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Peterson`s Print on Demand
2011
Peterson's Print On Demand
Prepared for:
Carol Aickley
2000 Lenox Drive
Lawrenceville NJ 08648
Order Number: POD46474
Order Date: 08/29/2011 02:23 PM
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Peterson's Print On Demand
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Advice/Article Center
The article center is where you will find all of the articles you selected during the book building process. The
articles tend to be shorter in length, never exceeding three pages. Their compact presentation of information is
what differentiates them from the chapters and book content in the next section. The content of each article was
written by an expert in their field to ensure that the information provided is up-to-date and answers even your
toughest questions. Whether you selected an article about admissions, or preparing for a high school admissions
test you can be assured that each article was carefully written to present you with valuable facts and tips to help
you reach your goals.
The articles you selected begin on the next page and include:
* The Benefits of Private Schools
* The Intangible Advantages of Summer Camp
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The Benefits of Private Schools
Although there are many excellent public high schools, some families are unhappy with the particular
schools available to their children. Overcrowding, concerns about safety, or the feeling that their children are
not being challenged have led many parents to investigate other possibilities. Here are some things to
consider in weighing your options.
Academic Rigor
Many parents feel their children are not being challenged in public schools. These parents are often drawn to
private schools because of the academic rigor that comes with smaller classes and teachers who nurture and
promote each child's talents. In a room with only 14 students, it is difficult to remain uninvolved or
unprepared. Smaller classes promote faculty-student interaction; most kids respond to teachers who know
and care about them.
Parents looking for smaller classes are also drawn to the adviser systems that characterize most private
schools. Although the specifics vary, most private schools find ways to promote close student- teacher
relationships. These connections are possible because, in addition to smaller classes, each teacher only
advises a small number of students. Most teachers also coach activities that allow them other means of
interacting with students.
The Arts
Another big draw of private schools is their emphasis on the arts. Families who have seen significant
cutbacks in their public schools are eager to find schools that will provide an outlet for their creative children.
Most private schools require at least one taste of the arts, and larger schools often offer courses that used to
be available only at the collegiate level.
Extracurricular Activities
Most private schools recognize the importance of providing an extended menu of extracurricular choices.
Many private high school students participate in several different clubs and play several sports. In some of
the smaller schools, even fairly modest athletes can enjoy playing on several school teams.
Values and Character
Other families are drawn to private schools because of their emphasis on values, character, and standards.
Removed from issues such as separation of church and state, private schools seek out opportunities to talk
with their students about their morals and values. Although some private schools have clear religious
affiliations, almost all address issues of integrity, service to one's community, and morality openly and
repeatedly.
In recent years, many private schools have developed a community-service requirement for graduation.
Students at these schools spend significant time volunteering, organizing walk-a-thons, or working with less
fortunate children. This provides a chance for students to look beyond themselves and to question the status
quo.
Security
Certainly, the extensive media attention given to incidents of school violence has heightened parental concern
about school safety. Although private school administrators cannot make guarantees, they hope that their
ability to provide extensive individual attention to each student will create a safe, secure community.
Recently, private schools have focused more attention on campus security. Although many schools have
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attempted to make their schools less accessible, most independent school heads would argue that their best
defense against campus violence lies in the fact that each student and each adult is a well-known part of the
school community.
Community
Unlike many public schools, where students and faculty members can only be in the buildings during
prescribed hours, private schools promote a strong sense of community in which teachers and students come
early in the morning and stay late into the evening. In fact, many of these high school students view their
school as their home.
Ticket to the Ivy League
Some parents seek a private school because they believe it will be their child's ticket to a competitive college.
This is tricky ground because college admission is not that simple.
Going to a private school does not guarantee admission to any college, but it can result in much more
personalized college counseling. Counselors advise a smaller number of students whom they know well.
These counselors spend hours talking with each child about what courses to take and what activities to
pursue at school and during the summer.
In addition, teacher recommendations from private schools reflect the close personal connections between
students and faculty members and can therefore be persuasive. Clearly, teachers who know their students
well are able to cite specific examples of their work and evidence of their aptitude. This kind of individual,
personal guidance is simply not possible when one college counselor works with hundreds of students.
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The Intangible Advantages of Summer Camp
The first letter home:
Dear Mom and Dad,
I hate being here. The counselors expect us to cook and keep everything clean. Before dinner we have to say something
about what happened that day. It's stupid. I had to hike to the top of a mountain when I didn't want to. I want to come
home -- now!
Your daughter
The last letter home:
Dear Mom and Dad,
This summer changed my life. Before, I always called the shots, but not here. Everyone is supportive and accepts me for the
real me, not the pretend me. I can't wait to come back next summer and climb more mountains.
Your loving daughter
One Adult, Coming Up
While the letter above is fictitious, it's based on real events. Unlike the perceptible advantages that children
gain from summer programs, the intangible advantages are harder to pin down. In conjunction with home
and school, summer programs are one of the many building blocks that create an adult. And while few
children realize how much they've been influenced by their summer experiences, as adults they often see
how their lives were enriched and layers were added to their development.
The Give and Take of Communal Living
Beyond facilities and activity schedules, the people whom children encounter -- bunk mates, counselors, and
staff -- play an influential role. Kids living in cabin situations soon find out that when they don't treat one
another well, there are consequences. If one person chooses not to cooperate, the whole group is affected.
Of course, the maturity level and experience of the staff is a key factor. An experienced counselor can size up
a child's situation and step in to help someone who is shy or shore up a child who will get picked on before
the child even knows it.
Campers Without Labels
Chris Yager takes small groups of teens off the beaten path in Asia with his program Where There Be
Dragons. Teens, who are in the throes of questioning their social, political, and economic environment see
themselves in another light as a result of being in such a foreign setting, notes Yager. He contends that when
teens are far from their normal circumstances, they react in new ways. Kids who have never been leaders take
charge. The popular outgoing teen becomes the quiet observer.
It is a wonderful experience for a child or teen to come to a place where he or she is an unknown entity and
freed from his or her usual context.
Trying New Things
Trying out new things is another significant intangible benefit. At home and in school, children can dodge
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new experiences. At well-run camps, they can't. Of course, the primary goal of any well-run program is fun.
Independence from parents also exerts a strong influence. The child who is away from home encounters new
experiences independently. With the safety net of insightful counselors and staff, children can risk finding
out what works and what doesn't in interpersonal relationships, while discovering new facets of themselves.
Things to Keep in Mind
Though summer camps and programs can have a deep impact on a child's development, not all camps have
what it takes -- a well-thought out philosophy, a mature and alert staff, and counselors who provide excellent
role models and give kids a fun time. By looking at the intangibles, you can choose a program wisely.
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Chapters/Books
Peterson’s books go through an extensive content assembly and editing process. It takes many months to create
all the questions and practice tests, craft the subject reviews, collect school information, facts, and figures, and
develop tips and strategies. Our books will not be made available to you unless every page has been reviewed
and edited, so you can be certain that the information presented in this section is of the highest quality. Whether
you selected an entire book or individual chapters from various books these materials will become an asset in
your quest for achievement.
The chapters/books you selected begin on the next page and include:
* Master the Catholic High School Entrance Exams--Practice Test 2: TACHS
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Practice Test 2: TACHS
READING
Part 1
5 MINUTES
Directions: For each question, decide which one of the four possible answers has most nearly the same
meaning as the underlined word above it. Then, on your answer sheet, find the row of answer spaces
numbered the same as the question. Fill in the answer space that has the same letter as the answer you
chose.
1. Highly anticipated arrival
(A)
expected
(B)
late
(C)
departed
(D)
unclear
2. Decaying leaves
(J) growing
(K)
falling
(L) rotting
(M)
colorful
3. An alternate plan
(A)
replacement
(B) ineffective
(C)
ambitious
(D)
inferior
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4. To estimate the cost
(J)
calculate approximately
(K)
approve of
(L)
discount
(M)
pay for
5. Weary runner
(A)
energetic
(B)
lost
(C)
tired
(D) winning
6. Vibrant colors
(J)
(K)
drab and dull
bold and bright
(L) transparent
(M)
black and white
7. A puzzling dilemma
(A)
game
(B) answer
(C)
appearance
(D)
problem
8. Driving recklessly
(J)
easily
(K)
carelessly
(L)
carefully
(M) for the first time
9. A rambling speaker
(A)
interesting
(B)
motivational
(C)
long-winded and wordy
(D)
loud
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10. Enormous buildings
(J) intricate
(K)
close together
(L)
huge
stone
(M)
STOP
If you finish before time is up, check over your work on this part only. Do not go on until the
signal is given.
Part 2
15 MINUTES
Directions: Read the passages below and then answer the questions. Four answers are given for each
question. You are to choose the answer that you think is better than the others. Then, on your answer
sheet, find the row of answer spaces numbered the same as the question. Fill in the best answer in the
ovals on your answer sheet.
PASSAGE 1
Charlie finally decided that he had had enough of city life. He made up his mind that he was tired of riding
the subway an hour to work every day, tired of living in a tiny apartment, and tired of not seeing the sunrise
and sunset. Charlie gathered his family around the dinner table and informed them of his desire to escape the
concrete jungle permanently. After a few hours, Charlie persuaded his wife and two kids to give the country
life a try.
Two weeks after Charlie made his decision, the family moved into a ranch house in rural Texas. On the day
the family moved in, Charlie’s youngest, Laurie, got stung by a small scorpion. Only a few hours later,
Charlie’s wife began sneezing uncontrollably and developed red, watery eyes. Charlie’s son found a
rattlesnake in the shed shortly thereafter. Before the movers unloaded half the furniture from the truck,
Charlie was on the phone with a Realtor back in New York City.
11. In sentence 1 of paragraph 2, what does the word “rural” mean?
(A)
Western
(B) In the country
(C)
Primitive
(D) Scenic
12. Why did Charlie call his realtor before he was even unpacked in Texas?
(J)
He was upset with the view from his porch.
(K)
He wanted to double-check the price of his new house.
(L)
The country life wasn’t what he hoped for, and he was ready to move back to the city.
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(M)
He was disappointed in the movers.
PASSAGE 2
In the nineteenth century, a wave of liberalism swept across Europe. Liberals—those who advocated
liberalism—heavily favored liberty, equality, and natural rights for citizens of European nations. Specifically,
liberals hoped to win for citizens such things as voting rights and equal protection under the law. Ironically,
the vast majority of liberals sought these rights for men only and not for women.
Standing in the way of liberal reform were the wealthy nobles, aristocrats, and the monarchs seated
precariously on the thrones of Europe. The nobility felt threatened by liberalism because nobles held nearly
all political power in early nineteenth-century Europe. Because they held all the power, the common man
was left with virtually no say in the government. The nobles knew that their political positions would be in
jeopardy if the common citizens were allowed to choose government officials. Ultimately, liberalism proved
too strong a force for the aristocracy to defeat.
13. What was the nobles’ greatest fear about common citizens winning the right to vote?
(A)
Citizens didn’t know how to vote.
(B) Citizens might not exercise their right to vote.
(C)
Nobles may not get the right to vote.
(D)
Citizens probably would elect people who had not been the power-holding nobles prior to
elections, thus leaving the nobles with little or no power.
14. Based on context clues in the second paragraph, the word “monarchs” probably means which of
the following?
(J) Commoners
(K)
Kings and queens
(L)
Jesters
(M)
Judges
PASSAGE 3
“Lefty” Gordon was an obscure outfielder who had a brief major league career with the Cleveland Indians in
the 1960s. He never hit dozens of home runs in a single season, he never stole many bases, he didn’t have
blazing speed, and he didn’t have the flashy style that many modern players have. What Lefty did have,
though, was a connection with the fans, particularly the ones in the cheap seats behind the centerfield wall.
For one fan in particular, Lefty Gordon was the greatest baseball player ever.
Mitchell Haskins was just a kid in the 1960s. Mitchell’s family had very little money, but he was fortunate
enough to be able to attend a few Indians games, in the cheap seats, as a kid. One warm June afternoon in the
final inning of a lopsided game, Lefty Gordon made his first appearance of the game in centerfield. On the
final out of the game, Gordon chased down a fly ball and made a nice catch. Mitchell, just a kid then,
applauded wildly. Gordon saw Mitchell cheering, climbed the fence, and tossed Mitchell the ball. As he
climbed down from the fence, he said to Mitchell, “If every fan cheered as hard as you, we’d win every game.
Thanks kid!”
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15. Why didn’t Lefty Gordon get into the game until the final innings?
(A)
He was left-handed.
(B)
The game was lopsided so the Indians didn’t want to run up the score on the visiting team.
(C)
The coaches didn’t like Lefty.
(D)
Lefty was not good enough to start the game and probably played only as a reserve player.
16. Why did Mitchell think Lefty was one of the greatest players?
(J)
Lefty had amazing skills.
(K) Lefty wasn’t being treated fairly.
Mitchell saw talent in Lefty that the coaches didn’t see.
(L)
Lefty made a personal connection with Mitchell and the fans that other players didn’t make.
(M)
PASSAGE 4
As Margie strolled through the mall, a muscular young man handed her a pamphlet advertising a brand new
workout facility across town. Margie took the pamphlet; she had been pondering a new fitness routine. She
read as she walked past store after store. On her way through the department store at the end of the mall, she
stopped and browsed the fitness equipment in the store. Margie was convinced that she needed to do
something to help herself feel better, have more energy, and generally lead a healthier life.
After much thought, Margie decided that an expensive exercise apparatus eventually would turn into an
expensive clothes rack in her bedroom. Margie also decided that the new workout facility would be better
than the exercise equipment. However, she wondered if a facility on the other side of town would actually
deter her from working out regularly. Margie ultimately decided to spend a fraction of the money she would
have spent otherwise, and she purchased a small set of weights and some workout videos.
17. What was Margie’s true feeling about purchasing the expensive exercise equipment?
She was afraid she wouldn’t know how to use the equipment.
(A)
(B) She wanted to hang clothes somewhere other than in her closet.
(C) She feared that she wouldn’t use the equipment enough to justify the price.
She didn’t think the equipment would fit anywhere except in her bedroom.
(D)
18. Based on context clues, what does the word “deter” mean in the passage?
(J)
allow
(K)
include
(L)
encourage
(M)
discourage
PASSAGE 5
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The camp director stood in front of the staff late Friday evening to address her camp counselors. The
counselors had been working for two weeks without a break and faced another two weeks of the same
routine before camp was to be dismissed for the summer. The counselors directed or participated in activities
with the campers for 12 or 14 hours every day. In addition, the counselors made themselves available to the
campers for one-on-one attention, including giving advice and just listening. The counselors poured
themselves into their jobs.
The director looked at the face of each counselor and smiled. She knew how much of themselves they
invested in making the camp a success. She said, “When my elbows get rough, dry, and cracked from work
and exposure, I rub lotion on them. It’s amazing how that can relax and refresh. I want to give each of you
some proverbial lotion to soothe your souls. You get tomorrow off!”
19. Which of the following most likely describes the counselors?
(A) Unruly
(B)
Disinterested
(C)
Exhausted
(D)
Confused
20. Why did the director tell the counselors that she wanted to give them “some proverbial lotion”?
(J)
She wanted to give them real lotion, but she didn’t have enough for everyone.
(K)
She wanted to help them be relaxed and refreshed by giving them a day off.
(L)
She wanted to give the counselors the hint that some of them had dry skin.
(M)
STOP
She wanted to encourage them to use suntan lotion when working with the campers.
If you finish before time is up, check over your work on this part only. Do not go on until the
signal is given.
LANGUAGE
Part 1
25 MINUTES FOR PARTS 1 AND 2
Directions: This is a test of how well you can find mistakes in writing. For the questions with mistakes
in spelling, capitalization, and punctuation, choose the answer with the same letter as the line
containing the mistake. For the questions with mistakes in usage and expression, choose the answer
with the same letter as the line containing the mistake, or choose the word, phrase, or sentence that is
better than the others. When there is no mistake or no change needed, choose the last answer choice.
1. (A) ocean
(B)
calculater
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(C) trench
(D)
minute
(E)
(No mistakes)
2. (J) transport
(K)
attitude
(L)
sinse
(M)
evaluate
(N) (No mistakes)
3. (A) receive
(B) fault
(C)
liquid
(D)
lable
(E)
(No mistakes)
4. (J) notebook
(K) famine
(L)
(M)
zebra
knolledge
(N) (No mistakes)
5. (A) destination
(B)
declare
(C)
mischief
(D)
concquer
(E)
(No mistakes)
6. (J) forfit
(K)
vital
(L) avalanche
(M)
comfortable
(N) (No mistakes)
7. (A) finished
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(B)
relyable
(C) chrome
(D)
disappoint
(E)
(No mistakes)
8. (J) credible
(K) starlight
(L)
venom
(M)
accelerate
(N)
(No mistakes)
9. (A) initiate
(B)
simply
(C)
govenor
(D)
decline
(E)
(No mistakes)
10. (J) monstrous
(K)
protection
(L)
fields
(M)
decieve
(N) (No mistakes)
11. (A) To find my dog, rover, I
(B)
sailed across the ocean
(C) to the Johnson’s farm.
(D)
(No mistakes)
12. (J) The king’s jet flew
(K)
over the Andes Mountains
(L)
and beyond the river.
(M) (No mistakes)
13. (A) The New York Jets’ kicker and
(B)
the Dallas cowboys’ punter
(C) are actually Atlanta Falcons’ fans.
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(D)
(No mistakes)
14. (J) President Jefferson once lived
(K)
in the famous Virginia Home
(L)
known as Monticello.
(M) (No mistakes)
15. (A) For christmas last year,
(B)
mom and dad gave me
(C)
a coat just like Jamie’s.
(D)
(No mistakes)
16. (J) The Basketball Coach sent
(K)
the injured basketball player
(L)
to see Dr. Moore.
(M) (No mistakes)
17. (A) Queen Mary ordered her daughter,
(B) the Princess, to marry the son of
(C) one of the country’s richest dukes.
(D)
(No mistakes)
18. (J) How many times did j.j.
(K)
take a bite of Buddy’s ice cream
(L)
when Buddy was talking to Sally?
(M) (No mistakes)
19. (A) The leading candy company,
(B) Sweet Tooth, inc., just announced
(C)
a new candy bar called O Yum.
(D)
(No mistakes)
20. (J) I can’t remember if California
(K)
is the biggest State
(L)
or if Texas is the biggest.
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(M) (No mistakes)
Part 2
Directions: For questions 21–30, choose the best answer based on the following paragraphs.
(1) Many people believe that cooks and chefs learn their craft in their home kitchens or from their mothers
and grandmothers. (2) In fact, most of the very successful chefs, especially in expensive restaurants, actually
attend College to learn to cook. (3) Many of the world’s greatest cities boast a number of culinary schools, or
schools for aspiring chefs. (4) Athens, Paris, New York, San Francisco, Tokyo. Are home to such culinary
institutes. (5) Such institutes are to cooking what Harvard and Yale are to the study of law. (6) Coincidentally,
such culinary educations are similar in costs to Ivy League educations.
21. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 2?
(A)
a College
(B)
college
(C)
College,
(D)
(No change)
22. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 4?
(J)
San Francisco, and Tokyo are home
(K)
San Francisco, Tokyo—Are home
(L)
San Francisco and Tokyo is home
(M) (No change)
________________
(1) One of the fastest growing industries of the last twenty-five years is the baby food manufacturing
industry. (2) Millions of Americans each year use canned or jarred baby food as a regular part of the diet of
their children. (3) Because each baby food company wants to outsell the other baby food companies, new
flavors and food combinations are created each month. (4) Unfortunately for some who work at the baby food
companies, someone has to taste the baby food before it hits the shelves. (5) These “tasters” have to try such
new flavors as peas, potatoes, and meatloaf or squash, prunes, and beef. (6) Without the taste buds of these
loyal employees—millions of American babies would be forced to eat old-fashioned baby foods like green
beans or strained carrots.
23. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 1?
(A) twenty five
(B)
Twenty Five
(C) twentyfive
(D)
(No change)
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24. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 6?
(J)
employees: millions
(K)
employees and millions
(L)
employees, millions
(M) (No change)
(1) Although small schools usually have good teacher-to-student ratios and small classes, large schools have
advantages, two. (2) For example, large schools often have more course offerings than small schools. (3) Large
schools can offer advanced courses instead of just History, Science, and Math. (4) Also, large schools
frequently have more extra-curricular activities, such as volleyball, choir, and football. (5) There simply is no
black-and-white answer as to which school size is preferable.
25. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 1?
(A)
in addition to
(B)
too
(C)
besides
(D)
(No change)
26. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 3?
(J)
history, science, and math
(K) History; Science; Math
(L)
history, and science, and math
(M) (No change)
________________
(1) Valerie knows more about fashion than anyone else in her class. (2) She watched all the fashion shows on
television, reads all the fashion magazines, and attends all the city’s fashion premiers. (3) Valerie has said
many times that she wants to be a fashion designer when she gets out of school. (4) Her plan is to stockpile as
much vintage clothing as she can afford. (5) She’s going to save it for about fifteen or twenty years. (6) Than,
when the time is right, she’ll design new, cutting-edge fashion lines using her stockpile of vintage things. (7)
Someone fifteen years from now will probably pay a high price for Valerie’s crazy idea.
27. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 2?
(A) had watched
(B) had been watching
(C) watches
(D)
(No change)
28. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 6?
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(J) Then
(K)
Regardless
(L)
Before
(M) (No change)
________________
(1) Mr. and Mrs. Johannson were a retired couple from Wisconsin. (2) They had lived in Wisconsin all their
lives. (3) For sixty years, they had put up with the bitterly cold Winter in Wisconsin and they had had
enough. (4) The Johannsons sold their house and their cars and bought a recreational vehicle, or RV, and hit
the road. (5) They headed directly for Florida where they were sure they would not have to cope with
blizzard-like conditions. (6) Ironically, the week they arrived, hurricane Emma struck the Florida coast. (7)
Hoping for a compromise of some kind, the Johannsons decided to spend the rest of their days exploring
Kansas.
29. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 3?
(A) winter
(B) Weather
(C) Winter Weather
(D)
(No change)
30. What is the best way to write the underlined part of sentence 7?
(J) there
(K) they’re
(L)
Their
(M) (No change)
STOP
If you finish before time is up, check over your work on this part only. Do not go on until the
signal is given.
MATH
Part 1
30 MINUTES
Directions: Four answers are given for each problem. Choose the best answer.
1. Which of the following is a prime number?
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(A) 27
(B) 28
(C) 29
(D)
30
2. The fraction
can be reduced to which of the following?
(J) 84
(K)
(L)
(M) 2
3. Which of the following is the product of 16 and 4?
(A) 4
(B) 12
(C) 20
(D)
64
4. Which of the following is the equivalent of 67 ?
(J) 6 ?? 7
(K) 7 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6
(L) 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6
(M) (6 + 6) ?? 7
5. The fraction 2
can be expressed as a decimal by which of the following?
(A) 2.006
(B) 0.0026
(C) 26,000.000
(D)
26.1000
6. What is the difference between
and ?
(J)
(K)
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(L)
(M)
7. What is the sum of (6 - 1) + (1 ?? 5) + (10 ?? 2) + (2.5 + 2.5)?
(A) 25
(B) 20
(C) 15
(D)
125
8. Which of the following is not a multiple of 4?
(J) 24
(K) 34
(L)
44
(M) 64
9. Which of the following is the equivalent of 3 - (-6)?
(A) -9
(B) -3
(C) 9
(D)
3
10. What is the least common multiple of 6, 12, and 72?
(J) 6
(K) 12
(L)
36
(M) 72
Directions: Four answer choices are given for each problem. Choose the best answer.
11. A new restaurant, The Pizza Parlor, boasts the widest variety of toppings in the city. The owners
claim that their 72 topping choices are 50 percent more than the next closest competitor, Patty’s
Pizzas. If The Pizza Parlor’s claim is true, how many topping choices does Patty’s Pizzas offer?
(A) 24
(B) 36
(C) 48
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(D)
Not given
12. Carl has collected 27 of the 32 available Captain Cosmos comic books, 19 of the 24 available
Galactic General comic books, and 21 of the 23 available Larry the Laser comic books. If Carl
wanted to acquire the missing comics from each series he collects, how many comic books would
he need to buy?
(J) 7
(K) 67
(L)
(M)
79
Not given
13. The school library recently relocated to a new building on campus. In the new library are many
new bookshelves. Each bookshelf holds 245 books. The library has 12 bookshelves that are 100
percent full and one bookshelf that is
full. How many books are in the new library?
(A) 2940
(B) 3136
(C) 2989
(D)
294,000
14. Paul’s digital camera normally holds 200 images. If Paul sets his camera to take extra-high-quality
pictures, his camera holds only 40 pictures. Paul has already saved 100 normal images on his
camera, but he wants to take as many pictures as possible of the sunset over the bay. How many
extra-high-quality pictures can Paul hold on his camera in addition to the 100 normal images he’s
already saved?
(J) 40
(K) 30
(L)
20
(M) 10
15. If Paige spends 3 hours per day practicing piano and she practices 4 days per week, how many
hours does Paige practice piano each week?
(A) 12
(B) 12
(C) 13
(D)
14
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16. Audrey and Ginnie volunteer each month to drive meals to elderly people. The first month they
volunteered, they delivered a total of 60 meals. The next month they delivered 33 percent more
than they did the first month. The third month they delivered twice as many meals as the first two
months combined. How many meals did the two girls deliver in the third month?
(J) 80
(K) 90
(L)
160
(M) 280
17. If Taylor earns $7.50 per hour, how many 40-hour weeks will he need to work to earn enough to
buy a new computer system that costs $1350?
(A) 3
(B) 4
(C) 4
(D)
12
18. Wallie wants to wallpaper her bedroom. Each roll of wallpaper covers 75 square feet of wall space.
Her room has four walls that are 10 feet high and 15 feet wide. How many rolls of wallpaper will
Wallie need to cover all four walls?
(J) 2
(K) 8
(L)
16
(M) 20
19. While trying to achieve a new high score at Blastomatic, the hottest video game on the market, Eric
recorded scores of 6776, 6892, 6990, 7010, and 7012. What was his average score for those five
games?
(A) 6890
(B) 6936
(C) 6990
(D)
Not given
20. Gee-Whiz electronics company exports 400,000 electronic devices each year. Gee-Whiz wants to
merge with Go Electro, a new electronics company that exports 1,900 electronic devices each
month. After the merger, how many electronic devices will the new company export per year?
(J) 35,233
(K) 401,900
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(L)
422,800
(M) 6,333,333
Directions: Four answer choices are given for each problem. Choose the best answer.
21. At Doodle’s Donuts, the most popular item on the menu is Doodle’s Dozen. The chart shows the
typical distribution of donuts in each Doodle’s Dozen that is sold. According to the chart, the
single most widely consumed donut in Doodle’s Dozen is which of the following?
(A)
Cream Filled
(B)
Glazed
(C)
Chocolate
(D)
Jelly Filled
22. Based on the information in the chart, Doodle’s Dozen includes three of which type of donut?
(J)
Cream Filled
(K)
Glazed
(L)
Chocolate
(M)
Jelly Filled
23. The chart above shows the feeder schools from which current ninth-graders at Washington High
School came. If these are the only feeder schools that sent students to the ninth grade at
Washington High School, which school sent the largest percentage of current Washington ninthgraders?
(A)
Philmont
(B) Darby
(C)
Rutledge
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(D)
Not given
24. Based on the information in the chart above, Washington High School currently has how many
ninth-graders?
(J) 211
(K) 178
(L)
346
(M) 735
25. The pie chart above illustrates the number and types of portraits at the Hudson Museum. Based on
the information in the chart, which of the following is true of the number of portraits in the
museum?
(A) There are fewer than 100 portraits.
(B) There are 100 portraits.
(C) There are more than 100 portraits.
(D)
Not given
26. The combination of which portrait types make up half of the entire collection?
(J)
Oils
(K)
Water Colors and Oil on Canvas
(L)
Charcoal and Pastels
(M)
Pastels and Water Colors
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27. The chart above shows the amount of yards serviced by Morris and Angelo, each of whom run a
small lawn-care business. Based on the information in the chart, what is the busiest season for
lawn care?
(A) Spring
(B) Summer
(C)
Fall
(D) Winter
28. Based on the information in the chart, which of the following statements is true?
(J)
Morris experienced a bigger decline in business from the summer to the winter than did
Angelo.
(K)
Angelo experienced a bigger decline in business from the summer to the winter than did
Morris.
(L)
Angelo and Morris experienced the same decline in business from the summer to the winter.
(M)
Neither Morris nor Angelo experienced a decline in business from the summer to the
winter.
29. The chart above illustrates the members of the Kensington Athletic Club between the ages of 40
and 60 and the sports in which they currently participate. Based on the information in the chart,
which sport becomes the most popular as both men and women grow older?
(A)
Golf
(B)
Tennis
(C)
Jogging
(D)
Not enough information available
30. Based on the information in the chart, which sport currently has the most total members
participating in it?
(J)
Golf
(K)
Tennis
(L)
Jogging
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Not enough information available
(M)
STOP
If you finish before time is up, check over your work on this part only. Do not go on until the
signal is given.
Part 2
10 MINUTES
Directions: For the following questions, estimate the answer in your head. No scratch work is allowed.
Do NOT try to compute exact answers.
31. The closest estimate of 46,922 + 32,090 is ________.
(A) 70,000
(B) 75,000
(C) 80,000
(D)
85,000
32. The closest estimate of 7988 ?? 397 is ________.
(J) 20
(K) 25
(L)
200
(M) 220
33. On a trip to his grandmother’s house, Skippy averaged 15 miles per hour on his bicycle. If his
grandmother’s house is 78 miles away, about how long did it take Skippy to get to his
grandmother’s house?
(A) 3 hours
(B) 5 hours
(C)
6 hours
(D)
13 hours
34. Coach Hollingsworth has a total of 653 wins in her career, and she has coached for 40 years. About
how many wins has she averaged per year?
(J) 13
(K) 16
(L)
19
(M) 24
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35. The closest estimate of 148 + 153.5 + 146 + 154.1 + 151 + 145.9 + 149 + 153 + 152.5 + 147.75 is
________.
(A) 1375
(B) 1400
(C) 1500
(D)
1575
36. A typical plain bagel has about 250 calories, and a typical glass of orange juice has about 160
calories. A jelly donut with chocolate icing and sprinkles has about 740 calories, and a large soda
has about 255 calories. About how many bagel-juice combos would it take to equal the amount of
calories in the jelly donut and a large soda?
(J) 1
(K) 2
(L)
2
(M) 3
37. The closest estimate of (4.9 ?? 10.9) + 44.9 is ________.
(A) 534
(B) 44.92
(C) 900
(D)
100
38. George earns $10 per week. How many weeks will it take him to earn about $255?
(J) 25
(K) 52
(L)
(M)
144
Not given
39. The closest estimate of 7.1 ?? 7.9 is ________.
(A) 49
(B) 56
(C) 63
(D)
70
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40. The closest estimate of 221.8 ?? 9.989 is ________.
(J) 22
(K) 20
12
(L)
(M) 11
STOP
If you finish before time is up, check over your work on this part only. Do not go on until the
signal is given.
ABILITY
5 MINUTES
Directions: In questions 1–2, the first three figures are alike in certain ways. Choose the answer choice
that corresponds to the first three figures.
Directions: In questions 3–7, the first figure is related to the second figure. Determine that relationship.
The third figure is changed in the same way to make one of the answer choices. Choose the answer
choice that relates to the third figure.
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Directions: In questions 8–10, look at the top row to see how a square piece of paper is folded and
where holes are punched in it. Then look at the bottom row to decide which answer choice shows how
the paper will look when it is completely unfolded.
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STOP
If you finish before time is up, check over your work on this section only. Do not go back to any
previous parts.
ANSWER KEYS AND EXPLANATIONS
Reading
PART 1
1. A
2. L
3. A
4. J
5. C
6. K
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7. D
8. K
9. C
10. L
1. The correct answer is (A), expected. Other synonyms include “hoped for” and “awaited.”
2. The correct answer is (L), rotting. Other synonyms include “decomposing” and “disintegrating.”
3. The correct answer is (A), replacement. Other synonyms include “substitute” and “stand-in.”
4. The correct answer is (J), calculate approximately. Other synonyms include “approximate” and
“reckon.”
5. The correct answer is (C), tired. Other synonyms include “fatigued” and “exhausted.”
6. The correct answer is (K), bold and bright. Other synonyms include “vivid” and “dazzling.”
7. The correct answer is (D), problem. Other synonyms include “predicament” and “quandary.”
8. The correct answer is (K), carelessly. Other synonyms include “thoughtlessly” and “wildly.”
9. The correct answer is (C), long-winded and wordy. Other synonyms include “verbose” and
“garrulous.”
10. The correct answer is (L), huge. Other synonyms include “gigantic,” “immense,” and “monstrous.”
PART 2
11. B
12. L
13. D
14. K
15. D
16. M
17. C
18. M
19. C
20. K
11. The correct answer is (B). The last sentence of the first paragraph gives the context clue when it
mentions “the country life.”
12. The correct answer is (L). The country life wasn’t what he hoped for, and he was ready to move
back to the city. Charlie made a hurried and rash decision to move from the city to the country.
Therefore, it was characteristic of Charlie to call his Realtor quickly and make another rushed
decision, the decision that he didn’t like life in the country.
13. The correct answer is (D). Citizens probably would elect people who had not been the powerholding nobles prior to elections, thus leaving the nobles with little or no power. The nobles were
people whose power didn’t depend on the favor of those they controlled and exploited. The
nobles knew that common citizens would most likely elect candidates with whom they had
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something in common.
14. The correct answer is (K). The reference to thrones in the first sentence of the second paragraph is
the context clue that “monarchs” is synonymous with “kings and queens.”
15. The correct answer is (D). Lefty was not good enough to start the game and probably played only
as a reserve player. The passage points out that Lefty wasn’t a standout player, so it is reasonable
that the weakest players are the last to play on a professional team.
16. The correct answer is (M). Lefty made a personal connection with Mitchell and the fans that other
players didn’t make. Lefty was outgoing and friendly toward Mitchell and that allowed Mitchell
to connect to and identify with Lefty. It was Lefty’s personality, not his physical ability, that made
him likable to Mitchell.
17. The correct answer is (C). She feared that she wouldn’t use the equipment enough to justify the
price. Margie had a feeling that after a while, she would stop using the equipment for exercise.
The line about the expensive clothes rack is a metaphor for exercise equipment that is not used for
exercising.
18. The correct answer is (M). The use of the word “however” at the beginning of the sentence indicates
a shift in thought. In other words, using “however” at the beginning of a sentence means that the
information in the second sentence is contrary to that in the first sentence. Margie initially
considered the new workout facility in the sentence before, so a sentence beginning with
“however” would mean that she wasn’t considering it or was deciding against the workout
facility.
19. The correct answer is (C). The entire first paragraph describes the grueling and demanding
schedule of the counselors. It is reasonable to expect people to be tired after a schedule like the
one described in the first paragraph.
20. The correct answer is (K). She wanted to help them be relaxed and refreshed by giving them a day
off. The director was using “proverbial lotion” as a metaphor for something that would relax and
refresh, i.e., a day off. A metaphor is symbolic and representative and, therefore, shouldn’t be
interpreted literally.
Language
PART 1
1. B
2. L
3. D
4. M
5. D
6. J
7. B
8. N
9. C
10. M
11. A
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12. M
13. B
14. K
15. A
16. J
17. B
18. J
19. B
20. K
1. The correct answer is (B). The correct spelling is calculator.
2. The correct answer is (L). The correct spelling is either sense or since.
3. The correct answer is (D). The correct spelling is label.
4. The correct answer is (M). The correct spelling is knowledge.
5. The correct answer is (D). The correct spelling is conquer.
6. The correct answer is (J). The correct spelling is forfeit.
7. The correct answer is (B). The correct spelling is reliable.
8. The correct answer is (N). (No mistakes)
9. The correct answer is (C). The correct spelling is governor.
10. The correct answer is (M). The correct spelling is deceive.
11. The correct answer is (A). The name “Rover” should be capitalized because a name is a proper
noun.
12. The correct answer is (M). (No mistakes)
13. The correct answer is (B). The Dallas Cowboys are a professional team and, as with names of other
professional organizations including teams, should be capitalized because it is a proper noun.
14. The correct answer is (K). In this sentence, “home” simply means a house and is not part of a title.
Therefore, “home” is a common noun and needs no capitalization.
15. The correct answer is (A). Holidays are proper nouns and should be capitalized.
16. The correct answer is (J). As used in this sentence, “basketball coach” is a common noun. If “coach”
were included in a title like “Coach Van Gundy” or “Coach Parcells,” then it would be capitalized.
17. The correct answer is (B). The words “prince,” “princess,” “king,” and the like are common nouns
unless included in someone’s title. Therefore, a proper noun such as “Prince William” would be
capitalized.
18. The correct answer is (J). Even though these initials are abbreviated, they are to be capitalized
because they are a person’s name, a proper noun.
19. The correct answer is (B). The abbreviation “Inc.” is short for “Incorporated,” which is part of the
official name of a business organization and must be capitalized because it is a proper noun.
20. The correct answer is (K). The word “state” is a common noun; the names of states, Texas or New
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York, for example, are proper nouns and should be capitalized.
PART 2
21. B
22. J
23. D
24. L
25. B
26. J
27. C
28. J
29. A
30. M
21. The correct answer is (B). The word “college” is only capitalized when included in a proper noun,
such as Austin College or Mississippi College.
22. The correct answer is (J). A list of cities by itself would be a sentence fragment as would a sentence
beginning with a verb and having no subject.
23. The correct answer is (D). (No change)
24. The correct answer is (L). A phrase such as “without the taste buds of these loyal employees”
should be set apart from the rest of the sentence by a comma.
25. The correct answer is (B). Meaning “also,” the word “too” is often mistakenly replaced by the
homonym “two.”
26. The correct answer is (J). These subjects are common nouns and would only need capitalization if
they were included in a proper noun, such as the name of a college course like “The History of
Science and Math in Western Civilization.”
27. The correct answer is (C). The passage is written in present tense and the verb “watch” must be in
agreement with the rest of the passage, hence the use of the word “watches.”
28. The correct answer is (J). The word “then” indicates sequence of events. Many people mistakenly
use the word “than” in its place.
29. The correct answer is (A). The names of the four seasons are common nouns and do not need
capitalization unless they are included in a title like “the Winter Olympics.”
30. The correct answer is (M). (No change)
Math
PART 1
1. C
2. M
3. D
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4. L
5. A
6. J
7. B
8. K
9. C
10. M
11. C
12. M
13. B
14. L
15. C
16. M
17. C
18. K
19. B
20. L
21. B
22. J
23. C
24. M
25. C
26. J
27. B
28. K
29. A
30. L
1. The correct answer is (C). 29 is divisible only by 1 and 29.
2. The correct answer is (M). can be reduced to , or 2.
3. The correct answer is (D). The term “product” is a clue to multiply.
4. The correct answer is (L). 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6 ?? 6; 67 means that 6 is multiplied by itself 7 times.
5. The correct answer is (A). The number 2.006 is the same as 2
6. The correct answer is (J). -
is the same as
- , which equals .
7. The correct answer is (B). (6 - 1 = 5) + (1 ?? 5 = 5) + (10 ?? 2 = 5) 1 (2.5 + 2.5 = 5) = 20
8. The correct answer is (K). No whole number multiplied by 4 equals 34.
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9. The correct answer is (C). Subtracting a negative is the same as adding a positive.
10. The correct answer is (M). 72 is the lowest number of which 6, 12, and 72 are all factors.
11. The correct answer is (C). If the Pizza Parlor’s 72 toppings are 50% more, then they are 150% of
Patty’s Pizzas’ toppings. So, if Patty’s Pizzas’ toppings = x:
12. The correct answer is (M). 32 - 27 = 5, 24 - 19 = 5, and 23 - 21 = 2. 5 + 5 + 2 = 12 comics that Carl
needs to buy. 12 is not an answer choice.
13. The correct answer is (B). 12 ?? 245 = 2940 books on the 100 percent full book shelves.
of 245 is the
same as 80% of 245, or 0.8 ?? 245, which equals 196. 2940 + 196 = 3136.
14. The correct answer is (L). 100 normal images is the same as , or 50 percent, of the 200 high-quality
images. If
of the memory is already used, then only
the camera’s memory is still available.
of
40 high-quality images the camera normally would hold is 20.
15. The correct answer is (C). 4 ?? 3 = 3 hours each week.
16. The correct answer is (M). 60 meals in the first month plus 33 percent more meals in the second
month (60 + 20 = 80) equals 140 meals. In third month, they delivered 2 ?? 140, or 280 meals.
17. The correct answer is (C). $7.50 ?? 40 = $300. $1350 ?? $300 = 4.5, or 4 .
18. The correct answer is (K). There are 4 ?? (10 ?? 15 = 150) square feet of wall space, or 600 square feet.
600 ?? 75 = 8 rolls.
19. The correct answer is (B). 6776 + 6892 + 6990 + 7010 + 7012 = 34,680. 34,680 ?? 5 = 6936.
20. The correct answer is (L). 1900 devices ?? 12 = 22,800 devices per year. 400,000 + 22,800 = 422,800.
21. The correct answer is (B). Forty-one percent of the donuts consumed are glazed.
22. The correct answer is (J). Twenty-five percent of a dozen, or 12, equals 3.
23. The correct answer is (C). Because Rutledge sent more students to Washington High than the other
two schools, it represents the largest percentage.
24. The correct answer is (M). 211 + 178 + 346 = 735.
25. The correct answer is (C). There are more than 100 portraits. By adding the values, not the
percentages, of each section it can be determined that there are 118 portraits.
26. The correct answer is (J). Oil on Wood and Oil on Canvas comprise 59 of 118 portraits, or 50 percent
of the portraits.
27. The correct answer is (B). Morris had 28 lawns in the summer and Angelo had 30 lawns in the
summer.
28. The correct answer is (K). Angelo experienced a bigger decline in business from the summer to the
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winter than Morris did; Angelo’s business went from 30 lawns in the summer to 6 lawns in the
winter, whereas Morris’ business went from 28 to 7 in that period.
29. The correct answer is (A). The number of members who play golf in the older-age category is much
more than the number of members who play golf in the younger-age category.
30. The correct answer is (L). A total of 202 members currently participate in jogging, whereas 187
members participate in golf and 176 members participate in tennis.
PART 2
31. C
32. J
33. B
34. K
35. C
36. L
37. D
38. J
39. B
40. J
31. The correct answer is (C). 46,922 + 32,090 is approximately 47,000 + 32,000, which equals 79,000.
79,000 is approximately 80,000.
32. The correct answer is (J). 7988 ?? 397 is approximately 8000 ?? 400 = 20.
33. The correct answer is (B). 78 ?? 15 = 5.2, which is approximately 5.
34. The correct answer is (K). 40 ?? 16 = 640, which is an approximation of 653.
35. The correct answer is (C). 148 + 153.5 + 146 + 154.1 + 151 + 145.9 + 149 + 153 + 152.5 + 147.75 is
approximately 150 added 10 times.
36. The correct answer is (L). It would take 2 combos of about 400 calories to equal the approximately
1000 calories of the donut-soda combo.
37. The correct answer is (D). 4.9 ?? 10.9 is approximately 5 ?? 11, or 55. 55 + approximately 45 is 100.
38. The correct answer is (J). $10 per week is about $500 per year, so it would take about 25 weeks to
earn $255.
39. The correct answer is (B). 7.1 ?? 7.9 is approximately 7 ?? 8, which is 56.
40. The correct answer is (J). 221.8 ?? 9.989 is approximately 222 ?? 10. 222 ?? 10 is 22.2, or about 22.
Ability
1. C
2. K
3. K
4. D
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5. C
6. J
7. A
8. K
9. C
10. M
1. The correct answer is (C). The first three figures each have six sides, as does choice (C).
2. The correct answer is (K). Each of the given figures has half its area shaded in black, as does choice
(K).
3. The correct answer is (K). For the first pair, a segment parallel to one side is drawn in the interior,
and then the figure is split into two parts.
4. The correct answer is (D). For the first pair, the second figure is one in which a smaller circle is
drawn and the area between the two circles is shaded. Thus, the fourth figure would be a triangle
inside the given triangle, and the area between them must be shaded. Choice (D) represents this
description.
5. The correct answer is (C). For the first pair, the inside figure changes from black to white and the
inside figure is enlarged so that its vertices touch the outside figure. Choice (C) shows the same
changes, including the color change.
6. The correct answer is (J). For the first pair, the figure is simply rotated 90?? clockwise. Choice (J)
also shows a 90?? clockwise rotation, without any other changes.
7. The correct answer is (A). For the first pair, the figure undergoes a dilation, which means it is kept
similar, but changes in size. (In this case, it gets smaller.)
8. The correct answer is (K). After the figure is folded over a horizontal line, a hole is punched in the
upper left and lower right corners. When unfolded, there will be four holes. The additional two
holes will be, respectively, the same distance from the horizontal line as the original two holes.
9. The correct answer is (C). After the figure is folded over a diagonal, two holes are punched along
the other diagonal (not drawn). When unfolded, there are four holes, all places on the other
diagonal.
