East Midlands route plan

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East Midlands route plan
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
East Midlands Route
Summary Route Plan
Document ref: SBPT211
Version 1.0
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Foreward
Welcome to the East Midlands Route Plan.
This document is a key building block that forms part of Network Rail’s Control Period 5 (CP5) Strategic Business Plan. It sets out the relevant
outputs, activity and expenditure at route level to achieve the specified national outputs. It also forecasts long-term activity and expenditure at
route level to demonstrate that the route is delivering CP5 outputs based on a sustainable whole-life, whole-system basis and should be read in
conjunction with the other plans that have been produced.
East Midlands as a devolved route
With Network Rail having devolved responsibility to the Routes – and integrated functions within the Routes – we are able to use our local expertise to make judgements, rather than following a
one-size-fits-all approach from the centre. We believe this puts us closer to our customers and passengers and improves service and safety. This document sets out how we intend to do this. It
details our plans on safety, sustainability, operations, asset management, and investment. It also sets out how we will work with our partners to unlock the expertise that exists in our wider
organisation so we can improve service and performance utilising a combination of both local knowledge and national support.
A central part of the Network
Our route is the primary rail link between the East Midlands and London. South of Leicester the predominant demand is for long distance journeys, London commuting and freight services.
Further north, a mixture of local, long distance and freight traffic exists on a wider network of routes. Finally, the Chesterfield – Derby – Burton-on-Trent section forms part of the North East/
Yorkshire to West Midlands link and is critical to both cross-country passenger and freight trains.
We therefore have a vital long-term role to play to help the Midlands build a thriving, sustainable, low carbon economy with better connections between people and jobs. The route is already
delivering record levels of performance against a background of growing demand. We seek to do this while maintaining a safer, more reliable railway, with greater capacity and efficiency. We
recognise that we have a leading part to play in a growing industry and will work with our customers, funders and wider stakeholders to support expected continued growth in the East Midlands
to London, our northern local and the Chesterfield – Derby – Burton-on-Trent passenger markets of 28%, 40% and 30% respectively; and support a rise in freight demand expected to be around
25%.
Building the future
This route plan offers us a chance to set out the investments we are making for the future – particularly our focus on signalling consolidation and electrification. But our planning goes beyond
making physical investments in new infrastructure; it includes the culture we are developing to trust and empower our people, the innovations being introduced to drive our performance and
alliances created with our customers.
We hope this plan provides an informative and exciting overview of the East Midlands Route’s plans to achieve our full potential to improve safety, reliability, capacity and value for our customers
and for taxpayers.
Kevin Robertshaw, Director Route Asset Management
Network Rail
Martin Frobisher, Route Managing Director
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Content
 Introduction
– Foreward
– Contents
– Route overview
– Route strategy
– Our customers
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 Route Safety Improvement Plan
– Safety Management System
– Assurance
– Workforce safety
– Public safety
– Level Crossing Safety
– Passenger safety
– Sustainable Development Initiatives
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 Route Performance & Capability Improvement Plan
– Performance summary
– Delivering CP4 performance
– Delivering CP5 performance
– Delivering CP4 capacity and capability
– Delivering Improved CP5 capacity and capability
– Freight capacity and capability in CP5
– Capability outputs
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 Route Network Availability Strategy
– Background
– Current access strategy
– Network availability requirements for CP5
– CP5 Works/Route Asset Management Plan
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Network Rail
 Operate Plan
– CP4 & CP5 Operate delivery plan
– East Midlands ROC on a page
– Signalling Migration Synopsis
– ERTMS on the East Midlands Route
– Electrical control
– Heritage considerations
– Headcount
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 Asset Management Plan
– Strategic overview
– Track
– Signalling
– Geo-technical assets (earthworks)
– Structures
– Buildings
– Electrification and plant
– Telecoms
– Level Crossings
– Drainage assets
– Maintenance
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 Deliverability & Assumptions
– Delivering CP4 and CP5 plan
– Expenditure summary
– Renewals volumes
– Operations, maintenance and renewals cost
– Efficiency and Headcount
– Key outputs
– Capacity Outputs
– Risk & Assumptions
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Route overview
East Midlands Route covers the Midland Main Line (MML) from St
Pancras to Chesterfield, along with the East Midlands local routes
radiating from Derby, Nottingham and Leicester as far as the East
Coast Main Line and West Coast Main Line.
This route serves a large number of communities in North London, the Home Counties and
East Midlands, and carries significant volumes of long distance and local passenger services,
as well as key freight flows.
Recent history
Significant works have been delivered during the past five years including:
 The gradual closure of Trent signal box via renewal of the signalling infrastructure between
Nottingham & Trent junctions, the Erewash Valley, the Robin Hood Line, and moving of
signalling control to the Rail Operating Centre in Derby.
 Stage one of the Thameslink programme providing East Midlands route with new and
improved infrastructure between West Hampstead and Farringdon.
 Transfer of signalling control from Leicester Signal Box to the Rail Operating Centre.
 High output track renewal of both ballast and sleeper/rail across the route.
 Re-railing of slab-track in the Moorgate tunnels.
 Installation and commissioning of the FTN fibre-optic telecoms network providing secure
and reliable voice/data transmission.
These works have contributed to improved asset reliability and train performance in recent
years and provide a solid foundation for sustaining a high level of performance through CP5
and beyond. Some of these works, high output track renewals for example, will continue to be
delivered in CP5 along with further planned renewals that will result in improved infrastructure
and see the Rail Operating Centre in Derby taking control of over 90% of the operational
route by the end of CP5.
Key features
Elements causing capacity constraints and affecting performance are: the heavily
used sections London to Bedford and Trent Junctions to Nottingham; Leicester area
conflict between passenger and freight flows; Derby station junction layout and
Kettering to Corby single track section.
Network Rail
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Route strategy
Beyond CP5 the longer-term strategy for the route is focused on
continuing the re-control of signalling systems into East Midlands
Control Centre and electrification of the Midland Main Line from
Bedford to Sheffield, Corby and Nottingham.
The opportunity will then exist for in-fill electrification schemes
to create an electrified freight route providing significant benefit
to our freight customers.
Meeting demand
Total passenger demand between the East Midlands and London St Pancras International is
expected to grow by 28 percent over the next 10 years. The market for rail travel to
Birmingham is expected to grow at a faster rate, with the number of journeys increasing by 40
percent over the same time frame.
Above average growth in peak passenger demand is set to occur at Leicester, Nottingham and
Derby where growth across the three-hour peaks is expected to be in excess of 30 percent
over the next 10 years. Freight growth is anticipated predominantly in the construction and
deep sea intermodal market sectors; the freight Route Utilisation Strategy (RUS) forecasts
growth of 25 percent. A small number of significant and high impact enhancement schemes will
provide capacity and capability improvements that meet the future demand for both passenger
and freight.
Baseline to HLOS
At the core of our plans for CP5 is a targeted renewals policy that increases maintenance
activity across the asset base and reduces renewal activity to the minimum sustainable level.
Over and above the baseline core cost there is the opportunity to invest in the future. This is
primarily delivered by amending our base signalling renewals plans to align with the Network
Operating Strategy (NOS) and reduce the forward cost of operations.
The increase in signalling renewals activity reduces cost elsewhere in the business plan by
removing or reducing maintenance/minor works requirements in other disciplines. Investment
in track engineering processes, mechanisation and asset information systems allows us to
significantly reduce the cost of managing the asset sustainably.
The HLOS published in July 2012 requires changes to our ‘baseline plus’ investment plans in
order to facilitate electrification and increased capacity in the route. The main impact is
seen in track renewals due to increase tonnage and civil engineering due to increased work
required on tunnels.
The overall change between our baseline cost and our HLOS compliant business plan
submission is an increase of circa £125m across the control period.
These schemes are our preferred options for investment in CP5 and include:
 Electrification of Midland Mainline from Bedford to Nottingham, Sheffield and between
Kettering and Corby.
 Midland Main Line capacity improvement including; doubling the line between Kettering
and Corby, additional line or loops between Kettering and Sharnbrook Junction, loop or realignment in the Desborough/Market Harborough area, Bedford to Harrowden Junction slow
line speed improvements and various schemes in the Leicester area.
 Remodelling of Derby station area.
 Enhancement to W10/12 Gauge on key freight routes.
Network Rail
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Our customers
Maintaining a positive relationship with our lead operators as well
as the other freight and passenger operators is important given the
nature of services operated and the impact that these may have
on adjacent routes.
Our Customers and their core business
CrossCountry, East Midlands Trains, First Capital Connect and Northern Rail operate
passenger services on the route, with DB Schenker, DRS, Freightliner and GB Railfreight
providing freight services.
East Midlands Trains provides long distance services between East Midlands and London, as
well as linking the cities of Derby, Leicester and Nottingham, and serving the more rural routes
feeding into these cities. The long distance high speed (LDHS) services on the Midland Main
Line between London, Sheffield and Nottingham represent their most important flows. A long
distance interurban service operates hourly between Norwich and Liverpool, and is heavily
used on Sundays in particular as it serves universities on the route.
The commuter services at the southern end of the route form part of the Thameslink service
which is operated by First Capital Connect between Bedford and Brighton/Sutton. As with all
operators in the South East they have a strong commuter market, mainly into Central London.
They also have a strong leisure market which includes: airport flows to Gatwick and Luton
Airports, day trips to London and the South Coast, and evening journeys to and from the
Capital.
Arriva CrossCountry provide an integrated network that links virtually all of the UK regions,
and serves a significant proportion of major cities in the UK and have a strong mix of both
commuter and leisure travellers, with the latter tending to make the longest journeys and
therefore making up a significant proportion of the discretionary market. The leisure market
includes flows to Stansted airport. In line with a number of long distance providers, they have
significant passenger flows on Sunday afternoons as people return home from weekends
away.
Network Rail
Northern Rail operates an hourly service between Leeds, Sheffield and Nottingham, which
created new direct journey opportunities when introduced in 2008.
Freight services are dominated by the three largest operators, DB Schenker, Freightliner and
GB Railfreight, although most of the smaller freight companies also run services, in part, on
the East Midlands Route.
Important long distance freight flows operate on the route, with the Wichnor Junction –
Toton/Derby – Chesterfield, MML, and Peterborough – Leicester – Nuneaton corridors forming
part of the Strategic Freight Network. Coal, steel and automotive flows are primarily aligned on
the axis from Wichnor Junction towards Derby and Chesterfield. Intermodal traffic uses both
this corridor, and increasingly the Peterborough – Leicester – Nuneaton corridor following W10
gauge clearance.
Intermodal flows centre on the movement of maritime containers between the deep sea ports
of Felixstowe, Southampton, Tilbury, Thamesport, Seaforth and strategic inland rail freight
interchanges. Container ships will not usually wait for late consignments and will sail at their
scheduled time, so a right time arrival at the deep sea port is especially critical.
Heavy haul is focused on the movement of bulk traffic by rail, including coal, aggregates and
cement. There are significant aggregate flows from the quarries of the East Midlands to the
South East. These flows can often be time sensitive as ‘just in time’ delivery of materials is
important within the construction industry.
Lead relationships
East Midlands is the lead route for two passenger train operators, East Midlands
Trains and First Capital Connect and as a consequence also manage the day-to-day
relationship across the country for both companies.
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Route Safety
Improvement Plan (RSIP)
This section covers our route actions to deliver a safe railway for all our
stakeholders; our workforce and contractors, passengers, and the public.
We also highlight our efforts to reduce the risk imported by Level Crossings –
one of the greatest safety risks on the rail network.
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
The Route Safety Improvement Plan
The Route Safety Improvement Plan (RSIP) has been prepared for East Midlands Route to reflect both the National and our own route-based
vision for safety and sustainable development throughout CP5. It draws on both local experience and knowledge to provide a framework for
safety improvement.
Our approach
In the past our approach has been to use 'best practice' procedures at all times, but moving
forward East Midlands Route aim to exceed the expectations of our stakeholders with respect
to safety of our staff, customers and the travelling public.
The RSIP has been prepared to drive through these improvements and make it accessible and
useful to all persons likely to need reference to how we will manage safety through CP5 in their
day-to-day activity, as well to assist the East Midlands team in preparation of safety action
plans. The RSIP also attempts in part to provide an overview of how we will improve safety in
the workplace in general.
Managing safety
Throughout the East Midlands route there is a continuous flow of safety information and activity
reflecting our continuous drive for improvement. The RSIP collates all safety activity into one
document providing all route employees with a single point of reference as to what is
acceptable, and what is unacceptable activity and/or safety behaviour.
A good safety plan has to be able to identify risks and the actions put in place to ensure that
these are reduced and controlled. The RSIP will be part of our overall people management
strategy package. We believe that safety is owned at all levels within the organisation from
front line staff to the Route Managing Director and we will engage with people at all levels
within our business to ensure this happens.
In the interest of producing the best possible outcome the RSIP must be considered active at
all times, and therefore open to revision as technology, along with human resources, change to
suit the business environment.
Simply put, our vision is this:
We will work together so that everyone returns home safely at the end of every day
Network Rail
RSIP contents
The RSIP has two connected elements:
 National Safety & Sustainability Policy and Principles, and the application of these to the
East Midlands Route;
 Local route based safety and sustainability initiatives.
Network Rail has a national Safety & Sustainability strategy and suite of policies. The RSIP will
apply these policies, where applicable to the route, and identify the benefit/impact of doing so.
Within any workplace there are risks and/or groups of risks that impact on our working
environment. Many of these risks are generic and it is appropriate to deal with them via
national policy. It is often the case that geospatial and structural differences create route
specific risks that will managed on a route by route basis.
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Safety Management System (SMS)
‘Safety planning’ must be considered as the methodology employed to manage the safety risks associated with business operations. The
planning can be, and often is, overlapped in other areas of the business plan.
Our approach to risk management on the East Midlands Route will be based on the principles
below and will be supported by quarterly risk reviews chaired by the RMD.
Safety Management System
Safety Risk will be managed as an integral part of business risk and we will:
 Develop a clear understanding of the safety risk profile of the East Midlands route
 Minimise and where possible eliminate safety risks to our staff, passengers and public; to our
neighbours and to supplier staff by making safety a core element of our design,
management, maintenance and operational activities
 Aim to eliminate work related injuries and ill health and associated losses and delays
 Actively comply with our rules and to challenge where appropriate to develop clear, relevant,
rules and standards that positively assist in the risk management process
Develop an increasingly risk based approach to our activities Investigating
Accidents & Incidents
The core objective of any accident or incident investigation is to identify the root cause and
prevent recurrence. Where it is not possible to eliminate root cause we aim to reduce the
likelihood and consequence of future occurrence so far as is reasonably practical.
The East Midlands Route will comply fully with NR/L2/INV/002 and ensure that all
accidents/incidents warranting investigation are allocated an independent Designated
Competent Person (DCP) from within the route, or where necessary external to the route.
Network Rail
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Assurance
In its simplest form, assurance will demonstrate that what we say we are doing is what we are actually doing, and this in turn will match what we
are supposed to be doing.
Within East Midlands route our safety assurance regime will be primarily delivered via safety
tours and assurance checks conducted by line managers and engineers in a consistent
manner and frequently.
Each year we will produce safety-tour and assurance check plans that cover our needs and
allows us to track progress. All findings from safety tours and assurance checks will be
consolidated and reviewed within the senior route teams on a quarterly basis
Our assurance regime will include:
Validation – that our systems, process, standards and guidance, are capable of delivering a
railway asset that can be managed safely and sustainably at best whole-life-cost. This will
primarily be delivered by Engineering Verification and Peer Review.
Compliance – with relevant legislation, policies, procedures and processes is in place and
embedded in our management systems. This will be primarily be delivered by a weekly
compliance conference call chaired by the Route Infrastructure Maintenance Director, the
National Core Audit Programme (NCAP) and line management self-assurance checks.
Technical compliance – with relevant legislation, standards and procedures is in place and
embedded in out management systems. This will be primarily be delivered by the NCAP audit
programme and line management self-assurance checks.
Staff surveillance – will be undertaken as a line management activity to provide assurance
that staff are working to the correct standard in a safe, compliant and controlled manner. This
will be primarily be delivered by management safety tours and line management selfassurance checks. During safety tours and assurance checks we will focus on gap analysis to
identify issues and implement beneficial change.
Asset Inspections – are undertaken by line management and senior engineers to assure us
that the maintenance and renewals policies we have put in place are having the desired effect
on the condition and sustainability of the asset.
Network Rail
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Workforce safety
We will develop a culture where everyone not only follows rules, but is prepared to speak up and get involved in generating solutions.
Safety leadership and culture change programme
Our overall aim of the East Midlands Route Culture Change Programme is that all our Leaders
and Managers set high standards for safety, communicate openly, confront risk and involve
and engage with their teams in this process. As a Route Team we will work to ensure the
principles below are embedded into everything we do.
Leadership
 We will strive to develop active, visible and trusted leaders & managers.
 Provide effective leadership that fully engages and collaborates with our staff, suppliers and
customers, encouraging all to take their safety and sustainable development responsibilities
seriously.
 Ensure that all staff have the opportunity to be fully engaged in improving our health, safety
and environmental performance
Culture & Behaviours
 The Route will put safety and sustainable development at the heart of everything we do. We
will develop a culture that is fair, flexible, learning, questioning and encourages reporting. We
will be an open, communicating team, which identify opportunities of sharing best practice
and maximise the benefits.
Excellence
Our aim is for excellence in our own activities and deliverables, and to embed exemplary safety
and sustainable development performance and risk management into everything we do.
 We will provide the skills and equipment required by our staff in order to do our jobs.
 We will continuously learn from all incidents and identify precursors.
 We will actively promote health and wellbeing for our staff.
Network Rail
Track worker safety
We will ensure that all persons working on or near the line are protected by a Safe System of
Work Pack (SSOWP) that is fit for purpose and supports the competence of the end user. We
will work with our front line managers and supervisors to ensure that we develop our people
into safety critical roles and provide the correct level of support, mentoring and coaching for
them to maintain safety critical competencies effectively.
Specifically we will:
 Improve the quality and competence of our Safe System of Work Pack planners and look
for opportunities to increase their empowerment to reduce the section manager’s work load.
 Maximise the use of Green Zone working by better understanding Green Zone availability
and the work required to be carried out.
 Implement the new Safe System of Work Pack planning tool in a controlled manner to ensure
that risk is kept to a minimum and that the safe systems of work developed are robust and
embraced by our front line staff.
Manual handling
Manual handling is a major contributor to workplace incidents across the East Midlands route.
Our manual handling procedures, along with associated regulations, requires a ‘Risk based
Approach’ incorporating consultation at all levels of the organisation, along with hazard
identification, risk assessment and risk control.
This approach demands that all members of the workplace are involved with establishing safe
manual handling techniques and, where possible, the elimination of manual handling hazards.
We will reduce the incidence of manual handling injuries by:
 Creating alternatives to manual handling to reduce the risk to staff and increase efficiency of
work.
 Promoting manual handling awareness campaigns across the Route. Refresher training will
be specific, targeted, identify best practice and cascade via master-class training.
 We will Increase use of Mechanical lifting & moving technology and seek to embrace
technological improvements in this area.
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Health Promotion and Education
We aim to raise awareness of occupational health and the benefits of a healthy lifestyle
using a variety of media including health and lifestyle leaflets. The East Midlands ROC has a
purpose built fitness gym for staff to use.
Slips, Trips and Falls
Rail is an industry that requires its employees to work around uneven surfaces and at height,
and thus slips, trips and falls are assessed as possible outcomes.
We will consider the possibility of slips, trips and falls in each and every workspace within the
route. This will include all areas on-or-near the line, access and egress points to the railway
environment, depot areas, operation control buildings, and the office environment.
Electricity
East Midlands route has approximately 56 route miles of electrified railway and significant lowvoltage power supply points. Our strategic plan includes electrification of the entire Midland
Main Line between Bedford, Corby, Nottingham and Sheffield.
We are committed to establishing and enforcing, safe work methods for all persons when
involved with the use of electricity. This applies to all staff working on electrical installations,
and protecting those working within or adjacent to electrical installations.
The consequences of working incorrectly with electricity are severe, so we will:
 Improve electrical awareness across the Route and a better understanding of the risks from
electricity through briefing, training and staff surveillance.
 Analyse how we work with electricity and reduce the need to work live or adjacent to live
electricity.
 Seek to improve our isolation processes and methodology for identifying the limits of
isolation.
 Ensure that where new installation takes place (electrification of Midland Main line) that due
diligence as been applied with regard to future maintenance and operational requirements.
Network Rail
Life Saving Rules, Just Culture, Near Miss Reporting and Safety Conversations
The East Midlands Route will be proactive in supporting national initiatives such as Life Saving
Rules, Just Culture, Near Miss Reporting and Safety Conversations.
The use of the new Close Call Reporting system to help make it easier and faster to report
Close Calls, will be briefed out to all people on the route outlining the new system. Increased
reporting will allow us to identify trends and patterns allowing us to prevent accidents occurring.
The Route supports the principal of a Just Culture and recognises that this is a fundamental
step to achieving the safety benefits we strive for. We will create an environment where people
clearly understand that where an incident arises from an honest mistake that we will seek to
learn from it and not look to apportion blame however where incidents arise from a deliberate
violation or reckless act then they are accountable and there will be clear consequences.
The Life Saving Rules have been developed to save lives, but the way we apply them will
also help create a fair culture in the Route. The rules will help us to focus on the main threats
to life within our industry and support us on the implementation of a Just Culture.
Positive encouragement is a strong tool and when people follow the rules we will recognise this
behaviour and praise it. We will encourage and support our people to:
 Have the courage to challenge unsafe behaviour
 Help others follow the Life Saving Rules
 Share safety concerns and lessons learnt
We recognise that leadership is a series of conversations and these set the tone for all our
working relationships. The route will embrace the principle and support all our staff to enable
them to hold effective Safety Conversations. We will move away from the existing briefing
process and promote constructive two way communications between our managers and their
teams.
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Public Safety
We will improve on the successes we have had using both current and new initiatives across the various locations identified as hotspots in an
attempt to both reduce railway crime and improve relations in the local communities that surround Network Rail Infrastructure
Route Crime Theft and Vandalism
We will improve on the successes we have had using both current and new initiatives
across the various locations identified as hotspots in an attempt to both reduce railway
crime and improve relations in the local communities that surround Network Rail
Infrastructure. Specifically we will aim to:
 Reduce the number of incidents and minutes delay at our identified Hotspots by
developing a route crime reduction plan based around a ‘5 Es campaign’, working
closely with the Education Manager to ensure that we understand the demographics of
offenders implementing effective solutions and work with the British Transport Police
(BTP) to ensure resources are used affectively to deter potential route crime and
enforce action where this cannot be achieved.
