whole or in part, and by any means, without
charge and without permission from the CPVA,
provided reasonable due diligence is exercised in
order to ensure the exactitude of the information
reproduced, that the CPVA is mentioned as the
source organization, and the reproduction is not
presented as an official version nor as a copy
having been made in association with the CPVA or
with its consent. To obtain permission for
reproduction please email the Editor at
[email protected]
THE ASSOCIATION
Founded in 1991 by former Canadian
peacekeepers and federally incorporated in 1993,
the Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association
(CPVA) is a national, democratic, apolitical, nonprofit, veterans-only organization open to all
veterans. The CPVA is neither a sect nor a
paramilitary organization.
The members of the
Canadian Peacekeeping
Veterans Association
wishes our troops
in Afghanistan and
in Peacekeeping Missions
the World over
A Happy New Year
2009
Come home safe
We care
Canadian Veterans
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE BLUE BERET JANUARY 2009 NEWSLETTER
TABLE OF CONTENTS: THE KIT BAG
FRONTSPIECE:
Feature Article:
Publication Advisory:
Table of Contents:
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:
National Reports:
National Reports:
CURRENT EVENTS:
National Events:
Special Events:
Calendar of Events:
EDITORIALS:
Poetry:
Editor’s Page:
Articles & Essays:
Terms & Definitions:
MILITARIA:
Symbols & Flags:
Parades & Ceremonial:
Dress & Deportment:
Honours & Awards:
Forms:
VETERANS SERVICES:
The Job Bank:
The Kit Shop:
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Fallen Peacekeepers:
Fallen Comrades:
Links of Interest:
COMMUNICATIONS:
Addresses:
Forms:
Forms:
Contact Lists:
Recruiting:
THE SWITCHBOARD
The Blue Beret
Editorial Data & Terms of Use
The Kit Bag
THE OPERATIONS CENTRE
National President's Message
Québec Chair
THE OBSERVATION POST
Peacekeeper Awards 2008
The New Year’s Levee
Peacekeeper’s Calendar 2009
THE BORDER PATROL
Beret of Blue
Communications is the Key
Multinational Peacekeeping Missions
The Terminology of Peace
THE PARADE SQUARE
The Flags of our Veterans
The National Flag of Canada
Flag Etiquette Do’s & Don’ts
1988 Nobel Peace Prize Recognition
Nobel Peace Prize Diploma Application
THE BUFFER ZONE
Why Employ A Veteran?
Accoutrement Providers & Products
THE BLUE BANNER
The Fallen Peacekeepers of 2006-2007
In the Service of Peace 1948-2008
The Wall of Honour
THE FINE BLUE LINE
Chapter Addresses and Contacts
CPVA Membership Application
CPVA Membership Renewal Request
CPVA Key Positions
CPVA Recruiting Poster
The Blue Beret – A Canadian Veterans Newsletter
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9-10
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12-13
14-15
16-17
Page
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22
23
24-26
27
Page
28
29-33
Page
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36-37
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CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
ASSOCIATION DES VÉTÉRANS
DU MAINTIEN DE LA PAIX
THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
As snow spreads a white blanket across this great country of ours and with Christmas very near, we need to reflect
and count the blessings of living in a land which is free and in which we can enjoy life. At this time when life is very
satisfactory, despite the somewhat glum economic situation, I want to express some fundamental thoughts about us
as veterans and as members of the Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association. First, the freedom and the ability
of Canadians to live their lives to the fullest has not been a gift: it has been won and defended throughout history by
men and women like you and me. Of course, in most of our experiences, the Canadian way of life and values have
been defended by preventing or stopping wars, battles and human suffering and we know that is the way we
measure success as peacekeepers. However, regardless of how or where you have served, you have earned the
right to be called a veteran.
Our shared experiences and common values have given us the desire for comradeship with our fellow veterans and
it is for that reason that we have formed this Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association. Without question, in
addition to comradeship, our main focus and concern is for the proper care and dignified treatment of all veterans
and particularly those who have suffered wounds and other disabling trauma as a result of their service. We strive to
ensure that Canada treats fairly those who have served under the unlimited liability clause. Naturally, we also pray
for the safe return of those men and women in Afghanistan, and in other far-away Canadian missions, who are
currently fulfilling their unlimited commitment.
We are a dynamic and growing organization with a steady influx of new and returning members, including several
from other nations such as New Zealand, Poland, Italy and the USA. It is good to belong and I personally find very
much satisfaction and comfort in the comradeship of my fellow peacekeepers. It would be truly energizing for the
Association if all members viewed it as their duty to find even more veterans to bring to the fold of our veterans'
family. The possibility of uniting in some way with other veterans organizations, specifically those closely related to
us, is also a very exciting and promising avenue for the future. We look forward to the coming year with an
expectation of progress and having a strong positive influence on matters which are important for the welfare of
veterans.
On behalf of the Executive of the Association, I thank all of you for your valuable contributions and comradeship in
the past year and wish all of our members and friends a very peaceful, safe and enjoyable Christmas and good
health, happiness and success in the New Year of 2009.
Respectfully,
Ray Kokkonen
President
23 December 2008
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
ASSOCIATION DES VÉTÉRANS
DU MAINTIEN DE LA PAIX
CPVA QUÉBEC AVMP
JE ME SOUVIENS
Montreal, 1 January 2009
ANNUAL MESSAGE FROM THE QUÉBEC CHAIR
The CPVA is an organization founded by peacekeeping veterans in 1991 which welcomes and advocates for all
veterans; be they peacekeepers, war-fighters, cold warriors, law enforcers, civil servants, active service or exservice personnel. This veteran’s organization is for you!
As we organize ourselves to bring veterans together, the CPVA membership will begin to grow in Québec this
year. With this in mind, as your Quebec Chair, here are my goals for the CPVA in 2009:
¾ Recruit new members in Québec and bring them together;
¾ Promote networking to keep our members informed;
¾ Compile a bilingual “Chapter Starter Kit” for the CPVA;
¾ Collaborate with the Veterans Affairs Canada offices in Québec;
¾ Produce a French-language edition of the CPVA newsletter called “Le Beret Bleu”;
¾ Redesign the CPVA website www.cpva.ca and make it bilingual;
¾ Partner with other veterans groups in Québec to organize common commemorative activities;
¾ Advocate for the unification of the modern (Post-1947) veterans organizations;
¾ Organize veterans for National Peacekeeper’s Day commemorations on 9th August; and
¾ Bring Somalia, Gulf War and Afghanistan Veterans together within the CPVA.
Please see the recruiting poster in this issue of the Blue Beret Newsletter. To join CPVA, simply complete the
form attached to this newsletter and mail it along with your cheque to the address indicated on the Membership
Application. If you have not renewed your membership, now’s the time!
Proud to serve, proud to have served, IN THE SERVICE OF PEACE
Karl O. Morel, CD, BA
CPVA Québec Chair
The CPVA is a national all-veterans Association
BRINGING VETERANS TOGETHER
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING VETERANS ASSOCIATION
Headquarters: PO Box 905, Kingston, Ontario, CANADA, K7L 4X8
ANNUAL PEACEKEEPER AWARDS
In order to recognize deserving service by its members, the CPVA has an annual awards programme. The awards are
in the form of engraved plaques with the CPVA emblem at the top stating the name of the award, the year awarded
and the name of the recipient.
Peacekeeper of the Year Award
This Award is given to the member who has demonstrated highly notable good work on behalf of the Association
during the past year as a volunteer at the national, regional or chapter level. The Peacekeeper of the Year Award is
normally given to one recipient each year but may be given to two if the circumstances warrant it. The award period
for the Peacekeeper of the Year is the period ending 31 March of the year in which the award is given.
Peacekeeper Builder Award
This Award is given to the member or non-member who has served the CPVA with distinction for a long time and has
made a significant contribution to the development and welfare of the Association or veterans in general. The
Peacekeeper Builder Award may be given only to one person per year and does not have to be awarded at all if there
is no suitable recipient. There is no set date period for the Builder Award.
From left to right: Karl Morel, Ray Kokkonen, Edward Oursien
This year, the National Executive has decided to bestow two Peacekeeper of the Year Awards; to Edward Oursien CD
of Miramichi, NB for his work rebuilding the membership database and to Karl Morel CD of Montreal, QC for his
editorial work on the Blue Beret newsletter. The Peacekeeper Builder Award is conferred to Harold Leduc of
Victoria, BC for his outstanding work and consistent support for the association for many years. Edward Oursien
received his award from the Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick on the 9th of August. Karl Morel received his
award on 22 August from the National Vice President.
Harold Leduc shall be presented with his award by the National President at a suitable opportunity in the near future.
BE A PROUD VETERAN!
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
CPVA Headquarters: PO Box 905, Kingston, Ontario, CANADA, K7L 4X8
THE NEW YEAR’S LEVEE
A CANADIAN TRADITION
As in our society generally, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day are times of merry-making and good
fellowship throughout the Canadian Forces and the RCMP. It is a long standing custom of the service and this
continues to be so even in retirement. It is an occasion to meet and greet members of the military, the police
forces, the civil service, our veterans, as well as active members of the community and important official
personages.
THE ORIGINS OF THE LEVEE
The annual New Year’s Levee, hosted by the Governor-General, the Lieutenant-Governors, military
establishments, municipalities and other institutions, has an unusual and interesting origin. The word itself
originally meant the action of rising, specifically from one’s bed, coming from the French verb lever (to rise). As
early as the seventeenth century, a “levée” was an official reception on rising from bed, a morning reception by
a king or person of distinction. French aristocrats used to receive guests in the morning after they had gotten
up. In the eighteenth century, British sovereigns held their levees in the early afternoon. From this tradition, it
follows that the military hold their levee in the morning as in the French custom and government and civilian
organizations do so in the afternoon in accordance with the British custom in Canada. This has the added
convenience of allowing one to attend more than one levee on the same day.
A CUSTOM OF THE SERVICE
The levee has a long tradition in the Canadian Forces as one of the activities associated with New Year’s Day.
Hospitality is dispensed in a variety of forms, from special alcoholic concoctions to traditional meals of all kinds.
As is the custom, a military unit celebrates the arrival of the New Year by holding a New Year’s Levee. Visits to
all three Messes are made amongst each other, and any other units who wish to pay their respects to the
members of the appropriate mess in accordance with a strict protocol. It is also customary to invite members of
the public to a levee at City Hall or at Government House. New Year’s Day in the messes epitomizes the
camaraderie and goodwill between all ranks. In most units of the Canadian Forces the officers as a group call
on the members of the Warrant Officers and Sergeants in their mess and then, in turn, they are entertained in
the Officers’ Mess. This custom in its various forms is long standing. Veterans are always welcome in messes,
the Legion Hall, the ANAVets Clubhouse, City Hall and Government House. The New Year’s Levee is one of
the major events of the year for veterans.