10. The correct answer is (M). This figure is folded over twice before three holes are punched. After
unfolding, there are (3)(2)(2) = 12 holes positioned in the northern, eastern, southern, and western
parts of the square, as shown by choice (M).
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Career Videos
Congratulations! You have done the research and found the careers that interest you the most. Now it’s time to
put yourself “on the job” for a day. Below is a list of all the career videos that you selected—each with a unique
URL. Click on the URL to see, hear, and read about your exciting, in-demand careers.
To fully utilize the career tool and explore each of the sections, click on the tabs to the right of the video:
• Career Description: Read more about the specific tasks and day to day functions of the job, including
working conditions, tools of the trade, and the varying roles within a career path.
• Required Education: Learn about minimum education requirements and the subjects you will encounter as
you begin your education. This section will also provide you with the preferred accreditations of specific
programs or schools.
• Earnings: Interested to know how much a career pays? Here you’ll find median salary information, so you’ll
have an idea of your projected income once your required education is completed.
• Internships: Internship experience makes you more competitive as a job candidate. This section provides you
with suggestions on landing an internship in your desired career field.
• Mentors: This section offers tips on where to find a possible mentor. Finding a mentor will provide you with
a contact who has experience in your desired career field. This person will help train you and provide you
with valuable advice.
• Future Outlook: Careers go through changes. Sometimes job growth is fast and the opportunities are vast. At
other times your desired career path may be stagnate, with few employment opportunities. This section
provides insight into the future, so you have an idea of what to expect while searching for a job.
• Additional Links: This section provides you with more links to explore the organizations related to your
career.
• Job Search: Provides tips and hints for finding a job using search engines like Google. Look at pages with job
listings in a specific field to narrow your search even further.
• School Search: Are you interested in a career that requires education beyond high school? Here you’ll find
schools that offer academic majors related to your career.
Your selected Career Video's include the following:
* Teacher - High School
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Teacher - High School
Maynard Brown - Crenshaw High School
Maynard Brown makes an effort to relate to his students, whether through hip-hop, fashion, or his own experiences. "Mr.
Brown," as he says, is "ready to teach."
Play Video
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Private Schools -- At a Glance
This section provides you with fast facts presented as a chart of the schools you selected. This information is
annually collected by Peterson’s and is provided directly from the school. The information that is provided to
you includes:
• The name and location of the school.
• Information on the school type and number of enrolled students.
• Religious affiliation, if applicable.
• To obtain even more information about each private high school you will also be presented with a URL. This
URL will take you directly to the school’s website so that you can further explore all that the high school has
to offer.
School
State
Day/Boarding
Boys/Girls
Enrollment
American Heritage School
FL
Day
Co-ed
2202
Baylor School
TN
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
1053
Berkshire School
MA
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
371
Besant Hill School
CA
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
100
Buxton School
MA
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
90
Cardigan Mountain School
NH
Day/Boarding
All-boys
195
Christ School
NC
Day/Boarding
All-boys
227
Cranbrook Schools
MI
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
1636
Cushing Academy
MA
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
445
Delbarton School
NJ
Day
All-boys
540
Ecole d'Humanité
CHE
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
0
Fountain Valley School of
Colorado
CO
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
251
George Stevens Academy
ME
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
299
Web
Site
Campus
Tour
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School
State
Day/Boarding
Boys/Girls
Enrollment
The Harker School
CA
Day
Co-ed
1750
Hillside School
MA
Day/Boarding
All-boys
139
The Hockaday School
TX
Day/Boarding
All-girls
1046
Hoosac School
NY
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
125
The Newman School
MA
Day
Co-ed
230
Pomfret School
CT
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
355
Rye Country Day School
NY
Day
Co-ed
876
Tilton School
NH
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
250
Valley Forge Military Academy
& College
PA
Day/Boarding
All-boys
248
Western Reserve Academy
OH
Day/Boarding
Co-ed
389
Web
Site
Campus
Tour
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School Profiles
School profiles differ than the Directories section because the information presented to you is very detailed. For
every school you selected you will see a profile that contains the following information:
• General Information: Provides information on school affiliations, campus setting, accreditations, studentteacher ratio, the year the school was founded, endowment information and the number of buildings on
campus.
• School Profile: This section provides the grade levels that attend the school, international student
information and student enrollment.
• College Admissions Counseling: This section provides information on the number of students who were
granted college acceptance and the names of institutions were the students enrolled.
• Faculty: Find out how many teachers work at the school, the female to male ratio, the number with advanced
degrees and average class size.
• Graduate Requirements: This section includes the required courses students must take and pass in order to
graduate.
• Special Academic Programs: If the school you are interested in offers additional courses such as advanced
placement or special electives they will be listed in this section. Furthermore, if you are seeking special needs
programs they will also be listed in this section.
• Student Life: Here you will find information about student housing, religious affiliations – if applicable and
dress code.
• Tuition and Aid: Cost of attendance, types of aid available and percentage of aid disbursed is all included in
this section.
• Admissions: This section provides the requirements, deadlines and fees required to apply to the school.
• Special Programs: Information for special programs offered by the school in addition to the standard
curriculum will be included in this section.
• Contact Information: If you have specific questions about admissions contact information including a phone
number, fax number and address are listed here. In some cases colleges have also provided e-mail addresses
for connecting easier and quicker.
Please be advised that since every school is different and unique some information within each category may not
vary from school to school.
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American Heritage School
Plantation, FL 33325
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational day college-preparatory, arts, and pre-medical, pre-law, pre-engineering school
Setting
Suburban, 40-acre campus, nearest major city: Fort Lauderdale
Accreditation
Association of Independent Schools of Florida, CITA (Commission on International and Trans-Regional
Accreditation), Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Florida Department of Education
Student:Teacher Ratio
14:1
Founded
1969
Buildings
5 buildings on campus
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.ahschool.com
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Enrollment
2,162 (Upper School Enrollment: 1,360) Class Size
Grades
PK-12
ADMISSIONS
19 students
Faculty
192
Upper School Faculty
37 men, 72 women; 60 have advanced degrees
CONTACT
Application Fee
$100
William R. Laurie, President
Application Requirements
Slossen Intelligence and Stanford
Achievement Test required
12200 West Broward Boulevard
Deadline
Continuous
[email protected]
Interview Requirements
On-campus interview required
954-472-0022 Ext. 3062
Plantation, FL 33325
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$16,781-$21,121
Types available:
Tuition reduction for siblings, merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants available
Who Received Aid?
22% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $3,212,241
STUDENT LIFE
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Art, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Chinese language and culture, Computer science, Economics, English,
Environmental science, French, Government and politics, History, Human geography, Music theory, Physics
Art Courses
Acting, Art, Dance, Drama, Drawing, Fine arts, Orchestra, Painting, Photography, Theater
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
227 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Florida Atlantic University; Florida
Gulf Coast University; Florida State University; Nova Southeastern University; University of Central Florida;
University of Florida
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), English, foreign language, mathematics, physical education
(includes health), science, social studies (includes history), acceptance to a 4-year college
COMPUTERS
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Computers
Computers are regularly used in computer applications, desktop publishing, digital applications, drafting,
drawing and design, economics, engineering, English, ESL, French, geography, graphic design, history,
keyboarding, library, literary magazine, mathematics, media arts, media production, multimedia, music,
music technology, newspaper, photography, programming, psychology, reading, SAT preparation, social
sciences, Spanish, speech, Web site design, writing, yearbook classes. Computer network features include oncampus library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless campus network, Questia.
Computer access in designated common areas is available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section
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Baylor School
Chattanooga, TN 37401
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory and arts school
Setting
Suburban, 670-acre campus, nearest major city: Atlanta, GA
Accreditation
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Southern Association of Independent Schools, Tennessee
Association of Independent Schools, The Association of Boarding Schools, Tennessee Department of
Education
Endowment
$70 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
8:1
Founded
1893
Buildings
28 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.baylorschool.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
70% of students are day students
Class Size
14 students
Enrollment
1,069 (Upper School Enrollment: 712)
Faculty
134
Grades
Boarding grades 9-12, day grades 6-12 Upper School Faculty
International Students
17 countries represented
ADMISSIONS
72 men, 62 women; 82 have advanced degrees;
40 reside on campus
CONTACT
Accepted
61% of students who applied were
admitted
Mr. Jon Bloom, Associate Director of Admission
Application Fee
$75
Chattanooga, TN 37401
Application Requirements
ISEE, SSAT or TOEFL required
[email protected]
Deadline
Continuous
423-267-8505 Ext. 804
Interview Requirements
Interview required
PO Box 1337
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$19,505
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$39,010
Who Received Aid?
40% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $350,000
Merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Art, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Computer science, Economics, English, Environmental science, French,
German language, Government and politics, History, Human geography, Latin, Physics
Art Courses
Art, Dance, Drama, Fine arts, Music, Photography, Theater
Special Needs
, Special instructional classes for deaf students
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
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Placement
190 students graduated in academic year; 189 went to college, including Georgia Institute of Technology; The
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; The University of Tennessee; University of Pennsylvania;
Vanderbilt University; Wake Forest University. Other: 1 entered military service
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), English, foreign language, mathematics, physical education
(includes health), science, social studies (includes history), Leadership Baylor, summer reading
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in art, English, history, mathematics, photography, publications, science,
Spanish, technology, theater arts, writing, yearbook classes. Computer network features include on-campus
library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless campus network. Computer access in
designated common areas is available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, Honors section, Study abroad
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Berkshire School
Sheffield, MA 01257
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory, arts, and technology school
Setting
Rural, 550-acre campus, nearest major city: Hartford, CT
Accreditation
Association of Independent Schools in New England, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, The
Association of Boarding Schools
Endowment
$83.5 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
6:1
Founded
1907
Buildings
36 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.berkshireschool.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
11% of students are day students
Class Size
12 students
Enrollment
371 (Upper School Enrollment: 371)
Faculty
67
Grades
9-PG
Upper School Faculty
International Students
28 countries represented
39 men, 28 women; 32 have advanced degrees;
52 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
36% of students who applied were
admitted
Mr. Andrew L. Bogardus, Director of Admission
Application Fee
$50
Sheffield, MA 01257
Application Requirements
ACT, PSAT, SAT, SSAT or TOEFL
required
[email protected]
Deadline
January 31
Interview Requirements
Interview required
245 North Undermountain Road
413-229-1003
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$32,700
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$42,450
Who Received Aid?
29% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $53,500
Merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Art, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Computer science, English, Environmental science, French, History,
Physics, Spanish, Statistics
Art Courses
Acting, Art, Choral music, Dance, Drama, Music, Painting, Photography, Theater
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
113 students graduated in academic year; 104 went to college, including Boston College; Cornell University;
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Dartmouth College; Northeastern University; St. Lawrence University; University of Vermont. Other: 3
entered a postgraduate year, 6 had other specific plans
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), English, foreign language, history, introduction to technology,
mathematics, science
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in art, mathematics, music, science, technology classes. Computer network
features include on-campus library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless campus
network, network printing, interactive Polyvision white boards (smart boards). Campus intranet is available
to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study, Study abroad
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Besant Hill School
Ojai, CA 93023
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory and arts school; primarily serves students with learning
disabilities, individuals with Attention Deficit Disorder, and dyslexic students
Setting
Small town, 500-acre campus, nearest major city: Los Angeles
Accreditation
California Association of Independent Schools, The Association of Boarding Schools, Western Association of
Schools and Colleges, California Department of Education
Endowment
$1 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
4:1
Founded
1946
Buildings
14 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.besanthill.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
20% of students are day students
Class Size
10 students
Enrollment
100 (Upper School Enrollment: 100)
Faculty
25
Grades
9-12
Upper School Faculty
International Students
11 countries represented
12 men, 13 women; 13 have advanced degrees;
22 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
48% of students who applied were
admitted
Terra Furguiel, Associate Director of Admissions
Application Fee
$75
Ojai, CA 93023
Deadline
February 19
[email protected]
Interview Requirements
Interview required
805-646-4343 Ext. 111
8585 Ojai Santa Paula Road, PO Box 850
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$19,900
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$39,990
Who Received Aid?
22% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Tuition reduction for siblings, need-based scholarship grants, paying campus jobs available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
No
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Calculus, English, Government and politics, Spanish
Art Courses
Acting, Art, Drama, Fine arts, Music, Photography, Theater
Special Needs
, Programs in English, mathematics, general development for dyslexic students
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
27 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Pitzer College; Sarah Lawrence College;
The Evergreen State College; University of California, Santa Barbara; University of California, Santa Cruz;
University of Puget Sound
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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), English, foreign language, mathematics, physical education
(includes health), science, social sciences, social studies (includes history)
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in desktop publishing, graphic arts, graphic design, mathematics, media arts,
publications, video film production classes. Computer network features include on-campus library services,
online commercial services, Internet access, wireless campus network.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study, Study at local college for
college credit
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Buxton School
Williamstown, MA 01267
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory and arts school
Setting
Small town, 150-acre campus, nearest major city: Boston
Accreditation
Association of Independent Schools in New England, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, The
Association of Boarding Schools, Massachusetts Department of Education
Endowment
$1.6 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
5:1
Founded
1928
Buildings
17 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.BuxtonSchool.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
11% of students are day students
Class Size
9 students
Enrollment
90 (Upper School Enrollment: 90)
Faculty
21
Grades
9-12
Upper School Faculty
International Students
9 countries represented
13 men, 8 women; 5 have advanced degrees; 14
reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
56% of students who applied were
admitted
Admissions Office
Application Fee
$50
Williamstown, MA 01267
Application Requirements
SSAT or TOEFL required
[email protected]
Deadline
February 1
413-458-3919
Interview Requirements
On-campus interview required
291 South Street
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$26,000
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$41,000
Who Received Aid?
47% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Need-based scholarship grants, need-based loans with limited in-house financing available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
No
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Art Courses
Dance performance, Drama performance, Drama, Drawing, Music, Painting, Photography, Voice
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
24 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Bard College; Lewis & Clark College;
Oberlin College; Reed College; Skidmore College; Worcester Polytechnic Institute
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
American history, English, foreign language, lab science, mathematics, social sciences
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COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in history, mathematics, media production, multimedia, music, photography,
science, Spanish, video film production classes. Computer resources include Internet access, wireless campus
network. Campus intranet and computer access in designated common areas are available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
ESL, Honors section
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Cardigan Mountain School
Canaan, NH 03741-9307
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Boys' boarding and day college-preparatory, arts, and technology school
Setting
Rural, 525-acre campus, nearest major city: Manchester
Accreditation
Association of Independent Schools in New England, Independent Schools of Northern New England, Junior
Boarding Schools Association, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, The Association of
Boarding Schools, New Hampshire Department of Education
Endowment
$14.8 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
4:1
Founded
1945
Buildings
18 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.cardigan.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
10% of students are day students
Class Size
12 students
Enrollment
187 (Upper School Enrollment: 187)
Faculty
46
Grades
6-9
Upper School Faculty
International Students
7 countries represented
38 men, 7 women; 23 have advanced degrees;
39 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
70% of students who applied were
admitted
Application Fee
$50
Application Requirements
Mrs. Jessica Bayreuther, Admissions Coordinator
62 Alumni Drive
Canaan, NH 03741-9307
ISEE, SLEP for foreign students, SSAT [email protected]
or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for
603-523-3548
Children III required
Deadline
Continuous
Interview Requirements
Interview required
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$24,500
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$42,200
Who Received Aid?
24% of students received aid in academic year
Need-based scholarship grants, need-based loans, prepGATE loans available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Art Courses
Art, Drama, Fine arts, Music, Theater
Special Needs
Remedial reading and/or remedial writing, Remedial math
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
70 students graduated in academic year; they went to Avon Old Farms School; Berkshire School; Kent School;
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Salisbury School; St. Paul's School
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), computer science, English, foreign language, mathematics,
reading, science, social studies (includes history), study skills
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in English, history, mathematics, science, writing classes. Computer network
features include on-campus library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless campus
network. Campus intranet and computer access in designated common areas are available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
ESL, Honors section, Independent study
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Christ School
Asheville, NC 28704
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Boys' boarding and day college-preparatory, arts, religious studies, and technology school, affiliated with
Episcopal Church
Setting
Rural, 500-acre campus
Accreditation
National Association of Episcopal Schools, North Carolina Association of Independent Schools, Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools, Southern Association of Independent Schools, The Association of
Boarding Schools, North Carolina Department of Education
Endowment
$10 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
6:1
Founded
1900
Buildings
15 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.christschool.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
25% of students are day students
Class Size
11 students
Enrollment
227 (Upper School Enrollment: 227)
Faculty
41
Grades
8-12
Upper School Faculty
International Students
9 countries represented
28 men, 9 women; 24 have advanced degrees;
30 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
65% of students who applied were
admitted
Mr. Denis Stokes, Director of Admission
Application Fee
$50
Asheville, NC 28704
Application Requirements
ACT, ISEE, PSAT, SAT, SSAT or
Wechsler Intelligence Scale for
Children III required
[email protected]
Deadline
Continuous
Interview Requirements
On-campus interview required
500 Christ School Road
828-684-6232 Ext. 118
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$19,200
5-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$37,800
Who Received Aid?
43% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $250,000
$37,800
Merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Religious
Yes
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
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Art Courses
Art, Drama, Fine arts, Music, Photography, Theater
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
52 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Duke University; Furman University;
Hampden-Sydney College; The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Wofford College
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), computer literacy, English, foreign language, mathematics,
physical education (includes health), religion (includes Bible studies and theology), science, social studies
(includes history)
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in all academic classes. Computer network features include on-campus library
services, Internet access, wireless campus network.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study
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Cranbrook Schools
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48303-0801
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory and arts school
Setting
Suburban, 315-acre campus, nearest major city: Detroit
Accreditation
Independent Schools Association of the Central States, Midwest Association of Boarding Schools, The
Association of Boarding Schools, The College Board, Michigan Department of Education
Endowment
$218 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
8:1
Founded
1922
Buildings
10 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: schools.cranbrook.edu
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
67% of students are day students
Class Size
16 students
Enrollment
1,636 (Upper School Enrollment: 790)
Faculty
191
Grades
Boarding grades 9-12, day grades PK12
Upper School Faculty
51 men, 41 women; 74 have advanced degrees;
67 reside on campus
International Students
21 countries represented
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
48% of students who applied were
admitted
Drew Miller, Director of Admission
Application Fee
$25
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48303-0801
Application Requirements
SSAT required
[email protected]
Deadline
Continuous
248-645-3610
Interview Requirements
Interview required
39221 Woodward Avenue, PO Box 801
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$25,850
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$35,450
Who Received Aid?
35% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $182,000
Merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Chinese language and culture, Computer science, English, French, German
language, History, Latin, Physics, Spanish, Statistics
Art Courses
Acting, Art, Choir, Choral music, Concert band, Concert choir, Creative dance, Dance, Drama, Drawing
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
203 students graduated in academic year; 202 went to college, including Brown University; Harvard
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University; Michigan State University; University of Michigan; University of Pennsylvania. Other: 1 had
other specific plans
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts, arts and crafts, English, foreign language, health, history, mathematics, performing arts, religion
(includes Bible studies and theology), science
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in English, foreign language, history, mathematics, science classes. Computer
network features include on-campus library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless
campus network, SmartBoards. Computer access in designated common areas is available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study, Study abroad, Term-away
projects
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Cushing Academy
Ashburnham, MA 01430-8000
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory, arts, and technology school
Setting
Small town, 162-acre campus, nearest major city: Boston
Accreditation
Association of Independent Schools in New England, New England Association of Schools and Colleges,
Massachusetts Department of Education
Endowment
$22.6 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
8:1
Founded
1865
Buildings
31 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.cushing.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
15% of students are day students
Class Size
12 students
Enrollment
445 (Upper School Enrollment: 445)
Faculty
64
Grades
9-PG
Upper School Faculty
International Students
36 countries represented
27 men, 37 women; 37 have advanced degrees;
47 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
63% of students who applied were
admitted
Mrs. Deborah Gustafson, Co-Director of Admission
Application Fee
$50
Ashburnham, MA 01430-8000
Application Requirements
ACT, PSAT, SAT, SLEP, SSAT or
TOEFL required
[email protected]
Deadline
February 1
Interview Requirements
Interview required
39 School Street, PO Box 8000
978-827-7300
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$31,200
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$42,850
Who Received Aid?
24% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $100,000
Merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Economics, English, French, History, Latin, Music theory, Physics, Spanish,
Statistics
Art Courses
Art, Creative arts, Creative drama, Dance, Drama, Drawing, Fine arts, Music, Photography, Theater
Special Needs
Remedial reading and/or remedial writing, Remedial math, Programs in English, mathematics, general
development for dyslexic students
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COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
138 students graduated in academic year; 134 went to college, including Boston College; Cornell University;
Purdue University; The George Washington University; University of Colorado at Boulder. Other: 1 entered a
postgraduate year
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), English, foreign language, health and wellness, mathematics,
science, social studies (includes history)
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in all academic, art, English, history, mathematics, science classes. Computer
network features include on-campus library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless
campus network, CushNet (on campus network). Campus intranet and computer access in designated
common areas are available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study, Term-away projects
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Delbarton School
Morristown, NJ 07960
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Boys' day college-preparatory, arts, religious studies, and technology school, affiliated with Roman Catholic
Church
Setting
Suburban, 200-acre campus, nearest major city: New York, NY
Accreditation
Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, National Catholic Education Association, New Jersey
Association of Independent Schools, New Jersey Department of Education
Endowment
$23.9 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
10:1
Founded
1939
Buildings
7 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.delbarton.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Enrollment
540 (Upper School Enrollment: 473)
Class Size
15 students
Grades
7-12
Faculty
84
Upper School Faculty
69 men, 15 women; 53 have advanced degrees
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
42% of students who applied were
admitted
Mrs. Connie Curnow, Administrative Assistant, Office of Admissions
Application Fee
$65
Morristown, NJ 07960
Application Requirements
Stanford Achievement Test, OtisLennon School Ability Test, school's
own exam required
[email protected]
Deadline
November 27
Interview Requirements
On-campus interview required
230 Mendham Road
973-538-3231 Ext. 3019
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$25,975
Types available:
Need-based scholarship grants available
Who Received Aid?
15% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
STUDENT LIFE
Religious
Yes
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Art Courses
Art, Fine arts, Music
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
122 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Columbia University; Georgetown
University; Villanova University
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), computer science, English, foreign language, mathematics,
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physical education (includes health), religion (includes Bible studies and theology), science, social studies
(includes history), speech
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in music, science, word processing classes. Computer network features include
on-campus library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless campus network.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, Independent study
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Ecole d'Humanité
CH 6085 Hasliberg Goldern,
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory, general academic, arts, vocational, and bilingual studies
school
Setting
Rural, 5-acre campus, nearest major city: Lucerne
Accreditation
Department of Education of Bern, North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, Swiss Federation of
Private Schools
Endowment
1 million Swiss francs
Student:Teacher Ratio
5:1
Founded
1934
Buildings
13 buildings on campus
Member of
European Council of International Schools
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.ecole.ch
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
6% of students are day students
Class Size
5 students
Grades
Ungraded, ages 12-19
Faculty
45
International Students
18 countries represented
Upper School Faculty
15 men, 19 women; 10 have advanced degrees;
39 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
80% of students who applied were
admitted
John Ashley Curtis, Director
Deadline
Continuous
[email protected]
Interview Requirements
Interview recommended
41-33-972-9272
CH 6085 Hasliberg Goldern
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
19,000 Swiss francs
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
43,000 Swiss francs-47,000 Swiss francs
Who Received Aid?
20% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Need-based scholarship grants, need-based loans, middle-income loans available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
coed dormitories
Dress Code
No
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Biology, Calculus, English, History
Art Courses
Art, Choir, Crafts, Creative dance, Dance performance, Dance, Drama workshop, Drama, Drawing, Fine arts
Special Needs
Remedial reading and/or remedial writing, Remedial math
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
7 students graduated in academic year; 5 went to college, including Dalhousie University; Guilford College;
Johnson & Wales University; Oberlin College; Reed College. Other: 1 entered a postgraduate year, 1 had
other specific plans
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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
English, foreign language, independent study, mathematics, physical education (includes health), research
skills, SAT preparation, science, social sciences, social studies (includes history), 2x term paper methodology
course, balance of courses in arts, sports, handcrafts
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in career exploration, college planning, creative writing, data processing,
English, graphic design, independent study, library, newspaper, photography, typing, yearbook classes.
Computer resources include Internet access. Computer access in designated common areas is available to
students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Accelerated programs, Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study,
Term-away projects
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Fountain Valley School of Colorado
Colorado Springs, CO 80911
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory, arts, and technology school
Setting
Suburban, 1,100-acre campus
Accreditation
Association of Colorado Independent Schools, The Association of Boarding Schools, Colorado Department
of Education
Endowment
$34 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
5:1
Founded
1930
Buildings
42 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.fvs.edu
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
34% of students are day students
Class Size
14 students
Enrollment
250 (Upper School Enrollment: 248)
Faculty
50
Grades
9-12
Upper School Faculty
International Students
14 countries represented
24 men, 16 women; 30 have advanced degrees;
34 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
64% of students who applied were
admitted
Mr. Randy Roach, Director of Admission
Application Fee
$50
Colorado Springs, CO 80911
Application Requirements
SSAT or TOEFL required
[email protected]
Deadline
February 1
719-390-7035 Ext. 251
Interview Requirements
Interview required
6155 Fountain Valley School Road
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$21,700
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$40,000
Who Received Aid?
36% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $322,600
Merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Art, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Economics, English, French, History, Physics, Spanish
Art Courses
Acting, Drama, Photography
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
63 students graduated in academic year; 62 went to college, including Boston University; The Johns Hopkins
University; University of Washington. Other: 1 had other specific plans
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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), computer science, English, foreign language, history,
mathematics, physical education (includes health), science, social studies (includes history), community
service hours, senior seminar
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in all academic, college planning, multimedia, news writing, newspaper,
photography, publications, Web site design, yearbook classes. Computer network features include on-campus
library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless campus network. Campus intranet and
computer access in designated common areas are available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study
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George Stevens Academy
Blue Hill, ME 04614
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory, general academic, arts, vocational, and technology
school
Setting
Small town, 20-acre campus, nearest major city: Bangor
Accreditation
Independent Schools of Northern New England, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, The
College Board, Maine Department of Education
Endowment
$7 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
10:1
Founded
1803
Buildings
6 buildings on campus
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.georgestevensacademy.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
93% of students are day students
Class Size
14 students
Enrollment
324 (Upper School Enrollment: 324)
Faculty
31
Grades
9-12
Upper School Faculty
International Students
8 countries represented
16 men, 15 women; 12 have advanced degrees;
1 resides on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Application Fee
$50
Ms. Sheryl Cole Stearns, Director, International Student Program
Application Requirements
PSAT, SSAT or TOEFL or SLEP
required
23 Union Street
Deadline
Continuous
[email protected]
Interview Requirements
Interview recommended
207-374-2808 Ext. 134
Blue Hill, ME 04614
TUITION AND AID
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
$32,500
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories, host family homes
Dress Code
No
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Art, Calculus, English, Environmental science, History, Human geography, Statistics
Art Courses
Art, Drawing, Fine arts, Jazz band, Music, Photography
Special Needs
Remedial reading and/or remedial writing, Remedial math
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
70 students graduated in academic year; 54 went to college, including University of Maine; University of
Southern Maine; University of Vermont; Wheaton College. Other: 13 went to work, 3 entered military service
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), electives, English, foreign language, history, mathematics,
physical education (includes health), science, social sciences, U.S. history, senior debate
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COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in all academic, all academic, computer applications, desktop publishing, Web
site design classes. Computer network features include on-campus library services, Internet access, wireless
campus network. Computer access in designated common areas is available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Accelerated programs, Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study,
Term-away projects
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The Harker School
San Jose, CA 95129
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational day college-preparatory, arts, technology, and gifted students school
Setting
Urban, 16-acre campus
Accreditation
California Association of Independent Schools, Western Association of Schools and Colleges, California
Department of Education
Student:Teacher Ratio
16:1
Founded
1893
Buildings
7 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.harker.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Enrollment
1,750 (Upper School Enrollment: 682)
Class Size
16 students
Grades
K-12
Upper School Faculty
39 men, 37 women; 59 have advanced degrees
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Application Fee
$75
Ruth Tebo, Assistant to the Director of Admission
Application Requirements
ERB CTP IV, essay, ISEE or SSAT
required
500 Saratoga Avenue
Deadline
January 14
[email protected]
Interview Requirements
Interview required
408-249-2510
San Jose, CA 95129
TUITION AND AID
Who Received Aid?
10% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Day Student Tuition:
$33,927
Types available:
Need-based scholarship grants, need-based loans available
STUDENT LIFE
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Art, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Computer science, Economics, English, Environmental science, French,
Government and politics, History, Japanese language and culture, Latin, Music theory, Physics
Art Courses
Acting, Choir, Dance performance, Dance, Drawing, Music, Orchestra, Painting, Theater arts
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
166 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Harvard University; Stanford
University; University of California, Berkeley; University of California, Los Angeles; University of
California, San Diego; University of Southern California
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Algebra, arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), biology, chemistry, computer science, English, foreign
language, geometry, physical education (includes health), physics, public speaking, trigonometry, U.S.
history, world history, 30 total hours of community service
COMPUTERS
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Computers
Computers are regularly used in all academic, graphic arts, newspaper, programming, yearbook classes.
Computer network features include on-campus library services, online commercial services, Internet access,
wireless campus network, ProQuest, Gale Group, InfoTrac, Facts On File.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, Honors section, Independent study
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Hillside School
Marlborough, MA 01752
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Boys' boarding and day college-preparatory and leadership school; primarily serves students with learning
disabilities and individuals with Attention Deficit Disorder
Setting
Small town, 200-acre campus, nearest major city: Boston
Accreditation
Association of Independent Schools in New England, Junior Boarding Schools Association, New England
Association of Schools and Colleges, The Association of Boarding Schools, Massachusetts Department of
Education
Endowment
$6 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
6:1
Founded
1901
Buildings
15 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.hillsideschool.net
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
30% of students are day students
Class Size
10 students
Enrollment
139 (Upper School Enrollment: 129)
Faculty
32
Grades
5-9
Upper School Faculty
International Students
9 countries represented
23 men, 9 women; 10 have advanced degrees;
24 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
76% of students who applied were
admitted
Application Fee
$50
Kristen J. Naspo, Director of Admissions
Robin Hill Road
Deadline
Marlborough, MA 01752
Any standardized test or WISC-III and [email protected]
Woodcock-Johnson required
508-485-2824
Continuous
Interview Requirements
Interview required
Application Requirements
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$25,650
5-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$39,950
Who Received Aid?
31% of students received aid in academic year
$44,400
Need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Religious
Yes
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Art Courses
Art, Music
Special Needs
Remedial reading and/or remedial writing, Remedial math, Programs in general development for dyslexic
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students, Special instructional classes for students with Attention Deficit Disorder, Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder, and slight dyslexia
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
29 students graduated in academic year; they went to Brewster Academy; Dublin School; The Cambridge
School of Weston; Vermont Academy; Wilbraham & Monson Academy
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
English, foreign language, mathematics, science, social studies (includes history)
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in all academic, art, music classes. Computer network features include oncampus library services, Internet access. Computer access in designated common areas is available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
ESL, Honors section
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The Hockaday School
Dallas, TX 75229-2999
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Girls' boarding and day college-preparatory school
Setting
Suburban, 100-acre campus
Accreditation
Independent Schools Association of the Southwest, The Association of Boarding Schools
Endowment
$92 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
14:1
Founded
1913
Buildings
12 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.hockaday.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
85% of students are day students
Class Size
14 students
Enrollment
1,046 (Upper School Enrollment: 443)
Faculty
129
Grades
Boarding grades 8-12, day grades PK12
Upper School Faculty
17 men, 44 women; 48 have advanced degrees
International Students
7 countries represented
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
29% of students who applied were
admitted
Jen Liggitt, Director of Admission
Application Fee
$175
Dallas, TX 75229-2999
Application Requirements
Admissions testing required
[email protected]
Deadline
Continuous
214-363-6311
Interview Requirements
Interview required
11600 Welch Road
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$21,970-$22,580
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$40,101-$44,810
Who Received Aid?
17% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Need-based scholarship grants, need-based financial aid available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Art Courses
Acting, Applied arts, Applied music, Concert choir, Dance performance, Dance, Orchestra, Photography,
Voice
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
100 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Cornell University; Georgetown
University; Harvard University; Northwestern University; Stanford University; Vanderbilt University
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
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Graduation Requirements
Algebra, American literature, art history, audio visual/media, biology-AP, chemistry, computer literacy,
computer skills, English, English literature, geometry, history of music, information technology, languages,
physical education (includes health), physics, senior project, U.S. government, U.S. history, world history, one
semester of History of Art and Music, 60 hours of community service
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in animation, art, computer applications, creative writing, dance, engineering,
English, French, health, history, humanities, information technology, introduction to technology, journalism,
Latin, mathematics, media, media production, media services, multimedia, music, newspaper, photography,
photojournalism, psychology, publications, publishing, science, Spanish, technology, Web site design,
yearbook classes. Computer network features include on-campus library services, online commercial services,
Internet access, wireless campus network. Computer access in designated common areas is available to
students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study, Study abroad, Term-away
projects
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Hoosac School
Hoosick, NY 12089
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory and arts school, affiliated with Episcopal Church
Setting
Rural, 350-acre campus, nearest major city: Albany
Accreditation
Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, National Association of Episcopal Schools, New York
State Association of Independent Schools, The Association of Boarding Schools, New York Department of
Education
Endowment
$1.5 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
5:1
Founded
1889
Buildings
16 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.hoosac.com
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
12% of students are day students
Class Size
8 students
Enrollment
125 (Upper School Enrollment: 125)
Faculty
23
Grades
8-PG
Upper School Faculty
International Students
19 countries represented
13 men, 10 women; 10 have advanced degrees;
15 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
64% of students who applied were
admitted
Dean S. Foster, Assistant Headmaster
Application Fee
$30
Hoosick, NY 12089
Deadline
Continuous
[email protected]
Interview Requirements
Interview required
800-822-0159
PO Box 9
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$15,300
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$31,300
Who Received Aid?
30% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Religious
Yes
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, English, History
Art Courses
Art, Dance, Drama, Fine arts, Music, Photography, Theater
Special Needs
Remedial reading and/or remedial writing, Remedial math, Programs in English, mathematics, general
development for dyslexic students
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
45 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Boston College; Boston University;
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Bowdoin College; Hamilton College; Penn State University Park; University of Michigan
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), computer literacy, English, ethics, foreign language,
mathematics, physical education (includes health), science, social studies (includes history), ethics
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in all academic classes. Computer network features include on-campus library
services, Internet access, wireless campus network. Campus intranet is available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Accelerated programs, Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Independent study, Study at local college
for college credit
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The Newman School
Boston, MA 02116
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational day college-preparatory and English as a Second Language school
Setting
Urban
Accreditation
Association of Independent Schools in New England, New England Association of Schools and Colleges,
Massachusetts Department of Education
Student:Teacher Ratio
14:1
Founded
1945
Buildings
2 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.newmanboston.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Enrollment
230 (Upper School Enrollment: 230)
Class Size
14 students
Grades
9-PG
Faculty
25
Upper School Faculty
11 men, 12 women; 9 have advanced degrees
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
58% of students who applied were
admitted
Application Fee
$40
Mr. Francis L. Donelan, Vice President
247 Marlborough Street
Deadline
Boston, MA 02116
School's own exam or SSAT required 617-267-4530
Continuous
Interview Requirements
On-campus interview recommended
Application Requirements
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$14,200-$24,000
Types available:
Merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants available
Who Received Aid?
20% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $100,000
STUDENT LIFE
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Biology, Calculus, English, French, Government and politics, History, Spanish
Art Courses
Art, Drama, Fine arts, Theater
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
60 students graduated in academic year; 58 went to college, including Boston College; Boston University;
Northeastern University; Suffolk University; University of Massachusetts Amherst; Worcester Polytechnic
Institute. Other: 2 went to work
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), computer science, English, foreign language, mathematics,
science, senior project, social studies (includes history)
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COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in English, ESL, history, library, mathematics, science classes. Computer
network features include on-campus library services, Internet access, wireless campus network.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Accelerated programs, Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Study at local college for
college credit
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Pomfret School
Pomfret, CT 06258-0128
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory, arts, religious studies, and technology school, affiliated
with Episcopal Church
Setting
Rural, 500-acre campus, nearest major city: Hartford
Accreditation
Connecticut Association of Independent Schools, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, The
Association of Boarding Schools, Connecticut Department of Education
Endowment
$40 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
6:1
Founded
1894
Buildings
62 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.pomfretschool.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
20% of students are day students
Class Size
11 students
Enrollment
355 (Upper School Enrollment: 346)
Faculty
74
Grades
9-PG
Upper School Faculty
International Students
9 countries represented
43 men, 31 women; 40 have advanced degrees;
58 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
50% of students who applied were
admitted
Mr. Erik Bertelsen, Assistant Head for Enrollment
Application Fee
$50
Pomfret, CT 06258-0128
Application Requirements
SSAT and TOEFL required
[email protected]
Deadline
January 15
860-963-6121
Interview Requirements
On-campus interview required
PO Box 128, 398 Pomfret Street
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$26,750
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$42,900
Who Received Aid?
33% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Religious
Yes
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Art Courses
Art, Drama, Fine arts, Music, Photography, Theater
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
94 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Boston College; Colby College;
Franklin & Marshall College; Hamilton College; Trinity College; Wesleyan University
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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), computer science, English, foreign language, mathematics,
religion (includes Bible studies and theology), science, social studies (includes history)
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in aerospace science, foreign language, history, mathematics, science classes.
Computer network features include on-campus library services, Internet access, wireless campus network.
Campus intranet and computer access in designated common areas are available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, Honors section, Independent study
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Rye Country Day School
Rye, NY 10580-2034
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational day college-preparatory, arts, and technology school
Setting
Suburban, 30-acre campus, nearest major city: New York
Accreditation
New York State Association of Independent Schools, New York Department of Education
Endowment
$24 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
7:1
Founded
1869
Buildings
7 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.ryecountryday.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Enrollment
877 (Upper School Enrollment: 390)
Class Size
13 students
Grades
PK-12
Faculty
117
Upper School Faculty
27 men, 31 women; 47 have advanced degrees
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
26% of students who applied were
admitted
Mr. Matthew J.M. Suzuki, Director of Admissions
Application Fee
$60
Rye, NY 10580-2034
Application Requirements
ISEE or SSAT required
[email protected]
Deadline
December 15
914-925-4513
Interview Requirements
On-campus interview required
Cedar Street
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$29,950-$30,300
Types available:
Need-based scholarship grants available
Who Received Aid?
19% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
STUDENT LIFE
Dress Code
No
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Art, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Computer science, Economics, English, Environmental science, French,
Government and politics, History, Japanese language and culture, Latin, Music theory, Physics
Art Courses
Art, Dance, Drama, Fine arts, Jazz band, Music, Photography, Theater arts, Theater
Special Needs
, Special instructional classes for deaf students
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
97 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Vanderbilt University
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), English, foreign language, life management skills, mathematics,
physical education (includes health), science, social studies (includes history)
COMPUTERS
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Computers
Computers are regularly used in art, classics, English, foreign language, history, mathematics, music,
photography, publishing, science, technology, yearbook classes. Computer network features include oncampus library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless campus network, student and
faculty schedules online. Campus intranet is available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, Honors section, Independent study
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Tilton School
Tilton, NH 03276
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory school
Setting
Small town, 150-acre campus, nearest major city: Concord
Accreditation
Association of Independent Schools in New England, Independent Schools of Northern New England, New
England Association of Schools and Colleges, The Association of Boarding Schools, New Hampshire
Department of Education
Endowment
$14.6 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
6:1
Founded
1845
Buildings
30 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.tiltonschool.org
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
24% of students are day students
Class Size
11 students
Enrollment
250 (Upper School Enrollment: 250)
Faculty
44
Grades
9-PG
Upper School Faculty
International Students
14 countries represented
28 men, 16 women; 18 have advanced degrees;
40 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
65% of students who applied were
admitted
30 School Street
Application Fee
$50
[email protected]
Application Requirements
PSAT or SAT for applicants to grade
11 and 12, SLEP for foreign students,
SSAT or writing sample required
603-286-1733
Deadline
February 1
Interview Requirements
Interview required
Tilton, NH 03276
Beth A. Skoglund, Director of Admissions
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$24,500
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$42,500
Who Received Aid?
49% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $379,000
Merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants, need-based loans available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Art, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, English, French, History, Physics, Psychology, Spanish, Statistics
Art Courses
Art, Drama, Drawing, Music, Painting, Photography, Theater
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
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Placement
104 students graduated in academic year; 100 went to college, including Bates College; Rollins College;
Stonehill College; University of Connecticut; University of New Hampshire; University of Rhode Island.
Other: 2 went to work, 2 entered military service
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
American history, arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), English, foreign language, history, lab science,
mathematics, science, annual participation in Plus/5 (including activities in art and culture, athletics,
community service, leadership, and outdoor experience)
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in English, foreign language, graphic arts, history, mathematics, newspaper,
science, yearbook classes. Computer network features include on-campus library services, online commercial
services, Internet access, wireless campus network, USB Ports, Smart Media Readers. Campus intranet and
computer access in designated common areas are available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study
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Valley Forge Military Academy & College
Wayne, PA 19087-3695
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Boys' boarding and day college-preparatory, arts, business, religious studies, bilingual studies, technology,
music, and military school
Setting
Suburban, 120-acre campus, nearest major city: Philadelphia
Accreditation
Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, The Association of Boarding Schools, Pennsylvania
Department of Education
Endowment
$12 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
11:1
Founded
1928
Buildings
83 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.vfmac.edu
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Enrollment
248 (Upper School Enrollment: 227)
Grades
Boarding grades 7-PG, day grades 7-12 Faculty
International Students
35 countries represented
ADMISSIONS
Class Size
Upper School Faculty
12 students
30
16 men, 12 women; 18 have advanced degrees;
14 reside on campus
CONTACT
Accepted
60% of students who applied were
admitted
Capt. Gerald Hale, Dean of Enrollment Management
Application Fee
$100
Wayne, PA 19087-3695
Application Requirements
TOEFL or SLEP required
[email protected]
Deadline
Continuous
610-989-1300
Interview Requirements
Interview required
1001 Eagle Road
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$21,400
5-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$35,890
Who Received Aid?
73% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit Scholarship Awarded
Total upper-school merit-scholarship money awarded for academic year: $2,230,907
$35,890
Tuition reduction for siblings, merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants available
STUDENT LIFE
Religious
Yes
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Biology, English, History, Physics, Statistics
Art Courses
Applied music, Art, Music
Special Needs
Remedial reading and/or remedial writing, Remedial math
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COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
73 students graduated in academic year; 65 went to college, including Drexel University; George Mason
University; Penn State University Park; United States Military Academy; United States Naval Academy;
University of Chicago. Other: 3 went to work, 1 entered a postgraduate year, 4 had other specific plans
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in all academic classes. Computer network features include on-campus library
services, Internet access, wireless campus network, Blackboard. Campus intranet and computer access in
designated common areas are available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, ESL, Honors section, Independent study, Study abroad, Study at local
college for college credit
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Western Reserve Academy
Hudson, OH 44236
GENERAL INFORMATION
School Type
Coeducational boarding and day college-preparatory and arts school
Setting
Small town, 190-acre campus, nearest major city: Cleveland
Accreditation
Independent Schools Association of the Central States, Midwest Association of Boarding Schools, North
Central Association of Colleges and Schools, Ohio Association of Independent Schools, The Association of
Boarding Schools, Ohio Department of Education
Endowment
$92.1 million
Student:Teacher Ratio
6:1
Founded
1826
Buildings
49 buildings on campus
Member of
Member of National Association of Independent Schools, Secondary School Admission Test Board
ONLINE REFERENCES
Web Site: www.wra.net
SCHOOL PROFILE
FACULTY
Day Students
32% of students are day students
Class Size
12 students
Enrollment
391 (Upper School Enrollment: 391)
Faculty
64
Grades
9-PG
Upper School Faculty
International Students
17 countries represented
39 men, 25 women; 47 have advanced degrees;
58 reside on campus
ADMISSIONS
CONTACT
Accepted
63% of students who applied were
admitted
Mrs. Anne F. Sheppard, Dean of Admission and Financial Aid
Application Fee
$50
Hudson, OH 44236
Application Requirements
ISEE, SSAT or TOEFL required
[email protected]
Deadline
January 15
330-650-9717
Interview Requirements
Interview required
115 College Street
TUITION AND AID
Day Student Tuition:
$27,900
7-day Tuition and
Room/Board:
Types available:
$39,100
Who Received Aid?
