Saturday, Sept. 10

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Saturday, Sept. 10
REGION, 4-B
SPOR TS, 3-B
NEW ORLEANS DEATH
TOLL MAY BE LOWER
THAN FEARED
S e r v i n g
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
State looking
to break streak
on the Plains
COLLEGE
GAME DAY
P a s c a g o u l a ,
O c e a n
S p r i n g s ,
M o s s
P o i n t ,
Took my
tetanus shot
the other day
— it hurt
more than
my dadburn bill
from the
IRS!
G a u t i e r
a n d
Old Crab
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Saturday, September 10, 2005
www.gulflive.com Our online affiliate
SOUTHERN COMFORT
Christy Pritchett/The Mississippi Press
Noah Broadus keeps Katherine Segarra from looking
as Shelia D’Metayer, a FEMA Disaster Medical Assistance Team member, gives her a tetanus shot in the
Ashley Place neighborhood of Ocean Springs Friday.
FEMA administers
tetanus shots
in Ocean Springs
boards and other building materials, carries the threat of
OCEAN SPRINGS — On a tetanus.
A six-person strike team from
normal summer day, people
would flock to the white or blue a Federal Emergency Management Agency Disasice cream truck drivFEMA office
ter Medical Assising through their
tance Team based in
neighborhood for ice
opens in
Florida took to the
cream.
Pascagoula,
streets Friday with
In the aftermath of
Page 6-A
a load of tetanus
Hurricane Katrina,
shots.
residents are flocking to a silver
“We’re going to the areas hardFEMA van for tetanus shots.
The rubble left by the catego- est hit, where they’re cleaning
ry four storm, which hit Missis- up debris and offering them
sippi on Aug. 29, with nailed
See FEMA, Page 8-A
By CLAIR BYRD
The Mississippi Press
William Colgin/The Mississippi Press
Dock workers moor the U.S. naval hospital ship Comfort as it arrived Friday afternoon at the Port of
Pascagoula to aid in the Hurricane Katrina relief efforts.
Navy hospital ship moored at Bayou Casotte
By JOHN SURRATT
The Mississippi Press
PASCAGOULA — Lt. Mark Anderson
is coming home to help his community.
A Gautier native and the son of retired
The Mississippi Press employee James
Anderson, Mark Anderson is an operating room nurse on board the U.S. Navy
hospital ship Comfort, which is moored
at the Port of Pascagoula’s Bayou
Casotte Facility.
“I’m glad to be back home and to contribute to helping my community recover from this disaster,” he said, adding
that his family was doing all right.
“Their house was damaged, but it’s
livable; they’re OK,” he said.
The 894-foot Comfort arrived Friday
afternoon in Pascagoula to provide assistance to Coast residents recovering from
Hurricane Katrina, the Category 4 storm
that hit Mississippi on Aug. 29.
The ship and its medical crew are no
strangers to humanitarian aid.
Comfort has completed missions to
Haiti and to New York to house rescue
workers after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack on the World Trade Center
towers.
“We are a Navy ship, but our overall
mission is to provide health care wher-
ever it is needed,” Allington said.
“We expect to be able to provide a
whole range of services while we’re here,
from health care to lodging and food for
relief workers and rescue workers,” said
Capt. Thomas Allington, the commander of the medical staff on board the ship.
“Our primary mission is to treat
patients; they will come first. We’re able
to provide a whole range of acute care
services and to assist the community’s
medical facilities.”
The Comfort is capable of being a
1,000-bed facility and has the equipment on board to meet that requirement
if it’s needed, but Allington said the ship
is configured as a 250-bed hospital for its
humanitarian trip to the Coast.
While the plans have not yet been
determined how patients will be brought
to the ship, the Comfort is able to receive
patients either by helicopter or by ambulance, which would unload the patients
“We expect to be able to provide a whole range of services
while we’re here, from health
care to lodging and food for
relief workers and rescue
workers.”
— Capt. Thomas Allington,
commander of the medical staff
aboard the Navy hospital
ship Comfort
at the dock to be carried on board.
That configuration includes a section
the ship’s intensive care unit that has
been converted for obstetrics and gynecology.
This trip, the Comfort’s medical staff is
supplemented by volunteers from the
international health care organization
Project Hope, ship’s spokesman Lt. j.g.
Bashon Mann said.
Inside its massive white hull, the
Comfort is designed almost like a regular civilian hospital. Its casualty
receiving areas function like an emergency room , where pati e n ts ar e
received, assessed and admitted. The
See COMFORT, Page 8-A
FEMA director dumped
■ Bush compares
hurricane recovery
to Sept. 11 aftermath
By LARA JAKES JORDAN
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The administration dumped FEMA
Director Michael Brown as
commander of Hurricane Katrina relief operations Friday
as President Bush stoked
memories of the 2001 terror
attacks, hailing the “extraordinary bravery” of rescue personnel.
Brown, who had come to personify a relief operation widely panned as bumbling, will be
replaced by Coast Guard Vice
Adm. Thad W. Allen. Allen had
been in charge of relief, recovery and rescue efforts for New
Orleans.
The decision to order Brown
back to Washington from
Louisiana — he remains as
director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency —
marked the administration’s
latest attempt to assert leadership in the wake of the devastating storm and its aftermath, including the weakest
public opinion polls of Bush’s
time in office.
At the same time, there was
fresh evidence of raggedness
in the relief effort, when
FEMA announced it would discontinue a two-day-old program to issue debit cards
See DIRECTOR, Page 8-A
Despite Hurricane Katrina, Catholic schools find ‘God is so good’
■ St. Peter the
Apostle school
principal’s faith
unshaken by storm
By ALLISON MATHER
The Mississippi Press
PASCAGOULA — From the
curb of busy Telephone Road,
you can read classroom rules
posted on the hurricane-ravaged
walls inside St. Peter the Apostle Catholic School.
Looking out across the
remains of the school she’s dedicated the last 10 years to, Sister
Bernadette McNamara took a
moment to reflect on the past
and think to the future.
Even after the devastation of
Hurricane Katrina, McNamara’s faith remains unshaken.
“God is good. God is so good,”
the school principal said, smiling.
McNamara and several
parishioners hauled wet furniture, mattresses and clothing
from the adjoining convent and
rectory. Both buildings had
about 18 inches of flooding.
Beyond those buildings, neat
rows of pews are visible through
gaping holes in sanctuary walls
that look as though they’ve been
pounded by mortar shells.
Kered Graves, 9, is in third
grade at St. Peter’s, and spent
Friday helping her parents and
brothers clean up debris.
“When we (my family) came
by here, I was really sad. My
mom was sad. Everybody was
really sad,” she said.
See ST. PETER, Page 8-A
■ Resurrection
Elementary classes
to resume Oct. 3
By ALLISON MATHER
The Mississippi Press
William Colgin/The Mississippi Press
Bishop Thomas J. Rodi of the Diocese of Biloxi surveys the
damage from Hurricane Katrina at St. Peter the Apostle
Catholic School and Church on Telephone Road in Pascagoula
on Friday morning.
LOCAL, 5-A
REGION, 8-A
SPOR TS, 1-B
Accendo Christian Home
youths offer
a helping hand
BRAC proposal
targets more
bases in South
INDEX
Mississippi
athletes transfer
to save seasons
Advice . . . . . . . . . . . .7-B
Classified . . . . . . . . .2-C
Comics . . . . . . . . . . .6-B
MISSISSIPPI PRESS HURRICANE HEADQUARTERS: (251) 219-5551, (866) 843-9020
PASCAGOULA — Despite
significant damage from Hurricane Katrina, students attending Resurrection Catholic School
should plan to return to class
Oct. 3, school officials said.
Schools have been closed since
the Category 4 hurricane struck
the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29.
The Rev. Mike Kelleher, a
member of the school’s advisory
panel and a priest at Sacred
Heart Catholic Church, which
adjoins Resurrection Elementary, said about four feet of
water flooded the halls and
classrooms of the school.
Sixth-grade teacher Laura
Nunenmacher spent time Friday emptying the flooded classrooms and helping other volunteers clean the facility.
She said the start date at both
Resurrection campuses is Oct.
3.
Tony Hollowell, 23, an Alliance for Catholic Education
teacher at Resurrection’s high
school campus, said there was
one to two feet of flooding in the
building.
“I’m just cleaning out the
classrooms, getting rid of anything that has mold on it, cleaning the floors,” Hollowell said,
taking a moment to rest. “It’s
what needs to get done.”
Hollowell said the aftermath
See RESURRECTION, Page 8-A
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . .1-B
TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-B
Vol. 159 — No. 253, 24 Pages ©
2-A
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
Hurricane death toll rises
■ Broadus: Jackson
KATRINA
DEATH TOLL
County count at 11,
including a Jane Doe
and a John Doe
From Staff Reports
Officials in Mississippi have
placed the death toll at 211
and rising, as workers match
bodies with names.
In Jackson County, coroner
Vicki Broadus said 11 people
died in the storm, including
a Jane Doe and a John Doe.
Broadus attributed 23 other
deaths indirectly to the storm.
At the airport in Gulfport, a
temporary morgue is trying
to match bodies with reports
of missing persons. “We’re trying to do what it takes to help
the families reach closure,”
said Dr. Richard Weems, an
expert in forensic dentistry
from Birmingham, Ala.
Officials in Hancock County said Friday that 52 people
are considered unaccounted
for in that county alone and
officials in other counties
refused to guess how many
coastwide still haven’t been
accounted for by their fami-
lies.
Broadus said Jane Doe, a
white female, was between 60
to 70 years old, weighed 140
pounds, small nose, prominent bridge, had thin extremities, large stomach, small
feet, arthritic hands and
black hair. She also had had
lots of dental work done, and
had experienced childbirth.
When discovered in waters
near Gulf Hills, Jane Doe
wore jewelry and a Bobby
Brooks tan knit shirt.
John Doe, a black male,
was found in a marsh area off
Gulf Park Estates.
Broadus attributed the
deaths of at least 23 others
indirectly to the hurricane.
The official death toll in
Louisiana from Hurricane
Katrina was raised to 118 on
Thursday, while state officials
said a Houston-based disaster response company has
been hired to deliver bodies
to relatives of the dead.
Hurricane Katrina death
tolls reported by state and
local officials as of Friday.
Officials have said they
expect the toll to reach the
thousands.
ALABAMA: 2
FLORIDA: 14
GEORGIA: 2
LOUISIANA: 118
MISSISSIPPI: 211
TOTAL: 347
The number for the
national Find Family Call
Center is toll free (866) 3269393.
Source: The Associated
Press
Of the 118 confirmed dead,
67 are in a morgue in St.
Gabriel, with the rest housed
at local coroners’ offices, the
state Department of Health
and Hospitals said Thursday.
The toll was raised from 83
deaths reported Tuesday.
The number of dead is likely to rise, however, because
of massive flooding that swept
through the city after Katrina
struck Aug. 29, trapping
many in homes. New Orleans
Mayor C. Ray Nagin has said
the death toll in New Orleans
alone could reach 10,000, and
state officials were ordering
25,000 body bags.
Meanwhile, the firm of
Kenyon Worldwide Disaster
Management has been hired
by FEMA to coordinate the
recovery of bodies in Orleans,
Jefferson, St. Bernard and
Plaquemines parishes.
“Kenyon supports each
parish coroner in their statutory duty to recover and identify and return the deceased
to their families in a dignified manner,” a state news
release said.
According to the company’s
Web site, it has responded to
disasters dating back to a
1929 Imperial Airways plane
crash in England. Most
recently, Kenyon has been
involved in recovering bodies
or providing mortuary services after last December ’s
killer tsunami in Southeast
Asia, the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and TWA Flight
800 that crashed off Long
Island in 1996.
Major developments in Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath
Major developments in the aftermath
of Hurricane Katrina:
• Authorities say their first systematic
sweep of New Orleans found far fewer
bodies than expected, suggesting that the
death toll may not be the catastrophic
10,000 feared.
