View project summary. - Canadian Institute of Planners

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View project summary. - Canadian Institute of Planners
Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates
+
Prairie pothole wetlands
Parkland County is located in central Alberta, just west of the capital city of Edmonton.
The County is home to a wide range of natural areas and is rich in biodiversity. A variety
of existing and future development pressures face Parkland County. With extremely high
growth rates, ongoing resource extraction, and an expanding industrial area, the County
initiated the Environmental Conservation Master Plan (ECMP) project to take stock of
its environmental assets as a first step in prioritizing landscape-wide planning initiatives.
The ECMP consists of two interrelated components: 1) an inventory of the County’s
Environmentally Significant Areas (Phase 1) and 2) a comprehensive set of policies,
procedures, and map tools for county-wide environmental management (Phases 2 and 3).
Environmentally Significant Areas (ESAs) have been defined in Alberta as places vital to
the long-term maintenance of biological diversity, soil, water, or other natural processes
at multiple scales. In Parkland County, identifying and mapping ESA was viewed as
critical step in informing wise land use planning and science based decision-making. The
study therefore formed the foundation of the ECMP, providing a solid framework for
environmental policy development grounded in landscape ecological principles and analysis.
Unlike many ESA studies, which focus on individual ESAs in relative isolation, this applied
ESA study acknowledges that landscapes embody a gradient of environmental values,
with ESAs as critical nodes—or indispensible patterns—in the landscape. The study was
based on the premise that if certain indispensible patterns are conserved, the majority
of ecological functions of that landscape will remain intact. From this perspective, the
ESA study informed the development of practical policy tools to conserve interconnected
ecological processes and resources across the entire landscape. The ESA analysis was used
to develop policy maps that provide a spatial understanding of priority areas for resource
conservation and management from a landscape systems perspective.
Project Background +
Summary
There are certain
“indispensible patterns”
in any landscape that, if
protected, will conserve
the majority of important
ecological functions in that
landscape.
The process of identifying ESAs in Parkland County consisted of obtaining, formatting,
and integrating a wide variety of county-wide spatial data sets within a consistent, repeatable
mapping framework. Extensive data analysis, field reconnaissance, and public consultation
were instrumental in identifying and refining a total of 61 ESAs, while shaping an overall
vision for the environment. Centralized and decentralized methods of engagement were
used to collect feedback over a large geographic area with a dispersed rural population.
Multiple public open houses and stakeholder workshops were held in various locations
across the County, while an online mapping tool was used to collect public feedback
without requiring people to travel long distances to events. Stakeholders were unflagging
in their commitment and played an important role in ensuring that the ECMP reflects the
diverse values of Parkland County.
The ECMP contributes to the profession through the applied use of landscape ecological
principles as a framework for landscape analysis and planning. The project strives to facilitate
the conservation and restoration of critical ecological networks through the application
of policy initiatives and map tools. The ECMP will guide the county in developing the
Community Sustainability & Development Plan (CSDP) which will be completed in 2016.
As a statutory plan, the CSDP is one of the key means of implementing the findings of the
ECMP, effectively translating rigorous landscape analysis into holistic landscape planning
solutions.
Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates
Canadian Institute of Planners | 2015 Awards Planning fo Excellence | Category: Natural Systems Planning
1
Evaluation Criteria
How the Parkland County ECMP
Meets the Evaluation Criteria
Innovation + Contribution to the Profession
The Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan (ECMP) is innovative
and contributes to the profession in many ways.
Innovation
Innovation lies in the use of a multi-criteria modelling process to identify ESAs, as well as
an interactive web-mapping tool to collect spatially relevant public feedback on the ESA
delineation.
Multi-Criteria Modelling: Well-defined ecological criteria were established as
quantifiable metrics of environmental significance aimed at meeting specified conservation
objectives for Parkland County. These ESA criteria, along with defined metrics of
environmental sensitivity, were weighted according to relative importance and overlain in
a multi-criteria GIS model to generate a map of overall environmental significance. This
map was then used to delineate preliminary ESA boundaries.
Because Parkland County covers such
an extensive area, most of which is
rural, the web-mapping tool provided
a convenient decentralized method of
collecting feedback without asking people
to travel long distances for a centralized
event.