34% of upper-school students received aid in academic year
Merit scholarship grants, need-based scholarship grants, need-based loans available
STUDENT LIFE
Housing
single-sex dormitories
Dress Code
Yes
SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
AP Courses
Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Computer science, Economics, English, French, German language, History,
Latin, Music theory, Physics, Spanish
Art Courses
Art, Dance, Drama, Fine arts, Music, Orchestra, Photography, Theater
COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING
Placement
112 students graduated in academic year; all went to college, including Case Western Reserve University;
Cornell University; Duke University; United States Naval Academy; University of Virginia; Williams College
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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduation Requirements
Arts and fine arts (art, music, dance, drama), English, foreign language, history, mathematics, physical
education (includes health), science, senior seminar, senior thesis
COMPUTERS
Computers
Computers are regularly used in architecture, drawing and design, economics, engineering, English, foreign
language, history, mathematics, science, technical drawing classes. Computer network features include oncampus library services, online commercial services, Internet access, wireless campus network. Campus
intranet is available to students.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Special Programs
Advanced Placement exam preparation, Honors section, Independent study, Study abroad, Study at local
college for college credit
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College Promotional Materials
Peterson's comprehensive private secondary school profiles contain concise yet thorough information. Private
Secondary School profiles are divided into the following sections: General Information (type of school, setting,
accreditation, student-teacher ratio); School Profile (grades, enrollment figures); Faculty; Graduation
Requirements; Special Academic Programs; Student Life; Tuition and Aid; Admissions (application and
interview requirements, application deadlines and fees); Computers; Special Programs; and Contact information.
In each Close-Up you'll find the following sections: The College or University, Location, Majors and Degrees,
Academic Programs, Off-Campus Programs, Academic Facilities, Cost, Financial Aid, Faculty, Student
Government, Admissions Requirements, and Application and Information.
Your College Close-ups include the following:
* American Heritage School
* Baylor School
* Berkshire School
* Besant Hill School
* Buxton School
* Cardigan Mountain School
* Christ School
* Cranbrook Schools
* Cushing Academy
* Delbarton School
* Ecole d'Humanité
* Fountain Valley School of Colorado
* George Stevens Academy
* Hillside School
* Hoosac School
* Pomfret School
* Rye Country Day School
* The Harker School
* The Hockaday School
* The Newman School
* Tilton School
* Valley Forge Military Academy & College
* Western Reserve Academy
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American Heritage School
Plantation and Delray Beach, Florida
The School
American Heritage School's mission is to graduate students who are prepared in mind, body, and spirit to
meet the requirements of the colleges of their choice. To this end, the School strives to offer a challenging
college preparatory curriculum, opportunities for leadership, and superior programs in the arts and athletics.
American Heritage is committed to providing a safe and nurturing environment for learning so that children
of average to gifted intelligence may achieve their full potential to be intelligent, creative, and contributing
members of society. Students receive a well-rounded education that provides opportunities for leadership
and character building and extensive opportunities for growth in the arts, athletics, and new technology.
Academic Program
The curriculum for the preprimary child is developmental and age appropriate at each level. Daily language,
speech, and auditory development activities help children to listen, understand, speak, and learn effectively.
The program seeks to maximize the academic potential of each child, while fostering a positive self-image
and providing the skills necessary for the next level of education.
The Lower School is committed to developing a student's basic skills, helping the student master content
areas, and maintaining the student's enthusiasm for learning. Students learn the fundamentals of reading,
process writing, mathematics, and English through a logical progressive sequence, and they learn social
studies, handwriting, spelling, science, and health, with an emphasis on the development of good study
skills. In math and reading, students are grouped according to ability. Enrichment classes in computer
education, art, media center, music, Spanish, Chinese, physical education, and investigative science lab are
offered. Field trips, special projects and events, and assemblies supplement the work introduced in class.
Math, reading, grammar, literature, social studies, and science are the core subjects of the junior high
curriculum, where critical-thinking skills become increasingly important. Writing skills are emphasized,
helping students become literate and articulate thinkers and writers. Enrichment courses are an important
part of the junior high curriculum, with courses rotated on a nine-week basis. Honors classes are available in
all core subject areas.
At the high school level, emphasis is placed on college preparation and on higher-level thinking skills.
Students are challenged by required research and speech and writing assignments in all subject areas. An
extensive variety of classes in all areas of the fine arts is available. A selection of electives—from marine
biology to Advanced Placement Chinese to stagecraft—rounds out the students' schedules, allowing them to
explore other interests and talents. In addition to traditional lecture and discussion, teachers supplement the
text curriculum with activities, projects, and field trips that make subjects more relevant and meaningful to
the students.
Honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses are available to qualified students. Students may gain college
credit as a benefit of the successful completion of AP courses, which include American government,
American history, biology, calculus, chemistry, economics, English language, English literature,
environmental studies, European history, French, music theory, physics, psychology, Spanish, and world
history.
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American Heritage School offers unique premedical, prelaw, and pre-engineering programs to qualified high
school students. The programs challenge those ninth- through twelfth-grade students who have an interest in
these fields of study and encourage students to consider these areas as potential career choices. The many
course offerings are most often taught by working professionals in each area. In addition to course work for
both programs, there are required internships that match students with professionals in their area of study.
In 2010, the school had 31 National Merit Scholarship Semifinalists and was the top-ranked private school at
the National Mu Alpha Theta (mathematics honor society) annual conference.
Through the international program, in addition to an international student's regular academic classes, one to
two hours of English language instruction is provided daily. Living with an American family produces more
opportunity for language development and practice.
Faculty and Advisers
The students at American Heritage are served by 187 teachers, counselors, and administrators at the
Plantation location and 106 teachers, counselors, and administrators at the Delray campus. Sixty-five percent
hold master's or doctoral degrees. Teachers actively seek out both school-year and summer workshops to
attend, and they return with creative ideas for their teaching. Faculty turnover is minimal. The faculty is also
committed to the Heritage philosophy of developing good character and self-esteem as well as the
reinforcement of traditional values in students. Teachers maintain close communication with parents
regarding their child's progress, with frequent written progress reports, phone calls, and scheduled
conference days. The school provides a Web-based service, Edline, on which students and parents can access
information ranging from general school, club, and sports topics to specific content for individual classes.
Classes are small, with a 17:1 student-teacher ratio.
College Admission Counseling
At American Heritage, the goal is to send seniors to colleges that match their goals and expectations for
college life. There are 6 full-time guidance counselors in the high school, including a Director of College
Placement and a Scholarship Specialist.
The college placement process begins in seventh grade with academic advising about curriculum and course
selection and continues through high school with college-preparation advising. The counselors keep abreast
of current admissions trends through attendance at national and local conferences and frequent contact with
college admissions representatives.
The preparation for college intensifies as students in grades 9 through 12 follow a program designed to help
them score well on the SATs. The program includes SAT prep mini-exercises in their English and math
classes. In tenth grade and above, students may take an intensive daily SAT prep class taught on campus
during the regular school day.
At this level, academic counseling gives consideration to graduation requirements and course selection,
study skills and time management, leadership and club involvement, and referral to mentoring or
professional tutoring, if needed. College advising is offered in the classroom on topics such as standardized
test taking, the college application process, resume and essay writing, and searching for colleges and majors.
The School reviews all college applications sent, writes letters of recommendation, finds scholarships for
students, prepares students for college interviews, invites college admission representatives to campus, hosts
a college fair, and proctors AP exams. A guidance resource room with catalogs, videos, and guidebooks is
available for students and parents.
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Virtually all graduates continue their educations and are admitted to the nation's finest colleges and
universities. In recent years, graduates have been admitted to such schools as Boston College, Colgate,
Columbia, Cornell, Duke, Harvard, Georgetown, MIT, NYU, Pepperdine, Princeton, Rutgers, Tufts, Wake
Forest, West Point, Yale, and the Universities of Connecticut, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Southern
California.
Student Body and Conduct
In the Lower School, the PK-3 classes enroll about 16 students; PK-4, 17; Kindergarten, 18; grades 1 and 2, 21;
grades 3 and 4, 22; and grades 5 and 6, 23. In preschool through grade six, each class has a teacher and a fulltime assistant. Grades 7 through 12 in the Upper School average 17 students.
The Plantation campus has 2,400 students, with 1,170 in the Lower School and 1,230 in the Upper School. The
Boca/Delray student population totals 1,011, with 348 students in the Lower School and 663 in the Upper
School. The School's day population is culturally diverse, with students representing forty-three countries
from around the world.
Academic Facilities
The Plantation campus includes a fully equipped science lab, ten state-of-the-art computer rooms, and a $25million Center for the Arts that houses a state-of-the-art 800-seat theater, a black-box theater, spacious art
studios, a graphic design lab, choral and band rooms, and individual practice rooms. There are two new
library/media centers, one that services the Lower School and another that meets all the technological
requirements of students in the Upper School. Heritage has an excellent physical education center that
includes an Olympic-sized swimming and diving facility, a gymnasium, six tennis courts, a track, four
modern locker rooms, a weight-training room, and acres of well-maintained athletic fields.
The American Heritage Boca/Delray campus provides four state-of-the-art iMac computer labs, fully
equipped science labs, art studios, a college guidance computer lab, a library/media center and research lab,
a new $20 million center for the arts, an Olympic-sized swimming pool with eight racing lanes, a 2,600square-foot teaching pool, a 25,000-square-foot gymnasium/auditorium, six lighted tennis courts, a football
and soccer field, fully equipped weight training room, locker rooms, two well-equipped playgrounds, acres
of well-maintained baseball and softball fields, practice fields for soccer and football, and beautifully
landscaped grounds and courtyards.
Athletics
The athletic program is an important part of the sense of community that has developed at Heritage. Parents,
teachers, administrators, and students develop a special kind of camaraderie while cheering on the Patriot
teams. Awards evenings are held for athletes and parents at the conclusion of each season. Heritage offers a
complete competitive sports program. A ''no-cut'' policy allows every student who wants to participate an
opportunity to play on the Patriot team of his or her choice. Coaches provide high-quality instruction in all
sports. Sportsmanship, team-work, recognition of effort, and thorough training and preparation are the goals
toward which the School works every day. Each year, a number of student-athletes receive financial help for
their college education based on their athletic ability and their performance. More importantly, however, for
those who do not have the ability—or maybe the desire—to participate at the collegiate level, athletic
opportunities offer a very enjoyable and memorable experience, with accomplishments and relationships that
last a lifetime. American Heritage competes as a member of the Florida High School Activities Association,
and the athletics programs are consistently ranked in the top ten in the state of Florida.
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Extracurricular Opportunities
The extensive activities offered at Heritage serve several purposes. Primarily, they assist in the growth and
development of students, but they also provide opportunities for leadership and excellence, which are
increasingly required for college admission. Among the activities and clubs offered to high school students
are the National Honor Society; Student Council; Spanish/French Honor Society; Premed, Prelaw, and Preengineering Clubs; the Modern Language Club; Mu Alpha Theta (math club); SADD; the computer club;
yearbook; the student newspaper; thespians; marching band; orchestra; jazz band; and chorus. Lower School
students can take after-school classes in art, dance, instrumental music, karate, cooking, computers, and other
areas of interest. Students may also participate in Student Council, Junior Thespians, or Math Superstars.
American Heritage School provides an outstanding fine arts program to students in PK-3 through grade 12.
The Center for the Arts is a beautiful, specially designed facility that enhances the arts program. Students
participating in art, music, and drama programs have won awards at local, state, and national levels of
competition in recent years. This recognition includes the Florida Vocal Association (superior ratings for
choir, solo, and ensemble), Florida Orchestra Association (superior ratings for solo and ensemble/guitar and
strings), American Choral Directors Award, and National Scholastic Art Competition (gold and silver
medals).
Many students participate in enrichment and leadership programs offered in Broward County, including the
National Conference for Community and Justice, Leadership Broward, Boys and Girls Clubs, Silver Knights,
and the Institute for Math and Computer Science. Nationally, students have participated in Hugh O'Brian
Youth Foundation, Freedoms Foundation, Presidential Classroom, and Global Young Leaders Conference. In
addition, American Heritage School is home to two nonprofit organizations: Mosaic Theatre, an organization
committed to promoting the dramatic arts, where students are able to work alongside professional actors,
and the Center for the Arts Scholarship Foundation, a fund-raising organization that awards scholarships to
talented students in the arts.
Summer Programs
American Heritage has provided summer fun for young campers since 1981. Summer camp provides
activities that help build confidence and self-esteem. Campers enjoy the challenges and rewards of teamwork
as they work and play. Through the numerous activities that are offered, campers continue to develop the
socialization skills begun in school. Campers enjoy good relationships with the high school and college
counselors, who serve as role models for them. American Heritage Day Camp sessions are available for
students 13 years old and under.
For students who have failed a credit course in high school or have been required by their current school to
attend summer school in order to pass to the next grade level, summer school is a necessity. However, many
others can benefit from American Heritage's summer academic program, including preschoolers who need
readiness skills to succeed in kindergarten or first grade; elementary and junior high students who need
practice and development of basic skills in math, reading, and language arts; any students who perform one
or two years below grade level; students for whom English is a second language; high school students who
want to advance themselves academically by earning extra credits during the summer; and high school
students who will soon take the SAT or ACT tests for college admission. More information can be obtained
by contacting the American Heritage School.
Costs and Financial Aid
In 2010–11, tuition and fees total between $16,781 for preschoolers and $21,121 for twelfth-grade students. An
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international program is available at additional cost for the academic school year—August through May—
and includes tuition, housing, three meals a day, books, uniforms, and 2 hours a day of English language.
American Heritage offers financial aid to parents who qualify.
Admissions Information
Enrollment at American Heritage School is limited to students who are above average to gifted in intelligence
and who are working at or above grade level. Math, reading, vocabulary, and IQ tests are administered and
are used to determine if the student has the background and basic skills necessary to be successful. The
results of these entrance exams are discussed with the parents at a conference following the testing. I-20 visas
are granted to international students who are accepted. Details are available from the Director of Admissions.
Students are admitted without regard to race, creed, or national origin.
For acceptance into American Heritage's international program, families must supply complete academic
records from the age of 12, translated into English; two teacher letters of recommendation, translated into
English; copies of the student's passport; and a completed American Heritage School application form. The
American Heritage Admissions Committee reviews the student's records and determines suitable placement.
Full tuition for the school year is due upon acceptance. After tuition has been received, the School issues an I20 form, which must be taken to the U.S. Embassy in the student's country to obtain a student visa.
Application Timetable
First-semester classes begin in mid-August. For information regarding specific deadlines, students should
contact American Heritage School's Plantation campus.
Admissions Correspondence
Attn: Admissions
American Heritage School
12200 West Broward Boulevard
Plantation, Florida 33325, United States
Telephone: 954-472-0022
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.ahschool.com
American Heritage School Boca/Delray
6200 Linton Boulevard
Delray Beach, Florida 33484, United States
Telephone: 561-495-7272
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.ahschool.com
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Baylor School
Chattanooga, Tennessee
The School
Founded in 1893, Baylor School's mission is to foster in students the desire and ability to make a positive
difference in the world. The admission office actively seeks students who bring different geographic,
economic, social, ethnic, and racial backgrounds to the school community. At Baylor—as in the real world—
both girls and boys occupy leadership positions and participate fully in the life of the school. And all
students benefit from the global and cultural perspectives that the boarding students bring.
In addition to an excellent academic program, great care has been applied over the years to maintain and
preserve the 670 acres of land and the turn-of-the century buildings that overlook the Tennessee River gorge.
Classes are spread out among various academic buildings that are all within walking distance. Each element
of the campus is beautiful, safe, and functional. Together, they are nothing less than spectacular.
The scenic backdrop for Baylor's campus is the dynamic city of Chattanooga, a midsized city (population of
312,000 in Hamilton County) that has become a model for urban revitalization. Chattanooga residents enjoy
abundant recreational and cultural opportunities, and the city is an invaluable educational resource for
Baylor students and faculty members.
Baylor is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. It holds membership in the
Educational Records Bureau, the Mid-South Association of Independent Schools, the National Association of
Independent Schools, the Southern Association of Independent Schools, the Southeastern Association of
Boarding Schools, the College Board, and the National Association of College Admission Counselors. The
School is eligible for participation in the Morehead Scholarship program, the Jefferson Scholars program, the
Boston University Trustee Scholarships program, and the Emory University Awards.
Academic Program
A recent survey of day and boarding alums from the last four decades revealed that the primary reason for
attending Baylor was academic quality. Baylor's small classes, innovative curriculum, and individualized
attention from teachers and advisers are all designed to help each student thrive in the classroom. At Baylor,
students quickly find peers who value academic achievement and are surrounded by faculty members who
are committed to helping them reach their full academic potential.
The idea of learning outside of the traditional classroom is deeply entrenched at Baylor (and the envy of
many schools). Baylor's outdoor education program (Walkabout) leads students through the Grand Canyon,
up the Himalayas, and down Costa Rica's Pacuare River; and art students have the opportunity to live and
study in Florence, Italy. Closer to home, students can work in the school's organic garden or tutor inner city
children each afternoon.
Graduation requirements include at least 4 years of English, 3 years of mathematics, 3 years of science, 3
years of social studies, 2 years of one foreign language, and 1 year of fine arts. College counseling is part of
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the curriculum in grades 9–12. A total of 22 credits are needed to graduate. In addition to these required
courses, Baylor offers an extensive selection of electives, including creative writing, digital design, film
history and criticism, visual literacy, drawing, painting, curricular theater, forensics, current world topics,
Eastern religions, ethics, astronomy, pottery, and vocal and instrumental music.
In addition, students can choose from college-level AP courses in nineteen subjects, including English
(language and literature), Latin, French, German, Spanish, American history, European history, U.S.
government and politics, calculus (AB and BC levels), biology, chemistry, physics, and studio art. More than
80 percent of Baylor students who take the AP exams qualify for college credit or waivers.
All students have an adviser. Extra-help sessions are also built into the daily schedule, so students can
receive immediate attention if they are experiencing difficulty. The Writing Center is open daily and on
certain evenings, and the library is open seven days a week and at night. Baylor's English as a Foreign
Language (EFL) program plays a vital role in the success of the school's international students. New students
attend proctored day study hall with access to the study skills director and peer tutors until the end of the
first grading period, at which time their study needs are reevaluated. All boarding students are expected to
study nightly, and quiet is maintained in the dorms by student proctors and residential faculty members.
Faculty and Advisers
More than 70 percent of Baylor faculty members hold advanced degrees from such schools as Boston
University, Cornell, Duke, Emory, Harvard, Notre Dame, and Vanderbilt (including many with Ph.D.
degrees). Teachers also serve as advisers, regularly interacting closely with students in all aspects of their
school life.
College Admission Counseling
Baylor has a comprehensive college counseling program beginning in the ninth grade. Individual sessions
with students and their parents, SAT prep classes, college visits, and contact with college admission officers
who visit Baylor on a regular basis are all an integral part of the college counseling process.
In the past four years, Baylor students have been offered more than $40 million in merit scholarships for
excellence in academics, fine arts, leadership, community service, and athletics. Colleges that have accepted
Baylor graduates recently include Amherst, Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Davidson, Duke, Emory,
Furman, Georgetown, Harvard, Northwestern, MIT, Princeton, Rhodes, Sewanee, Stanford, Tulane, the U.S.
Air Force Academy, the U.S. Military Academy, the U.S. Naval Academy, Vanderbilt, Williams, Yale, and the
Universities of Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.
Student Body and Conduct
Baylor is one of the few college-preparatory schools in the United States that emphasizes instruction in
leadership. The Leadership Baylor Program was launched in 2005 with the goal of reaching out to all
students to help them discover and develop their unique leadership skills. Beginning in the ninth grade and
continuing through their senior year, students are required to take a quarter-long Leadership Baylor course.
Baylor was one of the first secondary schools to establish an Honor Code, and to this day it remains central to
the Baylor experience. At the beginning of each school year, students sign a pledge indicating that they will
not lie, cheat, steal, or plagiarize. This community of trust is fostered by students who conduct themselves
with integrity and expect the same from their peers. An elected student Honor Council investigates alleged
honor offenses and suggests appropriate punishments to the administration.
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Academic Facilities
The academic and residential facilities at Baylor comprise a physical plant worth $110 million. An extensive
library renovation provides students with a twenty-first century state-of-the-art academic center. Other
noteworthy additions to Baylor's academic facilities include a $5-million fine arts complex consisting of three
separate buildings for music, studio arts, and performing arts. The $6.5-million Weeks Science building
provides state-of-the-art technology and science classrooms, and all Baylor classrooms are equipped with
projectors connected to computers. All teachers have course Web sites, and many use the Moodle course
management system.
Boarding and General Facilities
Eight dormitories house boarding students and resident faculty members. Most dormitory rooms house 2
people, although there are some single rooms. Internet access, laundry facilities, and television lounges are
available in all dorms, as are a centrally located refrigerator, microwave oven, and soft drink machine.
Student proctors aid the resident adult in keeping order in the dorms. Baylor's newest dorm is LEED
certified.
The student center is a popular place, complete with large-screen television, pool tables, comfy couches and
a snack bar—a cozy gathering spot complete with Starbucks coffee, smoothies, burgers, and snacks.
At least one nurse is on duty in the health center 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The school also
maintains a close relationship with several local doctors, and the nurse in the health center arranges for any
necessary medical attention.
Athletics
Sports Illustrated magazine recently named Baylor's athletic program the top program in Tennessee and
among the top 25 in the country. Central to its athletic philosophy are the lessons learned through teamwork
and good sportsmanship. In addition, the school strives to instill in students the lifelong enjoyment that
comes from an active lifestyle.
Baylor fields seventy-four teams in seventeen sports, thirteen of which are sanctioned by the state athletic
association. These teams include baseball, basketball, bowling, cross-country, football, golf, lacrosse, soccer,
softball, tennis, track and field, volleyball, and wrestling. Teams also compete interscholastically in
cheerleading, crew, dance, diving, fencing, and swimming.
Baylor's athletic facilities include two gyms and a field house complex containing basketball courts and a
basketball arena, volleyball courts, a cardio room, and wrestling facility. This complex also contains the only
indoor 50-meter pool within a 130-mile radius and a new fitness center with state-of-the-art equipment and
training for elite athletes.
Baylor's campus provides ample space for a football stadium with artificial turf; a seven-lane track; baseball,
softball, lacrosse, and soccer fields; football practice fields; a cross-country course; outdoor and indoor tennis
courts; and an outdoor pool. A golf short game practice center features six stations, a chipping green with
bunkering, and a putting green. Crew team members also enjoy Baylor's proximity to the Tennessee River,
launching their boats directly from a campus dock.
Extracurricular Opportunities
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Basic to Baylor's philosophy of educating the whole person is the belief that students should participate in a
variety of activities. To that end, almost sixty clubs and activities are offered each year. Students are active in
community service projects, religious fellowship groups, and environmental awareness through school clubs
and afternoon activities. Four publications are produced every year by Baylor students and students may
also run for student government and dorm leadership positions.
Daily Life
Students are expected to enroll in five academic classes, unless they carry several AP courses or hold an
elected office. One period of a student's schedule is devoted to lunch and one to free time for study or
intramural recreation. Students are required to participate in either an athletic activity or other activities, such
as community service, each afternoon following the academic day. Breakfast is served each morning and
dinner is served in the evening, followed by evening study hall and quiet hours.
Weekend Life
Boarding students are allowed day, overnight, and weekend leaves starting on Friday night and ending
Sunday evening. Typically, students go shopping, eat at one of the many nearby restaurants, attend Baylor
athletic events, go to the movies, or visit the homes of day school friends. School-sponsored activities are
planned each weekend by a full-time staff member and typically include trips to shopping malls, nearby
attractions, restaurants, movie theaters, concerts, and sporting events as well as on-campus activities. The
Student Center is also a hub of activity during the week and on weekends, providing an inviting place for
games, movies, and relaxation.
In addition, Baylor's Walkabout outdoor program schedules at least two trips each weekend, providing an
opportunity for students to become proficient at rock climbing, hiking, camping, canoeing, rafting, kayaking,
and many other outdoor activities.
Students are encouraged (and transportation is provided each week) to attend worship services at area
churches and congregations.
Costs and Financial Aid
Baylor's 2010–11 tuition and comprehensive fees are $19,536 for day students and $39,790 for boarding
students. The school subscribes to the School and Student Service for Financial Aid, and awards are made on
the basis of need. In 2010, Baylor awarded $3.5 million in need-based financial aid. A merit-based scholarship
is available on a competitive basis for qualified ninth-grade boarding students.
Admissions Information
Baylor seeks boys and girls of high moral character who are willing to compete in a rigorous collegepreparatory curriculum. Students are accepted in grades 6 through 11. Transcripts, recommendations, a
personal interview and visit, Secondary School Admission Test scores, and an application fee complete the
application. Baylor School does not discriminate on the basis of color, race, religion, or national or ethnic
origin.
Application Timetable
Inquiries are welcome at any time, and required campus tours and interviews are available by appointment
year-round. Baylor operates under a rolling admission policy, with the review of completed files beginning
in January and continuing until all available spaces are filled. The application fee is $75; for international
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applicants, the fee is $100. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Prospective students are
encouraged to visit while school is in session to experience a regular day of classes and activities.
Admissions Correspondence
Bill Murdock
Director of Admissions
Baylor School
171 Baylor School Road
Chattanooga, Tennessee 37405, United States
Telephone: 423-267-8505
Fax: 423-757-2525
E-mail: [email protected]
[email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.baylorschool.org
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Berkshire School
Sheffield, Massachusetts
The School
Berkshire School is a coed college preparatory boarding school offering rigorous academics. Pioneering
programs—such as Math/Science Research, Sustainability and Resource Management, Chinese language,
and Aviation Science (including flight training and FAA Ground School certification)—are available along
with advanced sections and AP offerings in all disciplines. With a range of artistic and athletic offerings, a
state-of-the-art academic building, brand new facilities for music and dance, and national recognition for its
efforts in environmental conservation, Berkshire is an extraordinary setting in which students are encouraged
to learn, in the words of the school motto, “Not just for school, but for life.”
In 1907, Mr. and Mrs. Seaver B. Buck, graduates of Harvard and Smith respectively, rented the building of
Glenny Farm at the foot of Mt. Everett and founded Berkshire School. For thirty-five years, the Bucks devoted
themselves to educating young men to the values of academic excellence, physical vigor, and high personal
standards. In 1969, this commitment to excellence was extended to include girls.
Situated at the base of Mt. Everett, the second-highest mountain in Massachusetts, Berkshire's campus spans
500 acres. It is a 75-minute drive to both Albany International Airport and Hartford's Bradley International
Airport, and just over 2 hours from Boston and New York City.
Berkshire School is incorporated as a not-for-profit institution, governed by a 28-member self-perpetuating
Board of Trustees. The School has an $85-million endowment. Annual operating expenses exceed $25 million.
Annual Giving in 2009–10 exceeded $2.77 million. The Berkshire Chapter of the Cum Laude Society was
established in 1942.
Berkshire School is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and holds
memberships in the Independent School Association of Massachusetts, the National Association of
Independent Schools, the College Entrance Examination Board, the National Association for College
Admission Counseling, the Secondary School Admission Test Board, and the Association of Boarding
Schools.
Academic Program
Berkshire's academic program is firmly rooted in a college-preparatory curriculum that features advanced
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and AP courses across all disciplines. In addition, unique opportunities to excel in math/science research,
student-directed independent study, and electives in science, history, and fine arts allow students to pursue
advanced study at Berkshire. As creative and agile problem solvers, strong critical thinkers, persuasive
communicators, and active global citizens, Berkshire's students are equipped with the skills required to excel
in the twenty-first century. The School's balance between academic rigor and possibility allows students to
flourish as independent learners, community members, and professionals.
Believing that the best preparation for college is the acquisition of knowledge from a variety of disciplines,
Berkshire requires the following credits: 4 years of English; 3 years each of mathematics, a foreign language,
and history; 2 years of science; and 1 year of the visual or performing arts. All departments provide for
accelerated sections, and students are placed at a level commensurate with their skills and talent. Many
students take one or more of the sixteen Advanced Placement courses offered.
Most students carry five courses. The average number of students in a class is 12, and the student-teacher
ratio is 7:1. The academic year is divided into two semesters, each culminating with an assessment period.
Students receive grades, teacher comments, and adviser letters twice each semester. Berkshire uses a
traditional letter-grading system of A–F (D is passing).
In 2007, Berkshire introduced its advanced math/science research course in which students use the strong
foundation of knowledge acquired in the regular Berkshire curriculum as a springboard for beyond-thecurriculum projects in areas of cutting-edge research and other fields. Students intern with a professional
scientist to conduct research in facilities located in the nearby Hartford, Connecticut and Albany, New York
areas. Students work closely with their mentor in the field of their choice for 4 to 8 hours a week. The course
culminates with a critical review paper and a research paper, both in scientific format.
Faculty and Advisers
The Berkshire teaching faculty numbers 58, 47 of whom live on campus. Thirty-one teachers hold a master's
degree and 4 hold doctorates. Faculty members contribute to both the academic and personal development of
each student. The small size of the Berkshire community permits faculty members to become involved in
students' lives outside, as well as inside, the classroom. Each student is paired with a faculty adviser who
provides guidance, monitors academic progress, and serves as a liaison with the student's family. Berkshire
also retains the services of 4 pediatricians, a nurse practitioner, 4 registered nurses, and 2 certified athletic
trainers.
Michael J. Maher was named Berkshire's fifteenth head of school in the spring of 2004. He holds a bachelor's
degree in political science from the University of Vermont and a master's degree in liberal studies from
Wesleyan University. Mr. Maher is in his seventh year at Berkshire; previously he held positions as
administrator, teacher, and hockey coach. He and his wife, Jean, an associate director of admission and a
member of the Foreign Language Department, have 3 children, 2 of whom attend Berkshire.
College Admission Counseling
College counseling at Berkshire is the responsibility of 3 full-time and 2 part-time professionals who assist
students and their parents in the search for an appropriate college or university. The formal process begins in
the Fifth Form, with individual conferences with the college counselors, and the opportunity to meet with
some of the approximately 100 college admissions representatives who visit the campus. In February, Fifth
Formers and their parents attend a two-day seminar on the college admission process. Admission strategies
are discussed and specific institutions are identified for each student's consideration. During the summer,
students are encouraged to visit colleges and write the first draft of their college application essay. The
application process is generally completed by winter vacation in the Sixth Form year.
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Members of the classes of 2008, 2009, and 2010 enrolled at a variety of four-year colleges or universities,
including Bard, Bates, Berkeley, Boston College, Boston University, Bowdoin, Brown, Carnegie Mellon,
Colby, Colgate, Cornell, Dartmouth, Denison, Dickinson, Emory, Johns Hopkins, Kenyon, Lehigh,
Middlebury, MIT, NYU, Northeastern, Northwestern, SMU, St. Lawrence, Syracuse, Union, Villanova,
Williams, and the Universities of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, Wisconsin,
and Vermont
Student Body and Conduct
In the 2010–11 academic year, there were 352 boarders and 42 day students; with 3 students studying abroad
in the first semester. The student body is drawn from twenty-five states and twenty-four countries.
Students contribute directly to the life of the school community through involvement in the Student
Government, the Prefect Program, dormitory life, and various clubs and activities. Participation gives
students a positive growth experience supporting the School motto of learning “not just for school, but for
life.” The rules at Berkshire are simple and straightforward and are consistent with the values and ideals of
the School. They are designed to help students live orderly lives within an environment of mutual trust and
respect.
Academic Facilities
Berkshire Hall, the primary academic facility built in 1930 and the centerpiece of the campus, reopened in the
fall of 2008 after a full renovation. It now features larger classrooms with state-of-the-art technology, new
administrative offices, a two-story atrium, and a Great Room for student study and special functions. A new
music center opened in the fall of 2010, featuring two specially designed classrooms to meet the needs of the
instrumental, choral, and chamber music programs. The center has five practice rooms, plenty of spacious
storage cabinets for instruments, a recording studio, and storage and office space for the music program. A
new dance studio also opened in the fall of 2010 as part of the existing gymnasium. Godman House is home
to several darkrooms and a digital art and electronic music studio, and deWindt Dormitory houses a visual
arts studio. In 2009, the School opened its Center for Writing and Critical Thinking, which is home to a nightly
writing tutoring program. The center also hosts faculty forums and 4 visiting writers each year.
The Geier Library contains approximately 43,000 volumes in open stacks, an extensive reference collection in
both print and electronic format, numerous periodicals, and a fine audiovisual collection. The library has
wireless Internet access, as well as twenty computers with Internet access and an online card catalog for
student use. ProQuest Direct, the Expanded Academic Index ASAP, the New York Times full text (1994 to
present), and the current ninety days' full text of 150 Northeastern newspapers, including the Wall Street
Journal online, keep the library fully up-to-date on breaking information.
At the Dixon Observatory, computer synchronized telescopes make it possible to view and photograph
objects in the solar system and beyond. Given the combination of equipment, software, and location,
Berkshire's observatory is among the best in New England.
Boarding and General Facilities
Berkshire has ten residential houses, including two girls' dormitories that were completed in the fall of 2002.
Three faculty families, many with small children, generally reside in each house along with a prefect—Sixth
Formers whose primary responsibility is to assist dorm parents with daily routines, such as study hall and
room inspection. Dorm rooms all have Internet access and private phone lines. There is a common room in
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each house, where students may relax or study. Benson Commons, the school center, features a dining hall
capable of seating the entire School, a post office, the School bookstore, the Student Life office, the Center for
Writing and Critical Thinking, and recreational spaces.
Athletics
Berkshire enjoys a proud tradition of athletic excellence. The School provides competition in twenty-seven
interscholastic sports, including baseball, basketball, crew, cross-country running, field hockey, football, golf,
ice hockey, lacrosse, mountain biking, skiing, soccer, softball, squash, tennis, track and field, and volleyball.
Students may also participate in the Ritt Kellogg Mountain Program, a program that utilizes Berkshire's
natural environment and its proximity to the Appalachian Trail to present athletic challenges, teach
leadership, and foster environmental responsibility.
In January 2009 the 117,000-square-foot Jackman L. Stewart Athletic Center opened. The facility offers two ice
rinks (one Olympic-size), fourteen locker rooms, seating for 800 spectators, a 34-machine fitness center and
athletic training rooms. It can also be used for indoor tennis and can accommodate all-school functions. A
second athletic center features full-size courts for basketball and volleyball, four international squash courts,
a climbing wall, and a dance studio. Other facilities include the new Thomas H. Young Field for baseball,
new softball fields, an all-weather track, a lighted football field, and two synthetic-turf fields. A new twelvecourt tennis facility was completed in the fall of 2010.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Berkshire offers students a variety of opportunities to express their talents and passions. Students publish a
newspaper, a yearbook, and a literary magazine that features student writing, art, and photography. The Ritt
Kellogg Mountain Program offers backcountry skills, boatbuilding, fly fishing, hiking, kayaking, rock
climbing, and winter mountaineering.
There are a number of active clubs, including the Drama Club, the International Club, the Investment Club,
the Maple Syrup Program, the Philanthropy Society, and a Student Activities Committee.
Berkshire's student-run FM radio station, WBSL, operates with a power of 250 watts and is capable of
reaching 10,000 listeners. Berkshire is one of the few secondary schools to hold membership in the
Intercollegiate Broadcasting System and the only one affiliated with both the Associated Press wire service
and its radio service.
Berkshire students pursue the arts in the classroom and in extracurricular activities. The theater program
offers two plays in the fall and spring as well as a winter musical. There are three choral groups: Ursa Major,
an all-school chorus; Ursa Minor, a girls' a cappella group; and Greensleeves, an all male chorus. There are
two music groups: a jazz band and a chamber music ensemble. Students can also take private voice and
instrumental lessons. Each season the Berkshire community looks forward to various performances, such as
dance and music recitals, a jazz café, and poetry readings. Visual arts include painting, drawing, sculpture,
digital art, photography, and ceramics. Students display their work in galleries in the Student Center and in
Berkshire Hall.
Daily Life
The first of the six class periods in a school day begins at 8 a.m., and the final class concludes at 2:45 p.m.,
except on Wednesday and Saturday, when the last class ends by 11:35 a.m. Berkshire follows a rotating
schedule in which classes meet at different times each day.
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Athletics, outdoor experiences, and art activities occupy the afternoon. Clubs often meet after dinner, before
the 2-hour supervised study period that begins at 8 p.m.
Weekend Life
Weekend activities are planned by a Director of Student Activities and include first-run movies, dances with
live bands, and other dances hosted by DJs. There are trips to local amusement parks and theaters as well as
shopping trips to Hartford and Albany. In addition, students and faculty members journey to New York and
Boston to visit museums, attend theater and music productions, or take in professional sports events.
Costs and Financial Aid
For the 2010–11 academic year, tuition is $42,900 for boarding students and $35,900 for day students. For most
students, $100 a month is sufficient personal spending money. Ten percent of the tuition is paid upon
enrollment, 50 percent is payable on July 1, and 40 percent is payable on November 30. Various tuition
payment plans are available.
Financial aid is awarded on the basis of need to about 30 percent of the student body. The total financial aid
spent in 2010–11 was $3.9 million. The School and Student Service (SSS) Parents Financial Statement and a
1040 form are required.
Admissions Information
Berkshire adheres to the principle that in diversity there is strength and, therefore, actively seeks students
from a broad range of geographic, ethnic, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Admission is most
frequent in the Third and Fourth Forms, and the School enrolls a small number of postgraduates each year.
In order to assess the student's academic record, potential, character, and contributions to his or her school,
Berkshire requires a personal interview, a transcript, test scores, and recommendations from English and
mathematics teachers, along with the actual application. Candidates should have their Secondary School
Admission Test (SSAT) scores forwarded to Berkshire School (school code 1612).
Application Timetable
Interested families are encouraged to visit the campus in the fall or winter preceding the September in which
admission is desired. Visits are arranged according to the academic schedule, Monday through Friday, from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturday from 8 to 10:45 a.m. January 15 is the deadline for submitting applications; late
applications are accepted as long as space is anticipated. Berkshire adheres to the standard notification date
of March 10 and the families' reply date of April 10. Depending on availability, late applications are
processed on a rolling basis. Applications for admission are available online at the School's Web site:
http://www.berkshireschool.org.
Admissions Correspondence
Andrew Bogardus, Director of Admission
Berkshire School
245 North Undermountain Road
Sheffield, Massachusetts 01257, United States
Telephone: 413-229-1003
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Fax: 413-229-1016
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.berkshireschool.org
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Besant Hill School
Ojai, California
The School
Founded in 1946 by Aldous Huxley, J. Krishnamurti, Guido Ferrando, and Rosalind Rajagopal on 520 acres
in the resort town of Ojai, California, this residential school community offers a vigorous college-preparatory
curriculum with a cornerstone of creative expression, sustainability, and divergent thinking. Besant Hill
offers thirty-three art electives, competitive athletics, travel and experiential education programs, small
classes, and a 4:1 student-teacher ratio.
The School was envisioned as an educational community that would provide an atmosphere where students
could develop and discover both their intellectual and creative potential and where they would learn “how
to think not what to think™.” This philosophy is still the core of the School today.
In addition to its fine arts and athletic programs, Besant Hill School has an academic program that integrates
best practice teaching techniques and universal design. This cutting-edge program prepares students for a
lifetime of learning as well as a foundation for their professional career. The School has recently added
SmartBoards in 100 percent of its classrooms, making the Socratic method of teaching it uses even more
accessible to many styles of learners.
Besant Hill School holds membership in the California Association of Independent Schools, the National
Association of Independent Schools, and Western Boarding Schools Association. The School is accredited by
the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.
Academic Program
The Academic Dean is responsible for the academic life of the School. The curriculum is absolutely and
without exception college preparatory. Courses of study follow the University of California (UC) system and
can also be determined by the individual student's future plans and interests. The average load is five
academic solids, an elective, and an art.
Class size averages 10 students. Independent study is available for especially well-motivated students, and
Advanced Placement courses are offered in calculus, English, government, physics, and Spanish.
Besant Hill has two academic semesters, and evaluations are sent to parents four times a year. An evening
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study hall is required.
Graduation requirements are as follows: English, 4 years; Science, 3 years (including 1 year of biology and 1
year of chemistry); Foreign language, 2 years of the same language; Math, 3 years (through algebra II); Social
Science, 3 years (including world cultures and American (U.S.) history); Arts, 2 years (visual, theater, music)
with at least 1 year of the same art; Fitness, 4 years; and Electives, at least 3 (one must be senior capstone).
English as a second language (ESL) is also offered. This program works to improve the development of
English and oral and listening comprehension skills. Concentration on vocabulary expansion, improved
pronunciation, and use of idioms aid the students in understanding and participating in class. The full-year
course, which requires an additional fee, is two or three periods a day and can include ESL classes in science,
social studies, U.S. history, and TOEFL preparation.
Faculty and Advisers
There are 35 teachers and administrators on the Besant Hill staff. Twenty-one faculty members and
administrators reside on campus, and all faculty and staff members are involved in the life of the community
beyond the classroom. Of the 25 full-time teachers, half have advanced degrees, 2 of whom hold their
doctorates.
College Admission Counseling
All students take a college-preparatory curriculum and begin their testing program with the Preliminary SAT
(PSAT) in the fall of the sophomore year. They take the PSAT again as juniors, in preparation for the SAT,
which they take later that same year and then again as seniors. The SAT Subject Tests are administered to
those juniors and seniors for whom it is appropriate.
The School receives annual visits from college representatives. The Director of College Counseling is on
campus and begins working with students in their sophomore year. In 2010, colleges or universities accepted
all of the graduates. Recent graduates are attending colleges such as Bard, Beloit, Berklee School of Music,
Bowdoin, Cal Arts, Chicago Institute of the Arts, Columbia, Mills, NYU, University of Washington, and
various campuses of the California State University and University of California systems.
Student Body and Conduct
Of the 105 students attending Besant Hill School this year, one fifth are day students and four fifths are
residential. Besant Hill School seeks to instill in students a lifelong love of learning. This goal is reflected in
the School motto “Aun Aprendo” (“I am still learning”). The community sets reasonable limits for its
members. Elected students participate in a Disciplinary Advisory Committee, along with faculty members
and administrators. The School disciplinary system works on a basis of minors and majors. Students may
have occasional work crew hours or more serious disciplinary action, depending on the offense.
Academic Facilities
There are twelve buildings on campus. Networked computer stations are available in several buildings. Most
of the campus has wireless access. The School houses a science lab, photography lab, new art studio, theater,
recording studio, ceramics studio, and digital media lab. The renowned Zalk Theater houses both the drama
and music departments. The School has also recently added four soundproof music practice rooms.
Boarding and General Facilities
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The Besant Hill School campus offers boarding facilities for both boys and girls. The residents are housed 2 to
a room in bedrooms that contain study and storage facilities for each student. Dorm parents live in each wing
of the dormitories and supervise the boarding students with the help of student prefects. Other facilities
include a modern dining hall, tennis courts, volleyball courts, a baseball field, basketball courts, and a soccer
field.
Athletics
Team experience and personal challenges through athletics are a valuable part of any education and are
made available to every student. The School competes interscholastically in baseball, basketball, crosscountry, soccer, and volleyball. Boys varsity basketball is the School's most competitive athletic program, and
the team has won back-to-back Southern California Section titles.
Extracurricular Opportunities
The School's proximity to both the coast and the mountains provides students with a wide range of
recreational activities, from surfing to rock climbing. Students can also take advantage of museums, movies,
concerts, plays, skating, shopping, and bowling.
Daily Life
Boarding students are responsible for cleaning their rooms and performing assigned crew jobs. Breakfast is
served from 7 to 8 a.m. Academic classes are until 2:45 p.m. In the afternoon, fitness and athletics classes are
offered. Dinner is at 6 p.m., followed by evening study hall.
Weekend Life
Weekends give students a chance to relax, catch up on their studies, or partake in planned activities by the
Residential Life Director. Weekend trips to Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, and Ventura are frequent.
Students who have parental permission may leave the campus on open weekends, provided they are in good
standing with the School.
Costs and Financial Aid
The cost of tuition, room, and board for the 2010–11 academic year was $41,990. Day student tuition was
$21,990. A book and activity fee of $2600 is required to cover the costs of books, trips, and other expenses.
The ESL fee for first-year students is $7000. Participation in the School's instructional support program is
$7200.
Approximately 20 percent of the School's income is given annually in scholarship and financial aid.
Information on aid availability can be obtained from the Admissions Office.
Admissions Information
Students are selected on the basis of character and academic promise. Personal interviews and references are
used to identify those students who are most likely to benefit from the Besant Hill School experience.
Consequently, a visit to the School is strongly urged for each applicant. Acceptance is based upon records,
recommendations, and a personal interview.
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Application Timetable
Candidates should schedule an interview with a member of the Besant Hill School admissions team,
schedule a class visit, go on a tour of the School, and begin working on the Besant Hill School application for
admission by fall 2011. Students should also begin requesting recommendations, transcripts, and school
reports from their current school. The financial aid deadline is January 15, and the application deadline is
February 22. Admissions decisions should be mailed by March 10, and new student contracts are due by
April 10. Applications received after February 22 are reviewed and acted upon on a space-available basis as
soon as the candidate's file is complete. After April 10, remaining spaces will be filled through a rolling
admissions policy.
Admissions Correspondence
Randy Bertin
P.O. Box 850
Besant Hill School
Ojai, California 93024, United States
Telephone: 805-646-4343 Ext. 422
800-900-0487 (toll-free)
Fax: 805-646-4371
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.besanthillschool.org
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Buxton School
Williamstown, Massachusetts
The School
In 1928, Ellen Geer Sangster founded Buxton School as a coeducational day school in Short Hills, New Jersey.