 We will identify areas for potential fencing upgrades that have a significant effect on
route crime and work with our delivery teams to effect this change.
 Develop a route strategy for scrap removal/collection to avoid stocking points
around known route crime locations.
 Prioritise areas of high graffiti and look for alternative solutions at identified high
incident areas.
 Continue to build on foundations established with local authorities, schools and
enforcement agencies in reducing railway crime, and review other opportunities to
work with other potential stakeholders.
The RRP Groups have been created to seek engagement in implementing closer working relationships
with traffic authorities on Level Crossing (LX) issues which represent a significant source of road and
rail delay, and a rare but significant cause of catastrophic railway accidents.
The RRP have resulted in achieving a reduction in risks at level crossings within the route through
several initiatives-:
 Provision of fitment of all LX Advanced Warning signs with new Yellow Backboard fitted signs and
improved illumination across all counties.
 Closure of Rolleston MGC on nights.
 Provision of ‘SLOW’ approach markings at Fiskerton.
 Double yellow lines at Barton Lane Automatic Half-Barrier (AHB) to stop cars parking causing a
blocking back issue.
 Reduction of speed over Bingham Crossing from 60 mph to 30 mph.
 Working on the diversion and bridging of several footpath crossings.
 Instigating several bridge bash mitigation schemes jointly funded.
Road Rail Partnership Group
The East Midlands Route has 4 Road Rail Partnership Groups (RRP) covering 8 County
authorities grouped as follows:
 Staffordshire and Stoke
 Derby City and Derbyshire
 Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire
 Leicester and Rutland.
Network Rail
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Level Crossing Safety
We aim to reduce the overall level crossing risk across the route by closure or diversion of 52 crossings and to better engage with users of level
crossings to effectively reduce incidents of misuse and to actively discourage intentional misuse.
Level Crossings
Our strategy on level crossings will align with the National Level Crossing policy and where
possible seek closure as our first option. Where closure cannot be achieved we will bridge
the crossings to eliminate the risk; alternative options to actively manage and reduce the risk
will be utilised for the period between identification of unacceptable risk level and permanent
solution being put in place, or to manage those level crossings where closure or bridging is not
an acceptable option.
Our primary aim is to focus on reducing risk and where appropriate utilise innovative and novel
methods in order to increase the delivery pace. Examples of our ongoing commitment to level
crossing risk reduction through CP5 are given below:
 Our level crossing renewals strategy is underpinned by carrying out rigorous full and
substantial risk assessment on each proposal.
 Within the route we will maintain a register of level crossings prioritised by risk as
measured by All Level Crossing Risk Model (ALCRM), but augmented with local knowledge
and reasonable customer requirements. This register will be a living document that becomes
the routes long-term risk mitigation plan for each level crossing.
 We will maintain a living action plan for the top 50 level crossings on our register that details
what, when, how, and who in terms of activity to be undertaken. By undertaking continuous
action in this way we will progressively reduce the collective risk of all our level crossings.
Through CP5 it is our aim for the top fifty level crossings in our risk register to have been
closed or moved (in relative risk terms) out of the top fifty on the risk register.
 Develop and improve our level crossing inspection and maintenance regime including the
use of remote monitoring equipment to enable improved consistency and efficiency in our
management of level crossing assets.
Network Rail
 Ensuring that the route team takes the lead on all level crossing enhancement, replacement
or closure, and that a holistic approach is taken based on funding, risk and
operational/user benefit. This will include providing additional input to renewal and
enhancement schemes ensuring all activity aligns with our long-term plans for level crossing
risk reduction.
 Seek new ways to work with our users and neighbours in order to raise awareness of the
risks around level crossings.
 During CP5 we will continue with our current approach by targeting two footbridges per
annum and reducing risk at our top 50 level crossings with development and application
of innovative technology. We anticipate a funding requirement of £10m-£12m from the
England & Wales level crossing risk reduction fund to enable delivery.
 Develop and standardise our use of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) monitoring across
the route to reduce equipment cost and improve operation roll-out.
 New technology/innovation is embraced to reduce risk where practicable.
MCB-OD
The MCB-OD level crossing technology is a fully automated system requiring no intervention
from the signaller in normal operations. As a standalone level crossing scheme or as part of a
re-signalling, MCB-OD provides a re-control opportunity for locally controlled crossings. The
technology has been successfully trialed on an operational crossing at Filey and is approved
for use across the network.
Within East Midlands Route we will commence implementation of MCB-OD commissioning our
first sites during 2013-14 and continue during CP5.
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Passenger safety
We will seek to reduce the risk to our passengers by focusing on improving interfaces between train, signaller and infrastructure.
Irregular Working
We will work to ensure that our irregular working events are fully understood and actioned as
appropriate, to reduce the occurrences of irregular working during CP5.
By improving the consistency of risk ranking of irregular working events we will ensure
resources are targeted in the correct areas and that we fully understand and are able to
manage the risk on the route more effectively.
We will address incorrect routing of trains due to signaller error by holding targeted
workshops to understand the causes of wrong routed trains and ensure that action plans are
developed in conjunction with our teams for poor performers in this area.
The adoption of Automatic Route Setting (ARS) and Traffic Management within the Rail
Operating Centre during CP5 will also help reduce the wrong routing of trains.
 Where wrong-routing is attributed to poor planning by network operations planning
department we will provide robust feed back and follow this through to implementation where
changes are required.
 We will seek opportunities for remodelling of potentially high risk junctions.
 We aim to ensure all operating irregularities are captured, reported in a timely manner, and
remedial measures developed and consistently implemented across the route. Our aim is
100% reporting and closure of operating Irregularities.
 We will reduce the incidences of irregular working linked directly to failings in competence
and training of individuals. Where this has occurred appropriate remediation will be put in
place to prevent the risk of a re occurrence.
 Deliver the five-year rolling Signal Risk Assessment Plan for the route and ensure that
detailed assessments are completed within twelve-weeks of identifying high risk signals and
the necessary mitigation is put in place.
 Have suitable representation at the various project stages of all new re-signalling schemes
that affect the route and ensure that the principle of safety by design is embraced by the
project teams.
 Maintain a list of multi-SPAD signals and risk-manage these effectively.
 Actively continue replacement of existing signal heads with LED light-engine replacement of
filament lamps, or full LED signal head conversion improving the resilience of the
infrastructure.
 Refurbish and replace signal back boards to enhance signal visibility where beneficial.
 Maintain historical data of signals encroached by vegetation ensuring persistent offenders
have maximum sighting achievable through fitment of signal sighting plates to the
infrastructure and management of line side vegetation.
Signals Passed at Danger
We will maintain the strategy of reducing the risk of Category A Signal Passed at Danger
(SPAD) by ensuring signals are correctly placed, line side vegetation is managed to maintain
visibility, sighting inspections are carried out consistently and that TOC/FOC customers are
continually engaged with us in actively monitoring the effectiveness of all signals across the
Route.
Specifically we will:
 Actively promote and seek funding for signal renewal schemes on the Route and look for
opportunities to improve the asset.
Network Rail
14
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Seasonal management
We aim to drive out much of the uncertainty around seasonal weather patterns and apply
appropriate controls at the right time and in the right place. In the last control period we made
significant gains in this area; we will build on this success to better manage the risks that arise
from extremes of weather.
We aim to achieve this by:
 Development of an annual route vegetation management plan and joint review with train
operators and other stakeholders to ensure that we target the areas of concern and manage
their expectation effectively.
 Reviewing the effectiveness of the current rail head treatment programme and technology,
and seek to improve on current performance, thus maximising safety and availability of the
asset
 Building greater understanding between our Operational and Maintenance staff to educate
them on the requirements and safety benefits of effective seasonal management initiatives,
e.g. vegetation clearance.
 Implementing a programme of strategic briefings delivered at key times in the year prior to
seasonal change to ensure all Operational Staff are aware of seasonal working Instructions.
 We will review the effectiveness of localised weather stations and forecasts on the route
and identify any geographic areas that have poor coverage with a view to further installation
of this equipment.
 Use of failure data to risk assess track circuits and build a case for further fitment of Remote
Condition Monitoring (RCM) in high risk areas.
Platform Train Interface
We will work with our customers to remove the risk of passengers falling between train and
platform and slips, trips and falls of passengers on Station platforms by:
 Seeking innovative ways to communicate the safety risk to passengers so that they better
understand this risk and are able to contribute toward the solution.
 Identify ‘mind the gap’ stations where the stepping distance between platform edge and
train is excessive and look at what we can easily do to reduce the problem, e.g. slew the
track.
 Identifying solutions using the combination of infrastructure improvements and operational
controls to reduce the risk so far as is reasonably practicable.
 Work with the Train Operating Companies (TOC) to better understand the demographics of
use at particular stations (e.g. high number of elderly /disabled users), so that we can
develop the right response to mitigate the risk.
Network Rail
15
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Sustainable development
East Midlands Route has a culture of pushing for higher levels of safety, reliability and transparency, as well as better value for money for our
customers and stakeholders. Sustainable Development (SD) is the overarching principle at the heart of this as it supports these values, the
change culture and is integral to the long term success of the company and the railways.
Our sustainable development aim:
To deliver a better railway for a sustainable Britain
The Route’s strategy is based on the Network Rail strategy for SD. Knowledge and momentum
of SD within the Route is not as advanced as issues such as safety and performance, and
considerable emphasis is required to bring it up to those levels. Within most areas of SD there
is an element of legislative compliance, in CP4 our aim has been to achieve full legislative
compliance; during CP5 we intend to substantially improve upon this and move to a level
beyond compliance.
Sustainable Development Improvement Areas
There are a number of key areas where we can affect change in order to help us achieve our
aim, these are principally:
 Safety & Wellbeing
 Energy & Resources
 Climate Change Adaptation
 Buildings & Land
 Environmental Protection
 Communities
 Accessibility & Inclusivity
 Employees
Energy & Resources
In East Midlands Route opportunities exist for us to reduce energy, waste generation, and
resource use in general. Opportunities exist to ensure that our maintenance and renewal
investments are increasingly sustainable, whether this is through sustainable procurement or
from considering the whole life cost of waste.
Network Rail
We recognise that the biggest impact on sustainable energy production can be achieved
through the lead role that Strategic Sourcing (SS) and the National Delivery Service (NDS) can
take working with suppliers to provide the most sustainable options for a range of resources –
particularly electricity – for Network Rail at the best price.
We will commit to purchasing from these business units to support any national frameworks.
This support will be maintained whilst SS/NDS are able to demonstrate the Network Wide
business benefits of a sustainable approach. Following the development of a self-generation
policy setting out minimum requirements by Asset Management we will ensure this is
incorporated into our designs and will seek opportunities for this in the mean time.
We will work with our TOC/FOC customers to assist and support energy efficiency
improvements and consider the potential for part funding/benefit sharing of schemes. For other
products we will seek to procure local resources (including human resources) in a sustainable
manner.
Waste management is an important area for our route.
We will work with Strategic Sourcing to maximise the efficiency of national waste contracts. As
a route we need to focus on managing waste through the life cycle of its creation by designing
out potential waste creation in the design stages of projects, reducing the amount of materials
we use, and maximising the potential for recycling waste from all our activities.
We will work with NDS to focus on creating the ability for the route to measure waste so that
this data is available by business unit to enable us to focus our efforts on critical waste streams
and areas where performance can be improved.
We believe that good management of our economic and environmental impacts
is key to maintaining a strong and prosperous business. Through sustainable
development, we will drive efficiency, build trust and create long term value for
our stakeholders
16
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Climate Change Adaption
Climate & weather have a significant impact on the running of a safe and timely railway. In
order to build better resilience of our assets to this issue there are a number of things we can
do at Route level which links to our asset management plans.
We will need to understand the current resilience of our asset, understand areas where we
have risks and ensure that our asset management plans reflect any new or different
requirements.
Our Asset Management plans will reflect any issues that are identified by Asset Management
to optimise strategic opportunities to enhance the resilience of our route and the rest of the
countries resilience via rail network.
Buildings & Land
As the owner of a large number of buildings, we have the opportunity to make simple changes
to improve energy efficiency. As we continue to replace and refurbish locations across the
Route opportunities exist to improve the whole life cycle sustainability of those projects. We
will seek to retrofit buildings with energy efficient technology to bring our whole estate up to a
more modern standard.
We will look to Asset Management and Property to set minimum specifications for sustainable
building, and to define and mandate the use of a common assessment tool (e.g. BREAAM)
and a recognised carbon calculator. We will support the use of this tool and compliance with
specifications, and will also utilise the carbon calculator to ensure we can link our carbon
output to how much money we are spending.
Environmental Protection
We have a legal obligation to protect the environment and we need to seek to minimise our
impact as we enhance our infrastructure. We are committed to achieving this and compliance
with all related Network Rail requirements and in part will succeed by including in our
programmes education and coaching on these requirements.
We will ensure that environmental risks are considered for our route and managed accordingly.
All our major projects will have environmental impact assessments and we will specify
sustainable options to our suppliers using the S&SD guidelines.
Communities
The Route runs through the major cities of London, Leicester, Derby and Nottingham as well
as numerous other towns and villages. Currently the Route seeks to be a good neighbour to
the communities we operate in and we will work with Local Authorities to improve our presence
in the areas of social regeneration, community involvement and helping to change the publics’
behaviour around the infrastructure.
Accessibility and Inclusivity
The Route understands the important social role played by public transport. Public transport
has a key role to play in improving accessibility for all individuals, thereby minimising social
exclusion and enhancing social cohesion. We already have an ‘access for all’ programme at
stations which we will continue to drive.
We will drive, through our culture change programme a behaviour change in peoples approach
to energy efficiency. Network Rail will adopt a long term strategy on vegetation management
needs to be which will be developed by the S&SD team. We will support this approach given
the appropriate investment being made available so that we can work towards managing
vegetation rather than maintaining it without a net loss to biodiversity. We recognise the
ongoing need to comply with the legislation associated with invasive species and Sites of
Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). We will also establish, budget for and quantify contaminated
land on our route and ensure we are managing this at least in accordance with legislation.
Network Rail
17
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Sustainable development
CP5
Our CP5 activities will include the following, taking into account Network Rail’s emerging
view of them:
 Sustainable procurement
 Whole life approach to waste management and alternative uses for waste
 Working with our customers to improve their energy efficiency
 Self-generation of electricity
 Optimising weather resilience
 Climate change & plans for the impact on our assets and train performance
 Communication of or role in climate and weather resilience
 Sustainable new build and major refurbishment projects
 Energy/resource efficiency retrofitting
 Behaviour change to enhance energy efficiency
 Understanding & sustainable protection of lineside vegetation
 Performance risk associated with lineside neighbours land
 Establish, quantify and account for contaminated land
 Manage contaminated land appropriately
 Reflect management of contaminated land in investment plans
 Steps to reduce green house gas emissions and other pollutants
 Improvement in Operational environmental risk management
Network Rail
18
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Table 2: Sustainable development actions
Energy
2012/13
2013/14
Continue to progress the installation of SMART meters at locations across the Route
Understand our waste streams, contractual arrangements for the disposal of each and identified
alternative better use options
Develop an employee energy efficiency behavioural change programme for CP5
Develop a suite of environmental performance indicators that can be used by cost centre owners to
challenge energy and water usage locally
Understand what electricity self generation opportunities exist for the Route and started to develop a
robust business case
Climate Change
Maintain business as usual approach via RAMP
Test the adequacy of our knowledge on climate change and its likely affects on our asset base and
develop more mature asset protection plans as necessary
Buildings & land
Continue to progress the installation of SMART meters at locations across the Route
Identify opportunities and develop robust business cases for the retrofitting of energy saving devices
in existing buildings with some of this work being realised in our ‘bigger hitting’ areas first
Develop a suite of environmental performance indicators that can be used by cost
centre owners to challenge energy and water usage locally
Develop an employee energy efficiency behavioural change programme for deployment in CP5
Consider the expansion of ISO14001 to trackside activities
Environmental
protection
Appoint an Environmental Specialist to help develop and mature our Sustainable
Development Improvement Plan
Have a clear view on the expansion, or otherwise, of ISO 14001 on other Route activities
Achieve ISO 14001 for our Maintenance Delivery Units
Include environmental considerations in safety tours undertaken by the Route’s senior
leaders
Identify, scope the benefits and deliverables of a programme to reduce our
environmental impacts from our managed stations, signal boxes and signalling centres
Communities
Maintain business as usual approach via the Route Safety Improvement Plan,
Community Relations and Strategic Planning
Understand and meet the resourcing requirements to achieve this improvement plan including our
capacity to deal with community safety and other related issues across the Route
Work closer with our top 3 major suppliers of services to the Route to develop and align their
approach to sustainable development with ours
Accessibility &
inclusivity
Network Rail
Maintain current approach to the national station improvement programme and access
for all
Maintain current approach to the national station improvement programme and access for all
19
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Route Performance
and Capability Improvement Plan
This section summarises the projects, actions and initiatives aimed at
delivering East Midlands Route’s performance targets in the remainder
of CP4 and across CP5. It looks at capacity and capability improvements
for both passenger and freight, and the key project to achieve this.
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
East Midlands Route performance summary
Performance outputs
The route performance outputs for the end of CP4 and through CP5 are provided in the
following tables. These figures should be considered as the first draft performance
deliverables for the East Midlands (rather than targets) and are subject to more detailed
work to be undertaken when the CP5 Joint Performance Improvement Plans are
formulated and final outputs are agreed both internally and externally for Network Rail
as a whole.
Figure 1: Annual delay minutes for East Midlands route for CP3 and
CP4 actual/forecast vs target
FCC PPM MAA
PPM MAA percentage
94%
92%
90%
88%
86%
84%
82%
CP3
2013/14
2012/13
2011/12
2010/11
2009/10
2008/09
2007/08
2006/07
2005/06
80%
2004/05
Route infrastructure was supported by the introduction of Remote Condition
Monitoring (RCM), which has resulted in and will continue to result in greater asset
reliability. This was supplemented with project work bringing asset reliability through the
planned renewal of life expired signalling assets. There were some significant
performance issues - power cable issues in the Nottingham and Leicester area have
now been addressed in conjunction with the East Midland Signalling Renewals
(EMSR) project. As we enter the last phase of Control Period 4 there is still a significant
challenge ahead of us if we are to meet our performance targets in March 2014.
Figure 2: PPM MAA for First Capital Connect for CP3 and CP4 actual/forecast vs target
CP4
FCC PPM MAA actual / forecast
CP4 PPM MAA target
Figure 3: PPM MAA for East Midlands Trains for CP3 and CP4 actual/forecast vs target
EMT PPM MAA
PPM MAA percentage
Performance in early Control Period 4 was marked by exceeding
forecast levels of delivery. This was achieved through a reliable
infrastructure, a timetable fit for purpose and reliable fleet.
94%
92%
90%
88%
86%
84%
82%
Delay minutes
520,000
CP3
480,000
EMT PPM MAA actual / forecast
2012/13
2012/13
2011/12
2010/11
2009/10
2008/09
2007/08
2006/07
560,000
2005/06
2004/05
80%
600,000
CP4
CP4 PPM MAA target
440,000
400,000
360,000
320,000
CP3
EM Route delay minutes actual / forecast
Network Rail
2013/14
2012/13
2011/12
2010/11
2009/10
2008/09
2007/08
2006/07
2005/06
2004/05
280,000
CP4
CP4 route delay minutes target
21
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Delivering CP4 performance
During the early stages of performance planning for 2012/13 the routes
were asked to put together a two year performance plan, including
a two year Joint Performance Improvement Plan (JPIP) for each
lead TOC.
JPIPs
The shift away from one year plans recognised that with two years left in Control Period 4, and
with the industry failing to meet some of its regulatory targets, a plan was needed to make sure
that these shortfalls in performance were identified and robust plans were put in place to
recover. The JPIPs, known as the ‘Base’, are the corner stone of an industry performance plan
and are supplemented by the nationally held ‘Base +’ and ‘Base ++’ programmes. The industry
performance plan is the direct response to the shortfalls in current performance and is there to
ensure that regulatory targets are met by the end of the Control Period.
East Midlands targets
For the East Midlands Route the agreed targets for the remaining years of Control Period 4 are
shown in the table below:
The targets set for East Midlands are very challenging but ultimately considered to be
deliverable. The route delay minute target has only been achieved by the route once before
in 2011/12. The TOC delay minutes targets are equally as significant a challenge to the route,
with the First Capital Connect and Cross Country targets being set at record levels.
The Route Performance Team will monitor and track delivery against plan through a set
structure. This structure, consisting of a series of strategic and tactical meetings, as well as a
daily performance conference allows the tracking of on-going delivery as well as providing new
schemes, projects and risks that the Performance Team can quantify and add into the
Performance Plan throughout the year making it a ‘live’ process.
This process will be supplemented in 2013/14 with the advent of a Route Performance
Project Manager, which is an extra resource afforded to the routes to help ensure delivery of
the performance plans through the use of project management skills and techniques.
The commissioning of the new Performance Action Tracker (IPAT) will also gives the route
greater management and control over the benefit schemes and risks in the performance plans.
Table 3: Route performance in CP4
CP4 Year 4 (2012/13)
CP4 Year 5 (2013/14)
East Midlands Route Total
Delay Minutes
318,840
310,000
East Midlands Trains
PPM
CaSL
East Midlands Route delay minutes
92.7%
2.4%
127,106 min
92.82%
2.40%
118,334 min
First Capital Connect
PPM
CaSL
East Midlands Route delay minutes
90.7%
3.0%
59,927 min
90.7%
3.0%
55,927 min
Cross Country
PPM
CaSL
East Midlands Route delay minutes
90.5%
3.93%
44,000 min
91.3%
3.72%
44,000 min
Network Rail
22
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Delivering CP5 performance
Performance during CP5 will be heavily affected by a large programme
of investment on the East Midlands Route. This will provide significant
long term benefit to all rail stakeholders, but in the short term it poses a
number of challenges and adds significant risk to performance delivery.