WHEN AND WHERE TO ATTEND A LEVEE
The New Year’s Levee is normally held on January 1st but some are held a day or two earlier and some later.
The military and the RCMP hold a reception in the forenoon and most government offices hold the levee in the
afternoon. Check your local paper or with City Hall for dates and times. For the Governor-General’s and
Lieutenant-Governor’s Levees, these may be found by typing ‘New Year’s Levee” in your Internet web browser.
There is no shortage of places to go in most communities. Levees are held at City Hall, the local Legion,
military messes on bases or at the local Militia armouries. So Veterans, rise from your bed on the first of
January, maintain the tradition, the custom, and the decorum, dress up in full regalia with medals and attend a
levee. If ever there was a time to make new acquaintances and meet old comrades, this is it!
The CPVA: BRINGING VETERANS TOGETHER
PEACEKEEPER’S CALENDAR
2009
JANUARY
sun
mon
tue
FEBRUARY
mon
tue
thu
fri
sat
sun
4 5 6 7
11 12 13 14
18 19 20 21
25 26 27 28
1
8
15
22
29
2
9
16
23
30
3
10
17
24
31
1 2 3 4 5 6
8 9 10 11 12 13
15 16 17 18 19 20
22 23 24 25 26 27
29 27 28
APRIL
sun
mon
tue
thu
fri
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29
2
9
16
23
30
3
10
17
24
wed
thu
fri
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29
2
9
16
23
30
3
10
17
24
31
sat
sun
mon
tue
mon
tue
fri
sat
sun
7
14
21
28
1 2 3 4 5 6
8 9 10 11 12 13
15 16 17 18 19 20
22 23 24 25 26 27
29 30 31
mon
wed
sun
mon
tue
wed
fri
sat
7
14
21
28
sat
sun
wed
thu
fri
sat
7
14
21
28
1
8
15
22
29
2
9
16
23
30
1 2 3
7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 23 24
28 29 30
4
11
18
25
5
12
19
26
6
13
20
27
fri
sat
sun
7
14
21
28
1
8
15
22
29
1 2 3
6 7 8 9 10
13 14 15 16 17
20 21 22 23 24
27 28 29 30
fri
sat
sun
thu
mon
mon
mon
NOVEMBER
thu
tue
SEPTEMBER
tue
wed
thu
fri
sat
4
11
18
25
5
12
19
26
DECEMBER
wed
thu
fri
sat
sun
4 5 6 7
11 12 13 14
18 19 20 21
25 26 27 28
1
8
15
22
29
2
9
16
23
30
3
10
17
24
31
1 2 3 4 5 6
8 9 10 11 12 13
15 16 17 18 19 20
22 23 24 25 26 27
29 30
28 ◄ Law Enforcement Days
thu
fri
3 4 5 6
10 11 12 13
17 18 19 20
24 25 26 27
31
wed
wed
thu
4
11 2
18 9
25 16
23
30
tue
tue
JUNE
AUGUST
sat
OCTOBER
sun
tue
4
11 3 4 5 6
18 10 11 12 13
25 17 18 19 20
24 25 26 27
31
JULY
mon
thu
MAY
wed
sun
wed
MARCH
wed
9 ◄ Peacekeeping Days
mon
tue
wed
thu
fri
sat
7
1 2
14 6 7 8 9
21 13 14 15 16
28 20 21 22 23
27 28 29 30
3
10
17
24
31
4
11
18
25
5
12
19
26
6 ◄ Military Days
Note: If you know of any significant dates which should be added to the Veteran’s Calendar please contact the Editor.
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING VETERANS ASSOCIATION
IMPORTANT DATES
2009
Thursday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Saturday
Thursday
Sunday
Sunday
Monday
Friday
Wednesday
Saturday
Sunday
Sunday
Wednesday
Sunday
Wednesday
Sunday
Monday
Sunday
Monday
Thursday
Saturday
Saturday
Wednesday
Friday
Thursday
Friday
Friday
Saturday
01
14
15
09
17
04
09
03
10
25
29
03
06
07
21
01
09
19
20
21
27
12
15
24
31
11
04
10
11
25
26
January
February
February
March
March
April
April
May
May
May
May
June
June
June
June
July
August
August
September
September
September
October
October
October
October
November
December
December
December
December
December
NEW YEAR’S LEVÉE
SAINT VALENTINES DAY
NATIONAL FLAG OF CANADA DAY
COMMONWEALTH DAY
SAINT-PATRICK’S DAY
NATO ANNIVERSARY DAY
VIMY ANNIVERSARY DAY
BATTLE OF THE ATLANTIC DAY
MOTHERS DAY
VICTORIA DAY
INTERNATIONAL DAY OF UNITED NATIONS PEACKEEPERS
CANADIAN FORCES APPRECIATION DAY
D DAY ANNIVERARY
DECORATION DAY
FATHER’S DAY
CANADA DAY
NATIONAL PEACEKEEPERS' DAY
DIEPPE RAID ANNIVERSARY
BATTLE OF BRITAIN DAY
UNITED NATIONS INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE
POLICE AND PEACE OFFICER’S NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY
THANKSGIVING DAY
NATO DAY
UNITED NATIONS ANNIVERSARY DAY
HALLOWEEN
REMEMBRANCE DAY
SAINT BARBARA’S DAY
1988 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE ANNIVERSARY
STATUTE OF WESTMINSTER DAY
CHRISTMAS DAY
BOXING DAY
THE CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING VETERANS ASSOCIATION
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
AN UNFICYP PEACEKEEPER’S POEM
BERET OF BLUE
He is young and strong
And time will seem long
While he does what he has to do
CYPRUS
Jim MacMillan-Murphy CD
He was trained to fight
But he won’t use that right
When wearing a Beret of Blue
It doesn’t make sense
On his side of the fence
To play a role he did not choose
When out on patrol
He must keep control
With a gun he cannot use
He is some mothers son
And not much can be done
Except pray he’ll come through
As he does his best
To survive the test
And bring home his Beret of Blue
Proud to serve, proud to have served, IN THE SERVICE OF PEACE
BE A PROUD VETERAN, STAND STRAIGHT AND WALK TALL!
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE EDITOR’S PAGE
COMMUNICATIONS IS THE KEY
Karl O. Morel, CD, BA
THE BLUE BERET NEWSLETTER
It is that time of year to put things into perspective, to look back on what has been
accomplished, and to look ahead to new challenges. Eighteen months ago, I was asked
by our National Vice-President Ray Kokkonen if I would like to help him get out an issue of
the Blue Beret which had been without an editor for many months. I offered to produce a
two-pager to help out. Well, it turned out to be a 12-pager for August and then a 34-pager
in October! So now that I am definitely committed to the success of the CPVA Blue Beret
Newsletter, let me just say that with all the support I have received it has been a real
pleasure!
Judging from the feedback from across the country, the August and October issues of 2007
have been a success. We were most impressed with the submissions received from every
chapter of the CPVA for the October issue. We thank you all for the input. The October
issue included activities from other veteran’s groups such as CAVUNP and the Legion. For
the first time, the Blue Beret was produced in full colour and included a gallery of pictures.
It was distributed electronically to CPVA members as well as to other groups and
individuals of the veteran’s community, in Canada and overseas. In fact, no copy of the
Blue Beret has been mailed out, thereby cutting mailing costs to the CPVA. We rely on the
members and other readers to get the word out!
The New Year will see more innovations, such as a French version called Le Beret Bleu so
our francophone veterans in Canada, Europe, Asia and Africa may read about our
achievements too. Future issues will feature articles on other veteran’s organizations from
around the World, so we may all learn about each other’s existence and promote fraternal
bonds. As each issue of the Blue Beret is produced, the editorial style changes with the
feedback indicating the areas of interest of our readers. The next issues will include
practical information on veteran’s care, job opportunities, and veteran’s contact information.
Articles on accoutrements, on ceremonial, flags, medals, uniforms, insignia and other
militaria are planned. Each issue shall include an article about at least one Peace Support
operation with illustrations. Other things to watch for will be editorials, essays, obituaries,
biographies, new members, chapter news, contact lists and items on veterans’ issues. But
this is not a one-man show; we the Editorial Review Board, Ray Kokkonen, Ed Oursien and
yours truly, Karl Morel, anxiously await your input. It’s your Blue Beret!
THE CPVA: WE SUPPORT OUR TROOPS
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE EDITOR’S PAGE
INTERNET COMMUNICATIONS
The CPVA must use the Internet to its maximum effect to communicate with its
membership, and vice versa, its membership to its leadership. We are a wonderfully simply
structured organization. Communication within CPVA is easy, just type up an e-mail
message to the President, the Editor, the Chapter President or whomever. This is our
strength, this ease of communication! We keep ourselves well-informed and we also try
keep the veterans community at large well-informed. We make use of electronic
communications to advocate on behalf of veterans at all government levels and elected
officials, because, along with bringing veterans together, these are the two most important
aspects of our existence as an organization, namely: veteran’s unity and advocacy.
There are three key communications tools within CPVA; these are The Blue Beret
Newsletter, the CPVA News Bulletins / Communiqués, and the CPVA National Website,
www.cpva.ca currently under revision. Communication is the key because it permits our
National Executive to get the pulse of the membership and at the same time keeping the
very same members informed in a timely manner of the veteran’s issues which affect them.
It is therefore very important for those of us who have access to the Internet to
communicate information to those members who do not. We count on all of you for
feedback, to speak up, rightly or wrongly, about anything you feel is important to you and
other veterans. Don’t rely on others to get the word out for you, this is what a veterans
association is all about, taking care of our own! Get other veterans to join, and make CPVA
a louder voice.
Whether you were a Corporal or a Colonel, you are equally important; there is no rank
among veterans, but there is respect and comradeship. Every one of us counts; military or
police, man or woman, regular or reserve, French or English, black or white, peacekeeper
or war-fighter, we together can make things change, as we are comrades-in-arms!
The Blue Beret Newsletter will feature a “Letters-to-the Editor” column; please use it to
express your self. And guess what, you may even get a straight answer! Tell us and the
readership what you think about veteran’s issues, what you expect your leaders to do, ask
questions, demand answers, express your joy, your frustration. We are listening very
intently.
Communications is the key!