In 1947, she moved the high school to her family estate in Williamstown, Massachusetts, and formed it anew
as a boarding school.
From the beginning, Buxton has been a progressive school, one devoted to innovation and change. Today,
that devotion remains steadfast. At Buxton, students' pursuits help them develop the clear vision they need
to comprehend the world they live in and to define their future lives. Each student's bridge to the larger
world is the informed, skilled, confident self that he or she develops while at Buxton.
Buxton places great importance on the composition and character of its student body. Foremost, a young
person must want to be at Buxton. In addition, Buxton seeks to enroll students who have the intelligence,
motivation, creativity, and intellectual curiosity to succeed there. Prior to coming to Buxton, students have
experienced positive relationships with adults as well as peers. Buxton students take a responsible and
ambitious role in shaping their own lives and wish to make significant and mature social contributions. They
are conscious of the importance of being useful and contributory, of serving as an asset to others, and of
aiding in others' efforts to enrich the life of the group. One of the first tasks Buxton students encounter is that
of developing and maintaining a sound, compassionate, stimulating environment for oneself and for the
entire group.
Buxton promotes personal growth and cultivates students' abilities to understand and manage their lives.
Presenting a way of life that students can come to understand and manage is of primary importance. The
student body is diverse; life at the School is flexible, noninstitutional, and open to change. Opportunities
often arise for collective deliberation of life's most pressing challenges. A Buxton education reflects the
fundamental premise that a mature individual must be morally and actively committed, each in his or her
own way, to the creation and betterment of a healthy society.
The 150-acre campus of Buxton overlooks historic Williamstown, which is located approximately 170 miles
north of New York City and 150 miles west of Boston. Williams College, the Clark Art Institute, and the
Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) are nearby and are all exceptional resources for
Buxton students.
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Buxton is a nonprofit, nonsectarian institution governed by a 24-member self-perpetuating Board of Trustees.
The board includes the Co-Directors, Associate Director, faculty members, alumni, parents of students and
alumni, and friends of the School.
The physical plant at Buxton is valued at $6 million. The operating budget is $4 million annually. The current
endowment is $1.7 million, and the Annual Fund for 2009–10 raised $220,133.
Buxton is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and is approved by the
Massachusetts Department of Education. It is a member of the Secondary School Admission Test Board, The
Association of Boarding Schools, the Association of Independent Schools of New England, the National
Association of Independent Schools, and the Small Boarding School Association as well as other professional
organizations.
Academic Program
Academic courses, activities, and community life are all essential parts of a Buxton education. Each offers the
opportunity for unique and vital growth; therefore, each is of educational significance.
Buxton's academic curriculum is broad and demanding, offering an unusual combination of traditional
subjects, courses in the arts, and electives in subjects that are usually only encountered at the college level.
Students collaborate with teachers to design their course programs. Although they are advised to design a
course schedule that will prepare them for higher education, students have considerable freedom of choice
about what courses they take and when they take them.
Sixteen credits are required for graduation. Students must take 4 years of English and 1 year of American
history. They are also counseled to complete a minimum of 3 years of mathematics, 2 years of social science,
2 years of laboratory science, and at least 2 years of a foreign language (French, Spanish, and Indonesian are
offered), although 3 years are strongly recommended. Students are also encouraged to pursue courses in the
arts—studio art; ceramics; black-and-white and digital photography; video production; music theory,
composition, and performance; and beginning and advanced drama.
Buxton offers a range of elective courses—those offered recently include writing workshops, Shakespeare,
Twentieth-Century Literature, The Practice of Poetry, Coming of Age, Traditional Taoism and Western
Literature, Advanced European Studies, Media Literacy, Cultural Anthropology, Film History, Sound and
Music in the Twentieth Century, Rights and the Law, Contemporary Social and Political Movements, Africa,
Topics in Religion and Politics, Radio and the Social Documentary, History of Dissent in the United States,
Calculus II, Marine Science, Geology, Astronomy, Psychology, Kinesiology and Sociology of Sports,
Environmental Studies, Behavioral and Chemical Addiction Studies, Chemistry of Photography, Sculpture:
Metal Fabrication, and Book Arts.
Students in their junior year are invited to participate in a year-long research project that culminates in a
substantial scholarly paper as well as a creative project that grows out of their research. Topics in recent years
have included a history of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, the invention of the steam engine, the worldwide
problem of human trafficking, the history and tradition of the Japanese tea ceremony, cowboy history and
lore, and an exploration of the life and work of the film and theater director Elia Kazan.
Buxton divides its academic year into two semesters. The School has a 5:1 student-teacher ratio, and class size
averages 9 students. Faculty-supervised study periods are held daily during class hours and for 2 hours in
the evening. Students may be required to attend.
Each year in March, the whole School travels to a major North American city. Atlanta, Chicago, Havana,
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Mexico City, New Orleans, Philadelphia, San Juan, Toronto, Washington, D.C., and three cities in Nicaragua
are among those visited in recent years. This event is of central importance in the school year, and students
are involved in all aspects of planning and executing the weeklong trip. Social, economic, and political issues
are the focus of project groups, and the entire Buxton community takes part in the All-School Play or other
performances, which are presented several times during the trip. Upon returning to Buxton, students share
their project experiences with the School and archive their reports.
Faculty and Advisers
There are 21 faculty members—12 men and 9 women. Four hold master's degrees. Thirteen live on campus.
C. William Bennett, Director of the School since 1983, is a graduate of Williams College and has been at
Buxton since 1969. In 2008, Peter Smith became Co-Director with Mr. Bennett. Mr. Smith graduated from
Buxton in 1974, is a graduate of Clark University, and has been working at Buxton since 1984.
Most teaching families and teachers live at the School, interweaving their daily lives with those of the Buxton
community. Along with teaching in the classroom, faculty members have advisory, leadership,
administrative, and caretaking responsibilities. As advisers, faculty members are in regular contact with
parents.
Compassionate adult action and reaction form the foundation of education at Buxton. Teachers seek to
motivate students to engage in sincere intellectual commitment and self-evaluation. The adults are available
and open to young people and are concerned with their growth in academic disciplines as well as in every
other respect. Buxton faculty and staff members react to young people knowledgeably, deeply, and
personally. Developing honest and caring friendships between Buxton adults and students is an educational
goal in itself.
College Admission Counseling
Buxton faculty members counsel students as they form their college plans. Students are assigned faculty
advisers in the spring of their junior year. The advisers guide students in making appropriate college choices
and help students with the application process.
In recent years, Buxton graduates have attended Amherst, Bard, Bennington, Berklee College of Music,
Carleton, Cornell, Emory, Hampshire, Lewis and Clark, Middlebury, Mount Holyoke, Oberlin, Reed,
St. John's, Sarah Lawrence, Skidmore, Smith, Swarthmore, Wellesley, and Williams.
Student Body and Conduct
Enrollment at Buxton averages 90 students, with an equal number of boys and girls. In 2010–11, twelve states
and the countries of Bermuda, Bolivia, China, Ecuador, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, Rwanda, and
Switzerland are represented among the student population.
Academic Facilities
The campus contains four classroom buildings (one housing science labs and a computer lab), a library with
Internet-access computers and extra Ethernet ports for students' portable computers, an art studio, a ceramics
studio, a darkroom, a music classroom and practice rooms, and a theater. Designated campus areas are
equipped for wireless Internet access. A new music and fine arts complex is scheduled to be completed in
early 2011.
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Boarding and General Facilities
In addition to the academic facilities, there are a number of other buildings on campus. The Main House
contains a girls' dormitory, the School dining room, and administrative offices. The Gate House serves as an
additional girls' dormitory; the boys' dormitory is a converted barn. The School has additional buildings for
administrative offices and for faculty and staff housing. Williamstown Medical Associates provides medical
services to students.
Athletics
At Buxton, competitive and recreational sports programs do not merely fulfill physical education
requirements; they also expose students to the challenges inherent in disciplined physical activity and
different kinds of team play. Students acquire personal confidence and a sense of mastery as well as
leadership skills through participation in these activities.
Competitive sports are not mandatory, but regular outdoor activity is expected of everyone. Interscholastic
soccer and basketball take place on a scheduled and supervised basis. Other activities include yoga classes,
biking, hiking, horseback riding, indoor soccer, intramural basketball, martial arts, running, skating, skiing
and snowboarding at a local area, sledding, softball, spring soccer, table tennis, tennis, and Ultimate
(Frisbee).
The campus has its own playing fields, a basketball court, a weight room, three ponds for ice skating, and a
hill for sledding and skiing. Hiking trips are scheduled when there is student interest. Riding lessons can be
arranged.
Extracurricular Opportunities
In keeping with the Buxton philosophy that all aspects of School life are valuable to the education of a
student, activities play a prominent role. Students of every degree of interest and ability are urged to take
part and are counted on to support the efforts of each other as co-participant, audience, or encouraging
friend. All of Buxton's activities, which include art, music, drama, dance, drumming, and creative writing, are
designed to foster personal expression and commitment through a combination of self-discipline, patient
practice, interpersonal skill, and astute observation of life. The art studio has an extensive array of two- and
three-dimensional media. Painting, drawing, figure drawing, printmaking, book arts, sculpture, metal
fabrication, work with fabric or found objects, mixed media, ceramics, and black-and-white and digital
photography are available. Chorus, chamber orchestra, and chamber ensembles are offered at Buxton as
music activities. Drama includes acting, working on technical crews, and costuming. The dance and
drumming program at Buxton focuses on West African and Afro-Caribbean traditional influences. Students
also have the chance to study Balinese dance and drumming in the summer program in Bali. Each year,
seniors raise funds for and produce the School yearbook, which they present as a gift to the Buxton
community.
An essential part of a Buxton education is Work Program, which takes place on Tuesday afternoons and
Saturday mornings. At these times, students engage in tasks such as forestry work and gardening,
construction projects, office work, and cooking. Administered by volunteer students and faculty members,
Work Program requires a great deal of planning, budgeting, and managing. What is done and who does it are
always changing, but it is a consistent, direct challenge to everyone that Work Program can and must fill a
major part of Buxton's nonprofessional needs.
The annual Fall and Spring Arts Festivals offer students' families the opportunity to share in Buxton life.
Over the three days of these events, the School presents performances by the chorus, chamber orchestra, and
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chamber ensembles; performances of student composers' work; drama productions; and readings of students'
creative writing. The School also exhibits new student artwork. Independent and joint science projects are
often presented on these weekends as well. In addition, there is ample time for parent-faculty conferences.
The proximity of Williams College is particularly significant, as it provides a source of stimulation and
example as well as the opportunity to occasionally attend lectures and events and use the college library.
Bordering the Buxton campus is the Clark Art Institute, one of the finest small art museums in the country.
Daily Life
Each day, students clean their rooms and complete minor housekeeping tasks around the School. Classes
begin at 8 a.m. and are held until 3 p.m., five days a week. Sports and activities are offered from 3 to 5 p.m.
Students attend study hall, study on their own, or participate in rehearsals or other activities from 7 to 9 p.m.
Meals are family-style, with student waiters; students attend lunch at 12:30 and dinner at 6 in the School
dining room.
Weekend Life
Weekends at Buxton are considered just as important as weekdays. Students plan and organize Friday night
activities, which include outdoor sports and games, dances, swimming, and theme events. On Saturday
mornings, everyone in the School participates in Work Program. Students are free to go into Williamstown to
buy necessities or attend a movie or cultural event on Saturday afternoons and evenings. All Saturday meals
are planned and prepared by students. Sundays begin with brunch and typically are devoted to academic
work. Sunday evenings feature a formal dinner and arts events or presentations concerning social issues.
Students remain at Buxton on weekends except for a designated Home Weekend each semester.
Students who wish to do so may attend religious services locally.
Costs and Financial Aid
Tuition and fees for 2010–11 are $43,500 for boarding students and $27,500 for day students. This included
room and board and academic study, plus basic materials for courses, lab fees, field trips, tickets to approved
cultural events, athletics (including ski passes), and programs and activities held on campus. Books, allschool trip fees, laundry fees, some art supplies, weekly allowance, and travel are the family's responsibility.
Buxton is committed to maintaining the diversity of its student body. Approximately 47 percent receive
need-based financial aid; $1.2 million was awarded for 2010–11.
Admissions Information
Buxton admits students into grades 9 through 11. Interested parents and prospective students may request an
information packet by calling or writing the Admissions Office or through the School Web site. An oncampus interview is required, and the student's most recent SSAT or TOEFL scores should accompany the
application.
Application Timetable
Inquiries are welcome any time. Applications are due February 1, although they are accepted later if space is
available. The application fee is $50 for U.S. students and $100 for international students.
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Admissions Correspondence
Admissions Office
Buxton School
291 South Street
Williamstown, Massachusetts 01267, United States
Telephone: 413-458-3919
Fax: 413-458-9428
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.BuxtonSchool.org
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Cardigan Mountain School
Canaan, New Hampshire
The School
Cardigan Mountain School was founded in 1945 to serve the specific educational and developmental needs
of boys during their formative middle school years. Two men whose vision and belief in their goal were
unshakable—Harold P. Hinman, a Dartmouth College graduate, and William R. Brewster, then Headmaster
of Kimball Union Academy—joined forces with legendary Dartmouth President Ernest M. Hopkins to obtain
the land that is now the site of Cardigan Mountain's campus. Cardigan Mountain School opened with 24
boys, and, in 1954, upon merging with the Clark School of Hanover, New Hampshire, the School as it is
known today began to emerge. Since that time, the School has grown to its current enrollment of more than
200 boys in grades 6 through 9, while the philosophy and objectives set forth by the founders have remained
unchanged.
Cardigan was built upon an educational experience that emphasized rigorous academics and study habits, as
well as spiritual guidance, physical training, and social orientation. In order to accomplish this purpose,
Cardigan's program was tailored to each boy so that he made the best possible use of his potential in these
areas. Thus, every boy had a balanced and well-rounded life: physically, mentally, and spiritually. This
philosophy is the same today as it was in 1945.
The 425-acre campus, located on Canaan Street Lake, is 18 miles from Dartmouth College. Driving time from
Boston is approximately 2½ hours. Some of the finest skiing in New England is only 1 hour away.
The self-perpetuating Board of Trustees and Incorporators is instrumental in guiding the School. The School's
endowment is valued at more than $13.2 million. In 2009–10, Annual Giving was approximately $1 million.
Cardigan Mountain is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Its memberships
include the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS), the Junior Boarding Schools Association, the
Independent Schools Association of Northern New England (ISANNE), the Association of Independent
Schools of New England (AISNE), the Secondary School Admission Test Board (SSATB), Boys' Schools, A
Better Chance (ABC), the Federation of American Independent Schools, and the Educational Records Bureau
(ERB).
Academic Program
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Cardigan's curriculum is designed both to support and to challenge each student as the School prepares him
for the demanding academic programs characteristic of the independent schools most graduates attend. In all
disciplines, special emphasis is placed upon mastery of fundamental skills, content, and the study skills
needed to become academically self-sufficient.
The curriculum provides each student with thorough instruction in all the major courses and substantial
exposure to a number of other subject areas that round out a boy's education at this age. Cardigan requires all
students to take yearlong courses in English, mathematics, social studies, and science. In addition, a foreign
language (French, Latin, or Spanish) is required of boys not enrolled in English as a second language.
Beyond these major courses, the School also requires each boy to broaden his horizons and strengthen his
scholastic preparation through additional course work in music, life skills, leadership, and art or
woodworking. Cardigan students also take a course called Personalized Education for the Acquisition of
Knowledge and Skills (PEAKS), which helps them become stronger learners and self-advocates.
The average class size ranges from 4 to 16 students, and, within each grade, there is ability tracking. There are
normally three levels in each subject in grades 7, 8, and 9. In the accelerated sections of each grade, more
difficult texts are used, assignments are longer and more challenging, and more emphasis is placed upon
independent study and thought. The middle- and supportive-level sections in each grade spend more time
stressing fundamentals. Assignments and examinations are designed to challenge but not overwhelm
students. The sixth grade is grouped heterogeneously and follows a self-contained classroom model.
The PEAKS program provides students with guided self-development and helps each student, no matter his
skill level, become a better learner and self-advocate. PEAKS facilitates collaboration among the members of
the Cardigan Mountain School community to respond to the evolving needs of each student by focusing on
the process of learning through the acquisition of developmentally appropriate knowledge and skills.
Cardigan believes that every student learns differently. Through the PEAKS program, each boy comes to
understand how he learns best, and becomes equipped with tools to use as he goes forward, enabling him to
find success as a lifelong learner. The PEAKS program also offers additional support for students in and out
of the classroom.
PEAKS coaches are available for one-on-one assistance in the afternoons and evenings. Recognizing that
some students require regular tutorial sessions, while others may need less frequent support, the program is
designed to maximize the accessibility of the coaches to their students.
Faculty and Advisers
The faculty consists of 42 full-time and 3 part-time members, the majority of whom reside on campus. Almost
one quarter of the faculty members are women. Nearly half of the faculty members have earned advanced
academic degrees. All faculty members teach, coach, supervise dormitories, and serve as advisers for the
students. Cardigan has a 4:1 student-faculty ratio. Of the greatest importance to Cardigan are the faculty
members who, by setting and attaining personal goals, serve as positive role models for the boys. Cardigan
faculty members bring with them a love for learning and a variety of skills, experiences, and talents that
broaden and enrich the educational experience and inject warmth and enthusiasm into campus life.
Secondary School Placement
Cardigan offers extensive assistance to the students and their parents in selecting and then applying to
independent secondary schools. The Secondary School Placement Office begins the counseling process in the
spring of the eighth grade and continues to guide the student and his family throughout the application
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experience. The Placement Office offers workshops on interviewing techniques, SSAT preparation, and essay
writing.
Over the past few years, a number of Cardigan graduates have matriculated to schools such as Avon Old
Farms, Brooks, Deerfield, Holderness, Hotchkiss, Lawrence, Phillips Andover, Phillips Exeter, Pomfret,
Salisbury, St. Mark's, St. Paul's, Tabor, Taft, and Westminster.
Student Body and Conduct
For 2009–10, 195 boys enrolled at Cardigan. There were 50 boys in the ninth grade, 89 in the eighth, 38 in the
seventh, and 18 in the sixth. Almost 90 percent of the Cardigan students were boarders. In 2009–10, students
came to Cardigan from sixteen states and ten countries.
Cardigan has a two-tiered disciplinary status system in order to inform students, their advisers, and parents
when School expectations are not being met. This disciplinary system is used to correct patterns of
misbehavior and to discipline those students who commit serious offenses. The Discipline Committee meets
to hear cases deemed appropriate by the headmaster and the assistant headmaster. Two student leaders and
3 faculty members are selected by the assistant headmaster to join him on the committee. The committee
hears cases and makes a recommendation for consequences to the headmaster.
Cardigan has a clearly stated Honor Code, and all students are expected to abide by the spirit of that code.
Academic Facilities
The numerous buildings that house academic facilities are highlighted by the Bronfman Center. Completed
in 1996, Bronfman Center features, among other things, the three Freda R. Caspersen state-of-the-art science
laboratories, an art studio, the Bhirombhakdi Computer Center, the School store, and classrooms for the sixthgrade class. Stoddard Center is the home of both the Kirk Library and the Humann Theatre. Opened in fall
1982, the Kirk Library is a three-tiered, well-equipped multimedia resource center that offers students and
faculty members computer software, audiotapes, and videocassettes in addition to more than 10,000 volumes
and numerous journals and periodicals. Thousands of newspaper and magazine articles are available
through the Infoweb NewsBank Reference Service. Computers with Internet access are available in both the
Kirk Library and the adjacent writing lab. Affiliation with the New Hampshire State Library's Automated
Information Access System enables users at the School to obtain materials through the interlibrary loan
process. The library is staffed by 1 full-time librarian and a part-time aid. A flexible access plan allows
students and faculty members to work in groups, as well as individually, throughout the day and five
evenings each week. Humann, the 250-seat theater, is the site of School meetings, lectures, films, concerts, and
drama performances.
Cardigan emphasizes the visual arts. The Williams Woodshop and the Art Center are focal points for this
important aspect of a boy's education. The Hinman Auditorium houses the School's music facilities, where
opportunities for vocal and instrumental instruction are available.
All dormitory rooms and many classrooms are wired for access to the Internet.
Boarding and General Facilities
Eleven dormitories house from 8 to 16 students each. Each dormitory houses faculty members and their
families. Students reside in double rooms, with some singles provided. Two dormitories, referred to as
'houses,' were completed in fall 2000 and each dorm houses 3 faculty members, their families, and 12
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students.
The School operates an on-campus health center, where most of the students' medical needs can be met. For
extended services, Cardigan students benefit from the Alice Peck Day Hospital and Dartmouth-Hitchcock
Medical Center, both of which are located in Lebanon, New Hampshire. The Hamilton Health Center on the
Cardigan campus has a resident nurse and a visiting physician.
Athletics
The objectives of the activities program at Cardigan are to provide the boys with opportunities to experience
success, to offer healthy and enjoyable activities for the boys' free-time periods and weekends, to promote the
physical and athletic development of each boy, to teach cooperation with and reliance on teammates, to allow
the boys to experience sports and activities that may be new or unfamiliar to them, and to encourage good
sportsmanship.
Over the years, Cardigan has been fortunate enough to acquire extensive athletics facilities, fields, and
equipment. These include five fields for soccer, football, and lacrosse; fourteen outdoor tennis courts; two
baseball diamonds; a state-of-the-art hockey rink that can be converted to a multipurpose arena in the fall and
spring; an on-campus, lighted ski slope; cross-country ski trails; ski team rooms; a wrestling room; an outing
club room; a fully equipped weight-training room; an in-line hockey rink; and indoor and outdoor basketball
courts.
As the School is situated on the shores of Canaan Street Lake, students and faculty members take full
advantage of water-related activities. Sailing is pursued in the School's fleet of Flying Juniors, sailboards, ice
boats, and the Hobie catamaran. Motorboats, rowboats, and canoes provide additional opportunities for
students to enjoy the water. The waterfront area is well supervised, and instruction is available in all
activities.
The Sunapee Mountain ski area is close to the School and is used on weekdays by the Alpine ski team,
recreational skiers, and snowboarders. On Sundays, there are daylong ski trips to major ski areas in New
Hampshire and Vermont.
As in the classroom, the focus of interscholastic sports and individual activities is on learning the
fundamentals. Teams are fielded on several levels in most sports, and they compete against local
independent and public schools. Recreational sports are offered for the student who does not wish to
compete interscholastically.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Many students and faculty members bring to Cardigan skills and interests that, though not included in the
usual program of studies, may be pursued and developed in the informal setting of the Club Program. Clubs
meet every Thursday afternoon in lieu of athletics, with the opportunity for additional meetings if the
members and adviser so desire. Recent clubs have participated in community service, creation of a rock
band, technical rock-climbing, Rube Goldberg, Lego Robotics, ice fishing, kite surfing, chess, photography,
SSAT prep, crafting stained glass, whiffleball, broomball, and team handball.
A boy may participate in the optional drama program in each of the three seasons. The department mounts
four productions a year: a series of one-act plays, the annual Christmas pageant, a full-length play/musical,
and scenes from plays during the spring term talent show. Boys are given opportunities to act, serve
backstage, learn to work lights and sound, build and decorate sets, produce, and, in some cases, direct.
During the nights of performance, the student stage managers and student technical staff run the entire show.
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The audition process gives boys an excellent opportunity to learn the skills required to get a part.
Daily Life
The typical academic day begins six days per week with a required family-style breakfast. After room
inspection in the dormitories, classes begin at 7:45 a.m. Six class periods precede a family-style lunch. On
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, lunch is followed by an advisory/conference period. On
Wednesday and Saturday, the academic day ends with lunch and is followed by a full slate of athletics and
recreational activities. Dinner is a family-style meal every evening except Wednesday and Saturday, when a
buffet is scheduled. A study period occurs each school night. Lights-out ranges from 9:20 to 10 p.m.,
depending on the evening and the age of the student.
Cardigan is nondenominational, yet the School seeks to strengthen each boy's spiritual development within
his own religious heritage. All boys are required to attend the weekly Thursday afternoon chapel service.
Arrangements are made for students of all faiths to attend appropriate weekly services in the immediate area.
Weekend Life
In addition to the regularly scheduled vacations, all boys may take weekends away from campus, and
parents are invited to the campus to share in their son's experience at any time. The majority of Cardigan
students are on campus on weekends, and the School provides an exciting array of options for them. A
typical Saturday night's schedule might include a movie, a trip off campus, various other on-campus
activities and programs, or an excursion to Dartmouth College to watch a hockey game.
Summer Programs
The Cardigan Mountain Summer Session, a coeducational experience for 170 girls and boys, was instituted in
1951 to meet the needs of four groups of students: those who may be seeking admission to Cardigan in the
fall, those who desire advanced academic work and enrichment, those who require intensive work in basic
academic skills, and those who require review. The Summer Session also serves a limited number of
international students for whom English is not a first language. Cardigan's outstanding range of sports and
activities, along with its academic offerings, makes the Summer Session a special blend of camp and school.
Academic enrichment offerings in the sciences are a focal point for the more able students. Courses in
environmental sciences are designed to better prepare youngsters for the changing world. The visual and
performing arts, long a part of the Summer Session's afternoon program, achieve curricular status, allowing
students to pursue drama, ceramics, and photography as part of their morning academic program of study.
The six-week program is still known for its individualized instruction, close supervision of daily study time,
and general emphasis on improving study skills. Academic offerings include English, advanced English
composition, computers, prealgebra, algebra I and II, geometry, study skills, French, Spanish, and Latin.
The Summer Session is open to students who have completed third through ninth grade. The cost for the 2010
Summer Session was $8500 for boarding students and $4500 for day students. Need-based aid is available.
Costs and Financial Aid
In 2010–11, charges for boarding students are $44,100 and for day students, $25,600. There are additional
charges for items such as textbooks, laundry service, and athletic equipment.
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Financial aid is available to families of qualified students who complete the School and Student Service for
Financial Aid forms and demonstrate need. Information about loans and payment plans is available from the
Cardigan Admissions Office. For 2009–10, approximately 25 percent of the student body received more than
$981,000 in financial assistance.
Admissions Information
Cardigan seeks to enroll students of good character and academic promise who will contribute to and benefit
from the broad range of academic and extracurricular opportunities available. The Admissions Committee
reviews applications on a rolling admissions basis for students wishing to enter the sixth through the ninth
grades. Students in grades 3–9 are considered for the Summer Session. Decisions are based upon previous
school records, teacher recommendations, aptitude testing, and a campus interview. Cardigan admits
students of any race, color, nationality, or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities
generally accorded or made available to students at the School.
Application Timetable
Initial inquiries are welcome at any time. Office hours are 8 to 4, Monday through Friday, and 8 to noon on
Saturday. School catalogs and applications can be obtained through the Admissions Office. The application
fee is $50 for domestic applicants and $125 for international applicants.
Admissions Correspondence
Chip Audett, Director of Admissions
Cardigan Mountain School
62 Alumni Drive
Canaan, New Hampshire 03741, United States
Telephone: 603-523-3510
Fax: 603-523-3565
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.cardigan.org
Brian C. Beale, Director of Financial Aid
Cardigan Mountain School
62 Alumni Drive
Canaan, New Hampshire 03741, United States
Telephone: 603-523-3528
Fax: 603-523-3565
E-mail: [email protected]
Matt Rinkin, Summer Session Programs Coordinator
Cardigan Mountain School
62 Alumni Drive
Canaan, New Hampshire 03741, United States
Telephone: 603-523-3526
Fax: 603-523-3565
E-mail: [email protected]
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Christ School
Arden, North Carolina
The School
Founded in 1900 and located just south of Asheville, North Carolina, Christ School is located on a beautiful
500-acre suburban mountain campus. The school is home to 243 students; 165 live on campus and 77 are day
students. They come from nineteen states and nine other countries, including Germany, China, Canada, South
Korea, Lithuania, Hong Kong, and Jamaica.
A traditional college preparatory boarding school for boys, Christ School's focus and offerings center on
providing opportunities for boys to simply become a more mature expression of who they are intended to
be.
Comfortable, genuine, quality minus pretense—these are ways in which the school is often described. A
student sums it up in this way: “Christ School is not a coat and tie school; it's a necktie and shorts school.” In
short, Christ School is a place where solid academic programming can coexist alongside solid athletic and
extracurricular programming—one does not come at the expense of the other.
Academic Program
Preparing boys academically for college is Christ School's primary objective. The curriculum is designed to
provide students with a firm foundation in both the academic subjects and the study skills they will need in
college. The School's curriculum also stresses the knowledge and skills that will enable a student to become
an informed and intelligent citizen of his community. The School has always believed that these objectives
can best be fulfilled through a concentration in the traditional arts and sciences.
Small classes and individual attention are the keys to a boy's academic development. A structured program
of independent and supervised study enables a student to better achieve his potential.
Requirements for graduation include the completion of 21 credits: English (4); mathematics (4); science (3);
history (3); foreign language—Latin, French, or Spanish (2); fine arts (1); religious studies (0.5); computers
(0.5); and electives (3). Electives include Advanced Placement courses in the arts, computer programming,
English, foreign languages, history, mathematics, and science. General elective courses include choir,
economics, government, history of Vietnam, journalism, marine biology, music of Western civilization, music
practicum, music theory and composition, studio art I and II, and theater.
Most students carry a course load of five academic subjects, independent or supervised study, and a choice
of extracurricular activities.
The average class size is 10–12 students; the student-faculty ratio is 5:1. Students are placed in classes on the
basis of their achievement levels, their interests, and the requirements for graduation.
Christ School's Learning Resource Program offers academic support in English, math, and study skills within
the context of a rigorous college-preparatory curriculum. The program serves those who can meet the
challenges of a full academic schedule while benefiting from the program's supportive techniques.
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Faculty and Advisers
The faculty consists of 43 full-time members, 23 with advanced degrees. Twenty-eight reside on campus.
Paul M. Krieger was appointed the twelfth Headmaster of Christ School in 2003. He had previously served as
the school's Principal since August 2000. Before coming to Christ School, he served as Head of the Middle
School at Montgomery Academy in Chester Springs, Pennsylvania. Following an extensive career in
marketing, much of which was spent in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East, he chose to leave the
business field in 1989 for education. At the Hill School, in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, he served as Assistant
Director of Development and Alumni Affairs and Assistant Director of Admissions, was Founder and
Director of the Hill Sports Camp, and held the Knobloch Chair in Economics, teaching Advanced Placement
courses. Mr. Krieger has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Gettysburg College and a Master of Education
Leadership from Immaculata College.
The School seeks teachers who are dedicated to the academic, social, and spiritual well-being of students and
who share the common interest in self-improvement that sets boys upon the path to maturity and manhood.
A student's progress throughout his years at Christ School is monitored closely by the faculty. Each boy has
an adviser for guidance, mentorship, and support in his academic and personal life at the School.
A strong relationship between the student and adviser is formed through formal and informal meetings and
frequent gatherings for meals and recreation. In addition, each new student is matched with an outstanding
upperclassman as a Big Brother to further help the adjustment to boarding school life.
College Admission Counseling
In a student's sophomore, junior, and senior years, the Dean and College Counselor work with the student
and his family to assist him in securing admission to the college most suited to his needs. In addition, college
representatives visit the campus in the fall and winter to discuss college admission requirements and
procedures with students.
Christ School graduated 38 seniors in 2008, all of whom were accepted at four-year colleges and universities.
The School administered sixty Advanced Placement exams.
Graduates have been accepted at a variety of colleges and universities. Among them are the Air Force
Academy, Art Institute of Boston, Brown, Clemson, Columbia, Duke, Elon, Furman, George Washington,
Georgia Tech, Harvard, Macalester, Morehouse, Northeastern, Presbyterian, Rensselaer, SMU, Stanford,
Wake Forest, Washington and Lee, Wheaton, William and Mary, Wofford, the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, and the University of the South.
Student Body and Conduct
Christ School has a boarding student population of 166 boarders and 77 day students. Nineteen states and
nine other countries are represented among the student body, and boys come from various religious and
socioeconomic backgrounds.
The responsibility for student life and conduct at Christ School is largely in the hands of the students
themselves. A student council, composed of prefects appointed by the Headmaster and members elected by
the various forms, makes recommendations to the Headmaster regarding discipline and other aspects of
School life. Sixth Formers (twelfth graders) guide and help supervise various activities, such as house life and
the self-help work program.
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Academic Facilities
The academic facilities are housed mainly in Wetmore Hall, which contains classrooms, four science labs, a
computer lab, and a music room. The Information and Media Center houses the main reading and research
room, with a state-of-the-art computer center that links an in-house service with the Internet global
community. The Pingree Fine Arts Auditorium was dedicated in 1992.
Boarding and General Facilities
Christ School students reside in five houses and typically, two boys are assigned to a room. Each house is
supervised by prefects and proctors under the direction of a dorm parent. All houses are fully equipped with
computer networking capabilities. Students in grades 8 and 9 live separately from students in grades 10
through 12. A student center includes a game room, lounge, fireplace, snack shop, barbershop, bookstore,
and forty-seat theater/TV room. Renovations of St. Joseph's chapel, which was built in 1907, were completed
in 2006.
Athletics
Physical development, sportsmanship, cooperation, and self-esteem are all fostered by organized athletics.
The various levels in all team sports allow each boy to choose those activities that best meet his interests and
competence.
On the School grounds are six hard-surfaced tennis courts, a football field, a baseball field, three soccer fields,
an all-weather track, a challenging 5K cross-country course, and a 3-acre lake that is used for kayaking,
canoeing, fishing, and swimming. Indoor athletics facilities are housed in a modern field house containing a
basketball court and three full-sized practice courts. The remodeled Memorial Gymnasium contains a
wrestling gym, three racquetball courts, a new weight room, a training room, an equipment room, four locker
rooms, and offices for coaches.
The School fields interscholastic teams in football, cross-country, soccer, basketball, wrestling, swimming,
lacrosse, baseball, tennis, golf, and track. In lieu of athletics, students have the option to participate in the
theater program, debate, an intramural program, or the outdoor program. An outdoor education program
provides instruction and trips in white-water canoeing, climbing, hiking, camping, mountain biking, and
initiatives on a low-ropes course. The outdoor program is available as an alternative to team sports.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Daily periods are set aside for extracurricular activities. On weekends, a wide range of planned activities is
available for students to explore other interests.
For students who are learning to play musical instruments, private lessons in guitar, drums, keyboards, and
other instruments can be arranged. The School yearbook and literary magazine provide opportunities for
creative writing, photography, and art. The student newspaper is produced using the latest computer
technology and appears on the School Web site. A theater program produces three plays a year, enabling
students to express their talents in acting, set designing, and stage managing. The art studio contains tools
and equipment for extracurricular painting, woodworking, drawing, and ceramics.
Because of the School's proximity to various winter resorts, there are many opportunities for Christ School
students to ski on designated ski days and weekends.
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Weekend Life
Weekends offer a less structured environment that allows participation in sports, planned activities, and free
time to pursue a wide variety of interests. Christ School has a student activities director to coordinate
weekend and coeducational activities. Weekends provide opportunities for interscholastic athletics; whitewater rafting; taking in a concert or a movie; trips to cultural events in Asheville, Atlanta, Charlotte, and
Knoxville; attending professional and collegiate sporting events; shopping; dances; and course work.
Costs and Financial Aid
For the 2010–11 school year, tuition and room and board are $39,030 for boarders and $19,825 for day
students. In addition, a weekly allowance can be arranged through the school bookstore to cover additional
expenses for each individual student. Tuition insurance and tuition payment plans are available.
Financial aid and merit scholarships are available to qualified students. For the 2010–11 school year, the
School will award $1.8 million in aid and scholarships.
Admissions Information
Christ School accepts students in grades 8–11. Admission policies are based on academic ability and personal
qualifications. The School seeks students who can realize their full potential in a school that emphasizes the
value of structure, community, and personal responsibility. Of paramount importance is the ability of each
potential student to fit into and contribute to a small, caring community.
The School requires prospective candidates to schedule a campus visit, and submit teacher
recommendations, a transcript, and application essays. The SSAT is required.
Campus visits include a tour of the campus and a personal interview with the admission office, as well as
time with the Headmaster.
A small number of students are accepted for the second semester, which begins in January. The School
encourages families to set up a campus visit in the fall.
Application Timetable
For boarding students, the nonbinding, early action application deadline is December 15, and decisions are
mailed on January 1. The regular application deadline for boarders is February 15, and decisions are mailed
on March 1. For day students, the application deadline is February 15, with decisions mailed on March 1.
After March 1, admissions are made on a rolling basis. There are very limited openings after June 1.
Admissions Correspondence
Morgan B. Scoville
Director of Admission
Christ School
500 Christ School Road
Arden, North Carolina 28704, United States
Telephone: 828-684-6232 Ext. 106
800-422-3212 (toll-free)
Fax: 828-209-0003
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E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.christschool.org
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Cranbrook Schools
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
The School
First established in 1922, Cranbrook Schools seek to prepare young men and women from diverse
backgrounds to develop intellectually, morally, and physically; to move into higher education with
competence and confidence; and to appreciate the arts. The Schools also strive to instill in their students a
strong sense of social responsibility and the ability to contribute in an increasingly complex world.
Its founders, George and Ellen Scripps Booth, believed that “a life without beauty is only half lived.” Critics
have called the 315-acre Cranbrook campus “a masterpiece of American architecture.” The buildings,
gardens, and fountains were designed by Finnish architect, Eliel Saarinen, and offer students an exquisite
environment in which to live and learn.
The Schools are a division of Cranbrook Educational Community, which also includes Cranbrook Institute of
Science (a natural history and science museum serving Michigan and the Great Lakes region) and Cranbrook
Academy of Art, known worldwide for its prestigious graduate programs in fine arts and architecture as well
as its Art Museum. The entire complex has been designated a National Historic Landmark.
Cranbrook offers a comprehensive college-preparatory education that commences with Brookside (PK–5),
continues in Cranbrook Kingswood Middle School (6–8, separate programs for boys and girls), and
culminates in the opportunity and possibility that is provided by graduation from Cranbrook Kingswood
Upper School (day and boarding, 9–12).
Bloomfield Hills is a residential suburb (population 3,985) approximately 25 minutes northwest of Detroit
and 5 minutes from Birmingham.
A nonprofit corporation, Cranbrook is directed by a 21-member, self-perpetuating Board of Trustees, which
meets four times a year. The corporation has a $215 million endowment.
Cranbrook Kingswood is accredited by the Independent Schools Association of the Central States. It is a
member of the National Association of Independent Schools.
Academic Program
The school year, from September to early June, is divided into semesters. Classes, which enroll an average of
16 students each, meet five days a week. Eight academic periods are scheduled daily. All boarding students
participate in supervised evening study hours from Sunday through Thursday. Grades are sent to parents
quarterly, written evaluations are given semiannually, and progress reports for new students are issued in
October.
Promotion from one class level to another is contingent upon faculty recommendations and is necessary for
graduation. Each student is expected to take five academic classes each semester, along with a class chosen
from the fine arts, performing arts, or computer departments. In order to graduate, students must complete
the following minimum unit requirements: English, 4; mathematics, 4; foreign language, 2; social
science/history, 2½; science, 3; religion/philosophy, 1; and performing or fine arts, 1. (One unit is the
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equivalent of a full-year course.)
In addition to sixty-eight full-year courses, Cranbrook Kingswood Upper School offers seventy-six semester
courses, including anatomy, astronomy, Eastern religious traditions, ethics, genetics, geology, heroes in
British literature and film, human geography, principles of macroeconomics, principles of psychology, and
Russia and Eastern Europe. An extensive fine and performing arts program includes basic design, drawing,
painting, sculpture, metalsmithing, ceramics, weaving, photography, dance, concert band, symphony
orchestra, madrigals, jazz band, mastersingers, concert choir, acting, speech, and stagecraft.
Sixteen Advanced Placement (AP) courses are available in English, foreign languages, mathematics, and
social sciences. Honors courses and directed-study programs are also offered for qualified students. ESL is
offered for international students who demonstrate a strong academic record and a high intermediate level of
English proficiency.
The Tennessee Wilderness Expedition (modeled on Outward Bound) is available to tenth graders each
March. Seniors can participate in Senior May (off-campus internships) during the spring term.
Students are graded on an A–E scale, although some elective courses are pass/fail. Students must maintain a
minimum C- average to avoid academic probation. Classes are generally grouped by ability within grade
level. The student-teacher ratio is 8:1.
Faculty and Advisers
More than 70 percent of the 95 full-time Cranbrook Kingswood Upper School faculty members reside on
campus; 51 are men and 44 are women; 85 percent of the Upper School faculty members hold master's
degrees or Ph.D.'s in the subject area that they teach. The average tenure of a Cranbrook Schools teacher is
more than fourteen years.
In selecting its faculty, Cranbrook Kingswood seeks men and women with educational and intellectual
curiosity. Faculty members are encouraged to explore special interests and talents that extend beyond their
academic discipline. They are continually involved in professional advancement programs—course work,
conferences, and workshops, the cost of which Cranbrook Kingswood largely underwrites. All faculty
members are involved in some type of extracurricular activity, and each is an adviser to an average of 8
students, helping them in all aspects of school life from course selection to peer relationships.
Arlyce M. Seibert was appointed Vice President of Cranbrook Educational Community and the Director of
Schools in 1996. Mrs. Seibert joined the Upper School in 1970 and has served in many capacities in her thirtynine years with the Schools.
College Admission Counseling
Four full-time counselors help students select colleges, and representatives from more than 140 colleges visit
Cranbrook Kingswood each year. The selection process begins in the junior year, involving both students and
parents.
Among Cranbrook Kingswood's 2010 graduates, the mean SAT scores were 633 critical reading, 665 math,
and 641 writing. A total of 194 graduates are attending such colleges and universities as Amherst, Brown,
Carnegie Mellon, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Duke, Georgetown, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, MIT, Oberlin,
Princeton, Williams, Yale, and the Universities of Chicago, Michigan, and Pennsylvania.
Student Body and Conduct
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The 2010–11 Upper School was composed of 149 boarding boys, 261 day boys, 102 boarding girls, and 285
day girls, distributed as follows: 186 in the ninth grade, 201 in tenth, 192 in eleventh, and 218 in twelfth.
Twenty-four states and twenty countries were represented. Twenty-eight percent of students identified
themselves as members of minority groups, and international students made up 11 percent of the student
body.
Cranbrook Kingswood's disciplinary system is designed to be educative, not punitive. Honest conduct,
regular attendance, punctual completion of assignments, and thoughtful adherence to school policies and
rules are the minimum commitments expected of students. A Discipline Committee, consisting of faculty
members, the deans, and elected students, assumes responsibility in matters of conduct. Major offenses may
result in dismissal.
Students participate in several committees that help to shape life at Cranbrook Schools, such as the Conduct
Review Board, the Dormitory Council, the Athletic Committee, the Diversity Committee, the Student
Leadership Task Force, and the President's Council.
Academic Facilities
Students have the advantage of full access to two educational campuses. Kingswood's world-famous,
Saarinen-designed building is a single continuous unit that includes a library with 23,500 volumes, a
gymnasium, and six separate art studios. A girls' middle school is under construction and is scheduled to
open in 2011.
Cranbrook's classrooms are located around a quadrangle in Lindquist Hall (1927) and Hoey Hall (1927).
Other facilities that compose the quadrangle complex are a library with more than 21,500 volumes, a dining
hall, boys' dormitories, and a student center. A recently renovated performing arts center and the Gordon
Science Center are located adjacent to the quadrangle.
Students take shuttle buses from one campus to another according to their class schedules. Students also
have access to the museums and other resources at the Cranbrook Institute of Science and the Cranbrook Art
Museum.
Boarding and General Facilities
Cranbrook Kingswood maintains single-sex boarding facilities. The campus buildings are linked by a fiberoptic network and provide telephone, computer, and video access in each dormitory room, classroom, lab,
and faculty and student work area. The campus is equipped with more than ninety SmartBoards.
The Kingswood dormitory for girls, adjacent to Kingswood Lake, houses 102 girls. Most live in suites that
contain two single or double bedrooms with adjoining bath. The dormitory has two lounges with televisions,
stereo equipment, and a piano. Two kitchenettes and laundry facilities are available, in addition to a fourlane bowling alley.
At the Cranbrook campus, there are single rooms for 158 boys, who are divided according to their grade. The
student activity center has a dance floor, a snack bar, a performance space, recently renovated kitchen, and a
small theater for videotape recording and viewing.
Many Cranbrook Kingswood faculty members live in the dormitories with their families. Others live in
faculty homes clustered throughout the grounds. Resident Advisers (senior students) live on each floor and
act as confidants and helpmates to their fellow boarders.
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Athletics
Cranbrook Kingswood Upper School provides the opportunity for participation in eighteen interscholastic
sports, including baseball, basketball, cross-country, crew, fencing, field hockey, football, golf, ice hockey,
lacrosse, skiing, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, track, volleyball, and wrestling. Recent state
championships include boys' and girls' tennis, girls' golf, boys' lacrosse, and boys' and girls' hockey. Among
the intramural and noncompetitive athletic activities are martial arts, modern dance, rock climbing, strength
and fitness, and walking for fitness.
