Pasco County, Florida Popular Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year

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Pasco County, Florida Popular Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year
Pasco County, Florida
Popular Annual Financial Report
Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2013
Table of Contents
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
A Letter from Your Clerk & Comptroller
Your Elected Pasco County Leadership
The Components of Your County
Government
Pasco County’s Financial Reports and
Common Terms Used in Financial Reporting
Pasco County At-A-Glance
What We Own – Pasco County’s Assets
What We Owe – Pasco County’s Liabilities
The Annual Budget Cycle
Follow the Money
Comparing Our Revenues and Expenditures
Public Safety and Emergency Services
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
Emergency Management and
Communications, Fire Rescue, and the
Sheriff ’s Office – Financial Snapshots
Just Courts and Free Elections
The Clerk & Comptroller’s Office and the
Supervisor of Elections’ Office – Financial
Snapshots
Accurate Valuation and Fair Taxation
The Property Appraiser’s Office and the Tax
Collector’s Office – Financial Snapshots
Business-Type Activities
Pasco County Utilities – Financial Snapshot
Other County Services for Our Citizens
Top cover photo:
Pasco County’s agricultural heritage continues to be a vital part of our local economy.
Middle cover photo:
Pasco County’s “old” county courthouse in downtown Dade City is now home to the Pasco
County Board of County Commissioners. Fully renovated, it is listed on the U.S. National
Register of Historical Places.
Bottom cover photo:
Robert K. Rees Memorial Park
To my fellow Citizens of Pasco County:
It is my pleasure to provide you with this Popular Annual Financial Report for
Pasco County’s 2013 fiscal year. This report is a concise summary of our
much more detailed Comprehensive Annual Financial Report and is intended
to offer the citizens that we serve a brief overview of their county government’s
financial activities. Readers desiring more information should refer to the
Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the 2013 fiscal year which is
available on our website, www.pascoclerk.com.
Your county government is composed of many different departments overseen
by the Board of County Commissioners as well as the operations of the five
constitutional officers of Pasco County: the Clerk & Comptroller, the Property
Appraiser, the Sheriff, the Supervisor of Elections, and the Tax Collector.
Each of these entities has its own dedicated budget and engages in its own
financial activities, but all of those components are brought together in the
county’s annual reports in order to accurately represent the financial position
of Pasco County as a whole.
You work hard for your money, a portion of which you are required to give to
Pasco County government in the form of various local taxes. Given that it is
your money financing your county government, you have every right to
demand that your government spend your money wisely and account for every
dollar properly. We take our responsibility as guardians of the public trust very
seriously. One of my duties under Florida Statute is to act as a watchdog for
you, the citizens of Pasco County, with regard to your county government’s
finances.
Contact information for my office is listed on the back cover of this report.
Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to serve you as your Clerk of Circuit
Court & County Comptroller.
Sincerely,
Paula S. O’Neil
1
Your Elected Pasco County Leadership
Pasco County is a “non-chartered” county, meaning that it is organized and governed
in strict accordance with the Florida State Constitution and Florida State Statutes.
Board of County Commissioners
Honorable Jack Mariano, District 5, Chairman
Honorable Henry Wilson, District 4, Vice-Chairman
Honorable Ted J. Schrader, District 1
Honorable Pat Mulieri, Ed.D., District 2
Honorable Kathryn Starkey, District 3
2
Constitutional Officers
Honorable Paula S. O’Neil, Ph.D., Clerk of Circuit Court & County Comptroller
Honorable Mike Wells, Property Appraiser
Honorable Chris Nocco, Sheriff
Honorable Brian E. Corley, Supervisor of Elections
Honorable Mike Fasano, Tax Collector
(appointed to replace Mike Olson in 2013)
The Components of Your County Government
Citizens of Pasco County
Property
Appraiser
Supervisor of
Elections
Tax
Collector
County
Attorney
Development Services Branch
Building Construction Services
Building Inspections
Central Permitting
Engineering Services
Environmental Lands
Project Management
Real Estate
Survey
Traffic Operations
Planning and Development
Metropolitan Planning
Road and Bridge
Stormwater Management
Transportation
Planning/MPO
Internal Services Branch
Facilities Management
Fiscal Services
Fleet Management
Information Technology
Geographic Information
