Braiding Hair

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Braiding Hair
Braiding
Hair
By Dana Meachen Rau • Illustrated by Kathleen Petelinsek
C h e rr y
L a k e
P u bli s h i n g
•
A n n
Arb o r ,
M ic h i g a n
A NOTE T
OA
Please revie DULTS:
wt
for these cr he instructions
aft projects
be
your childre
n make them fore
. Be
sure to help
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ny
crafts you d
o not think
they can
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ct on their
own.
Published in the United States of America by Cherry Lake Publishing
Ann Arbor, Michigan
www.cherrylakepublishing.com
Content Adviser: Dr. Julia L. Hovanec, Professor of Art Education,
Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Photo Credits: Pages 4 and 5, ©CREATISTA/Shutterstock, Inc.; page
6, ©Subbotina Anna/Shutterstock, Inc.; page 8, ©urosr/Shutterstock,
Inc.; page 9, ©Jacek Kadaj/Shutterstock, Inc.; pages 20, 26, 28, and
30, ©Dana Meachen Rau; page 29, ©Maria Dryfhout/Shutterstock, Inc.;
page 32, ©Tania McNaboe
Copyright ©2013 by Cherry Lake Publishing
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in
any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Rau, Dana Meachen, 1971–
Braiding hair / by Dana Meachen Rau.
p. cm. — (How-to library. Crafts)
Audience: Grade 4 to 6
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-1-61080-471-4 (lib. bdg.) —
ISBN 978-1-61080-558-2 (e-book) — ISBN 978-1-61080-645-9 (pbk.)
1. Braids (Hairdressing)—Juvenile literature. I. Title.
TT975.R38 2012
646.7’247—dc23
2012009658
Cherry Lake Publishing would like to acknowledge the work
of The Partnership for 21st Century Skills. Please visit
www.21stcenturyskills.org for more information.
Printed in the United States of America
Corporate Graphics Inc.
July 2012
CLFA11
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Be sure t these
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safety firs
Table of Contents
Unique Hairdos…4
What Is Hair?…6
Hair in History…8
Basic Tools…10
Three-Strand Basic Braiding…12
Two-Strand Fishtail Braiding…14
French Braiding…16
Braided Rose Bun…18
Hidden Fairy Braids…20
Glitter Crown…22
Wavy Seashore Braid…24
Tropical Paradise Braids…26
Benefits of Braiding…29
Glossary…30
Adding Beads…30
For More Information…31
Index…32
About the Author…32
Unique Hairdos
Braiding can be a soci
al event with friends.
Everyone is unique. Close your eyes and think of your friends
and family. What makes each of them different and special?
One thing you might think of is their hair. It may be blond,
brown, red, black, white, or gray. It might be short or long. It
could be straight, wavy, or curly. It could be thin or thick.
Do you like to wear your hair down? Or do you prefer
pulling it up into a ponytail or pushing it back with a headband?
4
Braiding is a fun way to weave your
hair into interesting designs. Braids
are like art on your head!
You can braid your own hair.
Braiding can also be a social event.
Practice on a friend, and let your
friend practice on you. Learn
how to do basic braids. Then try
the styles in this book. Don’t be
afraid to experiment with your
own ideas to create a unique
braided hairdo of your own!
e as you
u
iq
n
u
s
a
is
ir
a
h
Your
All Kinds
The type of Hair
of hair yo
u
depends
on your e have often
thn
the trait
s passed ic group and
do
parents.
You migh wn by your
th
straight,
dark hair ave very
or
curly spir
als of ha very tight
ir.
long, thin
, blond ha You may have
ir o
hair. Try
braids on r thick, red
all
to see ho
w each h types of hair
ai
for diffe
rent peop rstyle works
le.
are!
5
What Is Hair?
e same stuff.
made of th
e
ar
ls
ai
rn
e
ng
fi
d
an
Your hair
Hair is made of a substance called keratin. This is the same
material that makes up your fingernails.
Hair grows out of the skin. The part of the hair under the
surface is alive. Each hair sits in a little hole called a follicle.