Athletics facilities include a football stadium, a track, fifteen outdoor tennis courts, a dance studio, an indoor
ice arena, three gymnasiums, and numerous playing fields. The School's award-winning natatorium was
designed by a Cranbrook graduate.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Cranbrook Kingswood offers thirty-nine student organizations, including Model UN, forensics, ethnic clubs,
dramatics, community service, and publications including a newspaper and an arts and literary publication.
Other clubs meet to discuss topics as varied as politics and racial diversity.
The cultural and educational events on campus include the exhibitions, lectures, films, and concerts offered
through the science and art museums, highlighted by regular planetarium and laser shows, a world-class
collection of modern American and European paintings, and traveling exhibits. The spacious grounds,
wooded areas, lakes and indoor and outdoor theaters provide a serene setting for cross-country skiing,
biking, jogging, swimming, and canoeing, as well as the Cranbrook Music Festival, the American Artists
Series, the Cranbrook Kingswood Film Program, the Symposium Series, and the Cranbrook Retreat for
Writers and Artists.
Daily Life
The school day is divided into eight 45-minute classes between 8 a.m. and 3:20 p.m., including lunch,
Monday through Friday. After-school activities such as class meetings, extra-help sessions, and athletics
follow. Dinner for boarders begins at 5:30 weekdays, followed by a study period from 8 to 10 p.m.
Weekend Life
Boarding students have an unusual opportunity to take part in urban and rural activities on the weekends.
Although students may go home some weekends with parental permission, there are weekends during the
year when all boarding students must stay on the campus for special activities. Shuttle buses drive students
to nearby Birmingham for shopping and entertainment, and groups can go to places such as Detroit and Ann
Arbor for professional sporting events and cultural activities. There are frequent weekend camping, hiking,
rock climbing, and skiing trips during the year. On-campus activities include dances, concerts, exhibits,
lectures, sporting events, and recent movies at the student center.
Summer Programs
The Cranbrook Educational Community conducts several summer programs for day and boarding students
and the community at large. These include day camps, a theater school, a soccer clinic, a filmmaking seminar,
a compensatory educational program for youngsters from low-income families, a jazz ensemble, and ice
hockey, lacrosse, and tennis camps.
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Costs and Financial Aid
The 2010–11 fees are $36,450 for boarding students and $26,450 for day students. Other expenses are for
books ($500) and a room deposit fee ($200). A tuition-payment plan, health insurance plan, and tuition
insurance are offered.
In 2010–11, 30 percent of the Upper School students received some amount of tuition aid, some as much as
50 percent of day or boarding tuition. Aid is based on financial need, following procedures established by the
School and Student Service for Financial Aid.
Admissions Information
Cranbrook admits day students in preschool through grade 12 and boarding students in grades 9 through 12.
The Schools accept students without regard to race, religion, national origin, sex, or handicap. Admission is
based on recommendations, past performance, a personal interview, a writing sample, and results of the
SSAT or other standardized examinations. Recommended grades for entrance are all A's or A's and B's.
Application Timetable
An initial inquiry is welcome at any time. Campus tours and interviews are arranged on weekdays through
the admissions office. Notification of acceptance begins in February. The application fee is $50.
Admissions Correspondence
Drew Miller
Dean of Admission and Financial Aid
P.O. Box 801
Cranbrook Schools
39221 Woodward Avenue
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 48303-0801, United States
Telephone: 248-645-3610
Fax: 248-645-3025
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.schools.cranbrook.edu
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Cushing Academy
Ashburnham, Massachusetts
The School
Cushing Academy, founded in 1865, opened as a coeducational boarding school with funds provided by
Thomas Parkman Cushing. Since its founding, Cushing Academy has prepared boys and girls in grades 9
through 12 and postgraduate to be contributing members of colleges and universities and of the modern
world. Students live and learn with students from over thirty countries and twenty-eight states in a quiet,
safe, and supportive community 1 hour west of Boston. At Cushing Academy, students are prepared for the
technological, political, artistic, environmental, scientific, cultural, and ethical issues already present in their
lives—the big questions of this new century that frame their academics, athletics, activities, and life on
campus. Cushing builds students' global awareness, helps them to fulfill their aspirations, and enables them
to learn the skills they will need to succeed throughout their lives.
Cushing's 162-acre campus lies in the small, rural town of Ashburnham in north-central Massachusetts,
55 miles west of Boston and 10 miles south of the New Hampshire border. Proximity to Boston permits
extensive use of the city's cultural, entertainment, and commercial resources.
The Academy is governed by an 18-member Board of Trustees, 6 of whom are alumni. The operating budget
for 2010–11 is $24 million, and the endowment is estimated at $22.6 million. Total voluntary support received
in 2009–10 exceeded $5 million.
Cushing is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. The Academy is a member of
the National Association of Independent Schools, the Association of Independent Schools in New England,
the Secondary School Admission Test Board, and the Cum Laude Society.
Academic Program
The hub of Cushing's academic program is the Cushing Institute for 21st Century Leadership, founded in
2007. Designed to help high-school students understand the world of today and tomorrow at their academic
level, the Institute brings current issues into every classroom, drives curriculum, facilitates global travel
experiences, and brings a range of speakers to campus—including the twice-yearly Oxford-Cushing Panel
Discussions—in order to deliver the world to Cushing students. The institute also provides leadership and
entrepreneurial opportunities on campus and coordinates internships and the Cushing Scholars, an
enrichment program for students selected on the basis of intellectual, athletic, and artistic promise, as well as
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leadership potential.
The Academy offers more than 150 full-year courses and seminars, including ten laboratory courses and
fifteen advanced-level courses. Advanced independent study programs may be arranged through the Dean of
Academics.
Typically, Cushing Academy students carry five major courses every trimester, in addition to a required
elective in the visual or performing arts. To satisfy Cushing's diploma requirements, students must earn a
minimum of 18 credits distributed as follows: English, 4; mathematics, 4; foreign language, 2; history and
social science, 2; science, 2; and fine arts, ? per year at Cushing. The remaining requirements may be filled by
choosing from numerous electives, including ethics, creative writing, ecology, marine biology, economics,
comparative religions, global diplomacy, and leadership.
All teachers are available in their classrooms during a daily extra-help period. Informal tutoring may also
take place after dinner or during free time.
The Academy offers a structured academic support program staffed by 6 educational specialists who work
with students on a variety of strategies to assist them with their studies. Students who enroll in the academic
support program, either through the admissions process or who are identified as needing additional support
after they arrive at Cushing, take one or more courses with the academic support specialists, concurrent with
their other classes, for an additional fee. With students from thirty countries, Cushing also has a thriving
international community. Students entering Cushing in need of English as a second language enroll in the
ESL program for one or more years and then transition into the standard academic offerings.
The academic year is divided into three terms of twelve, ten, and nine weeks in length. Cumulative final
exams are given at the end of fall and spring terms in all academic courses. Evaluations are sent home six
times each year. Letters warning of academic difficulty are written at the discretion of the Academic Dean.
Cushing uses a letter grading system that follows a 4.0 scale; 1.2 is passing, 3.3–3.6 is honors, and 3.7 and
above is high honors. Class placement is determined by demonstrated ability and past performance in each
subject area. The average class size is 12 students. The student-teacher ratio is approximately 8:1. On
weeknights from 8 to 10 p.m., students work quietly in their rooms during supervised study hall.
Faculty and Advisers
In 2010–11, the faculty and administration consisted of 92 full-time teachers and administrators—45 women
and 47 men, of whom 52 had master's degrees, and 7 had earned their Ph.D.'s. Seventy percent of faculty
members live on campus, and all faculty members are involved in the daily life of students beyond the
classroom experience. Each teacher is responsible for the academic, social, extracurricular, and dorm life for 5
to 7 student advisees.
The Headmaster, Dr. James Tracy, joined the Cushing community in 2006. He received an M.A. from the
University of Massachusetts, a Ph.D. from Stanford University, and an M.B.A. from Boston University.
College Admission Counseling
Staffed by 5 experienced professionals, the Cushing Academy College Counseling Office is a resource
available to all students and parents. The counseling process begins when a student enters the school, at
which time a comprehensive College Counseling Guide is presented to each student and his or her parents.
Cushing believes in engaging the students at all levels and that the college advising process should focus on
each student's particular needs, aspirations, and abilities. The goal is to provide students and parents with
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information that will help all to feel knowledgeable, confident, and organized as they move through this
exciting time.
Group meetings are held regularly for each of the various grade levels on such topics as summer activities,
college research, campus visits, athletic recruitment, interviews, financial aid, applications, and standardized
tests. Workshops for parents are presented during family weekends in the fall and spring. During the winter
and spring trimesters, juniors meet individually with a member of the college counseling staff to establish a
prospective list of colleges. The following fall, a new round of group meetings and individual interviews
take place to aid the seniors in completing their applications to universities of responsible choice.
Standardized tests, including the SAT and the ACT, are administered on-site at Cushing throughout the year,
beginning with the PSAT in October. Individual tutoring and group test preparation is available for an
additional fee.
The College Counseling Office utilizes Naviance, a Web-based counseling tool and database that aids the
students and the office in the research process as well as in the organization and management of the
application process. In addition, a library of college counseling books, course catalogs, viewbooks, DVDs,
and other college materials are available in the College Counseling Office.
Recent college enrollments include Boston College, Boston University, Bowdoin, Brown, Cornell, College of
the Holy Cross, Dartmouth, George Washington, Hofstra, Parsons School of Design, Purdue, Syracuse,
University of Virginia, Vanderbilt, and Wellesley. Admissions representatives from over eighty colleges and
universities visit the Cushing Academy campus each fall to meet with the students and college counseling
staff.
Student Body and Conduct
The 2010–11 student body consists of 41 boys and 24 girls in the freshman class; 67 boys and 40 girls in the
sophomore class; 71 boys and 69 girls in the junior class; 70 boys and 40 girls in the senior class; and 20 boys
and 3 girls in the postgraduate class.
Of these 445 students, 374 were boarders. Students were predominantly from Massachusetts (136) and other
parts of New England (59), as well as from New Jersey (16), New York (11), Florida (11), and Georgia (7), and
Texas (7). Twenty-eight states and Puerto Rico, as well as thirty countries, ranging from Indonesia to
Germany, were represented. Of the total enrollment, 8 percent were African American.
Students play an active role in school governance through their participation in the school's thriving student
organizations, such as student proctors, class officers, student-faculty senate, and tour guides, and through
participation in the school's discipline committee process. Through these and other organizations, students
influence decision making at the school and serve as leaders for the community.
Academic Facilities
At the center of Cushing's campus is the Main Building, which houses classrooms, offices, and Cowell Chapel
where members of the community gather for all-school meetings and performing arts productions. Also in
the Main Building is the Fisher-Watkins Library, which was transformed in 2009 to a primarily digital
learning center. In addition to its collection of e-readers and online data sources, the library features
collaborative instruction space, large-screen monitors for viewing interactive data and news feeds from
around the world, quiet study carrels, and a cyber café. The Joseph R. Curry Academic Center houses
mathematics, the sciences, and the performing arts. This state-of-the-art facility of more than 56,000 square
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feet includes instructional laboratories, studios, student project rooms, and seminar space. The English
Building houses seven newly renovated classrooms. The Emily Fisher Landau Center for Visual Arts has
both studio and gallery space for students to create and display professional-quality work in a variety of
media, including fused and stained glass, silver, ceramics, photography, painting, and sculpture. Cushing
Academy students have been invited to display their works in galleries in Santa Fe, New York, and Oxford
University.
The Cushing Network, a campuswide wireless computer network, may be accessed throughout the school,
including all classrooms and dormitory rooms. CushNet and MyCushing, the school's intranet systems, allow
students to send e-mail, join bulletin-board discussions for classes, communicate with teachers and friends,
follow campus happenings, monitor homework and submit assignments. Parents and guardians of Cushing
students may log in to a separate portal where they may access their students' course syllabi, school news
items, calendars, and events. SmartBoard technology is available in all classrooms.
Boarding and General Facilities
The Academy houses more than 350 students in seven dormitories and six student-faculty houses that vary in
capacity from 3 to 81 students each. Almost all rooms are doubles, and returning students select rooms
through a room-draw system that favors seniority. New students are assigned rooms by the Co-Directors of
Admission and the Student Life Office. The ratio of faculty to students in the dormitories is generally 1:12.
Cushing's dining commons houses a student center on the lower level, which includes a recreational area,
snack bar, bookstore, and post office. Formal family-style dinners are served once a month.
Athletics
In the belief that physical fitness and agility enrich both the individual and the community, Cushing's
renowned athletic program is designed to involve everyone in physical endeavors. There are boys'
interscholastic teams in baseball, basketball, cross-country, football, golf, ice hockey, lacrosse, skiing, soccer,
tennis, and track; girls compete in basketball, cross-country, field hockey, ice hockey, lacrosse, skiing, soccer,
softball, tennis, track, and volleyball. Organized recreational sports include aerobics, dance, figure skating,
horseback riding, skiing, snowboarding, tennis, and weight lifting.
The Heslin Gymnasium contains four locker rooms, the John Biggs Jr. Memorial Fitness Center, a training
room, and a basketball/volleyball court. There are also six playing fields and six tennis courts. In addition to
year-round ice skating, the Theodore Iorio Ice Arena offers boys' and girls' locker rooms, workout facilities, a
multipurpose function room, and a snack bar. Cushing's Athletic Leadership Program further challenges
student-athletes who wish to take their drive beyond the playing fields through workshops, guest speakers,
and off-campus opportunities.
Extracurricular Opportunities
In addition to their commitments in the classroom and on the playing fields, Cushing students take
advantage of the many opportunities to join or start up clubs and to organize campus events. Always based
on student interest, clubs in recent years have included Open Doors, International Club, Environmental Club,
Cushing Academy Music Association, Literary Magazine, Radio Station, Mock Trial, Model United Nations,
and Book Club. Students are also involved in coordinating campus events.
Cushing's proximity to Boston enables students to have access to the city's resources—museums, sporting
events, shopping, theater— and regular trips to take advantage of these opportunities are scheduled
throughout the year. Students interested in exploring opportunities in business, the arts, law, or other fields
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can also pursue internships with Boston-area professionals.
Daily Life
The Monday-through-Friday schedule, which begins with classes at 8 a.m., provides time for an extra-help
period, activities, and athletics before evening study hall at 8 p.m. Lights-out is at 10:30 p.m. for
underclassmen and 11 for seniors and postgraduates. Classes are 40 minutes long on Mondays and Fridays
and 55 minutes long on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. Courses, activities, and athletics are all
centrally scheduled to avoid unnecessary conflicts. On weekdays, the hours from 3 to 5 p.m. are reserved for
athletics, arts, and activities; interscholastic competitions occur on Wednesday, Friday (occasionally), and
Saturday.
Weekend Life
On a typical weekend at the Academy, students enjoy many off-campus trips with faculty chaperones.
Movies are shown on campus each weekend, while dances and concerts are often scheduled in the evening.
Students are permitted to spend a limited number of weekends off campus, but on any given weekend 70 to
75 percent of the boarding population chooses to remain at school. One weekend each month is designated
an on-campus weekend, meaning students remain at Cushing to enjoy performances, sporting events, and
special activities as a community.
Summer Programs
During the five-week summer session, Cushing offers a unique boarding school experience for girls and boys
ages 12–18 from throughout the United States and around the world. The program features Prep for Success
for middle school students, regular and advanced college-preparatory courses for high school students,
intensive art, and extensive English as a second language instruction. Each program is combined with
interesting artistic and athletic electives as well as exciting excursions throughout New England. For further
information, students should contact Margaret Lee, Director of Summer Programs at [email protected] or
978-827-7700.
Costs and Financial Aid
Tuition and required fees for 2010–11 were $44,600 for boarding students and $32,300 for day students. There
are optional fees for skiing, music lessons, and fine arts materials. A $4460 nonrefundable enrollment deposit
($3220 for day students) is credited toward the balance due; half of the remaining total is due on July 1 and
the balance on December 1.
In 2010–11, 26 percent of the student body received $3.2 million in financial aid. Funds are awarded on the
basis of need as demonstrated by established criteria of the School and Student Service for Financial Aid.
Financial aid is renewed annually, subject to continued need and availability of funds.
Admissions Information
Cushing Academy seeks students who are interested in taking an active role in promoting their own
academic and social growth. Cushing values strong character, motivation, diversity, and strength in
extracurricular activities. Candidates are evaluated based on school performance, SSAT, PSAT, SAT, ACT,
TOEFL, or other tests, and a personal interview. If travel is too difficult, international applicants may request
a video interview via Skype.
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Application Timetable
Initial inquiries are welcome at any time. Application materials are available online and are provided, along
with the school's viewbook, upon request. Interviews and campus tours are scheduled Monday through
Friday and some Saturdays.
Completed applications should be submitted, along with the $50 nonrefundable application fee ($100 for
international students), by February 1. Applications may be submitted after February1, and will be acted on
after March 10, subject to the availability of spaces in the classes. Decisions are mailed out on March 10 for
students submitting applications by the deadline and for others on a rolling basis as space permits.
Admissions Correspondence
Deborah Gustafson, Co-Director of Admission
Adam Payne, Co-Director of Admission
P.O. Box 8000
Cushing Academy
39 School Street
Ashburnham, Massachusetts 01430, United States
Telephone: 978-827-7300
Fax: 978-827-6253
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.cushing.org
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Delbarton School
Morristown, New Jersey
The School
Delbarton School was established in 1939 by the Benedictine monks of Saint Mary's Abbey as an independent
boarding and day school. Now a day school, Delbarton is located on a 200-acre woodland campus 3 miles
west of historic Morristown and 30 miles west of New York City. Adjacent to the campus is Jockey Hollow, a
national historic park.
Delbarton School seeks to enroll boys of good character who have demonstrated scholastic achievement and
the capacity for further growth. The faculty strives to support each boy's efforts toward intellectual
development and to reinforce his commitment to help build a community of responsible individuals. The
faculty encourages each boy to become an independent seeker of information, not a passive recipient, and to
assume responsibility for gaining both knowledge and judgment that will strengthen his contribution to the
life of the School and his later contribution to society. While the School offers much, it also seeks boys who
are willing to give much and who are eager to understand as well as to be understood.
The School is governed by the 9-member Board of Trustees of the Order of Saint Benedict of New Jersey,
located at Saint Mary's Abbey in Morristown. Delbarton's 2010–11 annual operating expenses totaled $18.1
million. It has an endowment of $19.1 million. This includes annual fund-raising support from 45 percent of
the alumni.
Delbarton School is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and approved by the
Department of Education of the State of New Jersey. It is a member of the National Association of
Independent Schools, the New Jersey Association of Independent Schools, the Council for Advancement and
Support of Education, the National Catholic Educational Association, and the New Jersey State Interscholastic
Athletic Association.
Academic Program
The academic program in the Upper School is college preparatory. The course of study offers preparation in
all major academic subjects and a number of electives. The studies are intended to help a boy shape a
thought and a sentence, speak clearly about ideas and effectively about feelings, and suspend judgment until
all the facts are known. Course work, on the whole, is intensive and involves about 20 hours of outside
preparation each week. The curriculum contains both a core of required subjects that are fundamental to a
liberal education and various elective courses that are designed to meet the individual interests of the boys.
Instruction is given in all areas that are necessary for gaining admission to liberal arts or technical institutions
of higher learning.
The school year is divided into three academic terms. In each term, every boy must take five major courses,
physical education, and religious studies. The specific departmental requirements in grades 9 through 12 are
English (4 years), mathematics (4 years), foreign language (3 years), science (3 years), history (3 years),
religious studies (2 terms in each of 4 years), physical education and health (4 years), fine arts (1 major course,
1 term of art, and 1 term of music), and computer technology (2 terms). For qualified boys in the junior and
senior years, all departments offer Advanced Placement courses, and it is also possible in certain instances to
pursue work through independent study or to study at neighboring colleges.
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The grading system uses 4 to 0 (failing) designations with pluses and minuses. Advisory reports are sent to
parents in the middle of each term as well as at the end of the three terms. Parents are also contacted when a
student has received an academic warning or is placed on probation. The average class size is 15, and the
student-teacher ratio is about 7:1, which fosters close student-faculty relations.
Faculty and Advisers
In 2010–11 the faculty consisted of 12 Benedictine monks and 71 lay teachers. All are full-time members, with
49 holding advanced degrees.
Br. Paul Diveny, O.S.B., became Headmaster in July 2007. Br. Paul received his B.A. from the Catholic
University of America in 1975; his diploma in Monastic Studies from the Pontificio Ateneo Sant'Anselmo in
Rome, Italy in 1982; and his M.A. in German from Middlebury College in 1987. He has served the School
previously as a teacher of Latin, German, ancient history, and religious studies, and as Assistant Headmaster.
The teaching tradition of the School has called upon faculty members to serve as coaches, counselors, or
administrators. A genuine interest in the development of people leads the faculty to be involved in many
student activities. Every boy is assigned to a guidance counselor, who advises in the selection of courses that
meet School and college requirements as well as personal interests. Individual conferences are regularly
arranged to discuss academic and personal development. The counselor also contacts the boy's parents when
it seems advisable.
College Admission Counseling
Preparation for college begins when a boy enters Delbarton. The PSAT is given to everyone in the tenth and
eleventh grades. Guidance for admission to college is directed by the senior class counselor. This process
generally begins in the fall of the junior year, when the junior class counselor meets with each boy to help
clarify his goals and interests. Many college admissions officers visit the School annually for conferences.
Every effort is made to direct each boy toward an institution that will challenge his abilities and satisfy his
interests.
The mean SAT critical reading and math score for the class of 2010 was 1330. More than 25 percent of the
young men in the classes of 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010 have been named National Merit Scholars,
Semifinalists, or Commended Students. In addition, 85 percent of the members of the class of 2010 were
enrolled in at least one AP course.
All of the graduates of the classes of 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010 went on to college, with 5 or more attending
such schools as Boston College, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Duke, Georgetown, Harvard, Holy Cross,
Johns Hopkins, Middlebury, Notre Dame, Princeton, Villanova, Williams, Yale, and the Universities of
Pennsylvania and Virginia.
Student Body and Conduct
The 2010–11 Upper School student body consisted of 130 ninth graders, 120 tenth graders, 119 eleventh
graders, and 112 twelfth graders. The Middle School has 32 seventh and 34 eighth graders. All of the students
are from New Jersey, particularly the counties of Morris, Essex, Somerset, Union, Bergen, Hunterdon, Passaic,
and Sussex.
Regulations, academic and social, are relatively few. The School eschews the manipulative, the coercive, the
negative, or the merely punitive approach to discipline. The basic understanding underlying the School's
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regulations is that each boy, entering with others in a common educational enterprise, shares responsibility
with his fellow students and with faculty members for developing and maintaining standards that contribute
to the welfare of the entire School community. Moreover, shared responsibility is essential to the growth of
the community; at the same time, much of an individual boy's growth, the increase in his capacity for selfrenewal, his sense of belonging, and his sense of identity spring from his eagerness and willingness to
contribute to the life of the School. Each class has a moderator, who is available for advice and assistance. The
moderator works closely with the boys, assisting them in their progress.
Academic Facilities
The physical facilities include two classroom buildings, a fine arts center, a science pavilion, a greenhouse,
the church, and the dining hall. Academic facilities include thirty-four classrooms, six science laboratories, art
and music studios, a language laboratory, and a library of more than 20,000 volumes. The five computer
laboratories consist of 250 workstations in a networked system. Also, the music department provides twelve
personal computers for the advanced study of music and composition.
Athletics
Sports at the School are an integral part of student life. The School holds the traditional belief that much can
be learned about cooperation, competition, and character through participating in sports. Almost 80 percent
of the boys participate on one or more interscholastic athletics teams. Varsity sports offered in the fall term
are football, soccer, and cross-country; in the winter term, basketball, wrestling, track, hockey, squash,
bowling, and swimming (in an off-campus pool); and in the spring, baseball, track, lacrosse, tennis, and golf.
In most of these sports, there are junior varsity, freshman, and Middle School teams. Some intramural sports
are available, depending upon interest, every year.
The facilities consist of two gymnasiums, eight athletics fields, six tennis courts, and an outdoor pool for
swimming during warm weather. Students who join the golf team are able to play at nearby golf clubs.
Extracurricular Opportunities
The School provides opportunities for individual development outside the classroom as well as within. The
faculty encourages the boys to express their intellectual, cultural, social, and recreational interests through a
variety of activities and events. For example, fine arts at Delbarton are available both within and outside the
curriculum. Studio hours accommodate boys after school, and students visit galleries and museums. In the
music department, vocal and instrumental instruction is available. Performing ensembles include an
orchestra, band, and chorus and smaller vocal and instrumental ensembles. Under the aegis of the Abbey
Players, drama productions are staged three times a year, involving boys in a wide variety of experiences.
Other activities include Deaneries (student support groups promoting School unity and spirit), the Courier
(the School newspaper), the Archway (the yearbook), Schola Cantorum (a vocal ensemble), the Abbey
Orchestra, and the Model UN, Mock Trial, Speech and Debate, Junior Statesmen, Art, History, Chess, Cycling,
Stock Exchange, and Future Business Leaders clubs. In addition, faculty moderators of the Ski Club regularly
organize and chaperone trips during School vacations.
To expose students to other cultures and to enhance their understanding of the world, faculty members have
organized trips to Europe, Africa, and Latin America. The Campus Ministry office is active in sponsoring
several outreach programs that lead boys to an awareness of the needs of others and the means to answer
calls for help. The outreach programs include community soup kitchens, Big Brothers of America, Adopt-aGrandparent, Basketball Clinic for exceptional children, and a program in which volunteers travel to
Appalachia during break to contribute various services to the poor of that area.
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Students' imagination and initiative are also given opportunities for expression through Student Council
committees and assemblies. The students are also offered School-sponsored trips to cultural and recreational
events at area colleges and in nearby cities.
Daily Life
Classes begin at 8:15 a.m. and end at 2:34 p.m. The average number of classes per day for each student is six.
Two classes are an hour long, while the remainder are 40 minutes each. The School operates on a six-day
cycle, and each class meets five days per cycle. Physical education classes are held during the school day.
After classes, students are involved in athletics and the arts. Clubs and organizations also meet after school,
while many meet at night.
Costs and Financial Aid
Charges at Delbarton for the 2010–11 academic year are $26,975. These are comprehensive fees that include a
daily hot lunch as well as library and athletics fees. The only other major expenses are the bookstore bill and
transportation, the cost of which varies. Optional expenses may arise for such items as the yearbook, music
lessons, or trips.
Because of the School's endowment and generous alumni and parent support, a financial aid program
enables many boys to attend the School. All awards are based on financial need, as determined by the criteria
set by the School and Student Service for Financial Aid. No academic or athletics scholarships are awarded.
Financial aid is granted to boys in grades 7 through 12. This year, the School was able to grant $1.4 million to
students.
Admissions Information
Delbarton School selects students whose academic achievement and personal promise indicate that they are
likely to become positive members of the community. The object of the admissions procedure is for the
School and prospective student to learn as much as possible about each other. Admission is based on the
candidate's overall qualifications, without regard to race, color, religion, or national or ethnic origin.
The typical applicant takes one of the four entrance tests administered by the School in October, November,
and December. Candidates are considered on the basis of their transcript, recommendations, test results, and
personal interview in addition to the formal application. In 2010–11, 343 students were tested for entrance in
grades 7 and 9; of these, 144 were accepted. Eighty-six percent of the students who were accepted for the
seventh grade were enrolled; 91 percent of those accepted for the ninth grade were enrolled. Delbarton does
not admit postgraduate students or students who are entering the twelfth grade.
Application Timetable
The School welcomes inquiries at any time during the year. Students who apply are invited to spend a day at
Delbarton attending classes with a School host. Interested applicants should arrange this day visit through
the Admissions Office. Tours of the campus are generally given in conjunction with interviews, from 9 a.m. to
noon on Saturdays in the fall, or by special arrangement. The formal application for admission must be
accompanied by a nonrefundable fee of $65. Application fee waivers are available upon request.
It is advisable to initiate the admissions process in the early fall. Acceptance notifications for applicants to
grades 7 and 9 are made by the end of January. Applicants to all remaining grades, as well as students placed
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in a waitpool, are given acceptance notification as late as June. Parents are expected to reply to acceptances
two to three weeks after notification. A refundable deposit is also required. Application for financial aid
should be made as early as possible; the committee hopes to notify financial aid applicants by the middle of
March.
Admissions Correspondence
Dr. David Donovan
Dean of Admissions
Delbarton School
Morristown, New Jersey 07960, United States
Telephone: 973-538-3231 Ext. 3019
Fax: 973-538-8836
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.delbarton.org/admissions
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Ecole d'Humanité
Hasliberg-Goldern, Switzerland
The School
The Ecole d'Humanité is located in Hasliberg Goldern, Switzerland, just off the rail line between Interlaken
and Lucerne. Surrounded by the awe-inspiring peaks of the Bernese Oberland, this international village for
living, learning, and growing is home to students and teachers from some twenty-five different countries. The
stunning natural setting provides both a wholesome learning environment and exceptional opportunities for
hiking, skiing, climbing, and other outdoor activities.
The school was founded in Germany by Edith Geheeb-Cassirer and Paul Geheeb, early leaders in the
progressive education movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Very radical for its day,
their coeducational boarding school involved students in new forms of learning. During the Nazi era, the
Geheebs emigrated to Switzerland rather than compromise their educational principles. In 1946, the school
was moved to its present location in the Swiss Alps. The philosophy of the Ecole d'Humanité continues to
emphasize education of the person as a whole—a balance between artistic, athletic, and rigorous academic
programs.
The Ecole d'Humanité strives to realize a simple, environmentally responsible lifestyle. By strictly limiting
both material and electronic consumerism, the school attempts to create a space where students can engage
directly and honestly with other people, with its common cultural heritage, and with the natural world, and
where they are free to discover and explore their own unique strengths and passions.
The Ecole d'Humanité offers both Swiss and American academic programs. The American Program leads to a
High School Diploma and includes preparation for the College Board SAT exams, for which the Ecole is an
official testing center. Students can also prepare for exams leading to the AP International Diploma (APID)
and entrance to universities around the world.
The Ecole d'Humanité is an international boarding school that has been legally registered with and
recognized by the education department of the Canton of Berne, Switzerland since 1946, and is accredited by
the North Central Association Commission on Accreditation and School Improvement (NCA CASI).
Academic Program
The academic program at the Ecole d'Humanité aims to promote meaningful understanding rather than
surface knowledge. Students take the same three classes for a full trimester every morning from Monday
through Saturday. They select their own courses with the help of faculty advisors, balancing university
requirements, career plans and their personal preferences. Having only three academic subjects at a time
enables the classes to explore topics in more depth than in traditional school systems.
Small classes (student-teacher ratio is 5:1) allow for individualized instruction and demand active
participation. Students are not “marked” with grades, but instead receive extensive feedback from their
teachers based on their papers, tests, quizzes, and oral presentations. They assess their own work in regular
written reflections that help them come to see their education as primarily their own responsibility.
The Ecole d'Humanité offers full preparation for exams leading to the Advanced Placement International
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Diploma (APID). These exams qualify students for entrance to universities not only throughout the Unites
States, but also in many European countries and around the world. The College Board grants the APID to
students at international schools who have earned a U.S. High School Diploma and have, in addition,
received passing scores on five AP exams in a constellation, ensuring breadth and depth of study as well as a
global perspective. AP courses at the Ecole are open to all interested students. Students can choose to take
any number of APs—or none at all—according to their own particular strengths, interests, and ambitions.
Why APs rather than the IB? The Ecole carefully considered offering the IB and was impressed by its many
merits. In its view, however, the APs offer a more flexible and less bureaucratic program, one that is better
suited to the Ecole's philosophical underpinnings and to the size of the school. APs are recognized in more
than forty countries, including Switzerland, Germany, Austria, and the United Kingdom and have been
determined to be the right choice for this globally oriented school.
Under normal circumstances a graduating student will have completed 20 course credits, including 4 years of
English, 3–4 years of mathematics, 2–3 years of science, 2 years of history or social science, and 3 years of a
foreign language. He or she will also have written two Source Themes—extensive research papers on topics
of the student's choice. In addition, most students will have completed several electives. Arts, sports, and
music courses are required throughout each student's academic career. Extended hiking trips every fall and
spring, an annual project week, and regular community service round out the program.
Faculty and Advisers
Forty full-time teachers and teacher/administrators and 5 part-time teachers live on campus. Additional
teachers are engaged part-time as needed for instruction of specialty courses such as musical instruments, ski
touring, and mountain climbing. The teachers also serve as “family heads” and as academic advisers,
conferring with students about their individual goals, counseling them as they choose their courses, and
following their progress throughout their time at the school. Teachers are passionate about both academic
and nonacademic pursuits, and so offer sports, music, arts, and crafts courses as well as courses in their
academic disciplines.
Ashley Curtis is the director of the American Program and co-director of the school. He served as a teacher at
the Ecole from 1988 to 2003, returning in 2009 to direct the school. Ashley has also taught at schools in
Massachusetts and in Italy. He earned B.A. and M.A.R. degrees at Yale University.
College Admission Counseling
The Dean of Academics meets with juniors to review college aspirations and to plan a college-visiting tour,
using catalogs and online resources. Each senior meets weekly with a college adviser to complete college
applications. The Ecole is an official College Board Testing Center, and students take the SAT and SAT
Subject tests, as well as any AP exams they have chosen, right on campus. American colleges and other
colleges around the world readily accept students who have had a thorough U.S. high school education
combined with the experience of living abroad. Recent graduates of the American Program have attended a
wide array of colleges and universities, including Bard, Bennington, Boston Conservatory, Brown, Colorado
College, Dartmouth, Hampshire, NYU, Oberlin, Reed, Sarah Lawrence, the Universities of Chicago and
Michigan, and the Universities of Southampton, Richmond, and Bristol in England.
Student Body and Conduct
The student body for 2010–11 totals 130—71 boys and 59 girls. Seven are day students. Approximately 50
percent of the students come from Switzerland and the rest from twenty-four other countries. About 20
percent of the student body is non-Caucasian; 25 percent of students receive financial assistance.
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Although this is a school with a demanding academic program, it is also a living community. Students at the
Ecole take charge of such important tasks as organizing weekend activities, delivering firewood, taking care
of the donkeys, and running the library and the fire brigade. Some are active in the Student Council or
involved in peer counseling. Everyone participates in the weekly school meeting, which is chaired by a
student. Here students can address both individual and community concerns, learning to find their own
voices within a public forum.
Academic Facilities
Twelve buildings are used for academic purposes. Besides regular classrooms, they house three science
laboratories; a workshop each for wood, stone-carving, pottery, metal, silver smithy, and studio art; a flexible
performance space/assembly hall; seven instrumental practice rooms; a computer room; a kitchen for general
use; and an audiovisual room. The library houses more than 22,000 volumes in German and English, and
French.
Boarding and General Facilities
All students live in family groups that are usually composed of 2 faculty members and about 8 boys and
girls. Most students have one roommate. Each family lives together in one of the school houses and eats
together in the common dining room. Wednesday evening is Family Evening, and the family members spend
it together as a group—playing games, cooking a meal, working on a project, or just talking.
Teachers take particular interest in the students in their family and are concerned with their total
development on a day-to-day basis, assuming such parental roles as planning birthday celebrations and
offering counsel when problems arise. After their first year, students are able to choose the family and the
house they wish to live in.
These family groups foster more open relationships among young people and between staff members and
students. Living with a mixed group including both sexes and various cultures helps everyone to see beyond
the stereotypes and appreciate individual differences. The mixture of older and younger children is also an
important aspect of the family atmosphere.
A trained professional assists the family heads in administering to common illnesses and ailments. A
physician visits the school regularly and is available for consultation in the next village. Trained
professionals in psychology are available to consult with students as needed or to make special
arrangements outside the school.
Athletics
The Alps provide a stunning natural setting for outdoor sports, which include hiking, skiing, rock climbing,
ski touring, and, occasionally, mountain biking and kayaking. In winter, students have the opportunity to ski
or snowboard almost every day at the Meiringen-Hasliberg ski area, which extends right down to the school.
The school also offers team sports such as basketball, soccer, and volleyball. Students and faculty members
often organize intramural competitions on weekends. The school has its own playing field and basketball
and volleyball courts as well as access to the local gymnasium. A swimming pool is located in a nearby
village.
Twice a year, in the fall and spring trimesters, the entire school sets out in small groups on four- and six-day
hikes into the mountains of Switzerland and Italy.
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Extracurricular Opportunities
To balance the intensive academic program in the morning, students devote their afternoons to the arts,
sports, and practical work, selecting from some eighty possible courses. Blacksmithing, skiing or
snowboarding, woodworking, painting, pottery, rock-climbing, the annual Shakespeare production, French
theater, classical, jazz, folk, and pop music ensembles, instrumental and voice lessons, gardening, and animal
husbandry are just a few of the fields students can choose to explore and then concentrate on in their
afternoons. In the middle of the fall trimester, an “Intensive Week” allows students to devote an entire week,
morning and afternoon, to a single project. Student theater as well as musical and dance performances are
presented throughout the year.
Daily Life
Wake-up is at 6:30 a.m., with breakfast at 7:05. All meals are eaten in family groups in the common dining
hall, with a Service Group of students serving the meal and washing up after. The first morning course begins
at 8:05 a.m., and the last morning course ends at 12:30 p.m. The nonacademic courses take place Monday
through Thursday between 2:30 and 6:15, following lunch and siesta. After dinner, there is free time until the
evening Quiet Hour. Family Evening is on Wednesday. The school gathers for a community meeting on
Friday afternoon and singing on Saturday morning.
Weekend Life
The weekend officially lasts from Saturday at midday until Sunday dinner. Students and teachers alike
organize activities for the weekend, including sports events, coffeehouses, films, and biweekly disco and
folk-dance evenings. Students and/or teachers present an “Andacht” on Sunday evenings, which is generally
a reflection on ethical, philosophical, or social issues. Older students may visit the nearby town, and all are
free to explore the surrounding natural wonders. In winter, many students spend at least part of the weekend
skiing or snowboarding.
Costs and Financial Aid
Tuition is quoted in Swiss francs, and, for those paying in other currencies, is dependent on the current
exchange rate. The tuition for the academic year 2010–11 is CHF 44,000. Tuition is payable in one payment,
three payments (one per term), or ten installments (monthly). The Scholarship Committee reviews
applications for financial aid.
Admissions Information
The Admissions Committee seeks students who are eager to challenge themselves academically, to discover
and develop their own individual passions, and to participate in a simple and ecologically sound
community life without the distractions of excessive electronic entertainment. All applicants who live in or
near Switzerland must visit the school for an interview and tour that offer the opportunity to meet students
and faculty members. Applicants who live farther away can request an interview by phone or with someone
familiar with the school in their area. The American program requires two letters of recommendation and
school records.
Application Timetable
Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Applications received by May 15 have the best chance of
acceptance. An American student who is enrolling at the school must obtain a student visa, which can take up
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to eight weeks for processing by the Swiss Embassy.
Admissions Correspondence
Ecole d'HumanitéCH-6085 Hasliberg-Goldern
Switzerland
Telephone: +41-33-972-92-92
Fax: +41-33-972-92-11
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.ecole.ch
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Fountain Valley School of Colorado
Colorado Springs, Colorado
The School
Fountain Valley School of Colorado (FVS) was established in 1930 and was opened the following year led by
a group of visionary men and women who were philanthropists, statesmen, scientists, entrepreneurs, and
educators. Many had personal and professional ties to the East; all shared the conviction that the Eastern
independent school tradition of academic excellence, progressive ideals, self-reliance, and intellectual
curiosity would thrive in the expansiveness of the Rocky Mountain West. John Dewey, the notable American
educational reformer, was on the first Board of Trustees, and his grandson graduated with the class of 1940.
The School's mission remains unchanged: FVS is dedicated to providing a rigorous college-preparatory
curriculum in academics, athletics, and the arts. The community endeavors to foster a lifelong love of
challenge and learning in an environment of diversity and mutual respect and to prepare adolescents to
become individuals who are open-minded, curious, courageous, self-reliant, and compassionate.
The School is situated at the base of Pikes Peak on the former Bradley Ranch on 1,100 acres of rolling prairie
in southeastern Colorado Springs. The School's 40-acre Mountain Campus is located 115 miles west of the
main campus, in the San Isabel National Forest.
Fountain Valley School of Colorado is a nonprofit corporation governed by a 23-member Board of Trustees,
18 of whom are alumni. The School's endowment is valued at more than $23 million. In 2009–10, annual
giving was $1.2 million. More than 2,600 alumni maintain contact with FVS, and many are actively involved.
In June 2005, more than 600 alumni returned to campus to celebrate the School's seventy-fifth anniversary. In
2003, FVS completed a $24-million capital campaign, the largest in Colorado independent-school history.
FVS is accredited by the Colorado State Board of Education and the Association of Colorado Independent
Schools and holds memberships in the National Association of Independent Schools, the Secondary School
Admission Test Board, the College Board, the Association of Boarding Schools, the Western Boarding School
Association, the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, the Colorado High School Activities
Association, and the Cum Laude Society.
Academic Program
Fountain Valley's academic program is rigorous and comprehensive, offering honors and Advanced
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Placement courses in all disciplines and providing a flexible approach to placing students in courses
appropriate to their abilities. More than 70 courses were offered by seven departments in the 2009–10 year.
The school year is divided into two semesters; major semester courses receive ½ credit. Twenty credits in
major courses are required for graduation (most seniors graduate with more than 22 credits), with the
following minimum departmental expectations: 4 credits of English; completion of the third-year level of one
foreign language (French, Mandarin Chinese, or Spanish); 3 credits of high school mathematics, with the
minimum successful completion of algebra II, 3 credits of science (including 1 credit of biology); 3½ credits of
history (including 1 credit of Western civilization, 1 credit of global studies, 1 credit of U.S. history and 1
credit of senior history elective); 1 credit of visual and performing arts; ½ credit of computer skills; ½ credit
of human development; and 4 credits of physical education. Most students take one minor and five major
courses per semester. In addition, English as a second language (ESL) is offered at the intermediate and
advanced levels. Qualified seniors, with the approval of the Curriculum Committee, design Independent
Study Projects to supplement their advanced studies. All seniors participate in the Senior Seminar, a
weeklong service project culminating their FVS education. Freshmen are required to take the Freshman
Transitions class, which seeks to help students adjust to life at FVS, and Freshman Arts, a yearlong
introduction to all the arts.
The Western Immersion Program (WIP) is a signature interdisciplinary program for all FVS sophomores.
Weaving together the disciplines of literature, history, science, and art, WIP explores how the Western
landscape shaped the people, history, and culture of the region. Sophomores also take Career Development.
The student-teacher ratio is 6:1, and the average class size is 12 students. The small classes allow for personal
attention and provide an intimate learning environment characterized by mutual respect and active
participation.
Grades (letters A through E) are given at midterm and at the conclusion of each semester. Written comments
are provided for each course at the fall midterm for all new students and at the end of the term for all
students.
Faculty and Advisers
FVS has a 47 member teaching faculty, with 36 teaching full-time. Seventy percent of faculty members hold
advanced degrees; 27 live on campus, with 9 in residence halls; 34 are advisers; and 28 are coaches.
Fountain Valley's seventh headmaster, Craig W. Larimer Jr. '69, assumed the leadership of the School in 2007.
He graduated from Pomona College and earned his M.A. from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced
International Studies. Prior to his appointment as headmaster, Larimer served for five years as president of
the FVS Board of Trustees, where he coauthored the School's current Strategic Plan. Professionally, he worked
for twenty-two years in international capital markets with the First National Bank of Chicago and Bank One.
Larimer began his career in government, where he served in the U.S. Treasury Department's office at the U.S.
Embassy in London as well as the Office of International Monetary Affairs in Washington, D.C.
Because all faculty members share responsibility for the residential and cocurricular programs at the School,
Fountain Valley seeks to recruit teachers with personal idealism, a genuine respect for students, and high
professional competence. An endowment and annually budgeted funds ensure continued faculty
professional development.
College Admission Counseling
Students begin to prepare for college in their first year at Fountain Valley through course choice and careful
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planning with the Academic Dean. College counseling starts in the sophomore year. Sessions are planned to
help students understand the complexities of the college application process and learn about the range of
colleges offering programs in which they are interested.
Each fall, Fountain Valley holds a college fair to give juniors and seniors an opportunity to talk with
representatives from approximately 150 colleges and universities. Students gather firsthand information from
the Director of College Counseling, college Web sites and other college Internet resources, an extensive
library of college catalogs and media, and a workbook designed to help them with the college application
process.
FVS has a detailed section on its own Web site devoted to college counseling. The section includes
information on college programs, summer programs and scholarships, financial aid, and detailed Web
listings to help the college-bound student.
The Director of College Counseling begins working with individual students and small groups during the
junior year, while other staff members work with sophomores. She creates an individual list of college
possibilities for each junior tailored to their expressed interests and needs. She continues to work closely
with each senior in refining his or her college plans.
The classes of 2008 through 2010 had an SAT range of scores (middle 50 percent) of critical reading, 500–663;
math, 540–680; and writing, 500–650. From 2006 through 2010, FVS graduates were admitted to 308 four-year
colleges and universities.