Key projects
The High Level Output Statement (HLOS), released in July 2012, documented a number of
significant projects that will be undertaken on East Midlands Route during CP5 (see Capacity
and Capability section). The consistent risk across all schemes is that of possession
management and the associated risk of overrun. In addition major works carry a risk of
construction issues arising.
Worthy of note is the renewal of Kentish Town Slab Track scheduled for 2017/18. The
location of this work is key, as the traffic levels in this area mean even a small possession
overrun can conclude as a significant delay. The area requiring renewal is a double layer of
slab track and although the condition of the upper layer is understood, that of the lower level
will not become apparent until the upper layer is removed. Construction/commissioning work
could potentially have a significant effect on delay minutes, PPM and CaSL especially for long
distance passenger and freight operators on the East Midlands route.
There are several other major events that may provide a risk to performance delivery during
CP5 including:
 The introduction of a new timetable for the Thameslink route (culminating in 24 trains per
hour through the core area at peak times) will make incident management and service
recovery a real challenge.
 The impact of cable theft across the route can be considerable. We will identify and
prioritise our ‘hotspots’ and will continue to review these on an ongoing basis seeking to
apply the appropriate mitigation measures. Within the areas of concern we will identify and
prioritise our top 40 access points that will require additional works to reduce the likelihood of
cable theft on the key Strategic Route Sections. We anticipate that £1m will be required to
fund this work in CP5 based on a unit rate of £27k per site.
 The prevention of suicides on the railway poses many challenges for the industry as a
whole as well as at route level. The programme of “4 Es” (Education, Engineering,
Enablement and Enforcement) to implement schemes such as additional platform fencing,
CCTV installation as well expanding our partnership with The Samaritans and local
stakeholders is established. In order to roll out an enhanced programme of targeted
preventative measures across the route we would wish to seek a sum of £2m in order to
prioritise sites for CCTV installation and additional fencing.
Network Rail
Key Performance improvement initiatives
One of the key performance improvement opportunities in Control Period 5 for East Midlands
relates to several large projects upgrading the current infrastructure.
The largest of these projects is East Midlands Signalling Renewals (EMSR) Programme
which will, by the end of Control Period 5, will have re-signalled or re-controlled a large
proportion of the route. A significant amount of infrastructure, including many mechanical signal
boxes, will be replaced with modern equipment. The work that the EMSR have completed on
the route during Control Period 4 has given significant improvement in asset reliability. This
improvement has positively impacted on delay minutes with a subsequent improvement of
PPM and CaSL.
Key schemes for CP5:
Modular Signalling Renewals east of Nottingham and on the Derby to Stoke line. The
replacement of a large number of assets in modular form is expected to increase asset
reliability.
Leagrave Approach Control Signalling. A proposal similar to that installed at Harpenden
Junction and Radlett Junction will provide benefit in terms of service recovery and more
flexibility for our Operations staff.
Leicester re-modelling. The collective benefit provided by a number of HLOS schemes (as
listed in section 3.3) will provide a significant benefit to performance by effectively separating
the railway for EMT, Cross Country and freight services.
Derby Central Interlocking Renewal and Re-control. Renewal of the central interlocking
provides improved asset reliability and facilitates the later re-modelling of the Derby station
area. The re-control into EMCC includes all of the Derby remote interlocking putting signalling
control in one location.
East Midlands Route Performance Delivery Strategy
The East Midlands Route will focus on incident prevention first and foremost, but when
incidents do happen the route will focus hard on managing those incidents to minimise impact
to the network and the fare paying customer.
The route will be applying a whole life asset management approach to incident prevention.
This will mean closer working between the route team and our customers. We will make best
use of our resources and knowledge in order to deliver reliable infrastructure. We will continue
to monitor safety, compliance and performance weekly to reduce the risk of asset failure and
performance damaging incidents.
23
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
A risk based approach to reliability will continue to be applied during CP5 acknowledging that
there are key ‘golden’ assets which are crucial to performance delivery. Where considered
necessary, the route will employ an enhanced regime above and beyond set standards for
these assets.
When incidents do occur, the route will continue to look at how it can best respond in order to
minimise the impact on the train service. We will continue to minimise primary delay using a
risk based approach to incident response.
We will continue to proactively manage service recovery through the use of the agreed
contingency plans, as well as proactively monitoring ongoing events on other routes. We work
with adjacent routes to minimise imported/exported delay via co-ordinated service
management.
Involvement of Lead Train Operators
We have worked with our two lead train operators, First Capital Connect and East Midlands
Trains to formulate the CP5 performance plan. It should be noted that the FCC franchise is
due to end in September 2013 and East Midlands Trains franchise is due to end in April
2015, therefore neither operator were able to divulge their proposed delivery targets for
their franchise renewal bids at this time.
The numbers below have been supplied by the respective operator Head of Performance
and have been produced using very simple assumptions on performance delivery in CP5:
EMT Assumprions
 EMT starting position is their end of CP4 target
 EMT retain the franchise
 EMT retain the same fleet with the same maintenance regime
 EMT produce the same improvements over CP5 as in CP4 (12.2% reduction)
FCC Assumprions
 FCC starting position is their end of CP4 target
 FCC retain the franchise
 FCC retain the same fleet with the same maintenance regime
 The Thameslink Programme will have an adverse affect on FCC delivery.
Table 4: CP5 Delay minutes – Network Rail
Delay minutes
340,000
320,000
300,000
CP4
Network Rail
2018/19
2017/18
2016/17
2015/16
2014/15
2013/14
2012/13
280,000
CP5
24
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
CP5 TOC performance trajectories
This section outlines the performance trajectories that can expected during CP5, which will be
refined during formal delivery planning as part of the two yearly JPIP process.
Figure 1: PPM MAA trajectories for First Capital Connect for CP5
Figure 3: PPM MAA trajectories for East Midlands Trains for CP5
East
Midlands
Trains
England
& Wales
First
Capital
Connect
England
& Wales
Predicted CP5 PPM Range by Year
93.5%
Predicted CP5 PPM Range by Year
91.5%
91.0%
93.0%
90.5%
90.0%
89.5%
92.5%
PPM (%)
89.0%
PPM (%)
88.5%
88.0%
92.0%
2013/14
2014/15
2015/16
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19
HLOS Scenario
92.8%
92.9%
92.8%
93.0%
93.1%
93.4%
Central Scenario
92.8%
92.9%
92.8%
92.9%
93.0%
93.2%
Downside Scenario
92.8%
92.8%
92.7%
92.8%
92.9%
93.0%
87.5%
87.0%
2013/14
2014/15
2015/16
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19
HLOS Scenario
90.7%
90.9%
89.9%
89.9%
90.0%
89.8%
Central Scenario
90.7%
90.3%
89.4%
89.3%
89.4%
89.2%
Downside Scenario
90.7%
89.8%
88.9%
88.7%
88.8%
88.6%
Figure 2: CaSL MAA trajectories for East Midlands Trains for CP5
Figure 2: CaSL MAA trajectories for First Capital Connect for CP5
First
Capital
Connect
England
& Wales
East
Midlands
Trains
England
& Wales
Predicted CP5 CASL Range by Year
Predicted CP5 CASL Range by Year
2.5%
3.8%
3.7%
3.6%
3.5%
2.4%
3.4%
3.3%
3.2%
2.3%
3.1%
3.0%
2.9%
2.2%
2.8%
CaSL (%)
CaSL (%)
2.7%
2.6%
2.5%
2.4%
2.1%
2.3%
2.2%
2.0%
2.1%
2013/14
2014/15
2015/16
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19
HLOS Scenario
2.4%
2.2%
2.3%
2.2%
2.2%
2.2%
3.0%
Central Scenario
2.4%
2.3%
2.3%
2.2%
2.2%
2.2%
3.3%
3.3%
Downside Scenario
2.4%
2.3%
2.3%
2.3%
2.2%
2.3%
3.6%
3.7%
2.0%
2013/14
2014/15
2015/16
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19
HLOS Scenario
3.0%
2.9%
3.0%
3.0%
2.9%
Central Scenario
3.0%
3.1%
3.3%
3.3%
Downside Scenario
3.0%
3.3%
3.6%
3.6%
Network Rail
25
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Capacity and capability
Assessment of the capacity and capability of the East Midlands Route
was carried out, in consultation with passenger and freight train
operators and other stakeholders, as part of the development of the
East Midlands Route Utilisation Strategy (RUS), established
in May 2010.
As crowding on the long distance services builds from North Northamptonshire this has the
effect of reducing the requirement for lengthening of the LDHS trains into London from
Sheffield and Nottingham. The timetable study has identified a series of capacity improvements
required to support the introduction of a sixth LDHS train path alongside the growth in freight
traffic. Analysis is continuing to determine the capacity available to accommodate a sixth train
in combination with the increased quantum of Thameslink services from 2018, particularly
across the three hour peak south of Bedford.
The RUS covered the vast majority of the route and identified the interventions necessary to
support freight and passenger growth to the end of Control Period 5 (CP5) and beyond. The
case for electrification, which forms the cornerstone of the strategy for the Route going
forward, was demonstrated in the Network RUS: Electrification which was established in
October 2009.
The Government’s strategy for CP5, identifies the first priority as the creation of a high
capacity passenger and freight electric corridor running from the South Coast through
Oxford, Bedford and via the Midland Main Line to the East Midlands and South Yorkshire. This
includes the requirement to pursue opportunities to improve journey times and increase
capacity for freight on the east – west corridor through Leicester. The potential capacity
improvements identified by the industry to support service segmentation are unlikely to be
sufficient to deliver the Electric Spine and additional interventions are likely, particularly in the
Bedford station area.
Since the publication of the RUSs, Network Rail, in close collaboration with train and freight
operators, has been evaluating how a restructured timetable could deliver a major output
change for services operating on the Midland Main Line (MML). A major objective being to
achieve the aspiration, shared by Network Rail, passenger train operators and wider
stakeholders, to reduce journey times for both Long Distance High Speed (LDHS) and interurban services operating on the Route whilst also providing sufficient capacity to accommodate
the future growth in freight traffic.
Initial timetable analysis has indicated that there are potential benefits to journey times and
further industry operational cost savings (beyond those identified in the Network RUS:
Electrification) from segmentation of the service offer by market type. This will require an
additional long distance outer suburban service to serve the North Northamptonshire commuter
belt market to support improved journey times on long distance services.
Network Rail
In addition to the previously committed Thameslink Programme to deliver the KO2 service
from December 2018, the proposed strategy to deliver the HLOS requirements includes a
progressive programme of electrification and capacity enhancements. The first phase provides
a half hourly electric service from North Northamptonshire/Leicestershire to St Pancras using
outer-suburban units.
Extension of electrification to Nottingham allows electric operation of the two Nottingham – St
Pancras services each hour by December 2019. Finally, the route via Derby to Sheffield is then
electrified by December 2021 in CP6. Further details concerning the specification of capacity
and capability requirements for the Route is updated in the Network Specification January
2013 – East Midlands and the supporting Route Specifications.
26
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Delivering improved CP4 capacity and capability
A number of schemes are still intended to improve the capability of the
infrastructure in CP4 and will be completed in 2013/14.
Long-distance journey times
Work is in hand to improve the capability of the infrastructure to allow a potential journey time
reduction of a minimum of eight minutes between Sheffield and St Pancras International for
Class 222 operated services with calls at Chesterfield, Derby and Leicester.
There will also be an incremental benefit of a minimum of around five minutes journey time
reduction for the HST services between Nottingham and St Pancras International calling at
Market Harborough, Leicester and East Midlands Parkway.
Nottingham & Erewash Valley
In conjunction with major signalling improvements at Nottingham, the opportunity is being
taken to remodel the station area to deliver improved performance for services operating
through the area.
Minor works are planned to improve the capability of the track along the Erewash Valley and
deliver industry-wide benefits. These works will take advantage of the recent signalling
improvements on this corridor and will result in improvements to the journey times for the Class
158 services operating via this route between Nottingham and Leeds.
Finally, as part of the development of the Strategic Freight Network, gauge clearance to W12
will be undertaken between Water Orton and Doncaster via the Erewash Valley which will
improve the capability of this route for intermodal freight. To allow longer, heavier freight trains
to transport aggregates from the Peak Forest along the MML via Corby to London, the junction
at Manton will be doubled and a loop will be provided at Sundon.
Network Rail
27
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Delivering improved passenger CP5 capacity & capability
A wide range of schemes are planned to be completed in CP5.
Long distance high speed services
Within the LDHS market sector there has been a large increase in travel to London from
stations south of Leicester, in particular those within North Northamptonshire. This reflects the
increased trend in long distance commuting driven partly by the rapid increase in London
living costs. The demand for rail travel along this corridor is forecast to increase by an average
2.5 percent per annum until 2019/20.
It is proposed to accommodate growth, improve journey times and reduce industry operational
costs by progressively converting current LDHS trains to electric operation over the next
two control periods. Services between Sheffield/Nottingham and London will be operated by an
electric fleet of up to 10-cars in length. Outer suburban services from North Northamptonshire
and Leicestershire will be operated by formations of up to three 4-car Class 350 type rolling
stock and the frequency will be increased to two trains per hour. This will increase the overall
service frequency from five trains per hour to six trains per hour in the peak and off-peak.
Interurban services
There is currently sufficient capacity on the LDHS interurban services between Reading and
Newcastle operating on the Route. Trains on the Plymouth – Edinburgh corridor are fairly busy
with most exceeding load factors of 75 percent over the length of their journey, and a handful
exceeding seated capacity on some parts of their journey.
Demand forecasts for these services are based on the forecast in the Network RUS for the
cross-country corridor under a “Global Responsibility” scenario and are anticipated to grow
by an average of 2.3 percent per annum over the next 30 years. To accommodate growth, DfT
is examining increasing the four-car Voyagers to become five-car (an electric power car is
added to make use of the expanding electrified route).
Crowding is expected to increase on the Birmingham New Street – Stansted Airport corridor
as a result of increased commuting to both Cambridge and Birmingham. Rail travel is
anticipated to grow by 3 percent per annum with services in the inter-peak crowded along the
whole of the route by 2019. The existing class 170s should be increased from three to fourcars throughout the day to accommodate this growth. In addition, the existing Birmingham to
Leicester service would be extended to Cambridge on some hours, increasing the frequency of
service from one train per hour to two trains per hour on this corridor.
The planned completion of enhancements on the Hope Valley route (between Sheffield and
Manchester) as part of the Northern Hub scheme, may allow the provision of a new interurban
service from Leicester and Derby to the North West.
Suburban and commuter services
At the southern end of the route, crowding on commuter services into London will be
addressed by the introduction of eight and twelve-car fixed formation rolling stock as part of the
Thameslink Programme, which is a previously committed scheme in CP5.
Rural and branch services
In general, the existing service levels are sufficient to accommodate forecast growth in demand
on rural and branch lines on the East Midlands Route. Some strengthening during the peaks is
required on the Nottingham to Worksop (via Mansfield) and Nottingham to Lincoln corridors,
where some peak trains should increase in length by one-car. Whilst crowding into Derby from
Matlock is expected to be severe by 2019, there is no value for money case to lengthen
services, so strengthening will need to be accommodated within the existing resource base.
The target numbers of arriving passengers to be accommodated in the morning peak are
shown in section 7 on pages 80 and 81 with the capacity in the peak hour and the peak three
hours to be achieved at regional hubs, including examples of how this capacity would be
delivered.
Demand for rail travel on the Liverpool Lime Street – Norwich services is expected to grow by
2.5 percent per annum over the next 10 years.
There is sufficient capacity on all services east of Nottingham having already strengthened the
majority of services to four cars. However, unless capacity is further increased, crowding is
likely to remain on some services between Liverpool Lime Street and Nottingham by 2019 that
have not been strengthened. The remaining services are expected to be strengthened from
two to four-car once rolling stock becomes available.
Network Rail
28
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Freight capacity and capability improvements in CP5
The most significant market sectors driving anticipated freight growth
on the East Midlands Route are construction and aggregates, and
intermodal container traffic.
SFN forecasts
The industry’s accepted freight forecasts are those developed as part of the Strategic Freight
Network (SFN) by freight operators, Network Rail and other stakeholders. There are forecasts
for 2019 and 2030.
In summary, the forecasts show:
 Substantial growth in intermodal freight from ports and, in the longer term, between domestic
intermodal terminals (many of which do not currently exist but are expected to be developed
in future)
 A gradual decline in coal traffic over the long term, as coal forms a smaller part of the UK’s
power generation mix
 Modest growth in commodities such as construction industry aggregates.
We recognise that traffic could differ from the projections due to a range of factors including:
the timing of port expansion; planning consent for intermodal terminals; the extent to which
biomass develops as substitute for coal-fired power generation; and the development of the
Channel Tunnel freight market. A particular risk is the growth and timing of intermodal traffic
using the Electric Spine via Bedford rather than via the West Midlands, Burton-on-Trent and
Sheet Stores Jn.
Market Sectors
The most significant market sectors driving anticipated freight growth on the East Midlands
Route are construction and aggregates, and intermodal container traffic.
The aggregates market is a major contributor to rail freight on the Route, with four major
quarries in the area at Croft, Bardon Hill, Stud Farm and Mountsorrel that serve London and
the south west markets using a number of terminals on the MML, in the London area and
elsewhere. There is also aggregates traffic from the Peak Forest area, which is anticipated to
be a key area of growth, alongside cement services from the Hope Valley.
Network Rail
To accommodate this growth two paths per hour in each direction will remain the requirement
for the MML through CP5. In the southbound direction, this will comprise of one path routed via
Market Harborough and a path capable of accommodating longer, heavier freight services via
Corby. To improve operational flexibility, freight operator aspirations are for two heavy freight
paths to be capable of operating via Market Harborough. In the northbound direction, the
freight operators have aspirations for one of the paths to be capable of accommodating a
longer, heavier freight train. Not all these paths over the course of the day will be required for
bulk traffic and so some would be available for future intermodal traffic.
Development work is continuing to determine what capacity is required to accommodate
heavier aggregates traffic via Market Harborough and up to two additional intermodal trains per
hour in the Electric Spine.
It is assumed that all of the aggregates flows will continue to be diesel operated although the
opportunity would exist for the Mountsorrel to Elstow/Radlett flows to convert to electric
operation towards the end of CP5. On the east – west corridor from Croft/Nuneaton to
Peterborough corridor via Leicester, one path per hour is required to accommodate aggregates
traffic.
Enhancement of the loading gauge across a number of corridors within the Route and the
capacity improvements included in the HLOS at Leicester will generate further growth in
intermodal traffic carried through this corridor from the ports at Felixstowe, Tilbury and
Southampton. To accommodate growth, two intermodal paths per hour will be required
between Nuneaton and Peterborough. In addition, one intermodal path per hour will be
required on the Syston to Stoke corridor.
The completion of W12 gauge clearance from Bedford to Syston Jn as part of the Electric
Spine requirements is likely to see some traffic from Southampton to Yorkshire and the North
East run via Bedford and the MML rather than via the West Midlands, Burton-on-Trent and
Sheet Stores Jn. At least one additional intermodal path per hour is likely to be required. Again,
further development work is required to determine any additional schemes needed to deliver
the outputs of the Electric Spine. Across other market sectors, traffic flows are anticipated to
continue at broadly current levels.
29
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Capability outputs
The capability of route at the start of CP5 will be as follows:
 Linespeed improvements at various locations along the Midland Main Line between London St Pancras International and Sheffield will raise the speed for passenger services from 110mph to a
maximum permissible speed of 125mph.
 Remodelling of Nottingham station area and the segregation of trains at the western end of the layout with bi-directionally paired tracks for trains to Derby/Leicester and Mansfield/Sheffield will
improve performance and network resilience.
 On the Erewash Valley, minor works planned in the Langley Mill area will increase the linespeed to 90mph.
 Gauge clearance to W12 between Water Orton and Doncaster via the Erewash Valley will improve the capability of these key freight routes. The provision of a double junction at Manton and a
loop at Sundon will allow longer, heavier freight trains to operate on the MML via Corby.
Linespeed
Electrification
Route Availability
Gauge
As part of the Infrastructure Capability Programme a number of Network Changes to Route Availability and Gauge, which may affect some of the detail of these maps, have been issued for
consultation. Details of the Network Changes being consulted and those that have been established can be found on the Network Rail website.
Network Rail
30
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Projects
The HLOS includes the requirement to develop and deliver the
Electric Spine.
Current project and timetable development work indicates that the following schemes will be
required to support delivery of the Electric Spine on the East Midlands Route:
 Midland Main Line Electrification to extend the overhead lines from Bedford to Sheffield
via Derby, Nottingham and Corby (DP005). This includes an increment for gauge clearance
to W10/W12 for intermodal freight trains.
 Midland Main Line Capacity Schemes (NE029). The additional capacity interventions
required to deliver the Electric Spine are still in development but options may include:
– doubling of the line between Kettering – Corby
– an additional line or loops between Sharnbrook and Kettering
– between Kettering – Wigston, loops or realignment in the Desborough / Market
Harborough area
– line speed increases on the slow lines between Bedford and Harrowden
– remodelling of the Bedford station area
 Capacity improvements in the Leicester area between Syston and Wigston (NE032)
 Derby station area resignalling and remodelling (NE003)
 Midland Main Line train lengthening and associated platform extensions (NE009)
 Capacity improvements between Helpston – Syston (candidate scheme for the Strategic
Freight Network fund)
Completion of all works is likely to span two control periods and the timing of individual
schemes requires further development work.
Previously Committed Schemes for delivery in CP5
Thameslink KO2 which will provide a new Light Maintenance Depot at Cricklewood and
several long sidings at Bedford. Various changes will be made to the signalling system,
including implementation of Automatic Train Operation through the core section between Dock
Jn and Blackfriars.
Enhancement Schemes (not currently funded)
 NE008 – Birmingham to Stansted journey time improvements scheme, to increase the
linespeeds on the corridor between Helpston and Nuneaton. This should be delivered in
association with signalling renewal and the above SFN Fund item
 Nottingham – Sheffield – Leeds journey time improvements, to improve the linespeed in the
Radford Jn area. More significant infrastructure interventions on the Sheffield – Leeds
section of this corridor have been included in the LNE Route Plan
 Reduce journey times through the relocation of Ambergate jn, in conjunction with S&C
renewals planned in CP5
 Provision of improved approach controls at Flitwick and Leagrave Jn, in conjunction with
S&C renewals planned in CP5
 Provision of improved signalling arrangements at St Albans, in conjunction with S&C
renewals planned in CP5
 Increase linespeed to 75mph between Lowdham and Newark Castle, to take advantage
of passive provision included in the East of Nottingham signalling renewal scheme planned
in CP4
 Increase linespeed to 90mph between Netherfield and Allington, to take advantage of
passive provision included in the East of Nottingham signalling renewal scheme planned in
CP4
 Increase linespeed to a minimum of 75mph between Derby and Stoke in conjunction with
signalling renewals planned in CP4/5 between Stenson jn and Derby and the modular
resignalling renewals from North Stafford jn and Stoke
At least some of these schemes would be potential candidates for the Passenger Journey
Improvement Fund. More detail on all of the projects listed above can be found in the CP5
enhancements supporting document.