Systems (GIS)
Office of Management & Budget
Personnel/Risk Management
Purchasing/Central Stores
Board of County
Commissioners
Clerk &
Comptroller
Judiciary
Sheriff
County
Administrator
Chief Assistant
County
Administrator
Customer Service/Performance
Development
Emergency Management
Fire/Rescue
Ambulance Billing
Public Safety Communications
Rescue/Combat
Office of Public Communications
Tourism Development
Public Services Branch
Utilities Services Branch
Community Services
Animal Services
Community Development
Cooperative Extension
Elderly Nutrition
Human Services
Misdemeanor Probation
Transportation Services
Veteran Services
Library Services
Parks and Recreation
Administration & Support Services
Environmental Lab
Customer Information
Hazardous Waste
Warehouse Services
Engineering & Contract Management
Solid Waste/Resource Recovery
Recycling & Education
Street Lighting
Field Operations
Wastewater Services
Reclaimed Water
Water Services
3
4
Pasco County’s
Financial Reports
Common Terms Used in
Financial Reporting
At the end of each fiscal year (which runs from October 1st to
September 30th), the Division of Financial Services in the Office
of the Clerk & Comptroller spends several months preparing the
Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) in accordance
with the statutes of the State of Florida and the guidelines
established by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board
(GASB). In 2012, for the 30th consecutive year, Pasco County
was recognized for its excellence in financial reporting by the
Government Finance Officers Association of the United States
and Canada. This award showcases our commitment to you, the
citizens of Pasco County.
In order to be truly comprehensive, the CAFR typically totals
about 200 pages. While it is unquestionably an essential part of
fulfilling our responsibility to report how Pasco County’s funds
are being managed, it is not casual reading material. This Popular
Annual Financial Report (PAFR) presents key information from
the CAFR in an easily understandable format. Our hope is that
this PAFR will assist the citizens of Pasco County in better
understanding how their county government manages its
finances.
Readers desiring more detailed information on a given topic
may refer to the FY 2013 CAFR and other financial reports on
the Clerk and Comptroller’s website, www.pascoclerk.com,
under the Finance tab.
Because this PAFR is a summary, it does not conform with
generally accepted accounting principles and reporting
requirements for government entities. The activities of the Pasco
County Housing Finance Authority, a discretely-presented
component unit of Pasco County, are not included in this report.
Governmental activities include activities of government
funded primarily through taxes, such as public safety,
court operations, public transportation, and culture and
recreation.
Business-type activities include activities of government,
funded primarily by charges for services, such as streetlighting, water and sewer service, and resource recovery.
Current, in accounting and finance, refers to periods of oneyear or less, also called “short-term.”
Non-current, in accounting and finance, refers to periods of
more than one year, also called “long-term.”
Assets are resources owned by Pasco County that are
expected to provide a future economic benefit, such as
vehicles, buildings, and land.
Liabilities are obligations of Pasco County such as the
payment of principal and interest on bond issues and
accrued employee vacation time.
Net position is the difference between Pasco County’s assets
and its liabilities; the county’s “net worth.” In business,
this is referred to as equity. We do not refer to it as
equity in government because governments do not have
owners, but net assets has the same meaning to a citizen
as equity does to a stockholder.
Restricted funds are reserved for a certain purpose and
cannot be used for anything else.
Unrestricted funds can be used for a variety of purposes.
Pasco County At-A-Glance
Pasco County was established in 1887 when the original Hernando County was divided into present-day Hernando and
Pasco Counties. Our county is named after U.S. Senator Samuel Pasco (1834 – 1917) and covers 742 square miles.
Demographics
Median Age
Per Capita Personal Income
Four-Year Graduation Rate
Unemployment Rate
2013 Largest
Employers
2003
45.1
$24,851
74.9%
5.2
Government
Pasco County Board Departments
and Constitutional Officers.............3,928
Florida State Government...................1,262
Federal Government...............................729
Education
Pasco County School District.........9,289
Saint Leo University............................658
Pasco-Hernando Comm. College......548
2008
45.1
$29,066
79.5%
8.1%
2013
43.6
$33,228
75.9%
7.8%
Private
Wal-Mart..............................................2,531
Target......................................................658