Student Body and Conduct
In 2010–11 the School's enrollment is 174 boarding students and 87 day students from twenty-seven states and
nineteen countries.
The School works to create and maintain an environment for learning in which goodwill and mutual trust
exist among all members of the campus community. At the same time, it adheres to the belief that every
strong community must have a clear set of standards and defined values for all its members to uphold. If a
student is found to be involved in a serious disciplinary matter, the case is heard by an honor council
composed of elected student representatives and faculty members. The council considers all facets of each
case and recommends a course of action to the Headmaster.
A Community Council chaired by the president of the student body provides a forum in which any members
of the School community can make recommendations regarding the operation of the School.
Academic Facilities
The majority of classes are conducted in the Froelicher Academic Building, which includes a state-of-the-art
science annex and two computer labs (with both PCs and Macintosh computers). There are also clusters of
computers in other parts of campus that students can use, including in the library and the Learning Center.
The William Thayer Tutt Art Center (Art Barn) houses art, jewelry, and ceramics studios; an art gallery; a
photo laboratory; and production rooms for the School's publications. The John B. Hawley, Jr. Library has
forty-one study carrels, two seminar rooms, and a film editing and projection room. The library has an online
catalog of more than 25,000 volumes and a collection of periodicals on microfilm.
The FVS Learning Center offers important education support for students, parents, and teachers. Students
who need help with study skills, personal organization, time management, or test anxiety can meet with a
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trained staff member individually or in small groups.
Students who need continued, regular support for their learning issues can be enrolled by their parents in the
Learning Assistance Program. There is an additional charge for the program; enrollment is limited.
Boarding and General Facilities
Fountain Valley School's four residence halls include ten individual houses where 174 students and 13
houseparent families live. Spacious double and triple bedrooms, common rooms, a kitchen, dining area,
bathrooms, laundry facilities, and a computer lab are laid out in floor plans unique to each house.
The Hacienda, Fountain Valley's original ranch house, has dining facilities for 300, private dining rooms for
meetings, and a living room for meetings and quiet conversation. The dining room was renovated in 2008 to
provide a better atmosphere and a wider selection of menu choices for students and faculty. The Chase Stone
Infirmary is a recently renovated ten-bed facility with a nurse on call at all times.
The Frautschi Campus Center was completed in 1990 and has a student-operated snack bar, a campus
bookstore, a post office, lounge and recreation facilities, a faculty lounge, a multimedia viewing room, and a
meeting space.
The Lewis Perry Jr. Chapel, currently being expanded to accommodate the School's increased student
population, houses weekly All-School meetings, concerts, and other regular activities. The Performing Arts
Center contains a small black-box type theater that houses the School's three yearly productions.
Athletics
Fountain Valley believes strongly in the value of sports for building physical fitness, self-confidence, and
character. Most students fulfill their requirement by participating in a variety of interscholastic sports,
including basketball, climbing, cross-country, golf, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, tennis, track, and volleyball
for boys and basketball, climbing, cross-country, field hockey, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, tennis, track, and
volleyball for girls.
Students may also earn physical education credit for horseback riding, skiing, snowboarding, and outdoor
education. The School provides suitable levels of competition for students of varying abilities. FVS offers a
comprehensive horsemanship program that provides diverse training in both English and Western riding.
Riding facilities include the largest outdoor arena in the Colorado Springs area, a covered arena, a barn,
stables, and more than 1,000 acres of open prairie. In 2007 and 2010, the English riding team earned the hunt
seat national title at the Interscholastic Equestrian Association championships. A new state-of-the-art indoor
riding facility that includes stables, tack rooms, offices, and classroom space opened in 2008.
The Penrose Sports Center includes a gymnasium, two squash courts, a newly renovated strength and
conditioning facility, and a five-lane, 25-yard indoor swimming pool. FVS athletic fields are some of the finest
in Colorado for soccer, field hockey, and lacrosse. Also, the School's first-ever outdoor track opened in 2008.
Nine tennis courts and a climbing wall complete the facilities.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Extracurricular activities vary from season to season. Students can perform in three major drama productions
annually, including a winter musical. Guest speakers and artists regularly visit the campus for formal
presentations and lectures. There are three student publications (newspaper, poetry book, and yearbook) and
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about twenty student activity clubs.
Special annual events include gymkhanas in which a riding team from Fountain Valley competes with teams
from local riding clubs, Earth Day, Mountain Bike Weekend, Ski Weekend, Stupid Night Out, and Unity Day.
During Interim, traditional classes are suspended, and students participate in a variety of on- and off-campus
programs. Recent Interims have included learning about French culture while in Paris, discovering southern
culture and the blues in Memphis, kayaking in Georgia, and connecting with American musical theater in
New York. Freshman Interim introduces students to the central premise of Interim—learning by doing.
Organized in small groups, Freshman Interim focuses on the history of Colorado by exploring subjects such
as ranching, Colorado wildlife, Native American heritage, Hispanic heritage, and pioneer heritage.
Daily Life
Classes meet five days per week in six 50-minute sessions between 8 and 3. Afternoon activities (athletics or
theater) are scheduled from 3:15 to 5:30. One period each week is used for student-adviser and All-School
meetings. Students and teachers generally have at least one free period daily.
Dinner is at 5:30, and study hours run from 7 to 8:30 p.m. and 9 to 10 p.m. All boarding students are expected
to observe study hours, although seniors in good academic standing may be excused in the spring of their
senior year.
Day students are expected to be on campus before their first commitment and to remain until 5:30 p.m. on
weekdays. Day students may stay overnight in a residence hall with permission from the houseparent and
the student's parents.
Weekend Life
Weekends are time for relaxation and taking advantage of campus resources and a host of opportunities in
the surrounding mountain region.
Student and faculty teams sponsor recreational activities throughout the weekend. Events include mountain
climbing, skiing, and pack trips, often based at the Mountain Campus; excursions to Colorado Springs and
Denver for movies, theater, concerts, dinner, and shopping; and dances, barbecues, movies, and athletics on
campus.
Students with parental permission may request a weekend away from the campus. Many students visit
friends or relatives or are invited to another student's home.
Costs and Financial Aid
In 2010–11, tuition was $42,000 for boarding students; the cost (including all meals and bus transportation) for
day students was $22,800. A book fee of $1060 covers textbooks, art supplies, lab fees, and one yearbook.
Interim, a required weeklong experiential learning opportunity, varies in cost according to the student's
choice of trip. There are also fees for optional activities such as music lessons, horseback riding, and horse
boarding. Tuition insurance and a tuition payment plan are available.
In 2009–10, 36 percent of students received approximately $1.8 million in merit- and need-based financial aid.
Fountain Valley School adheres to the principles of good practice in its need-based aid distribution as part of
the National Association of Independent Schools. All first-round applicants for ninth and tenth grade are
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considered for merit scholarships through the School's Summit Scholarship program.
Admissions Information
Students are admitted without regard to race, religion, or nationality. Fountain Valley School of Colorado
seeks students who have the potential to benefit from a rigorous academic program and contribute to the
School community. Students are admitted in grades 9 through 11 (in some cases grade 12) on the basis of
previous school records, three academic recommendations, results of the Secondary School Admission Test
(SSAT), an essay, and a personal interview.
Application Timetable
Fountain Valley subscribes to the March 10 notification date endorsed by the SSAT Board. The application
deadline is February 1. Applications are processed after that date if openings remain. The application fee is
$50 for applicants residing in the United States and $100 for applicants living outside the United States.
Admissions Correspondence
Randy Roach
Director of Admission and Financial Aid
Fountain Valley School of Colorado
6155 Fountain Valley School Road
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80911, United States
Telephone: 719-390-7035 Ext. 251
Fax: 719-390-7762
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.fvs.edu
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George Stevens Academy
Blue Hill, Maine
The School
George Stevens Academy (GSA) was founded in 1803 as Blue Hill Academy. The first students, men and
women from nearby towns, were taught by a preceptor and 2 teachers, and their courses of study included
Greek, Latin, and navigation. The Academy flourished under the guardianship of the Congregational Church,
but in 1832, George Stevens, the first non-Congregationalist to become a member of the Board of Trustees,
offered money and land to the Academy on the condition that it become an equal-opportunity institution.
When the Board refused, he donated 150 acres of land to build another school, the George Stevens Academy.
In 1943, the two schools finally merged into Blue Hill–George Stevens Academy.
Today, GSA consists of 20 acres, including administrative buildings and athletic fields, plus another 500 acres
for future development. The mission of the Academy is to create a caring and dynamic community that
educates and encourages students to reach their highest potential through a wide array of challenging
academic and extracurricular programs. It is committed to academic excellence, creative thinking, and artistic
expression and offers diverse opportunities for self-discovery that enable and require students to make
responsible choices. The governing body includes the Head of School, the Assistant Head of School, the
Academic Dean, the Dean of Students, and a 20-person Board of Trustees, on which many GSA alumni sit.
Academically, students from GSA rank among the best in the state, with many graduates attending the top
universities and colleges in the U.S. In music, the Jazz Band and the Jazz Combo have won state
championships for the past seven years, bringing home six first-place trophies and six MVP awards. For more
than eighteen years, the Jazz Band placed in the top three spots at the State Competition. GSA's Jazz Combo,
Musiquarium, won fourth place at the 2005 Berklee College of Music Jazz Festival in Boston. In athletics, the
boys' tennis team won the Eastern Maine Championships in 2010 and 2008, and the girls' team won the same
championship in 2009. In 2006, the girls' soccer team won the Eastern Maine Championship. The baseball and
softball teams won the Eastern Maine Championship in 2010, and the girls' basketball team won that title in
2009. That same year, one of the girls scored her 1,000th point as a GSA basketball player. In 2009, the golf
team (coed) qualified for the State Team Championship.
GSA is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEAS&C) and the Maine
Department of Educational and Cultural Services. GSA is also a member of the College Board, the Secondary
School Admission Test Board (SSATB), and the Independent Schools Association of Northern New England.
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Academic Program
The academic year is divided into two semesters: September through December and January through June. In
order to graduate, students must earn a total of 22 academic credits, including 4 English credits, 3 math
credits, 3 science credits, 3 social science credits, 1 physical education credit, 1 fine arts credit, ½ credit in
health, and 6½ elective credits. All students are required to carry a minimum of 5 credits each semester.
Juniors and seniors may also participate in a two-week Independent Study and Internship Program. Seniors
must fulfill a senior debate requirement in order to graduate. Every June, seniors debate one another on a
wide range of topics, from current events to legal issues. Public speaking, research, cooperation with partners
and team members, synthesizing an informed argument, and self-expression are important elements of the
debate process. The debate is a logical culmination of the high school language arts experience and gives
students an opportunity to study, in depth, a topic of their choice.
In order to accommodate different learning styles and abilities, GSA offers a varied curriculum at three
different levels: skills, college-prep (CP4), and honors. Seven AP courses are also available. Honors and AP
courses challenge students to pursue subjects deeply, intensively, and rigorously. The foreign language
program includes French, Spanish, and Latin. Some of the more unique courses at GSA are human
geography, earthworks, boat building, marine science, Maine environment, forensics, jazz, chamber music for
strings, photography, psychology, lab geometry, and advanced applications of finite math. A state-certified
special education teacher is available to support students with special needs who are taking the majority of
their courses in regular classes.
GSA offers a comprehensive ESL program for international students at three levels: beginner, intermediate,
and advanced. Students are tested prior to placement in one of the levels. ESL courses focus on developing
conversational and writing skills as well as the language necessary for regular subject classes. Special
emphasis is also placed on preparing students for the TOEFL exam and entry into U.S. colleges and
universities.
An Alternative Course Contract (ACC) provides an opportunity for a student to take a course not offered in
the regular curriculum. A student, in consultation with the Office of Student Services and a member of the
GSA faculty, may design the curriculum and write a course proposal that includes a description of the
course, goals, and objectives and the amount of credit to be earned. An Alternative Course Contract may be
taken on a pass/fail basis or for a numerical grade. Alternative Course Contracts are usually taken in
addition to the required 5 academic credits. The Head of School must pre-approve all Alternative Course
Contracts.
Faculty and Advisers
There are 31 teachers at the Academy; more than half of the instructors have advanced degrees. The faculty is
composed almost equally of men and women. GSA faculty members are skilled, caring educators who are
actively involved in students' lives. Each full-time faculty member serves as an adviser for up to 15 students
to assist them in their academic, social, and emotional development. They help students set educational
goals and develop the skills necessary to accomplish them. In addition, advisers assist students through the
college-admission process, including the coordination of college aptitude tests and the various aspects of
applying to college. Faculty members are also involved in advising student clubs and coaching athletics.
Bayard Brokaw has a B.A. in history and political science from Bowdoin College and an M.A. in international
studies from Denver University. Mr. Brokaw joined the GSA faculty in 2002, serving first as Dean of Students
and more recently, as Academic Dean. Prior to coming to GSA, he was Director of the Bay School in Blue Hill.
Between 1992 and 1996 he helped establish and direct Souhegan High School in Amherst, Massachusetts.
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College Admission Counseling
The Office of Student Services meets with students on an individual and group basis to discuss and map out
students' future plans, explore and refine individual goals, and organize a time-management system for the
college application process. There is a dedicated college counselor specifically for international students who
guides students through the college selection and application process. This counselor also helps arrange for
students to take the SAT, ACT, or TOEFL exams. The Academy hosts a number of college admissions
representatives and financial aid workshops every year. About 81 percent of students who graduate from the
Academy attend postsecondary institutions. Within Maine, recent graduates have attended Bates, Bowdoin,
Colby, and the Universities of Maine and Southern Maine. Recent graduates are attending such colleges and
universities as Berklee College of Music, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, NYU, Penn State, RPI, Smith,
Stanford, Yale, the University of Virginia, and the U.S. Naval Academy.
Student Body and Conduct
In the 2010–11 academic year, the Academy has enrolled a total of 300 students: 142 boys and 157 girls. In
grade 9, there are 37 boys and 24 girls; grade 10, 42 boys and 36 girls; grade 11, 29 boys and 47 girls; and
grade 12, 34 boys and 50 girls. The majority of students come from Blue Hill and the surrounding towns. The
socioeconomic range is wide; students have parents in occupations ranging from lobstermen and mill
workers to lawyers and doctors. In fall 2010, GSA admitted 33 international students from China, Japan,
Germany, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Students participate in the management of the school through the Student Council, which provides
leadership, school service, a forum for student voice, and channels for student involvement. Students' rights
and responsibilities are outlined in the school handbook, and both students and faculty members are
expected to maintain an atmosphere of respect and encouragement for learning, take responsibility for their
actions, foster a safe and caring atmosphere, use courteous and appropriate language, abide by the highest
standards of honesty, and remain chemically free. GSA's administrators and faculty members are responsible
for discipline.
Academic Facilities
GSA's campus is located in the heart of Blue Hill and currently consists of four main buildings plus two
residence halls. The Academy's library contains a collection of more than 8,000 items for research and
recreational reading. Materials are offered in a variety of formats, including books, magazines, microfiche,
videotapes, and CD-ROMs. The library also includes seven computers with Internet access. There are thirty
laptops in two mobile units for student use as well as sixteen computers in the campus computer lab. In
addition, the school has fifty netbooks for student use. The entire campus is wireless, and every teacher has
an in-class computer. Students also have access to the Blue Hill Library, which has more than 39,000 items,
and the MERI Center for Marine Studies.
Boarding and General Facilities
GSA has two residential options for international students: home stay and boarding. The Host Family
Program provides international students with the opportunity to live with a family in the community.
Students become a member of that family for the school year and may spend time with their host family after
school, on weekends, and during vacations. This offers students the chance to practice English intensively
while experiencing life in an American household. GSA also has one recently renovated and one new
residence hall. The girls' residence houses 8 students, and the boys' dormitory holds 16. Each building also
houses full-time dorm parents who provide constant supervision for the students. GSA's residential facilities
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are a reflection of the school's overall aim to provide students with a comfortable environment in a warm,
caring community.
Athletics
GSA participates in twelve interscholastic sports throughout the year, including baseball, basketball, golf,
indoor and outdoor track, sailing, soccer, tennis, and wrestling. Games and practice times take place after
school during the week and sometimes in the morning on weekends. In order to play, students must be
enrolled in five full-credit courses at the Academy and maintain good academic standing. Other
requirements include a parents consent form, a yearly physical examination, an emergency medical card
completed and on file in the Athletic Office, and attendance at a preseason meeting. In addition to a newly
renovated gymnasium, GSA also has extensive athletic fields where teams play baseball, soccer, and softball.
Extracurricular Opportunities
There are more than twenty-five clubs and activities for students at GSA. Some of the clubs include Amnesty
International, Chess Team, Drama Club, Environmental Action Club, French Club, International Cooking
Club, Jazz Band, Jazz Combo, Literary Magazine, Math Team, Model United Nations, National Honor
Society, Outing Club, Spanish Club, Student Council, and Yearbook.
GSA sponsors an annual Arts Festival, a five-day event that celebrates arts in all its forms and allows students
to show parents and friends their special accomplishments. Every year, students can take part in three days of
studio-based learning at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, which attracts some of the finest craftspeople in
the nation. The Academy also offers numerous opportunities to participate in sports, performing arts,
community service, and other interests.
Daily Life
The school day begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 2:35 p.m., with a 15-minute break at 9:20 and a 45-minute lunch
beginning at 12:15. The Academy runs on an eight-period schedule. Each eight-period cycle lasts two days.
Each day is divided into four periods, which are 75 minutes in length. Students may spend one of these
periods in a study hall, and juniors and seniors may have the opportunity to explore an academic or
vocational interest through a self-designed, two-week course of study. Residential students are required to
participate in activities from 3 to 4:30. These might include sports, yoga, painting, volunteering, or working
with young children. Dinner is from 5:15 until 6, and from 7 to 8:30, there is a mandatory study hall in the
library. This is an opportunity for students to work with tutors or each other on their homework.
Weekend Life
Students can spend their weekends in the Blue Hill Peninsula, which is known for its traditional, coastal
fishing and boatbuilding history. More recently, it has become a haven for writers, painters, sculptors, and
musicians. The village of Blue Hill offers shops, art galleries, pottery studios, and restaurants. Throughout
the year, there are opportunities to attend or participate in classical, jazz, steel drum, and choral concerts. The
Blue Hill Library hosts Friday movie nights. Students can walk along the beach, hike up Blue Hill Mountain,
go canoeing and kayaking, take a bike ride through blueberry fields, kick a soccer ball in the park, and
browse local shops and bookstores. In the winter, there are plenty of chances for ice-skating, cross-country
skiing, and downhill skiing. Chaperoned weekend trips may include shopping, movies, or bowling in nearby
Ellsworth or Bangor; visits to Acadia National Park and Bar Harbor; whale watching; and cultural visits to
Portland and Boston. Blue Hill is an hour's drive from Acadia National Park or the Camden Snow Bowl,
3 hours from Portland or Sugarloaf Mountain, and 5 hours from Boston.
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Costs and Financial Aid
The Academy admits almost any student from Blue Hill or a neighboring town that does not have its own
high school as well as international students and students from nonsupporting towns who are open to new
challenges and experiences. The homestay tuition of $35,000 per year includes tuition, the stipend for host
families, book rental, and most regular school activities. The boarding tuition is also $35,000 and includes
tuition, room and board, book rental, and most regular school activities. Participation in the English as a
second language course costs $1500 per semester. Students requiring health insurance must pay $800 per
year, and all students are required to pay a $1000 general deposit for emergency expenses.
Admissions Information
George Stevens Academy admits students of any race, religion, gender, national origin, or sexual orientation
to the rights, privileges, programs, and activities available to students at the school. GSA does not
discriminate in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, or any other programs
administered by the school. Admission is based on the candidate's transcript, application essay,
recommendations, and, when possible, PSAT, SSAT, TOEFL, or SLEP scores. GSA's Admissions Committee
carefully screens all applicants to determine their level of maturity, academic competency, and ability to
function successfully in the GSA community.
Application Timetable
A $50 nonrefundable processing fee is required at the time of application. A campus visit and interview are
highly recommended for all applicants. Telephone interviews are arranged for candidates who are unable to
visit. GSA has a rolling admissions policy, which means that applications are accepted throughout the school
year and summer. However, candidates are encouraged to complete the application process by March 1. An
admissions decision is made within three weeks of receipt of the application.
Admissions Correspondence
Sheryl Stearns
Director of International Student Program
George Stevens Academy
23 Union Street
Blue Hill, Maine 04614, United States
Telephone: 207-374-2808 Ext. 134
Fax: 207-374-2982
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.georgestevensacademy.org
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Hillside School
Marlborough, Massachusetts
The School
Since 1901, Hillside School has continued its mission of working with boys in their formative years. Students
work to develop academic and social skills while building confidence and maturity. Hillside provides small
classes instructed by talented educators in a community that emphasizes personal integrity and mutual
respect and is dedicated to maintaining diversity.
Hillside is situated on 200 acres of fields, forest, and ponds in Marlborough, Massachusetts. Marlborough is
located just 30 miles from Boston, 70 miles from Hartford, 45 miles from Providence, and 3½ hours from New
York City. This location is convenient for families, but it is also important to the School's educational and
recreational programs. School field trips are bountiful and weekend activity opportunities are endless. The
visual arts and athletic programs at Hillside are strong and offer the boys opportunities to succeed and grow.
Both boarding and day students take advantage of a high-quality residential life that is supportive, active,
and exciting.
Unique to Hillside are the working farm and farmhouse dorm, tutorials available for students who need
remediation and organizational skills, a daily and weekly recognition system conveying to students clear
expectations regarding social and academic behavior, and excellent programs for students with minor
learning disabilities or ADD/ADHD.
Hillside seeks students of average to above-average intelligence who are looking for a supportive, structured
school. Family involvement is not only encouraged, it is a critical part of the School's program. Hillside's
graduates matriculate at leading independent secondary boarding schools as well as local parochial and
public high schools.
Hillside School is a nonprofit institution and is governed by a 23-member Board of Trustees, which includes
Hillside alumni, leading citizens of Marlborough and nearby communities, and other individuals with a
commitment to the School's educational mission. The School has an endowment of $4 million, with an
operating budget of $6 million. Annual Giving for 2009–10 was $600,822. The physical plant is valued at more
than $20 million.
Hillside School is a member of the National Association of Independent Schools, the Association of
Independent Schools in New England, and the Junior Boarding Schools Association.
Academic Program
Hillside School recognizes the importance of committed faculty members, small classes, and a highly
structured program as factors in developing the student's self-confidence, self-esteem, individual thinking,
and decision-making ability. Students in grades 5 and 6 learn in self-contained classrooms, with a core
curriculum consisting of mathematics, language arts, social studies, and reading and specialized instruction
in art, science, and music.
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In grades 7–9, the curriculum includes English, history, science, math, studio art, music, farming, and French,
Spanish, or Latin.
The new Honors Seminar Program at Hillside School is for eighth and ninth graders. The boys are selected by
faculty members to challenge top students and to better prepare them for competitive secondary schools. In
2006, seminars were The Writing of Mathematics and The Myths of the Settling of the American West.
Responding to concerns about global conflict, the Peace Studies course and curriculum are allowing students
to review concepts and learn skills for promoting peace within society. Also, starting with the 2007–08
academic year, Hillside incorporated a special health and wellness focus across the entire curriculum to
enhance students' well-being and development. For the 2008–09 academic year, the Asian Studies course
informs seventh-grade students about a region of the world that is increasingly important to their daily lives.
The leadership program is required of all grades, with the goal of providing a forum for students to learn and
discuss leadership skills and teamwork with their peers through hands-on activities.
Other programs were developed in recent years to help meet the needs of students who have been diagnosed
with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or mild learning disabilities. These students are in an
environment that provides understanding and support so that they may attain a level of academic and
personal success.
Hillside establishes an early appreciation for the importance of organizing time and materials. This is
accomplished by teaching and reinforcing such study skills as keeping a master organizational notebook in
which “two-column” note-taking strategies are utilized as well as test preparation and active reading skills.
The curriculum is reinforced by tutorial sessions in which study skills are developed and enhanced in small
groups. Each student is provided with instruction in math, science, English, history, skills for life, and
writing. French, Spanish, and Latin are offered to seventh-, eighth-, and ninth-grade students. Music and
studio art are also taught.
The tutorial program aids students who are having difficulty in a particular subject or need study skills that
can be applied to all subjects.
The school year is divided into three trimesters. Students are evaluated midway through each marking
period in detail by their teachers and advisers to ensure that each student's academic progress is closely
monitored throughout the academic year. Parents receive student report cards three times during the
academic year.
Faculty and Advisers
David Beecher, Head of the School, is a graduate of the Choate School and Lake Forest College. He served as
an English and history teacher at Berkshire School as well as a coach, adviser, and dorm parent. Mr. Beecher
also served Berkshire as Dean of Students and as an assistant in Admissions and Development. He also
served as Director of Admission and Financial Aid at Fay School and at Wilbraham and Monson Academy.
The faculty consists of 45 full-time members; 28 reside on campus. Three counselors are available throughout
the week. All 45 faculty members have bachelor's degrees and 10 have master's degrees. Faculty members
and students have their meals together, live in the dormitories, and spend recreational time together on the
weekends. All faculty members serve as student advisers and meet with their advisees three times per week.
The majority of faculty members coach at least one sport. Faculty members use patience, kindness, and
empathy as they work alongside students.
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Secondary School Placement
The Director of Secondary Placement assists students and their families in selecting and applying to schools
that best match a student's needs. The needs of each student are identified by the faculty members, advisers,
coaches, and families at the beginning of the application process.
Schools recently attended by Hillside graduates include Brewster Academy, Chapel Hill–Chauncey Hall
School, Cheshire Academy, Choate Rosemary Hall, Cushing, Dublin School, Hotchkiss, Kent School,
Lawrence Academy, Marvelwood School, Millbrook, New Hampton School, Pomfret School, St. Andrew's
School (Rhode Island), St. Mark's School, Tilton School, Vermont Academy, and Wilbraham and Monson
Academy.
Student Body and Conduct
The 2009–10 student population of 145 students consists of 90 boarding students and 55 day students. These
boys are also representative of Hillside's growing diversity, with 30 percent being students of color, 32
percent receiving financial aid, 60 percent participating in the tutorial program, and 20 percent being
international students. There is a standard dress code for all students.
Hillside School embraces the five core values of honesty, compassion, respect, determination, and fun as the
guiding principles for overseeing student behavior and achievement. Shades of Hillside Blue is a system
based on these values that is designed to give students and families comprehensive and timely feedback
about a boy's overall performance at school. During a biweekly period, boys are evaluated in all areas of
School life using three shades of blue. Royal blue, the School color, signifies that a boy consistently meets
established expectations. Sky blue signifies that a boy meets expectations with some assistance, and navy
blue indicates that a boy needs frequent guidance in attempting to meet expectations. Each student has an
adviser who reviews this feedback with the boy and his family. The adviser works in conjunction with the
Dean of Students and other faculty members in helping boys to set and meet appropriate individual goals on
an ongoing basis. Parental involvement with the Hillside system is sought and greatly encouraged so that a
clear, consistent message is given to students. The Dean of Students is charged with overseeing residential
life, counseling, and conduct.
Academic Facilities
The academic hub of the School is centered in the Stevens Wing of the new Academic and Health Center. The
Stevens Wing contains fourteen classrooms, WiFi, computer access, and the science laboratory. Linked to the
Stevens Wing is the Tracy gymnasium/auditorium. The student center houses the dining room;
administrative, admissions, and business offices; and the newly expanded Wick Tutorial Center.
The much-anticipated Academic and Health Center opened its doors in March 2008. This newest campus
facility includes fitness rooms; a state-of-the-art health center staffed by a registered nurse; a
wrestling/multipurpose room; nine new classrooms, three of which are science labs; and offices for health
and wellness and counseling programs.
Boarding and General Facilities
The Messman-Saran Library is located in Drinkwater Hall. Students are housed in six dormitories: two new
houses—Mack House and Maher House—and Williams, Whittemore, Matthies, and the Farm Dorm. Living
in each house are at least 2 faculty members and their respective families. Additional campus buildings
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include Lowell House, the Headmaster's residence; Tipper House, residence of the Dean of Athletics;
Emerson House, residence of the Assistant Headmaster; and the Patten House and other buildings on the
farm.
Athletics
Hillside School offers an extensive athletics program and competes with other junior boarding and day
schools in the area. The School population is small enough that every student is able to participate. The boys
are taught basic skills and participate in a sports program that includes baseball, basketball, cross-country,
golf, ice hockey, lacrosse, sailing, skiing, soccer, tennis, track and field, wrestling, and yoga. The School also
offers an outdoor program called Eco-Team, which features hiking, canoeing, and working with more than 80
animals on the farm. Fitness activities, weight lifting, Ultimate (Frisbee), and volleyball are part of the
intramural program.
Extracurricular Opportunities
The students and the faculty members place great emphasis on service to others. Three times per year,
students participate in community service days. In this program, students visit local nursing homes and
spend time with the elderly, participate in community social service projects, and assist in a volunteer
program for local residents.
Students participate in woodworking, painting, plays, poetry contests, and student government. They can
volunteer to be on the yearbook staff. Students help plan and execute a Farm Day harvest festival, Diversity
Day, Spring Fling, and a Daughters of the American Revolution Day.
Daily Life
During the school week, students arise at 6:30 a.m. to dress and to clean their rooms before breakfast at 7:15.
Classes begin with homeroom at 8 a.m. and end at 3 p.m. Students meet with their adviser three times each
week and attend community meetings five times each week. Class periods are 50 minutes long. All students
participate in art, music, and the leadership program as part of the academic day. Time is set aside each day
from 3 to 5 p.m. for athletics. Dinner is at 5:45, and there is a supervised study hall, located in the main
classroom building, from 6:30 to 8. Bedtime varies from 9 to 10 p.m., depending on the age of the student.
Weekend Life
A wide variety of activities are offered to boarders each weekend. The School takes full advantage of the
surrounding area, including Boston and Providence, with day trips to historic sites and museums. There are
evening and weekend trips to sports events, live theater, exhibits, movies, and malls. A pond, located on the
farm, provides opportunities for fishing, swimming, canoeing, and winter ice-skating. Students can go rollerskating, skiing, and bowling, all within a few miles of the School.
Many families of day students welcome boarders to their homes for weekends, and a day student may spend
the night at the School, depending on the activity for that weekend. Weekend permission to go home is
granted to seven-day boarders if they have attained minimum standards in academics and if they have no
school commitments. Transportation is arranged after permission is given by parents.
Costs and Financial Aid
Tuition for 2010–11 is $48,950 for a seven-day boarding student, $43,150 for a five-day boarder, and $28,600
for a day student. Hillside offers tuition payment plans. Every student has a personal account set up in the
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Business Office from which he receives weekly pocket money. Money can be withdrawn for special needs as
long as it is approved by the Dean of Students. Funding for this account varies per year.
Thirty percent of the current student population receives more than $1 million in financial aid. To apply for
tuition assistance, a candidate must complete the Parents' Financial Statement (PFS) from the School and
Student Service for Financial Aid (SSS).
Admissions Information
The Admissions Office goes to great lengths to admit a diverse group of boys from a broad range of
socioeconomic and racial backgrounds. Hillside seeks boys who are in need of a sheltered, structured, and
nurturing learning environment. The School can accommodate both traditional learners and those with
learning differences and/or attention problems. The boys are generally average to superior in intelligence yet
have not reached their full potential. They perform best in an environment that is personalized, supportive,
and challenging.
Application Timetable
Parents interested in Hillside School may write, call, or e-mail the School directly for information. Enrollment
is possible throughout the year, provided an opening exists. Decisions and notifications are made once an
applicant's file is complete. There is a $50 application fee.
Admissions Correspondence
Kristen Naspo, Director
Admissions and Financial Aid
Hillside School
Robin Hill Road
Marlborough, Massachusetts 01752, United States
Telephone: 508-485-2824
Fax: 508-485-4420
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.hillsideschool.net
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Hoosac School
Hoosick, New York
The School
Hoosac is an independent coeducational boarding school. Founded in 1889, the School still follows many of
the traditions for which it is well known—for example, the nation's first student work program, in which
students participate in the maintenance of their environment, and the Boar's Head and Yule Log Christmas
Celebration, in which Burgess Meredith ('26) performed as a student.
Hoosac School is well suited to students who are academically motivated and are seeking a small-school
environment. Hoosac also serves those who have not lived up to their potential in larger school settings,
students with mild learning differences, and students who have talent but have received poor training
through the years.
Hoosick is a rural community located 30 miles northeast of Albany, New York; 7 miles west of Bennington,
Vermont; and 13 miles northwest of Williamstown, Massachusetts. The name of the town, like that of the
School, is one of several spellings of a Native American word meaning ''Place of the Owl.''
Hoosac's setting amid 350 acres of fields and woods at the head of the Taconic Valley allows for a variety of
outdoor activities, and the proximity of Williams College and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the larger
centers of Albany and Troy provide access to a wide range of cultural and educational opportunities.
Hoosac follows the Episcopal tradition in the short chapel services offered several times a week.
The School is operated by the Headmaster for an independent, self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. The plant
is valued at $15 million.
Hoosac is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and chartered by the New
York State Board of Regents. It is a member of the National Association of Independent Schools, the
Secondary School Admission Test Board, the National Association of Episcopal Schools, and the New York
State Association of Independent Schools.
Academic Program
The student-faculty ratio of 5:1 ensures that classes are kept small and that students receive a great deal of
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individual attention. One-to-one tutorials, independent study, and Advanced Placement courses are all
available.
The curriculum consists of English I–IV, French I–II, ancient and modern European history, global studies,
U.S. history, early American history, algebra I and II, geometry, precalculus, biology, chemistry, physics,
psychology, earth science, computer literacy, art, photography, drama, music, film appreciation, criminology,
fashion design, dance, and health. Advanced Placement courses are offered in calculus, U.S. history, and
English.
In addition, the Oasis Program provides individual instruction to students with mild learning problems,
relying on tutorials to establish healthy patterns of self-reliance.
Graduation requirements include the following: 4 years of English, 3 of science, 3 of mathematics, 3 of history
and social studies (including 1 of U.S. history), 2 of a foreign language, 1 of a lab science, 1 of health, 1 of
ethics, 1 of computers, and 1 trimester each of music, drama, and art. A two-year ESL program is available for
international students.
Hoosac uses “Mastery Teaching.” The concept of mastery education is older than the one-room schoolhouse
where it was practiced; only the name is new. Mastery is an approach commonly used in every walk of life
except formal education. For example, a person who wants to learn how to play tennis would not say, ''I have
40 minutes to learn to serve. If I cannot do it in this time, I will never play tennis.'' Learning to serve a tennis
ball well may take time. Therefore, a person would keep practicing until he or she mastered it. As in tennis,
many things in life require time and repetition to learn. Given enough time and exposure, most people can
master most things. Given enough exposure and support, students can learn almost anything.
Mastery uses testing as part of the instructional process. Each test reveals what a student does not know. On
the basis of this, he or she is redirected and retaught in the weak areas. Each test, therefore, is a review of a
student's knowledge for the purpose of reteaching. For example, a student takes a test, which is corrected and
returned in class. The student is then retaught the information that they did not understand and tested again.
Students also get extra help outside of class.
Mastery is an old and proven technique. It is used all over the United States, and it is a successful approach
for most students. It allows the student to develop self-confidence and self-reliance.
Faculty and Advisers
Hoosac's Headmaster is Richard J. Lomuscio. Mr. Lomuscio is a graduate of NYU. He has been a newspaper
editor and taught in both public and private schools. Mr. Lomuscio has served Hoosac for thirty-five years in
many capacities—teacher of math, French, science, history, and English; housemaster; coach; college
counselor; Director of Athletics; Director of Studies; Dean; and Headmaster.
The faculty numbers 24, of whom 8 are women. Faculty members live on campus. They and their families
participate fully in all activities.
The School's adviser system is one more example of the individual attention given to students. The system
provides the structure and support students need to be successful. A faculty member is responsible for up to
8 advisees, whom he or she sees at least twice a week—once in a private meeting and once in a group
meeting. Advisers receive biweekly reports on each student from the student's teachers so that any changes
or problems that arise can be handled quickly. Parents also play a significant role in this system; they can
monitor their child's progress by keeping in close contact with his or her adviser.
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College Admission Counseling
College counseling, supervised by the Headmaster, begins in the junior year, and students visit colleges
during the summer and fall. Admissions officers from many colleges and universities visit Hoosac.
In the last several years, graduates have been accepted to Bennington, Boston College, Boston University,
Bowdoin, Clarkson, Connecticut College, Drexel, Hamilton, Hartwick, Manhattanville, Northeastern, NYU,
Penn State, Rensselaer, St. Lawrence, Syracuse, Trinity (Hartford), Vassar, Vanderbilt, Washington and
Jefferson, Wheaton, and the Universities of Hartford, New Hampshire, Southern California, and Vermont.
Student Body and Conduct
Hoosac enrolls 113 boarding boys and girls. Most students come from the northeastern United States; others
are from Georgia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Idaho, California, Texas, and Florida and from several other
countries.
Students are represented in school affairs through a traditional prefect system and play major leadership
roles in important areas of school life. The kitchen and dining hall are supervised by student stewards. All
class bells are rung by a student bell ringer, and the coaches are helped by student assistants. The work
program is supervised by student proctors, as are the dormitory facilities. The faculty and administration
offer careful guidance in order to strengthen the lessons of leadership and responsibility.
Minor infractions of Hoosac's rules and regulations result in an obligation to donate work for the benefit of
the School community; more serious infractions of the regulations can result in suspension, and very serious
cases can lead to dismissal.
Academic Facilities
Tibbits Hall, built in 1828 and remodeled in 1860, is a freestone Gothic castle containing offices, classrooms, a
dormitory, and faculty apartments. Wood Hall contains the School's library, a faculty apartment, and a
dormitory area. Crosby Arts Center provides facilities for theater, art, music, and dance.
Other buildings include Memorial Dining Hall (1963), which houses a spacious dining area and student
lounge as well as classrooms. Blake Hall (1969) is the science building and includes classrooms, laboratories,
a darkroom, a lecture hall, and an observatory equipped with two telescopes. A new theater for the
performing arts was recently added to Blake.
Boarding and General Facilities
Lewisohn and Dudley houses are small dormitories. Whitcomb Hall houses the chapel, a dormitory, and a
faculty residence.
Pitt Mason Hall (1967) is the largest of the dormitories, housing 30 students; it includes apartments for three
faculty families. Lavino House (1969) also serves as a dormitory. The Edith McCullough House (1990) holds 8
students and a faculty family, as does Cannon House, built in 1970.
About half the dormitory rooms are doubles and the rest are singles. At least one faculty family lives in every
dormitory.
Athletics
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Every student is required to participate in athletics or an athletics alternative during the afternoon. The
School fields teams at the varsity level in soccer, ice hockey, lacrosse, basketball, tennis, baseball, and
volleyball and offers skiing and flag football as intramural sports. Modern dance and fitness classes are also
available. Hoosac's teams participate in league competition.
Campus sports facilities include three soccer fields, one baseball diamond, a skating pond, 6 miles of crosscountry running and skiing trails, and tennis courts. Students can also fish in nearby trout streams and hike
and camp in Tibbits Forest. The School's sports complex includes a gymnasium, a locker and shower area,
and a swimming pool. Hoosac has a ski slope on campus as well.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Because the student body is small, individual interests and casual groups, rather than formal clubs, are
emphasized. Extracurricular activities include student publications, academic clubs, music, and art. The
students present theatrical productions and participate annually in the century-old Boar's Head and Yule Log
Christmas Celebration.
The Student Activities Committee works with a faculty member to provide weekend opportunities. Informal
organized activities include hiking, camping, horseback riding, fishing, skiing, and skating. Traditional
events for the School community include two Parents' Weekends. There is a banquet with a speaker every
Friday evening.
A driver's education course is offered, as is a Red Cross lifeguarding course.
Daily Life
Breakfast is served at 7:20 a.m. Chapel is at 8, followed by a Schoolwide meeting. Classes run from 8:30 to
2:55; there is a break at noon for a family-style sit-down lunch. Sports take place in the afternoon after classes.
Dinner is at 6, followed each evening by a required study period. Lights-out is at 10:30.
Classes meet six days a week for 40 minutes each period; Wednesday and Saturday are half days to leave
time for special activities, athletic competition, and free time.
Weekend Life
Dances, concerts, lectures, and other special activities are planned with local schools, such as Emma Willard,
Stoneleigh-Burnham, Miss Hall's, and Doane Stuart. On Saturday evenings, students go to movies or the mall
in Pittsfield, Albany, and Saratoga or at the School or participate in other leisure-time activities. They may
also attend musical, theatrical, and educational programs at local colleges, particularly Williams and
Rensselaer in Troy.
Following brunch on Sunday, students explore the woodlands, climb, hike, fish, or ski on campus or at
nearby resort areas. One long weekend is scheduled during each trimester, and students may take additional
weekend leaves.
Costs and Financial Aid
Boarding tuition for 2010–11 is $35,000; day tuition is $16,000. Students enrolled in the ESL program paid an
additional fee of $3500. Students enrolled in the OASIS program paid an additional fee of $7500. Books and
laundry totaled an additional $1300.
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Hoosac, which subscribes to the School and Student Service for Financial Aid, grants financial aid on the basis
of demonstrated need. Approximately 30 percent of the students receive aid totaling more than $500,000 per
year.
Admissions Information
New students are accepted at all grade levels on the basis of previous academic records and a personal
interview. The first step for interested students and their families is to request a catalog and application and
schedule a visit to the campus.
Application Timetable
Candidates are encouraged to apply by March 15, although applications are considered at any time during
the year as long as there are spaces available.
Admissions Correspondence
Dean S. Foster, Assistant Headmaster
Hoosac School
Hoosick, New York 12089, United States
Telephone: 800-822-0159 (toll-free)
Fax: 518-686-3370
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.hoosac.com
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Pomfret School
Pomfret, Connecticut
The School
Founded in 1894, Pomfret School is an independent coeducational college-preparatory boarding and day
school for students in grades 9 through 12 and postgraduates. Set on a stunning 500-acre campus in
northeastern Connecticut and brought to life by an exceptional faculty, Pomfret offers a rich and rewarding
experience for students from various cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds.
Pomfret's campus is an oasis, with boutique shopping, movie theaters, malls, and Connecticut's premier
antique district all close by. The School is just 50 minutes from Providence, 50 minutes from Hartford, a little
over an hour from Boston, and 3 hours from New York City. Interesting and challenging academics (thirtyseven AP and honors courses and independent projects offered in all disciplines) combined with competitive
athletics and exciting opportunities in the creative arts continue the 117-year tradition of educational
excellence that defines Pomfret School. In addition to its excellent academic programs, Pomfret is particularly
well-known for its strong community atmosphere, a rigorous and engaging education, a commitment to
service beyond self, and numerous opportunities for personal growth in academic, athletic, artistic, and
residential settings.
The School is governed by a Board of Trustees, most of whose 26 active members are alumni, current parents,
or parents of alumni. The physical plant is valued at $100 million, and the endowment is in excess of $40
million. In 2009–10, more than $1.8 million was donated to the Annual Giving fund; 86 percent of current
parents participated.
Pomfret School is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and is approved by
the Connecticut State Department of Education. Its memberships include the Connecticut Association of
Independent Schools, the Headmasters' Association, the National Association of Independent Schools, the
Secondary School Admission Test Board, A Better Chance (ABC), and the Cum Laude Society.
Academic Program
Pomfret School offers a traditional college-preparatory curriculum that stresses the fundamentals. Emphasis
is placed on reading, writing, math, foreign languages, science, history, and computer competence. The
minimum academic requirements for graduation include 4 years of English, 3 years of mathematics through
the junior year and through algebra II, a foreign language through the third level, 3 years of history, 3 years of
science (physics, chemistry, and biology, taken in that sequence), 1 trimester of religion, and 1 trimester of
social issues. The school year is divided into trimesters, with exams in November and June.
Pomfret School recognizes the value of imaginative and creative development and offers a particularly strong
arts program. Students are required to enroll in an art course in two of three terms each year they attend
Pomfret. Creative arts courses are offered in music, theater, painting, sculpture, film, dance, creative writing,
photography, painting, drawing, and digital arts. The religion requirement may be met through such
electives as Faith and Imagination and World Religions. Pomfret encourages its students to participate in
community service. Options include tutoring, assisting youth groups, hospital projects, blood drives, and
environmental activities.
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The average class size is 11 students, and the faculty-student ratio is 1:6. The grading system uses letter
grades of A to E. Grades are given twice during each trimester, and teacher comments accompany grades
three times per year. A faculty adviser works closely with a group of 5 to 7 students.
Faculty and Advisers
There are 82 faculty members (46 men and 36 women), 58 of whom teach; 65 are full-time, 42 have earned
master's degrees, and 4 hold doctorates. Most faculty members have advisees and live on the campus. The
average length of teaching experience is eleven years.
Pomfret employs teachers who engender enthusiasm for learning. The job of any faculty member goes
beyond the classroom to include coaching, advising, and running a dormitory. Pomfret believes it is at the
forefront in providing for the professional growth of its faculty members.