2
Interactive Web-mapping Tool: After an preliminary set of ESAs were identified and
mapped by the project team using a multi-criteria modelling process, ESAs were verified
by stakeholders and citizens using an interactive web-mapping tool. Because Parkland
County covers such an extensive area, most of which is rural, the web-mapping tool
provided a convenient decentralized method of collecting feedback without asking people
to travel long distances for a centralized event. Web map users were invited to explore
the hotspots of environmental significance generated by the data analysis, as well as the
preliminary ESA boundaries to see where new ESAs were being proposed. Users could
click on individual ESAs to learn more about each one and place a pin anywhere in the
maps to add a location-specific comment. Public comments and questions regarding the
location, boundaries, and significance ranking of individual ESAs were then considered
and incorporated into the final ESA database.
Contribution to the Profession
The project contributes to the profession through the applied use of landscape ecological
principles as a framework for landscape analysis and planning. The ECMP acknowledges
that landscapes embody a gradient of environmental values with ESAs as critical nodes
that should be prioritized for conservation and management.
Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates
Canadian Institute of Planners | 2015 Awards Planning fo Excellence | Category: Natural Systems Planning
MAP 6: SPECIES AND HABITATS OF CONSERVATION CONCERN
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Bell Lake
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Gladu Lake
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Muir Lake
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Chickakoo Lake
Isle Lake
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Glory Lake
Soldan Lake
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Eden Lake
Hubbles Lake
WABAMUN
SEBA BEACH
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V
16
SPRUCE GROVE
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Wabamun Lake
Mink Lake
Star Lake
Wabamun No. 133A
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SPRING LAKE
628
Cottage Lake
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759
60
Hasse Lake
Yekau Lake
Stony Plain No. 135
ee
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Mayatan Lake Jack Fish Lake
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At
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Keephills
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Tomahawk
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Longhurst Lake
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N o r t h S as k
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iv
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a tc
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Kitto Lake
County Boundary
Score
High
Municipal Boundary
First Nations Reserve
Low
Highway
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ESA Criteria Map: Species + Habitats Score
Date Saved: 28/11/2013
Document Path: N:\Projects\130708 Parkland County - Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates\05- Data\MXDs\Theme_Maps\Version3\species_v3.mxd
MAP 7: LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY MEASURES
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Bell Lake
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Kilometres
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Gladu Lake
Pemb
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Dussault Lake
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16
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Glory Lake
Soldan Lake
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Eden Lake
Hubbles Lake
WABAMUN
SEBA BEACH
Muir Lake
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Chickakoo Lake
Isle Lake
Round Lake
Entwistle
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SPRUCE GROVE
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Wabamun Lake
16A
STONY PLAIN
Johnnys Lake
Hoople Lake
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SPRING LAKE
628
Cottage Lake
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759
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Hasse Lake
Yekau Lake
Stony Plain No. 135
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Cr
Mayatan Lake Jack Fish Lake
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Mink Lake
Star Lake
Wabamun No. 133A
At
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Keephills
627
Tomahawk
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Longhurst Lake
To m a h
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N o r t h S as k
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Kitto Lake
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ESA Criteria Map: Landscape Ecology Score
County Boundary
Score
High
Municipal Boundary
First Nations Reserve
Low
Highway
Date Saved: 28/11/2013
Document Path: N:\Projects\130708 Parkland County - Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates\05- Data\MXDs\Theme_Maps\Version3\landscape_ecology_v3.mxd
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MAP 9: LANDFORMS AND SLOPES
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Kilometres
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Carvel Pitted Delta
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Bell Lake
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Gladu Lake
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Dussault Lake
Wabamun Meltwater Channel
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Round Lake
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Entwistle
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SEBA
BEACH
43
WABAMUN
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Glory Lake
Soldan Lake
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Eden Lake
i Cr
Muir Lake
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Chickakoo Lake
Isle Lake
Pembina River
Valley
Hubbles Lake
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k
16
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Wabamun Lake
16A
Johnnys Lake
Hoople Lake
Star Lake
Wabamun No. 133A
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628
U
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60
770
759
Mayatan Lake
Hasse Lake
Yekau Lake
Stony Plain No. 135
ee
Jack Fish Lake
m
Sundance
Natural Area
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22
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Cottage Lake LAKE
Cr
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Wagner
Marl Ponds
SPRUCE
GROVE
STONY
PLAIN
SPRING
Mink Lake
At
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V Keephills
627
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Longhurst Lake
Devon Dunes
To m a h
Tomahawk
aw
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624
No r th Sa s k
R
Analysis
Well-defined ecological criteria were established as quantifiable metrics of environmental
significance aimed at meeting specified conservation objectives for Parkland County.