BE A PROUD VETERAN, STAND STRAIGHT AND WALK TALL !
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
PEACEKEEPING
THE MULTINATIONAL PEACEKEEPING MISSIONS
There have been eight multinational peacekeeping missions since 1953 which were not set up under any international
organization such as the United Nations (UN), NATO, the European Union (EU), the African Union (AU), the Arab
League, the Confederation of Independent States (CIS) the Organization of American States (OAS) or the
Commonwealth. The UNCMAC mission was established in 1953 under the stewardship of the United States. The ICSC
and ICCS missions were organized as truce observer “commissions” with the assent of the United Nations between
1953 and 1973. MFO is a combined observer mission and a peacekeeping force operation set up by the United States
and INTERFET was mainly an Australian peace support operation. Canadian peacekeepers served in all of these
multinational missions and are eligible for the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal or the Special Service Medal with
“Peace” Bar. Two other multinational missions; FOMUC in the Central African Republic and Operation ASTUTE in East
Timor have not yet involved Canadian participation. Canada did not participate in Operation BOLEAS in Lesotho. The
five multinational operations which involved Canadian participation are detailed below.
UNCMAC KOREA 1953
The UNITED NATIONS COMMAND – MILITARY ARMISTICE COMMISSION (UNCMAC)
was created at the end of the Korean War by the United Nations Command (UNC) in 1953
to represent the United Nations (UN) combatant forces as a signatory to the armistice
between the UNC and North Korea and China, as well as to monitor the armistice under the
Military Armistice Commission (MAC). Its acronym notwithstanding, “UNC-MAC” is a
multinational, not a United Nations, observation mission whose role is limited to the
monitoring of the armistice, the investigation of serious incidents and participation in
relevant negotiations by the belligerents. UNCMAC no longer deploys observers along the
ceasefire line since 1978 and has since exercised a very limited diplomatic role. Canada
has suffered six fatalities during this mission. There is no distinctive medal for this mission
but Service with UNCMAC is recognized by the United Nations Service Medal (UNSM) or
by the Special Service Medal (SSM) with ‘Peace’ bar after 1954.
ICSC INDOCHINA 1954
The INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION FOR SUPERVISION AND CONTROL (ICSC) was
created by the Geneva Accords at the end of the Indochina War between the Viet Minh,
Pathet Lao and French forces in 1953 to implement the withdrawal of all French military
forces from Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, the former components of French Indochina
which thereby obtained their independence. The ICSC, the first peacekeeping operation
not conducted by the United Nations was actually composed of three commissions for
Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia with slightly different mandates. ICSC came about principally
because China was not a member of the UN at the time. Military and civilian personnel for
ICSC was provided by a neutral country; India, a Warsaw Pact country; Poland, and a
NATO country; Canada. The main tasks of the ICSC were largely completed by 1955 and
the mission had very limited success afterward. The ICSC ended when it was replaced by
the ICCS in 1973. Canada suffered two casualties on this mission. Service with the ICSC is
recognized by the award of the ICSC Medal.
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
PEACEKEEPING
THE MULTINATIONAL PEACEKEEPING MISSIONS
ICCS VIETNAM 1974
The INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION FOR CONTROL AND SUPERVISON (ICCS) was
created by the Paris Peace Accords at the end of the Vietnam War in 1973 to monitor the
cease-fore in South Vietnam and the withdrawal of United States, and other allied forces.
The ICCS was a peacekeeping operation not conducted under the auspices of the United
Nations which replaced the ICSC created in 1954. Military and civilian personnel for ICCS
was provided by one neutral country; Indonesia, two communist countries; Poland and
Hungary, and one western country; Canada. The ICCS mission had very limited success
after 1973. Canada pulled out of the ICCS because of the intransigence of Hungary and
Poland at the end of 1973. The ICCS ended two years later in 1975 with the fall of South
Vietnam and subsequent reunification with North Vietnam. Canada suffered one death on
this mission. Service with the ICCS is recognized by the award of the ICCS Medal.
MFO EGYPT - ISRAEL (SINAI) 1982
The MULTINATIONAL FORCE AND OBSERVERS (MFO) was created in 1982 as a result
of the Camp David Accords of 1979 between Israel and Egypt which ended the state of war
which had existed between them since 1948. The Multinational Force & Observers was set
up by the United States in 1982. It is a multinational peacekeeping mission which is
sanctioned by, but operates independently of, the United Nations. Canada has been part of
the MFO since 1986 along with ten other countries. The mission of the MFO is to supervise
the implementation of the security provisions of the Egyptian-Israeli Treaty of Peace and
employ best efforts to prevent any violation of its terms. FMO patrols the Egypt-Israel border
in the Sinai peninsula / Negev desert. Unique among the multinational missions, FMO
Peacekeepers wear a distinctive Orange Beret and the FMO insignia and serve under the
orange and white MFO Flag. One Canadian died on this mission in 2007. Service with the
MFO is recognized by the award of the MFO Medal.
INTERFET EAST TIMOR (INDONESIA) 1999
The INTERNATIONAL FORCE EAST TIMOR (INTERFET) was a United Nations-mandated
multinational force formed as an emergency peacekeeping force under Australian command
to restore order in East Timor and help the UNAMET to carry out its tasks. The INTERFET
deployed to East Timor in September 1999 as a coalition force mostly composed of
Australian troops. Peacekeepers for INTERFET were provided by New Zealand, Portugal
and several other nations including Canada. Intended as a temporary expedient,
INTERFET handed over control in East Timor, also called Timor-Leste, to UNTAET forces in
February 2000. Canadian peacekeepers have served with UNAMET, INTERFET and
UNTAET. In 2006 another multinational mission was set up in East Timor as Operation
ASTUTE to enhance law enforcement. No Canadians were lost during the INTERFET
mission. Service with INTERFET is recognized by the award of the INTERFET Medal.
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE TERMINOLOGY OF PEACE
PIECING THE “PEACE” WORDS TOGETHER
Karl O. Morel CD, BA
THE TERMINOLOGY OF PEACE
With the end of the Cold War in 1989, the nature of what is called “peacekeeping” has changed. A myriad of ‘peace’
terms have been invented by our military and political leaders since then. The multiple use of the terminology such as;
Peace-Keeping (peacekeeping), Peace-Support, Peace-Making (peacemaking), Peace-Enforcement, Peace-Imposition,
Peace-Building, Peace Operations, Peace Forces, Soldiers of Peace, and so on, all becomes very confusing for most of
us. The Canadian public, for want of simplicity, has now taken to call all our military, police and other peace officers
“Peacekeepers” no matter under what operational conditions they are serving in, be it peace or war.
It is astounding how often the word “peacekeeper” is used to describe our soldiers in Afghanistan. Those men and
women who are fighting for peace in that strife-torn country are properly called “war-fighters”, not “peace-keepers”. The
International Support & Assistance Force (ISAF) is not a peacekeeping mission at all, it is a combined peaceenforcement and peace-building operation which is taking place in the face of an armed insurrection by the Taliban and
other terrorists, and it is more appropriately described as a war, not peacekeeping. There is yet no peace to keep!
PEACE TERMS DEFINED
Here below are the definitions of the terminology of peace. Most of the following terms may be grouped under the main
rubric of “Peace Support”. We shall examine and explain how these terms fit together in the next issue of The Blue
Beret.
« Peacekeeping» describes the classical peace-support mission where an impartial third force consisting of military and
civilian personnel intercedes in a conflict, with the consent of the belligerents, to help restore and maintain the peace.
Such operations include deployed military units and/or groups of military observers normally deployed under Chapter VI
of the United Nations Charter. The United Nations defines peacekeeping as “The prevention, containment, moderation
and determination of hostilities between or within states through an impartial third-party intervention organized and
directed internationally for restoring and maintaining peace. This is conducted using military forces, police and civilians,
and usually with the consent of the main belligerents.”
«Peacekeeping Missions» is another term for “Peacekeeping Operations” coined by the United Nations Organization
(UN).
«Peace Operations» include peace enforcement operations, peace-making, peace-building, humanitarian and
peacekeeping missions.
«Peace Support Operations» refers to the logistical and operational support for all types of peace operations.
«Peacemaking» is a diplomatic effort by a third party which is undertaken by negotiators to bring conflicting parties to
make peace with each other. The term “peace-making” is often confused with the term “peace-enforcement” another
term for “war-making” which is exactly the opposite.
«Peace Enforcement Operations» refers to military and police operations conducted in the context of peace
enforcement.
«Peace Enforcement» are established and conducted under Chapter VII of the United Nations’ Charter, involve the
potential use of armed force in order to maintain the peace or enforce law and order in a troubled area. Such a mandate
might include the employment of economic sanctions or embargoes, the use of force to deliver humanitarian supplies,
the armed patrolling of ‘no-fly zones’ or the armed protection of ‘safe areas’ such as occurred in Somalia, Iraq and
Kosovo.
«United Nations Peacekeeping» refers to international peacekeeping operations organized and conducted by the
United Nations Organization (UN) such as the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL). These peacekeeping
missions of the UN are composed of multinational military and police forces whose members wear the UN Blue Beret,
and are also known as “Blue Helmets” from the French term “Casques Bleus”.
«Multinational Peacekeeping» refers to international peacekeeping operations sanctioned by the United Nations
Organization (UN) undertaken by one or more proxy nations. Examples of multinational peacekeeping missions are the
Multinational Force & Observers (FMO) presently deployed in the Sinai, or the International Force in East Timor
(INTERFET) which served in East Timor (Timor-Leste).
«International Peacekeeping» refers to international peacekeeping operations sanctioned by the United Nations
Organization (UN) undertaken by a proxy international regional organization such as the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization (NATO), the European Union (EU), the Commonwealth, the Organization of American States (OAS), the
League of Arab States (Arab League), and the African Union (AU). Examples are the NATO Kosovo Force (KFOR)
deployed in the Kosovo region of Serbia or the African Mission in Sudan (AMIS) currently deployed in the Darfur region
of the Sudan.
«Peace-Building» refers to stability actions, predominantly diplomatic and economic, that strengthens and rebuilds
governmental infrastructure and institutions in order to avoid a relapse into conflict.
«Humanitarian Operations» refers to humanitarian assistance activities undertaken to alleviate human suffering. Such
operations include the evacuation, feeding, medical care and housing of refugees, escort of convoys for the delivery of
humanitarian supplies from distribution centres to areas of strife.
«Peacekeeper» means a person who is a member of the military or of the police forces deployed on a peacekeeping
operation.