Saddlebrook Resort...............................646
Pall Aeropower Corporation...............552
Healthcare
HCA Healthcare................................2,502
Physicians Injury Medical.................2,200
Florida Medical Clinic.......................1,066
5
What We Own
Pasco County’s Current Assets
Pasco County’s Non-Current Assets
(in thousands)
(in thousands)
Current Assets
Cash and equivalents
Investments
Restricted assets:
Cash and equivalents
Accounts receivable, net
Notes receivable
Assessments receivable
Impact fees receivable
Due from other
governments
Inventories
Other
Total current assets
Governmental Business-Type
Activities
Activities
Governmental Business-Type
Activities
Activities
Total
$468,227
8
$97,653
-
$565,880
8
8,208
4,804
16,786
3,777
57,058
16,003
-
57,058
24,211
4,804
16,786
3,777
24,666
913
792
$528,181
905
1,191
$172,810
25,571
2,104
792
$700,991
Note: “In thousands” means that the displayed amount of
$700,991 represents the amount of $700,991,000.
Non-Current Assets
Restricted assets:
Cash and equivalents
Investments
Notes receivable
Due from other
governments
Deferred charges
Water entitlements
Capital assets:
Land
Intangibles
Buildings
Improvements other than
buildings
Equipment
Construction in process
Infrastructure
Less acc. depreciation
Total Non-Current Assets
Total Assets
Assets per Citizen
$4,949
6
Total
$43,197
$67,440
68,488
-
$67,440
68,488
43,197
-
18,804
1,233
1,249
18,804
1,233
1,249
125,833
5,708
226,012
25,828
1,297
152,410
151,661
7,005
378,422
39,279
147,126
90,091
518,798
(361,260)
$834,786
802,887
5,084
39,400
(372,898)
$811,220
842,166
152,210
129,491
518,798
(734,158)
$1,646,006
$1,362,967
$984,030
$2,346,997
What We Owe . . . and the Difference
Pasco County’s Current Liabilities
Pasco County’s Non-Current Liabilities
(in thousands)
(in thousands)
Governmental Business-Type
Activities
Activities
Current Liabilities
Vouchers payable
$25,123
Contracts payable
1,340
Accrued liabilities
6,894
Claims payable
3,459
Due to other governments
504
Deposits
3,598
Interest payable
862
Other liabilities
21
Compensated absences
1,368
Notes payable
529
Payable from restricted assets:
Deposits
Interest payable
Bonds payable, net
Total Current Liabilities
$43,698
Total
$15,501
1,322
427
106
-
$40,624
2,662
7,321
3,459
504
3,598
862
21
1,474
529
4,782
7,444
7,131
$36,713
4,782
7,444
7,131
80,411
$
Governmental Business-Type
Activities
Activities
Non-Current Liabilities
Estimated landfill closure
costs
Pollution remediation costs
Claims payable
$7,209
Compensated absences
15,940
Unearned revenue
10,523
Notes payable
9,435
Other post employee
benefits
19,390
Bonds payable, net
59,000
Total Non-Current
Liabilities
$121,497
Total Liabilities
$165,195
Total
$48,091
430
1,846
25,624
-
$48,091
430
7,209
17,786
36,147
9,435
1,513
266,986
20,903
325,986
$344,490
$465,987
$381,203
$546,398
Liabilities per Citizen
$1,076
7
The Annual Budget Cycle
September – The budget workshops conclude,
public hearings are held, and the final budget and millage
rate are approved by the Board of County Commissioners.
August – The proposed budget is submitted,
Truth in Millage notifications are mailed, and
budget workshops and negotiations begin.
October 1st – Happy Fiscal New Year! This isn’t the
beginning of the budget process, however. It’s actually the
end of the process that started almost twelve months ago…
Board of County
Commissioners
June and July – Each department’s
budget is finalized and doublechecked for accuracy and adequacy.
November – The previous fiscal year’s budget
is closed and the compilation of Pasco County’s
annual financial statements begins.
December and January – Budget analysts
review previous years’ trends and create
forecasts of future revenues and expenses.
Budget Timeline
April and May – Preliminary budgets are submitted
for review and comment at the department level,
then returned to managers for revision.
February – Analysts and managers determine next
year’s objectives, create guidelines and initiatives,
and set targets and goals.
March –
Capital improvements are planned and the annual
financial statements for the previous year are completed.
8
Follow the Money
The Board of County Commissioners and other
taxing authorities implement or adopt impact fees,
assessments, user charges and millage rates (used to
calculate property taxes) based on how much money is
needed to cover budgeted expenses.
The Clerk of Court & County
Comptroller receives the funds on behalf
of the Board of County Commissioners and
invests the funds until they are needed to pay
bills.
The Property Appraiser values all real
estate and tangible personal property in
Pasco County for the purpose of creating the
annual ad valorem tax roll (property taxes).
This tax roll is sent to the tax collector for
collection.
The Tax Collector collects, invests and distributes
money for various state, regional and local government