Enhancement of the gauge to W12 between Syston and Stoke to provide an alternative route
for intermodal traffic.
Network Rail
31
East Midlands Route Plan Submission
Route network
availability strategy
This section sets out our plans for developing the East Midlands
route and capabilities requirements of our customers.
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Network availability
Network availability is about striking the right balance between when users wish to operate services and when the infrastructure needs to be
maintained, renewed and enhanced in order to maximise net industry value and revenue.
East Midlands strategy
The key drivers of the East Midlands network availability strategy for CP5 are therefore
customer (and stakeholder) requirements and the work to be delivered during CP5, as mapped
below.
To develop the strategy, we have been in dialogue with customers and across relevant teams
within Network Rail. For inter-route operators, we are co-ordinating access principles with other
Network Rail routes.
The East Midlands network availability strategy is a high level framework supporting annual
planning processes, including the Engineering Access Statement in which possessions are
categorised as follows:
 standard opportunities for undertaking planned works
 midweek night access for maintenance of the network
 disruptive possessions items
Network Rail
Network availability
During Control Period 4, we have made significant strides in reducing the disruption that
planned engineering works causes to train services, and to increase the availability of the
network for customers. Nationally, our target has been to reduce passenger disruption by 37%
and not increase the level of disruption to freight.
The table below shows actual and planned performance at the end of each year as measured
by possession disruption indices for passenger and freight, and we are currently on course to
achieve our end of CP4 targets.
Network Availability performance in CP4
Passenger possession
disruption index
Year
Freight possession
disruption index
Target
Actual/Plan
Target
Actual/Plan
2009/10
1.02
0.65
1
0.82
2010/11
0.91
0.52
1
0.90
2011/12
0.83
0.54
1
0.85
2012/13
0.68
0.62
1
0.73
2013/14
0.63
0.46
1
0.81
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Current access strategy
The industry prioritised a number of key flows at the start of CP4 as
part of a Route Categorisation initiative.
For passenger, this was based on those flows carrying high numbers of passengers between
important conurbations. A number of strategic national freight flows were also identified. The
routes in the table below are applicable to East Midlands.
The application of the Network Operating Strategy (NOS) as part of our investment strategy will
reduce the number of signalling control points across the route significantly, but will increase
the line side asset and transmission equipment population across the route. The latest
modelling indicates the change from mechanical signalling assets to electronic in modular form
is cost neutral in maintenance terms.
Route Categorisation and key routes identified in CP4
Passenger routes
Freight routes
Birmingham New St – Nottingham
Birmingham New St – York
London St Pancras – Nottingham
London St Pancras – Sheffield
Bedford – Brighton
Southampton/West Midlands to South Yorkshire
Felixstowe to West Midlands
Leicester area to London/cross London routes
The key routes within the East Midlands route boundaries were established as London St
Pancras to Nottingham and Sheffield via Derby, and Wichnor Junction to Chesterfield. The
need to maintain routes through Derby is centrally important.
At a strategic level, guiding principles have been established within our access planning
processes, and are applied unless impractical. Passengers travelling between key intermediate
stations are not to be transferred onto buses, and where trains are diverted the aim is to limit
increases in planned journey time at 25-30%. For freight, we seek to provide a through route
from origin to destination, making best use of alternative routes.
Plain line track renewals towards the end of CP4 are being delivered using high output
equipment, based on either 16 hour weekends or 8 hour midweek nights with an element of
adjacent line open (ALO). On 4 track lines, a 2 track railway is operated. On 2 track sections,
12 hour all line possessions (with 4 hours ALO) applies at weekends with 2 hour all line blocks
(with 6 hours ALO) on midweek nights.
Residual and localised conventional renewals are still required at locations where there are
particular formation and drainage constraints, and these usually require 30 hours. Longer
access is required for S&C renewals, generally 30 hours for a standard layout, which increases
for more complex locations. This is based on the use of tilting wagons and modular S&C
panels. Again, ALO is used where appropriate.
Summary of access strategy for maintenance and track in CP4
Key route sections
Maintenance (all midweek
nights)
Track Renewals
London St Pancras – Bedford
1 in 6 weeks, 7hrs
Plain line – high output in 16 hr
weekends or 8 hr midweek
nights. Conventional generally
using 30hr weekends.
Bedford – Sheffield
1 in 6 weeks, 5.5hrs
Wichnor Jn – Derby
1 in 6 weeks, 5.5hrs
(aligned with West Midlands
and GN)
Derby – Nottingham
1 in 6 weeks, 5.5hrs
Nuneaton – Peterborough
1 in 6 weeks, 5.5hrs
S&C – generally 30hr weekends
for standard, longer access
required at complex locations.
For significant enhancements to the network, including re-signalling schemes the approach has
been to agree access plans with customers on a case-by-case basis, to seek the best industry
solution. The most disruptive project in CP4 is Nottingham re-signalling, for which the industry
has agreed to deliver the works within a 37-day blockade in 2013. This has enabled industry
costs to be minimised and the period of disruptive works to be curtailed. In line with this the
industry has communicated a clear message to end users and stakeholders.
In terms of access planning in CP4, planned maintenance has been mostly restricted to section
5 midweek night opportunities, on one out of every six weeks. The strategy is aligned with
adjacent routes, for example co-ordinating disruptions to overnight freight. The strategy also
ensures that first and last trains can be operated, and East Midlands Trains can always get to
Derby from London.
Network Rail
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Route capabilities supporting network availability
There are a number of 4 and 3 track sections that already enable the disruption from planned
engineering works to be minimised. There are also a number of diversionary routes to support
the access strategy. The table below captures this.
Infrastructure capabilities for network availability
4 track sections
London St Pancras – Sharnbrook
Syston – Trent South Junction
Clay Cross – Tapton
3 track sections
Sharnbrook – Harrowden Junction
Kilby Bridge Junction – Syston
Diversionary routes
Kettering – Leicester via Manton Junction and Corby
Derby – Birmingham via Leicester or Lichfield
Derby – Chesterfield via Erewash Valley
Chesterfield – Sheffield via Barrow Hill and Beighton
Loughborough – Derby via Sheet Stores and Stenson Junction
Several projects have been delivered in CP4 to support the access strategy on East Midlands.
A programme of road rail access points, junction lighting installations and motorised inspection
carts enables more efficient maintenance access, reducing disruption by making the four tracks
south of Bedford available from 1200 on Sundays. Maintenance activities are also supported
the fixed warning systems that have been installed to reduce journey times for trains that are
diverted via Manton.
In terms of enhancements, a bi-directional through platform has been installed at Chesterfield
Station, reducing rail replacement requirements for through services and allowing trains to call
at platform 3 when the line to Tapton Junction is blocked. The extension of platform 3 at
Loughborough enables trains to call at Loughborough when the Up and Down Fast Lines
are blocked.
Network Rail
35
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Network availability requirements for CP5
Following consultation with customers on East Midlands, the most
important routes for network availability have been confirmed and are
listed in the tables below.
N.B. Route Categorisation did not prioritise as a ‘Category A’ route in CP4.
Key passenger routes
Operator
Key routes
Important intermediate stations
Arriva Cross Country
Birmingham New St – Nottingham
Birmingham New St – York
Birmingham New St – Stansted*
Derby
Derby, Sheffield, Leeds
Leicester, Peterborough, Cambridge
East Midlands Trains
London St Pancras – Nottingham
London St Pancras – Sheffield
Norwich – Liverpool*
Luton, Leicester, Derby
Luton, Leicester, Derby
Peterborough, Nottingham, Sheffield,
Manchester
Bedford – Brighton
Luton, East Croydon, Gatwick Airport,
Haywards Heath
First Capital Connect
Key freight routes
Strategic freight route
East Midlands freight route
Southampton/West Midlands to South Yorkshire
Felixstowe to West Midlands
Leicester area to London/cross London routes
Tamworth – Chesterfield
Peterborough – Nuneaton
Leicester – Peterborough, Leicester – London
The priority for the network availability strategy is to protect these key flows, so far as it is
practical to do so. For the key passenger routes, this means no rail replacement buses and
limiting the increase in journey times when using diversionary routes in line with the principles
that were established in CP4. The strategic freight flows identified above are taken from the
national Freight JNAP, and the need to ensure a suitable through route, utilising appropriate
diversions, remains the overriding concern.
Network Rail
The key routes within the East Midlands route boundaries remain London St Pancras to
Nottingham and Sheffield via Derby, and Wichnor Junction to Chesterfield. The routes through
Derby and Bedford to London are particularly important.
From the table above, it can be seen that our customers seek to maintain the routes that were
established through Route Categorisation in CP4. In addition, two additional long distance
flows have been identified that are particularly important in terms of revenue and minimising
disruption; Birmingham New Street to Stansted Airport and Norwich to Liverpool.
In terms of service requirements for network availability, the table below highlights the
additional requirements that have been identified with customers and key stakeholders
for CP5.
Specific service aspirations for CP5
Operator
Service aspirations
Arriva Cross Country
Protection of key flow between Birmingham New St and Stansted Airport.
Planning of access restrictions co-ordinated across NR routes
East Midlands Trains
Protection of key flow between Norwich and Liverpool. Reduce journey times
between Derby & London on Saturday-type service on Sundays south of
Bedford. Sheffield to London route available from 1200 on Sundays
First Capital Connect
‘Core’ available at all times, except for 0145 to 0545 on Sunday morning. Fulfil
suppressed demand for an overnight service between Three Bridges and
Brighton (to be addressed through Sussex route network availability strategy)
Northern
Minimise disruption where possible on Leeds to Nottingham route
Freight
Support growth in intermodal flows (domestic and maritime). Southampton/West
Midlands to South Yorkshire, extended Sunday demand. Felixstowe to West
Midlands, midweek night and Sunday afternoon demand. Planning of access
restrictions co-ordinated across NR routes
36
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
CP5 works
The East Midlands Route Asset Management Plan (RAMP) brings
together the inspection, maintenance and renewal interventions for
each asset discipline.
The RAMP identifies the most appropriate approach to asset interventions to deliver the
required outputs for the minimum whole life, whole system cost. Full details of our asset
management plans for CP5 are provided in section 6 of this document. There are some
significant works planned for CP5, for example electrification of the MML. Dependant upon the
scope these works there is potential for significant disruption
Access Strategy
The aim of the access strategy is to optimise the trade off between efficiency of work and
availability of the network for delivery of the timetable. The ‘win-win’ position is where reducing
disruption leads to a better net financial position for the industry, taking into account costs,
savings and revenue. Where the approach increases both disruption and industry costs, this is
normally discounted. The diagram below highlights the potential trade-offs.
Significant renewal and enhancement works on key route sections in CP5
Key sections
CP5 work headlines
London – Bedford
S&C renewals Flitwick, West Hampstead South, Luton South,
St. Albans, Bedford, Radlett Redlands
Bedford – Sheffield
Derby re-modelling
Capacity improvements Wigston to Syston
MML electrification works
S&C renewals Ratcliffe, Wellingborough, Loughborough,
Syston South, Sileby
Wichnor Jn – Derby
Derby re-modelling
S&C renewal Wichnor Jn
Derby – Nottingham
Derby re-modelling
MML electrification works
Nuneaton – Peterborough
Felixstowe to Nuneaton freight enhancements
Options for access and work delivery in CP5
As a starting point, the East Midlands RAMP provides an integrated asset management
approach and this in itself supports the integration of access plans, and drives out disruption.
Beyond this, there are certain choices on how to best deliver work in CP5.
For Derby re-modelling the access strategy will be dependant on whether the scope is
constrained to re-control, with limited weekend disruption or major re-modelling, requiring
significant weekend access over a sustained period of time. Unlike the case of Nottingham resignalling (37 day blockade), a blockade is not likely to be agreed due to the importance of the
routes through Derby. The major S&C renewals that are planned for CP5 are currently
anticipated to be completed in 30 hour possessions, with longer durations required at more
complex junctions where clearance becomes an issue. For plain line renewals, the approach is
likewise expected to be in line with CP4; utilising high output over 16 hour weekends and 8
hour midweek nights, with conventional renewals in 30 hour weekends.
Network Rail
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
For MML electrification significant works will be carried out in CP5 and CP6. The more disruptive access requirements will be related to a number of bridge reconstructions that will be required to
address clearance issues, with locations such as Leicester and Nottingham expected to be highly disruptive. Technical solutions for delivering these complex works are being investigated, such
as the conductor beam technology used on Thameslink. We have worked with the Rail Delivery Group sponsored Integrated Access Planning project to identify best industry access solution for
the East Midlands Route.
The table provides a high level summary of the options considered.
Summary of main options considered for access in CP5
Work/Project
Main options considered (including net financial implications)
Option(s) with best industry case
Option(s) discounted
Maintenance
8hr midweek nights on a 1 in 6 cyclical basis.
8-12hr weekend disruption on a 1 in 12 quartley basis at locations that
cannot be blocked midweek.
Longer than 8hrs midweek due to limited staff resources.
Possessions of less than 5-6hrs duration due to inefficiency.
Track renewals: Plain line
c.30-40% of volume to be delivered in 8hr midweek opportunities.
Undertaking all work at weekends – ORR efficiencies can only be achieved by efficient 6-7day
Formation renewals and other technically-challenging sites will remain in working of available resources.
16 or 30hr weekend opportunities.
Track renewals: S&C
Much of the volume will be linked to Enhancements schemes at
Leicester and Derby. For other works, a mix of solutions from an
extreme of 8-10hr midweek nights to 54hrs+ weekend will be employed,
dependent on the complexity of the location.
NIL – a variety of solutions will be employed specific to each site.
Derby re-modelling
Multiple weekends of 30-54hrs duration. Aim to try and divide works into
2 halves, either split north-south or east-west to maintain a train service
to Derby – albeit reduced.
A blockade along the lines of Nottingham due to the effect on 2 major routes (MML and NE-SW axis)
and the impact of no access to Etches Park Depot.
MML electrification works
Weekend all line blocks of 30-54hrs duration for major bridge
demolitions/ reconstructions due to site/ methodology/engineering
constraints. Blockade for Kettering-Corby Works.
8hr midweek nights for mast piling/installation and wiring on plain line
sections. Junctions to be undertaken in 8-12hr weekends.
Note: Bedford, Leicester, Nottingham and Sheffield Station areas are all
subject to particular technical challenges which currently prevent a
preferred strategy from being declared for these areas.
Blockades on the MML due to the lengthy period over which works need to be delivered – i.e.
throughout CP5.
W10 gauge clearance
30hr weekends of 2-tracks proposed for track lowers/bridge
reconstructions where possible – any longer works to be aligned with
other schemes – eg MML electrification. Likely blockade solution for
works at Meir Tunnel on North Staffs line.
Blockades on the MML section between Syston-Trent.
Network Rail
38
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
CP5 initiatives to improve network availability on key routes
Water Orton capacity improvements will benefit availability for CrossCountry services via Derby (HLOS).
On the MML, a review of engineering allowances is ongoing, and may contribute to the journey time improvements that East Midlands Trains are seeking on Sundays.
For Freight, further capacity improvements are expected to be delivered in CP5 between Felixstowe and Nuneaton to accommodate anticipated growth in intermodal traffic from the port facilities
at Felixstowe and Bathside Bay, to terminals in the Midlands, North West, North East and Scotland. In addition, it will enable some freight that is currently routed via London to these destinations
to use the cross country route instead. This has the potential to offer journey time savings and release capacity on the congested Great Eastern Main Line for other rail services and in the
London area in connection with the new London Gateway port.
For the Southampton/West Midlands to South Yorkshire freight flow, the demand for extended Sunday access will be dependant upon development of the strategic freight network, and further
W10 gauge clearance on the routes via Kew and the Joint Line. For the Felixstowe to West Midlands flow, additional midweek night and Sunday afternoon availability is dependant on the
strategy to complete renewals on the Felixstowe branch.
Access strategy and industry justification
We have agreed with our customer the key routes and the principles that will apply on these routes unless impractical, and this is detailed below. The access strategy that we intend to implement
for CP5 will enable us to best meet these principles, within the context of delivering planned works cost effectively.
Maintenance
The maintenance access strategy for East Midlands route in CP5 will continue to utilise midweek night section 5 opportunities. This approach will continue to take into account the agreed
principles for first and last trains, and is based on the overall asset management strategy as detailed in the RAMP. CP4 initiatives to secure more efficient maintenance access have been
consolidated into the base position for CP5. The strategy will largely be a rollover of that in place for CP4, but with an increase in the number of longer 8hr midweek opportunities where
Maintenance work can be aligned with Renewals/Enhancements works as per the recent IAPIP study recommendations.
General approach for maintenance on key route sections in CP5
Key section
General principles (incl. key dependencies)
London St Pancras – Bedford
Midweek: 2 out of 4 tracks blocked for between 6-7hrs – with WTT of 2-track railway trains timed over the Slow lines. Some work will be piggybacked on longer 8hr opportunities
in place for Renewals/Enhancements. Following locations excluded for midweek access: (i) Farringdon-Carlton Road Jn (Thameslink Core route), (ii) Bedford South-Bedford Station
Jns inclusive Slow lines, as all 3 are required for operation of overnight FCC services.
Weekend: 2 out of 4 tracks blocked for 12-13hrs, enabling 4-track operation from 1200 Sun onwards. Again, WTT based on a 2-track railway over the Slow lines. Cyclical disruptive
access to be taken at the 2 locations which can’t be accessed midweek (see above) as follows: (i) Thameslink Core – 4 x 27hr possessions per annum (ii) Bedford South – Bedford
Station Slow lines – 4x 8hr, 2x 12hr and 1x 27hr per annum. Additional 12hr weekend disruptive possessions are required on a quarterly basis affecting (i) Cricklewood Sidings and
(ii) Harpenden-Leagrave Slow lines, where the normal access opportunity is 8hrs rather than 12hrs. Finally there will be a requirement for 2x 8hr All line blocks per annum for strategic
junction tamping with 4x s&c machines.
Bedford – Sheffield
Midweek: 1 in 6 strategy of 5-7hrs. Some sections subject to 2-track strategy as per London-Bedford, other sections subject to complete block with diversion via alternative routes
(e.g. Kettering-Wigston, Derby-Clay Cross). Some work will be planned in longer 8hr opportunities where aligned with Renewals/Enhancements works.
Wichnor Jn – Derby
Midweek: 1 in 6 strategy of 5-6hrs. Non-disruptive to passenger services, access maintained to Central Rivers Depot. Duration constrained by freight volumes.
Weekend: 10hr weekend possessions. Non-disruptive to passenger services. Any longer requirements will be aligned on the back of Renewals/Enhancements works, in the form
of a timetable period block of 16 or 30hrs rather than a cyclical strategy.
Derby – Nottingham
Midweek: 1 in 6 strategy of 5-6hrs. No access planned midweek at key junctions.
Weekend: Standard opportunity of 5-6hrs – non-disruptive to passenger services. Key junctions (Derby London Road, Sheet Stores, Trent East) will be tackled on a cyclical quarterly
basis of 8-12hr possessions, with diversions via alternative routes.
Nuneaton – Peterborough
Midweek: 1 in 6 strategy of 6-7hrs. Non-disruptive to passenger services. Key interdependency with WCML and Anglia strategies, as only alternative route for gauge-dependent
traffic is via London.
Weekend: 10-12hr weekend possessions. Non-disruptive. Any longer requirements will be aligned on the back of Renewals/Enhancements works, in the form of a timetable period block
of 16 or 30hrs rather than a cyclical strategy.
Network Rail
39
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Renewals
Planned renewals volumes for the East Midlands in CP5 are generally lower than the volumes seen in CP4.
Track: The aim is to move around 30% of track renewals to a midweek delivery strategy. However, a key obstacle to this (and also to reducing weekend possession durations) is the recent
changes in ALO working practises resulting from ORR intervention. A significant percentage of the planned renewals will be delivered through High Output technology in 8hr midweek/12-16hr
weekend opportunities.
Signalling: Early CP5 works will be modular schemes focused on the rural routes, where it is envisaged that the normal midweek and weekend non-disruptive opportunities will provide sufficient
access for preparatory civils and signals installation works, confining disruption to one-off weekends of 54-72hr duration for major commissionings.
Civils/E&P: The majority of works will be delivered as part of the significant Enhancements programme including electrification.
General approach for renewals on key route sections in CP5
Key section
General principles (incl. key dependencies)
London St Pancras – Bedford
Strong preference for High Output methodology wherever possible in 8hr midweek nights. Aim to move conventional renewals into 8hr midweek nights as well. Some complex
s&c works will require longer weekend possessions of 30-37hrs duration. 2-track railway principles apply for all these works. Any all line block requirements will be directed to
Bank Holidays.
Bedford – Sheffield
Renewals on particular sections would be delivered in timetable period blocks of 16-30hrs duration, with a view to packaging works to focus on a particular section in one year
rather than across CP5. Some scope for midweek delivery in 8hr opportunities, particularly High Output track renewals. This section will be dominated by MML electrification
works in CP5, so many of the renewals will be optimised on the back of these works.
Wichnor Jn – Derby
Minimal midweek delivery of work proposed due to limited duration of possessions. Work concentrated on 12-16hr weekend opportunities, with some limited 30hr
possessions for S&C renewals at key junctions. Volumes considerably lower than CP4, so proposal is to plan to a maximum of around 6 weeks per annum.
Derby – Nottingham
Limited works proposed for CP5 due to the renewals/enhancements at Nottingham in CP4. Derby area renewals will be undertaken as part of the Enhancements remodelling
scheme.
Nuneaton – Peterborough
Significant volume of High Output track renewals to be delivered in midweek strategy of 8hr possessions. To be timetable as period blocks, as volumes far greater than can
be accommodated by normal 1 in 6 strategy on this route. Aim to limit weekend disruption to around 6 occasions per annum of c.30hr duration.