«Peace Officer» means a person whose principle employment is in law enforcement. The term “Peace Officer” in
Canada includes the terms; sheriff, deputy sheriff, sheriff’s officer, corrections officer, warden, deputy warden, instructor,
keeper, jailer, prison guard, police officer, police constable, customs or excise officer, fishery guardian or fishery officer,
military police officers and non-commissioned members of the military police (provost corps).
«Soldier of Peace» is another term for a military “Peacekeeper”.
«Preventative Diplomacy» describes the process whereby diplomatic negotiations are undertaken by a state or an
international organization to prevent war or remove a threat to peace.
«Preventative Deployment» refers to the positioning of military and police forces into a potentially sensitive area in
order to deter a potential conflict.
«Peacetime» means the opposite of “wartime”, a state of peace. This does not include a truce or a cease-fire, which is
neither war nor peace but technically a state of war between belligerents who may have ceased fighting.
THE CPVA: WE SUPPORT OUR TROOPS
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE FLAGS OF OUR VETERANS
THE VETERAN AND THE FLAG
Only a veteran really knows the special personal, almost religious, attachment to flags during war
and peace support operations. It is rightly said we fight for queen and country, both being
represented by the sacred and patriotic symbols which are our national ensigns and battle flags.
Here follows the story of the Flags of our Veterans. Lest we forget
THE NATIONAL FLAG OF CANADA
Also called the “Red Maple Leaf Flag”, the National Flag of Canada became our first truly official
Canadian flag by parliamentary approval in 1965 and as such first flew in combat operations during
the 1991 Gulf War. It was also proudly carried into battle by our veterans during the Somalia
conflict. Our national flag is flown and worn on our uniforms during peacekeeping and peace
enforcement operations the world over. Recognized as a beacon of peace around the world, it has
also become the Canadian battle flag. Today, we are witnessing the rise of a new generation of
combat veterans returning from service under our flag in Afghanistan. There were no fatalities
during the Gulf War but one UN peacekeeper was lost in Somalia. To date, there have been 100
mortal casualties in the Afghanistan Conflict. Hundreds of our Afghanistan Veterans have been
injured, many permanently, serving under the Red Maple Leaf Battle Flag. Lest we forget
THE ROYAL UNION FLAG
Commonly known as the “Union Jack”, and called the “Union Flag” outside Canada, thousands of
Canadians who served under this famous symbol of the British Empire and Commonwealth first
became war veterans during the Northwest Rebellion and in the Sudan in 1885. Many more served
during the Boer War of 1899-1902 in Southern Africa and in the Great War of 1914-1918 in
Europe. There followed the Second World War of 1939-1945 where over a million Canadians saw
service on land, at sea and in the air. Today, many of the Second World War veterans are still with
us. A good many of these served with British and other Commonwealth Forces. The Union Jack
was by default, the official flag of the Dominion of Canada from 1904 to 1965 even though it was
replaced as the national flag by the Red Ensign in 1945. It was also the flag of Newfoundland and
Quebec until very recently. An estimated 106,460 Canadian sailors, soldiers, airmen and
merchant seamen lost their lives fighting under the Union Jack. Lest we forget
THE CANADIAN RED ENSIGN
Never an official Canadian flag by parliamentary approval, all three versions of the Canadian Red
Ensign nevertheless deserve high national honours. It was produced in its first version beginning
in 1868, then in 1922 and finally in 1957. Although the 1868 version saw service as a battle flag at
the end of the First World War, notably at Vimy Ridge, it was only flown outside Canada from
January 1944. The Merchant Navy had flown it at sea from 1924 onwards. In 1945 it was officially
flown on land and later became the battle flag of our Korean War Veterans. The 1957 version may
also said to be the flag of our Cold War Veterans. Canada lost 44,893 souls in the Second World
War, 496 during the Korean War and over 100 during the Cold War. Lest we forget
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE FLAGS OF OUR VETERANS
THE FLAG OF THE UNITED NATIONS
The United Nations (UN) Flag came into being in 1947 and it is the flag of the Peacekeeping
Veterans world-wide, the renowned Blue Berets. Peacekeeping missions did not exclude conflict,
they were fraught with them. The UN Flag was also carried by our veterans during the Korean War.
Those who served under the sky-blue flag of peace often came under fire in places such as
Cyprus, Congo, Lebanon, Yugoslavia, Somalia, Rwanda, and other zones of conflict. Included
under this flag are the veterans of five multinational peacekeeping missions. The largest single loss
of Canadian lives occurred on a UN peacekeeping mission, on the 9th of August 1974, when a
Canadian UN aircraft was shot out of the sky over Lebanon. Canada has suffered 114 fatalities
during UN Peacekeeping operations to date. For their extraordinary sacrifice and courage in the
service of peace, the Blue Berets were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1988. Lest we forget
THE NATO FLAG
The flag of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is both a Peacekeeping Veterans’ and a
War Veterans’ flag. It is also the flag of the Cold War Veteran. It dates from 1953. The formation of
the western alliance of the democratic nations of Western Europe and North America took place in
1949 to face the threat from the Communist Bloc under the Warsaw Pact. It is flown as a common
Battle Flag at sea and on land by all the NATO nations. Today, long a guarantor of peace, NATO
is at war. Formerly a Cold War symbol, today the NATO flag has been involved in peace support
operations in the former Yugoslavia, the Darfur region of the Sudan and in Afghanistan. Canada
has lost 12 NATO Peacekeepers in Yugoslavia and 100 war-fighters in Afghanistan so far.
Lest we forget
THE EUROPEAN UNION FLAG
It is less known that Canadians have served on peacekeeping missions in the former Yugoslavia
under the European Union (EU) flag. Peacekeeping and peace enforcement operations in the
former Yugoslav republics of Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Macedonia were recently handed
over to the EU by the United Nations and NATO. Although Canada has so far suffered no
casualties under the EU Flag, the Kosovo region remains a dangerous assignment for our military
and police peacekeepers who serve there under the UN, NATO, and the EU. Lest we forget
THE SYMBOLISM OF OUR FLAGS
The soldier’s passionate commitment to the flag is not understood by the civilian who harbours a
more comfortable patriotism for the national symbols. For veterans, flags are more then patriotic
and rallying symbols. The flag is home, the beacon of salvation, the signal that all is not lost. This
symbolism of the flags we served under have a sacred, deep-rooted significance which is not
experienced by civilians. We, the veterans, the guardians of our flags, unlike our fellow citizens,
are willing to lay down our lives for the flag, and over 100,000 of our comrades in arms did so, a
very personal loss to the military community. This is why a flag must be carried with honour and
never be dipped or permitted to touch the ground. It is the veteran who salutes the flag because it
is the veteran who serves under the flag. It should therefore be the veterans’ right to carry the flag
first on parade with pride and honour! Lest we forget
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE FLAGS OF OUR VETERANS
“Have not I myself known five-hundred living soldiers sabered into crows’ meat
for a piece of glazed cotton, which they call their flag; which, had you sold it at any
market-cross, would not have brought above three groschen?”
(Thomas Carlyle, c1828)
THE BATTLE FLAGS OF OUR NAVY VETERANS
The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) came into being in 1910 and flew the British Imperial Naval
(White) Ensign from that time including the First and Second World Wars and the Korean War.
Canada was authorized to fly the Red Ensign on merchant ships from 1892 and the Blue Ensign
on government vassals, including warships from 1924. Before 1949, Newfoundland flew the
standard British Red Ensign on her ships. During the Second World War, the Imperial White
Ensign was again in service on RCN ships up until the unification of the Canadian armed forces in
1968 even though the Blue Ensign was still official. Our Merchant Navy continued to fly the Red
Ensign. From the beginning of the war in 1940 until 1965 our navy again flew the White Ensign.
After 1965 the Red Maple Leaf Flag flew from our warships. In 1968, the Navy received its own
distinctive White Ensign to fly at sea. Since 1965, Canadian merchant vassals fly the Red Maple
Leaf Flag.
IMPERIAL NAVAL
WHITE ENSIGN
1910-1965
RCN
NAVAL ENSIGN
1924-1940
MERCHANT NAVY
RED ENSIGN
1924-1965
NATIONAL
FLAG OF CANADA
1965
CF
NAVAL ENSIGN
1968
THE BATTLE FLAGS OF OUR ARMY VETERANS
Up until the Great War of 1914-1918 the regiments of the Canadian Militia flew the Royal Union
Flag and a myriad of regimental colours and guidons. For a brief time during the Great War,
notably at Vimy Ridge, the 1868 version of the Red Ensign was flown by our military. Otherwise,
the Canadian Army flew the Imperial Union Jack until January 1944. It should be noted that when
serving overseas, our soldiers wore a green or a red maple leaf to distinguish themselves from
other British and Commonwealth forces. A special battle flag was designed for the military during
the war but was unpopular and fell into obscurity. From the reconstitution of the Canadian Army in
Northwest Europe in 1942, the 1922 and 1957 versions of the Red Ensign became the battle flags
of our army until 1965. From 1965 the National Flag of Canada (Red Maple Leaf Flag) replaced
the Red Ensign. With unification in 1968, the Canadian Forces (CF) Ensign came into use
alongside the National Flag. A distinctive CF Army Ensign came into being about 1975 but it is the
Red Maple Leaf Flag of Canada which our troops wear on their uniforms and now carry into battle.
CANADIAN
RED ENSIGN
1868-1904
ROYAL UNION
(JACK) FLAG
1904-1944
CANADIAN
RED ENSIGN
1944-1965
NATIONAL
FLAG OF CANADA
1965
CF
ARMY ENSIGN
1975
Be a proud Veteran – Carry our flags with honour!
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE FLAGS OF OUR VETERANS
THE BATTLE FLAGS OF OUR AIR FORCE VETERANS
With the creation of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) in 1924, the various air components in
Canada were united under the Royal Air Force (RAF) Blue Ensign. Many of our pilots and aircrew
in Europe and elsewhere fought under the RAF Ensign during the Second World War as members
of the British Imperial and Commonwealth forces. In 1940, a distinctly Canadian Blue Ensign was
finally adopted for the RCAF. A red maple leaf replaced the red dot in the roundel. After the
unification of the Canadian armed forces in 1968 the Blue Ensign disappeared but again came into
service in 1984. Between 1965 and 1984 the Canadian Air Force flew the National Red Maple
Leaf Flag or the Canadian Forces (CF) Ensign after 1968. Canadian military aircraft wore the Red
Ensign prior to 1965 and now wear the Maple Leaf Flag recognized the world over. Today, the Air
Force proudly flies the redesigned traditional Light Blue Air Ensign.