• Homeland Security Secretary Michael
Chertoff announces that Federal Emergency Management Agency Director
Michael Brown is being relieved of his
command of the Bush administration’s
Hurricane Katrina onsite relief efforts.
• The federal government will discon-
tinue its program to distribute debit cards
worth up to $2,000 to hurricane victims.
Once officials distribute cards this weekend at shelters in Dallas, Houston and
San Antonio, victims elsewhere will have
to apply to receive direct bank deposits
instead.
• Workers repairing New Orlean’s system of levees and water pumps project
that it will take a month to dry out the
city. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
says most neighborhoods could be drained
by Oct. 2, but some areas could take
longer.
• The first planeload of 100 Louisiana
National Guardsmen returns home from
Iraq, leaving behind the carnage of warfare to find their families in their hurricane-ravaged state. Most of the soldiers
lost everything to Hurricane Katrina, and
will qualify for safe haven status, in which
they will get a 14-day leave and then be
eligible for demobilization.
• President Bush says he’ll make his
third trip to the disaster zone on Sunday.
• Authorities say the New Orleans airport will reopen to commercial flights on
Sept. 19.
OBITUARIES
PHILLIPS
Mr. Louis R. Phillips, Jr.,
of Pascagoula, Miss., died Sept.
3, 2005 in Jackson, Miss. He
was born Dec. 7, 1932 in Jackson County, Miss.
Mr. Phillips was an active
member of Sacred Heart
Catholic Church in Pascagoula,
where he was an usher at
10:30 a.m. Mass. He was also a
member of Knights of Columbus with 4th Degree.
He was preceded in death by
his father, Louis R. Phillips,
Sr.; mother, Forestine Gager
Phillips DeShirley; and sister,
Patsy Prouse.
He was a loving husband,
father, grandfather and uncle.
Survivors include his wife of
47 years, Mary Martin Phillips,
Pascagoula; daughter, Cynthia
“Cindy” (Alan) Whitley, Gautier, Miss.; daughter, Ann (Clay)
Beard, Jackson, Miss.; daughter, Mary (Stephen) Burrow,
Pascagoula; grandchildren,
Julia Whitley, Joseph Whitley,
Millender’s Funeral Home
We honor all PRE-PLANNED &
BURIAL Insurance policies 100%
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475-5448
4412 Main Street • Moss Point
Thierry Beard, France Beard,
Patton Beard, Victoria Burrow,
Phillip Burrow, Elizabeth Burrow, Evan Burrow; sisters,
Helen (Norman) McLeod,
Houston, Texas and Annette
(Jerry) Terry, Biloxi, Miss.; and
a host of nieces, nephews, family and friends.
Visitation will be on Sunday,
Sept. 11, 2005, from 2 p.m. to 4
p.m. at Heritage Funeral Home
in Escatawpa, Miss.
Rosary will be recited at 3:30
p.m. from the Magnolia Room
at Heritage Funeral Home.
Funeral services will begin
at 4 p.m. from the Chapel of
Heritage Funeral Home in Escatawpa, Miss. with Father
Mike Kelleher officiating.
Burial will be at Machpelah
Cemetery in Pascagoula.
In lieu of flowers, family
request donations be made to
Resurrection Catholic School
in memory of Mr. Phillips.
Arrangements by Heritage
Funeral Home, Escatawpa,
Miss. Locally owned and operated.
RYALS
Charles E. Ryals of Pascagoula, Miss., passed away Sept.
5, 2005. He was born in Vancleave, Miss. on Nov. 10, 1924.
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He was employed at Litton
Industries as a NTD Coordinator for 35 years. He was a
charter member of Faith United Methodist Church in Pasca-goula. He loved his church
and served in a number of offices. He will be missed
tremendously by his wife, family and friends. Chuck was a
man of humor and always had
a smile for everyone. No matter
who you were he called you
“Jake” His precious little dog,
Jake will miss him.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Elbert Allen and
Julia Breland Ryals; daughter,
Bobbie Jean Everett; brothers,
Elbert, Samuel and Harry
Ryals; sisters, Hazel Roberts,
May Vincent, Kathryn Morris,
Margaret Stewart, Bessie Ferrell, Ina Harris, and Addys
Raines.
He is survived by his wife of
30 years, Syble P. Ryals; two
sons, Charles “Chuck” Ryals
(Jeanette), James “Ric” Ryals
(Verdie); one daughter, Sandra
Rogers (Roy); grandchildren,
James “Ricky” Ryals (Keli),
Sean Whitney, Christopher
Ryals, Roybn Pate (Steven),
Della Beech (Mark), Denise
Barnes, Mike and Joey Everett;
great grandchildren, Brandon
Lowe, Preston and Cale Yarbrough, Destiny Barnes, Carston and Carlie Pate, Collin and
Kate Beech and Tammy Jane
Everett; son-in-law, Sonny
Everett; brothers, Manson
(Frances) Ryals and Gordon
(Betty) Ryals; sisters, Annie
(Hermes) Ladnier and Dorothy
Ryals; numerous nieces, nephews, friends and other relatives.
A memorial service will be
held at the O’Bryant-O'Keefe
Funeral Home Chapel in Pascagoula on Saturday, Sept. 10,
2005 at 2 p.m. with Rev. Edward “Dock” Tyndal officiating.
Interment will follow at
Serene Memorial Gardens in
Escatawpa, Miss.
Arrangements by O'BryantO’Keefe Funeral Home, Pascagoula, Miss.
28, 2005, at Ochsner Medical
Foundation, New Orleans, La.
She was born Aug. 15, 1930 in
Gautier, Miss. to Joseph Salisbury and Maude. She was a
lifelong member of Bethel Baptist Church in Gautier.
She was preceded in death
by her parents; and two brothers, Robert and Pete Salisbury.
Survivors include her husband of 55 years, Whitney Mire
of Gautier; daughter, Maria
Delong and Bill of McComb,
Miss.; sons, John Mire and Ava
of Nashville, Tenn., Timmy
Mire and Tonya of Gautier,
Benny Mire and Petty of Gautier; one brother, Everett Salisbury of Gautier; sisters, Betty Delcomyn of Alexandria, La.
and Roberta Kliest of Colorado
Springs; nine grandchildren,
Amanda Carter and Jason,
William Delong and Sarah,
Karen McKenzie and Justin,
Dylan, Julian and Simon Mire,
T.J. Mire, Brenna Graves and
James, Amber Temten and
Matt; three great grandchildren, Aidan Ray, Laura Beth
McKenzie and Draven Graves.
Visitation will be 10 to 11
a.m., Saturday, Sept. 10, 2005,
at Bethel Baptist Church in
Gautier.
Funeral service will follow
at 11 a.m. at the church with
the Rev. Larry McVeay officiating.
Interment will be at
Pinecrest Cemetery, Gautier,
Miss.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Bethel Baptist Church, P. O. Box 13, Gautier, Miss. 39553.
Arrangements by Jones
Funeral Home, McComb, Miss.
AREA DEATHS
EUGENE VANCE, 83, of
Franklin, Tenn., died Sept. 9,
2005. George County Funeral
Home, Lucedale, Miss.
MILTON L. TILLEY, JR.,
55, of Wiggins, Miss., died Sept.
7, 2005. Sigler Funeral Home,
Lucedale, Miss.
MYRTIS MARIE HOLTSCLAW, 85, of St. Elmo, Ala.,
died Sept. 7, 2005. Sigler
Funeral Home, Lucedale, Miss.
DONALD WEEMS, 59, of
Vancleave, Miss., died Sept. 9,
2005. O’Bryant-O’Keefe Funeral Home, Pascagoula, Miss.
MARILYN MCCORMICK,
62, of Hurley, Miss., died Sept.
9, 2005. Heritage Funeral
Home, Escatawpa, Miss.
MIRE
Delores Elizabeth Mire,
“Obituaries over one inch in
75, of Gautier, Miss., died Aug. length are paid advertisements.”
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
MISSISSIPPI COAST WEATHER
TODAY
Partly cloudy
Hi 91
Lo 69
SUNDAY
Partly cloudy
Hi 90
Lo 69
MONDAY
Partly cloudy
Hi 90
Lo 70
LUNAR STAGES
ALMANAC
First quarter
Sept. 11
Record High
98 in 1980
Full moon
Sept. 17
Record Low
62 in 1980
Last quarter
Sept. 25
Yesterday’s High
90°
New moon
Oct. 3
Yesterday’s Low
88°
Yesterday’s Rain
0”
N/A
This Month’s Rain
N/A
86.4°
Year to Date Rain
N/A
MISSISSIPPI SOUND
Salinity
Water temperature
TIDES
SUNRISE/SET
Rise
Set
Sat.
2:19 am H
1:58 pm L
Sat.
6:36 am
7:06 pm
Sun.
3:28 am H
3:33 pm L
Sun.
6:37 am
7:04 pm
Mon.
4:50 am H
4:47 pm L
Mon.
6:37 am
7:03 pm
Tues.
6:13 am H
5:45 pm L
Tues.
6:38 am
7:02 pm
Wed.
7:30 am H
6:32 pm L
Wed.
6:38 am
7:01 pm
Thurs.
8:39 am H
7:11 pm L
Thurs.
6:39 am
6:59 pm
Fri.
9:47 am H
7:38 pm L
Fri.
6:39 am
6:58 pm
RIVER STAGES
MARINE FORECAST
Pascagoula River (Cumbest Bluff)
9.52 feet
Pascagoula River (Merrill)
8.75 feet
Chickasawhay River (Leakesville)
12.58 feet
North winds 5 to 10
knots becoming
less in the afternoon.
Seas 1 to 2 feet.
Protected waters
a light chop.
Ophelia regains
hurricane strength
By TRAVIS REED
The Associated Press
FLAGLER BEACH, Fla. —
Ophelia regained hurricane
strength Friday on a course
that
could
On the Net:
take
National Hurricane
it
Center:
into
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov
the
U.S.
coast, and forecasters urged
residents of northern Florida
and the Carolinas keep close
watch on its path over the
next few days.
The Category 1 storm had
sustained winds of 75 mph
Friday evening. It was moving northeast at near 7 mph
and was expected to continue
on that track through Saturday.
Forecasters said Ophelia
has been hard to predict. It
could go out to sea, but it
may also head anywhere
from north Florida to North
Carolina, said Robbie Berg, a
meteorologist at the National Hurricane Center.
“The models that we look
at, most of them are going in
all different directions. So,
it’s making it difficult to forecast for us where Ophelia is
going to go,” Berg said.
Along the coast, many
were anticipating the storm.
George Curovic, the general manager of Manny’s, said
his restaurant drew big
crowds through last year’s
season because it was one of
few in the Flagler Beach area
with power. This time is different, he said.
“Now they’re getting away.
I think they’ve seen too much
damage, too much death,”
Curovic said. “All it takes is
one tidal wave to wipe this
place out.”
Florida has been hit by two
hurricanes this year and six
in the past 13 months. Many
residents have already
stocked up on batteries,
water and nonperishable
food.
“These people around here
are veterans. They are
already prepared,” said Rick
Storm, a clerk at a Wal-Mart
Supercenter in Merritt
Island. “They are fully
stocked and ready to go.”
A t 5 p . m . E D T F r i d a y,
Ophelia was centered about
175 miles east-northeast of
Daytona Beach and about
220 miles south-southeast of
Charleston, S.C.
Even as it lingered offshore, Ophelia sent waves
crashing onto beaches and
stirred up strong wind gusts.
Officials shut down a stretch
of coastal road in Flagler
County so transportation
workers could shore it up
with sand and boulders. Officials at NASA were also
keeping an eye on Ophelia
as well.
Two other tropical storms,
Nate and Maria, posed no
threat to land as they weakened moving into cooler
waters of the north Atlantic.
The Atlantic hurricane
season began June 1 and
ends Nov. 30. Peak storm
activity typically occurs from
the end of August through
mid-September.
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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
Contact: Lance Davis, News Editor, (866) 843-9020
E-mail address: [email protected]
5-A
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
LOCAL
George debris removal to begin Monday
■ County, Lucedale retain
crews to remove debris
By ROYCE ARMSTRONG
The Mississippi Press
LUCEDALE — Streets and road rights of
way are already piled high with Hurricane
Katrina debris, but Lucedale and George
County officials are asking for more.