Follicles also have glands that help coat your hair with oil.
6
The hair above the surface of the scalp is called the shaft.
This part of the hair is not alive. That’s why it doesn’t hurt
when you cut it.
Each shaft of hair has a layer of armor called a cuticle to
protect it. If your hair is too dry, the cuticle can break and your
hair can look dull.
Hair gets its coloring from a substance called melanin. Hair
with more melanin is dark, and hair with less melanin is light.
Shaft
Follicle
Oil gland
Cuticle
7
Hair in History
Braids and decorated
hair have been an impo
rtant part
of some cultures.
Braided hair has played a part in the history of many different
cultures around the globe. In Africa, people braided patterns
and designs into their hair. The Viking women of northern
Europe had long, blond braids. Native American men and
women decorated their braids with feathers, shells, and beads.
Braided hair had a practical purpose. It was a good
way to keep hair neat and pulled away from the face while
8
people worked. But people also
braided their hair for other reasons.
Fancier braided styles could express
a person’s importance. Certain
braided patterns were saved for
important events or celebrations.
Braiding was also a way for people
to spend time with each other.
You can express your
personality with braids. What will
your braid say about you?
Long or Sho
rt?
The longer yo
ur h
your braids ca air, the longer
n be
some styles w . You can braid
ith medium len
gth
hair, too. You
may have to a
djust
your braiding t
echniques to
make
the hairstyles
in this book w
ork
for your hair
length. Exper
iment
to see what w
orks best for
you.
t places.
Braiding st
differen
in
t
n
e
r
e
f
if
d
be
yles can
9
Basic Tools
Always start your braiding projects with clean hair. You should
also comb it well to get rid of knots and tangles. Always be gentle
with your hair. Don’t pull too hard as you comb it, and don’t
wear your ponytails or braids too tight. It is better to braid your
hair when it is dry instead of wet. Wet hair can stretch and break.
Here are some tools you need to braid your hair:
• Tail comb—A tail comb has a comb on one end and a
pointed stick on the other. The stick end helps you
make parts in your hair.
• Hair elastics—Use elastics made for hair to secure the ends
of your braids. Don’t use rubber bands. They can break your
hair and hurt when you take them out. Tiny hair elastics are
good for smaller braids.
• Bobby pins—These hairpins are bumpy on
one side and straight on the other. They
help hold down stray hairs and keep
braids in place. Push them into
your hair with the flat side
facing your scalp.
• Holding clips—These big plastic
clips help hold hair out of the way
while you work on another section.
10
Here are some decorations for your hair:
• Headbands, tiaras, and scarves—to wear on the top of
your head
• Combs, barrettes, and silk flowers—to decorate the
side, top, or back of your head
• Ribbons, scrunchies, and beads—to wear at
the end of your braids
The Important
Part
Your hair pro
bably has a na
tural part—
where it falls
along a line fr
om your
forehead tow
ard the crown
of your head.
You can also
make your ow
n parts when
you need to d
ivide hair into
sections. Run
the pointy end
of a tail comb
gently across
your scalp to
make a line th
rough the hair
Take the hair
.
on one side of
the line and
hold it out of
the way with
a holding clip
while you wor
k on the othe
r section.
11
Three-Strand
Basic
Braiding Part
Crown
Hairline
Forehead
Brush all of your hair back from
your hairline. Let it fall into its
natural part. Before you braid,
you can pull your hair back
into a ponytail or just let it
hang loose.
Nape
Steps
1.Divide the hair into three equal strands.
2. Hold the left strand in your left hand. Hold the right strand in your
right hand. Cross the right strand over the middle strand. Hold the
new middle strand in place with your right thumb.
12
3.Cross the left strand
over the middle
strand. Hold the new
middle strand in place
with your left thumb.
4.Continue crossing the
right strand and then
the left strand over the
middle strand. As you
work, keep the strands secure,
but don’t pull too tight. Slide
your hand down the strands
once in a while to
smooth them out.
5.When you reach the
end of the braid,
secure with a hair
elastic.