RAF
BLUE ENSIGN
1924-1940
RCAF
BLUE ENSIGN
1940-1965
NATIONAL
FLAG OF CANADA
1965
CF
WHITE ENSIGN
1968
CF
AIR ENSIGN
1984
THE ORDER OF PRECEDENCE OF OUR FLAGS
For most of us veterans as well as the public, the order of precedence of our flags is confusing.
Official Canadian flag precedence only applies to current, not former, flags. One must be cautioned
that the flag precedence established by some veterans associations leads us in error. The
Canadian Forces has its own order of precedence on land and sea but this does not include the
flags of our veterans. The United Nations Flag Code applies internationally to national flags and for
the UN flag only. The proper manner for flying the flags of our veterans may be found by combining
the recognized international flag protocol with former flags by seniority. Note that it is highly
improper to fly active CF ensigns and battle flags in a veteran’s parade unless they are flown by
those CF contingents present. The following order of flags is recommended as the most
appropriate in Canada.
Flag
Precedence Description
The 1965 Red Maple Leaf Flag is the National Flag of Canada and our Battle Flag
It represents all national service, peacekeeping and war veterans from 1965
The 1801 Royal Union Flag is a former flag of Canada and is still an Official Flag
It represents our British, Commonwealth and Canadian veterans before 1944
The 1924 Canadian Red Ensign is a former flag of Canada last altered in 1957
It represents our Merchant Navy, Second World War and Korean War veterans
The 1801 Imperial White Ensign is a former flag of the RCN
It represents our Canadian, British and Commonwealth naval veterans
The 1940 Canadian Blue Ensign is a former flag of the RCAF
It represents our Canadian air force veterans
The 1947 United Nations Flag is an international flag with national status
It represents our United Nations and multinational peacekeeping veterans
The 1953 North Atlantic Treaty Flag is an international flag with national status
It represents our Cold War and NATO peace support veterans
Be a proud Veteran – Carry our flags with honour!
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
PARADES & CEREMONIAL
THE NATIONAL FLAG OF CANADA
THE SYMBOLISM OF THE FLAG
Commonly called the “Canadian Flag” or the “Maple Leaf Flag”, the National Flag of
Canada became our official flag on 15 February 1965. Its colours, red and white, are
the official colours of Canada and the maple leaf is a traditional Canadian symbol
which has been with us since the beginning of the 18th Century and it has long been
the symbol of our armed forces. There is no official pledge to the Canadian flag;
however, there are no laws or statutes which prevent an association or an individual
from adopting a form which will suit the purpose.
THE DESCRIPTION OF THE FLAG
The official description reads: “The
flag is red and white, the official
colours of Canada as appointed by
King George V in 1921, with a
stylized 11-point red leaf in its centre”.
Its proportions are described as: “Two
by length and one by width” meaning
it is twice as wide as it is high (1 X 2).
The flag becomes a ceremonial dress flag when it is adorned with gold fringe around
its edges. Gold heading, sleeve, cord and tassel may be added as well. Such
accessories are purely decorative additions, an optional enhancement of the beauty of
our flag. There is no special flag protocol for the display of a ceremonial dress flag.
THE FLAG IS TREATED WITH RESPECT
Flags are symbols that identify people belonging to a group. The National Flag of
Canada is a symbol of honour and pride for all Canadians. It should be treated with
respect. February 15th is observed as National Flag Day in Canada.
The National Flag of Canada shall not be dipped or lowered as a means of paying a
salute or complement. The national flag, when carried, is never dipped or lowered to
the ground or allowed to touch the ground. When salutes are given, the flags are not
dipped but are let fly. The flag bearer extends his/her hand and lets the flag fly free. At
the conclusion of the salute, the flags are gathered in. This procedure applies during
inspection or on a march-past.
The half-masting of national flags is a well-established procedure whereby countries
bestow an honour and express a collective sense of sorrow. Given that such flags are
recognized as paramount symbols of their nations, the act of half-masting is a
dramatic visual statement that speaks to the sense of loss that is shared by all their
citizens. Canadian flag protocol should always be strictly followed for half-masting.
Sources: This article was quoted and compiled from:
A-AD-200-OOO/AG-000 The Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the CF, Chapter 4, Section 4 The National Flag.
Canadian Heritage Website: www.pch.gc.ca Ceremonial & Canadian Symbols Promotion, The National Flag
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
FLAG ETIQUETTE
FLAG TO DO’S
NOT TO DO’S
The Flag should always fly alone on its own
mast or flagpole.
The Flag may be flown at night without
being lit.
When the Flag is raised or lowered, or when
it is carried past in a parade or review,
people should face the Flag, men should
remove their hats, veterans and persons in
service uniform shall salute, and all should
remain silent.
Half-mast the Flag only on occasions when
a public demonstration of sorrow is
officially called for.
Fly the Flag in the international order of
precedence, meaning in front of all other
flags when flown in Canada.
When there are several flags on different
flag poles, the Flag must be flown at equal
height with the other flags.
The Flag is flown or carried in the centre of
the line, at the extreme left (on the marching
right), or at both ends when facing the flags.
The Flag may be used to cover a casket at
the funeral of a person who is so entitled. It
may be ceremoniously removed, folded and
given to a close relative of the deceased.
Decorative gold fringe may be sewn around
the exterior edge of the flag. Gold heading,
sleeve, cord and tassel may be added.
Replace a faded or torn Flag with a new
one. Dispose of an old Flag by burning it in
private.
Always show respect for the Flag.
The Flag must not be modified, defaced, or
marked in any way.
Never fly the Flag upside down for any
reason.
The Flag should not be allowed to touch the
ground and must never be dipped, meaning
to lower it from a vertical position to one
which is 45 degrees from the horizontal.
Only consecrated colours are dipped but
may not be allowed to touch the ground.
Do not half-mast the Flag for a person other
than called for by the official government
regulations governing such a display.
Do not use the Flag as a wall ornament,
table cover, facing, curtain, or to cover a
statue. Do not cloak yourself with it.
Do not fly another flag above or below the
flag on the same flag pole. A regimental
colour may not be flown from a flagpole.
Do not replace the Flag on its flagpole or
mast with any other flag for any occasion.
Do not cover the casket with the Flag for a
person who is not entitled to it. Only those
who have served Canada in an official
capacity have this honour.
The Flag may not be flown sewn together
with another flag. Do not salute the flag by
placing your hand over your left breast.
Do not burn the Flag as part of any public
ceremony. The flag may not be torn in
order to dispose of it.
Do not fly the Flag where it is inappropriate.
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
HONOURS AND AWARDS
1988 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE RECOGNITION
BACKGROUND
Almost thirty years ago, on the 10th of December 1988, the Norwegian Nobel
Committee awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 1988 to the United Nations PeaceKeeping Forces for their devotion and sacrifice in the service of peace since 1956.
The award was accepted by the then United Nations Secretary-General Perez De
Cuelliar,
on
behalf
of
the
“Blue
Helmets”
Peacekeepers.
See
http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1988/un-acceptance.html.
SIGNIFICANCE
It thus came about that all those Canadians who served on at least one United
Nations (UN) peacekeeping mission beginning with the Suez Crisis in 1956 with
the first UNEF, to the date of the award in 1988, became Nobel Laureates. They
are known as the “First Generation” of Peacekeepers who served from 1956 to
1989 and may also be referred to as the “Cold War” Peacekeepers. In French,
they are more often called “Casques Bleus”. So, if you meet a UN “First
Generation Blue Beret” Veteran, please congratulate our Nobel Laureate!
MEDALLION
The Nobel Peace Prize Medallion awarded in 1988 is described on the front page
of the August 2007 issue the CPVA Newsletter, The Blue Beret.
RECOGNITION
There is no official recognition for our Veteran Nobel Laureates by the
Government of Canada. When the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal
(CPSM) was designed in 1999, largely inspired by the 1988 Nobel Peace Prize
award, it was recommended by the CPVA to include a “Nobel” Bar for those who
are Nobel Laureates but this seems to have been lost in the approval process.
Sadly, there is no official military certificate to recognize this important event
either. Some provincial governments do issue a certificate of recognition to these
veterans through the efforts of our CPVA chapters.
Recognition is available through the CPVA by the award of the Norwegian 1988
Nobel Peace Prize Certificate. Nobel Laureates may apply directly to the CPVA
National Membership Chair to obtain one. A form is posted on the website and in
this edition of The Blue Beret.
Future recognition might be obtained in the form of post nominal initials, for
example “NL”, or by a lapel pin, even a tie clip and cuff links designed in imitation
of the 1988 medallion. For those who wish to spend a small fortune, a private
purchase commemorative medal, ribbon and certificate may be obtained from the
“Skanhandel” company in Denmark.
Proud to serve, proud to have served, IN THE SERVICE OF PEACE
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
HONOURS AND AWARDS
THE 1988 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE DIPLOMA
BE A PROUD NOBEL LAUREATE, STAND STRAIGHT AND WALK TALL!
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
HONOURS AND AWARDS
COMMEMORATIVES
PRIVATE PURCHASE COMMEMORATIVES
There are items designed for recognition available. There is a catch; you must be
prepared to pay for their commemorative products as the companies who manufacture
them do so to turn a profit, not to honour you particularly. One such company is the
Danish Skandinavisk Handels Kompagni, or “SKANHANDEL” for short.
THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE MEDAL 1988
A Norwegian Veterans organization submitted designs to the Nobel
Prize Association and the Norwegian Defence Ministry Medal
Committee in 1995. The Medal, with the Certificate and Diploma were
approved in 1996. The Danish Skanhandel Company was awarded
the exclusive right to manufacture and sell the medal and to
reproduce the accompanying Diploma. Only the veterans of United
Nations “Blue Helmet” peacekeeping missions from 1956 to 1988 are
eligible. The cost is approximately $180.00. The medal comes with
an undress ribbon, the Diploma, and a personalized certificate.
THE INTERNATIONAL VOLUNTEERS FOREIGN SERVICE MEDAL
The Skanhandel company also produces a medal and certificate for
post 1947 veterans of other international organizations including the
UN, NATO, SEATO, and EU or for multinational missions such as
ICCS, ICSC, and MFO. Veterans of the Gulf War, UNITAF and ISAF
are equally eligible. This medal may also be sold to civilian members
of UN humanitarian agencies and other recognized NGO’s. Veterans
who do not qualify for the Nobel Peace Prize Medal 1988 are eligible
for this commemorative. The cost is approximately $145.00. The
medal comes with an undress ribbon and a personalized certificate.