Enhancements and major projects
General approach for significant enhancements and major projects in CP5
Project
General principles (incl. key dependencies)
Derby re-modelling
Work is likely to be concentrated in a series of major weekend possessions. The detailed strategy is yet to be finalised, but the basic access principle would be an aim of still
serving Derby with around 50% capacity for passenger trains. Freight will be diverted via the Erewash and Castle Donington.
MML electrification works
Bridge reconstruction and track lowering will be the most disruptive element, with significant all line weekend possessions – targeted on Bank Holidays. Disruption levels will
vary from section-to-section, with an aim of keeping 2 tracks out of 4 available where possible, but dependent on specific structures issues – Leicester Station, Nottingham
Station and Toadmoor Tunnel are the 3 most complex locations at this stage in the process, where significant disruption will be required. The installation of the OHLE
equipment itself will be less disruptive with a focus on making use of midweek night possessions and shorter weekend rules of the route access.
W10 gauge clearance
Much of this will run hand-in-hand with the electrification works, but 2 key sections will be Syston-Trent, where the aim is to minimise the all line block requirements and keep
2 tracks out of 4 open, and Meir Tunnel, where a blockade is the most likely solution to providing W10 capability.
Network Rail
40
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Access Principles for Key Passenger Routes
Key Route
General access principles
(including seasonal considerations and major special events)
Key dependencies and considerations
(including other NR routes and diversionary routes)
Bedford – Brighton
Unless exceptional circumstances make it impractical, passengers
travelling between key intermediate stations will not be transferred onto
buses and planned journey times will not be increased by more than
30% if the train is diverted.
A ‘4 track’ railway south of Bedford supports these principles. The challenge is the ‘Core’ route through Central
London, for which no diversionary route is available.
Birmingham New St –
Nottingham
Unless exceptional circumstances make it impractical, passengers
travelling between key intermediate stations will not be transferred onto
buses and planned journey times will not be increased by more than
25% if the train is diverted.
The lack of suitable compliant diversionary routes for this service group means that the only diversionary route
considered to be compliant is the diversion via Whitacre for trains between Water Orton & Kingsbury.
Where the extension to journey times falls in the range of 20-30%, the
parties will review whether that extension is acceptable.
Birmingham New St –
York
Birmingham New St –
Stansted
Other diversionary routes are available but they exceed the 25% increase in journey time;
Birmingham – Derby via Lichfield
Birmingham – Derby via Leicester
Birmingham – Derby via Castle Donnington/Trent reverse
Unless exceptional circumstances make it impractical, passengers
travelling between key intermediate stations will not be transferred onto
buses and planned journey times will not be increased by more than
25% if the train is diverted. Where the extension to journey times falls in
the range of 20-30%, the parties will review whether that extension is
acceptable.
The lack of suitable compliant diversionary routes for this service group means that the only diversionary routes
considered to be compliant is the diversion via Whitacre for trains between Water Orton & Kingsbury and via the
Erewash Valley for services between Derby & Chesterfield.
Maximum of one diversion between origin and destination and no
transfer of passengers by road.
There are two diversionary routes available (note both exceed a 25% increase in journey times)
Leicester – Peterborough via Grantham
Birmingham – Leicester via Tamworth
Other diversionary routes are available but they exceed the 25% increase in journey time;
Birmingham – Derby via Lichfield
Birmingham – Derby via Leicester
Access strategy and plans will need to be aligned with Anglia, LNE and LNW routes.
London St Pancras –
Nottingham/Sheffield
Passengers travelling between key intermediate stations will not be
transferred onto buses and planned journey times will not be increased
by more than 30% if the train is diverted.
The following diversionary routes are available and do not increase journey times by more than 30%: Kettering –
Leicester via Corby; Trent Jn – Nottingham via Trowell; Derby – Chesterfield via Erewash Valley. In addition,
there is a ‘3 & 4 track’ railway south of Bedford and between Leicester and Trent.
Liverpool – Norwich
Maximum of one diversion between origin and destination and no
transfer of passengers by road.
Access strategy and plans will need to be aligned with Anglia, LNE and LNW routes.
Network Rail
41
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Access Principles for Strategic Freight Routes
Key flow
Primary route
Diversionary routes
Key dependencies and considerations
Southampton/West Midlands
to South Yorkshire
via Water Orton, Trent, Erewash
Valley, Beighton and Hexthorpe
via Lichfield City
via Nuneaton and Leicester
via Ambergate
via Dore and Sheffield
Main route will be gauge enhanced to W10 by the end of CP4
From Southampton:
South West Main Line via Kew and ECML
From CP5 diversionary routing from Southampton to the NE will require a W10
option:
via SW main line and Kew (potential NR scheme)
via Joint Line (CP4 scheme)
Dependencies
Additional diversionary route from Southampton via Kew
HPUK gauge enhancement of ECML
Felixstowe to West Midlands
via GEML, NLL, T&H, WCML
via Ely, Manton, Leicester and Nuneaton
via Syston and Castle Donnington
Issues
1 & 2 – Diesel Traction only
2 – requires enhancement to W10 between Syston and Sheet Stores
Dependencies
Coordination of wider renewals programme with route in Anglia
Leicester area to
London/cross London routes
via Midland Main Line to Brent Curve
Brent Curve to Acton via Neasden
Acton to Barking via Willesden High
Level and Stratford.
via Corby
Brent Curve to Lee Junction via Carlton Road Junction,
Junction Road Junction and Temple Mills then NLL
Acton Wells to Camden Road Junction via Willesden
South West Sidings and Primrose Hill
Gospel Oak to Barking via South Tottenham and
Wanstead Park
Occasional major construction projects – to be dealt with as arising
Issues
Reduced trailing loads via 4
Network Rail
42
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Operate Plan
This section considers how the East Midland Route will deliver its
operational plans, including signalling migration initiatives, ERTMS,
changes to electrical control, and the heritage considerations the
route has in respect of its signal box inheritance.
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
CP4 and CP5 Operate plan delivery
% of SEUs in
ROC
CP4
0
230
35
37%
CP5
35
86
7
90%
CP6
67
86
2
93%
CP7
99
86
2
100%
…
…
…
…
…
CP11
99
86
2
100%
East Midlands SEUs – Current
9
8
7
6
5
4
Mechanical
3
Relay
2
Electronic
1
For full migration details please refer to the ROC migration plan
>300
250 to 300
200 to 250
150 to 200
140 to 150
130 to 140
120 to 130
110 to 120
100 to 110
80 to 90
90 to 100
70 to 80
60 to 70
50 to 60
45 to 50
SEUs per Workstation
21% o f Netwo rk Co ntro l
57% o f Operating Co sts
Network Rail
40 to 45
35 to 40
30 to 35
25 to 30
20 to 25
0
15 to 20
By the end of CP11 all signalling across the route will be controlled from the East Midlands
ROC with the majority of migration occurring before the end of CP7.
Number of
Signalling &
LX Locations
Remaining
10 to 15
Consolidation
No mechanical signalling will remain in operation on the Route at the end of CP7, however
some workstations contain fewer than 100 SEUs per workstation. Further work is ongoing with
CCD Design and Ergonomics Ltd to ensure that the ergonomic workload assessment is
stringently tested and all workstations are efficiently utilised.
Signaller &
Crossing
Keeper
Headcount
0 to 5
CP5
The opportunity exists to reduce East Midland Route’s annual operating costs by £7m per
annum and deliver improved operational performance. Some enabling elements of the strategy
have been deployed in CP4 providing the capability to accelerate renewals investments to
successfully reduce opex costs. Future benefits are split by Control Period and can be seen in
the table opposite.
Cumulative
Additional
Spend (£m)
5 to 10
CP4
Before the end of CP4 the transfer of the remainder of Trent PSB, that currently controls the
Nottingham station area and three signal boxes east of Nottingham (Netherfield Junction,
Rectory Junction and Sneinton) will have been completed and an additional workstation
brought into use at the East Midlands Control Centre. This transfer of control is planned to
take place during July/August 2013 as part of the agreed 37-day commissioning period.
Planned migrations into East Midlands ROC by Control Period
Number of Workstations
With the opening of the East Midlands Control Centre (EMCC) in 2008
there has been some transfer of signalling control, most notably of the
Erewash Valley, Leicester and part of the Robin Hood Line into the
new facility.
22% o f Netwo rk Co ntrol
18% o f Operating Co sts
19% o f Netwo rk Co ntro l
39% o f Netwo rk Co ntro l
10% o f Operating Co sts
15% o f Operating Co sts
44
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
East Midlands ROC on a page
RfP
Traffic
Management
outline
timescales
Proto-typing
1st deployment
TM Rollout
300
100%
90%
Number of SEUs per project
250
80%
70%
200
Derby, 2016, 193 SEUs
60%
150
50%
40%
Leicester - Peterborough, 2017, 113 SEUs
100
30%
20%
Derby, 2016, 61 SEUs
50
SEUs in ROC / headcount saved
Bardon Hill - Moira West Jn, 2021, 259 SEUs
10%
Full re-signalling
Modular
Cumulative headcount reduction
Network Rail
Recontrol only
Re-control & I/L renewal
2030
2029
2028
2027
2026
2025
2024
2023
2022
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
0%
2010
0
ETCS
Cumulative SEU migration
45
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Signalling migration synopsis
The East Midlands Rail Operating Centre (ROC) is already constructed. This section defines
the ROC signalling control area at a high level and highlights Route boundary changes. The
initial schemes will see Nottingham to Newark migrated between 2013 and 2014. Derby will
migrate in 2016, along with the North Staffs route. Leicester to Peterborough migrates in 2017,
with the remainder of the route migrating by 2022.
Signalling Control Area
Leicester SB Control Area
Derby SB Control Area
Trent SB Control Area
Foley Crossing – Newark Castle and Allington Jn
Syston – Uffington & Barnack
Changes of route allocation
Signal Box
Current Route
Future Route
West Hampstead
East Midlands
Sussex
Totley Tunnel East
LNW
East Midlands
Alrewas SB
East Midlands
LNW (Saltley)
Worksop SB
LNE
East Midlands
Network Rail
46
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
ERTMS
The first major infrastructure implementation of European Train
Control System (ETCS) is on the Midland Main Line (South) by
way of a European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS)
Level 2 (L2) overlay of the infrastructure with signals retained
between 2020 and 2023.
East Midlands (Derby) SEU Migration
100%
75%
50%
Some non ERTMS SEUs are currently planned to remain in CP11 but options are being
reviewed for the remaining rolling stock fitment that supports the future railway vision.
25%
Progressive extension of ERTMS across East Midland Route
0%
CP4
CP5
CP6
CP7
CP8
CP9
CP10
CP11
% ERTMS SEUs
0%
0%
21%
33%
52%
63%
87%
92%
% SEUs in ROC
40%
85%
90%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
Network Rail
CP 4
CP 5
CP 6
CP 7
% SEUs in ROC
CP 8
CP 9
CP 10
CP 11
% ERTM S SEUs
47
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Electrical control
All existing Electrical Control supervisory systems are due for
replacement by 2022.
14
11
Within the existing 13 electrical control rooms, we have 16 different control systems, none of
which has a back up capability. There is currently a workstream working to validate the impact
of moving traction control to approximately 8 to 10 locations which would be route aligned.
Initial demographic evaluation suggests that most ECO staff can get to a ROC within a
reasonable travelling time; this is now to be reviewed in detail.
Impact on the East Midlands Route
The electrification scheme for the East Midlands mainline is acknowledged and built into the
plan for the migration into the new centre. The decision has not yet been made on which
electrical control location will cover the Route but work is on-going on the ergonomic,
operational and resilience considerations to determine this.
ROC & existing ECR
12
Brighton
1
Glasgow (Cathcart)
13
Eastleigh
2
York (York)
Rail Operating Centres
3
Rugby (Rugby)
14
Edinburgh
4
Romford (Romford)
15
Manchester
Existing ECR
16
Derby
5
Crewe
17
Saltley
6
Sandhills
18
Cardiff
7
Lewisham
19
Didcot
8
Raynes Park
20
Basingstoke
9
Selhurst
21
Three Bridges
10
Canterbury
22
Gillingham
11
Paddock Wood
23
Ashford
22
6
15
5
16
17
18
33
19
20
13
44
7
89
22 10
11 23
21
12
Network Rail
48
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Heritage considerations
Network Rail currently has over 800 signal boxes, of various sizes and
ages. The Operating Strategy will over time render more and more of
them redundant.
It is recognised that we need to develop a coherent strategy towards dealing with these assets,
to avoid redundant structures remaining a liability to the company, and to comply with Network
Rail’s sustainability policy.
Not proactively managing the heritage has consequences of unused boxes being prone to
vandalism and also an increased maintenance burden. Many of our signal boxes are of
interest to heritage bodies, preserved railways and local communities. Over 90 of our boxes
are listed buildings, which imposes certain legal requirements with regards to maintenance
and upkeep.
To address some of these issues and start to create a coherent approach to our signalling
heritage, members of the Operating Strategy team have been proactively engaging with listing
bodies, the National Railway Museum, the Heritage Railway Association and internal
Network Rail colleagues.
A key part of creating a signalling heritage strategy has been identifying what signalling
assets Network Rail currently has. To that end, the Operating Strategy team has created a
comprehensive register of signal boxes which is currently being validated by local ops staff.
This information has enabled us to identify what structures each Route has, as well as their
historic importance and any other associated issues.
It is hoped this information will help inform a proactive approach to effectively managing these
assets in a sustainable way which benefits the company. Work is on going with English
Heritage as they are conducting a national review of all signal boxes, with a view to publishing
their report in March 2013. This could lead to a change in the number of listed boxes, with the
possibility of some being removed or added to the list.
On the East Midlands Route there are currently three Grade 2 listed signal boxes (shown
below). One is leased to a preservation group and the other two are operational. There are a
further eleven boxes of varying ages which are currently not in operational use.
Name
Current Closure Date
Status
Date Built
Listed Status
Oakham Crossing
2015
Operational
1899
Grade 2 Listed
St Albans South
Closed
Other use
1892
Grade 2 Listed
Sudbury
2015
Operational
1885
Grade 2 Listed
Network Rail
Notes
Suggested Action
Create action plan prior to closure
Leased to preservation group
who maintain as a tourist
attraction
None
Create action plan prior to closure
49
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Operations Headcount
East Midlands operations headcount figures
CP4
CP5
Control Period Averages
2012/13
2013/14
2014/15
2015/16
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19
CP6
CP7
CP8
CP9
CP10
CP11
236
230
200
190
141
86
86
86
86
86
86
86
86
Shift Signaller Mangers
11
11
11
11
11
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
LOM / Ops Manger
12
12
11
11
10
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
Operational Controls
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Signaller / LX Keeper
Electrical Controls
Mobile Operations Managers
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
Route Performance
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Route Enhancement
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
Managed Stations
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
CRE
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
51
51
51
51
51
51
51
51
51
51
51
51
51
Operations Delivery
Other Route
Total
21
21
21
21
21
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
395
389
358
348
298
245
245
245
245
245
245
245
245
East Midlands – Building Capability Amongst Our People
We are already working across all levels of our people on the route to improve the capability of our individuals and teams and this is summarised below.
As part of our ongoing efforts to up-skill displaced frontline Maintenance and Operations staff, we are working with Derby College to offer places on their basic level ITC accredited course. Our
Maintenance Team Leaders will be benefiting from external training provider Benchmark to develop a route specific training programme. The course will be based on the highly successful people
leadership programme (PLP) and a pilot is due to run in February 2012 with a wider roll out to follow by mid 2012.The Route Succession Plan is reviewed on a regular basis looking at individual
development plans. High potential managers continue to be nominated for the Stepping Stones, Business and Senior Leaders programmes and we are working with Sheffield Hallam University
to provide places on the HNC programme for our Apprentices.
Network Rail
50
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Asset Management Plan
East Midlands Route Plan
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Asset Management overview
Electrification of East Midlands route between Bedford, Corby,
Nottingham and Sheffield creates a step-change in our asset
management strategy. This once in a generation opportunity drives
interaction between all engineering disciplines and in many cases
changes our plans enabling the best system whole life cost solution to
be realised.
Activities
The most significant changes in our renewals plans are:
 The acceleration of signalling renewals plans in the Leicester area adding a significant
work load into CP5 to facilitate major capacity schemes required to meet HLOS outputs. By
collating all the signal engineering elements of each enhancement, including electrification,
we will create one signalling work package that delivers the signalling outputs of many
schemes. We will achieve a reduced overall cost and reduce the deliverability risk associated
with many schemes impacting the same signalling control area.
 The structures work bank in CP5 will change to include a suite of bridge reconstructions
enabling electrification gauge clearance. Early reconstruction to electrification and W10/W12
gauge clearance will pave the way for overhead line construction.
 Our track work bank will see track lowering schemes where it is feasible to achieve the
required clearance without structure reconstruction. Due to the cost, duration and complexity
of structure reconstruction track lowering is the preferred option where the resultant
configuration is sustainable for the future.
Our ambition to move over 90% of operational control into the Rail Operating Centre at Derby
is supported by the NOS work bank and influences most of the signalling renewals in the
control period. We will re-control as we resignal Leicester, the lines East of Nottingham and the
Derby-Stoke line. Derby is not scheduled for resignalling, but will be recontrolled when the
central interlocking is renewed in CP5 and Derby station junctions will be remodelled.
Network Rail
52
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Track
The main lines on East Midlands Route were nearly all converted from
Jointed Track to Continuous Welded Rail (CWR) in the late 1960s and
early 1970s and as a consequence of this approximately 23% of all rail
is pre 1976 in age with around a third of this being on the main lines.
Most of the original ballast remains and the rail and the sleepers are approaching the end of
their life cycle. Despite the predominant age of the asset, performance has been strong. With
most of the asset now at or beyond expected service life, intervention is required to prevent
performance deterioration.
Away from main lines, the track is predominately Continuously Welded Rail (CWR) with
pockets of jointed track. The age of the asset is sustainable by following track policy, but the
population of pre 76 rail is having an impact in terms of defects and rail breaks.
Track asset
Current %
composition
CWR
84.10%
Jointed Track
15.61%
CEN 60
5.77%
CP4 Strategy
In order to address the large population of 1960s / 70s track on main line routes, the latter
years of the CP4 strategy have focused on strategic renewal using High Output. 2013/14
delivery year continues this, with High Output ballast cleaning and High Output track relaying
forming the majority of the work bank.
Any mainline work that can not be treated by ‘high output’, such as formation failures, have
been accounted for via conventional methods. Away from the main lines, routes are to be
treated by refurbishment and life extension methods, with particular focus on eliminating
remaining jointed track.
Network Rail
Output Objectives
Our primary output objective is to deliver the required level of asset availability and
performance for the lowest whole life cost. Our key performance indicators are those feeding
into the Track Asset Stewardship Indicator, which is an amalgamation of various metrics
including, but not limited to: number of broken rails, poor and good track geometry, track
quality measures and track Wrong Side Failures.
CP5 Strategy
The CP5 plan continues focus on the main lines in light of Midland Mainline linespeed
increases in CP4 and the impact of HLOS schemes in CP5, including Electrification. The plan
broadly aligns with modeled volumes which take into account traffic increases brought about by
enhancement schemes.
Away from the main lines, there is a greater focus on refurbishments, moving away from the
CP4 attitude of renewing the full asset in one mobilisation.
The majority of full renewal spend will be on criticality band 1 and 2, with the remainder being
spent on refurbishment of criticality bands 3 to 5.
Criticality Band 1
The route has requested that SRS I.01 be re-classified as a Criticality Band 1 based on the
Thameslink Traffic and line-speed increases. The aim during CP5 is to:
 Remove all pre 1976 and >700 cumulative equivalent mean gross tonnes (CEMGT) rail
 Increase the proportion of CEN60 CWR in line with asset policy
 Significantly reduce the overall age of profile of the asset
Achieving the above will reduce the requirements for maintenance intervention and track
access, while maintaining current performance parameters despite traffic increases.
The renewals will be delivered predominantly by high output ballast cleaning and high output
track relaying. Conventional methods will be used where formation renewals are required or
the high output systems can not work due to physical constraints.
53
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Criticality Band 2
The remainder of the mainlines fall into Criticality Band 2. The CP5 strategy for these routes
mirrors that of route criticality 1 above.
Criticality Bands 3 to 5
All other routes away from the main lines will be treated by life extension and refurbishment
methods. Packages of note include:
 Ballast cleaning routes affected by the Felixstowe to Nuneaton freight capacity increase
 Re-railing pre 1976 rail on routes affected by the Felixstowe to Nuneaton freight capacity
increase
CP5 Variances to Policy
An area that has impacted on the CP5 submission is the CP4 Midland Main Line linespeed
increase. In order to sustain this project, the Route has rail renewal volumes much higher than
the modeled numbers. Population of pre 1976 rail has been a cause for concern with regards
to future sustainability, and as such, the CP5 plan commits to removing this. In addition, 31
point ends of S&C have been included in the CP5 submission to remove full depth S&C on
timber layouts.
Base Plan and Investments
The base plan position assumes that there is no money spent improving the way work is
delivered and as such is the highest price submission. The base plan plus investment
submission assumes money is taken out to fund central schemes that allow work to be
delivered more efficiently. Investment schemes for Track include:
 ORBIS: better asset information to ensure work is targeted correctly.
 S&C criticality: Analyses frequency of S&C usage and identifies opportunities for
abandonment.
 Refurbishment competency and training: With CP5 emphasis on a larger refurbishment
portfolio, investment is required to enable competent delivery.
 Refurbishment delivery: Purchase of Medium Output Ballast cleaner to allow efficient
delivery of ballast refurbishment.
Network Rail
HLOS
The HLOS submission has been developed using volumes generated by a central track model.
The model calculates the volume of renewal required to sustain existing performance levels in
light of HLOS traffic increases, With the modelled volumes as a guide, an HLOS compliant
work bank for track has been developed ‘bottom up’. The work bank addresses HLOS traffic
increases, but does not identify track work directly required for scheme implementation. The
work bank contains assets that would require renewal in CP5 to maintain ‘steady state’
performance in light of traffic increases. Where coincidental synergies exist with HLOS
schemes, these have been communicated to the relevant scheme. No future work has been
accelerated, and no HLOS specific life extension work has been declared.