Bradford Hastings became Headmaster in 1993, after serving as Assistant Headmaster at Deerfield Academy.
He is a graduate of Pomfret and was on the faculty from 1972 to 1978. Mr. Hastings served on Pomfret's Board
of Trustees from 1985 to 1992. His master's degree in education is from Harvard University.
College Admission Counseling
College placement starts with college counseling, a process that begins at Pomfret during the sophomore
year and continues as a refining and defining process until graduation. At all times, it is thought of as an
effort that fosters individual social maturity, academic growth, and a deeper commitment to School activities.
All juniors take the PSAT in the fall and the SAT and SAT Subject Tests in the winter and spring.
A complete portrait of each individual's life at Pomfret—social, academic, and extracurricular—and a
personal understanding of each student's aspirations enable the college counseling office to provide very
close personal attention.
Student Body and Conduct
Pomfret currently has 268 boarding and 84 day students. There are 54 in the Third Form (grade 9), 95 in the
Fourth Form (grade 10), 94 in the Fifth Form (grade 11), and 109 in the Sixth Form (grade 12). The students
come from twenty-six states and thirteen countries. Twelve percent of students classify themselves as
members of minority groups.
Participation in the student government enables students to assume active leadership roles within the School.
A president (a Sixth Former) chairs the government, which is made up of elected representatives from each
Form and from the faculty.
Students at Pomfret are expected to follow the School rules outlined in the student handbook. Any infraction
of these rules leads to an appearance before the Discipline Committee, which is composed of both students
and faculty members and is chaired by the Dean of Students. The committee makes recommendations on
discipline to the Headmaster.
Academic Facilities
The School is located on 500 acres, which consist of thirteen playing fields, two turf fields, rolling hills, and
woodlands. The principal school buildings are grouped in the middle of the campus. The athletic and
student center, which opened in 2004, houses a two-floor student center, study room, snack bar, student radio
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station, student publications office, and bookstore. It also includes eight international-size squash courts, a
wrestling room, a fitness center, locker rooms, an athletic trainer's facility, a trophy room, and offices for the
Athletic Director and Director of Student Activities. In addition to the new athletic and student center,
Pomfret recently opened a new ice-hockey rink, boathouse, and outdoor tennis center.
The School House contains history and foreign language classrooms, administrative offices, and the recently
renovated music center. It is flanked on one side by four brick dormitories and on the other by Hard
Auditorium, the center for dramatic and musical productions.
Nearby is the Monell Science Building, with laboratories for biology, chemistry, and physics as well as
lecture rooms furnished with video equipment. The Centennial Building (1996) houses all mathematics and
English classes as well as two- and three-dimensional art studios, metal and wood shops, and a 125-seat
state-of-the-art theater.
The du Pont Library completes the current academic buildings. Along with its 22,000 volumes and the
Technology Center, the library provides students with Internet access, a fully automated catalog and
circulation system, and more than a dozen online subscription databases that cover a broad spectrum of
disciplines with full-text and print capability. In addition, materials from outside the library are available
through interlibrary loan.
Other nearby buildings include a dance studio and the Main House, which contains the dining hall, mail
room, and health center, which is staffed by 3 registered nurses. The School physician is at the health center in
the mornings. Clark Memorial Chapel also occupies a central location on campus.
Boarding and General Facilities
Pomfret students are housed in ten dormitories on campus. Four converted homes, four large brick
dormitories, Pyne Hall, and Robinson House serve as student residences. A wireless campus connects all
Pomfret dormitory rooms, classrooms, faculty apartments, and offices, permitting computer and telephone
networking throughout the campus as well as access to e-mail and the Internet in each dorm room. Most
students are assigned to double rooms, though some returning students can choose to live in single rooms.
All dorms are supervised by live-in faculty dorm parents, each of whom supervises between 7 and 14
students on his or her floor.
Athletics
Athletics at Pomfret are an integral part of the educational experience, and all students are expected to
participate each season at the level that is most challenging to them. Coaching responsibilities are shared by
most faculty members. In addition, the School employs an athletics trainer.
The goal of the athletics program is to field competitive teams that exhibit discipline, the desire to excel, and
pride in themselves and the School.
A varied interscholastic program is offered throughout the academic year. It includes cross-country, field
hockey, football, soccer, and volleyball in the fall; basketball, ice hockey, squash, and wrestling in the winter;
and baseball, crew, golf, lacrosse, softball, and tennis in the spring. In addition, aerobics, community service,
dance, drama, and outdoor education are offered as athletic alternatives.
Pomfret has a fully equipped, 3,000-square-foot fitness center. Under faculty supervision, students are able to
supplement their work on the playing field with a complete resistance training or aerobic program.
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Students may opt to undertake an independent project for a given season rather than engage in sports.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Pomfret encourages student participation in a wide range of extracurricular activities. The Pontefract
(newspaper), Griffin (yearbook), and Manuscripts (magazine) enjoy good student leadership and
participation. An active theater program presents three plays and numerous theater projects each year,
including musical productions (staged each winter). Auditions are open to students, faculty members, and
local artists.
Daily Life
Classes are held in 50-minute periods with two 80-minute periods scheduled on Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, and Friday. Classes run from 8 to 3:15. Sports practices are scheduled in the afternoons from 3:45 to
5:45. The class day ends at 12:25 p.m. on Wednesdays and at 11:30 a.m. on Saturdays. Evening study hours
are 8 to 10 p.m., Sunday through Friday. Students study in their rooms. Lights-out is at 10:30 for Third and
Fourth Formers and Fifth and Sixth Formers are expected to be in their rooms at 11.
The academic year, which is divided into trimesters, begins in early September and ends in early June, with
vacations scheduled for one week at Thanksgiving, two weeks at Christmas, and two weeks in March.
Weekend Life
Most students prefer to remain at school on the weekends to enjoy time with friends and take advantage of
the scheduled activities. On Saturday afternoons, there are interscholastic athletics contests. Students
appreciate the local area, which combines rural beauty with elegant shopping and café dining. They also
enjoy Sunday trips to Boston, Vermont ski slopes, and area shopping malls and movie theaters. Indoor and
outdoor movie nights, concerts, dances, and other special events on campus at Pomfret School are always
popular.
The student lounge, tuck shop, indoor tennis courts, squash courts, and gymnasium are open and available
seven days a week. On Sundays, students are invited but not required to attend a chapel service or a local
church service. Brunch is served at 10. The weekend officially ends on Sunday before dinner. There are
regular study hours on Sunday evening in preparation for Monday classes.
Costs and Financial Aid
In 2010–11, tuition is $46,500 for boarding students and $29,000 for day students. Costs for textbooks,
stationery, athletics equipment, laundry, and dry cleaning are charged separately through a student debit
account. For families who qualify, $3.4 million in need-based financial aid is available.
Admissions Information
Pomfret seeks students whose past achievement indicates that they could benefit from and contribute to life
at the School. Pomfret gives prime consideration to those applicants who possess academic ability, interest in
the arts and/or athletics, and a willingness to become involved in and supportive of the Pomfret School
community.
Each applicant must submit an application, come to Pomfret for an interview, and take the SSAT by
January 15. Notification to prospective students is made on March 10.
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Pomfret School admits students of any race, color, creed, handicap, gender, sexual orientation, or national
origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students
at the School. The School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, disability, gender, sexual
orientation, age, marital status, national origin, or any other status protected by law in the administration of
its educational or admissions policies, financial aid, or other programs.
Application Timetable
Initial inquiries are welcome at any time, and tours and interviews can be arranged by calling the Admissions
Office. Office hours are 8 to 4 Monday through Friday and 8 to noon on Saturdays with classes. School
catalogs and applications can be obtained from the Admissions Office or on the Web site at
http://www.pomfretschool.org.
Pomfret adheres to the Parents' Reply Date of April 10. Thus, a place that has been offered on March 10 is
reserved until April 10. Late applications (those to which it is not possible to reply by March 10) are accepted
and acted upon as soon as possible and as enrollment permits.
Admissions Correspondence
Rachel Tilney
Director of Admissions and Financial Aid
P.O. Box 128
Pomfret School
398 Pomfret Street
Pomfret, Connecticut 06258-0128, United States
Telephone: 860-963-6120
Fax: 860-963-2042
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.pomfretschool.org
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Rye Country Day School
Rye, New York
The School
Founded in 1869, Rye Country Day School (RCDS) is entering its 141st year. Reflecting and reaffirming the
School's purposes, the mission statement states, “Rye Country Day School is a coeducational, collegepreparatory school dedicated to providing students from Pre-Kindergarten through Grade Twelve with an
excellent education using both traditional and innovative approaches. In a nurturing and supportive
environment, we offer a challenging program that stimulates individuals to achieve their maximum potential
through academic, athletic, creative, and social endeavors. We are actively committed to diversity. We expect
and promote moral responsibility, and strive to develop strength of character within a respectful school
community. Our goal is to foster a lifelong passion for learning, understanding, and service in an everchanging world.”
The 26-acre campus is located in Rye at the junction of routes I-95 and I-287, one block from the train station.
The School's location, 25 miles from Manhattan, provides easy access to both New York City and to a
suburban setting with ample playing fields and open spaces. Through frequent field trips, internships, and
community service projects, the School takes considerable advantage of the cultural opportunities in the New
York metropolitan area.
A nonprofit, nonsectarian institution, Rye Country Day is governed by a 26-member Board of Trustees that
includes parents and alumni. The annual operating budget is $24.5 million, and the physical plant assets
have a book value in excess of $54 million. Annual gifts from parents, alumni, and friends amount to more
than $5.7 million. The endowment of the School is valued at more than $21 million.
Rye Country Day School is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and the New
York State Association of Independent Schools and is chartered and registered by the New York State Board
of Regents. It is a member of the National Association of Independent Schools, the New York State
Association of Independent Schools, the Educational Records Bureau, the College Board, and the National
Association for College Admission Counseling.
Academic Program
Leading to the college-preparatory program of the Upper School, the program in the Middle School (grades
5–8) emphasizes the development of skills and the acquisition of information needed for success at the
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secondary school level by exposing students to a wide range of opportunities. The academic program is fully
departmentalized. Spanish or French is offered to all students in grades 2–5. Starting in grade 6 students may
choose Latin or Mandarin Chinese or continue with Spanish or French. The math, foreign language, and
writing programs lead directly into the Upper School curriculum. Programs in art, music (vocal and
instrumental), computer use, and dramatics are offered in all grades. Students in kindergarten through grade
6 are scheduled for sports for 45 to 75 minutes daily, and a full interscholastic sports program is available to
both boys and girls in grades 7 and 8, and in the Upper School.
Sixteen courses are required for Upper School graduation, including 4 years of English, 3 years of
mathematics, 3 years of one foreign language, 2 years of science, and 2 years of history. Students entering the
School by grade 9 must complete ½ unit in art and music survey, and ½ unit in the arts. Seniors must
successfully complete an off-campus June-term community service program. In addition, seniors must
satisfactorily complete 1 unit in the senior humanities seminar. Students are expected to carry five academic
courses per year.
Full-year courses in English include English 9, 10, and 11; major American writers; English and American
literature; and creative and expository writing. Required mathematics courses are algebra I, algebra II,
trigonometry, and geometry. Regular course work extends through calculus BC, and tutorials are available
for more advanced students. Yearlong courses in science are environmental science, biology, chemistry, and
physics. Science courses are laboratory based. The computer department offers beginning and advanced
programming, software applications courses, desktop publishing, and independent study opportunities.
The modern language department offers five years of Mandarin Chinese, French, and Spanish, and the
classics department teaches five years of Latin. History courses include world civilizations, U.S. history,
government, and modern European history. Semester electives in the humanities include philosophy,
psychology, government, and economics.
In the arts, full-year courses in studio art, art history, and music theory are available. Participation in the
Concert Choir and Wind Ensemble earns students full academic credit. Semester courses in drawing,
printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, ceramics, and photography are available. The drama department
offers electives in technique, history, oral presentation, technical theater, and dance.
Advanced Placement courses leading to the AP examinations are offered in biology, psychology,
environmental science, chemistry, physics, statistics, calculus, English, government, U.S. and modern
European history, French, Spanish, Latin, music theory, art, and computer science. Honors sections are
scheduled in tenth- and eleventh-grade English, math, physics, biology, and chemistry, and in foreign
languages at all levels. Independent study is available in grades 11 and 12 in all disciplines.
The student-teacher ratio is 8:1, and the average class size in the Upper School is 12. Extra help is provided
for students as needed.
The year is divided into two semesters. Examinations are given in March. Grades are scaled from A to F and
are given four times a year. Written comments accompany grades at the end of each quarter.
Academic classes travel to New York City and other areas to supplement classroom work. Although not a
graduation requirement, all students are involved in community service programs. Semester class projects as
well as individual experiences involve work with local charities and schools, YMCA, Midnight Run, United
Cerebral Palsy, Big Brother-Big Sister, Doctors Without Borders, AmeriCares, and numerous local
organizations.
Students in grades 7–12 are required to have laptop computers. The campus supports wireless Internet
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connection and provides appropriate filters for student and faculty educational use. A technology
department supports and updates the network and assists students with software and hardware issues.
Students receiving financial aid awards receive new laptop computers from the school which are replaced
every three years.
Faculty and Advisers
The Upper School faculty consists of 65 full-time teachers—35 men and 30 women, the large majority of
whom hold at least one advanced degree. The average length of service is eight years, and annual faculty
turnover averages fewer than 6 teachers.
Scott A. Nelson became Headmaster in 1993. He holds a B.A. from Brown University and an M.A. from
Fordham University. Prior to his appointment at Rye, he served as Upper School Director both at the
Marlborough School in Los Angeles and at the Hackley School in Tarrytown, New York. Mr. Nelson and his
family reside on campus.
Nearly all faculty members in the Middle and Upper Schools serve as advisers for 5 to 12 students each. In
addition to helping students select courses, faculty advisers monitor the students' progress in all areas of
school life and provide ongoing support. The advisers also meet with students' parents at various times
throughout the year.
Rye Country Day seeks faculty members who are effective teachers in their field and who, by virtue of their
sincere interest in the students' overall well-being, will further the broad goals of the School's philosophy.
The School supports the continuing education of its faculty through grants and summer sabbaticals totaling
more than $330,000 a year.
College Admission Counseling
The college selection process is supervised by a full-time Director of College Counseling and an Associate
Director. Advising is done in groups and on an individual basis, with the staff meeting with both students
and their families. More than 100 college representatives visit the campus each year.
The 97 graduates of the class of 2010 enrolled in fifty-four colleges and universities, including Barnard,
Bowdoin, Brown, Caltech, Chicago, Colgate, Columbia, Dartmouth, Davidson, Duke, Georgetown, Michigan,
Middlebury, MIT, Northwestern, Notre Dame, Pennsylvania, St. Andrew's (U.K.), Stanford, Texas, Tufts,
Vanderbilt, Vassar, Wake Forest, Washington (St. Louis), Washington and Lee, Wesleyan, Williams, and
Yale.
Student Body and Conduct
The Upper School enrollment for 2010–11 totaled 385: 200 boys and 185 girls. There were 95 students in grade
9, 94 in grade 10, 99 in grade 11, and 97 in grade 12. Members of minority groups represented 28 percent of
the student body in grades 5–12. Students came from more than forty different school districts in Westchester
and Fairfield Counties as well as New York City. Students holding citizenship in fourteen countries are
enrolled.
While School regulations are few, the School consciously and directly emphasizes a cooperative, responsible,
and healthy community life. The Student Council plays a major role in administering School organizations
and activities. Minor disciplinary problems are handled by the Division Principal or Grade Level Dean; more
serious matters in the Upper School may be brought before the Disciplinary Committee. There is student
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representation on the Academic Affairs and other major committees.
Academic Facilities
Academic facilities at Rye Country Day School include the Main Building (1927) and Main Building Addition
(2002), with separate areas for kindergarten through grade 4, grades 5 and 6, and grades 7 and 8. The Lower
and Middle School divisions have separate art, computer, and science facilities.
The Upper School is housed in the Pinkham Building (1964), which was completely renovated in 2010. The
new 14,000-square-foot addition includes a 140-seat auditorium, a college counseling center, faculty offices,
classrooms, and three science labs.
There are two libraries on campus—the Lower School Library (2002) and the Klingenstein Library (1984),
which serves the Middle and Upper School divisions. The Klingenstein Library contains more than 25,000
volumes with fully automated circulation and collection management technology. Resources include
significant periodical and reference materials that are available via direct online services and the Internet, CDROM, and substantial videotape collection.
The school has invested in technology infrastructure and classroom SmartBoards in all three divisions.
Laptop computers, which are required for all students in grades 7 through 12, are used extensively
throughout the curriculum. Access to the RCDS network and Internet is via a campuswide wireless network.
In total, there are 650 networked computers on campus.
The performing arts programs are housed in the Dunn Performing Arts Center (1990), which includes a 400seat theater-auditorium and classroom spaces for vocal music, instrumental music, and a dance studio. There
also are five music practice rooms which adjunct faculty use for private music lessons.
Athletics
Rye Country Day's athletic program offers seventy-two interscholastic teams for students in grades 7 through
12. Varsity competition includes boys' and girls' teams in soccer, cross-country, basketball, ice hockey,
fencing, squash, tennis, golf, and lacrosse, as well as football, field hockey, wrestling, baseball, softball, and
coed sailing. Approximately 70 percent of the students participate in at least one team sport.
The physical education department offers classes in aerobics, CPR, ice skating, kickboxing, squash, tennis,
weight training, yoga, and dance.
Athletic facilities include the LaGrange Field House (1972) with its indoor ice rink/tennis courts; the Nelson
Athletic Center (2000), which houses a two-court gymnasium, four squash courts, four locker rooms, and an
athletic training facility; and a state-of-the-art fitness center. Between 2007 and 2009, the School installed four
artificial turf fields, making it the premier outdoor athletic facility in the area.
Extracurricular Opportunities
More than thirty-five extracurricular activities are available. Students can choose vocal music (Concert Choir,
Madrigal Singers, and solfeggio classes) and instrumental music (Wind Ensemble, Concert Band, and Jazz
Band). Many of these offerings have curricular status. The performance groups give local concerts and
occasionally travel to perform at schools and universities here and abroad. In addition, 10 professional
instructors offer private instrumental and voice lessons during and after the school day. The drama
department presents major productions three times a year. Recent productions have included The Laramie
Project, South Pacific, Dark of the Moon, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Macbeth, The Pajama Game, The
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Arabian Nights, Anything Goes, Alice in Wonderland, Urinetown, Museum, and Bye Bye Birdie.
Student publications include a yearbook, newspaper, literary magazine, graphic arts and photography
magazines, and a public affairs journal, each of which is composed using student publications desktop
publishing facilities. The School's Web site (http://www.ryecountryday.org) is an ever-changing location for
student- and staff-provided information on and perspectives of the School. Students participate in Model
Congress programs on campus and at other schools and colleges. The School has a dynamic community
service program that embodies the RCDS motto: “Not for self, but for service.” Students also participate in
many other activities and School organizations, including foreign language, mock trial, debate, theater,
sports, and computer clubs.
Daily Life
Beginning each day at 8:05, the Upper School utilizes a six-day schedule cycle. Most courses meet five of the
six days, with one or two longer, 70-minute periods per cycle. The day includes an activity/meeting period
and two lunch periods as well as seven class periods. Class periods end at 2:50, and team sport practices and
games begin at 3:30. Breakfast and lunch may be purchased in the school dining room; seniors may have
lunch off campus. Study halls are required for grade 9.
Summer Programs
The Rye Country Day Summer School enrolls approximately 200 students—grades 6 to postgraduate—in
remedial, enrichment, and advanced-standing courses. Some courses prepare students for the New York State
Regents exams that may be taken at the local public schools. The program is six weeks long and runs on a
five-period schedule from 8 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday. Tuition averages $1200 per course. A
brochure is available after April 1 from the Director of the Summer School or on the School's Web site.
In addition to the Summer School, Rye conducts a summer program, ACTION, for students in grades 6–8
from nearby Westchester communities. Fifty students from minority groups enroll in a four-week program
that emphasizes academic enrichment in the areas including writing, math, leadership, and computer use.
Costs and Financial Aid
Tuition for grade 9 for 2010–11 is $31,500. Additional charges are made for textbooks, lunches, sports, field
trips, and private music lessons, as appropriate.
Tuition aid is available on a need basis. For 2010–11, 124 students received a total of more than $3.3 million in
aid. All aid applications are processed through the School and Student Service for Financial Aid.
Admissions Information
Students are accepted in all grades. In 2010–11, 17 new students enrolled in the ninth grade, 10 in the tenth
grade, and 1 in the eleventh grade. Academic readiness is a prerequisite; a diversity of skills and interests, as
well as general academic aptitude, is eagerly sought. The School seeks and enrolls students of all
backgrounds; a diverse student body is an important part of the School's educational environment.
Required in the admissions process are the results of the Educational Records Bureau's ISEE or the Secondary
School Admission Test (SSAT); the student's school record; and school and faculty recommendations. A visit
to the campus and an interview are also required.
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Application Timetable
Inquiries are welcome throughout the year. Interviews and tours of the campus begin in late September. To
be considered in initial admissions decisions, applicants must fully complete the Application by
December 15. All other parts of the Application Folder (transcripts, testing, recommendation forms,
interview, etc.) are due by January 15. Candidates whose Application Folders are complete by that date are
notified by approximately February 15. Applications received after December 15 are evaluated on a rolling
basis.
Admissions Correspondence
Matthew J. M. Suzuki, Director of Admissions
Rye Country Day School
Cedar Street
Rye, New York 10580-2034, United States
Telephone: 914-925-4513
Fax: 914-921-2147
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.ryecountryday.org
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The Harker School
San Jose, California
The School
The origins of The Harker School belong in the city of Palo Alto where two schools, Manzanita Hall and Miss
Harker's School, were established in 1893 to provide incoming Stanford University students with the finest
college-preparatory education available.
Harker's three campuses are located minutes from each other in the heart of California's famed Silicon Valley.
The campuses are well maintained, beautifully landscaped, and secured with an emphasis on student safety.
The Upper School campus is 16 acres, the Middle School campus is 40 acres, and the Lower School campus is
10 acres. The Harker Upper School opened in 1998 and graduated its first senior class in 2002.
Harker's suburban San Jose location attracts day students from surrounding communities, such as Los Gatos,
Saratoga, Cupertino, Los Altos, and Fremont.
Harker operates as a nonprofit organization, governed by a board of directors composed of business leaders,
educators, and parents. With strong support from parent volunteers, the School's Annual Fund raised more
than $1 million during the 2009–10 school year. Funds are used to enhance programs such as computer
science and fine arts.
Harker is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and is a member of the California
Association of Independent Schools.
Academic Program
The Harker School is a coeducational day school for students in kindergarten through grade 12. Harker
students are highly motivated, creative young people who come from families with strong commitments to
educational values. The exceptional faculty, caring and qualified support staff, and modern, safe campuses
give students a definite advantage in becoming top achievers. For example, students consistently score
among the highest percentiles in nationally normed achievement tests. Each year, an impressive number of
seventh-grade students qualify for academic recognition as Johns Hopkins University Scholars by scoring
above 500 on the SAT. Small class sizes, with an average of 16 students, enable teachers to form flexible
ability groupings so that children's needs are constantly evaluated and met.
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The Upper School curriculum offers a full array of academic courses, from introductory-level to Advanced
Placement and honors-level courses in every discipline, from sciences and math to English, foreign language,
and the fine arts. The Upper School offers a complete athletic program for boys and girls as well as a full
extracurricular program, including yearbook, performing arts, newspaper, and debate.
The use of technology in teaching is an important facet of the academic program, and every student takes a
semester of technology as a graduation requirement. A unique aspect of the program is Harker's requirement
that every student have Internet access at home. The Internet is utilized for academic research through the
Harker Library's online periodical databases and access to faculty help after school hours. Grades 6–12 are
also required to have a personal laptop that is linked to the School's wireless network. A Middle School
laptop program was implemented in fall 2007.
Graduation requirements include 4 years of English, third-year proficiency in a foreign language (French,
Spanish, Japanese, or Latin), 3 years of science (physics, chemistry, and biology), 3 years of mathematics (with
a strong recommendation to take 4 years), 3 years of history, 2 years of physical education, 1 year of fine arts,
and 1 semester of computer science.
The Lower and Middle Schools' solid curriculum in both the core subjects of math and language arts and the
enriching opportunities with specialists in science, expository writing, Spanish, French, Japanese, computer
science, physical education, art, music, dance, and drama provides a solid foundation for the Upper School
academic program.
The Lower School's full-day program allows all students ample time for learning through games, dancing,
and other physical activities. Harker kindergarteners have access to teaching specialists and campus
resources such as extensively equipped computer science labs and the library. In grades 1–5 the curriculum
is strongly academic. In keeping with the School's commitment to treat each child as an individual, students
who show special promise have ample opportunity to go beyond the standard curriculum through Harker's
advanced placement grouping. Study-travel trips to Marin Headlands and California's Gold Country add
field experience to the academic science offerings.
Harker's Middle School program offers students a safe and trusting atmosphere in which to grow through the
challenging times of early adolescence. Special courses aid students in gaining a sense of self-worth, dealing
with anxiety, understanding the risks of substance abuse, and learning about other major health issues.
Student performances, field trips, art exhibitions, and assembly presentations enliven the School atmosphere.
Study-travel trips to Yosemite, the Grand Canyon, and Washington, D.C., are meaningful Middle School
experiences.
Faculty and Advisers
The Harker faculty is composed of 186 professionals, 117 of whom hold advanced degrees. Christopher
Nikoloff, Head of School, earned his B.A. in English literature and his M.A.T. in education at Boston
University. Faculty members serve as advisers to students on a daily basis. Many participate in after-school
athletics as well as academic and arts enrichment activities. Continuing education is facilitated with monthly
meetings and individual incentives for professional growth. Harker seeks highly qualified candidates who
reflect the School's commitment to academic excellence and diversity.
College Admission Counseling
Harker is a college-preparatory school whose rigorous curriculum prepares students for top universities.
Four college counselors provide extensive guidance to students and parents in the junior and senior years
regarding preparation for college admission. Over the four years of high school, there are parent workshops,
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family interviews, individual student interviews, classes for students, visits from college representatives, and
special speakers from college admission offices.
Student Body and Conduct
During the 2010–11 academic year, there are 1,762 students enrolled in kindergarten through grade 12. The
student body reflects the dynamic and diverse Bay Area population, and the international programs further
prepare the students as global citizens.
Harker Lower and Middle School students are required to wear uniforms. Upper School students adhere to a
dress code. Students are expected to comply with rules defined in the Student/Parent Handbook. Good
citizenship, along with academic and athletic achievement, is frequently rewarded. Discipline rests primarily
with the faculty.
With leadership from its Student Council, the entire School communicates its views on codes and policies
and works on community service projects. Students participate in a variety of leadership opportunities, spirit
commission, and service volunteer programs.
Academic Facilities
Harker's strong sense of community ties three campuses into one school, while allowing children close
contact with their peers. The Lower, Middle, and Upper School campuses are within 3 miles of each other.
Modern, extensively equipped facilities such as computer and science labs and art and dance studios
provide enhanced learning opportunities for students at all grade levels. A new state-of-the-art Science and
Technology Center opened in 2008.
The library system has 44,900 items among the three campuses. Each campus has its own library facility,
staffed by full-time professional librarians, and equipped with an array of quality print and digital resources.
With over 80 subscription databases, students have 24/7 access to materials from Gale, ProQuest, EBSCO,
Oxford University Press, JSTOR, Project MUSE, LexisNexis, and others. Librarians and instructional
technologists team with classroom teachers to select appropriate technology tools to support twenty-firstcentury learning.
Harker has extensive student support services. The full-time staff includes licensed school counselors,
college counselors, registered school nurses, certified lifeguards, and a professional chef.
Athletics
Students of all ability levels are encouraged to participate in the School's extensive athletics program.
Baseball, basketball, cross-country, football, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, track, and volleyball are popular
Upper School sports. Combined athletic facilities include two competition-sized pools, eight tennis courts,
three wood-floored gymnasiums, a new lighted football/soccer field with synthetic turf, and expansive
playing fields.
Extracurricular Opportunities
While the basic goal is to prepare students for future schooling by introducing them to a large body of
knowledge, the focus on academics is balanced with numerous opportunities for personal development,
including school spirit, sports and arts activities, and community service projects. Students take an active role
in their school community, including planning school dances and rallies and participation in more than forty
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clubs. Harker's proximity to San Francisco makes frequent field trips to major cultural attractions and
performances possible for students at all grade levels.
Daily Life
Students can arrive on campus as early as 7 a.m. The school day begins and ends at staggered times between
8 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. The campus closes at 6 p.m. Supervised after-school recreation and athletics programs
are available to all students at no additional cost. A professional chef supervises food service on all
campuses, providing nutritious lunch selections of hot meals, fresh fruits, salad bars, and vegetarian options.
Summer Programs
Harker Summer Programs offers an intriguing variety of activities for boys and girls ages 4½ to 18. For
students in grades K–8, day camp choices offer academic enrichment combined with sports, recreation, and
computer science for a total of eight weeks. Field trips to local natural and cultural attractions such as Santa
Cruz beaches, local redwood forests, and San Francisco are a popular aspect of the program. Harker's
Summer Institute for students in grades 9–12 runs for 6 weeks during the summer. Students attend academic
credit courses to hone existing skills or learn new topics. Offerings have included the Summer Conservatory
program of music, theater, and dance; Speech and Debate Camp; rigorous math and science courses; and an
enrichment courses in expository writing, Spanish, and PSAT/SAT. Annual enrollment is approximately
1,300. Enrollment in Harker's academic program is not required. Harker Summer Programs is accredited by
the American Camping Association and the Western Association of Independent Camps. Further information
can be obtained by contacting Summer Programs Director Kelly Espinosa at the Harker School office.
Costs and Financial Aid
For the 2010–11 school year, tuition ranges from $23,794 to $35,372. An $1100 to $1200 lunch fee is added to
tuition for Middle and Upper Schools. Estimated extra costs are as follows: $400 to $550 plus lunch fee for
Lower School and $700 to $850 for Middle and Upper School students. A nonrefundable $700 new Lower and
Middle School student fee and an enrollment deposit of $2500 for students are due within seven days of
acceptance. Financial aid based on need is available.
Admissions Information
Harker seeks a diversified student body that reflects a range of backgrounds, aptitudes, and interests.
Students performing at average to above-average levels are considered for acceptance. Student motivation
and the ability to adjust comfortably to a close-knit and congenial educational community are also important
factors. The specific criteria used in admissions are entrance exams, school records, character evaluations by a
teacher or principal, and extracurricular experiences.
Application Timetable
An initial inquiry is welcome at any time, and students should visit the Web site for School and application
information. Potential students and their families are encouraged to attend an open house or schedule a visit
because there is no better way to appreciate Harker's warmth and vitality. A visit may be arranged by
contacting the School offices, which are open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Admissions Correspondence
Ms. Nan Nielsen
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Director of Admission and Financial Aid
The Harker School, Saratoga Campus
Lower School (K–5)
4300 Bucknall Road
San Jose, California 95130, United States
Telephone: 408-871-4600
Fax: 408-871-4320
Middle School (6–8)
3800 Blackford Avenue
San Jose, California 95117, United States
Telephone: 408-248-2510
Fax: 408-248-2502
Upper School (9–12)
500 Saratoga Avenue
San Jose, California 95129, United States
Telephone: 408-249-2510
Fax: 408-984-2325
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.harker.org
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The Hockaday School
Dallas, Texas
The School
The Hockaday School, founded in 1913, provides a nationally recognized college-preparatory education for
bright girls of strong potential who may be expected to assume positions of responsibility and leadership in
a rapidly changing world. Ela Hockaday dedicated herself to giving each girl a foundation for living based
on scholarship, character, courtesy, and athletics—the traditional Four Cornerstones that remain the dominant
influence in the School's educational philosophy.
Hockaday's campus encompasses almost 100 acres of open fields and wooded creeks in residential northwest
Dallas. The School's contemporary architectural setting features an academic quadrangle built to provide
views of exterior gardens and landscaped terraces. The science center and Clements Lecture Hall opened in
1983, the Ashley Priddy Lower School Building in 1984, the Biggs Dining Room and Whittenburg Dining
Terrace in 1985, the Fine Arts Wing in 1987, the Lower School addition in 2001, the Liza Lee Academic
Research Center in 2002, the renovated Middle and Upper Schools in 2005, and the renovated Clements
Lecture Hall in 2007.
A Board of Trustees is the governing body. The School's endowment is more than $100 million, and the
operating income is supplemented by Annual Fund giving of more than $2 million. The Alumnae
Association, with more than 7,000 graduates and former students, contributes significantly to the ongoing
programs of the School.
The Hockaday School is accredited by the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest. It holds
membership in the National Association of Independent Schools, the National Association of Principals of
Schools for Girls, the College Board, the National Association for College Admission Counseling, the
Educational Records Bureau, the National Coalition of Girls' Schools, and the Secondary School Admission
Test Board.
Academic Program
Students are exposed to a rigorous academic curriculum that offers core educational subjects as well as
unique offerings in technology, the arts, and leadership and personal development. Graduation requirements
(in years) include English, 4; mathematics, 3; history, 2.5; foreign language, 2; laboratory science, 3; fine arts,
1.5; physical education and health, 4; and academic electives from any department, 2, plus basic proficiency
in computer usage. Hockaday offers 121 courses, including many honors courses. Advanced Placement
courses are offered in eighteen subjects, including English, modern European history, U.S. history, AB and
BC calculus, statistics, physics, chemistry, biology, studio art, Latin, French, Spanish, computer science, and
economics. For some selected courses, Hockaday has a cooperative program with St. Mark's School of Texas,
a boys' school in Dallas. Private lessons are available in cello, flute, guitar, piano, violin, and voice.
A one-year English as a second language (ESL) program is offered to students on intermediate and advanced
levels. Intensive language training in writing, reading, listening, and speaking skills is the focus of the
program. Students may continue at Hockaday after the first year, following acceptance into the regular
academic program. International students with intermediate or advanced English proficiency may study at
Hockaday. Along with these special classes, students may study math, science, fine arts, and other courses in
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the mainstream curriculum. First-year students travel to Washington, D.C., and the Texas Hill Country.
Class sizes average 15 students, with an overall student-teacher ratio of 10:1.
The grading system in grades 7–12 uses A to F designations with pluses and minuses. Reports are sent to
parents at the end of each quarter period. High achievement in the Upper School is recognized by inclusion
on the Headmistress's List and by initiation into a number of honor societies, including the Cum Laude
Society.
Each student receives careful counseling throughout her Hockaday career. Academic counseling begins even
in the admissions process and continues under the supervision of the counseling office, which coordinates
the faculty adviser system and general counseling program. Each student has an interested, concerned faculty
adviser to assist her with academic or personal matters on a daily basis.
Faculty and Advisers
The Hockaday faculty is represented by accomplished individuals, most of whom have advanced degrees,
with 6 holding Ph.D.'s.
Hockaday's teachers are chosen for depth of knowledge in their fields of specialization, personal integrity,
and the ability to facilitate the progress of individual students. Many are successful writers, lecturers, artists,
musicians, photographers, or composers; many regularly assist colleagues in other schools by giving
workshops and lectures. Summer study grants are awarded to faculty members to encourage both research
and professional development.
Ms. Jeanne P. Whitman, the Eugene McDermott Headmistress, is a magna cum laude graduate of Wake
Forest University. She earned her master's degree in English from the University of Virginia and a second
master's degree in business from Wake Forest University.
College Admission Counseling
The college counselors work directly with Upper School students in their college planning. Each student
participates with her parents in conferences with the counselor concerning applications and final selection.
In 2009, SAT scores ranged from 610 to 740 in critical reading, 630 to 730 in math, and 630 to 730 in writing.
The class of 2010 had 16 National Merit Finalists, 16 National Merit Semifinalists, 21 National Merit
Commended Students, 2 National Achievement Finalists, 2 National Achievement Scholars, 2 National
Achievement Outstanding Participants, and 2 National Hispanic Honorable Mention Finalists. There are 117
Hockaday students from the classes of 2009 through 2011 who have been recognized as AP Scholars, 10 of
whom qualified for the National AP Scholar Award. Hockaday alumnae are Hesburgh-Yusko Scholars (Notre
Dame), Jefferson-Echols Scholars (Virginia), Marshall Scholars, Morehead-Cain Scholars (UNC-CH), a Rhodes
Scholar, and Truman Scholars. They have received the Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Fellowship at
Harvard and have been named to the Gates Millennium Scholars Program. Traditionally, 100 percent of
Hockaday graduates attend four-year colleges or universities. The 123 members of the class of 2010 were
admitted to 193 institutions, including Brown, Carnegie Mellon, Claremont McKenna, Duke, George
Washington, Harvard, McGill (Canada), Middlebury, Northwestern, Oxford (England), Princeton, SMU,
Stanford, Vanderbilt, Wake Forest, Washington (St. Louis), Yale, and the Universities of Chicago and Texas at
Austin, among others.
Student Body and Conduct
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The student body is composed of 1,087 girls (85 of whom board) from eight states and twelve countries
outside of the United States. Thirty-seven percent of the girls are members of minority groups.
The Upper School Student Council and the Honor Council exert strong, active, and responsible leadership in
student affairs. In addition to planning activities, allocating funds, and serving as a forum for student
concerns, these councils promote and exemplify the School's written Honor Code.
Students are expected to abide by the guidelines set forth in the Upper School manual. Disciplinary measures
rest primarily with the Head of the Upper School and the Headmistress.
Academic Facilities
The campus includes sixteen buildings. The Liza Lee Academic Research Center is 52,000-square-feet and
hosts two expansive libraries, several computer labs, breakout rooms, and a versatile hall that doubles as a
lecture facility and audiovisual theater. In the academic area are classrooms; laboratories for languages,
computers, and reading; and a study center. The campus is fully wireless, and Middle and Upper School
classrooms are equipped with SmartBoard technology for use in conjunction with students' laptops, required
for every girl in grades 6–12. The Fine Arts facilities include a 600-seat auditorium, instrumental and voice
studios, practice rooms, a painting studio, ceramics facilities with outdoor kilns, a photography laboratory,
printmaking facilities, and an electronic music studio. The Science Center contains a recently renovated
lecture hall, study lounges, classrooms, ten major laboratories, a computer lab, and a greenhouse. The
Wellness Center includes the 5,000-square-foot Hill Family Fitness Center, an 1,800-square-foot aerobics room
with state-of-the-art aerobic and resistance equipment, and athletic training facilities fully equipped for the
treatment of sports-related injuries.
Boarding and General Facilities
Accommodations for boarding students are comfortable dormitories, updated study areas, and lounges. Girls
of similar grades are normally housed on a separate hall, each with its own lounge, kitchen, large-screen
plasma television, DVR, and laundry room. The dormitories are wireless and all laptops are equipped with
Skype. An additional common lounge is also updated with a large-screen television, kitchen, and fireplace,
and overlooks an outdoor swimming pool and tennis courts. Rooms are shared by two students, and each
hall contains a small suite for the adult counselor in charge. The dormitories are closed for Thanksgiving,
Christmas, and spring vacations.
An infirmary is located on the ground floor of the dormitory area, with a registered nurse on duty at all times
and the School doctor on call. Campus security is maintained 24 hours a day.
The Wellness Center features an aerobics center, a fitness testing area, a trainer's facility, and the Hill Fitness
Center, a 5,000-square-foot facility offering aerobic, resistance, and circuit training equipment.
Athletics
Athletic facilities include two gymnasiums housing basketball courts (convertible to volleyball and indoor
tennis courts), a climbing wall, two racquetball courts, a swimming pool, and a dance studio. On the grounds
are six athletic fields, a softball complex, an all-weather track, a tennis center with ten courts and seating for
90, and 100 acres of open space. Interscholastic sports include basketball, crew, cross-country, fencing, field
hockey, golf, lacrosse, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, track, and volleyball.
Extracurricular Opportunities
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The Hockaday educational experience includes far more than just the classroom. There is a vast range of
extracurricular opportunities for students to take part in: more than fifty student clubs, community service
projects that impact the world beyond the campus, class bonding trips that build lifelong friendships, worldrenowned speakers who expand students' perspectives, talent showcases at the Coffeehouse, and more.
To encourage student creativity, the Upper School sponsors a literary and journalistic magazine, a
newspaper, and the Hockaday yearbook. These publications are edited by students with the guidance of
faculty advisers. The literary magazine, Vibrato, won a Gold Crown Award from Columbia Scholastic Press
Association (CSPA) and was named All American with four marks of distinction by the National Scholastic
Press Association (NSPA). Vibrato has won top distinctions in ten of the last eleven years. Hockaday's
student newspaper, The Fourcast, was awarded a Silver Medal by CSPA, and ranked First Class with three
marks of distinction by the NSPA. The yearbook, Cornerstones, was featured in a full-page treatment in the
2010 edition of Taylor Publishing's Yearbook Yearbook. All three of Hockaday's scholastic press publications
were featured in the NSPA's Best of the High School Press.
Service to the School and its surrounding community is an important part of a girl's life at Hockaday. Each
Upper School student is required to contribute a minimum of 15 volunteer hours per year in service to the
wider community.
Daily Life
Upper School classes begin at 8 a.m. and end at 3:45 p.m. Monday through Friday. The daily schedule
provides time for academic help sessions and club meetings.
Varsity sports meet after the close of the regular school day. Residence students have a 2-hour required study
time, Sunday through Thursday nights.
Weekend Life
Off-campus activities each weekend enable residence students to take advantage of the many cultural and
recreational resources in the Dallas–Fort Worth area. Faculty members are frequently involved in boarding
activities, as are families of the Hockaday Parents Association, who sponsor girls who are new to Hockaday
and include them in family activities. Each residence student is matched with a local Dallas family through
the Host Family Program. The host families offer local support for the girls and encourage their participation
in social activities outside of school.
Summer Programs
A six-week coed academic summer session is offered for day and boarding students. Students may attend
three- or six-week sessions beginning in June and July. Summer boarding is limited to girls ages 12–17.
Programs in language immersion, math and science enrichment, computers, sports, SAT preparation, study
skills, English, creative writing, and arts/theater are offered. Academic courses focus on enrichment
opportunities. English as a second language, an international program lasting three weeks, begins in July.
Information on the summer session is available in late spring. Applications are accepted until all spaces are
filled, although students are encouraged to apply early to ensure their preferred course selection.
Costs and Financial Aid
In 2010–11, tuition for Upper School day students averaged $23,000. For resident students, costs were
approximately $42,000 for tuition, room, and board. Additional expenses for both day and resident students
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include, among others, those for books and uniforms. A deposit of $1000 is due with the signed enrollment
contract, and the balance of tuition and fees is due by July 1 prior to entrance in August. Partial payment for
room and board for resident students is also made at this time. The room and board balance for resident
students is payable by December 1 following entrance in August.
The Hockaday Financial Aid Program offers assistance based on financial need. Parents of all applicants for
financial aid must provide financial information as required by the Financial Aid Committee. Close to $3
million was awarded to students in 2010–11. Details of the programs are available from the Admission Office.
Admissions Information
Applicants to Hockaday's Upper School are considered on the basis of their previous academic records,
results of aptitude and achievement testing, teacher and head of school evaluations, and, in most cases, a
personal interview. There is no discrimination because of race, creed, or nationality. Because the School
requires a student to attend the School for at least two years to be eligible for graduation, new students are
not normally admitted to the senior class. In order to qualify for admission and have a successful experience
at Hockaday, a girl needs to possess a strong potential and desire to learn.
Application Timetable
Initial inquiries are welcome at any time, and applications are received continuously. There is a
nonrefundable application fee for both day-student and boarding-student applications. Entrance tests are
scheduled in December, January, and February and periodically throughout the spring and summer. Campus
tours are available at convenient times during the year. Notification of the admission decision is made
approximately six weeks after the testing. Parents are expected to reply to an offer of admission within two
weeks.
Admissions Correspondence
Jen Liggitt, Director of Admission
The Hockaday School
11600 Welch Road
Dallas, Texas 75229-2999, United States
Telephone: 214-363-6311
Fax: 214-265-1649
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.hockaday.org
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The Newman School
Boston, Massachusetts
The School
The Newman School provides a diverse student body with a college-preparatory, liberal arts education
based on Judeo-Christian values, intellectual rigor, and trust, guided by the spirit and philosophy of John
Henry Cardinal Newman. Located in the heart of Boston's historic Back Bay district, the Newman School, near
Copley Square and the Prudential Center, is convenient to railroad stations, bus terminals, and MBTA
stations. Newman's motto “let heart speak to heart” establishes the tone for each day, encouraging students to
form mature and stimulating relationships with teachers and peers and to recognize their individual gifts.
The Newman School, which was named in honor of John Henry Cardinal Newman, was founded in 1945 by
Dr. J. Harry Lynch to provide a year of college-preparatory work. Since then, the Newman School has grown
into a four-year high school. Classes are offered in fall, winter, and summer sessions, enabling students to
attend the School year-round, if desired. Intensive instruction for international students is also available.
Newman is incorporated as a not-for-profit organization and directed by a self-perpetuating 10-member
Board of Trustees, which meets quarterly and includes several alumni.