A weakened Katrina, packing 100 mph
winds, ripped through George County on
Aug. 29 after the powerful storm terrorized the Gulf Coast.
County and the city officials are asking
residents to place any storm-related debris
on the nearest public road right of way.
This includes vegetation, such as leaves,
limbs and trees. It also includes white goods
— building materials (wood or metal), furniture and appliances.
The debris must be sorted by type. Vegetation goes in one pile, white goods go into
a second pile.
The piles should be placed on road shoulders and ditches, making sure the piles are
not in the way of traffic, said Lucedale Mayor Dayton Whites.
Shingles cannot be placed in either pile.
Both the city and the county are trying to
come up with a time and place for getting
rid of shingles.
The Federal Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) will reimburse both the
city and the county 100 percent of the cost
of removing storm debris, as long as the
job is completed within 60 days of the disaster declaration.
There are 49 days remaining and the
clock is ticking, according to Whites.
“It is important that people get this done
as quickly as possible,” said Board of Supervisors President Kelly Wright. “We cannot
wait until the last minute and expect the
contractors to get the job done.”
The city and the county opted to go their
separate ways for debris removal.
The county hired the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers to do the job. The Corps will
begin work this weekend or on Monday,
Wright said.
The city hired Pryor Contractors, Laurel. Pryor Contractors will use local subcontractors and is expected to begin work on
Monday, Whites said.
Pryor Contractors is charging $7.50 per
cubic yard of material, including nonburnable material, the mayor said.
The amount the Corps of Engineers is
charging FEMA for removing county debris
is not available, according to Wright.
Whites said that the city will remove
stumps after all other debris is cleaned up.
He also said the city recycling center is
closed due to the volume of material already
received. The dumpsters, provided by a
Gulfport company, are filled.
Residents are reminded a countywide
burn ban is in effect.
Reporter Royce Armstrong may be contacted at [email protected]
County courts to feel Katrina’s impact for months
By JOHN SURRATT
The Mississippi Press
Joy E. Stodghill/The Mississippi Press
A resident of the Accendo Christian Home in Gautier
adds a piece of storm-damaged material from the Resurrection Catholic Elementary School to a growing pile
of debris Friday.
Accendo
boys offer a
helping hand
By JOY E. STODGHILL
The Mississippi Press
PAS C A GOUL A — M ost
children and teenagers are
enjoying their vacation from
school, playing on fallen trees
left by Hurricane Katrina.
But the boys of the Accendo
Christian Home have found a
different way to occupy their
time since Katrina’s strike.
Despite five feet of water in
their own home on Old Spanish Trail, 12 of the 24 boys are
out in the heat helping elderly people and organizations
r e mo v e t he
de b ri s a nd
muck in their
dwellings.
“We want
to help those
that
can’t
help their selves,” said Tommy
Fortenberry, “father” to the
boys at the home. “My heart’s
for the kids and old people:
folks who can’t defend themselves.”
Maurice Jefferson, a reside n t of t he ho m e for tw o
months, said, “We were just
ready to come down and help
(after the storm).”
Lucas Lestrade, another
r e s i de nt , s a id s e ein g th e
reports of what happened was
“upsetting,” and they were
“sad to know what people
were going through.”
“It feels good to help people,” Lestrade said.
Words like “raunchy” and
“disgusting” were among a
long list of adjectives the 12
boys used to describe the work
they had been doing.
After pulling out ruined furniture from Resurrection
Catholic Elementary School,
they had to clean and mop up
raw sewage as well as debris.
Each of the boys donned protective gear and gloves, but
those items failed to make the
work pleasant.
Fortenberry said one of the
boys, Adam Marcus, said earlier in the day, “You couldn’t
pay me to do this.” He added
that sense the work gave him
th e o p p o r t unit y t o “sh ow
God’s love, I do it for free.”
Fortenberry said, “They do
get satisfaction out of ‘helping.’”
T h e A c c e nd o b o y s lost
everything in their home, but
still took time to help others.
“We lost everything. We
have a lot to do,” Fortenberry
said. “When I look at my loss
(estimated at $50,000) it really seems so minimal when you
look at th e other t hings
around you.”
He added despite the work
they need to do for themselves, “Things like this are
more pressing now. I’ve got to
help somebody. People have
been so good to us.”
When Fortenberry returned
from Tupelo, where he had
evacuated the boys for safety,
his neighbors had cleared the
yard around his primary residence in the Hickory Hills
area
even
though,
“t hey’re a ll
ol d er t ha n
me.”
Janie Hickson, mother
to three children, a fourthgrader, a sixth-grader and a
10th-grader, took time to
thank Fortenberry for the
help he and the boys gave to
the school.
“The Christian schools in
th e ar ea ar e com p let ely
dependent on volunteers and
the goodness of others,” Hickson said.
She added private, Christian schools cannot get federal
help because of the religious
affiliation.
She added that several
National Guardsmen wanted
to help them a day or two ago,
but could not since they are a
private school.
Fortenberry said he will not
be receiving any FEMA aid
with the Accendo home since
it is not his primary residence.
Also, he did not have flood
insurance, like many people
not in flood zones.
They lost all their furniture,
including the boys’ schoolwork
and computers for school.
Fortenberry said they were
able to save their records.
When they returned, they
found water, mud and snakes
in their home.
The other 12 boys are still
in Tupelo, where they are
being housed at state Rep.
Brian Aldridge’s home.
Contact Todd Trenchard,
ex ec u tiv e dir ect or of t he
Bacot-McCarty Foundation,
at (228) 217-5791, for help
w ith r esiden tia l st orm
cleanup.
Reporter Joy E. Stodghill
can be reached at [email protected]
mspressonline.com or (251)
219-5551.
Say you saw it in
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
[email protected]
PASCAGOULA — The effects of Hurricane Katrina on Jackson County’s two court
systems could be felt for several months or
more as the county’s chancery and circuit
clerks try to recover records and get their
computer systems back on line.
Chancery Clerk Terry Miller said his
office will reopen Monday at the Jackson
County Civic Center on the fair grounds to
begin receiving land records and other legal
documents.
“What we’ll do is take the documents
and date them, but they won’t be recorded
until we can get our computer system back
on line,” Miller said.
Miller, who is also the county’s financial
officer, said a docket of claims for the county is expected to be ready Monday, but
added, “vendors who are doing business
with the county will have come in and pick
up their checks. We will make payroll for
the county employees.”
Circuit Clerk Joe Martin said that he
will reopen his office Monday in the courthouse.
“There’s no place at the civic center
where I can put 15 employees,” Martin
said. “My office didn’t receive any damage.
It should be environmentally safe for my
employees. What we need is the computers
to get on line. The first floor of the courthouse did not get any water although the
ground floor had some water.”
He said court records that were stored
on the ground floor had water damage.
The circuit court handles criminal and
civil jury cases, but Martin said there will
be no jury trials when the new court term
begins in October.
“I’ve talked with Judge (Kathy King)
Jackson and we won’t have the power (electric service) to take care of a jury,” he said.
“(Judge) Dale (Harkey) and (Judge) Bob
(Krebs) both had water in their homes. We
probably won’t have a jury trial until the
January term.”
Part of Miller’s job is caring for the county’s land records, chancery court and board
of supervisors minutes and the county
archives.
The land record books that hold the
deeds, mortgages, titles and indices were
moved to safety before the storm.
Miller said he hopes to have the county’s
computerized records system back in operation starting Sept. 15 with the recordings.
“We’ll start with the recordings,” he said.
“Once we get the recordings on line, the
next phase will be the archives. We hope to
have them by Sept. 26.”
He said the records on the courts building next to the courthouse had water damage and would have to be dried or repaired.
Miller’s offices in the courts building house
the chancery court files and the minutes for
the chancery court and the board of supervisors.
He said he expects chancery court to be
back in operation by some time in October.
Reporter John Surrat can be reached
at [email protected] or (251)
219-5551.
2703 Denny Avenue (Hwy. 90)
Pascagoula, MS 39567
228-762-7111
On August 29, 2005, our beautiful Mississippi Gulf Coast was severely
damaged by an un-welcomed visitor named “Katrina”. Hurricane Katrina left
a path of destruction and devastation like no other storm in the history of
the MS Gulf Coast. During this time of crisis, La Font Inn, Hotel &
Conference Center is honored to be able to serve our local residents with
hot meals daily and lodging for those who are here to help us get back on
our feet. We welcome you to join us for a traditional “Southern Style”
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Inn, our thoughts and prayers go out to everyone on the coast who suffered
a loss as a result of this horrific natural disaster. We will persevere,
neighbor helping neighbor, hand to hand, hearts to God. The Mississippi
Gulf Coast will rise, rebuild and recover.
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Through life’s darkened maze I go,
And trouble overwhelms my soul,
Lord, give me the grace to know,
That you are always in control!
6-A
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
Contact: Lance Davis, News Editor, (866) 843-9020
E-mail address: [email protected]
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
LOCAL
Carpenter’s union hammers out generosity
By DONNA HARRIS
The Mississippi Press
William Colgin/The Mississippi Press
Residents form Friday afternoon a line around the front of Pascagoula High School
to register for FEMA aid.
FEMA has Pascagoula
residents fuming
By BRAD CROCKER
The Mississippi Press
PASCAGOULA — Eleven
days after Hurricane Katrina
left south Pascagoula in rubble and much of the city under
water, residents began faceto-face meetings with officials
from the Federal Emergency
Management Agency. But
storm-weary citizens said they
were not getting the answers
they wanted or needed.
And Mayor Matthew Avara,
who has attacked FEMA in
the national arena for the
agency’s slow response, continued Friday by echoing citiz e n s ’ s e nt im e nt s
th at
although Pascagoula was not
hit as hard as New Orleans
or the western Mississippi
Gulf Coast, it was smacked
all the same.
“We have not received any
definite answers regarding
anything. Nobody knows anything,” Avara said. “I don’t
think FEMA has the leadership to get the resources on
the ground.”
Th e c it y ha s r e qu ested
9,000 temporary housing trailers, but Avara said he is not
certain what assets will be
brought to the Flagship City.
There was no need to bus residents out of town to meet
housing needs, as previously
b e l i e v e d , b e c a use c ode
enforcement crews determined that services such as
power, water and sewer, telephone and other utilities have
been restored to most customers.
“We’re just in a hurry-upand-wait-for-FEMA mode,”
Avara said. “I’m just frustrated, angry and mad because
our citizens, who have been
so patient, are being left in
the dark.”
Meanwhile, residents struggle to get a leg up in the aftermath of Katrina, and information has seemed to replace
the chaotic dash for ice, food
and water that residents scurried through last week.
“It’s just ridiculous. (Agencies) give you all these (phone)
numbers and half of them are
invalid and you can’t use
them,” said Desari Hinkel of
Pascagoula, who along with
her husband, James, waited
in a long line of people at
Pascagoula High School,
FEMA’s first assistance and
information center in the city.
Flood waters cracked the
foundation of the Hinkels’
Meteor Street home and also
claimed their shed. They’ve
b e e n s lo s hing a r ou n d in
sludge while gutting their
entire house, including completely pulling up the floors.
Desari Hinkel said their
insurance company said “don’t
touch anything” until FEMA
inspects their property. They
w e r e a ls o t o ld t o r emov e
everything for health and
safety reasons.
“I’d hate to see what’s all in
that mud. We’ve got mold all
over the house and we can’t
touch anything,” said Desari
Hinkel, adding that her husband still has to determine
what can be done about his
damaged shop, tools, antique
vehicle and boat.
Tom Hegele, FEMA public
information officer stationed
TO REGISTER
FOR DISASTER
ASSISTANCE
Disaster Recovery Centers in Pascagoula, Moss
Point and Ocean Springs
are the only Jackson County
locations where citizens can
register for disaster assistance. Centers are open
seven days a week, from 8
a.m. to 6 p.m. The centers
are located at Pascagoula
High School, on Market
Street in Pascagoula, Pelican Landing, on Miss. 613
in Moss Point and America’s
Thrift Store, 3164 Bienville
Blvd. in Ocean Springs.