These ESA criteria, along with defined metrics of environmental sensitivity, were
weighted according to relative importance and overlain in a multi-criteria GIS model to
generate a map of overall environmental significance. This map was then used to delineate
preliminary ESA boundaries.
U
V
aw
Define ESA objectives
Build criteria that meet specified objectives
Acquire data that best represent established criteria
Systematically weight and score criteria
Conduct spatial modelling to determine the location, classification, and relative
significance of ESAs
16A
STONY PLAIN
Johnnys Lake
Hoople Lake
To m a h
The process for identifying ESAs in Parkland County consisted of obtaining, formatting,
and integrating a wide variety of county-wide spatial data sets within a consistent,
repeatable mapping framework. The following steps were taken in the process of
identifying and classifying ESAs:
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
Dussault Lake
Round Lake
Entwistle
a tc
h e wa n
Kitto Lake
First Nations Reserve
Municipal Boundary
+
k
ESA
Criteria Map: Landforms + Slopes Score
High
Priority Landforms
Minor Local Significance
Local Significance
Low
Provincial Significance
Highway
Date Saved: 25/11/2013
Document Path: N:\Projects\130708 Parkland County - Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates\05- Data\MXDs\Theme_Maps\Version3\landforms_v3.mxd
MAP 11: SURFACE WATER RESOURCES
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Gladu Lake
Dussault Lake
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43
Ki
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779
Glory Lake
Soldan Lake
U
V
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Eden Lake
Hubbles Lake
WABAMUN
SEBA BEACH
Muir Lake
U
V
Chickakoo Lake
Isle Lake
Round Lake
Entwistle
U
V
16
SPRUCE GROVE
U
V
Wabamun Lake
16A
Johnnys Lake
Hoople Lake
Wabamun No. 133A
U
V
22
STONY PLAIN
Mink Lake
Star Lake
U
V
SPRING LAKE
628
Cottage Lake
U
V
U
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770
759
60
Hasse Lake
Yekau Lake
Stony Plain No. 135
ee
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Cr
Mayatan Lake Jack Fish Lake
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At
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Keephills
627
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Longhurst Lake
To m a h
Tomahawk
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N o r t h S as k
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a tc
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Kitto Lake
County Boundary
Municipal Boundary
First Nations Reserve
Highway
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ESA Criteria Map: Surface Water Score
Score
High
Low
Date Saved: 28/11/2013
Document Path: N:\Projects\130708 Parkland County - Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates\05- Data\MXDs\Theme_Maps\Version3\surface_water_v3.mxd
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MAP 10: GROUNDWATER RESOURCES
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Kilometres
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Dussault Lake
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Glory Lake
Soldan Lake
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Eden Lake
Hubbles Lake
WABAMUN
SEBA BEACH
Muir Lake
U
V
Chickakoo Lake
Isle Lake
Round Lake
Entwistle
U
V
16
SPRUCE GROVE
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Wabamun Lake
16A
Johnnys Lake
Hoople Lake
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Star Lake
Wabamun No. 133A
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STONY PLAIN
Mink Lake
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SPRING LAKE
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Cottage Lake
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Hasse Lake
Yekau Lake
Stony Plain No. 135
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Mayatan Lake Jack Fish Lake
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Field Reconnaissnace
After analyzing, mapping, and ranking Environmentally Significant Areas (ESAs) based
on scientific data, potential ESAs were then ground-truthed for accuracy by a team of
landscape ecologists and environmental planners. Ground truthing involved a combination
of recent aerial photos, driving public access roads, and a helicopter fly-over of the entire
county.
0 1 2
i
Pemb
Determining Significance
Once modelling was complete, ESAs were classified within a hierarchy of significance.
ESAs were systematically evaluated for significance on a local, regional, provincial,
national, and international level. Consistent and objective critera were defined for each
level of significance and a decision tree was developed to systematically classify ESAs into
a hierarchy of relative significance.