Hand position can be
Continue crossing over the
tricky. It will also be different
strands until you reach the end.
depending on whether you are
braiding a friend’s hair or your
own. Practice to find the way that works best for you. If you
don’t have a friend nearby to practice on, you may have a doll
with hair you can braid. She won’t complain if you tug too
hard by mistake!
13
Two-Strand Fishtail
Braiding
This type of
br
is also called aid
a
herringbone br
aid.
To start a fishtail braid, brush all of your hair back
from your hairline. Like the three-strand basic
braid, you can pull your hair into a ponytail, or you
can let it hang loose and start the braid at
the nape of the neck.
Steps
1.Divide the hair into two equal strands.
Hold one in each hand with your palms
facing up.
14
Start with
two strands.
2. With your left index finger, divide a thin
section of hair from the outside of the left
strand. Reach over with your right hand
and cross this section over to the inside of
the right strand.
3.With your right index finger, divide a
thin section from the outside of the right
strand. Reach over with your left hand
and cross this section over to the inside
of the left strand.
4.Continue all the way down the braid,
alternating left and right. Try to keep
the new added strands of hair the same
size. Then your braid will look more
uniform.
5.When you reach the end of the braid,
secure it with a hair elastic.
ip
Elastic T have
you
Make sure
stic handy
la
e
ir
a
h
r
u
o
y
braiding.
t
r
a
t
s
u
o
y
before
on your
it
p
e
e
k
n
a
You c
it’s right
n
e
h
T
.
t
is
r
w
need it.
u
o
y
n
e
h
w
there
Keep adding
thin sections
of hair to the
opposite stra
nd.
15
French
Braiding
French
t
p
a
d
a
n
a
c
u
Yo
o many
t
ls
il
k
s
id
a
r
b
s.
unique hairdo
To make this French
braid, you will pick up new
sections of hair as you braid from the
crown of the head to the nape of the neck.
Steps
1.Use a tail comb to make a section
of hair at the hairline in the center
of the forehead. Divide the section
of hair into three strands.
2.Start a three-strand basic braid
(see pages 12–13).
16
Variations
on the Fr
ench Braid
Once you’ve m
astered the F
rench braid, tr
dividing the ha
y
ir into two se
c
t
io
d
n
o
s
3.Cross over the right
wn the middle
for “pigtail” F with a part
re
use a section
strand and hold it in
of hair parted nch braids. Or
fr
the other to
place with your left
make a braide om one ear to
d “headband.”
thumb. With your
If you cross t
he strands un
de
other instead
right hand, pick up a
of over as you r each
braid, you will
create a braid
small section of hair
that sits on t
op of the hair
This overbraid
from the hairline
.
ing technique
is
u
c
s
o
e
r
d
n
toward your braid.
rows—tiny br
aids made wit to make
of hair that a
h small sectio
You can also use a
re braided clo
ns
s
e
t
o
t
h
tail comb to help
e scalp.
you pick up a new
section of hair. Add this new section
to the crossed-over strand.
4.Cross over the left strand and hold it in place with your
right thumb. Pick up a small section of hair on the left side.
Add it to the crossed-over strand.
5. Continue working from the crown to the nape, adding
sections of hair on each side. Keep braiding even after you’ve
run out of extra hair to pick up.
asic
Continue a b nd
e
braid to the h
c
once you rea
the nape.
17
Braided
Rose Bun
orks
This style w ing hair
p
well for kee for
off your face .
s
dance classe
Some people like to wear flowers
in their hair. Why not make your
hair look like a flower instead?
Materials
Brush
2 hair elastics
1½-inch-wide (3.8 centimeters wide) green ribbon, about
12 to 15 inches (30 to 38 cm) long
Scissors
Bobby pins
Steps
1.Brush the hair back from the hairline. Gather it together
into a high ponytail and secure it with a hair elastic.
18
2.Separate the ponytail hair
into three strands. Braid a
three-strand basic braid
(see pages 12–13). Secure
the end of the braid with the
other hair elastic.