Registration is also available by calling (800) 6213362 or online at
www.fema.gov. The best
time to call is between midnight and 6 a.m. Information
required includes social
security number, private
insurance information,
address and zip code of
damaged property and
directions to property. Also,
volunteers are needed to
work the Red Cross tables.
To volunteer, go early each
morning to the Red Cross
office in the senior citizens
building on Washington
Avenue in Ocean Springs.
at PHS, said the site is for
registration and information
only and that anyone who registered with the FEMA hotline or online did not have to
come to the high school or Pelican Landing in Moss Point,
which is expected to open
today.
Personnel to handle Small
Business Administration loan
applications, disaster unemployment, health, disaster
legal assistance, insurance,
Housing and Urban Development, Medicaid and other
storm-related problems were
also fielding residents’ concerns.
Rental assistance is a major
relief program, Hegele said,
as well as helping homeowners with their claims.
Residents were also upset
to find FEMA was not cutting
checks or handing out debit
cards as in Houston, which
Hegele said was a pilot program. Victims can choose to
have FEMA directly deposit
checks into their bank
accounts, but he could not
confirm what the amount will
be, or when they’ll be available.
Tamara Anderson was holding her 14-month-old granddaughter, Keleigh Johnson,
while trying to get property
answers and also health-related information because of
another granddaughter, a
newborn.
Anderson worked a full shift
as a nurse at Singing River
Hospital before evacuating to
Pensacola, Fla.
“It was a disaster just getting to Pensacola. I mean, I
was in tears by the time we
got there,” she said.
And she didn’t feel any better when she and her family
a rrived a t t heir C oncord
Street home in Pascagoula.
“I was sick. When I opened
the door, water came out and
everything else that was in
there,” she said.
Moss Point native Cathy
Wells, 55, fled New Orleans
before Katrina, but the storm
blew the roof off her mother’s
home in Moss Point, where
they stayed.
Wells and her daughter,
Keisha Wells, 21, say they’re
glad to be alive and are having better luck than many of
their friends in the Crescent
City, where Cathy Wells has
lived for 38 years.
“We’re trying to see what
kind of assistance we can get
here because everything’s so
messed up over there,” she
said. “There are people who
perished so we cannot complain. We were blessed to
have some place to go that
wa s
not
com p let ely
destroyed.”
Reporter Brad Crocker can
be reached at [email protected] or (251) 2195551.
WE’RE OPEN!
• FUNGUS & MILDEW CONTROL •
• TERMITE CONTROL •
Roaches – Rats – Mice – Ants
762-5959
392-3425
Pascagoula
Biloxi
To Contact
MOSS POINT — Shaded by a purple, gold
and green frilly umbrella, Betty Jo Taylor tossed
out Mardi Gras beads as a continuous line of
cars paraded by.
The Pascagoula woman stood at the entrance
of the makeshift hurricane relief center at the
Carpenters Local 234 training center on Miss. 63,
north of Interstate 10. The 22,000-square-foot
center has become a staging area for tons of
donated food, water and supplies.
Taylor lost in the storm, but doesn’t want to
focus on herself. She’d rather see the smiles
from those flipping their beads around their
necks.
“Everybody needs something,” she said.
“They’re laughing. Isn’t that wonderful?”
Andrie Bang, 2, sat on her grandmother’s knee
and grinned when she slipped on her pair of
Mardi Gras necklaces. Rhonda Cumbest held
the toddler because when they lost their cars in
the storm, they lost their car seats. She was
hoping to find replacements at the relief center.
Cumbest has three families living in her
Escatawpa mobile home. The families were sharing one vehicle.
“They lost everything,” she said of her children.
Taylor twirled her umbrella over her shoulder
and tossed more beads to surprised storm survivors. “I’m giving out my love. I ain’t got nothing
else,” she said.
J.O. Richardson of Mobile, Ala., the local ’s
business manager, said several 18-wheelers of
supplies were set to arrive from Florida and Illinois regional union councils. Red Cross gives
them 1,000 pounds of supplies daily to distribute.
Donations are also welcome from area churches
and organizations.
Richardson said volunteers there will sort the
donations and distribute them to those needing
supplies. Thousands have been served by the
center since they opened two days after Katrina
made landfall.
“We want the people who need it,” he said.
Reporter Donna Harris can be reached at
[email protected] or (251)454-9399.
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8-A
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
BRAC proposal targets more bases in South
By JEFFREY McMURRAY
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — A commission sent President Bush a military realignment proposal on
Friday that was less kind to Southern bases
than the Pentagon wanted, and affected communities in the region were moving ahead
with redevelopment plans even as their lawmakers hoped for last-minute changes.
The independent Base Closure and Realignment Commission ultimately approved all but
14 percent of the closings and consolidations
sought by Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld. Many of the rollbacks came as bad news
for the South, but few decisions to salvage
bases or major missions benefited the region.
“The commissioners seemed to feel that the
Pentagon had been too hard on the Northeast and it was their job to rebalance the decisions in order to prevent the demilitarization
of New England,” said Loren Thompson, a
defense analyst at the Lexington Institute, a
think tank in Arlington, Va.
Thompson said he expected Bush and Congress to approve the commission’s recommendations. Still, Sen. Saxby Chambliss, RGa., was holding out hope something could
be done to restore the Pentagon’s initial pro-
posal to close Navy bases in Connecticut and
Maine. Those would have meant major job
gains at Kings Bay Submarine Station in
Georgia and Norfolk Naval Station in Virginia.
The BRAC panel reversed those decisions,
but Chambliss suggested Bush should rethink
them because they accounted for 80 percent of
the Navy’s cost savings.
The commission’s final deliberations were
particularly bad news for Georgia, which not
only failed to gain jobs at Kings Bay but still
lost four bases to closure — Naval Air StationAtlanta, Fort Gillem and Fort McPherson in
St. Peter
From Page 1-A
Kered, who wants to be a
teacher when she grows up, said
she would rather help clean up
the debris than attend class
“because it was very special to
me.”
Her mom, Waukeita, said the
damage to the school was especially devastating because her
children are the fifth generation
of the family to attend St. Peter.
The fate of St. Peter’s students
has been decided, at least for the
near future.
“The decision of the diocese is
that our children will go to Resurrection this year,” McNamara
said.
She said the teachers from St.
Peter will also transfer to Resurrection for the remainder of
the school year.
“And all of the teachers will
be paid. Benefits will be paid,”
she said, adding that arrangements will be made for families
who may no longer be able to
afford tuition.
A visit Friday from Diocese of
Biloxi Bishop Thomas J. Rodi
boosted morale.
He not only reassured parents
and students that the school will
be rebuilt, he introduced representatives from St. Isadore
Catholic Church in Bloomingdale, Ill., which “adopted” St.
Peter.
During the tour of the debris,
Illinois Rep. Roger Jenisch
remarked on the reality of the
surroundings.
“It sends chills up your spine
when you’re here in person, as
compared to seeing it on TV,” he
said.
“The rich and poor — even
(U.S.) Sen. (Trent) Lott’s house is
nothing but a pile of debris,” Rodi
said.
HURRICANE CLEANUP
“It sends chills up
your spine when you’re
here in person, as compared to seeing it on
TV.”
— Illinois Rep. Roger
Jenisch, touring
St. Peter the Apostle
Catholic School Friday
The bishop said other schools
along the Coast received varying degrees of damage.
“Some schools are destroyed.
Some have only moderate damage. Others have severe flooding,” he said.
“We intend to rebuild,” Rodi
added. “We’ve suffered a great
loss, but with God and the help
of others, we will be fine.”
McNamara said the 97-yearold school was named for St.
Peter Claver, who ministered to
black slaves during the 17th century. His feast is celebrated by
the Catholic church Sept. 9.
McNamara’s ties to Hurricane
Katrina transcend state lines.
She spent 17 years working
in New Orleans with the poorest,
most troubled citizens of the city.
Despite the devastation, she said,
it could have been worse.
“Every time we have a hurricane, we ask (God) for no direct
hit on New Orleans,” McNamara said. “If it had gone in the
way it was supposed to originally, New Orleans would be a
cemetery.”
A informational meeting for
parents will be at St. Peter at 1
p.m. today. Classes will resume
at Resurrection Oct. 3.
Reporter Allison Mather can
be reached at [email protected] or (251) 219-5551.
A line of trucks
stretches deep into
the Sunplex Industrial Park on Friday, where a dump
site for Hurricane
Katrina debris has
been established.
Citizens are asked
to divide debris
into three piles:
household
garbage, construction materials and
downed limbs and
vegetation. Debris
should not block
streets.
Christy Pritchett/The Mississippi Press
Resurrection
FEMA
From Page 1-A
tetanus shots,” said Ward 5
Alderman and Mayor Pro Tempore Jerry Dalgo, who lead the
unit around the city.
“I’m just glad I can be of some
help,” Sally Beach, an emergency room nurse from Palm
Beach County, Fla., who volunteers with FEMA’s DMAT FL-4
team.
Beach said she put her name
on FEMA’s list of volunteers the
Saturday after Katrina and was
called out on Labor Day.
Dalgo and Mayor Connie
Moran asked for the medical
team after seeing residents, who
had not had tetanus shots,
cleaning their yards and picking
up the scratches and wounds
that comes with it.
“We thought we’d just bring it
into the neighborhoods,” Dalgo
said. “They’re so busy with their
own recovery efforts that they
don’t have time to stop.”
The silver FEMA van, preceded by a police car, got only a
few responses at first, but once
word got out, residents seemed
to materialize out of the streetside debris piles to stand in line.
Despite the slow start, the
DMAT team administered
Christy Pritchett/The Mississippi Press
Residents of the Ashley Place neighborhood gather
together at the home of Susan and James Ray Warren
to eat a hot meal delivered by Nora Harvey, another
neighborhood resident. The two families have been
providing lunch for nearly 60-plus neighborhood residents since the day after Hurricane Katrina.
about 50 shots within the first
two hours, according to the chief
of DMAT FL-4, Garfield Jones.
“It’s silly not to take the shot,”
Larry Cosper said after he
received a shot. “It’s not exactly
the best climate to be working
in. We’re all getting skinned
up.”
Seventeen-year-old Matthew
Lewis was helping his aunt
clean up when the shots were
offered. He said he wasn’t too
worried about tetanus, but got a
shot anyway.
“It’s just probably better to
be safe than sorry,” Lewis said.
The team ran out of shots in
the Ashley Place neighborhood
at the home of Susan and
James Warren.
“Thank ya’ll for being here,”
Susan Warren said. “We’re so
glad the shots are here.”
The Warren’s back porch was
full of food and nearly 30 Ashley
Place residents scattered
around the yard with plates
piled high with fried chicken
and pizza.
The neighborhood returned
FEMA’s generosity and invited
the crew to eat from the various
items spread out on a piece of
plywood on top of two sawhorses.
The Warrens, along with
Nora Harvey, who’s cooking food
with her gas stove, have been
feeding up to 65 people in the
neighborhood since the day
after the storm.
“A child from the neighborhood walks around and tells
everybody ‘food’s on the table’
and we come,” Judy Howell
said. “We’re so fortunate to be
able to come over here and eat.”
Reporter Clair Byrd can be
reached at [email protected] or (251) 219-5551.
Comfort
From Page 1-A
ship’s X-ray department incl u de s f o ur p o r t a ble machines that can be moved to a
patient’s bed.
Its blood bank currently
holds 210 pints of blood with a
frozen blood supply in reserve.
The surgical department has
four equipped operating rooms.
“We are able to do any type of
surgery except open heart surgery, full joint replacement and
organ transplants,” Anderson
said.
Nursing services director
Cmdr. Linda Nash said the
Comfort’s 85 nurses perform a
number of duties besides health
care, including housekeeping
duties if the ship serves as
housing for relief workers helping with storm recovery.