Score
County Boundary
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Keephills
627
To m a h
Tomahawk
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Longhurst Lake
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ESA Criteria Map: Groundwater Score
County Boundary
Score
High
Municipal Boundary
First Nations Reserve
Low
Highway
Buried Valley Aquifers
Exploration Restricted Areas
Date Saved: 28/11/2013
Document Path: N:\Projects\130708 Parkland County - Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates\05- Data\MXDs\Theme_Maps\Version3\groundwater_v3.mxd
MAP 13: OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE SCORE
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ni
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Hubbles Lake
WABAMUN
SEBA BEACH
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Glory Lake
Soldan Lake
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Muir Lake
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Chickakoo Lake
Isle Lake
Round Lake
Entwhistle
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16
SPRUCE GROVE
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Wabamun Lake
16A
Johnnys Lake
Hoople Lake
Star Lake
Wabamun No. 133A
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SPRING LAKE
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Cottage Lake
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Hasse Lake
Yekau Lake
Stony Plain No. 135
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Mayatan Lake Jack Fish Lake
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STONY PLAIN
Mink Lake
At
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Keephills
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To m a h
Tomahawk
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Longhurst Lake
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Kitto Lake
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Overall Environmental Significance Score
Score
County Boundary
Municipal Boundary
<6
First Nations Reserve
6-12
Highway
12-18
18-24
24-30
30-36
>36
Date Saved: 20/11/2013
Document Path: N:\Projects\130708 Parkland County - Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates\05- Data\MXDs\Theme_Maps\Version3\overall_ESA_score_v3.mxd
ENVIRONMENTALLY SIGNIFICANT AREAS OF PARKLAND COUNTY (NEW 2013)
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Kilometres
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Pemb
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Entwistle
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U
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WABAMUN
SEBA BEACH
SPRUCE GROVE
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Wabamun Lake
16A
STONY PLAIN
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SPRING LAKE
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Wabamun No. 133A
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60
Stony Plain No. 135
k
759
m
Cr
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Keephills
At
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627
To m a h
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N o r t h S as k
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Decision tree for determining ESA significance
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Tomahawk
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Environmentally Significant Areas of Parkland County
County Boundary
Significance
First Nations Reserve
International
Municipal Boundary
National
Highway
Provincial
Regional
Local
Date Saved: 30/10/2014
Document Path: N:\Projects\130708 Parkland County - Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates\05- Data\MXDs\Phase 2 Maps\ESAs_Simple.mxd
Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates
Canadian Institute of Planners | 2015 Awards Planning fo Excellence | Category: Natural Systems Planning
0 1 2
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Kilometres
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Public Engagement
At the onset of the project, an engagement plan was prepared outlining the desired
outcomes and objectives, schedule of activities, and communications requirements
for coordinating meaningful public involvement in the ECMP. Both centralized and
decentralized methods of engagement were used to ensure that all residents, even those
in the more sparsely populated regions of the County, had the opportunity to be involved.
Public open houses and stakeholder workshops were held at multiple locations across the
County, from the more densely populated eastern end, to small community halls in the far
western reaches of the County. Online public surveys and an interactive web-mapping tool
provided decentralized ways of collecting feedback without requiring residents to travel.
Providing an abundant range of engagement opportunities was particularly important in
this project given the size of the County and the dispersed nature of its rural population.
+
Field Reconnaissance: helicopter fly over of entire county
+
Aerial documentation of ESAs
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Postcard Invitations to Public Open Houses
Engagement Activities
Public Online Survey: At the onset of the project, an online survey was conducted to
gain an understanding of the environmental priorities and environmental management
issues of interest to the general public in Parkland County. The survey was advertised in
newspapers, the Parkland County Communicator, the project website, and the County’s
facebook and twitter pages and recieved 186 responses.
Stakeholder Workshops: The process of ESA identification and community visioning
for the ECMP was undertaken in collaboration with stakeholders representing a diverse
cross-section of interests in the project. Stakeholders from industry, the business
community, the agricultural community, natural area societies, lake management
associations, neighborhood associations, surrounding municipalitiles, local NGOs, and
research institutions attended two separate workshops: one for Phase 1 of the project
(ESA identification) and one for Phase 2 (environmental policy + visioning). A total of
48 stakeholders attended the Phase 1 workshop while 52 stakeholders attended the Phase
2 workshops (one workshop held three times in different locations across the County).
There was a considerable amount of outreach and communication with stakeholders
from several lake management associations, and natural area societies that influenced the
evolution of the ECMP. These stakeholders were instrumental in providing additional data
and editorial comments, and shaping a plan that reflects the diverse values of Parkland
County.
Public Open Houses: Two open house events were held to present and discuss the draft
inventory of Environmentally Significant Areas (ESAs) with Parkland County residents.
The open houses were advertised primarily by project postcards delivered to 7,000 homes,
supplemented by newspaper advertisements, email invitations to the project mailing list,
promotion on the project website and social media pages, and advertising in the Parkland
County Communicator. A total of 28 residents attended the first open house held in the
eastern end of the County, while 8 attended the second open house in the far western
end. Open house attendees were invited to review display material, speak with project
team members, and leave comments using sticky notes and comment sheets.