SKANHANDEL CONTACT INFORMATION
Ordering and payment information including the order form for both medals may be
obtained at the Skanhandel website at www.skanhandel.dk and by sending an e-mail
to: [email protected] or mail to:
Skandinavisk Handels Kompagni
GI. Strandvej 1 – Box 1433
DK-9100 Aalborg, Danmark
NOTICE
The Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association does not sanction nor condone the purchase and wearing of private
commemorative medals by its members. It is recommended that only one medal be purchased. CPVA members should
exercise judgement regarding the sentimental value of these unofficial commemoratives versus the greater value of the
official service decorations which they wear. These medals are not recognized by the Government of Canada and are not
listed in the official order of precedence. Members are hereby advised that such commemorative devices are to be worn
over the right breast only and may not be juxtaposed with official service medals. Members are further advised to consult the
official website of the Governor-General of Canada, at www.gg.ca or to obtain more detailed information, download the PDF
document from the Chancellery at: http://www.cda-acd.forces.gc.ca/er/engraph/mss/handbook/pdf/Eng_Chapter_14.pdf.
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE 1988 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE DIPLOMA
APPLICATION
Send to: National Headquarters, PO Box 905, Kingston ON, Canada, K7L 4X8
Attention: Honours & Awards Committee
Tel: 506-773-5420 (Honours & Awards Chair), Website: www.cpva.ca
PLEASE PRINT IN BLOCK LETTERS
SECTION 1
PERSONAL INFORMATION
Surname:
Postal address:
Municipality:
Telephone - Home:
(
)
Telephone - Mobile:
(
)
Telephone - Business:
(
)
SECTION 2
SERVICE RECORD
Rank / Former Rank:
Service / Regimental Number:
UN Peacekeeping Mission:
UN Peacekeeping Mission:
UN Peacekeeping Mission:
Given Names:
Apartment:
Province:
DOB:
E-Mail:
E-Mail:
Other:
Postal Code:
Sex:
Date of enrolment:
Date of release:
Please attach proof of service with United Nations Peacekeeping Missions from 1956 to 1989
SECTION 3
HONOURS AND AWARDS
Please list only official national and international Orders, Decorations & Medals of Canada or another country
SECTION 4
SPONSOR INFORMATION
Full Name:
Postal address:
Municipality:
Telephone - Home:
(
)
Telephone - Mobile:
(
)
Telephone - Business:
(
)
SECTION 5
Official Title:
Apartment:
Province:
Organization:
E-Mail:
E-Mail:
Other:
Postal Code:
DECLARATION OF APPLICANT
I declare that all of the information and documents that I have provided are true and accurate.
I hereby apply for THE 1988 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE DIPLOMA via the Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association.
I request that the Diploma be sent to □ my address; or to □ my sponsor.(check one)
Signature of applicant: _________________________________ Date: ____________________
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
WHY EMPLOY A VETERAN?
A human resources management company, Right Management, has published a
bilingual brochure for employers in favour of hiring veterans. The text below is
taken from their brochure “Job Placement Program - Together we can meet the
employment needs of our veterans”. The heading reads: “Why Employ A
Veteran?” Quote:
The average age of today’s Veteran is 36. They have a wide range of
expertise, as well as professional and personal abilities that are greatly
prized in the civilian workforce. Given the vast array of transferable skills
they can offer the employer, Veterans are incredibly valuable and
desirable employees.
Over 2,100 CF members release each year and can access the JPP (Job
Placement Program). They include engineers, technicians, trainers,
administrators, IT managers, drivers, chefs, nurses, pilots, operations
managers, facilities managers, project managers and communications
experts. Today’s Armed Forces use cutting edge technology to its very
limits. However, technical abilities are not the only attributes that
Veterans have to offer employers.
Veterans have unrivalled experience and excellent personal qualities.
They have been tested in highly demanding and pressurized situations,
and are used to taking responsibility for their actions and getting things
right the first time. Veterans are quick to learn, picking up new skills and
adapting to new circumstances with ease. They are self-disciplined and
motivated problem solvers who will get a task done, whatever it takes.
In addition to offering such professional and technical abilities, they are
also skilled in planning and organizing, teamwork, communication,
management and leadership, all skills which have been honed in some of
the toughest environments. As well as a wide range of transferable skills,
Veterans can bring their considerable experience, moral and physical
courage to your business.
Right Management adds; “Our goal is to find a place for each veteran where
they can find not just a job, but a place to belong and grow” - Unquote.
BE A PROUD VETERAN, STAND STRAIGHT AND WALK TALL!
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE JOE DROUIN KIT SHOP
Joe Drouin Ltd. Tel: 819-588-6669 Fax: 819-568-1074
22 de Valcourt, Unit 10, Gatineau, QC, J8T 8G8
www.joedrouin.com
ITEM
ITEM NO.
UN-029
UN-028
UN-030
UN-026
UN-026A
UN-035
UN-027
UN-036
DESCRIPTION
NOTES
PRICE
HAT BADGE,
CPVA,
CLOTH,
HAND EMBOIRDERED,
6.5 CM DIAMETER
BLAZER CREST,
CPVA,
CLOTH,
HAND EMBROIDERED,
9 CM DIAMETER
SHOULDER BADGE,
CPVA,
CLOTH,
MACHINE EMBROIDERED,
8 CM DIAMETER
HAT BADGE,
UNITED NATIONS,
LARGE,
CLOTH, HAND EMBROIDERED,
6 CM LARGE,
HAT BADGE,
UNITED NATIONS,
SMALL,
CLOTH, HAND EMBROIDERED,
5 CM
HAT BADGE,
UNITED NATIONS,
METAL,
BROACH ON REVERSE,
5 CM WIDE
SHOULDER BADGE,
UNITED NATIONS, ENGLISH,
CLOTH,
MACHINE EMBROIDERED,
6CM DIAMETER
SHOULDER BADGE,
UNITED NATIONS, BILINGUAL,
CLOTH,
MACHINE EMBROIDERED
72MM DIAMETER (3”)
CPVA MEMBERS
ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
BERET
$ 10.00
CPVA MEMBERS
ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
BLAZER
$ 20.00
CPVA MEMBERS
ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
SUMMER SHIRT
$ 3.25
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
BLUE BERET
$ 10.00
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
BLUE BERET
$ 8.00
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
BLUE BERET
$ 8.00
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS
FOR WEAR ON
PERIOD COSTUME
ONLY
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS
FOR WEAR ON
PERIOD COSTUME
ONLY
$ 1.00
$ 1.85
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE KIT SHOP
Joe Drouin Ltd. Tel: 819-588-6669 Fax: 819-568-1074
22 de Valcourt, Unit 10, Gatineau, QC, J8T 8G8
www.joedrouin.com
ITEM
ITEM NO.
CC050E
UN-032
UN-007
UN-006
UN-012
UN-001
UN-005
UN-004
UN-024
UN-011
UN-031
UN-055
INS-012
DESCRIPTION
NOTES
BERET, UN, BLUE, WOOL,
BLUE FELT W/BLACK CLOTH
BAND AND COTTON LINING
CAP, LIGHT BLUE, CLOTH,
UNITED NATIONS INSIGNIA,
MACHINE EMBROIDERED
LAPEL PIN, METAL,
UNITED NATIONS INSIGNIA,
25 CM WIDE
LAPEL PIN, METAL,
NATO INSIGNIA,
2 CM DIAMETER
LAPEL PIN, METAL,
CPSM,
2 CM DIAMETER
LAPEL PIN, METAL,
NATO FLAG,
13 MM WIDE
LAPEL PIN, METAL,
FRIENDS OF PEACE DOVE,
2 CM WIDE
LAPEL PIN, METAL,
CANADA & UN FLAGS,
2.5 CM (1 IN) WIDE
LAPEL PIN, METAL,
CANADA INSIGNIA,
20 MM
LAPEL PIN, METAL,
UN BERET,
25 MM (1 IN) WIDE
BELT BUCKLE,
METAL BRASS,
INLAID UN EMBLEM
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS
ONLY
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS
ONLY
PEACKEEPING
VETERANS
ONLY
NATO
VETERANS
ONLY
PEACKEEPING
VETERANS
ONLY
NATO
VETERANS
ONLY
FLAG, UNITED NATIONS,
OUTDOOR, CORD & TOGGLE
KIT, 66 x 140 CM (26 x 55 IN)
FLAG PATCH, CANADA,
25MM x 50MM (1 X 2 IN)
PRICE
$ 16.50
$ 12.50
$ 3.10
$ 3.10
$ 5.00
$ 3.10
FOR GENERAL
PUBLIC
$ 3.00
FOR GENERAL
PUBLIC
$ 3.10
1947-1967
VETERANS
ONLY
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS
ONLY
PEACKEEPING
VETERANS
ONLY
$ 3.60
$ 3.00
$ 11.25
FOR GENERAL
PUBLIC
$ 44.75
FOR GENERAL
PUBLIC
$1.00
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA CHAPTER KIT SHOP
To order see www.cpva.ca or contact: Frank Chevrier
Tel: 250-384-3972 E-Mail: [email protected]
ITEM
ITEM NO.