Efficiencies
The recognised areas for efficiency in CP5 are:
 Year volume guarantee: enabling longer term finance arrangements, procurement plans and
employment approach from our suppliers.
 Smooth midweek programme: allowing the use of permanent and dedicated resources. The
efficiencies are essentially from better utilisation of men and machines achieved through
increased midweek working
 Work packaging across CP5: Increased synergies around preparation and follow up work
created by delivering geographically aligned items together. Increased utilisation of plant etc.
 Alliance working: Reduction in the size of central track asset management through alliancing
with contractors and eliminating duplicate roles
 Safety rules challenge: Reduced mobilisation costs due to permanent teams requiring less
stringent welfare facilities. There is also a challenge to reduce the number of machine
controllers required.
 Reduced mobilisation costs due to permanent teams requiring less stringent welfare facilities
and no requirement for site access controller: Reduction in overall machine controller
numbers.
 S&C materials: Longer term contracts via National Delivery Service and more integrated
supply chain.
54
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Signalling
The signalling asset base on the East Midlands can be described as
being of three distinct types of signalling equipment.
Mechanical based signalling
This is typically comprised of a mechanical signal box with lever frame as the interlocking,
controlling trackside equipment including semaphore signals through physical linkages. This
type of equipment can be found on the rural routes between Nottingham–Newark, Nottingham–
Grantham, Derby–Stoke and Syston–Peterborough.
Relay based signalling
This is typically comprised of a combined push button control panel with indications housed in
a signal box with a relay based interlocking controlling electrical operated lineside equipment.
This type of equipment is in widespread use throughout the route.
Electronic based signalling
This is typically comprised of a VDU monitor and control screen housed in a Signalling Centre
with a SSI or advanced computer based interlocking controlling electrical operating lineside
equipment. This type of equipment has been brought into use by recent re-signalling projects
principally in the St Pancras area, Erewash Valley and Robin Hood Lines.
In addition to the types of signalling equipment described above there are a considerable
number of active level crossings on the route (total of 93) of which around 40% are of the
automatic control type.
East Midlands Control Centre
The East Midlands Control Centre (EMCC) is one of the major operating control centres on the
route being brought into use in 2008. As part of the National Operating Strategy Derby EMCC
is to become one of the modern Rail Operating Centres (ROC) – currently there are around a
further 30 control points (Control Centres, Power Signal Boxes and Mechanical Signal Boxes)
on the route.
Across the route the signalling asset condition is on average 60% of the way through its
nominal life with age varying between the northern sections around 20% of the way through
their nominal life and some branch lines have a figure closer to 80% of the way through their
nominal life.
Across the route the asset condition of level crossing is similar to that of signalling equipment
having a figure of around 60% of the way through its nominal life.
Signalling asset performance
A small number of signalling systems are becoming increasingly difficult to maintain, mainly
through the lack of available spares or from the scarcity of specialised staff resources.
Some examples of this are;
 Obsolescence of some types of Level Crossing Equipment, i.e. Western Region and BR Mk1
barrier machines.
 Obsolescence of some types of signalling electronic control equipment, i.e. Westone
transmission systems.
 Scarcity of specialised staff to undertake work on mechanical signalling equipment
In general asset performance is dealt with through the route reliability programme involving
specific maintenance initiatives supported by targeted low level renewal work.
Delivery plan for final years of CP4
Signalling renewal work in the final years of CP4 includes the following significant projects:
 Leicester Re-lock
 Nottingham Resignalling
 Renewal of a number of Level Crossings
In addition to the above projects a number of targeted minor works shall be delivered by the
route maintenance organisation. This work shall life-extend the existing signalling infrastructure
improving the reliability and availability of the network.
Signalling Asset Age and condition
On the Midland Main Line, the installation of signalling equipment in the Derby area dates
back to the late 1960s the Leicester area to the mid 1980s and the West Hampstead area
to the late 1970s.
In general the signalling equipment on the branch lines is of a much earlier vintage although
various degrees of life extension work has taken place over the years.
Network Rail
55
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Key local issues influences the plan
When to renew the assets is driven by three key factors;
 Condition of asset
 Business drivers (e.g. centralisation of control)
 Synergies with other works (where accelerated renewals provide opportunities for enhanced
output and/or more efficient delivery)
The main driver for renewals on the route during CP5 is the condition of the asset.
While undertaking these renewals opportunity is being taken to align with the operating
strategy of consolidating operational control of the network into a smaller number of modern
operating centres.
This approach is resulting in modular signalling schemes being developed for the routes
branch lines which renews the signalling equipment in modern form and allows closure of
mechanical signal boxes while transferring control to Derby EMCC. This approach also eases
the problem of access to the specialised staff who work on mechanical signalling equipment.
Embedded in the modular signalling projects is the renewal/reconfiguration of level crossing
within the specific routes.
Variances to application of policy
The signalling work bank has been generated with strict adherence to national policy.
Work Profile Deliverability reviews with Infrastructure Projects have shaped the spending
profile of the routes signalling renewal business plan optimising the smoothness of the delivery
of the work. In essence the forecast spend in year 14/15 is £32.6m reaching a peak of £45.1m
in 16/17 before reducing to a value of £12.3m in year 18/19. Planned efficiency is incorporated
into the contract unit rates agreed with our delivery partner. The efficiencies are based on a
number of assumptions which generally fall into the following categories:
 Technical innovation
 Process improvements
 Contracting Framework cost reductions
Outwith the areas where modular signalling schemes are being delivered a number of level
crossings are being planned for renewal. This renewal plan shall have the added benefit of
converting the routes populations of obsolete Western Region and BR Mk1 style level crossing
equipment into a more modern form.
Renewals on the route are aligned with the national deployment plans for the introduction of
ERTMS on the network.
Summary of activity
Key activities are as follows:
 Recontrol of Derby PSB into Derby EMCC
 Relock of Derby PSB interlocking in electronic form, transferring to Derby EMCC
 Resignalling of Derby Station area in conjunction with project to remodel the layout
 External refurbishment of signalling equipment on various sections of the network controlled
from Derby EMCC
 Resignalling of the Syston–Peterborough in conjunction with the Felixstowe to Nuneaton
project
 Modular re-signalling of Nottingham–Newark, Nottingham–Grantham and, Derby–Stoke,
lines
 Resignalling of Alrewas, Fine Lane and Rodidge
 Renewal of a number of Level Crossings
 Various targeted minor works renewal items
Network Rail
56
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Geo-technical assets (Earthworks)
Our Geotechnical plans include the refurbishment and renewal of
earthworks across the East Midlands route.
Earthworks
Earthworks are generally the oldest and most variable assets on the railway network; often
being formed manually or constructed with lightweight compaction plant over 120 years ago.
The geology of the East Midlands Route is complex, ranging between Carbonifierous coal
bearing measures and limestones in Derbyshire and East Staffordshire, to Quaternary and
recent drift deposits of the north London area.
Geotechnical assets comprise a total of 665 miles of earthworks, comprising embankments,
soil cuttings and rock cuttings. The earthworks are categorised as Poor (2.1%), Marginal
(34.5%) or Serviceable (63.4%) condition based on the results of regular hazard based visual
examinations or intrusive investigation and monitoring. East Midlands is on target to deliver
CP4 Earthwork and Drainage renewal outputs. An additional programme to deliver soil and
rock cutting risk reduction sites and tunnel drainage sites as enhanced spend is scheduled for
delivery by the end of CP4.
Wholesale replacement of earthworks is generally impractical, and works are usually restricted
to protection of the existing earthwork from the effects of outside influences such as weather,
flood, historical mining or vermin. Interventions will be sustainable, efficient and will deliver
lowest whole life cost solutions. Intervention modes are, in order of reducing cost per unit
length, renew (i.e. strengthen rather than replace), refurbish, maintain and monitor.
The Asset Management Policy aim for CP5 is to maintain the overall condition of the
earthworks within the Route through each control period. Interventions are targeted to improve
or maintain the condition of assets, or to remediate failed assets which affect or are likely to
affect safety or performance, to balance the affects of deterioration on the remainder of the
asset population.
that the use of targeted earthwork refurbishment and steady state maintenance regimes can be
used confidently within EM. Significant investment is anticipated within EM Route during CP5,
specifically electrification of the Midland Mainline. It is anticipated that changes to the
earthwork and drainage portfolio will be delivered as a result of these works, which will improve
the overall condition portfolio, but these cannot be quantified at this time.
There are currently 225 potential shallow mine working hazard sites identified on the EM route,
forming around 5% of the national mining hazard. These comprise a mixture of old shafts,
galleries, mine roadways and adits passing beneath or within the zone of influence of the line.
The risks associated with shallow mine workings together with ongoing and future mining and
quarrying are managed by the Principal Mining Engineer who advises the route on proactive
investigations and, where necessary, the treatment of identified workings and voids. The EM
route has identified the requirement to undertake heavy investment in earthworks related
drainage activities through CP5, particularly around tunnels, their approaches and along the
crest of cuttings as a risk reduction and performance improvement initiative.
Significant work will be required through to the end of CP4 to identify the potential impact of
earthwork and drainage condition on delivering the HLOS outputs. Key areas of concern are
the potential requirement to widen embankments and cuttings to allow for additional tracks,
allowance for electrification, track lowering schemes to provide gauge clearance at structures,
and minor works to earthworks to provide safety refuges in areas where line speeds are to be
enhanced.
Over 95% of earthworks refurbishment and renewals are delivered via Infrastructure Projects
or by the EM Route Buildings and Civils Team (Minor Works). Efficient delivery and appropriate
packaging of works will drive the efficiency plan for earthworks. Centrally driven efficiencies
and improvements within Asset Management and data handling are unlikely to yield significant
financial efficiencies.
The SBP submission of £27.2m compares to a revised IIP figure of £22.95m. The SBP
submission is broadly in alignment with national policy in respect of the trend to concentrate on
maintenance works. The route plans to undertake slightly more renewal and less refurbishment
work due to the number of sites requiring renewal works within the lower criticality bands.
The overall balance and volume of works is consistent with improvement outputs indicated by
the policy. The costs of renewals are significantly greater than refurbishment; resulting in target
costs in line with IIP but delivering less overall asset improvement. The rationale behind this is
risk reduction and percentage reduction in Poor earthworks within CP5, irrespective of line
criticality. Further work will also be required to refine the Nationally modelled degradation rates
through the control period; backed up by more extensive asset examination knowledge in order
Network Rail
57
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Structures
The structures plan represents a significant increase over the IIP
however this aligns with the top down model; this recognises the major
issues and scale of the challenge within the structures portfolio.
Over many years the portfolio has been managed in decline, leaving the structures operating
close to their limit. As a result higher intensity examination regimes and/or load and speed
restrictions have been applied to many structures. The route submission adopts the new policy
and aims to achieve an improving state position over two control periods representing a
sustainable plan. The submission significantly increases spend on minor refurbishment and
preventative works as well as on renewal and major refurbishment.
Structures asset portfolio for East Midlands
Total 2753
Overline Bridge
815
Underline Bridge
390
Culverts
919
Retaining Walls
501
Footbridges
91
Tunnels
37
Included in the above numbers are eight major structures in East Midlands which are large,
unique and require specific management plans: Harpers Brook, Harringworth Viaduct,
Mansfield Viaduct, Trent Viaduct Fasts, Welsh Harp Viaduct, Wichnor Viaduct, Wichnor
Viaduct. (River Trent/Tame), Chiltern Green Viaduct Slow Lines.
Summary of structures activity
The policy for CP5 is to optimise interventions and carry out the works required to maintain or
achieve the required capability and to plan future interventions resulting in smaller work items
over a larger number of assets. This is a change from previous policy which aimed to carry out
more extensive interventions on a smaller asset population. The route submission aligns with
policy and lowest whole life cost. The submission has been built up from ‘bottom up’ as follows:
 The unconstrained work items from CARRS
 The principle load bearing element BCMI score
 The assessed capacity whether marginal or discrepancy
 The scour score
The final volumes and cost have subsequently been reviewed against the modelled numbers
and other routes to align and rationalise nationally managed/delivered work.
Network Rail
The above criteria are aligned with the track route category, to determine the level of
interventions. The new policy drives significantly greater spend on maintenance to achieve and
sustain a steady state position giving rise to a significant increase in minor works spend from
CP4. Historically the minor works spend has been determined on an emerging basis, the top
down model provides an estimate of predicted spend to meet policy and has been adopted for
the CP5 submission. Overall the business plan will retain current condition and capability
through CP5 and start to arrest the decline enabling a steady state, sustainable plan to be
adopted into future control periods.
Issues influencing the plan
The Electric spine within the HLOS will impact the management strategy of tunnels on the
route. These tunnels are subject to a rolling programme of works to keep them in a satisfactory
condition. The introduction of electrification will make access for these works more difficult and
hazardous. In addition to this, water management in tunnels post electrification will become
much more critical. As such a new management strategy will be adopted which will see the
condition of the structures raised over the control period so that post electrification, fewer
interventions are required.
Delivery plan for the final year for CP4
The workbank for the final year of CP4 will be delivered through a combination of Infrastructure
Projects and Maintenance and consists of the following:
 Renewals Items – £2.8
 Minor Works – £6.5m
 Other Structures Programmes – £3.4m
The minor works plan and renewals plan have been increased from the Live Business Plan in
13/14 by £5.5m and £2m respectively to reflect the change in policy which is to be
implemented immediately.
The plan will support the Network Rail corporate objectives through adequate:
 Capability – “The ability of the assets to bear load, pass gauge and allow line speed or
available traction power”
 Safety – “The protection from, or not being exposed to, the risk of harm or injury from the
infrastructure”
 Availability – “The ability of a route to perform its required function at a given time, or over a
period of time”.
 Efficiency – “The application of these outputs using lowest whole life cost wherever
possible”.
58
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
The output objectives will be measured against the following proposed Measures and
indicators which have been developed in the centre:
Corporate
objective
Name
Type
CP5 Measure
Capability
RA Licensed vs
RA Actual
Non-regulatory
output measure
The number of assets within utilisation
categories D to F.
Safety
Bridge PLBE
Condition Banding
Profile
Regulatory Output
Measure
Number of PLBE with BCMI scores 040 to reduce during CP5.
Structural
Stewardship
Indicator
NR KPI (to be
developed)
Composite measure that comprises:
the number of emergency renewals
and the number of assets with
utilisation categories D to F.
Tunnel Major
Element Condition
Banding Profile
Non-regulatory
output measure
The number of Major elements with
TCMI scores in defined bands:
0-40
41-80
81-100
Number of visual
Non-regulatory
on-site inspections output measure
overdue
The number of visual examinations
exceeding the timescales set out in
the appropriate standard. Note this
measures items overdue planned
dates but still compliant.
Number of
detailed on-site
inspections
overdue
Non-regulatory
output measure
The number of detailed examinations
exceeding the timescales set out in
the appropriate standard. Note this
measures items overdue planned
dates but still compliant.
Bridge Strikes
Non-regulatory
output measure
Delay Minutes attributed to Bridge
Strikes in CP5 should be less than
CP4. The NBSI will have been
prioritised and completed.
Availability
Network Rail
Variances to application of policy
The only variance in application of national policy is regarding vegetation clearance and
painting. Painting is only called for by the policy in the ‘do minimum’ or ‘managed’ intervention
scenarios when there is section loss or when 50% of the painting is failed. However the route
has taken a view that it will manage structures at a lower condition, meaning that planned
preventative maintenance is more critical, which is why all bridges no matter what the route
criticality, have been included in the painting programme.
The same is true for the vegetation clearance. The policy calls for bridges in the ‘managed’
intervention scenario to only have vegetation removed prior to a detailed exam. However we
have not discriminated against any bridge for vegetation clearance on the grounds of route
criticality.
The work will be delivered equally throughout the control period to ensure supplier resource is
effectively utilised.
Description of efficiency plans that impact on the work plan
The national structures efficiencies have been adopted and these are realised either
progressively through the control period or immediately as depicted below.
Efficiencies have been applied with central guidance on the achievable percentage efficiency
but taking account of the specific circumstances to East Midlands to give a CP5 outturn
efficiency of 10%.
59
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Buildings
Our asset management policy dictates that we will intervene when
justified by technical risk, business risk, asset criticality, customer
imperative or a combination of all four. Our interventions will be
sustainable, efficient and deliver lowest whole life cost solutions as
directed in national policy guidelines.
The development of CP5 work banks has produced a greater emphasis on targeted
refurbishment and maintenance activity to achieve a sustained condition. Our proposed CP5
investment in stations, depots and line side buildings is comparable to that in CP4. There is an
increase in asset inventory when compared to CP4 for example; there is a portfolio of NDS
sites which was transferred to Asset Management during CP4, additional FTN line side
buildings, increased numbers of lifts, escalators and platform extensions.
Improved asset knowledge and increased visibility of condition of Maintenance Delivery Units
has demonstrated the need to invest in refurbishing car parks, meeting power demand,
refurbishing drainage and repairing dilapidated premises.
We are working closer with our customers to jointly optimise renewal and maintenance effort
and target our work at sites where we will see maximum improvements in safety and
performance. A pilot project targeting efficiencies in delivery of improved customer service and
station maintenance has been trialled with First Capital Connect.
Current Condition
The overall condition of our franchised stations – as reported by the Station Stewardship
Measure (SSM) – is steadily improving across all station categories.
This is due to a combination of factors, including:
 Improved station surveying: more accurate capture of asset remaining life and risk data
 Cumulative beneficial effect of CP4 customer-focused enhancement projects (NSIP etc.)
 Effective asset stewardship.
 The better and improving condition of peripheral assets is masking condition of key assets.
This skews SSM due to the inadequate weighting between short and long life assets.
Network Rail
For line-side buildings and other assets where asset data is unavailable, technical risk is
determined by the criticality of the route served and the importance and sensitivity of the
equipment housed therein.
Critical assets in the route include:
 The East Midlands Control Centre at Derby
 Power Signal Boxes (PSBs) at Derby and West Hampstead
 Category B stations at St Albans, Luton, Nottingham, Leicester and Derby
 Light Maintenance Depots (LMDs) at Etches Park (Derby) and Eastcroft (Nottingham)
The Average Risk Score (ARS) is used to understand the asset criticality rating in terms of
safety and performance. ARS is a score of the consequence of asset failure.
Reports of safety-related events on buildings and civil engineering infrastructure, and other
reactive fault measures (TSRs, defects, reactive faults etc.) will be used carefully to identify
defects and determine their influence on safety and performance. The number and type of
events can be used as a measure to understand the effectiveness of maintenance and
management strategies.
Existing policy to end of CP4
The policy in CP4 was set to deliver sustained asset condition by application of generic
parameters to deliver the required outputs.
A total of £2 million is to be delivered over the next 18 months. The remaining schemes left to
deliver and hence achieve the control period objectives have been developed and are
programmed for completion by the end of the final year of CP4 (2013/14). These comprise a
small number of footbridge refurbishments and several minor platform improvements.
60
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Alignment of National and Route strategies for improved reliability and safety
performance
National policies for each Buildings asset group are constrained by a set of thresholds. These
thresholds have been established through top-down modelling and provide parameters by
which the routes are to adopt one of three intervention strategies; maintain, refurbish or renew.
These parameters are measures called Asset Risk Score (ARS) and Percentage Asset
Remaining Life (PARL). The Buildings condition and risk data base is known as OPAS and
holds values of both PARL and ARS for each asset, their key and non-key components,
elements and attributes.
ARS is an impact of failure score derived from an algorithm that comprises impact on
performance and safety. Each carry equal weighting and are recorded by competent surveyors
through annual visual and five yearly detailed examinations. These formal examinations are
undertaken for all franchised stations, franchised light maintenance depots, managed stations
and some critical line side buildings such as power signal boxes. These assets contribute to
80% of maintenance, refurbishment and renewal spend for the Buildings asset group.
Other assets, such as line-side buildings, National Delivery Service facilities (NDS) and
Maintenance Delivery Units (MDUs) rely on user, occupier and asset manager inspections.
There is a plan to populate OPAS with all these asset groups and commence recording key
data such as PARL via the reporting Planned Preventative Maintenance, PPM, which is
undertaken annually. PPM is a light-touch good house keeping programme for which there is a
national specification instructed to the Property Works Team. It comprises for example, such
activities as clearing drains, fixing door hinges, clearing vegetation and touching up paintwork.
The table shows a summary of thresholds for each asset type as defined in the IIP submission
to the ORR in September 2011. They are further enhanced by the application of local factors
that affect business risk and shape bottom-up work banks.
Intervention thresholds
Key Asset
Station Buildings
Station Canopies
Station Footbridges
Station Platforms
Station Trainsheds
LMD Buildings
LMD Sheds
MDU Buildings
NDS Buildings
Critical L/sides Buildings
Non-critical L/side Buildings
M&E Distribution Plant
Access routes
Apron/Hard Standing
Car Parks
Concourse
Subway
Waiting Shelters
PARL%
ARS
3
13
20
13
10
5
5
10
10
20
5
5
10
10
10
10
10
10
3.50
3.50
3.00
3.75
0.00
2.00
2.00
1.50
1.50
1.50
3.50
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
Route asset management for the franchised estate and managed stations is delivered by
consideration of both business risk and technical risk.
Network Rail
61
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Electrification and plant
E&P assets are effectively separated into three distinct elements;
overhead line, distribution, and plant.
Overhead Line
The southern section of the route, between Bedford and St. Pancras, was electrified in the
early 1980’s with a 25Kv Mk 3b OHL system which is still in use today. In line with current
asset policy the route has had little significant renewal in the intervening period with the
exception of the works at St Pancras to accommodate the connection to European traffic and
the ongoing Thameslink Project. The OHL system comprises of some 330+ wire runs, 16
neutral sections and 217 switches spread over 34 electrical sections. There has been a recent
increase in ancillary assets with the TLP project installation of an Auto Transformer system
over the area from Kentish Town to Borehamwood.
The overall condition of the existing OHL necessitates some half-life works to prepare the
asset for 125mph running and new rolling stock post electrification of the route north of
Bedford. It is normal for newly installed OHL equipment to have the potential to stretch in the
early years of its life and it is this movement that is planned to be addressed via creep recovery
works. The current asset is not due any other major renewals under asset policy and are
performing well in terms of delay causing incidents. During the remainder of CP4 we are
undertaking considerable work in the core area (Dock Junction to Farringdon) to facilitate the
strengthening of the OHL system in anticipation of the increase in traffic patterns the 2018
timetable changes will bring.