3.Tie the ribbon around the base of
the braid in a double overhand
knot (not a bow), so the ends stick
out on each side.
4.Cut the ribbon ends to a point so they look like leaves.
5. Wrap the braid around its base. Try to cover the ribbon
and knot so that all you see are the two “leaves” sticking
out the sides.
6.Continue wrapping the braid around the base until you
run out of hair. Secure the end with a bobby pin pushed
into the base of the bun.
7.Reinforce the rest of the bun with bobby pins by
sticking them around the bottom of the bun from the
outside into the center.
into
s
n
i
p
k
c
Sti
from
the bun .
s
all side
Bouquet o
f Roses
Make two, th
ree
or more pony , four,
tails on your
head. Coil ea
ch o
rose bun to m ne into a
ake a head
full of “flowe
rs.”
19
Hidden Fairy Braids
Just like fairies like to hide in
the forest, you can weave little
hidden braids into your hair.
They’ll peek out from under
your flowing hair.
Materials
Tail comb
2 holding clips
10 lengths of
1
/8-inch-wide (0.3 cm)
satin ribbon, each about
2 to 3 inches (5 to 8 cm)
longer than your hair
30 plastic pony beads
10 hair elastics
Jazz up your fair
y braids with bead
Steps
1. With a tail comb, make a part around the crown of the head.
Hold this hair up and out of the way with a holding clip.
2.Starting at the part, gather a small section of hair about
1 inch (2.5 cm) wide. Tie a piece of ribbon to the top of
the section in a small knot.
20
s.
as one
Use a ribbon strands.
of the three
3.Divide the section of hair
into two strands. Braid a
three-strand basic braid
using the two hair strands
and one ribbon piece
(see pages 12–13). Secure
the end temporarily with
another holding clip.
4.Thread 3 beads onto the end of the
braid (see instructions on page 30).
Secure the end of the braid with
a hair elastic.
5. Repeat steps 2 to 4 nine more times
around the head at the part.
6.When you are done, unclip
the hair from the crown.
Let if flow over the braids.
e done,
When you ar hair fall
n
let the crow braids.
e
back over th
21
Glitter Crown
Treat yourself like royalty. Turn a basic braid into a jeweled
crown by weaving in metallic ribbon and dotting your hairdo
with gems.
Materials
Tail comb
6 hair elastics
Metallic rickrack
Bobby pins
Gem bobby pins
(see instructions on
the next page)
ple
Turn two sim ancy
f
braids into a
headpiece.
Steps
1.With a tail comb, make a part down the center of the head.
Pull the hair on each side into ponytails behind the ears.
2.Divide each ponytail into three strands. Braid each ponytail
into a three-strand basic braid (see pages 12–13). Secure
the ends with hair elastics.
22
Wind the
r
down each ickrack
braid.
3.Cut one length of rickrack about the same length as
the braid. Tie the rickrack to the base of the braid
with an overhand knot.
4.Wind the rickrack around and around the braid from
base to end. When you reach the end, secure it with
another hair elastic over the first one. Repeat steps
3 and 4 on the other braid.
5. Cross one of the braids over the top of the head.
Use a bobby pin to secure the end of the braid
to the top of the hair.
6.Cross the other braid over the top of the
head and pin the end in place. Add a few
more bobby pins along the braids
to secure them to the hair.
7.Decorate the braids with
gem bobby pins.
Gem
How to Make
Bobby Pins
of plastic
Buy a variety
tore. Use
s
t
f
a
r
c
a
t
a
gems
ch them
a
t
t
a
o
t
e
lu
g
strong
bby pins. Let
o
b
f
o
s
d
n
e
e
to th
ely before
t
le
p
m
o
c
y
r
d
them
ldn’t want
u
o
w
u
o
Y
.
g
in
wear
caught in
t
e
g
o
t
ir
a
h
your
the glue!
23
Wavy
Seashore
Braid
Make waves with this fishtail braid.
Complete the theme by wrapping
the end in rope and adding some
seashell barrettes.
T
his is the
Materials
for a day perfect style
Brush
at the be
ach!