“We all pitch in and do a
number of things,” she said. “I
have nurses cooking in the gal-
the Atlanta area and a small Navy supply
school in Athens.
“The chances of a base getting off the list at
this point is remote,” said Gen. Philip Y.
Browning, executive director of the Georgia
Military Affairs Coordinating Committee,
which shepherded Georgia through the closure process.
When it comes to finding a future after closure, however, the Georgia bases figure to
have more options than some of the other
doomed Southern bases, such as Naval Station
Pascagoula in Mississippi or the Naval Support Activity in New Orleans.
ley and getting beds ready; we
clean up. We’re a team; no task
is too great or too small. We’re
here to serve.”
Nash said the ship has been
equipped and supplied to handle any medical situation.
“We don’t know what to
expect,” she said. “We had to
get ready quickly to get here.
We had help from bases all over
the country.”
Allington said he plans to
meet with area health care
providers to determine where
the Comfort and its medical
staff can help. He said the
length of time the ship will stay
in port is yet to be determined,
adding, “we’ll be here until
we’re relieved.”
Reporter John Surratt can
be reached at [email protected] or (251) 2195551.
KATRINA
AFTERMATH
AT A GLANCE
A look at the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina:
Death toll: Gov. Haley Barbour said Mississippi’s death
toll rose to 211.
Damage estimates: The University of Southern Mississippi said its campuses in Hattiesburg and on the Gulf Coast
sustained $100 million in damage.
Refugees, where and how: 13,262 in 104 shelters in Mississippi, with more in motels, hotels and private homes.
Power: About 203,000 homes and businesses were without power Thursday, down from 800,000 immediately after
the hurricane.
Foreign aid: Mexican sailors began unloading hurricane
aid Friday on the Mississippi coast. A Navy spokesman said
87 Mexican sailors will help with disaster relief.
Visitor’s view: Lt. Gen. Steven Blum, chief of the National
Guard Bureau, said that “arguably” a day or so of response
time was lost due to troops from the Mississippi National
Guard’s 155th Infantry Brigade being in Iraq. “Had that
brigade been at home and not in Iraq, their expertise and
capabilities could have been brought to bear,” Blum said in
Bay St. Louis.
From Page 1-A
of the hurricane has offered
many lessons.
“It’s an extraordinary situation,” he said. “Life is about a lot
more than the curriculum.”
A return to the routine of
attending school will be good
for students, Hollowell said,
explaining that for a child, a
break in routine can be a jolt to
the system.
Students returning to Hollowell’s class are in for a jolt,
too. He had a test scheduled for
the day after the hurricane
made landfall.
“I told all of my students the
second day we get back we have
a test,” he laughed. “They’ve
had a whole month to study —
there’s not going to be any
excuses.”
As far as hurricanes go, the
Indiana native remains unimpressed.
“I like snow better,” he said.
Reporter Allison Mather can
be reached at
[email protected]
or (251)219-5551.
Director
From Page 1-A
worth up to $2,000 to dispossessed hurricane victims.
Evacuees relocated to Texas,
many of whom began receiving
cards on Friday, will continue
getting them, officials said, but
not victims elsewhere.
Brown introduced the program on Wednesday, calling it
“a great way to ... empower
these hurricane survivors to
really start rebuilding their
lives.”
At the White House, spokesman Scott McClellan said the
decision to reassign Brown
had been made by Homeland
Security Secretary Michael
Chertoff and that Bush supported it.
One Republican welcomed
Brown’s ouster with unusually sharp language. “Something
needed to happen. Michael
Brown has been acting like a
private instead of a general,”
said Sen. Trent Lott of Mississippi, whose state was hardhit by the storm.
Senate Democrats, who have
been sharply critical of Bush’s
response to the storm, said the
president should not have left
Brown as head of FEMA. In a
letter to the president, the
Democratic leader, Sen. Harry
Reid of Nevada, and three other members of the leadership
called for the dismissal of the
FEMA director.
He “simply doesn’t have the
ability or the experience to
oversee a coordinated federal
response of this magnitude,”
wrote Reid and Sens. Dick
Durbin of Illinois, Chuck
Schumer of New York and
Debbie Stabenow of Michigan.
Separately, Reid and Senate
Majority Leader Bill Frist
opened private discussions
over a GOP plan for a congressional committee to investigate the administration’s
readiness for the storm and
reaction to it.
Republicans hold a majority
in both the House and Senate,
and Frist and Speaker Dennis Hastert announced plans
this week for a joint panel
with more GOP members than
Democrats. Reid and House
Democratic Leader Nancy
Pelosi have said they would
boycott the proceedings, calling for an independent commission instead.
Bush’s public support rose
dramatically in the days following the attacks of 2001. He
linked that time with the present at a ceremony Friday
awarding medals to family
members of fire, police and
other first responders killed
by terrorists four years ago.
“When America has been
challenged, there have always
been citizens willing to step
forward and risk their lives
for the rest of us,” the president said. “Over the last 11
days in Louisiana and Mississippi and Alabama, we have
again seen acts of great compassion and extraordinary
bravery from America’s first
responders.”
S PORTS
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
Contact: JR. Wittner, (251) 219-5553
E-mail address: [email protected]
B
Saturday, september 10, 2005
AP ANALYSIS
Saints try
to win one
for city
By TIM DAHLBERG
SAN ANTONIO — Their
own dome is trashed, and
so is their city. Their fans
are scattered here and
there, and so are their
families.
They take buses to the
gym to lift weights, and
buses from the gym to the
Alamodome to get dressed.
They take buses to a high
school to practice, and buses back to the hotel where
they now live.
On Sunday they’re supposed to try and win a
game for a place that in
some ways doesn’t exist
anymore.
Life has never been
tougher for the citizens of
New Orleans. Football has
never been tougher for
their Saints.
“Our situation is uncomfortable,” said Saints tackle Wayne Gandy. “But for
the people in New Orleans
it’s catastrophic.”
Gandy reminded his
teammates of that a few
days ago when some began
grumbling about the
vagabond life of a team
with no home. He stood
before the offense and told
them they were lucky men,
no matter where they
played.
Most still had homes,
and they all still had their
family. They still had jobs,
no matter where they end
up working at them.
A lot of the people who
used to pay to watch them
play don’t have any of that.
“I was a little disgusted
about people making at
least six figure incomes
worrying about anything,”
Gandy said. “Sometimes
you forget to think of the
lesser man. Sometimes you
forget to put things in perspective.”
The Saints go to Carolina on Sunday to begin a
season on the road. Their
first “home” game will be
in front of rabid New York
Giants fans at the Meadowlands, courtesy of a
bizarre decision by the
NFL. It’s anyone’s guess
whether they end up playing most of their home
schedule at the Alamodome, in Houston or in
Baton Rouge, La.
Their mission this year
isn’t to win a Super Bowl.
It’s to give a bit of comfort
to the displaced citizens of
New Orleans, who desperately need something to
hang onto that serves as a
link to the city that Hurricane Katrina nearly
destroyed.
Some of them tried to do
just that earlier this week,
going to visit some of the
displaced people living in
shelters in San Antonio.
“You saw the gleam in
their eyes that they were
happy to see us,” wide
receiver Donte Stallworth
said. “All they talked about
was how the Saints would
do. They told us, ‘We need
you guys.”’
The players want to do
their part. They’ve visited
shelters, and they talk of
making donations, doing
benefits and helping New
Orleans recover.
Their owner, meanwhile,
does nothing.
Long before Katrina hit,
Tom Benson was looking
for a way to move the team
See COLUMN, Page 2-B
FLORIDA LOTTERY
Cash 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-2-5
Play 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8-4-0
Fantasy 5 . . . . . .2-3-12-20-30
Mega Money (1) . . .3-16-22-28
LOUISIANA LOTTERY
Pick 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-0-4
Pick 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-5-4-4
Big inning leads Nationals over Braves
Kolb.
By the Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Jose
Guillen broke a tie with a tworun double in the eighth inning
for his 1,000th career hit, capping the Washington Nationals’
comeback for an 8-6 victory over
the NL East-leading Atlanta
Braves on Friday night.
Guillen’s big hit came on the
first pitch from reliever Dan
Phillies 12, Marlins 5
PHILADELPHIA — Pat Burrell and Ryan Howard each hit a
two-run homer, and the Philadelphia Phillies snapped a five-game
losing streak with a 12-5 win
over the Florida Marlins on Friday night.
Cardinals 3, Mets 2
ST. LOUIS — Larry Walker
MLB ROUNDUP
hit a tiebreaking home run off
the right-field scoreboard with
two outs in the eighth inning and
Jason Marquis threw eight
strong innings, helping the St.
Louis Cardinals beat the New
York Mets 3-2 Friday night.
Brewers 7, Astros 4
MILWAUKEE — Roger
Clemens lasted just three innings
in his shortest start in more than
a year, and the Milwaukee Brewers spoiled Jeff Bagwell’s return
from the disabled list with a 7-4
victory over the Houston Astros
on Friday night.
AL Capsules
Yankees 8, Red Sox 4
NEW YORK — Boston arrived
at Yankee Stadium with a Sep-
tember lead in the AL East for
the first time in a decade, and
Derek Jeter and Aaron Small
promptly made it shrink.
Jeter turned in two great
defensive plays and drove in the
go-ahead run, and Small won his
seventh straight decision to lead
the New York Yankees over the
Red Sox 8-4 Friday night in the
opener of a big three-game series.
KATRINA IMPACTS FOOTBALL
Harrison County prep standouts transfer elsewhere
By JOEDY McCREARY
The Associated Press
AP
J.C. Brignone cools off during his first practice with the Parkview Panthers in Lilburn, Ga. When Hurricane Katrina tore through the Mississippi coastal town of Bay St. Louis, Brignone, a defensive tackle college
prospect, lost nearly everything. Brigone transferred to Parkview after
learning that St. Stanislaus may not play football this season.
Crew chief ‘probably’
leaving Gordon team
By HANK KURZ Jr.
The Associated Press
R I C H M O N D , Va . —
The future of Jeff Gordon’s
crew chief is up in the air
when his contract with
Hendrick Motorsports
runs out at the end of this
season, and Robbie Loomis
said Friday that he “probably” won’t be making the
calls next season for the
No. 24 team.
Loomis, Gordon’s crew
chief for the last of his four
series championships in
2 0 0 1 , s a i d h e ’s i n t h e
process of reprioritizing
his life to place God first,
family second and racing
third after having racing
in the top spot throughout
his career.
First, Loomis will try to
help
Gordon
reach
NASCAR’s Chase for the
Nextel Cup championship.
To succeed, the team needs
an impressive run Saturday night at Richmond
International Raceway.
“If we get the car in the
Chase, the next 10 weeks
I’m going to put all my
focus towards getting that
car to win the championship,” he said.
Loomis also backed off,
but only slightly, from a
statement he made earlier
to reporters, telling them
he already had determined
he wouldn’t be back next
year.
“I probably used the
w o r d p r o b a b l y, ” s a i d
Loomis, whose contract is
expiring. “It’s a good time
for me to reprioritize my
personal life and get
things figured out there.”
One of the things
Loomis said he wants to
focus on is spending time
with his mother, Sally,
who was seriously ill last
season.
“I feel like the good Lord
gave me some extra time,
and I want to make sure I
utilize it the right way,”
he said.
JACKSON— High school football
star J.C. Brignone lost nearly everything when Hurricane Katrina tore
through coastal Bay St. Louis, from
his home to his senior season at St.
Stanislaus High.
Brignone’s family fled 400 miles
to join relatives in the suburban
Atlanta town of Lilburn, where
Georgia powerhouse Parkview High
received him with open arms.
“It’s just gone by real slow, getting
everything back to normal and not
being able to see your friends,” the
defensive lineman said. “It’s just taking a lot of getting used to, I guess.”
Dozens of blue-chip high school
players scattered when the storm
ravaged the recruiting hotbeds of
Mississippi and Louisiana, and
Brignone is among the lucky ones
— he stayed on college recruiters’
radar.
But interested coaches are scrambling to keep track of others who
have dispersed among schools in the
Southeast.