Interactive Web-Mapping: An interactive web mapping tool was developed to allow
stakeholders and residents the opportunity to virtually review ESA analysis and to leave
spatially referenced comments. This tool ensured that individuals who may not have been
able to attend the workshop or the open house were still afforded an opportunity to
participate in the project. This was especially important given the size of the county and
the dispersed nature of its rural population.
+
Stakeholder comments on initial mapping
4
Steering Committee Oversight: The project team worked very closely with a
multidisciplinary steering committee of Parkland County staff throughout all phases of
the project. The steering committee helped the project team validate findings, fine tune
recommendations, and work collaboratively toward well rounded solutions.
Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates
Canadian Institute of Planners | 2015 Awards Planning fo Excellence | Category: Natural Systems Planning
PRIORITY AREAS FOR CONSERVATION AND REMEDIATION
Value
Risk
Ri v
Pemb
Value
Isle Lake
765
16
Wagner Natural Area
Critical habitat and stepping stone in the
midst of intensive development
Value
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V
43
in
K il
WABAMUN
Wabamun Lake
759
Risk
D
44
U
V
16
SPRUCE GROVE
U
V
16A
STONY PLAIN
U
V
oa
l
628
U
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Wabamun No. 133A
C
U
V
770
60
Stony Plain No. 135
ee
M
in
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i
At
U
V
Keephills
627
A G R I C U LT U R A L
S
Devon Dunes
LAND
rt
h
k
C
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624
Sa
ek
ska
tchew
a n R i v e r Va l l e
y
Sturgeon Hole Reach
Central Corridor feeds into and affects the N. Sask
River Valley Sturgeon Hole Reach ESA:
a Nationally significant ESA for its critical spawning habitat for
endangered lake sturgeon
Value
Risk
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aw
U
V
Western Interior Patch Complex
Provides for generally uninhibited connectivity
across a large portion of the County
Value
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V
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No
Tomahawk
N
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SPRING LAKE
lt
a
G
LA
i Cr
k
an
sA
U
V
N
li n
Cr
ZI
nds
Pembina R
iv
Pe
A
Ki
N o r t h S as k
a tc
hewa n
Devon Dunes Patch Complex
Generally undisturbed patch complex
containing wetlands, overlying permeable soils
North Saskatchewan
River Valley Corridor
Risk
Value
*
r
iv
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a
atl
R
ek
R
22
re
iC
m
Tr
G
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V
er
Risk
Big Lake
U
V
U
V
SEBA BEACH
lle
Value
Risk
Risk
U
V
Entwistle
Va
Big Lake/Atim Creek Corridor
Riparian restoration required along Atim Creek to restore connectivity
Value
779
Value
Risk
Risk
Large Patch Complexes
ESAs
Landscape Patterns
Coal Mine (Province)
Large Patches
Stepping Stones
Major Corridors
County Boundary
Municipal Boundary
First Nations Reserve
Highway
Communication Techniques
Postcards: Postcard invitations were sent to over 7,000 homes in Parkland County
inviting residents to attend the ECMP public open house events.
Lac Ste. Anne
North Central Patch Complex:
Relatively intact patch network allowing for
generally uninhibited connectivity north of highway 16.
757
i
Western Interior
Patch Complex
(see below)
na
Risk
U
V
e
r
Value
Chickakoo Lake Patch Complex:
Relatively intact patch network
surrounding lakes
Central Corridor:
Value
Risk
and wetlands
Kilini Creek to North
Saskatchewan River Valley
Isle Lake
Remediation, land use management and monitoring
required to restore lake ecosystem
Pembina River Corridor
To m a h
Environmental Advisory Committee Meetings: Two presentations about the
ECMP project were made to the Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC) - a standing
committee of Parkland County Council. EAC members were also invited to participate
in the stakeholder workshops. The first presentation introduced the project and provided
an overview of consultation activities and objectives. The second presentation provided a
detailed description of ESA mapping and analysis, and sought feedback from committee
members.