DESCRIPTION
HAT BADGE,
CPVA, CLOTH,
HAND EMBOIRDERED,
6.5 CM DIAMETER
BLAZER CREST,
CPVA, CLOTH,
HAND EMBROIDERED,
9 CM DIAMETER
SHOULDER BADGE,
CPVA, CLOTH,
MACHINE EMBROIDERED,
8 CM DIAMETER
HAT BADGE,
UNITED NATIONS, METAL,
BROACH ON REVERSE,
5 CM WIDE
LAPEL PIN,
CPVA,
METAL
BERET, LIGHT BLUE,
WOOL,
PHOTO NOT
AVAILABLE
CAP, BALL, LIGHT BLUE,
CLOTH,
CPVA INSIGNIA
PHOTO NOT
AVAILABLE
TIE, DRESS,
CPVA,
CLOTH
PHOTO NOT
AVAILABLE
SHIRT, GOLF,
CPVA CREST,
SIZES: S, M, L, XL
PHOTO NOT
AVAILABLE
MEDAL & RIBBON,
MINIATURES,
NOTES
CPVA MEMBERS
ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
BERET
CPVA MEMBERS
ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
BLAZER
CPVA MEMBERS
ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
SUMMER SHIRT
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS ONLY
FOR WEAR ON
BLUE BERET
CPVA
MEMBERS
ONLY
PRICE
$15.00
$26.00
$5.00
$15.00
$5.00
UNITED NATIONS
VETERANS
ONLY
$25.00
CPVA
MEMBERS
ONLY
$20.00
CPVA
MEMBERS
ONLY
$20.00
CPVA
MEMBERS
ONLY
$30.00
CPVA
MEMBERS
ONLY
$12.00
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
VETERAN LAPEL PIN KIT SHOP
Dunrovin’ Enterprises: 12 Doran Road, Petawawa, Ontario, CANADA, K8H 1P5
To order go to www.webhart.net/veteranspins or contact: Marilyn & Jack Meeks
Tel: 683-687-5335 E-Mail: [email protected]
ITEM
ITEM NO. DESCRIPTION
NOTES
PRICE
LAPEL
PIN
OVERSEA
VETERAN
1939-1945
WW II
COMBAT
VETERANS
$10.00
LAPEL
PIN
WW II
VETERAN
1939-1945
WW II
NON COMBAT
VETERANS
$10.00
LAPEL
PIN
KOREA
VETERAN
150-1953
KOREAN WAR
VETERANS
$10.00
LAPEL
PIN
PERSIAN GULF
VETERAN
1991
GULF WAR
VETERANS
$10.00
LAPEL
PIN
UN-NATO
PEACEKEEPER
VETERAN
PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS
$10.00
PHOTO
NOT
AVAILABLE
LAPEL
PIN
AFGHANISTAN
VETERAN
AFGHANISTAN
VETERANS
$10.00
PRODUCT
NOT
AVAILABLE
LAPEL
PIN
NATO
VETERAN
NATO
VETERANS
PRODUCT
NOT
AVAILABLE
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE KIT SHOP
FLAG BADGES
To order see www.flagbadges4u
E-Mail: [email protected]
ILLUSTRATION
ITEM
DESCRIPTION
NOTES
PRICE USD
FLAG
PATCH
EUROPEAN
UNION
8.0 X 5.5 cm
Sew or
Iron-on
fabric
7.60 US$
FLAG
PATCH
CANADA
6.5 X 3.5 cm
Sew or
Iron-on
fabric
6.06 US$
FLAG
PATCH
UNITED NATIONS
8.0 X 5.5 cm
Sew or
Iron-on
fabric
7.60 US$
LAPEL PIN
NATO
2.0 X 2.0 cm
Enamel
with
fastener
5.07 US$
LAPEL PIN
CANADA
2.0 X 1.5 cm
Enamel
with
fastener
5.07 US$
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE FALLEN PEACEKEEPERS OF 2006-2007
The Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association belatedly honours the
sacrifice of two of our Canadian Peacekeepers who have given their lives
in the service of peace. Their names shall live on in our memory, for
they were our brothers. They gave their lives so that others may live.
Corporal Benoit Chevalier 1982 -2007
An Aerospace Control Operator from 3-Wing based in
Bagotville, Québec, Corporal Benoit Chevalier was killed in
an accidental plane crash during a training mission in the
central Sinai with eight French peacekeepers near the village
of El Thamad, Egypt. The Canadian peacekeeper was based
with Task Force El Gorah (TFEG) of the Multinational Force
& Observers (MFO) peacekeeping mission in the Sinai
peninsula. On May 6th 2007, the nine passengers of the
aircraft, a DeHavilland Twin DHC-6 Twin-Otter, died when
attempting an emergency landing on a desert highway. The
plane struck a truck with its wing and exploded on impact.
Corporal J.M.D.B. Chevalier had been serving with MFO for
only one month of a six-month tour. Je me souviens
MFO Mission Background The Multinational Force &
MFO
Observers (MFO) was created as a result of the 1979 Camp
David Accord between Israel and Egypt. It was set up by the
United States in 1982. It is a multinational peacekeeping
mission which is sanctioned by, but operates independently
of, the United Nations. Canada has been part of the MFO
since 1986 along with ten other countries. The mission of the
MFO is to supervise the implementation of the security
provisions of the Egyptian-Israeli Treaty of Peace and
employ best efforts to prevent any violation of its terms. FMO
patrols the Egypt-Israel border in the Sinai / Negev desert.
Corporal Chevalier is the first Canadian fatality of this
multinational peacekeeping mission.
Proud to serve, proud to have served, IN THE SERVICE OF PEACE
They were our brothers
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
THE FALLEN PEACEKEEPERS OF 2006-2007
Major Paeta Hess-von-Kruedner 1960- 2006
A member of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry
(PPCLI) Major Hess-von-Kruedner was the only Canadian
serving as a United Nations Military Observer (UNMO) in the
Lebanon. Attached to the UNTSO mission as part of
Observer Group Lebanon (OGL), he was stationed at UN
Patrol Base Khiam about 10 kilometres from where the
Syrian, Lebanese and Israeli borders meet. The UN mission
there is to report ceasefire violations. On July 25, that post
came under fire from Israeli artillery and was then struck by a
precision-guided aerial bomb. The four UNTSO officers
posted there were killed, including Major P.D. Hess-vonKruedner. He was a veteran of UNFICYP (Cyprus), of
UNPROFOR and IFOR/SFOR (Bosnia) and the ONUC
(Congo) missions and had served nine months of the oneyear tour. Lest we forget
UNTSO Mission Background
UNTSO
The United Nations
Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO) is a peacekeeping
force created by the United Nations in 1948 to observe and
maintain the cease-fire and general armistice agreements
between Israel, Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria, following
the first Arab-Israeli War (War of Independence) of 19471948.
Under UNTSO, unarmed observers working in
multinational teams report on violations of agreements,
including ceasefires in southern Lebanon, the Golan Heights
and the Sinai Peninsula. Canada has contributed military
observers since 1954 and has suffered two fatalities during
this long-standing United Nations peacekeeping mission. In
the summer of 2006, a war of attrition developed between the
Lebanese paramilitary Hezbollah Organization and the Israel
Defence Forces (IDF) which caused the deaths of the four
UNMO’s.
Photo credits and text sources: CTV News / Canada.com / DND
Proud to serve, proud to have served, IN THE SERVICE OF PEACE
They were our brothers
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING CASUALTY FIGURES
NATO
Commonwealth
Multinational
United Nations European Union
TOTALS BY MISSION
1948 - 2008
(Only those operations and missions where Canadian deaths occurred are listed)
EUROPE
MISSION
UNPROFOR
IFOR / SFOR
KFOR
UNMIK
NATO FY
LOCATION
Yugoslavia (Croatia, Bosnia, Macedonia)
Yugoslavia (Croatia, Bosnia, Macedonia)
Yugoslavia (Kosovo, Serbia)
Yugoslavia (Kosovo)
Yugoslavia (Croatia, Kosovo, Bosnia, Macedonia)
MISSION
UNTSO
UNEF
UNFICYP
UNEFME
UNDOF
MFO
UNOHCI
LOCATION
Palestine, Israel, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Egypt
Egypt, Israel, Palestine (Suez Canal, Sinai, Gaza)
Cyprus
Egypt, Israel (Suez Canal, Sinai)
Israel, Syria (Golan Heights)
Israel, Egypt (Sinai)
Iraq
MISSION
UNMOGIP
UNCURK
UNCMAC
ICSC
ICCS
UNTAC
LOCATION
India, Pakistan (Kashmir)
Korea
Korea
Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos)
Vietnam
Cambodia
ORGANIZATION DURATION CAS
United Nations 1992 – 1995
11
NATO
1995 – 2003
8
NATO
1998 – 2003
1
United Nations 1999 –
2
NATO
2003 – 2004
3
TOTAL EUROPE:
25
MIDDLE EAST
ORGANIZATION DURATION CAS
United Nations 1948 –
2
United Nations 1956 – 1967
33
United Nations 1964 –
27
United Nations 1973 – 1979
16
United Nations 1974 –
4
Multinational
1982 –
1
United Nations 2003 –
2
TOTAL MIDDLE EAST:
85
ASIA
ORGANIZATION
United Nations
United Nations
Multinational
Multinational
Multinational
United Nations
DURATION CAS
1948 –
1
1953 – 1973
6
1953 – 1978
40
1954 – 1974
2
1974 – 1975
1
1992 – 1993
1
TOTAL ASIA:
51
AFRICA
MISSION
ONUC
UNOSOM
UNOMOZ
UNAMIR
MONUC
LOCATION
Congo
Somalia
Mozambique
Rwanda
Congo
ORGANIZATION DURATION CAS
United Nations 1960 – 1964
2
United Nations 1992 – 1993
1
United Nations 1992 – 1995
1
United Nations 1993 – 1996
1
United Nations 1999 –
1
TOTAL AFRICA:
6
AMERICA
MISSION
UNMIH
MINUSTAH
LOCATION
Haiti
Haiti
Organisation
DURATION CAS
United Nations 1993 – 1997
1
United Nations 2004 –
2
TOTAL AMERICA:
3
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING CASUALTY FIGURES
TOTALS BY PEACE SUPPORT ORGANIZATION
(Canadian Peacekeeping Casualties 1948 - 2008)
LOGO
ORGANIZATION
UNITED NATIONS ORGANIZATON
ACRONYM
UN
NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION
CAS
114
NATO
12
OAS
0
EUROPEAN UNION (EUROPEAN COMMUNITY)
EU
0
UNION OF AFRICAN STATES (AFRICAN UNION)
AU
0
LEAGUE OF ARAB STATES (ARAB LEAGUE)
AL
0
C
0
CF
44
ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN STATES
THE COMMONWEALTH
MULTINATIONAL FORCES (CANADIAN FORCES)
TOTAL CASUALTIES:
170
IN THE SERVICE OF PEACE - LEST WE FORGET
CANADIAN WAR CASUALTY FIGURES
(1950- 2008)
OPERATION
LOCATION
ORGANIZATION DURATION CAS
UNC / Korean War Korea
Multinational
1950 – 1953 496
Gulf War Ops
Persian Gulf, Kuwait, Iraq
Multinational
1990 – 1991
0
UNITAF
Somalia
Multinational
1992 – 1993
0
Antiterrorism Ops Afghanistan & Gulf states Multinational
2001 – 2003 *16
ISAF
Afghanistan
NATO
2003 – 2008 *87
TOTAL CASUALTIES: 603
*A total of 103 casualties are attributed to the Afghanistan Special Operations Zone since 2002
Korea
Iraq & Kuwait
Somalia
Afghanistan
Afghanistan
KOREA
MEDAL
GULF & KUWAIT
MEDAL
SOMALIA
MEDAL
SOUTHWEST ASIA
SERVICE MEDAL
GENERAL
CAMPAIGN STAR
THE CPVA: WE SUPPORT OUR TROOPS !