Tail comb
1 small hair elastic
12-inch (30-cm) length of thin rope
Scissors
2 shell barrettes
Steps
1.Brush the hair back from the hairline. Use the pointy end
of a tail comb to divide the hair into two sections.
24
2.Braid a two-strand fishtail braid (see pages 14–15).
Secure the end with a small hair elastic.
3.To wrap the end with rope, bend one end
of the rope so you have about a 3-inch
(7.5 cm) tail. Hold the looped part of the
rope against the end of the braid.
4. Starting slightly below the elastic, wrap the
longer tail of the rope around and around
the bottom of the braid, toward the nape
of the neck. Cover the elastic and continue
up a few more coils. Make sure the coils lay
neatly next to, not on top of, each other.
Make sure the loop is still visible at the top.
5. Thread the long end of the rope through
the loop at the top. Carefully pull on the
bottom and top ends of the rope to make a knot under
the coils. Snip off the ends of the rope with scissors.
6.Clip the two shell barrettes (see instructions below)
on either side of your head to hold up any loose hairs.
Shell
How to Make
Barrettes ells or buy
eash
Collect small s ore. Attach
t st
some at a craf tes with strong
rret
them to hair ba t them dry
to le
glue. Be sure
aring them.
e
w
e
r
o
f
be
ly
e
complet
25
Tropical Paradise
Braids
When the sun burns
hot, you need to
keep cool. With this
exotic hairstyle, you
can look cool, too!
Three French braids
joined together with a
bouquet of silk flowers
creates a tropical
vacation look.
You can add ribbons and
feathers to your
flowery elastic.
Materials
Brush
Tail comb
2 holding clips
3 small hair elastics
1 large hair elastic
Colorful silk flowers
26
the
Work across t
f
head from le
to right.
Steps
1.With a tail comb, divide the hair into three equal sections
by making one part over the crown of the head from ear to
ear and the another part across the back of the head. Keep
the front and back sections separate with holding clips.
2.Starting with the middle section, French braid from the
hairline on the left side of the head to the right (see pages
16–17). Continue even after you no longer have hair to
pick up. Secure the end of the braid with a small hair
elastic.
3.Repeat step 2 on the front section. If you have bangs, you
can include them in this section. Or you can let them hang
on your forehead and just pick up a section of hair behind
them.
4.Repeat step 2 on the back section. You will now have three
French braids.
27
5.Gather the ends of the three
braids together with the
larger hair elastic.
6.If your silk flowers have small
stems, simply tuck them
into the elastic. If not, sew
them onto a hair elastic (see
instructions below) and use
it to secure the three braids
together.
e
Join all thre e elastic.
n
braids with o
Flower
Make
How to
Elastics
and knot
le
d
e
e
n
g
in
w
Thread a se hread. Stitch
he t
the end of t bout five times
th a
back and for and around the
er
into the flow not and clip the
ak
elastic. Tie
scissors.
h
it
w
d
a
e
r
h
extra t
28
Benefits of Braiding
Braiding isn’t just a way to wear your hair. It has many other
benefits. If you play sports, it’s a good way to keep your hair
out of your face. It also keeps hair off your neck to keep you
cool on a hot day. Depending on the type of hair you have,
you may be able to keep your braids in for more than one day.
Braids can also reflect your personality. Two braids with
bows might show people you are playful. A fancy bun or crown
braid says that you are sophisticated. Make your own style to
show off how you see the world.
Braiding also brings people together.
Healthy Hai
Find a friend and learn how to braid as
r
H
a
ir
n
e
eds healthy
a team. Get help from a parent, aunt,
n
utrients to gro
uncle, or grandparent. Spend time
w. Nutrients
are in the food
learning, chatting, and braiding together.
you eat. If
you eat health
y food, your
hair will get th
e food it
needs, too.
Braids keep your
ha
out of your eyes s ir
o
you can concentra
te
on playing.