“Some of these guys don’t have
homes, their cell phones are spotty ...
Finding out where kids are, I don’t
want to sound bad, but it’s hard to
know if they’re still alive or if their
families are OK,” said Ronnie
Sanders, recruiting coordinator at
Southern Mississippi.
Even as Brignone trained in
Parkview’s weight room, he hoped
his old school could salvage its season. When that didn’t happen, he
just decided to play for Parkview.
“I went up there to go work out ...
and came back to find there was
nothing to go back to,” Brignone said
this week.
Several other coastal Division I
prospects have found new homes.
Defensive back Wesley Ladner of
D’Iberville resurfaced at Acadia High
School in Lafayette, La. And Fort
Walton Beach in the Florida panhandle welcomed two players from
Mississippi: quarterback Tyler Burks
and receiver Robert Labat of Bay St.
Louis.
“Our kids have taken them in and
really accepted them,” Fort Walton
Beach coach Mike Owens said.
A third player, running back
Damion Fletcher, expressed interest
in playing but ultimately returned to
Mississippi after Biloxi announced
plans to play the season.
Brignone is set, too. He’s attracting
interest from Mississippi State, Rice
and Louisiana-Lafayette.
But others — who might’ve hoped
to parlay a big senior season into a
scholarship — now may wind up
overlooked, recruiting analyst Bobby
Burton said.
“The kids that were the up-andcoming seniors that were hoping to
have a great senior season and play
their way into a scholarship — that’s
who it hits the hardest,” Burton said.
“With recruiting accelerating so
much, having commitments prior to
a senior year, the coaches aren’t
going to have enough video on kids
from the New Orleans area to make
that assessment.”
Many states are making it easier
for displaced players to get onto the
field as administrators across the
region have relaxed residency
requirements and other transfer
rules. People around the sport dismiss the notion that a coach might
use those weakened regulations to
entice Katrina refugees.
“That would be kind of an insensitive thing to do in a situation like
that,” said Robert Maddox, the coach
at Auburn (Ala.) High School.
“I have not seen that one iota,”
Burton said.
At this point, the coaches say, giving the players an opportunity is
more about helping them get their
lives back together than winning. A
suburban Atlanta church group and
the entire community is donating
furniture and helping the Brignone
family find a house, Parkview coach
Cecil Flowe said.
“They had the shoes on their feet
and the clothes on their backs,”
Flowe said. “He’s ready to get his
life back going. He said, ’I’ve got to
play. I want to play.”’
Said Owens: “This is something
bigger than football. They need to
be a part of something, and they
need quickly in their lives to get
some semblance of normal.”
Clijsters,
Pierce to
meet in
Women’s final
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Mary Pierce
resorted to gamesmanship and
Kim Clijsters recovered the
spark she’d momentarily lost to
set up a U.S. Open final
between one of the oldest
women in the game and the
toughest on tour this year.
Pierce brought her famous
histrionics to a new level Friday — a 12-minute, doubleinjury timeout after she lost the
first set, another tape job afterward, doses of eye drops here
and there, endless poses and
finger-blowing between shots —
before she finally put away last
year’s rattled runner-up, Elena
Dementieva, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2.
Clijsters watched five match
points disappear before her disbelieving eyes in the second set
against top-seeded Maria
Sharapova, got crushed in a
tiebreak, then found the fire she
needed to win 6-2, 6-7 (4), 6-3
and remain in pursuit of her
AP
Kim Clijsters, left, greets Maria Sharapova at the net
following their match at the U.S. Open in New York,
Friday. Clijsters won, 6-2, 6-7 (4), 6-3.
first Grand Slam title.
The way the two matches
played out, the final in prime
time Saturday night has the
makings of a soap opera.
It will be Pierce’s first U.S.
Open final in a 17-year-career
and her second major final this
year as she tries to atone for
the shellacking she suffered
against Justine Henin-
Hardenne at the French three
months ago. For the 22-yearold Clijsters, who sat out last
year’s Open with a wrist injury
after reaching the final in 2003,
this will be a chance to win her
first major title and seventh
tournament this year.
The richest rewards in Grand
Slam and women’s sport history
See U.S. OPEN, Page 2-B
2-B
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
BY THE NUMBERS
FOOTBALL
Prep Scores
Friday’s Results
Amory 36, Itawamba 29
Biggersville 28, Alcorn Central 14
Booneville 35, Nettleton 13
Bruce 49, Houston 7
Calhoun City 14, Independence 0
Carthage 37, Edinburg 6
Charleston 36, West Tallahatchie 6
Clinton 38, Brandon 13
East Holmes 25, Central Holmes 0
East Side 7, West Boliver 6
East Webster 26, Walnut 12
Lafayette 51, Shaw 0
Leland 16, Cleveland 8
Mooreville 13, Mantachie 0
Oxford 51, News Albany 18
Ripley 16, Holly Springs 14
Senatobia 28, Corinth 14
Shannon 44, Okolona 6
Smithville 16, West Oktibbeha 0
South Panola 40, Germantown (Tenn.) 10
St. Andrews 56, St. Aloysius 21
Starkville 17, Meridian 14
Tupelo 17, Louisville 12
Vardaman 42, Thrasher 6
Warren Central 22, Grenada 11
Water Valley 47, Aberdeen 14
West Point 35, Columbus 11
NFL Scores
Thursday's Game
New England 30, Oakland 20
Sunday's Games
Denver at Miami, noon
Chicago at Washington, noon
Houston at Buffalo, noon
Tennessee at Pittsburgh, noon
N.Y. Jets at Kansas City, noon
Seattle at Jacksonville, noon
New Orleans at Carolina, noon
Cincinnati at Cleveland, noon
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, noon
Green Bay at Detroit, 3:15 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 3:15 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Giants, 3:15 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 3:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Baltimore, 7:30 p.m.
Monday's Game
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 18
Detroit at Chicago, noon
Baltimore at Tennessee, noon
Pittsburgh at Houston, noon
Buffalo at Tampa Bay, noon
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, noon
Minnesota at Cincinnati, noon
New England at Carolina, noon
San Francisco at Philadelphia, noon
Atlanta at Seattle, 3:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 3:05 p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 3:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Green Bay, 3:15 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 3:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 19
N.Y. Giants vs. New Orleans at East
Rutherford, N.J., 6:30 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8 p.m.
BASEBALL
National League Glance
East Division
W L
Pct GB
Atlanta
81 60
.574 —
Florida
75 66
.532
6
Philadelphia
74 67
.525
7
1
Washington
73 69
.514 8 ⁄2
New York
70 71
.496 11
Central Division
W L
Pct GB
St. Louis
90 52
.634 —
Houston
75 65
.536 14
Milwaukee
70 71
.496 191⁄2
Chicago
69 71
.493 20
Cincinnati
64 76
.457 25
Pittsburgh
57 83
.407 32
West Division
W L
Pct GB
San Diego
70 69
.504 —
Los Angeles
63 76
.453
7
San Francisco 63 76
.453
7
Arizona
63 78
.447
8
Colorado
56 83
.403 14
———
Thursday’s Games
Pittsburgh 8, Arizona 7, 12 innings
Florida 8, Washington 4
St. Louis 5, N.Y. Mets 0
San Diego 3, Colorado 2, 10 innings
Chicago Cubs 5, San Francisco 3
Friday’s Games
Washington 8, Atlanta 6
Philadelphia 12, Florida 5
Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 4
Milwaukee 7, Houston 4
St. Louis 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Arizona at Colorado, (n)
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, (n)
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, (n)
Today’s Games
Atlanta (Sosa 10-3) at Washington (L.Hernandez 15-6), 12:25 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Prior 10-5) at San Francisco (Hennessey 4-6), 3:05 p.m.
San Diego (Hensley 0-0 or Oxspring 0-0) at
L.A. Dodgers (Lowe 9-13), 3:10 p.m.
Houston (Pettitte 14-9) at Milwaukee (Ohka
10-7), 6:05 p.m.
Florida (Vargas 5-3) at Philadelphia (Myers
12-7), 6:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (K.Wells 7-15) at Cincinnati
(Ra.Ortiz 8-10), 6:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Trachsel 1-1) at St. Louis (Suppan 13-10), 6:15 p.m.
Arizona (Vargas 8-8) at Colorado (Day 1-2),
7:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Atlanta at Washington, 12:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 12:15 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, 12:35 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at St. Louis, 1:15 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 2:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m.
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 3:10 p.m.
Wild Card
W L
Pct GB
Houston
75 65
.536 —
1
Florida
75 66
.532
⁄2
Philadelphia
74 67
.525 11⁄2
Washington
73 69
.514
3
New York
70 71
.496 51⁄2
Friday’s Games
Washington 8, Atlanta 6
Philadelphia 12, Florida 5
Milwaukee 7, Houston 4
St. Louis 3, N.Y. Mets 2
NL Boxes
NATIONALS 8, BRAVES 6
ATLANTA
WASHINGTON
abr h bi
abr h bi
Furcal ss 5 1 2 1
Wlkrsn 1b 5 1 2 2
MGiles 2b 4 1 1 0
Byrd lf
210 0
CJones 3b 4 1 1 0
Brgmn p 0 0 0 0
AJones cf 4 2 2 4
Mjwski p 0 0 0 0
LaRche 1b4 0 2 1
Baerga ph 0 0 0 0
Frncur rf 4 0 0 0
KKelly pr 0 1 0 0
JEstda c 4 0 1 0
CCrdro p 0 0 0 0
Lngrhn lf 4 1 1 0
JGillen rf 5 1 2 2
HRmrz p 1 0 0 0
PrWlsn cf 5 0 1 1
Orr ph
100 0
Castilla 3b 5 1 2 1
Boyer p 0 0 0 0
GBnntt c 3 0 0 0
Davies p 0 0 0 0
Schndr c 0 0 0 0
Foster p 0 0 0 0
DCruz 2b 3 1 1 0
Kolb p
000 0
Church lf 0 1 0 0
Hlndsw ph 1 0 0 0
CGzmn ss 3 1 1 1
Loaiza p 2 0 0 0
Watson lf 1 0 1 0
Carroll 2b 0 0 0 0
Totals 36610 6
Totals
348107
Atlanta
200 040 000— 6
Washington 100 110 14x— 8
E—MGiles (9), LaRoche (6), Boyer (1),
Watson (1). DP—Washington 1. LOB—
Atlanta 4, Washington 9. 2B—Furcal (25),
AJones (23), LaRoche (24), Langerhans (17),
Wilkerson (36), JGuillen 2 (29), CGuzman
(14). HR—AJones (46), Castilla (11). CS—
Watson (2). S—HRamirez, Carroll.
IP H
R ER BB SO
Atlanta
HRamirez
5
6
3 2 3 3
Boyer
1
1
0 0 0 1
Davies
1
1
3 3 2 0
Foster L,4-2 1-3 1
2
2 1 0
2
Kolb
⁄3
1
0 0 0 0
Washington
Loaiza
6 10
6 6 0 5
Bergmann
1
0
0 0 0 1
Majewski W,3-3 1
0
0 0 0 0
CCordero S,44
1
0
0 0 0 2
Davies pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
WP—HRamirez.
Umpires—Home, Larry Young; First, Eric
Cooper; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Marvin Hudson.
T—2:58. A—36,295 (45,250).