The Newman School is approved by the Boston School Committee and the Department of Education of the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.
The School holds membership in the Association of Independent Schools of New England (AISNE), the
National Association of Secondary School Principals, the Massachusetts Secondary School Principals
Association, the National Association of College Admission Counselors, and the Secondary School
Admission Test Board. It is approved by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service for the teaching of
international students.
Academic Program
The Newman School is recognized by the International Baccalaureate Organization as a World School,
offering the International Baccalaureate (I.B.) Diploma Programme in the eleventh and twelfth grades.
Freshmen and sophomores pursue a course of pre-I.B. studies in language, mathematics, English literature
and composition, and lab science leading to I.B. studies in the junior and senior years.
Transfer credit may be accepted for high school work completed in other schools; however, diploma
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candidates must take a minimum of 6 credits at Newman. To graduate, a student must complete 22 credits as
follows: 4 English, 3 social studies (including U.S. history), 4 mathematics, 3 laboratory science, 2 foreign
language, 1 fine/applied arts, 1 computer science, and 4 electives.
The International Student Adviser and the School's Guidance Department aid students from other countries
who are preparing for entrance to American colleges and universities. Intermediate and advanced English
courses for international students are offered in an intensive program of six classes per day for sixteen weeks
in the fall and spring semesters and ten weeks in the summer session. Special attention is given to preparing
for the Test of English as a Foreign Language and for College Board tests.
Faculty and Advisers
J. Harry Lynch, the Headmaster, is a graduate of the College of the Holy Cross (B.A., 1974) and Northeastern
University (M.B.A., 1976). He has been Headmaster of Newman since 1985.
The faculty includes 22 full-time teachers and 2 part-time teachers. These 9 men and 13 women hold twentytwo baccalaureate degrees, thirteen master's degrees, and one doctorate.
Members of the faculty are available each day to give students extra help with their course work.
College Admission Counseling
The College and Career Reference Area provides students with information regarding college admissions
and the employment outlook in various fields.
An average graduating class has approximately 65 students, of whom more than 95 percent attend four-year
colleges and universities. Recent graduates from Newman have been accepted to the following four-year
colleges and universities, among others: American, Assumption, Babson, Bates, Boston College, Boston
University, California Institute of Technology, Clark, Columbia, Emerson, Fairfield, Georgetown, Grinnell,
Harvard, Holy Cross, McGill, MIT, NYU, Oberlin, Regis, St. Anselm, Smith, Stonehill, Tufts, Tulane, the U.S.
Air Force Academy, Vassar, Wellesley, Wheaton, Worcester Polytechnic, and the Universities of Connecticut,
Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, Miami, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island.
Student Body and Conduct
The Newman School enrolls approximately 250 day students ranging from 14 to 19 years of age. About 50 of
them are out-of-town residents who are temporarily living in Boston. Current and recent students have come
from California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio,
Austria, France, Germany, Greece, India, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, the People's Republic of China,
Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, Spain, Vietnam, the West Indies, and several Central and South
American countries.
Admission to and continuance in the Newman School is to be regarded as a privilege and not a right; the
Board of Trustees requires the withdrawal of any student for disciplinary or scholastic reasons that it deems
sufficiently grave to warrant such action. The board is the final judge in matters of admission and retention of
students. Each student has the responsibility of being thoroughly informed at all times concerning the
regulations and requirements of Newman; these are outlined in the School brochure and student handbook.
Academic Facilities
The School plant consists of two nineteenth-century town houses located on Marlborough Street that contain
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libraries, laboratories, classrooms, and offices. Both buildings are wireless-network accessible. The School
does not maintain boarding facilities but does assist out-of-town students in finding homestay families.
Athletics
The School competes interscholastically with other independent schools in sports such as boys' and girls'
basketball and soccer, girls' softball, and boys' baseball and cross-country. Intramural sports, which include
competitive cheerleading, crew, flag football, rugby, sailing, and tennis, are available according to student
interest but may not be available each term.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Extracurricular activities that are available each year include a yearbook and a newspaper (247). There are
drama, dance, student government, community services, peer leadership, robotics, photography, film,
recreation and outing, and science clubs, as well as chorus, ensembles, and bands that perform throughout
the year. Other activities may be organized based on student interest. The School has sponsored studyabroad as well as student exchange programs with Spain, Italy, and Colombia.
Daily Life
The academic year is divided into semesters and each semester has four marking periods. At the end of each
quarter, grade reports are mailed home. Academic alerts are mailed any time when faculty members observe
poor performance by a student. Semesters begin in September and January and a ten-week session begins in
June. The school day starts at 8:10 and ends by 3. Classes are held five days a week; to permit completion of a
year's work in one fall or spring session, many courses meet for two periods each day.
The summer session incorporates the same amount of work in extended class periods. Thus, summer
students may earn a full year's credit for courses not previously taken.
Summer Programs
Newman students may continue their studies during the summer session, receiving academic credit for
regular high school courses. In addition, refresher and makeup courses are offered for students from other
schools who need to correct deficiencies. International students may attend the Newman School's summer
program to work on their English skills and to experience many aspects of American culture within the city of
Boston.
Costs and Financial Aid
Day tuition is estimated at $14,500 to $24,500 for the 2010–11 school year, depending on the individual
schedule. Additional expenses include books (approximately $300 per semester). Estimated living expenses
for out-of-town students are $10,600 for the 2010–11 school year.
Entering ninth graders may be given scholarships, depending on the result of the entrance examinations. The
School awarded $75,000 in scholarship aid for 2010–11. Financial aid is also available.
Admissions Information
Applicants are accepted for enrollment in September, January, and June. Transcripts of any previous high
school work, a personal interview, and a character reference letter from the previous school are all part of the
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requirements to determine acceptance. Applicants must also take a placement test that is administered at the
School.
It has always been the policy of the Newman School to admit students without distinction as to race, color,
creed, sex, age, ethnic background, or national origin.
Application Timetable
Candidates for admission should file an application on the required form at the earliest feasible date
preceding the session in which they wish to enroll. There is a $40 application fee for American students and a
$300 application and processing fee for international students.
Admissions Correspondence
Mrs. Patricia Lynch, Ph.D.
Director of Admissions
The Newman School
247 Marlborough Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02116, United States
Telephone: 617-267-4530
Fax: 617-267-7070
E-mail: @newmanboston.org
World Wide Web: http://www.newmanboston.org
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Tilton School
Tilton, New Hampshire
The School
Tilton School challenges students to embrace and navigate a world marked by diversity and change. Through
the quality of human relationships, Tilton School's faculty cultivates in its students the curiosity, the skills,
the knowledge and understanding, the character, and the integrity requisite for the passionate pursuit of
lifelong personal success and service.
Tilton School values education—the active pursuit of knowledge and the growth of intellectual curiosity. The
rigorous academic program is designed to prepare graduates to be successful college students and
contributing members of society. Various pathways to learning are supported; the acquisition of genuine
understanding is the goal. Tilton is committed to the principle that all students can excel. Through a broad
range of learning experiences, students discover the power of their potential by developing problem-solving
skills and self confidence while becoming independent and critical thinkers.
A nonprofit corporation, Tilton is governed by the Head of School and a 24-member Board of Trustees.
Annual expenses of $8.8 million are met through tuition, endowment, and annual giving. The endowment
currently totals $15.2 million. More than 5,200 living alumni have a beneficial impact on fund raising, with
pledges and gifts to the School of more than $1.7 million annually for both annual and restricted purposes.
Tilton School is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and is a member of the
National Association of Independent Schools, the Independent Schools Association of Northern New
England, the Cum Laude Society, the National Honor Society, the Secondary School Admission Test Board,
and the Council for Religion in Independent Schools.
Academic Program
Tilton's academic program offers a traditional college-preparatory curriculum framed within a twenty-first
century skills-based program, supporting the student's intellectual maturation and encouraging the
development of academic and personal competencies. The School seeks to produce students who have a
genuine interest in intellectual pursuits, to teach students self-discipline, and to reinforce in students the
sound moral and ethical judgment that are needed to successfully navigate the complex and changing world
of the twenty-first century.
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The school year is divided into two semesters. During each term, students at Tilton take a minimum of five
full-credit courses. Required credits include English, mathematics, world language, fine arts, laboratory
science, and social science (history), for a total of 18.
Interdisciplinary standards in the five essential domains of critical thinking, communication, creativity,
community, and character are the cornerstones of the curriculum.
The program of study for ninth grade students is a team-taught integrated program (F.I.R.S.T.—foundation,
integrity, respect, service, team) emphasizing a strong academic foundation and supportive intellectual,
personal, and social development.
Additional grade-level programs are designed from grade 10 through grades 11, 12, and the postgraduate
(PG) year to support student growth and development in a purposefully designed program. At the end of the
tenth grade year, and prior to graduation, all students must provide evidence of learning that meets
benchmark curriculum standards through participation in performance assessment programs, the Gateway
Program (grade 10), and the Capstone Project (graduating class).
The average class size is 12 students, and the student-teacher ratio is 6:1. Evening study hall is supervised.
Evening study hours are designed to allow for availability of resources and a quiet, uninterrupted study
atmosphere where reinforcement of learned skills can be emphasized under direct supervision by faculty
members. Academic focus is the primary purpose of evening study hall, which provides a balance of
structure and self-directed study.
At Tilton School, student learning is assessed by measuring demonstrated performance of learned skills and
knowledge against specific standards developed for grade levels, departments, and specific courses that
have been structured within the school's twenty-first century skills-curriculum framework, with reference to
national and state standards for specific academic disciplines. Within this system, letter grades mean the
following; A = significantly exceeds the standard; B = exceeds the standard; C = meets the standard; D = does
not yet meet the standard.
The Learning Center serves approximately 30 percent of the students, complementing their regular academic
instruction by identifying individual needs and helping to devise strategies that enable them to achieve
academic success. The center provides specialized instructional support for students whose academic
progress is limited by deficiencies in basic skills or study habits, or by distinct learning-style differences. A
2:1 SAT tutorial is also offered through the center.
The English as a Second Language Program serves students who need intermediate and advanced English
language support skills.
Faculty and Advisers
Tilton's faculty consists of 42 members. All of the faculty members hold bachelor's degrees, and there are
fifteen advanced degrees, including two Ph.D.'s. Most members of the faculty and administration live on
campus with their families.
Faculty members must have not only a high level of expertise in their academic areas but also an enthusiastic
commitment to students' interests and student life. In addition to dormitory and afternoon coaching and
activity duties, most faculty members have 6 to 8 student advisees. The adviser is responsible for monitoring
academic progress and for counseling in other areas of school life.
James R. Clements, appointed Head of School in 1998, is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire
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(B.A., 1972; M.B.A., 1998). Prior to joining Tilton, Mr. Clements spent twenty-one years at the Chapel Hill–
Chauncy Hall School in Waltham, Massachusetts, most recently as Head of School from 1993–98.
College Admission Counseling
Three full-time counselors guide students in the selection of colleges and coordinate the application process,
beginning in the junior year. College admissions officers visit the School each year to talk with groups of
students or to interview individual students.
Members of the classes of 2006–10 were accepted at numerous colleges and universities, including Bates,
Bowdoin, Boston University, Carnegie Mellon, Clarkson, Colby, Cornell, Denison, Hobart and William Smith,
Holy Cross, Lake Forest, Middlebury, Notre Dame, Syracuse, Trinity, Tufts, Union, Vassar, Wesleyan, and
the Universities of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
Student Body and Conduct
In 2010–11, Tilton enrolled 256 students—75 percent are boarders and 25 percent are day students. There are
165 boys and 91 girls. Tilton students represent many racial, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds;
twenty-two states are represented, with approximately 60 percent of the students coming from New England,
20 percent from other parts of the United States, and 20 percent from twenty-one other countries.
Expectations at Tilton are high and are thoroughly communicated. Although the immediate goal of School
rules and regulations is to promote order, mutual respect, and academic excellence, this structure serves, in
the long range, to prepare students for productive and responsible roles in a changing society. At Tilton,
there is a basic faith in young people. Guided by the attitude that students can learn and want to learn,
faculty members are eager to inspire commitment, pride, and responsibility in their students.
Academic Facilities
Plimpton Hall and the academic building create the academic quad on the West side of campus. Plimpton
Hall houses ten classrooms for English, social science, and English as a second language (ESL), the Center for
Leadership room, the computer center, admissions, college counseling, the business office, and the school
store. The academic building is home to three state-of-the-art science classrooms/labs, three math classrooms,
four world language classrooms, a world language lab, the ninth grade seminar room, a solarium, the
Learning Center, and the Davis Lecture Hall that seats 100. All classrooms include wireless access and
electronic interactive whiteboards.
Two music classrooms, two practice rooms and the art gallery are contained in the lower level of the chapel.
The Helene Grant Daly Art Center provides excellent facilities for art classes, including ceramics, graphic arts,
studio art, printmaking, sculpture, silk-screening, and photography. The Lucien Hunt Memorial Library
contains approximately 17,500 volumes, including subscriptions to numerous periodicals, newspapers,
encyclopedias, and an online periodical index. The library features ten computers; several Kindles, iPods,
and iPads; reading and conference rooms; and extensive facilities for research. Drama and musical
productions are performed in the Rome Theater in Hamilton Hall.
The Tilton campus is connected by a fiber-optic backbone that supports the School's intranet and access to the
Internet. All classrooms and dormitories are connected to the network via a combination of wired and
wireless networks. All students have their own account, accessible through a password. The network
supports both Windows and MAC OS environments. The world language lab is a state-of-the-art digital lab
with twenty-four workstations. There is also a student computer lab, two laptop carts with twenty-one
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laptops, and iPads available for classroom use. The Daly Art Center has both iMacs and computers for
graphic arts and photography instruction.
Boarding and General Facilities
Nine dormitories, each housing 18 to 48 students and 1 to 4 faculty members and their families, are located
on campus. Students live in double or single rooms. Returning students may state their preference for room
assignments.
The new Maloney Hall is a 15,000-square-foot dormitory housing 20 students and includes three faculty
apartments. Highlights of the new facility include a two-story common room, a group study room, suite-style
rooms (two double rooms that share a common bathroom), a recreation room, a laundry area, and storage
space.
The school store, MARC Student Center, and the snack bar are open at various times of the day and evening.
There is a six-bed health center operated by LRGH (Lakes Region General Hospital), with a resident nurse
and a doctor on call.
Athletics
The School believes that people of all ages perform best when they are active and healthy and that organized
sports promote physical development, physical courage, self-discipline, and a sense of team spirit. All
students must participate in an afternoon activity. Students must play at least one sport each year to fulfill
their annual athletic requirement.
Boys' sports include baseball, basketball, football, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, tennis, and wrestling. Girls'
sports are basketball, field hockey, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, softball, and tennis. Coed sports include
Alpine skiing, cross-country running, golf, mountain biking, and snowboarding.
Facilities include 25 acres of outstanding playing fields, 3 miles of cross-country trails, three tennis courts, a
gymnasium, a field house with an indoor ice rink, and an outdoor swimming pool. The golf team uses a
nearby eighteen-hole course.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Tilton's +5 Program, distinctive among independent secondary schools, requires that all students involve
themselves in five areas of nonacademic campus life: art and culture, team athletics, outdoor experiences,
community service, and leadership roles. These learning experiences enhance self-confidence and selfesteem.
By structuring extracurricular activities, the School broadens students' interests, enables them to develop
skills that enhance their self-worth, and provides enjoyment during their free time. Faculty members'
commitment to excellence and their guidance encourage and reassure students who may be doubtful of their
abilities. As a result, strong relationships develop, and students and teachers work together more effectively
in the classroom.
Offerings in art and culture include drama, musical theater, tech crew, ceramics, graphic arts, studio art,
photography, music studio, drum line, and chorus.
Throughout the school year, there are opportunities to participate in outdoor trips for canoeing, mountain
biking, Alpine skiing, fishing, rock climbing, hiking, snowshoeing, or cross-country skiing.
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Community service opportunities are available both on campus and in the Tilton community. This division
of the +5 Program encourages students to commit themselves to helping others. Other projects include
helping at a soup kitchen; reading to patients at the New Hampshire Veterans' Home; tutoring local children;
raising funds for UNICEF, Oxfam, and Toys for Tots; and teaching in a learn-to-skate program for young
children.
Leadership may be the most important of the five areas. Experience as an admissions ambassador, dorm
proctor, work-program supervisor, Student Council officer, editor, or team captain offers a rigorous
challenge.
Movies, plays, lectures, and concerts are regular events on campus, while trips to museums and theaters in
Boston are regular off-campus activities.
Daily Life
Class periods are approximately 45 minutes long, with each class meeting once a week for a double period.
Mid-morning each day, there is a meeting either with advisee groups, special committees, or the entire
School at School Meeting, which is held two times per week. Conference period and campus service
programs are also part of student life. The conference period is an opportunity to meet teachers for extra help
or to make an appointment to meet a teacher later in the evening for more extensive work.
After classes, everyone participates in after-school programs. Wednesday and Saturday schedules are half
days, which allows time for athletic competitions and program activities.
Weekend Life
Faculty and staff teams plan all weekend activities with student support. Saturday events include sports
competitions, movies, dances, concerts, and trips to shopping areas and movie theaters. The gym, field
house, student center, and art center are periodically open both Saturday and Sunday. Sunday is for
scheduled activities, both on and off the campus. Day students are invited to participate and are active in
weekend life.
Costs and Financial Aid
For 2010–11, tuition, room, and board cost $43,775; tuition for day students is $25,235. Additional expenses,
such as those for books and laundry, range from $600 to $1000. Private music or voice lessons, skiing,
snowboarding, learning center sessions, and ESL classes are charged separately. Tuition may be paid in full
in mid-July, or families can take advantage of one of Tilton's payment plan options.
Forty percent of the students receive financial aid in the form of direct grants and/or loans. For 2010–11, more
than $2 million in aid was granted. Applications for aid, which should be made before February 15, are
reviewed separately from admission decisions.
Admissions Information
The Admissions Committee seeks to admit students who will benefit from and contribute to Tilton and those
of diverse backgrounds and individual personal strengths. Students with various academic abilities who
seek to challenge themselves and take advantage of Tilton's programs within and outside the classroom are
excellent candidates for admission. Candidates for the ninth and tenth grades should take the SSAT and have
the results sent to Tilton. Eleventh and twelfth graders and postgraduates should take the PSAT or SAT.
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Additional application requirements for admission include the student's school transcript and current teacher
recommendations. All prospective students are expected to visit the School and interview with the
Admissions Office. Students may enter at all grade levels; entry in the eleventh or twelfth grade or the
postgraduate year is more competitive.
Application Timetable
Initial inquiries are welcome at any time but are recommended before the late spring prior to the year in
which admission is sought. Ideally, applications (accompanied by a $50 application fee or $100 international
application fee) should be filed by February 1. The Admissions Office is open for interviews on weekdays
and on selected Saturday mornings. It is best to plan a visit while school is in session.
Admissions decisions for applications received by February 1 are made on March 10. After March 10
decisions are made on a rolling basis. The School adheres to the Parents' Reply Date of April 10. A
nonrefundable deposit is required to hold a place at Tilton and is applied to tuition for the year.
Admissions Correspondence
Beth Skoglund
Director of Admissions
Tilton School
Tilton, New Hampshire 03276, United States
Telephone: 603-286-1733
Fax: 603-286-1705
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.tiltonschool.org
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Valley Forge Military Academy & College
Wayne, Pennsylvania
The School
The 100-acre campus of Valley Forge Military Academy includes a boys' boarding preparatory high school
and a coeducational transfer college, located 15 miles west of Philadelphia. The mission of Valley Forge is to
educate individuals to be fully prepared to meet their responsibilities, alert in mind, sound in body, and
considerate of others and to have a high sense of duty, honor, loyalty, and courage. Valley Forge fosters these
goals through a comprehensive system that is built on the five cornerstones of academic excellence, character
development, personal motivation, physical development, and leadership.
The Academy is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. It holds memberships
in the Association of Military Colleges and Schools of the United States, the Council for Religion in
Independent Schools, the Boarding School Headmasters' Association, the International Boys School Coalition
(IBSC), and the National Association of Independent Schools. The U.S. Department of the Army designates
Valley Forge as an honor unit with distinction.
Academic Program
Valley Forge seeks to educate and develop students for college entrance, career success, and responsible
citizenship. A challenging curriculum, dedicated faculty members, small classes, individual attention, and
faculty-supervised evening study hall provide cadets with an environment conducive to attaining academic
success. The acquisition of knowledge, the development of skills, and the shaping of attitudes are
emphasized to enable cadets to excel academically and to inspire them to pursue education throughout life.
The school year extends from late August to early June and is divided into two semesters; each has two
marking periods. At the end of each marking period, grades are sent to parents. Unsatisfactory grades result
in special afternoon help and extra study hall, with biweekly evaluations forwarded to parents. Evening
study hall is required of all students. Cadets are placed in one of three college-preparatory curricula—
honors, intermediate, or standard—according to aptitude level or achievement. The grading system uses A to
F with pluses and minuses. Class periods (eight per day) normally cover 45 minutes each, with double
periods for laboratory courses. Twenty and a half credits are required for graduation, distributed as follows:
English, 4; mathematics, 4; social studies, 3 (1 of which must be U.S. history); foreign language, 2; science, 2;
laboratory science, 1; and electives, 4.5.
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The average Academy class size is 13; the student-teacher ratio is approximately 10:1. Opportunities for
independent study, off-campus field trips, and enrollment in courses at Valley Forge Military College are
available to eligible cadets.
Faculty and Advisers
There are 52 full-time and 13 part-time teachers at the Academy. Thirty-one members hold master's degrees;
currently, 2 have doctorates.
Col. David R. Gray, USA (ret.), is a 1980 Distinguished Military Graduate of Western Illinois University where
he majored in history. He is a graduate of the Infantry Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, the Command
and General Staff College, the Armed Forces Staff College (JPME II), and the U.S. Army War College. He has
earned a master's degree in strategic studies from the U.S. Army War College and master's and doctorate
degrees in military history from Ohio State University. He has published articles in several professional
journals including Parameters, Military Review, Army History, and Army Magazine.
Experienced teachers, dedicated to educating young men, are selected primarily for their professional ability
and concern for young people. Faculty members perform additional duties as athletic coaches, study hall
supervisors, and advisers for extracurricular activities. Ongoing professional development is strongly
encouraged.
College Admission Counseling
The Guidance Department has 4 full-time counselors and gives continual assistance and counseling to each
cadet. The department follows each cadet's academic progress and keeps in close contact with parents.
College orientation and parent involvement begin during the second semester of the junior year and continue
throughout the cadet's residence. College orientation sessions cover college selection, nomination to service
academies, financial aid, the Army ROTC program, and contacts with college placement representatives.
College test requirements are reviewed, and cadets are counseled in college application preparation and
interview procedures. Ninety-nine percent of the class of 2010 went on to college, with the greatest
representation at Embry-Riddle, Holy Cross, Penn State, Purdue, the U.S. Air Force Academy, the U.S. Naval
Academy, and Villanova.
Student Body and Conduct
The 2009–10 Upper School student body was composed of 350 boarding cadets. The student body is diverse,
and this year cadets came from thirty-three states and thirty-one countries. Eight percent were African
American, 11 percent were Hispanic, 13 percent were Asian/Pacific Islanders, and 13 percent were
international students.
The military structure of Valley Forge provides extraordinary opportunities for students to develop and
exercise their leadership abilities in a safe environment. The Valley Forge experience is designed to foster the
development of individual responsibility, self-discipline, and sound leadership skills by providing
opportunities for the practical application of leadership theories in positions of increasing responsibility.
The Corps of Cadets is a self-administering body organized in eight company units along military lines, with
a cadet officer and noncommissioned officer organization for cadet control and administration. Cadet
leadership and positive peer encouragement within this structured setting result in a brotherhood and
camaraderie among cadets. Through their student representatives, cadets cooperate with the administration
in enforcing regulations regarding student conduct. A Student Advisory Council represents the cadets in the
school administration. The Dean's Council meets regularly to discuss aspects of academic life.
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Character development and personal motivation are integral parts of the Valley Forge experience. The
character development program includes weekly chapel and vesper services and monthly character
development seminars that are facilitated by peer/faculty teams. Valley Forge emphasizes time-proven
standards of conduct, ethical behavior, integrity, spiritual values, and service to community and country. It
also motivates young men to strive for excellence, both as individuals and as members of an organization, in
all areas of endeavor. Motivation is encouraged through positive competition, recognition, loyalty,
teamwork, organizational pride, and the establishment of personal goals.
Academic Facilities
Shannon Hall is the principal academic building. In addition to classrooms, it includes biology, chemistry,
and physics laboratories; a computer complex; and the military science department. The Friedman
Auditorium, adjacent to Shannon Hall, serves as a large study hall, a conference and instructional center, and
a center for SAT and other testing procedures. The May H. Baker Library provides more than 70,000 books,
500 video titles, more than 60 periodical subscriptions, and more than 30 subscriptions to online research
resources. To integrate library resources into the curriculum, the library faculty collaborates with the
classroom faculty in implementing information literacy instruction in two fully networked computer
classrooms and two seminar rooms. The educational psychologists of the Cadet Achievement Center, housed
in the library, counsel and advise cadets concerning learning and personal issues.
A fiber-optic, Internet-capable network connects all classrooms, laboratories, and library and dormitory
rooms on the campus.
Boarding and General Facilities
Cadets are housed by their military companies in individual dormitories, 2 cadets to a room, under the
supervision of adult Tactical Officers and their cadet leaders. Cadets eat together in the Regimental Mess.
The Health Center has a resident physician and a 24-hour staff; special consultants are always available. The
Alumni Chapel of St. Cornelius the Centurion seats 1,500. The service is nondenominational but Christian in
format, and services are available for all faiths. Mellon Hall provides a parents' reception room, a ballroom,
piano and instrument practice rooms, a photography laboratory, a 10-point rifle and pistol range, and
meeting rooms. Other facilities include the student center, the cadet laundry, the tailor shop, and the Cadet
Store. Price Athletic Center and Trainer Hall house three full-size and six intermediate-size basketball courts,
a five-lane swimming pool, locker rooms, weight rooms, meeting rooms, administrative offices, and the L.
Maitland Blank Hall of Fame. Also on campus are six athletic fields, nine outdoor tennis courts, an outdoor
Olympic-size swimming pool, the cavalry stables, and the Mellon Polo Pavilion.
Athletics
Athletics and physical well-being are important elements in a Valley Forge education. The aim of the
program is to develop all-around fitness, alertness, character, esprit de corps, leadership, courage,
competitive spirit, and genuine desire for physical and mental achievement. There is competition at three
levels: varsity, junior varsity, and intramural. To have every cadet on a team is the constant goal. Sports
opportunities include baseball, basketball, cross-country, equestrian jumping, football, golf, lacrosse, rugby,
soccer, swimming, tennis, track, and wrestling.
Valley Forge has a strong athletic tradition. Since 1986, the VFMA&C football program has sent more than 140
cadets to Division I schools on full football scholarships. Seven VF alumni currently play in the NFL. One
alumnus currently plays for a major league baseball team. In 2003, the equestrian show jumping team
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participated in the Junior Olympics.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Clubs, honor societies, publications, intramurals, the Regimental Choir, the Anthony Wayne Legion Guard,
and some thirty-five other organizations (forensic, literary, language, science, and Boy Scouts, to name a few)
attract about 75 percent of the Corps. Publications include the Legionnaire (the newspaper) and Crossed
Sabres (the yearbook).
Outside lecturers visit the Academy regularly. The band and choir travel widely and have performed at the
Kennedy Center, Carnegie Hall, Westminster Abbey, Lincoln Center, and the White House and have
participated in inaugural events for several U.S. presidents. Various cadet units assist local communities in
parades, community events, and horse shows. Cadets participate in various public service activities in the
surrounding communities; several cadet groups pay regular visits during the year to local children's homes,
centers for the disabled, and nursing homes. Important traditional events are Parents' and Grandparents'
Weekend, Regimental Mounted Parades, Dunaway Oratorical Contest, and frequent band and choir concerts.
Daily Life
Classes (45 minutes each) are held five days a week from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The average number of classes
per student is six in an eight-period day. An extra instruction period is available after the last class period.
Athletics and other activities are held between 3 and 5:45 p.m. daily. Evening study hours extend from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m. Taps sounds at 10 p.m. Monday afternoon is reserved for drill, company meetings, and special
activities, such as the ropes course and rappelling.
Weekend Life
Special or afternoon leaves as well as overnight and weekend privileges may be earned. Ample
opportunities exist for cadets to take advantage of the cultural and entertainment opportunities in the
Philadelphia area. Cadets desiring to stay at school can use all facilities and attend movies on Friday and
Saturday nights in the student center. The cadets frequently enjoy mixers, formal dances, plays, band
concerts, special sports events, and polo matches with students from neighboring schools. All events are
chaperoned by faculty members.
Gold and Silver Star cadets are those who have earned academic achievement. They are granted trips into
town on Wednesday afternoons and evenings. On Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, those not restricted for
academic or other reasons may visit town after their last duty until early evening. Periodically during the
year, weekend leaves are authorized for the entire corps; other times there are special weekend leaves for
Gold and Silver Star honor students. The leaves help reinforce positive peer pressure to excel in both
academics and leadership tasks. Following chapel and Regimental Parade on Sunday, cadets may leave the
grounds on special dinner leave with their parents or other authorized adults.
Summer Programs
A four-week residential summer camp is available for young men ages 8–16. A day camp is available for
young men and women ages 6–16. These programs provide them with the very best in recreational and
educational opportunities.
Costs and Financial Aid
The annual charge for 2010–11 is $38,290. This charge includes tuition, room and board, uniforms, and all
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other fees. There is an optional charge for private music lessons, developmental reading, and driver's
education. Health center stays for each period of more than 24 hours' duration are also an additional expense.
A nonrefundable application fee of $100 is required with an application. At the time of acceptance, a $500
validation fee is required.
In 2009–10, approximately 40 percent of the students received financial aid totaling more than $1 million.
Merit-based scholarships are offered for academic excellence and performance in athletics, the band, and the
choir. Through the generosity of many friends of Valley Forge, some special and endowed scholarships, with
varying need and/or merit-based criteria, are available.
Admissions Information
Admission is based on academic aptitude as measured by the Otis-Lennon Mental Ability Test and/or the
SSAT, information pertaining to grade level, personal character and scholastic references, and the
recommendation of the Admissions Counselor based on a personal interview with the applicant. Applicants
must present evidence of being capable of meeting the demands of a college-preparatory curriculum.
The admission policies of Valley Forge Military Academy & College are nondiscriminatory with respect to
race, color, creed, and national or ethnic origin and are in compliance with federal laws.
Application Timetable
Inquiries are always welcome. Those seeking further information are invited to attend periodic Sunday
Campus Visitations; everyone is encouraged to contact the admissions office to make an appointment to visit
the campus. New cadets are enrolled in late August, and limited openings also exist for January, or midyear,
entry. While there is no application deadline, it is recommended that applications be submitted three months
before the desired entry date.
Admissions Correspondence
Dean of Admissions
Valley Forge Military Academy & College
Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087-3695, United States
Telephone: 610-989-1490
866-923-VFMA (toll-free)
Fax: 610-688-1545
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://academy.vfmac.edu
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Western Reserve Academy
Hudson, Ohio
The School
Founded in 1826 as a preparatory school for Western Reserve College, Western Reserve Academy (WRA)
inherited its present campus in Hudson when the college moved to Cleveland in 1882 to eventually become
Case Western Reserve University. In 1916, the Academy was greatly aided by a handsome endowment given
by James W. Ellsworth. The school's endowment ranks among the top boarding/day, independent secondary
schools in the United States.
Reserve is a traditional college-preparatory school that is committed to maintaining academic excellence and
to offering its students a well-rounded program so that they may develop into interesting, knowledgeable,
and sensitive adults. The academic part of the day is not overly structured, but an atmosphere of academic
seriousness prevails. Close relationships among the adults and students are an essential and natural part of
daily life.
Hudson lies between Cleveland (30 minutes away) and Akron (25 minutes away), just off the Ohio Turnpike
(U.S. 80). The main part of the Western Reserve Academy campus is located one block from downtown
Hudson, but most of its 190 acres extend into the surrounding countryside. Thus, outdoor activities are as
much a part of life at WRA as are those kinds of activities associated with major urban areas. Concerts
(classical and otherwise), drama, art museums, outdoor activities, and cinema are a functional part of a
student's life at the school.
Western Reserve Academy is governed by a board of 30 trustees who supervise the school's $97.7-million
endowment. The annual budget of more than $15.5 million is fortified by the interest from that endowment as
well as by funds from an Annual Giving Program. Parent organizations such as the Dad's Club and the
Pioneer Women are actively involved in campus events as well. Approximately $3.6 million is allocated for
financial aid, providing an opportunity for students who otherwise would be unable to attend.
Western Reserve Academy is accredited by the Independent Schools Association of the Central States. It is a
member of the National Association of Independent Schools, the Secondary School Admission Test Board, the
School and Student Service for Financial Aid, the Committee on Boarding Schools, the Midwest Boarding
Schools, the Association of Boarding Schools, and the Ohio Association of Independent Schools.
Academic Program
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Western Reserve Academy offers a spirited four-year academic program of the highest caliber; students
typically find it challenging. Structured beginning-level courses prepare younger students for what lies
ahead in their final two years: opportunities to take advanced work in computer programming and
Advanced Placement (AP) courses in English, Latin, French, Spanish, German, U.S. history, European history,
art history, biology, physics, chemistry, computer science, statistics, calculus, and economics, as well as the
opportunity to take several courses for college credit through a special School College Articulation Program
(SCAP) in conjunction with Kenyon College. Each student graduates with at least 21 credits, which are earned
in the following configuration: 4 credits of English, 3 of mathematics, 3 of a foreign language, 3 of a lab
science, 3 of history (including U.S. history), 1 of fine arts and a Senior Seminar, and ½ each of health and
ethics and athletics, with the remaining credits in electives.
For upperclass students, the AP and SCAP courses may be supplemented by independent study. Upperclass
students may also participate in the School Year Abroad program.
On the average, students take approximately 5 credits per year, in schedules arranged with their faculty
advisers. The classes are small, with an average size of 12, although classes for advanced-level courses are
typically smaller in size. There are no formal opportunities for remedial studies in any academic discipline.
To a great extent, students determine the use of their free periods during the academic day on an individual
basis; there are no supervised study halls except during the evenings. At that time, students typically study
in their dormitory rooms, although they may study in the library or in open classrooms or labs, depending on
their specific needs.
Advisers work closely with students and parents to determine academic programs, daily schedules,
preparation for final exams, and the need for extra help.
Faculty and Advisers
Western Reserve Academy has 69 full- and part-time faculty members, of whom all but a few live on campus
in school houses or in apartments in dormitories. Many administrators teach at least one course. All faculty
members have a bachelor's degree, and 82 percent have advanced degrees; 6 have doctorates.
Only the third alumnus to serve as Head of School since the school's founding in 1826, Christopher D. Burner,
'80, was appointed in 2008 and is a graduate of Franklin & Marshall College (B.A.), Dartmouth College
(M.A.L.S.), and Harvard University (M.Ed.). Mr. Burner has taught at Western Reserve Academy on two
separate occasions. During his first term (1986) at WRA, Mr. Burner served as the Assistant Dean of Students,
taught Latin, and coached varsity wrestling, football, and lacrosse. He also held faculty positions at Saint
James School in Maryland and Westminster School in Connecticut. After returning to WRA (1992), Mr. Burner
served as the Director of Admission and most recently as the Dean of Faculty and Administration, in addition
to teaching Latin and coaching.
The average faculty member has been at Western Reserve Academy for more than twelve years. Typically, it
is the younger teachers moving on to graduate, law, or medical school who leave the staff. Almost all teachers
coach a sport, serve evening duty in dormitories, supervise an activity, and advise students. On-campus
housing and meals (morning and evening meals are available for all faculty families) constitute part of each
teacher's salary. A sabbatical program and summer study grants are also a part of faculty benefits.
College Admission Counseling
College placement is handled by the College Adviser, who consults with students and their families during
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the junior and senior years. The school report on each student is prepared by the Faculty Guidance
Committee, which is chaired by the College Adviser. Naturally, college visits are encouraged, but each year
WRA is visited by more than 85 representatives from colleges. The College Guidance Office keeps on file an
extensive selection of college catalogs and other admission information.
Of the Academy's graduates, 100 percent attend colleges or universities each year. SAT averages are
consistently very high. Recent graduates are attending such institutions as Case Western Reserve University,
Georgetown, Harvard, Miami (Ohio), Middlebury, Northwestern, Princeton, Stanford, the U.S. Naval
Academy, Vanderbilt, Yale, and the Universities of Chicago and Pennsylvania.
Student Body and Conduct
Two thirds of all students are boarders, and slightly more than half are boys. Students at WRA come from
many parts of this country and the world. The Academy is dedicated to creating and maintaining a healthy
and pluralistic composition in its student body. Currently, 28 percent of the students represent minority
groups (African American, Hispanic American, and Asian American).
Discipline and student conduct are handled by the Student Affairs Committee, which is made up of junior
and senior class officers and selected faculty members in equal proportions and is chaired by the Dean of
Students, with the final arbiter being the Head of School. Student government officers, dorm prefects, and
various other student leaders contribute their views in most matters of student conduct and general rule
determination, although the school behavior and dress code is generally considered conservative.
Academic Facilities
Almost every building at Western Reserve Academy has an academic function, but there are seven principal
academic buildings: Seymour Hall, the chapel, Hayden Hall, Wilson Hall, Knight Fine Arts Center, Metcalf
Center, and the John D. Ong Library. The seven buildings house classrooms, labs, music practice rooms, a
lecture hall, a recital hall, dance rooms, a student lounge, woodworking and metalworking shops, a
photography studio, a computer center, art studios, a publications room, administrative offices, and the
school library of 38,000 volumes. The Wilson Hall Science Center was completely renovated in 2001.
Visually dominating the campus is the chapel, modeled, as were most of the buildings, on the architectural
style of Yale College. Some of the buildings, such as the Loomis Observatory (circa 1838), are more than 100
years old.
Boarding and General Facilities
Western Reserve Academy has nine dormitories and one large dining hall for its boarding students. Two
times per week, evening meals are served family-style, as are lunches on Thursdays. Other meals during the
week are buffet-style. Students can also purchase items at the campus store, or they can sign out to eat at one
of Hudson's many restaurants. Most boys' dorm rooms are doubles, with some triples, and a few single
rooms are available. Girls have dorms with doubles and a few singles. There are laundry facilities in five
dorms.
The new school Health Center is state-of-the-art and has a dispensary, examination and waiting rooms, and
six sick-bay rooms. A nurse is on duty during the day and on call at night unless needed for a student who is
restricted to the Health Center overnight. The school doctor visits the campus every weekday to examine and
talk to students.
The Student Center, which is located in the lower level of Ellsworth Hall, contains the newly renovated Green
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Key snack bar, booths for eating and talking, a wide-screen television, and Ping-Pong, pool, and video
games. The radio station is next door.
Athletics
Western Reserve Academy emphasizes athletic competition and believes student participation in team sports
is an essential part of the daily program. There are two or three levels of interschool competition for boys and
girls in tennis, basketball, ice hockey, diving, swimming, cross-country, track, golf, lacrosse, soccer, football,
wrestling, baseball, riflery, volleyball, softball, and field hockey. Reserve is a member of the Interstate Prep
School League.
The Academy's athletics facilities include a ProTurf stadium with a six-lane all-weather track, a competition
swimming pool and separate diving well with 3- and 1-meter boards, a state-of-the-art fitness center with
Nautilus equipment, two football fields, four soccer/lacrosse fields, a 3.1-mile cross-country course, two
field-hockey fields, a wrestling arena, and twelve all-weather tennis courts. An indoor athletic complex
features a 45,000-square-foot field house housing a 200-meter indoor track, varsity and four practice
basketball courts, and a complete training facility.
Extracurricular Opportunities
Aside from participating in the Student Council, student publications, and services already mentioned,
students may join a diverse and changing group of clubs and organizations: photography, debate, chess,
REACH (a community service club), Green Key (the student center), skiing, drama, Green Campus Action
Team, Culinary Club, and WWRA (the school radio station). The school social committee, an extension of the
Student Council, organizes dances and weekend activities on campus as well as in Cleveland and Akron.
Daily Life
The class day at Western Reserve Academy begins at 8 a.m. There are six 55-minute periods each day. From
3:30 to 5:45, all students participate in athletics. Dinner begins at 6:30 p.m., and study halls in dorms are from
8 until 10. Classes meet on Saturday from 8 a.m. until noon.
Weekend Life
All students may sign out for weekend leave for most weekends. Leaves begin about noon on Saturday and
extend until study hours begin on Sunday evening. Less than one fourth of the students leave the campus on
a given weekend.
A variety of activities are presented to the student body (for both day and boarding students) Saturday and
Sunday afternoons.
The Academy is located in a thriving geographic area. Nestled in the quaint village of Hudson, Reserve is
within easy walking distance of attractive shops, restaurants, and community activities. Beyond Hudson,
Cleveland and Akron offer major cultural events. The world-famous Cleveland Orchestra, the Rock and Roll
Hall of Fame, E. J. Thomas Hall, Playhouse Square, the Ohio Ballet, the Cleveland Institute of Art, and the
Museum of Natural History are easily accessible. Weekend programs also include downhill skiing at nearby
slopes, concerts, off-campus movies, trips to the Gateway Sports Complex to see professional athletics teams,
and outdoor activities at the nearby Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area. The Academy's proximity to
Case Western Reserve University, Hiram College, Kent State, Oberlin, and the University of Akron makes the
resources of these colleges and universities available as well.
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Summer Programs
Western Reserve Academy hosts numerous summer programs. Among them are sports camps for lacrosse,
field hockey, soccer, basketball, swimming, and diving. New programs will be added during the summer of
2011.
Costs and Financial Aid
Fees for 2010–11 are $40,700 for boarders and $28,900 for day students. Extra fees of about $600 covered books
and other incidental expenses. Payments are made in three installments: July, September, and December.
Reserve uses the Knight Tuition Payment Plan and the Dewar Tuition Refund Plan.
For 2010–11, more than $3.8 million in financial aid was awarded to 34 percent of WRA's students. Awards
are made on the basis of family need (as established by the School and Student Service for Financial Aid). The
average award was $17,298 for day students and $29,000 for boarders.
Admissions Information
Western Reserve Academy admits students of any race, sex, color, disability, or national or ethnic origin to all
rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the Academy.
It does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, disability, or national or ethnic origin in the
administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletics
or other school-administered programs.
Western Reserve Academy requires that all applicants submit SSAT, ISEE, or SAT scores and
recommendations from 2 current teachers. Applicants average in the top three deciles on the SSAT and have
achieved A's and B's at their previous schools. Most students enter in grade 9 or 10. Reserve admits
approximately 100 freshmen per year.
Application Timetable
Most inquiries are made in the fall, with applications ($25 fee for students within the United States and $150
for international students) completed by January 15 (day students, December 15). Applicants and their
families should have a campus tour and an interview. After an application is submitted, it is reviewed by the
Faculty Admission Committee; families are notified after March 10 (day students, January 10) and are usually
allowed four weeks to notify the school of their intentions.
Admissions Correspondence
Admission Office
Western Reserve Academy
Hudson, Ohio 44236, United States
Telephone: 330-650-9717
800-784-3776 (toll-free)
Fax: 330-650-5858
E-mail: [email protected]
World Wide Web: http://www.wra.net
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Disclaimer
ACT®
ACT® is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product.
AP*
AP is a registered trademark of the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product.
CLEP*
CLEP is a registered trademark of the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product.
GMAT®
GMAT® is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). This book does not contain actual GMAT test
items, nor is it endorsed or approved by GMAC.
GMAT CAT ®
GMAT CAT® is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). This book does not contain actual GMAT
test items, nor is it endorsed or approved by GMAC.
GRE®
GRE® is a registered trademark of Educational Testing Service (ETS). This book is not endorsed or approved by ETS.
LSAT®
LSAT is a registered trademark of the Law School Admission Council, which does not endorse this book.
MCAT®
MCAT is a registered trademark of the Association of American Medical Colleges, which does not endorse this book.
NYSTCE®
NYSTCE® is a trademark of the New York State Education Department and National Evaluation Systems, Inc. (NES®), neither of which
endorses or approves this publication.
PCAT®
PCAT is a registered trademark of Harcourt Assessment, Inc., which does not endorse this book.
PPST®
PPST® is a registered trademark of Educational Testing Service (ETS). This book is not endorsed or approved by ETS.
The Praxis Series™
Praxis I® is a registered trademark of Educational Testing Service (ETS). This book is not endorsed or approved by ETS.
Praxis II® is a registered trademark of Educational Testing Service (ETS). This book is not endorsed or approved by ETS.
PSAT*
PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation, which were not involved in the
production of, and do not endorse, this product.
SAT*
*SAT is a registered trademark of the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product.
SAT Subject Tests* is a registered trademark of the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this
product.
SSAT
SSAT is a registered trademark of the Secondary School Admission Test Board, which does not endorse this book.
TOEFL®
TOEFL® is a registered trademark of Educational Testing Service (ETS). This book is not endorsed or approved by ETS.
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