Distribution – These assets only serve the currently electrified route.
With the exception of a number of assets installed as part of the Auto Transformer works the
remainder of the asset portfolio is approaching 30 years old and consists broadly of the
following: 77 circuit breakers with the 1980’s (x 45) vintage being SMOS Vacuum and the
newer units being Siemens SF6 (x 32), 99 transformers including booster transformers,
isolating transformers and AT feed units along with Scada units and various HV feeder cables.
None of the installed assets are planned to be renewed in the control period as they are
currently in good condition, performing well and operating in line with the expectations of the
relevant sections of asset policy. The standard cyclic maintenance activities are expected to be
enough intervention to ensure that asset performance levels can be maintained at a suitable
level throughout the control period.
Network Rail
Plant
Unlike the OHL and Distribution assets the Plant assets are spread far and wide across the
whole East Midlands route. The overall range of asset types is of a greater scale than the asset
groups associated with electrification. The plant assets in question consist of the following
types and volumes: 842 heated point ends, 43 Power Supply Points/Signalling Supply Points,
179 signalling feeder power cables, 475 DNO installations, 145 lighting installations, 6 pump
installations and 1 Panchex & Wheelchex site.
The asset age profile across the route is varied and the assets are currently performing well
even though some are in the second half of their asset life. The CP5 renewals planned are in
line with asset policy to ensure that the assets continue to perform at the current, satisfactory
level. It is expected that maintenance attention and minor renewal treatment will ensure that
the assets continue to and provide the performance levels expected through the control period.
The one exception to the current performance levels being acceptable and that is a number of
signalling power feeder cables that are failing at a higher than acceptable rate. In the
remainder of CP4 we will introduce a more pro-active testing regime followed up with selective
renewal of the highest priority individual cables.
The following works are currently ongoing within the CP4 plan, across the electrified route, and
will be completed before the control period end:
 Core OLE strengthening works in the south of the route that are being delivered by
Thameslink
 Structure renewals being delivered by the Asset Management team
 Middle line insulator renewals being delivered by the Asset Management team
A high level review of planned renewal in CP5 is shown below:
 DNO supply x 1
 OHL structures x 36
 Booster transformers x 3
 Neutral sections x 16
 Points heating x 87 ends
 UPS mid life refurbishment x 23
 Signalling power cable x 99km
 Walkway lighting x 1
 Level crossing lighting x 2
 OHL wire run creep recovery x 280
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Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Telecoms
Network Services
Network services on the route are provided by a mixture of Legacy Transmission, Fixed
Telecoms Network (FTN) Infrastructure with some moderate use of leased services. Older
legacy transmission is currently present in a variety of forms which support the majority of the
transmission requirements on the route and will be migrated to the FTN when available. The
FTN system will form the backbone of the new network services that will support GSMR and
ultimately the new signalling control including the future ERTMS system. The FTN network has
a high level of reliability, availability and provides 24/7 Network Management from a central
location in Stoke.
Railway Operational Telecommunications
Telephony
Operational telephony is provided at East Midlands Control Centre (EMCC) via a Siemens HiPath solution. This is the main site in the East Midlands with additional local signal boxes in the
area using STS Intertec systems. West Hampstead PSB operational telephony is provided by a
distributed STS Intertec system incorporating 9 remote nodes. Electrical Control for the route is
provided from York ECR and the operational telephony for this location is provided by a
Syntegra PABX.
Voice Recording
All operational voice communications via both telephone and radio are recorded. These assets
will be maintained, faulted and renewed by the maintainer in line with asset policy on an
ongoing basis.
Operational Radio
Services are provided by Cab Secure Radio (CSR) and National Radio Network (NRN).
GSM-R infrastructure is operational on the majority of the route, with East Midlands Trains
equipped with GSM-R radios. The remaining sections of the route are due to be completed
by December 2013.
Level crossing Communications
Automatic Half Barrier (AHB) crossings are present on the route and these are provided with
Whitley Public Emergency Telephone System (PETS) technology. User Worked Crossings
(UWC) are provided with direct telephony to their controlling signal box where deemed
required.
Driver Only Operation Closed Circuit Television (DOO CCTV)
There are currently 13 DOO CCTV systems in operation with colour TFT displays. These have
recently been renewed and are at the early stages of their service life.
Network Rail
SISS Assets
The station information and surveillance systems (SISS) assets on the route are of different
manufacture and at various stages through their service life. The majority of stations served by
East Midlands Trains (EMT) have a Public Address (PA), Customer Information System (CIS)
displays and CCTV present. A high percentage of these SISS assets have either been
replaced recently or due to be replaced by the end of control period 4 as part of a two stage
renewal project. The majority of these assets are owned by Network Rail, with some being
owned by EMT. The other stations on the route are served by FCC and all have CIS, PA and
CCTV present. The CIS displays are mid way through their service life, with the majority of the
PA equipment coming to the end and CCTV assets half way through their service life. These
assets are of mixed ownership between Network Rail and FCC. The DfT is currently
negotiating future changes to asset responsibility for SISS assets when new franchises are
awarded. SISS assets may therefore be handed over to the Franchise Operator and
responsibility in terms of ownership, faulting, maintenance, repair and renewal will reside with
the TOC.
Delivery Plan for Final Year CP4
Schemes being delivered in the final year of CP4 include East Midlands Trains SISS renewals,
Cable Route renewals and Voice Recorder and associated power renewals.
Output Objectives
The Asset Stewardship Indicator is used as the specific indicator for Network Rail Telecoms. It
combines observed condition of telecoms assets and the number of telecoms failures that
cause delay in excess of ten minutes. This KPI is used for scoring Telephone Concentrators.
CP5 Scope of Works
Major schemes being delivered in CP5 are CCTV renewals at East Midland Trains stations,
SISS renewals at First Capital Connect stations and Public Emergency Telephony System
including associated power renewals at AHB crossings.
Efficiencies
The telecoms asset management team is carrying out targeted renewals throughout CP5 and
continues to reduce asset risk by migrating, where possible, circuits onto FTN cable and
transmission where life expired systems exist. The Telecoms Decision Support Tool (DST)
assists in this process by allowing engineers to score individual assets and to build effective
work packages.
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Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Level Crossings
Level Crossing Closure is the preferred option for all crossings, if
closure is not possible MCB-OD is the second option, however if the
crossing does not meet the criteria required for MCB-OD then MCBCCTV to be installed.
There are 93 level crossings with associated signalling equipment on the route varying
between hand operated wooden gates to MCB (CCTV). Approximately 50% of the level
crossings are Automatic (AHBC/ABCL/MSL) with the remaining 50% requiring some form of
manual operation (MGH/MCB). There are also a large number of UWC‘s fitted with telephones
that are monitored by the respective signal boxes and as such impact upon the signaller’s
workload.
Across the route the asset condition of the level crossings is similar to that of the signalling
interlockings, circa 60% of the way through their nominal life. The asset age profile will be
improved by level crossing upgrades/life extension works and renewals as well as the
implementation of modular re-signalling on the rural routes and the associated introduction of
MCB-OD level crossings.
The route has identified 52 level crossings where the current level of performance requires
intervention. We have developed an action plan to improve performance at these crossings
through various intervention options including: road/path diversion and level crossing closure,
bridge installation and closure or change to use of the level crossing, provision of Miniature
Warning Lights, and minor works enhancements throughout the remainder of CP4 and CP5.
The level crossing policy requires a crossing to be assessed before a renewal takes place to
see if it can be closed. If closure is not possible, a suitable and sufficient risk assessment must
be carried out to decide how the crossing should be renewed. The renewal decision will be
based on the results of this risk assessment, on the asset condition and on other factors such
as the NOS relevant to the crossing.
Partial level crossing renewals are not included within the full workbank as they are difficult to
predict in the longer term. Obsolete barriers type are the main risk on the route. A number of
BR MKI are planned to be renewed in CP4 or CP5.
Renewal policy has three key aspects to it:
 Condition of the asset;
 Business drivers (e.g. for centralisation of control);
 Synergies with other works (where accelerated renewals provide opportunities for enhance
output and/or more efficient delivery.
Network Rail
The scope of what to renew is generally limited to the individual components that need
renewal. However the scope of renewal can be expanded where justified by improved outputs
and/or increased delivery efficiency.
What to renew with is somewhat dependant on the scope of the renewal. Small scale renewals
(e.g. individual component renewals) will renew in a modern equivalent form (e.g. LED road
signal for a lamp road signal). Where the scope of renewal is larger improvements to the
overall configuration will be made.
Level crossing renewals on the route will be predominantly delivered in connection with the
planned Modular Re-signalling of the Nottingham to Newark, Nottingham to Grantham, Derby
to Stoke and Syston to Peterborough Lines. The preferred type of level crossing for the existing
manually controlled crossings is MCB-OD as this aligns with the Network Operating Strategy
(NOS) although the overall decision criteria in order of preference for shall be; closure, bridge,
downgrade or convert to MCB-OD. It is also planned to close the existing L.C. at Trent Lane
and Sneinton as part of the Nottingham Station Re-signalling Project.
Existing AHBC’s shall be considered for like-for-like renewal subject to rigorous full and
substantial risk assessment including a review of the ALCRM score. Any level crossings where
the ALCRM score for collective risk is 1 or 2 has significantly increased may have to be
considered for upgrading. The requirement to transfer the monitoring/supervisory point of the
User Worked Crossings currently provided with telephones shall be assessed with regard to
ergonomics and signaller workload.
In addition to these renewals, there are also a number of standalone renewals, including those
at Spondon MCB CCTV, Brooksby, Rearsby, Broome Lane, Asfordby and Sutton Forest
AHBC’s, which are being developed by the Level Crossing Specialist Team (LC NST).
Minor Works
In addition to the major renewals schemes listed above, there are also a substantial number of
targeted minor works projects, delivered by the maintenance organisation. These projects are
predominantly “like-for-like” renewals which assist in improving the reliability and availability of
the network.
Minor Works projects include:
 Level Crossings Barrier Pedestal Renewals
 Power Supply and Battery Upgrades including point batteries
 Wire Degradation Life Extension Works
 Lineside cable renewals.
 The renewal of Little Bowden MSL is also being delivered by the maintenance organisation.
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Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Other works
Moreton on Lugg mitigation works are also being undertaken at five level crossings on the
route as part of a national project.
There is also a project to upgrade the “Another Train Coming” audible warnings at seven
automatic level crossings on the route to allow a spoken word warning to be delivered to the
user in addition to the more familiar warbling tone.
The East Midlands route has 47 level crossings which are identified as high risk by the
Operations Risk Team. The risk assessment was based on ALCRM score, crossings with
insufficient sighting, history of near misses and fatalities and risk judgement. Each crossing has
an action plan showing risk and mitigations.
This table is a summary of the types of level crossing and associated risk categories.
Risk Category
Type of
Crossing
B2
B3
C1
C2
ABCL
C3
D2
D3
1
E2
AHB
2
AHB-X
1
Barrow
1
E3
1
4
2
2
2
3
1
FPS
3
2
2
1
5
4
1
1
MCB
1
SPC
1
UWCT
Network Rail
1
1
FPWM
Total
G3
1
FPK
FPW
G2
1
CCTV
FPG
F2
3
1
1
1
1
12
11
4
5
1
3
4
1
1
65
Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Drainage assets
The Route Asset Manager (Geotechnics) has responsibility for the
refurbishment and renewal of all Network Rail owned off-track
drainage, whilst day-to-day maintenance of both track and off-track
drainage is managed by the route Maintenance Delivery Units
(MDU’s).
The Integrated Drainage Project (IDP), a national programme to record the presence and
condition of all of the Network Rail drainage systems, is currently being undertaken. A
completed asset register, including condition and serviceability data, will assist with the
creation of a management tool, due to be completed by end of CP4. The first part of the tool
will load the drainage asset information into the Ellipse maintenance scheduling system by the
end of 2012. Further work will be required through CP4 and into CP5 to determine a drainage
Asset Policy and Drainage Asset Management Plans (DAMPs) and allow maintenance and
renewal efforts to be targeted to critical systems.
The RAM(G) holds detailed examination records for approximately 30% of the EM Route,
undertaken prior to commencement of the IDP programme. The surveys demonstrate that the
condition of drainage nodes is Good (40%), Fair (26%) and Poor, or collapsed and in need of
repair, (6%) with a further 28% requiring further detail to allow complete classification.
Currently all drainage CP4 Business Plan schemes, including those within the Enhanced
Spend and Risk Reduction programmes are on-target for completion by the end of the control
period.
EM Route has identified specific drainage projects over and above the National Drainage
Policy and aims to accelerate and undertake these works within CP5 rather than across
several Control Periods. Targeted works include, preparing Route Drainage Asset
Management Plans; preparing 3 yearly cyclic drainage inspection schedules; maintaining and
refurbishing drainage around tunnel portals; maintaining cutting crest drains and establishing
annual drainage maintenance budgets.
100% of drainage renewals are delivered via Infrastructure Projects and by the EM Route
Buildings and Civils Team (Minor Works) teams. Efficient delivery and packaging of schemes
will drive the efficiency plan for drainage. Centrally driven efficiencies and improvements within
Asset Management and data handling including the completion of the IDP, and population of
drainage systems into the Ellipse system, will significantly improve maintenance work
scheduling efficiency.
The condition of the structure of drainage assets is generally managed through a reactive
renewals programme for emerging and incidents. The functionality of drainage systems, i.e.
blockages to flow, is managed by Maintenance Teams. When the depot teams report a
defective drainage system which they can no longer maintain, schemes are put in place,
generally through a Minor Works programme, to renew and replace broken drainage elements
including pipes and culvert repairs. Drainage ditches, siphons and screened culverts are
cleaned, maintained and repaired to agreed drainage standards.
Network Rail
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Route Plan_East Midlands_SBP submission
Maintenance
The application of the Network Operating Strategy (NOS) as part of
our investment strategy will reduce the number of signalling control
points across the route significantly, but will increase the line side
asset and transmission equipment population across the route.
The latest modelling indicates the change from mechanical
signalling assets to electronic in modular form is cost neutral
in maintenance terms.
Investment and enhancement in CP5
Delivery of enhancements will increase the asset population in all disciplines. However, the
new infrastructure will be modern in form and careful development/design will result in little
impact on the resource needed to sustainably maintain the asset. In addition, projects will
remove a number of complex and ageing assets thereby offsetting any additional
maintenance required for the new assets.
The electrification of MML over CP5 and CP6 will significantly increase the asset population.
The increase in E&P assets will more than double the current population and the increased
traffic flow over the existing OLE system will increase the maintenance requirement. This
adds around £4.5m to the maintenance cost by end of CP5; the increase will be gradually
implemented through the control period to allow a competent and experienced resource
once the OLE is commissioned.
Efficiency in CP5
We anticipate that we can achieve a position of 14% efficiency over our CP4 exit, but this is
effectively taken back due to the additional resource requirements to manage additional
assets introduced by the Thameslink programme and electrification of the MML.
Intelligent Infrastructure has provided significant benefit in CP4 and we envisage further
gains in CP5 through Remote Condition Monitoring and initiatives like Plain Line Pattern
Recognition.
Maintenance Strategy for CP5
CP5 presents a significant challenge for maintenance. The massive expansion of electrified
railway along the Midland Mainline will not only alter the service that we offer our customers,
but will also change the available access for maintenance and renewal activities.
Network Rail
Our ambition is to meet this challenge by changing our relationship with the asset to one
that is more integrated and aligned, and working toward a position where we undertake
efficient maintenance in a more focused and targeted way. We will embrace new technology
and innovative ways of working to ensure we make full use of our resources, our expertise
and the access we have to the network.
We will cost effectively and sustainably deliver regulatory, statutory and company
compliance; whilst still providing a high level of network availability for out customers. Key
areas of maintenance focus for CP5 are:
 Embrace and embed the migration toward removal of unassisted lookouts when working
on or near the line improving both safety and productivity of our staff.
 Developing plans for critical equipment, assets and geographical areas.
 Developing our maintenance regime to a more cost/technically effective level taking into
account route and asset criticality.
 Increasing our use of Remote Condition Monitoring equipment to not only predict and
prevent failure, but to influence our targeted maintenance regime.
 Improve our understanding of the relationship between asset use, maintenance regime
and asset life, allowing us to better influence the renewals strategy.
 Provide increased workforce availability for minor works and renewals support.
 Align the maintenance plan with the minor works plans to remove wasted effort and
improve the whole life cost of managing the asset.
We will take a risk based and targeted approach to planning and delivering our maintenance
activity, taking due cognisance of:
 Anticipated future maintenance problems.
 Equipment strategies to manage obsolescence.
 Critical spares and material holdings.
 Remote Condition Monitoring and Intelligent Infrastructure.
 Impact of failure on our customers, our resources and network availability.
 Identified and anticipated vulnerability ranging from weather related incident through to
trespass, theft and vandalism.
We recognise that development of the right maintenance delivery programme is a
continuous process building on our delivery in CP4 and reacting to developing customer
requirements. Integrated work plans will align with our access plan to make the best
possible use of cyclical access to the network thereby minimising the impact on our
customers. We will be flexible and responsive in our approach to failure and develop our
plans to ensure we provide the most appropriate response, whilst prioritising safety, cost,
performance and customer reasonable requirements.
67
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Deliverability, data and
assumptions
This section summarises the key outputs, activities, risks and assumptions
behind the East Midlands Route Plan.
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Delivering CP4 & CP5 plans
The volume of work to be delivered across East Midlands Route during CP5 requires a step change in the way that work is planned to ensure the
most efficient use of available access. To achieve this a number of workstreams are already underway, not least work to integrate access with
the timetable aspirations of the TOCs. The work on Integrated Access Planning (IAP) will take a fresh look at the best pattern of access across
the Route taking account of the needs for inspection, maintenance, renewals and enhancements. The initial outputs from this project will feed into
the engineering access plan and timetable for 2014.
Maintenance Delivery
CP5 presents a significant challenge for maintenance; we will need to adapt to the new
challenges that the HLOS investment will provide. The massive expansion of electrified railway
along the Midland Mainline will not only alter the service that we offer our customers, but will
also change the available access for maintenance and renewal activities. We recognise that
development of the right maintenance delivery programme is a continuous process building on
our delivery in CP4 and reacting to developing customer requirements. Integrated work plans
will align with our access plan to make the best possible use of cyclical access to the network
thereby minimising the impact on our customers. We will be flexible and responsive in our
approach to failure and develop our plans to ensure we provide the most appropriate response,
whilst always prioritising safety, cost, performance and customer reasonable requirements.
Enhancements
The major enhancement projects for CP5 are Midland Mainline Electrification and a collection
of schemes that deliver capacity improvements. All these schemes have been developed with
out Infrastructure Projects delivery partner, both individually and as a collective to make best
use of the rolling access plan and disruptive access where this is more efficient and agreed
with our customers. Whilst the strategy for electrification construction has not been finalised at
this time both conventional and high output options have been reviewed with respect to
plant/resource availability.
Route Operating Strategy
With the opening of the East Midlands Control Centre (EMCC) in 2008 there has been some
transfer of signalling control, most notably of the Erewash Valley, Leicester and part of the
Robin Hood Line into the new facility. Before the end of CP4 the transfer of the remainder of
Trent PSB, that currently controls the Nottingham station area and three signal boxes east of
Nottingham (Netherfield Junction, Rectory Junction and Sneinton) will have been completed
and an additional workstation brought into use at the East Midlands Control Centre. This
transfer of control is planned to take place during July/August 2013 as part of the agreed 37day commissioning period. The opportunity exists to reduce East Midlands annual operating
costs by £7m per annum and deliver improved operational performance. Some enabling
elements of the strategy have been deployed in CP4 providing the capability to accelerate
renewals investments to successfully reduce opex costs.
Asset Management Renewals
The majority of asset condition related renewals activity during CP5 is relatively low level
compared to CP4 with a move toward targeted renewal/refurbishment over full renewal. The
exception to this is high output track renewal, which is significant across the control period.
National assessment of deliverability has been undertaken with the centre to ensure best use
to the high output Track Relaying Systems resulting in a phased and deliverable campaign
strategy that spans the network.
The move to targeted renewal/refurbishment requires more frequent, but shorter duration
access to the network and out integrated access planning creates midweek-night opportunities
on a rolling 1 in 6 cycle. This cycle of access facilitates maintenance, heavy maintenance,
targeted renewal and high output delivery.
It is recognised that the high level of enhancement activity on top of current railway renewals
and maintenance presents a significant challenge to us all in CP5. Our infrastructure projects
delivery partner and track delivery integrated management team will continue to work closely
with the route ensuring delivery is optimised and disruption is minimised.
Network Rail
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Table 1: Route data
Delivery Units
Route Miles
Standard Track miles
Electrified lines km
No of Tracks (Majority & [Range])
S&C units (including sidings)
2
438.3
1,090.5
380
1-4 (excluding stations.
Primarily 2
1,254
Civils assets
Critical Lineside Buildings
Signalled Level Crossings
Equated track miles
Bridges
1,301
Number of Spans
2,974
Signal Boxes
(including manned crossings)
Signal Interlockings (ex. mechanical signal boxes)
Earthworks (miles)
370
93
1,441.9
39
56
665
Station Category
Light Maintenance Depots – FCC
2
A – National hubs
1
Light Maintenance Depots – EMT
2
B – Regional hubs
1
C – Important feeders
5
Operational Buildings
Maintenance
NDS
Network Operations
RAM Signaling and Telecoms
RAM E&P
Others (including redundant buildings)
Network Rail
D – Medium-sized staffed
13
E – Small staffed
14
47
F – Small unstaffed
41
318
Managed Stations
20
3
1
15
Franchised Stations – FCC
16
249
Franchised Stations – EMT
58
70
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Expenditure Summary
Renewals
The activity volumes for CP5 have been developed via comparison between top down policy
based modelling and bottom up workbank development. The bottom workbank has been
created from detailed asset knowledge and application of Network Rail asset policies; hence
the very small levels of variance to the top down modelled volumes. The minor variances seen
across the engineering disciplines relate to route specific structural factors and areas where
the current asset condition varies from what is expected for its age and utilisation.
Operations
The cost to operate the route during CP5 reduces substantially with almost full application of
our long-term operating strategy. By the end of CP5 the Rail Operating Centre (ROC) will be
over 90% populated and a substantial number of rural signal boxes plus three major power
signal boxes will have been closed and control of the signalling infrastructure migrated to the
ROC.