———
PIRATES 8, REDS 4
PITTSBURGH
CINCINNATI
ab rhbi
abr h bi
McLth cf 3 2 2 0
Freel 2b 4 0 0 0
JWilsn ss 4 3 2 1
FLopez ss 5 0 1 0
Bay lf
422 4
Dunn lf3 2 1 1
Ward 1b 4 0 0 0
Aurilia 3b 4 1 1 0
CWilsn rf 3 0 0 1
Casey 1b 3 0 1 0
STorres p 0 0 0 0
Kearns rf 2 0 1 1
Mckwk 3b 3 1 1 1
WPena cf 4 0 1 1
Doumit c 5 0 0 0
LaRue c 4 0 0 0
Snchez 2b 5 0 1 0
Hudson p 0 0 0 0
OlPrez p 2 0 0 1
Keisler p 1 0 0 0
Vglsng p 0 0 0 0
Coffey p 0 0 0 0
Rstvich ph 1 0 0 0
Dnorfia ph 1 1 1 1
Grabow p 0 0 0 0
Shcklfr p 0 0 0 0
TRdmn rf 0 0 0 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0
Hlbrt ph 1 0 0 0
Merckr p 0 0 0 0
Smpson p 0 0 0 0
JaCruz ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 34 8 8 8
Totals
334 8 4
Pittsburgh
231 000 020—8
Cincinnati
100 111 000—4
E—Freel (7). DP—Pittsburgh 1. LOB—
Pittsburgh 9, Cincinnati 7. 2B—JWilson (19),
Sanchez (16). HR—Bay 2 (28), Dunn (37),
Denorfia (1). SF—Mackowiak, OlPerez,
Kearns.
IP H
R ER BB SO
Pittsburgh
OlPerez
41⁄3
5
3 3 2 5
2
2
1 1 0 0
Vogelsong W,1-1 1 ⁄3
Grabow
12⁄3
0
0 0 1 2
1
1
0 0 1 3
STorres
1 ⁄3
Cincinnati
Hudson L,6-8
22⁄3
5
6 6 3 3
Keisler
2
2
0 0 1 1
1
Coffey
⁄3
0
0 0 0 0
Shackelford
1
0
0 0 0 1
Belisle
1
0
0 0 0 0
Mercker
1
1
2 2 0 0
Simpson
1
0
0 0 0 0
HBP—by Mercker (McLouth), by Hudson
(McLouth), by Hudson (Ward), by Hudson
(JWilson).
Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds; First, Wally Bell; Second, John Hirschbeck; Third,
Lance Barksdale.
T—2:54. A—19,244 (42,271).
———
PHILLIES 12, MARLINS 5
FLORIDA
PHILA
abr h bi
abr h bi
LCstillo 2b 5 0 0 0
Rollins ss 4 3 1 0
Conine lf 5 1 3 0
Lofton cf 3 1 1 1
MiCbra 3b 5 1 1 1
Mchels cf 1 1 0 0
CDlgdo 1b 4 1 2 0
Utley 2b 5 2 3 1
JEcrcn rf 5 1 1 0
BAbreu rf 3 2 2 2
Easley ss 3 1 2 0
Burrell lf 3 2 2 4
Pierre cf 4 0 3 2
Chavez cf 0 0 0 0
Tranor c 3 0 1 1
Howard 1b 5 1 1 2
Villone p 0 0 0 0
DaBell 3b 3 0 1 1
Qantrill p 0 0 0 0
Lbrthal c 4 0 0 0
Hrmida ph 1 0 1 0
Lidle p
200 0
Mota p
Burnett p
Mehler p
Wlnhm c
Totals
000 0
100 0
100 0
201 0
39 5154
Geary p 0 0 0 0
Vctrno ph 1 0 1 0
Madson p 0 0 0 0
Kata ph
100 0
ALopez p 0 0 0 0
Totals35 1212 11
Florida
022 000 010 — 5
Philadelphia105 014 01x — 12
E—Treanor (3), Utley (10), BAbreu (3).
DP—Philadelphia 3. LOB—Florida 9,
Philadelphia 6. 2B—Conine (15), Lofton (11),
Utley (30), Burrell (23). 3B—Utley (6). HR—
Burrell (29), Howard (16). SB—JEncarnacion (3), Easley (3), Pierre (49), Rollins 2
(32), BAbreu (28). SF—BAbreu.
IP H
R ER BB SO
Florida
1
Burnett L,12-10 2 ⁄3
4
5 5 3 3
Moehler
3
4
3 3 0 2
2
Villone
⁄3
2
3 3 1 0
Quantrill
1
0
0 0 0 0
Mota
1
2
1 1 1 0
Philadelphia
Lidle W,10-10
5
8
4 3 1 3
Geary
1
1
0 0 0 0
Madson
1
1
0 0 0 0
ALopez
2
5
1 1 1 2
HBP—by Moehler (DaBell). PB—Treanor,
Willingham.
Umpires—Home, Mike DiMuro; First, Brian
Gorman; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Joe
West.
T—3:12. A—32,933 (43,826).
American League Glance
East Division
W L
Pct GB
Boston
82 58
.586 —
New York
79 61
.564
3
Toronto
70 70
.500 12
1
Baltimore
65 74
.468 16 ⁄2
Tampa Bay
59 83
.415 24
Central Division
W L
Pct GB
Chicago
87 52
.626 —
Cleveland
80 61
.567
8
Minnesota
73 67
.521 141⁄2
Detroit
63 76
.453 24
Kansas City
46 93
.331 41
West Division
W L
Pct GB
Los Angeles
78 61
.561 —
1
Oakland
78 62
.557
⁄2
Texas
69 72
.489 10
Seattle
60 79
.432 18
———
Thursday’s Games
Cleveland 4, Detroit 2
L.A. Angels 3, Boston 0
Tampa Bay 7, N.Y. Yankees 4
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Friday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees 8, Boston 4
Cleveland 4, Minnesota 2
Kansas City 12, Detroit 2
Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 2
Oakland 9, Texas 8
L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, (n)
Baltimore at Seattle, (n)
Today’s Games
Boston (Schilling 5-7) at N.Y. Yankees
(Chacon 4-2), 12:25 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Colon 18-6 or Saunders 0-0)
at Chicago White Sox (Garland 17-8), 12:25
p.m.
Toronto (Bush 4-8) at Tampa Bay (Kazmir
8-9), 5:15 p.m.
Minnesota (Baker 1-1) at Cleveland (Elarton 8-7), 6:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Gobble 1-0) at Detroit (Maroth
12-13), 6:05 p.m.
Oakland (Blanton 8-11) at Texas (Loe 8-4),
7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Lopez 13-9) at Seattle (Harris 22), 8:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Kansas City at Detroit, 11:05 p.m.
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 12:05 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 1:05 p.m.
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, 2:05
p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 3:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Wild Card
W L
Pct GB
Cleveland
80 61
.567 —
1
New York
79 61
.564
⁄2
Oakland
78 62
.557 11⁄2
Friday’s Games
Cleveland 4, Minnesota 2
N.Y. Yankees 8, Boston 4
Oakland 9, Texas 8
AL Boxes
BLUE JAYS 7, DEVIL RAYS 2
TORONTO
TAMPA BAY
abr hbi
abr h bi
Adams ss 5 1 1 1
Lugo ss 3 1 1 0
Ctlnotto lf 4 1 2 1
Crwfrd lf 5 1 3 0
Jhnson lf 1 0 0 0
Cantu 2b 5 0 1 1
VWells cf 5 0 0 0
Huff rf
401 1
Koskie 3b 4 2 2 2
Gomes dh 4 0 2 0
Hlnbrn 1b 4 0 1 0
TLee 1b 4 0 0 0
Zaun c
400 0
NGreen 3b 4 0 0 0
Hinske dh 4 1 2 0
THall c
402 0
AHill 2b 3 1 0 0
Gthrght cf 3 0 0 0
Gross rf 4 1 3 1
EduPrz ph 0 0 0 0
Totals 38711 5
Totals
362102
Toronto
221 000 200— 7
Tampa Bay 200 000 000— 2
E—TLee (3), Gathright (3). DP—Tampa
Bay 2. LOB—Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 10. 2B—
Adams (24), Hinske (26), Crawford (29), Cantu (38), Huff (24). HR—Koskie (11). SB—
Crawford (43).
IP H
R ER BB SO
Toronto
Towers W,11-10 6
9
2 2 1 5
Chulk
1
1
0 0 0 0
Speier
1
0
0 0 0 2
Schoeneweis
1
0
0 0 1 0
Tampa Bay
McClung L,6-9
2
6
5 3 1 2
TV SPORTWATCH
TODAY’S LISTINGS
Auto Racing
6:30 p.m. — Nextel Cup: Chevy Rock & Roll 400 (TNT)
College Football
9:30 a.m. — Kansas St. at Marshall (ESPN2)
11 a.m. — Notre Dame at Michigan (Ch. 13)
11 a.m. — Clemson at Maryland (ESPN)
11:30 a.m. — Army at Boston College (ESPN Classic)
11:30 a.m. — Tulsa at Oklahoma (FSN)
11:30 a.m. — Mississippi State at Auburn (JP)
1 p.m. — Colorado St. at Minnesota (ESPN2)
2:30 p.m. — North Carolina at Georgia Tech (Ch. 13)
3 p.m. — Northern Illinois at Northwestern (ESPN
Classic)
4:30 p.m. — South Carolina at Georgia (ESPN)
5:30 p.m. — Boise St. at Oregon St. (FSN)
6 p.m. — Wake Forest at Nebraska (TBS)
6:45 p.m. — Southern Miss at Alabama (ESPN2)
7 p.m. — Texas at Ohio St. (Ch. 13)
7:45 p.m. — LSU at Arizona St. (ESPN)
9 p.m. — New Mexico St. at Colorado (FSN)
Golf
2:30 p.m. — PGA Tour: Bell Canadian Open (ESPN)
Major League Baseball
Noon — Braves at Nationals (Ch. 10, 25)
3 p.m. — Padres at Dodgers (Ch. 10, 25)
Tennis
11 a.m. — U.S. Open men’s semifinals (Ch. 4, 5)
7 p.m. — U.S. Open women’s championship (Ch. 4, 5)
WNBA Playoffs
4:30 p.m. — Conference finals: Houston at Sacramento (ESPN2)
Miscellaneous
3 p.m. — Extreme Sports: Dew Action Sports Tour (Ch.
6, 15)
11 p.m.— Dew Action Sports Tour (USA)
LCarter
42⁄3
3
2 2 0 1
Beimel
11⁄3
2
0 0 0 0
Colome
1
0
0 0 0 0
McClung pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd.
HBP—by Schoeneweis (EduPerez). WP—
Beimel.
Umpires—Home, Tim Welke; First, Gary
Cederstrom; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Brian
O’Nora.
T—2:41. A—10,092 (41,315).
———
INDIANS 4, TWINS 2
MINNESOTA
CLEVELAND
abr h bi
abr h bi
ShStwrt lf 4 0 1 0
Szmore cf 2 1 1 1
Punto 2b 2 0 0 0
Crisp lf
322 1
Mauer c 3 0 1 0
JhPlta ss 2 0 1 1
Rdmnd c 1 0 0 0
Hafner dh 4 0 0 0
LFord cf 4 0 0 0
VMrtnz c 4 0 1 1
JJones rf 4 2 2 0
Blliard 2b 3 0 2 0
LeCroy dh 4 0 2 1
JHrndz 1b 3 0 0 0
Rivas pr 0 0 0 0
Brssrd 1b 1 0 0 0
Mrneau 1b 4 0 0 0
Boone 3b 4 0 0 0
JCastro 3b4 0 1 1
Blake rf
212 0
Bartlett ss 2 0 0 0
MRyan ph 1 0 0 0
Totals
3327 2
Totals
284 9 4
Minnesota
010 100 000—2
Cleveland
200 020 00x—4
E—JHernandez (1), Blake (9). DP—Minnesota 2, Cleveland 1. LOB—Minnesota 7,
Cleveland 7. 2B—ShStewart (25), JJones
(20), Crisp (36), JhPeralta (31), Belliard (33),
Blake (28). HR—Sizemore (18). SB—JJones
(11). S—Punto, Sizemore.
IP H
R ER BB SO
Minnesota
JoStna L,13-7
5
8
4 4 2 2
Crain
1
0
0 0 2 0
Mulholland
1
0
0 0 1 0
JRincon
1
1
0 0 0 1
Cleveland
Wstbrk W,14-14 6
6
2 2 2 3
Rhodes
1
0
0 0 0 2
Howry
1
0
0 0 0 1
Wickman S,38
1
1
0 0 0 0
Crain pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP—by Mulholland (JhPeralta).
Umpires—Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Jeff
Kellogg; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Mike
Reilly.