*There are certain “indispensable patterns” in the landscape that, if
protected, will conserve the majority of important ecological
functions and biodiversity (Forman, 1995)
Generalized boundary of priority areas requiring remediation measures
Inherent environmental value vs. risk of degradation from development pressure
Potential links between patches
Date Saved: 19/10/2014
Document Path: N:\Projects\130708 Parkland County - Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates\05- Data\MXDs\Phase 2 Maps\Biodiversity.mxd
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Kilometres
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Policy Map: Priority Areas for Conservation + Management
Project website: A project website was created to post updates on the status of the
project, and to notify the public of upcoming project-related events.
Emails: Invitations for workshops and project updates were directly emailed to Parkland
County residents and stakeholders.
Local and Social Media: Engagement activities were posted on the Parkland County
Facebook and Twitter pages.
+
PRIORITY AREAS FOR GROUNDWATER RESOURCES
Beverly Buried Valley Aquifer
This shallow aquifer underlies a number of groundwater-fed
lakes and is the water source for many private wells.
Protecting this landform is crucial to maintaing the integrity of
drinking water supplies and lake surface water quality
Isle Lake
The potential for groundwater contamination on the southern
lake shore has been assessed as high.
Remediation, land use management and monitoring are required
to restore lake ecosystem and protect the underlying aquifer
Value
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e
r
Ri v
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Value
Risk
Wagner Grounwater Recharge Zone
The Wagner Natural Area ecosystem is dependent on a
stable supply of high quality groundwater. The Acheson
Industrial area falls within the recharge zone and may
potentially affect recharge rates and contaminate
groundwater quality within the Natural Area.
Risk
757
i
Pemb
Onoway Buried Valley Aquifer
This landform is highly vulnerable to
sub-surface grounwater contamination,
which can affect local aquifers and
surface water bodies, such as Isle
Lake. The Onoway Channel is also
interconnected with Wabamun
Lake by way of a glacial
meltwater channel.
Value
Risk
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V
779
Value
765
16
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43
Ki
li n
i Cr
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k
44
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16
er
WABAMUN
SEBA BEACH
759
Wagner
Recharge Zone
(see above)
SPRUCE GROVE
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qu
16A
STONY PLAIN
A
SPRING LAKE
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V
e
y
an
sA
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if
Wabamun Lake
Tr
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lt
a
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Wabamun No. 133A
C
oa
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M
770
in
e
627
rl
ve
Be
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Keephills
y
Bu
ri
ed
Va
ll
628
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60
Stony Plain No. 135
k
d
rie
Bu
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V
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V
ee
Cr
ay
r
ife
qu
yA
lle
Va
m
Entwistle
Risk
At
i
Devon
Dunes
To m a h
Tomahawk
aw
The Parkland County ECMP was founded on an understanding of the principles of
landscape ecology. This big picture approach is based on the notion that there are certain
“indispensible patterns” in any landscape that, if protected, will conserve the majority of
important ecological functions in that landscape. This was the critical rationale behind
identifying and prioritizing ESAs as a central component of the ECMP, and was also the
central concept driving the analysis methods for ESA identification.
O
no
w
Clarity of Goals + Objectives
Policy Map: Priority Areas for Surface Water Management
C
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Kilometres
8
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PRIORITY AREAS FOR SOIL RESOURCES
Central Parkland Soils Group
Some of the most productive agricultural land in the prairies occurs in the Central Parkland Subregion. In Parkland County, this
portion of the natural subregion is characterized by dark Chernozem soils, which have a Canada Land Inventory (CLI) rating of
Class 1 -Class 3, indicating that these soils are very well suited to cultivated crop production. In light of growing country residential
development enimating from Stony Plain and Spruce Grove, these soils should be conserved for agricultural purposes only.
U
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Value
757
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r
Ri v
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Risk
U
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779
U
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765
U
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Entwistle
16
U
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43
Ki
W
O
D
SPRUCE GROVE
U
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16A
STONY PLAIN
U
V
SPRING LAKE
628
U
V
770
k
Cr
ee
in
e
At
U
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Keephills
i
P
A
R
K
LA
N
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V
D
60
Stony Plain No. 135
L
627
N
T
CE
R
N
TR
M
m
oa
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44
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16
O
IX
M
Wabamun No. 133A
C
A
lt
a
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k
A
759
Y
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V
R
WO
D
ee
D
ED
L
IX
an
sA
E
Wabamun Lake
Tr
M
i Cr
WABAMUN
SEBA BEACH
OD
li n
C
E
Devon
Dunes
To m a h
Tomahawk
aw
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V
C
k
re
ek
r
N o r t h S as k
R
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624
a tc
hewa n
Generalized boundary of priority areas where proposed development
requires greater environmental assessment
Development Pressures
Canada Land Inventory Soil Capability For Agriculture Classes
County Boundary
Oil and Gas Well Site
Class 1: No significant limitations for agriculture
Municipal Boundary
Rural Industrial Site
Class 2: Moderate limitations
First Nations Reserve
Peat Harvest (Province)
Class 3: Moderately severe limitations
Highway
Coal Mine (Province)
Class 4: Severe limitations
ESAs
Country / Lakeshore Residential Development
Class 5: Very severe limitations
Gravel Pit
Class 6: Extremely severe limitations
Organic soils*
Inherent environmental value vs.