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
ANNOUNCEMENTS
WALL OF HONOUR
Dear Fellow Veterans and Friends,
This message to you is from our colleagues of the Canadian Association of
Veterans in United Nations Peacekeeping (CAVUNP). They have advanced a very
worthy cause for all our veterans. Please consider making a contribution. For detailed
information, see the link www.peacekeeperpark.ca.
All of our fallen will be remembered on the Wall of Honour and in the 7th book of
remembrance in the Peace Tower –They deserve no less - We need your support to
make this possible –Thanks for keeping the memories alive.
The website has an address where you, your Legion Branch, your ANAVETS Unit,
veterans group, Canadian business and caring Canadians can mail your support
cheque to help keep the Wall of Honour updated! Lets all help erect a new section
under construction. Hopefully caring Canadians will continue to be a tower of strength
and continue to Honour our Fallen in a permanent manner. Thank you and Best
o’health in 2009.
LEST WE FORGET
Billy Wilbond
THERE IS A WALL OF HONOUR
By Billy Willbond
There is a Canadian Wall of Honour
Friends’ names are listed there
These brave men who gave their lives
We remember them - we care!
Fallen from the Suez to Afghanistan
And all the Missions in between
Their names are etched upon the wall
For Canadians to see
Families travel from across this great land
To visit their wall of honour in Calgary
To view the names of their loved ones
Who died in the quest for global harmony
Many listed died in the Service of Peace
Some gave their lives to keep Afghans free
All deserve to be remembered and honoured
By caring Canadians like you and me
We desperately need a new addition to the wall
Canadian casualties increase and are many
And that is why I am asking you
To help the committee raise the money!
Author’s Note: All names are also listed in the 7th Book of Remembrance in the Peace Tower in Ottawa.
William Willbond Canadian Soldier Poet http://iwvpa.net/willbondwha www.petitiononline.com/vets8
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
CPVA CHAPTERS
PROVINCE
ADDRESS
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHAPTER
PO Box 48167
Victoria, BC V8Z 7H6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SURREY V CHAPTER
27291 27th Avenue
Aldergrove, BC V4W 3J8
ALBERTA
WEST CENTRAL ALBERTA
CHAPTER
329-133 Jarvis Street,
Hinton, AB, T7V 1R9
ALBERTA
NORTH EDMONTON
CHAPTER
14240 23rd Street
Edmonton, AB T5Y 1E8
ONTARIO
KINGSTON CHAPTER
6649 Wheeler St
Tamworth, ON K0K 3G0
NEW BRUNSWICK
MIRAMICHI CHAPTER
1518 Beaverbrook Road
Beaverbrook, NB, E1V 4S1
NEWFOUNDLAND
ST. JOHN'S, NL CHAPTER
13 Donovan Street
Mount Pearl, NL, A1N 2C5
NATIONAL HQ
NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS
PO Box 905
Kingston, ON, K7L 4X8
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
PLEASE PRINT IN BLOCK LETTERS
SECTION 1
PERSONAL INFORMATION
Surname:
Postal address:
Municipality:
Telephone - Home:
(
)
Telephone - Mobile:
(
)
Telephone - Business:
(
)
Telephone - Emergency: (
)
SECTION 2
SERVICE RECORD
Rank / Former Rank:
Service Number:
Service Elements:
Units / Corps / Branches:
War or Special Operations:
Peacekeeping Operations:
Given Names:
Apartment:
Province:
DOB:
E-Mail:
E-Mail:
Name of contact:
Other:
Postal Code:
Sex:
Date of enrolment:
Date of release:
Supplementary Reserve:
Please attach proof of service, including peacekeeping and other operations
SECTION 3
HONOURS AND AWARDS
Please list only official national and international Orders, Decorations & Medals
SECTION 4
MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY
□ Regular Membership $20.00 □ Associate Membership $25.00
(Veterans)
(Civilians)
□ Group Membership $100.00
(Organizations)
Organization Name (Group Membership):
Please check one box - Group members must give the President’s contact information in section 1
SECTION 5
DECLARATION AND DISCLOSURE
I declare that all of the information and documents that I have provided are true and accurate.
I hereby apply for membership in the Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association (CPVA).
I enclose a cheque or money order in the appropriate amount for my membership category, payable to the
Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association (CPVA).
Applicant Signature: ________________________________
Date: ___________________
Please check □ if you do NOT authorize the release of your personal information outside of the CPVA.
Send to: CPVA Membership, 329-133 Jarvis Street, Hinton AB, Canada, T7V 1R9
Tel: (780) 865-4332, E-Mail: [email protected], Website: www.cpva.ca
CPVA Membership Form.doc
July 2008 Revision
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING VETERANS ASSOCIATION
MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL FORM
Dear CPVA Member,
We value your membership. Your support is vital to ensure that CPVA
continues to grow and remains a viable national veteran’s organization
dedicated to bringing veterans together and continues to advocate on
behalf of all veterans.
Please take a few moments now to renew your membership. It is
through membership that you will continue to be kept informed about
issues and events that affect CPVA members and veterans in general.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Membership Renewal
Please renew my membership!
Make your cheque or money order payable to the
Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans Association
Regular (Veteran) Membership
Associate Membership
$20.00
$25.00
Membership Number ______ Name ____________________________
Please indicate any changes in address:
_________________________________________________________
E-Mail address _________________________
Please mail to:
CPVA Membership, 329-133 Jarvis Street, Hinton, AB, Canada, T7V 1R9
Tel: (780) 865-4332, E-Mail: [email protected]
Website: www.cpva.ca
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
KEY POSITIONS
CPVA Patron
CPVA Founder
CPVA Founder
President
Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer
Membership Director
Communications Director
Past President
2nd Vice President
Special Assignments
Editor, The Blue Beret
Webmaster
Honours & Awards Chair
Service Officer
NL Chair
NB/NS/PE Chair
QC Chair
ON Chair
MB Chair
SK Chair
AB Chair
BC Chair
St. John's, NL Chapter
Miramichi, NB Chapter
Kingston, ON Chapter
North Edmonton Chapter
West Central AB Chapter
Surrey, V Chapter
British Columbia Chapter
St. John's, NL Chapter
Miramichi, NB Chapter
Kingston, ON Chapter
North Edmonton Chapter
West Central AB Chapter
Surrey, V Chapter
British Columbia Chapter
HONORARY APPOINTMENTS
Michael O’REILLY
Chief Superintendent (Retired)
Richard BURKE, CD
Tom LEONARD, CD
[email protected]
NATIONAL EXECUTIVE
Ray KOKKONEN, CD
[email protected]
Vacant
Donald MACPHERSON, CD
[email protected]
Lorne COONEY, CD
[email protected]
Wayne KENNEDY, CD
[email protected]
Karl MOREL, CD
[email protected]
Tom HOPPE, MSC,MB,CD
[email protected]
APPOINTED OFFICERS
Larry GRAY, CD
[email protected]
Marlowe FRASIER, CD
[email protected]
Karl MOREL, CD
[email protected]
Rodd KENNEDY
[email protected]
Eldon ROGERS
[email protected]
(vacant)
APPOINTED PROVINCIAL CHAIRS
Garry BEST
[email protected]
Dean LAWRENCE, MMM, CD [email protected]
Karl MOREL, CD
[email protected]
Larry GRAY, CD
[email protected]
Dale LAMOUREUX, CD
[email protected]
Vacant
Wayne KENNEDY, CD
[email protected]
Marlowe FRASER, CD
[email protected]
CHAPTER PRESIDENTS
Selby LUFFMAN, CD
[email protected]
Jim MUCK, CD
[email protected]
Bill GREENLEY, CD
[email protected]
Wayne CLAYTON, CD
[email protected]
Bob SALT
[email protected]
Hugh MESSAGE, CD
[email protected]
Mike KAVANAGH, CD
[email protected]
CHAPTER SECRETARIES
Helen LUFFMAN
[email protected]
Ed OURSIEN, CD
[email protected]
Bill GREENLEY, CD
[email protected]
John PINSENT, CD
[email protected]
Wayne KENNEDY, CD
[email protected]
Terry HERRETT, CD
[email protected]
Harry STINSON, CD
[email protected]
604-408-1269
250-475-3754
506-627-6437
613-549-4421
613-531-3372
780-865-8662
514-847-0025
613-253-2006
250-661-3710
514-847-0025
250-294-0594
506-773-5420
709-834-1434
506-622-1963
514-847-0025
613-253-2006
204-754-3349
780-865-4332
250-391-1375
709-368-4273
506-622-8688
613-379-5874
780-457-0386
780-865-3743
604-551-6584
250-744-3074
709-368-4273
506-622-1580
613-379-5874
780-478-9605
780-865-8662
604-856-4488
250-665-7113
CANADIAN PEACEKEEPING
VETERANS ASSOCIATION
OUR ASSOCIATION
Founded in 1991 by former Canadian Peacekeepers and federally
incorporated in 1993, the Canadian Peacekeeping Veterans
Association (CPVA) is a democratic, apolitical, not-for-profit, and
non-sectarian, veterans-only organization run by Veterans for
Veterans, open to all Veterans.
OUR MISSION
The mission of the CPVA is to bring Veterans together in
comradeship, to advocate on their behalf for the defence of their
rights and to promote their interests.
OUR MEMBERSHIP
We are active and retired military service personnel, police and
other peace officers who have served in Canada and overseas.
PROUD TO SERVE, PROUD TO HAVE SERVED
CPVA Surrey Chapter Photo
DND / United Nations Photo
BRINGING VETERANS TOGETHER
We encourage unity, comradeship, and self-assistance, ease the
return to civilian life, and promote the welfare of our members by
commemorative, community, charity and social activities. Our
activities serve as a social focus for Veterans to permit them to
manifest their pride, uphold their dignity, and obtain the
recognition they deserve.
We are Veterans, we care for and we take care of our own.
OUR SERVICES
We help our members to obtain professional aid, service records,
missing medals, service pins and identity cards. CPVA
accoutrements and uniforms are available from our Kit Shop.
CPVA IS FOR YOU
CPVA has Chapters across Canada to welcome you. A Chapter
is made up of Veteran’s like you. When you join us, you are
family, no matter who you are or what you were. There is no rank
among Veterans. We offer unconditional peer acceptance,
comradeship, respect and recognition, PTSD peer support,
Veterans networking, humanitarian service and leadership
opportunities. Membership is voluntary. To find a CPVA Chapter
near you, go to our website at www.cpva.ca or write to:
CPVA Headquarters, PO Box 905, Kingston ON, K7L 4X8