agencies and taxing authorities. The tax collector mails
property tax notices, receives payment and sends the
monies collected to the local government and taxing
authorities.
.
9
Comparing Our Revenues and Expenses
14.1% Operating grants
(state and federal)
5.7% Capital grants (state and federal)
4.9% Investment and Miscellaneous
Where Each Dollar
Comes From
41.2%
Charges for service
(paid by users of services)
General
Government
14.0%
Transportation
12.9%
34%
Various taxes
(paid by the citizens)
Human Services
3.2%
How Each
Dollar Is Spent
*Includes culture and recreation, economic environment,
interest and long-term debt, and physical environment.
10
30.3%
Public safety
29.0%
Utilities
6.9%
Other*
Court-Related
4.2%
Public Safety and Emergency Services
Public safety is the first responsibility of local government. To meet that responsibility, the Board of County Commissioners
funds the Emergency Management Department, the Fire Rescue Department, and the Sheriff ’s Office. While Emergency
Management and Fire Rescue are “board departments,” and the Sheriff is an independent constitutional officer of the county, all
three work together to provide our citizens and visitors with seamless prevention, protection, and disaster response.
This combined Fire Station and Sheriff’s Office is one example of the joint efforts of the Board of County
Commissioners and the constitutional officers of Pasco County to serve you in a fiscally-responsible manner.
11
Emergency Management and Communications,
Fire Rescue, and the Sheriff’s Office – Financial Snapshots
Operating
Budget
$ 6,953,762
43,478,884
84,006,318
$134,438,964
FY 2013 Expenditures
Emergency 911 Services
Fire Rescue
Sheriff’s Office
Total
Statistical Information
Number of fire stations
Number of certified firefighters
Calls for service in FY 2012-2013
23
442
58,755
Actual
Operating
Expenses
$ 2,297,143
41,801,333
86,335,407
$130,433,883
Number of Sheriff’s stations
Number of sworn deputies
Calls for service in FY 2012-2013
3
1,319
216,054
Pasco County’s newest hurricane shelter is designed to accommodate disabled citizens and has facilities for
cats and dogs as well. In addition to public safety and emergency services agencies, Pasco County Public
Transportation also participates in disaster planning. The county’s buses will be an essential part of the citizen
evacuation plan should a major storm threaten us.
12
Justice System and Jury Service
When we think about what makes living in the United States different from so many other places in the world, our voting rights
and legal system are two of the first things that come to mind. More than anything else, our forefathers fought to create a
country in which everyone had a voice in government and access to impartial justice.
The Supervisor of Elections is responsible for qualifying candidates for public office, registering voters, and, most importantly,
supervising each election to ensure that every eligible vote is counted and no fraud is permitted.
The Judiciary, State Attorney , and Public Defender are elected by the citizens of the County. Each represent the Sixth Judicial
Circuit which is comprised of Pasco and Pinellas County.
The Clerk of Circuit Court (and County Comptroller) oversees the men and women who handle many of the detailed tasks that
help to keep our courts functioning smoothly. The Clerk & Comptroller also maintains a wide variety of public records for the
citizens of Pasco County and manages the county’s finances.
Civil Court
Alimony and Child Support
Criminal Court
Board of County
Commissioner Records
Family Court
Document Recording
Probate Court
Domestic Injunctions
Small Claims Court
Judicial Assignments
Traffic Court
Jury Service
Court Records and File
Viewing
Tax Deed Sales
The West Pasco Judicial Center was renovated in 2007.
13
The Clerk & Comptroller’s Office and
the Supervisor of Elections’ Office – Financial Snapshots
Supervisor of Elections
Clerk & Comptroller
FY 2003
New case filings
114,153
Marriage Lic. Issued*
Checks Processed
Employees
2,479
2,407
(2.9%)
29,734
63,768
53.4%
253
339
34.0%
*Based on calendar year.
14
FY 2013 Increase/
Decrease
101,146
(11.4%)
FY 2003
FY 2013
242,075
296,938
171
111
Countywide Elections
0
0
District Elections
0
2
Municipal Elections
3
3
Employees
25
23
Registered Voters
Precincts
Increase/
Decrease
22.7%
(35.1%)
(8.0%)
Accurate Valuation and Fair Taxation
Land has been the foundation of wealth for thousands of years. Centuries ago, our forefathers broke with the long-standing
traditions of the Old World and created a country where anyone could own land, rather than just the aristocracy. Today, over
43,000 of Pasco County’s citizens own property within the county, and that number increases every year. The property taxes
that these citizens pay form a critical part of the budgets for the Board of County Commissioners and all five constitutional
officers.