risk of degradation from development pressure
Date Saved: 19/10/2014
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4
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Kilometres
8
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Policy Map: Priority Areas for Soil Resource Management
PRIORITY AREAS FOR OPEN SPACE ACQUISITION + CONNECTIVITY
The Kilini Creek corridor, currently zoned as
Agricultural General District, would benefit from
being redistricted as a Conservation District to
ensure sensitive species and habitats are conserved
mb
ina Ri
ver
757
Pe
The Chickakoo Lake and Devon Dunes areas would benefit
from being re-districted as a Cluster Development District in
order to maximize open space conservation during the process
of future residential subdivision development
In the Mayatan Lake/Jackfish Lake area, it may
be beneficial to redistrict the land as a Cluster
Development District in order to conserve larger
parcels of public open space during the
subdivision process.
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Dussault Lake
Bell Lake
Isle Lake
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16
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765
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43
Ki
SEBA
BEACH
Soldan Lake
i
li n
Cr
Glory Lake
k
e e Eden Lake
U
V
44
Hubbles Lake
WABAMUN
Gladu Lake
779
Round Lake
Entwistle
Muir Lake
U
V
Chickakoo Lake
U
V
16
U
V
Wabamun Lake
16A
Johnnys Lake
Hoople Lake
Mink Lake
Star Lake
Wabamun No. 133A
U
V
U
V
628
U
V
U
V
60
770
759
Hasse Lake
Yekau Lake
Stony Plain No. 135
ee
Jack Fish Lake
m
Mayatan Lake
k
22
SPRUCE
GROVE
STONY
PLAIN
Cr
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SPRING
Cottage Lake LAKE
U
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Keephills
627
aw
k
C
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No r th Sa sk
a tc
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Kitto Lake
Provincial Natural Area
Atim Creek Big Lake Overlay
Municipal Boundary
Provincial Park
Agriculture/Nature Conservation District
First Nations Reserve
Provincial Grazing Reserve
Country Residential
Hydrography
Other Crown Lands
Lands Owned/Managed by Conservation Organizations
Stony Plain/Spruce Grove Municipal Parks
Environmental Reserve
Highway
r
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624
County Boundary
i
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Tomahawk
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The Pembina and North Saskatchewan
River Valleys may benefit from
re-districting as Conservation Districts to
more adequately conserve valued
ecological and recreational areas along
the river banks
At
Longhurst Lake
To m a h
Areas housing species of conservation concern
Rare or unique landforms
Large intact patches of natural vegetation
Natural corridors and connecting areas
Riparian areas and lake shorelines
Major river valley systems
Wetlands
Areas important for maintaining groundwater quality + quantity
Areas important for maintaining surfacewater quality + quantity
Areas of significant on-going ecological research
Inherent environmental value vs.
risk of degradation from development pressure
Policy Map: Priority Areas for Groundwater Management
22
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
Risk
Generalized boundary of priority areas requiring remediation measures
Date Saved: 19/10/2014
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Conservation Objectives
Building upon the guiding landscape ecology principles, the following resources and
landscape patterns were identified as objectives for conservation. These objectives
were translated into mappable criteria in the process of building a framework for ESA
modelling:
Value
Generalized boundary of priority areas where proposed
development requires greater environmental assessment
i
»» Conserve large patches of natural vegetation
»» Ensure connectivity between large patches via wide corridors or clusters of smaller
patches of natural vegetation
»» Maintain vegetated corridors along streams and rivers
»» Conserve stepping stones of small natural vegetation patches through altered
landscapes
a tc
hewa n
Devon Dunes
Porous sandy soils that characterize this landform make underlying
groundwater supplies particularly vulnerable to contamination,
especially in light of growing residential development pressures.