29
Glossary
alternating (AWL-tur-nay-ting) going back and forth between two things
crown (KROUN) the top part of the head
cuticle (KYOO-ti-kuhl) the outer layer of a shaft of hair
ethnic (ETH-nik) having to do with a group of people sharing the same
national origins, language, or culture
follicle (FAH-li-kuhl) a small hole in your skin where hair grows
glands (GLANDZ) body organs that produce or release natural chemicals
hairline (HAIR-line) where the hair meets your face at the forehead
keratin (KER-uh-tin) the substance hair is made of
melanin (MEL-uh-nin) the substance that gives hair color
nape (NAPE) the back of the neck
reinforce (ree-in-FORS) make stronger or more secure
shaft (SHAFT) the part of your hair above the surface of your skin
sophisticated (suh-FIS-tuh-kay-tid) having a lot of knowledge about
culture and fashion
Adding Beads
30
Twist the ends
.
lf
ha
in
r
ne
ea
cl
pe
pi
a
d
1. Ben
one end so it
at
op
lo
a
ke
ma
to
er
th
ge
to
wing needle.
looks like an oversized se
the pointy end.
2. Thread the beads onto
through the loop.
d
ai
br
e
th
of
d
en
e
th
k
ic
3. St
le, over the
ed
ne
e
th
up
s
ad
be
e
th
sh
4. Pu
aid.
looped end, and onto the br
d with a hair
ai
br
e
th
of
d
en
e
th
re
cu
5. Se
e large enough to
on
e
us
to
re
su
e
B
c.
ti
as
el
off your braid.
ng
lli
fa
om
fr
s
ad
be
e
th
ep
ke
For More Information
Books
Jones, Jen. Braiding Hair: Beyond the Basics. Mankato, MN:
Capstone Press, 2009.
Jordan, Jim. Hair: Styling Tips and Tricks for Girls. Middleton, WI:
American Girl, 2000.
Krull, Kathleen. Big Wig: A Little History of Hair. New York: Arthur
A. Levine Books, 2011.
Neuman, Maria. Fabulous Hair. New York: DK Publishing, 2006.
Swain, Ruth Freeman. Hairdo! What We Do and Did to Our Hair.
New York: Holiday House, 2002.
Web Sites
Discovery Kids: Human Hair
http://yucky.discovery.com/flash/body/pg000148.html
Find out more about why people have different types of hair.
KidsHealth: Your Hair
http://kidshealth.org/kid/cancer_center/HTBW/hair.html
Learn more about how your body grows hair and how to keep
your hair healthy.
Princess Hairstyles
www.princesshairstyles.com
Check out some fun new braiding styles.
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Index
barrettes, 11, 24, 25
beads, 8, 11, 21
bobby pins, 10, 19, 23
braided rose bun project,
18–19
clean hair, 10
color, 4, 7
combs, 10, 11
cornrows, 17
cultures, 8–9
cuticles, 7
gem bobby pins, 23
glands, 6
glitter crown project, 22–23
hand positions, 13
headbands, 11, 17
hidden fairy braids project,
20–21
holding clips, 10, 11
keratin, 6
length, 9
decorations, 8, 11, 23, 25,
26, 28
dryness, 7, 10
melanin, 7
nutrients, 29
elastics, 10, 15, 28
ethnic groups, 5
experimentation, 5, 9
flower elastics, 28
follicles, 6
French braids, 16–17, 26, 27
overbraiding techniques, 17
parts, 10, 11, 17
personalities, 9, 29
practice, 5, 13
ribbons, 11, 22
About the Author
Dana Meachen Rau is the author of more than
300 books for children on many topics, including
science, history, cooking, and crafts. She creates,
experiments, researches, and writes from her home
office in Burlington, Connecticut.
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rubber bands, 10
scalp, 7
scarfs, 11
scrunchies, 11
shaft, 7
shell barrettes, 25
silk flowers, 11, 26, 28
tail combs, 10, 11
three-strand basic braiding
project, 12–13, 16, 19,
21, 22
tiaras, 11
tools, 10
traits, 5
tropical paradise braids
project, 26–28
two-strand fishtail braid
project, 14–15, 25
Vikings, 8
wavy seashore braid project,
24–25

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