Two of the constitutional officers, the Property Appraiser and the Tax Collector, have direct responsibility for ensuring that
property taxes in Pasco County are levied and collected in a fair and equitable manner consistent with state law. The Property
Appraiser establishes the taxable value of all real estate and tangible personal property in the county and compiles the annual ad
valorem (Latin for “according to value”) tax roll. The Tax Collector uses the tax roll to deliver notices of taxes due (less
applicable exemptions like the Florida Homestead Exemption) and collects payments for delivery into the custody of the Clerk
& Comptroller on behalf of the Board of County Commissioners.
Since 2003, the Tax Collector has also provided the driver’s license and vehicle registration services previously handled by the
Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles.
15
The Property Appraiser’s Office and
the Tax Collector’s Office – Financial Snapshots
Tax Collector
Property Appraiser
(in thousands)
(in thousands)
FY 2003
Real Property Parcels
229,334
Est. Actual Value
$16,827,459
Net Exemptions
5,984,669
Tax. Assessed Value $10,842,790
Employees
62
FY 2013
253,325
$28,013,760
9,442,866
$18,570,894
Increase
9.5%
66.5%
57.8%
71.3%
48
(22.6%)
FY 2003
FY 2013
Increase
Total Tax Levy
$125,290,467 $132,024,326
5.8%
Total Tax Collections 120,755,127 127,060,367
5.2%
% of Levy Collected
96.4
96.2
Driver’s Licenses Issued
Vehicle Registrations
Issued
NA
116,548
-
NA
635,001
-
Employees
135
173
[copyrighted image used for mockup]
16
28.1%
Business-Type Activities
Pasco County Utilities is composed of the Water and
Sewer Unit and the Solid Waste Disposal and Resource
Recovery System. The Water and Sewer Unit provides
potable water to approximately 53,397 of the county’s
residents, as well as laboratory services to maintain clean,
safe drinking water for the many residents who rely on
wells. The Water and Sewer Unit also processes sewage to
generate reclaimed water for use in landscape irrigation
throughout the county. The county’s total miles of
reclaimed water pipelines have almost doubled in the last
ten years; our newest reclaimed water facility will be the
500-million-gallon Boyette Reclaimed Water Reservoir.
The Solid Waste Disposal and Resource Recovery System
manages the West Pasco Class III landfill, with its Refuseto-Energy plant, as well as the East Pasco Transfer Station.
In addition to regular waste, each facility accepts recyclable
materials, such as tires and used motor oil, and household
hazardous waste, such as paint and fluorescent light bulbs.
The Refuse-to-Energy plant not only reduces the amount
of landfill space consumed each year, but also generates
almost $2 million per month in electricity sales, which
helps to keep the Solid Waste System more affordable for
the citizens of Pasco County. Solid Waste also monitors
the closed Ridge Road Landfill.
17
Pasco County Utilities – Financial Snapshot
FY 2013 Revenues and Expenditures
Water and Sewer Unit
Charges for services
$95,681,622
Operating expenses
(96,598,939)
Non-operating expenses
(12,800,361)
Net income (loss)
($13,717,678)
Capital contributions and transfers in 14,429,777
Net change in assets
$712,099
Solid Waste Disposal and Resource Recovery System
Charges for services
$44,691,428
Operating expenses
(29,481,011)
Non-operating expenses
(1,818,415)
Net income (loss)
$13,392,002
Capital contributions and transfers in
Net change in assets
$13,392,002
FY 2013 Capitals Assets
Water
Deep wells
Miles of water mains (4”+)
Water customers
Daily consumption (millions of gallons)
Daily plant capacity (millions of gallons)
58
1,636
95,758
23
82
Sewer
Miles of sanitary sewers (4”+)
1,269
Lift and pumping stations
575
Sewer customers
82,235
Daily treatment (millions of gallons)
19
Daily treatment capacity (millions of gallons)
35
Reclaimed Water
Miles of reclaimed water mains (4”+)
Storage and pumping sites
Reclaimed water customers
Daily consumption (millions of gallons)
Storage capacity (millions of gallons)
332
9
12,386
21
245
Solid Waste Disposal and Resource Recovery
Revenue from electricity sales
$22,161,223
Landfills and ash storage sites (open)
2
Landfills (closed)
1
18
Other County Services for Our Citizens
There’s much more to Pasco County Government than the departments and offices mentioned so far, of course. For example,
our Health Department (co-funded by the state), Libraries, Parks & Recreation Department, Public Transportation, and so many
others all contribute to the quality of life for the citizens of Pasco County . . . and the citizens themselves contribute as well!
The community spirit is strong in Pasco and over 900 volunteers assist the various county departments and offices. We’re proud
to work alongside them and proud to serve Pasco County. After all, we don’t just work here – we live here, too!
19
Who should I call to…
Board of County Commissioners