Operations Cost (£m)
£m (12/13 prices)
Signaller
Non-Signaller
2014/15
2015/16
2016/17
2017/18
13.2
12.7
10.9
8.9
2018/19 CP5 Total
9.1
54.9
5.7
5.7
5.7
5.7
5.7
28.5
Headcount Profile
East Midlands
Maintenance Cost (£m)
Maintenance Function
Controllable Costs
2014/15
2015/16
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19 CP5 Total
40.3
41.2
39.9
38.6
38.9
199.0
RAM Function
Controllable Costs
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
3.6
CEFA element of RAM
Function Controllable Costs
2.9
2.9
3.0
3.1
3.1
15.0
Network Rail
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19
1,200
1,131
1,044
1,056
HLOS post-efficient
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
FY19
CP5
12/13 price
159.3
135.2
111.9
95.9
79.5
581.8
Track
77.0
41.6
31.2
33.8
25.3
208.9
Plain line
58.2
26.8
14.2
7.0
8.1
114.3
4.1
3.6
3.1
4.2
3.2
18.3
10.7
6.9
9.8
9.3
10.1
46.9
9.4
Refurbishment
S&C
Drainage
2.0
1.9
1.9
1.8
1.7
Fencing
1.0
1.3
1.2
1.3
1.2
6.0
Other off-track
1.0
1.0
1.0
10.2
0.9
14.1
32.6
45.2
34.9
21.1
14.8
148.7
Track Other
Signalling
Conventional resignalling
0.8
0.8
0.1
0.1
1.5
4.4
6.1
Level crossings
7.5
4.5
9.8
8.6
1.6
32.0
Minor works/life extension
5.2
6.3
5.4
5.5
5.5
27.9
Control centres
1.5
1.6
Modular signalling
4.2
8.6
7.8
1.6
0.1
22.4
National projects
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.4
2.2
12.3
Resignalling (partial)
£m (12/13 prices)
2015/16
1,194
Renewals Cost (£m)
ERTMS
Maintenance
Our maintenance plan includes application of remote condition monitoring and risk based
maintenance to achieve in 12% efficiency. This is offset by the increased maintenance
requirements following introduction of new assets during electrification and capacity works
across the route.
2014/15
3.1
21.4
9.2
0.8
ERTMS cab fitment
0.0
0.0
0.5
Traffic Management
1.5
1.5
1.5
0.6
0.6
0.6
Signalling Other
0.6
43.7
2.2
2.8
4.5
0.6
3.1
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Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
HLOS post-efficient
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
FY19
CP5
Civils
29.5
28.8
28.2
27.7
27.0
141.2
Underbridges
13.8
13.6
13.3
13.0
12.8
66.5
Major structures
Overbridges
3.3
3.3
3.2
3.1
3.1
16.1
Bridgeguard 3
HLOS post-efficient
Telecoms
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
FY19
CP5
3.8
3.0
2.9
1.8
1.8
13.2
Station I&S
1.9
1.5
0.7
0.0
0.3
4.5
Operational
1.8
1.5
2.1
1.8
1.5
8.7
Telecoms Other
FTN
Tunnels
2.8
2.8
2.7
2.7
2.6
13.6
Plant & Machinery
2.7
2.7
3.2
2.9
3.1
14.7
Civils Other Assets
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.5
1.5
7.9
Fixed Plant
2.0
1.9
1.9
1.8
1.8
9.4
Culverts
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.5
2.8
Mobile
Footbridges other assets
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.6
3.3
Intelligent Infrastructure
0.8
0.8
1.3
1.1
1.3
5.3
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
3.3
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.3
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
3.0
CP5
Coastal and estuary defences
Maintenance
Retaining walls
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
1.8
Earthworks
5.8
5.6
5.4
Civils Other
2.1
2.0
2.0
Buildings
9.7
10.4
8.0
5.5
High Output
5.3
5.1
27.2
IM
2.0
1.9
10.0
Other Renewals
4.4
38.1
Orbis
Managed Stations
0.4
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.6
2.5
Franchised Stations
4.3
4.7
4.6
3.1
1.9
18.5
Depots
2.5
3.0
1.8
1.2
1.1
9.5
Isolation
Lineside Buildings
1.1
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
4.2
LOWs
Depot Plant
1.5
1.4
0.3
0.0
0.1
3.3
Other Renewals
Electrification
3.3
2.8
2.7
2.4
2.4
13.7
Overhead Line
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.2
1.2
7.1
DC distribution
R&D (incremental)
Rollover
Renewals Efficiency
Conductor rail
AC distribution
Property
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.3
Efficiencies
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
FY19
0.0
Track
0%
3%
7%
10%
14%
5%
5%
10%
15%
18%
16%
12%
10%
SCADA
0.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.6
Signalling
Energy Efficiency
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.4
Civils
6%
8%
10%
12%
14%
System capability
Buildings
5%
10%
13%
15%
16%
11%
Electrification Other
Electrification
8%
12%
14%
18%
18%
14%
Telecoms
3%
6%
9%
12%
15%
8%
Plant
6%
9%
11%
13%
14%
11%
Network Rail
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
5.3
72
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Renewals expenditure graphs
Track
£m (12/13 price)
Civils
£m (12/13 price)
90
35
80
30
70
60
25
50
20
40
30
15
20
10
10
5
0
FY14
FY15
Plain line
Refurbishment
FY16
S&C
FY17
Drainage
FY18
Fencing
FY19
Other off-track
Track Other
0
FY14
Underbridges
Signalling
50
FY15
Major structures
FY16
Ov erbridges
Bridgeguard 3
FY17
Tunnels
FY18
Civ ils Other Assets
FY19
Earthw orks
Civ ils Other
£m (12/13 price)
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
FY14
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
Conv entional resignalling
ERTMS
Lev el crossings
Minor w orks / life ex tension
Modular signalling
Resignalling (partial)
ERTMS cab fitment
Signalling Other
Network Rail
FY19
Control centres
73
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Renewals Volumes
Track
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
FY19
CP5
SBP
Plain Line Conventional
Rail renewal (km)
9
8
5
6
36
29
29
17
17
17
110
7
6
6
4
6
29
24
Rail Sleeper Relay (km)
86
Heavy refurb (km)
25
FY19
CP5
SBP
1
1
5
12
1
32
1
1
MCB (#)
ABC (#)
45
23
49
AOC (#)
86
Obstacle detection (#)
68
MCB-OD(#)
Plain Line Refurbishment
3
6
3
10
MSL/MWL (#)
Heavy refurb (km)
Partial Conventional
Medium - concrete (km)
7
7
7
7
7
35
Targetted component
Medium - other (km)
8
9
9
13
15
54
Modular Resignalling
4
4
4
4
4
20
21
14
21
21
24
101
Heavy refurb (km)
19
14
15
27
15
90
Medium refurb (km)
44
42
30
29
23
168
Switches & Crossings
112
97
1
8
10
9
51
100
31
210
9
36
182
Other SLC
S&C refurbishment
Civils
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
FY19
CP5
SBP
Underbridges (sq m)
5,782
5,782
5,782
5,782
5,782
28,908
Major Structures (sq m)
–
–
–
–
–
936
936
936
936
936
–
–
–
–
–
Tunnels (sq m)
3,896
3,896
3,896
3,896
3,896
19,479
Culverts (sq m)
77
77
77
77
77
386
150
150
150
150
150
748
Overbridges (sq m)
Bridgeguard 3 (sq m)
Footbridges (sq m)
Coastal/Estuary Defences (m)
Network Rail
FY18
Level Crossings (#)
AHB (#)
ABC (km)
Full (#)
FY17
MCB-CCTV (#)
Plain Line High Output
Abandonment (#)
FY16
ERTMS (equ SEUs)
8
Single rail (km)
Heavy refurb (km)
FY15
Conventional (SEUs)
Steel relay (km)
Complete TrAX (km)
Signalling
4,682
–
–
–
–
–
Retaining Walls (sq m)
112
112
112
112
112
558
Earthworks (5 chain-length)
205
205
205
205
205
1,025
74
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Buildings
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
80
145
160
45
FY19
CP5
SBP
Franchised Stations
2
Footbridge (m )
430
2
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
840
277
300
2
7,419
1,700
2
100
1,281
Platform (m )
Building (m )
40
1,960
1,457
50
FY19
CP5
SBP
5
5
20
407
4
26
7
13
Station Information and
Surveillance Systems
CIS
2
Train Shed (m )
Canopy (m )
Telecoms
Public address
11,129
CCTV
1,381
Clocks
93
142
93
246
18
5
Operational telecoms
Managed Stations
2
Large Concentrators
2
Small Concentrators
Footbridge (m )
Train Shed (m )
Driver-only operation CCTV
2
Canopy (m )
2
Cables & Routes
2
PETS
Platform (m )
Building (m )
5
Voice recorders
Electrification
Overhead Line
FY15
FY16
FY17
FY18
FY19
CP5
SBP
63
63
63
47
47
284
OLE Re-wiring (wire runs)
Structure renewals
Legacy Radio
HMI Small (#)
1
1
GSM-R (#)
OLE Campaign changes (wire runs)
Mid-life refurbishments
HMI Large (#)
Power (#)
56
56
56
40
40
248
7
7
7
7
7
36
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
Conductor rail (km)
AC distribution
HV switchgear (#)
GSP transformers (#)
GSP cable (km)
Booster transformers (#)
DC distribution
HV switchgear (#)
HV cables (km)
LV switchgear (#)
LV cables (km)
Transformer/Rectifiers (#)
Network Rail
75
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
ORBIS is a key enabler for our efficiencies
Our plans for CP5 include a variety of efficiencies which vary in impact across the engineering disciplines and asset types. Offering Rail Better
Information Services (ORBIS) is a key enabler for many of the route’s efficiencies. ORBIS is focused on providing better asset information, in a
readily usable form, and advanced decision support capability enabling us to achieve efficiencies through improved decision making and is required
to effectively implement CP5 policies. The level of efficiencies attributable to ORBIS is consistent with that identified in the IIP business case.
ORBIS Overview: ORBIS is a major programme of Asset Information capability enhancements
that provides a vital enabler for condition-led asset policy implementation, enabling us to better
manage our asset base at reduced cost, and better exploit existing railway systems capability.
We recognise ORBIS efficiencies in two ways: split out ORBIS as a separate efficiency
component, acknowledging that additional process or working practice changes will be
required within route asset management and route infrastructure maintenance to realise the
efficiency; or leave ORBIS embedded as a key enabling component across identified
efficiencies.
Renewals: ORBIS will provide better information to support CP5 asset policies, focusing effort
on critical assets and identifying opportunities for refurbishment and life extension, while
assisting with effective prioritisation of renewals activity. ORBIS supports us in the track,
signals, E&P and B&C disciplines. Full track efficiencies are recognised from 2016/17, other
efficiencies are expected to ramp up from 2015/16.
Track renewal plans have been refined based on ORBIS capabilities; including Linear Asset
Decision Support (LADS), which overlays different sources of information to enable a better
understanding of condition, degradation, impact of interventions, and underlying root cause;
S&C verification and S&C criticality; enabling us to make more informed choices.
Signals renewal plans have been reduced based on ORBIS decision support using full asset
inventory and condition information, rather than the current sample, identifying optimum
renewal points, creating scope and value engineering efficiencies across maintenance
delivered renewals, minor works, and major schemes.
E&P renewal plans have been reduced based on ORBIS improving asset information and
providing decision support capability. Better condition data supports a fundamental E&P policy
shift from time to condition based intervention, leading to a move from renewals to
refurbishment in a number of major asset types including DC distribution, AC distribution/
OLE, electrical traction equipment, and signalling power cables, as well as fixed plant.
B&C renewal plans have been reduced in structures, buildings and earthworks, based on
ORBIS support for risk based renewals policies providing better understanding of asset risk
profiles, and decision support in conjunction with the buildings and civils asset management
(BCAM) transformation programme.
Network Rail
Maintenance: Improved information and decision support tools will enable maintenance
efficiencies by volume reduction across budget lines, reductions in administration across asset
disciplines and through improved asset and incident location information enabling maintenance
and incident response teams to respond more effectively. Based on early availability of
capability including mobile access and productivity-focused applications, efficiencies are
expected to ramp up from 2014/15.
Track OPEX: ORBIS provides a multi-layered view of linear asset data, which enables us to
better predict faults and understand the effectiveness of previous work, will create a range of
efficiency opportunities dependent on Route plans and asset condition. A range of expected
benefits has been identified across a number of track and off-track activities.
Non Track OPEX: ORBIS will create some efficiency in maintenance indirect labour. We have
identified administration across CP5 due to ORBIS enabling direct data capture, eliminating
elements of rekeying, automating and optimising work orders and providing a platform for other
applications. Direct OPEX efficiency opportunities in Signals and E&P are limited where teams
are sized for rapid response or other working practices. Additionally ORBIS has been
recognised as an enabler within Rapid Response, providing planning support and mobile
applications to facilitate information sharing.
Financial benefit: ORBIS financial benefits are primarily achieved through reduction in asset
renewal volumes, implementation of lowest-whole-life cost management policy for each asset
type, based on driving effective CP5 policy implementation decisions. In making information
readily accessible via smart-phone and tablet-based handhelds ORBIS will eliminate
paperwork, avoid future cost of positive reporting, improve incident response time and
accuracy, and improve operational safety. These reductions will be enabled by ORBIS but
require different processes or working practices within asset management and infrastructure
maintenance to realise the benefits.
Non-financial benefit: ORBIS will support a range of non financial benefits, including:
Asset Management policy optimisation, better management of safety risk, safer working
documentation, location improvement, improved investment planning, improved asset
management plans, improved operational performance, and regulatory compliance and
reputation benefits.
76
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Key Outputs
Safety
Our plans for CP5 do not include specific safety targets, but programmes of work designed to
reduce risk and improve safety metrics in a continuous and sustainable way. We will focus on
the following areas:
 Safety leadership & culture
 Improved asset management of our structure assets
 Track worker safety
 Level crossing risk reduction
 Route Crime, theft & vandalism
 Irregular working
 Platform-Train interface safety improvement
Asset reliability
The challenge for CP5 is to maintain our current level of performance through the increase in
Thameslink traffic and construction of significant HLOS schemes including Electrification and
re-modelling of Derby and Leicester. Significant High Output track delivery early in the Control
Period will remove a large volume of life-expired and less reliable track asset. Re-signalling of
Derby station area and modular re-signalling East of Nottingham and Derby-Stoke will renew
many of our life-expired and least reliable assets. E&P creep recover scheme will improve the
resiliance of the OLE south of Bedford. RCM continues to be a significant factor. We will
continue to utilise it to predict and prevent failure, but will increasingly develop our RCM
assets/skills using asset condition information to make better decisions and drive the right
interventions at the right time.
Train Performance
The route will be applying a whole life asset management approach to incident prevention.
This will mean closer working between the route team and our customers. We will make best
use of our resources and knowledge in order to deliver reliable infrastructure. We will continue
to monitor safety, compliance and performance weekly to reduce the risk of asset failure and
performance damaging incidents.
Network Rail
Capacity and capability
Key capacity and capability schemes in the control period include:
 Electrification of MML (including gauge clearance to W10/12) between Bedford &
Syston/Corby will allow the running of half-hourly electric services between Leicestershire
and London. Continued construction will prepare us for early CP6 extension of electrification
to Nottingham and Sheffield via Derby.
 Specific capacity improvement schemes:
 Track-doubling between Kettering & Corby
 Additional line/loops between Sharnbrook and Kettering
 Train lengthening and associated platform lengthening
 Remodelling Syston to Wigston
77
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Capacity Plans
High Level Output Specification (HLOS) route or city: Leicester
High Level Output Specification (HLOS) route or city: St Pancras – High level
AM 3 hour peak
Number of passengers*
Forecast capacity at end of
Control Period 4
Additional capacity enabled by
the plan
Forecast capacity at end of
Control Period 5
AM 1 hour peak
Forecast
demand in
2013-14
Extra
demand to
be met by
2018-19
Demand to
be met by
2018-19
Not spec.
Not spec.
Passenger
vehicle
arrivals
AM 3 hour peak
Forecast
demand in
2013-14
Extra
demand to
be met by
2018-19
Demand to
be met by
2018-19
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Number of
seats
Total
passenger
capacity**
Passenger
vehicle
arrivals
Number of
seats
Total
passenger
capacity*
103
5,400
5,400
44
2,400
2,400
35
2,100
2,100
16
900
900
138
7,500
7,500
60
3,300
3,300
High Level Output Specification (HLOS) route or city: St Pancras – Low level
AM 3 hour peak
Number of passengers*
Forecast capacity at end of
Control Period 4
Additional capacity enabled by
the plan
Forecast capacity at end of
Control Period 5
Forecast
demand in
2013-14
Demand to
be met by
2018-19
19,700
15,400
Passenger
vehicle
arrivals
296
744
Forecast capacity at end of
Control Period 4
Additional capacity enabled by
the plan
Forecast capacity at end of
Control Period 5
Forecast
demand in
2013-14
Demand to
be met by
2018-19
35,100
10,500
6,500
17,000
Number of
seats
Total
passenger
capacity**
Passenger
vehicle
arrivals
Number of
seats
Total
passenger
capacity*
21,200
29,200
128
9,300
12,800
Forecast capacity at end of
Control Period 4
23,600
Additional capacity enabled by
the plan
36,400
Forecast capacity at end of
Control Period 5
40,100
79,800
109,000
120
248
Demand to
be met by
2018-19
Forecast
demand in
2013-14
Extra
demand to
be met by
2018-19
Demand to
be met by
2018-19
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Passenger
vehicle
arrivals
Number of
seats
Total
passenger
capacity**
Passenger
vehicle
arrivals
Number of
seats
Total
passenger
capacity*
205
11,300
13,600
74
4,100
5,000
-1
100
300
6
400
600
204
11,400
13,900
80
4,500
5,600
AM 3 hour peak
Extra
demand to
be met by
2018-19
18,900
Forecast
demand in
2013-14
High Level Output Specification (HLOS) route or city: Nottingham
AM 1 hour peak
Extra
demand to
be met by
2018-19
448
Number of passengers*
AM 1 hour peak
Extra
demand to
be met by
2018-19
4,100
13,400
Number of passengers*
AM 1 hour peak
Forecast
demand in
2013-14
Extra
demand to
be met by
2018-19
Demand to
be met by
2018-19
Forecast
demand in
2013-14
Extra
demand to
be met by
2018-19
Demand to
be met by
2018-19
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Not spec.
Passenger
vehicle
arrivals
Number of
seats
Total
passenger
capacity**
Passenger
vehicle
arrivals
Number of
seats
Total
passenger
capacity*
106
6,700
8,900
43
2,800
4,000
2
100
200
2
100
200
108
6,800
9,100
45
2,900
4,200
* Number of passengers as specified in the HLOS
** Total passenger capacity includes an additional allowance for standing on short journeys of 20 minutes or less
For further information please refer to the passenger capacity plan supporting document.
Network Rail
78
Route Plan East Midlands SBP Submission
Risks and Assumptions
Both nationally, and at a route level, there will continue to be a focus
on mitigating the effects of external factors, such as extreme weather,
cable theft, vandalism and fatalities. The actions already undertaken in
CP4 give some confidence that the risk can be contained in CP5.
There is also a significant amount of industry change in CP5 – continued passenger and freight
growth, re-franchising (over half of the train operators), build phases of major engineering
schemes, Network Operating Strategy – all of which imply a high level of risk to performance.
In the production of this document a number of assumptions have been made and risks to our
plans identified. The key risks and assumptions are:
 The route will meet the end of CP4 targets in the Joint Performance Improvement Plan
agreed with each Train Operating Company utilising East Midlands route. Failure to meet the
planned start position for CP5 performance will increase the challenge to hit end of CP5
targets. Our plans for CP4 are clear and robust, but external factors (weather, suicide,
vandalism, etc) are a risk.
 Our current relationship with local focus and council groups, for example the Derbyshire Rail
Group, will continue and develop further. These relationships are key to maintaining our
ability to deliver changes where we interface with the public, i.e. at level crossings.
 Integrated Access Planning (Rail Delivery Group scheme) delivers expected benefits
and improved access. This programme has validated and collated many separate initiatives
previously considered into an integrated planning approach. If the benefits we envisage
cannot be realised a number of our core efficiency plans will be negatively affected.
 Franchise changes in late CP4 and CP5 do not introduce significant new requirements of the
asset (e.g. additional services) or materially impact on performance targets. This plan is
built from understanding the asset and the impact known service patterns will have on it.
Any material change in rail traffic will impact our plans and incur additional cost or add
performance risk to the route.
 Where route efficiency targets and work delivery is reliant on national functions these
are delivered in full as planned. We continue to maintain a healthy 2-way relationship with
the Network Rail central services and a number of our efficiency plans are reliant on delivery
of national plans. For example, the ORBIS programme enables a number of renewals and
maintenance efficiencies and in some cases the efficiency is wholly reliant on ORBIS (i.e.
increased accuracy and consistency of signaling asset condition assessment within SICA).
 Electrification of the Midland Main Line and major capacity schemes are developed
and delivered on time. As client for these schemes we will work with our delivery partners
to manage progress and work toward timely delivery. These significant schemes are complex
and any delay to commissioning will negatively affect out performance/maintenance plans.
Network Rail

Route boundaries will not change during CP5 – Although our enhancement plans will
result in a change to the track miles on the route in CP5, this plan assumes that the East
Midlands geographical route boundaries will remain the same during the whole of CP5.
Geographical boundary changes will introduce assets to the route that have not been
incorporated into out integrated plan and bring performance/asset management risks we
have not considered at this time.
 A full timetable is run during all project works – Many of the key projects which form the
major risks to the route in CP5 were only announced as being funded in July 2012. The
assumption has been made that a full timetable will be run on the route during all major
projects and any failure to do this will negatively impact out performance plans.
 No significant change in the impact of external incidents – Due to the difficulty in
predicting external events such as weather conditions, cable theft and fatalities on the
network the assumption has been made that amount and impact of these types of incidents
at the exit of CP4 will remain the same during CP5.
 Improvement in asset reliability – With no defined figures available at the time of writing
we have assumed that overall asset reliability will improve by 1% each year on the baseline
of 2011/12. This level of improvement is lower that for previous years and takes into account
the amount of construction activity across the route within CP5. Failure to achieve this level
of improvement will reduce our ability to meet our performance targets.
79