Groundwater Sensitivity Value Development Pressures
County Boundary
High
Oil and Gas Well Site
Municipal Boundary
Rural Industrial Site
First Nations Reserve
Low
Peat Harvest (Province)
Highway
Coal Mine (Province)
Buried Valley Aquifers
Country / Lakeshore Residential Development
ESAs
Existing Gravel Pit
Pemb
Landscape Ecology Principles
N o r t h S as k
R
iv
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624
ESAs
Potential Open Space Connections
Potential Connections requiring partnerships with
other jurisdictions and First Nations governments
Priority areas for potential re-districting to conserve
open space
Date Saved: 15/09/2014
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Kilometres
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Policy Map: Priority Areas for Open Space Acquisition
Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates
Canadian Institute of Planners | 2015 Awards Planning fo Excellence | Category: Natural Systems Planning
5
Implementation
The ECMP is a technical, non-statutory document that will help guide the development
of new statutory plans in Parkland County. The ECMP Phase 1 report was accepted as
information by Parkland County Council on June 10, 2014. Recommended policy
updates, procedures, and map tools (Phase 2) will be integrated into the County’s
Community Sustainability & Development Plan which will be completed in 2016. Phase
3 deliverables will inform key updates to several County policies and procedures related
to the preservation of the environment. In the meantime, landownwers and developers
will be expected to fully review the ECMP document for information and management
guidance if their developments occur adjacent to, or potentially within an Environmentally
Significant Area (ESA).
Parkland County
Environmental Conservation Master Plan
Phase 1 Background Technical Report
+
Landforms
Overall Presentation
Phase 1 Report
Prepared by : O2 Planning + Design Inc.
For: Parkland County
Submitted: June 11, 2014
Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan - Phase 1
1
+
Parkland County ECMP Phase 1 Report
WAGNER NATURAL AREA AND SURROUNDING FOREST ESA
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9
8
7
The Parkland County ECMP clearly presents complex information in a format that is
understandable to all. Considerable effort was made to create material that is highly visual
and appealing to use. The ECMP report contains fact sheets for each of the 61 ESAs in
the County, grouping them into chapters by the landscape unit (indicative of dominant
landscape character) in which they occur. The fact sheets present a detailed portrait of
each ESA, including the following elements: a photo, a map, a description, key features,
significance level, thematic bar graph illustrating the relative contribution of individual
ESA criteria characterizing the ESA, environmental sensitivity level, and management
considerations specific to the ESA. This fact sheet format makes the ECMP an accessible
and appealing reference manual that can be used by planners, developers, and the general
public.
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Phases 2 of the project generated a series of visually engaging policy maps. These maps
are intended to help both planners and the public understand how the spatial application
of certain environmental policies and procedures influences landscape wide ecological
health.
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Sustainability
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0 200 400
ESA Significance
800
1,200
1,600
Metres
Provincially Owned Lands
International
National
Provincial
Regional
Local
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Stony Plain
No. 135
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County Boundary
Municipal Conservation Areas
Parcel Boundary
Lands Owned/Managed by
Conservation Organizations
Municipal Boundary
Wagner Recharge Zone
Hydrography
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Potential Wildlife Corridors*
*Potential corridor locations based on reported resident observations
and confirmed by a land cover driven circuit connectivity model
First Nations Reserve
Highway
Date Saved: 24/01/2014
Document Path: N:\Projects\130708 Parkland County - Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates\05- Data\MXDs\ESA Maps\Individual ESA Map Sheets\Wagner_Natural_Area_and_Surr_Forest_20131218.mxd
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Wagner Natural Area ESA Map
96
Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan - Phase 1
6
With extremely high growth rates, ongoing resource extraction, and an expanding industrial
area, Parkland County initiated the ECMP project to take stock of its environmental assets
as a first step in prioritizing landscape-wide planning initiatives. The project is progressive
on several fronts, including the decision to begin viewing municipal land use planning
through the wide lens of landscape ecology. Through this lens, the County has committed
to sustainable planning and development at the scale of the entire landscape, ensuring that
future growth and development are mindful of impacts to broad, interconnected resource
flows and processes that sustain a high quality of life for County residents. The ECMP
will guide the County in developing the Community Sustainability & Development Plan
(CSDP) which will be completed in 2016. As a statutory plan, the CSDP is one of the
key means of implementing the findings of the ECMP, effectively translating rigorous
landscape analysis into holistic landscape planning solutions.
Parkland County Environmental Conservation Master Plan + Policy Updates
Canadian Institute of Planners | 2015 Awards Planning fo Excellence | Category: Natural Systems Planning

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