Report an emergency? 911

Learn when and where the Board of County
Commissioners will meet next?
352.521.4111, 813.996.2411 ext. 8100, or
727.847.2411 ext. 8100

Find a local bus schedule?
352.521.4587, 813.235.6073, or 727.834.3322

Find a local park with hiking trails / jogging trails / soccer
fields / tennis courts / you name it?
813.929.2760

Get a building permit?
352.521.4279, 813.929.2749, or 727.847.8126

License my family pet?
352.521.5194, 813.929.1212, or 727.834.3216

Obtain a library card?
727.861.3020

Pay my utility bill?
352.521.4285, 813.235.6012, or 727.847.8131

All of the above and more: www.pascocountyfl.net

Volunteer? Many of the departments above and offices to
the right (including Animal Services, Parks and Recreation,
and our Libraries just to name a few) offer volunteer
opportunities!
Clerk & Comptroller

Obtain a marriage license or a passport?
352.518.4008 or 727.847.8190

Report for jury duty?
352.521.4200 or 727.847.8900

Request help with child support?
352.523.2411 ext. 2218 or 727.847.2411 ext. 2218

All of the above and more: www.pascoclerk.com
Property Appraiser

Inquire about my property’s appraised value?
352.521.4433, 813.929.2780, 727.847.8151, or
www.appraiserpascogov.com
Sheriff

Report an emergency? 911

Sign up for Neighborhood Watch?
1.800.854.2862 ext. 3376 or www.pascosheriff.com
Supervisor of Elections

Register to vote?
1.800.851.8754 or www.pascovotes.com
Tax Collector

Renew my driver’s license and vehicle registration, update
my homestead exemption, or pay my property tax bill?
352.521.4360, 813.235.6020, 727.847.8165, or
www.pascotaxes.com
Back cover photo: Sunsets over the Gulf of Mexico are just one more reason why Pasco County is a beautiful place to live. [copyrighted image used for mockup]
20
Brought to you by the Office of Paula S. O’Neil
Pasco County Clerk of Circuit Court & County Comptroller
Division of Financial Services
14236 Sixth Street, Suite 201
Dade City, Florida 33523
General Information: 352.521.4566
www.pascoclerk.com/public-finance-info.asp
“Excellence . . . Always”
“Bringing Opportunities Home”