T—2:45. A—26,078 (43,405).
———
YANKEES 8, RED SOX 4
BOSTON
NEW YORK
abr h bi
ab r h bi
Damon cf 4 0 2 1
Jeter ss 4 1 1 1
Rnteria ss 5 1 2 2
BWllms cf 5 1 2 1
DOrtiz dh 4 0 0 0
Crosby cf 0 0 0 0
MRmrz lf 4 0 1 0
ARod 3b 5 2 3 2
Nixon rf 5 0 0 1
JaGbi 1b 5 0 3 1
Varitek c 3 1 1 0
Phillips 1b 0 0 0 0
Millar 1b 3 0 1 0
Matsui lf 3 0 0 0
Mueller 3b 4 1 3 0
Sierra dh 4 0 0 0
Grffnno 2b 4 1 1 0
Posada c 4 3 3 1
Cano 2b 3 1 2 0
Lawton rf 4 0 0 0
Totals 36411 4
Totals
378146
Boston
030 000 100— 4
New York 111 104 00x— 8
E—Damon (6), Renteria (25), Varitek (6),
Graffanino (10), Cano (14). DP—New York 1.
LOB—Boston 10, New York 8. 2B—Renteria
(32), Millar (25), Mueller (32), ARodriguez
(26). HR—ARodriguez (41), Posada (16).
SB—Crosby (3). S—Cano. SF—Damon.
IP H
R ER BB SO
Boston
DWells L,12-7
52⁄3
9
6 5 1 2
Bradford
0
2
2 2 1 0
1
⁄3
MMyers
1
0 0 0 0
Harville
1
1
0 0 0 2
Gonzalez
1
1
0 0 0 0
New York
1
9
4 4 2 3
Small W,7-0
6 ⁄3
Sturtze
0
0
0 0 0 0
Embree
0
0
0 0 0 0
Gordon
12⁄3
1
0 0 0 2
MRivera
1
1
0 0 0 1
Bradford pitched to 3 batters in the 6th,
Sturtze pitched to 1 batter in the 7th, Embree
pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP—by Sturtze (MRamirez), by Small
(Millar).
Umpires—Home, Bill Miller; First, Joe
Brinkman; Second, Derryl Cousins; Third,
Jeff Nelson.
T—3:40. A—55,024 (57,478).
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Signed INF Matt
Stairs to a one-year contract extension
through the 2006 season.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Activated
LHP Shawn Estes from the 60-day DL.
Recalled INF Jerry Gil from Tennessee of
the Southern League and placed him on the
60-day DL.
ATLANTA BRAVES—Activated C Eddie
Perez from the 60-day DL. Designated RHP
Adam Bernero for assignment.
FLORIDA MARLINS—Signed RHP Paul
Quantrill. Designated C Ryan Jorgensen for
assignment.
HOUSTON ASTROS—Activated 1B Jeff
Bagwell from the 15-day DL.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Activated
OF Ryan Church from the 15-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES—Resigned G Anthony Carter.
SAN ANTONIO SPURS—Declined to
match Utah’s offer sheet to G Devin Brown.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NEW YORK JETS—Signed OL Isaac Snell
to the practice squad. Released T Michael
Kracalik from the practice squad.
ECHL
LONG BEACH ICE DOGS—Agreed to
terms with G Greg Hewitt on a one-year contract.
COLLEGE
ASSUMPTION—Named George Reidy
men’s basketball coach.
BROWN—Named Bonnie Skrenta assistant softball coach.
COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON—Named
Jay Bruner men’s and women’s assistant
tennis coach.
YALE—Named Cory Pelletier assistant field
hockey coach.
Calcavecchia
leads field at
Bell Canadian
From Wire Reports
VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Mark Calcavecchia birdied three straight holes on the
front side, then used a big drive to set up a
birdie at 18 for a 3-under-par 67 and a five-shot
lead Friday after the second round of the Canadian Open.
Calcavecchia, the first-round co-leader with a
65, separated himself from the field by again
avoiding most of the trouble on the tight
Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club course.
His drives consistently found the narrow fairways and his short game was solid.
At 8-under 132 through 36 holes, Calcavecchia matched his best start in the Canadian
Open. He also was 8-under in the 1989 tournament at Glen Abbey, where he went on to finish
in a tie for second.
First round co-leader Lucas Glover shot a 72
and was alone in second. Carlos Franco (70),
Jerry Kelly (66) and Jesper Parnevik (72) were
another shot back at 138.
On a day when par was a good score, Calcavecchia cruised through his morning round,
hitting 10 of 14 fairways and 11 of 18 greens in
regulation.
Calcavecchia, winless since the 2001
Phoenix Open, had five birdies and two bogeys
in his morning round. He closed the front side
with birdies at Nos. 7, 8 and 9. He made putts
of 20 feet at 7 and 9 and hit a 4-iron within 6
feet at the par-3 eighth.
He started the day with a bogey at No. 1,
where he “chunked” a 5-iron on his second shot
and missed the green.
Europeans rally to take
early lead at Solheim Cup
CARMEL, Ind. — The Europeans made the
Americans pay for their inability to close out
matches at the Solheim Cup on Friday.
Europe rallied to win one match and halve
two others in the first alternate-shot session,
taking an early 3-1 lead heading into the afternoon session of better-ball matches.
For the Americans, who appeared on the
verge of taking a 3-1 lead with six holes left, it
was a lost opportunity.
“That’s the way match play is,” American Pat
Hurst said. “We’ve got to learn to close the
door.”
Instead, a series of American miscues gave
the Europeans the chance they needed.
The most agonizing match for U.S. captain
Nancy Lopez was the final one of the morning.
Michele Redman and Laura Diaz led Sweden’s Annika Sorenstam and Norway’s Suzann
Pettersen by four after 12 holes. Sorenstam
ignited the comeback with a tee shot that lipped
out on the 152-yard 13th, and the Europeans
won the last six holes to win 1 up.
PGA Tour officials
to inspect TPC of Louisiana
NEW ORLEANS — Assessment of the TPC
of Louisiana course will be made by agronomists for the PGA Tour, with an eye toward
rebuilding the golf course in time for the Zurich
Classic of New Orleans in April.
The decision was made Thursday at a meeting attended by PGA Tour commissioner Tim
Finchem and high-ranking officials from the
PGA Tour, Zurich and the Fore!Kids Foundation
in Ponte Vedra, Fla.
Approximately 40 percent of the course is still
underwater after Hurricane Katrina, which
struck southeast Louisiana and the Gulf Coast
on Aug. 29. The Category 4 storm also uprooted an estimated 1,000 trees on the par-72,
7,400-yard layout designed by Pete Dye.
Column
U.S. Open
From Page 1-B
also are up for grabs — $2.2 million, double the
top prize, for Clijsters if she wins, $1.65 million for
Pierce, since they finished 1-2 in the new U.S.
Open Series leading up to the tournament.
At 30, Pierce knows all the tricks of the tennis
trade, and she used them to good effect against
Dementieva, a 23-year-old Russian who had
enough trouble overcoming her own tragic serve,
never mind waiting for Pierce to play.
Pierce had a minor injury — a right quad muscle she tweaked in her quarterfinal victory over fellow Frenchwoman Amelie Mauresmo — but she
decided, in the interests of strategy, not to tape it
before playing Dementieva.
“I didn’t want my opponent to know there was
anything wrong with me,” Pierce said.
Dementieva didn’t have to see a bandage to
know she could win points against Pierce by running her from side to side. Avoiding the doublefaults that often plague her — she had 62 in the
first five rounds — Dementieva seemed on the
verge of a straight-sets victory even with her
powder-puff serves.
Pierce, though, wasn’t about to give up so easily on a chance to claim the third major title of her
career, five years after she won the French and 10
years after she won the Australian.
“After I lost the first set, I was like, ‘OK, I need
to get help because I can’t play this way,”’ Pierce
said.
The rules allow a player one timeout per injury,
and each timeout is not supposed to exceed 6
minutes — 3 minutes for evaluation, 3 minutes for
treatment. Because Pierce claimed two injuries —
she said her leg problem was affecting her back —
she was allowed two timeouts.
She lay on her stomach while the trainer massaged her back, then did a couple of yoga stretches. She had her right thigh wrapped with a yard
of tape. While Dementieva went back onto the
SPORTS DIGEST
court to warm up, Pierce got down on the ground
again and the trainer worked some more on her
back.
“You can change the game around by winning
an unbelievable point or by changing the rhythm,”
Dementieva said. “By taking a 12-minute timeout,
I don’t think it was a fair play, but she could do it
by the rules. And she did it. If that’s the only
way she can beat me, I mean, it’s up to her.
“I’ve never had such a long break. I was trying
just to keep warm, stay focused because that was
pretty long.”
Dementieva was thrown off almost as much
by the time Pierce took between points when
they resumed play. Pierce always plays deliberately, but in this match she got away with more
delays than usual.
“If she has 20 seconds, she’s going to use 25 seconds between points,” Dementieva said.
Pierce denied the timeouts were gamesmanship.
“No. No, not at all,” she protested.
Pierce surely looked like a different player in the
second and third sets, while Dementieva’s level
dropped. The Russian double-faulted four times in
the final set, running her tournament total to
68, and repeatedly looked at her mother and
coach, Vera, for encouragement.
It did no good.
Clijsters had to stop thinking about what Sharapova did to her at the end of the second set. Clijsters, up a set and leading 6-5 in the second,
had triple match points at love-40 when Sharapova double-faulted. But the 18-year-old Russian produced a great drop shot to save the first,
came up with other ways to save the next two,
then saved two more match points before holding
serve to send the set to a tiebreak that she also
won to even the match.
Clijsters slumped in her chair, frustrated that a
first major title might once again slip from her
grasp.
so the team has a local fan
gag, and light shines
through
the
top
from
large
base. The Alamodome is
he bought in 1985 out of
New Orleans, where it’s been holes opened up by powerful available and former Mayor
winds.
Henry Cisneros assured the
since 1967. What better
The field is littered with
chance than use the disaster
NFL earlier this week that
debris and there is vomit
to move the Saints to either
San Antonio residents will
San Antonio or Los Angeles? and feces on the darkened
buy tickets.
That may sound a bit cold- escalators. Even Benson’s
“I don’t think you have to
luxury
suite
above
the
50hearted but, hey, business is
be a brain surgeon to know
yard
line
was
trashed,
with
business. This is a guy
you want to play your games
fine liquor bottles scattered
whose team is worth up to
where you practice,” Haslett
about
and
a
toilet
jammed
$1 billion, but still had the
full
of
waste.
said. “We’re really not going
gall to make the state of
The
mess
can
be
cleaned
to play a home game anyLouisiana pay him some $2
up and, for a price, the dome where but this would be the
million for each home game
repaired. But the question
to help his profit margins.
closest thing.”
remains whether there will
Earlier this year, he tried
Haslett isn’t making
to extort even more from the be enough of a city left to
excuses for his team. He
make it worthwhile.
cash-strapped state to reno“People don’t really under- believes they will band
vate the Superdome. And,
stand
that a lot of those peo- together and play hard no
when he had a chance to
matter where they play.
ple
are
not going back to
reassure the city that the
Besides, in the end it’s just
team was still theirs, Benson New Orleans,” Gandy said.
“You don’t rebuild ghettos.”
a game. The Saints know
waited more than a week to
For the immediate future,
that better than anyone.
say anything — then issued
the players and coach Jim
“You look at the people and
a tepid statement that said
Haslett would like the team
nothing.
what they’ve gone through
to play its home games in
One thing is for sure: The
the last two weeks,” Haslett
team won’t be playing in the San Antonio, where players
said, “and the last thing you
have already begun searches
Superdome this season, and
can do is feel sorry for us.”
for apartments and houses.
the odds aren’t good the
Tim Dahlberg is a national
There are more than
Saints will ever return to the
sports
columnist for The
20,000
evacuees
in
San
Antobuilding.
Associated
Press. Write to
nio
already
and
they
could
I was in the Superdome on
be given tickets for the game him at tdahlbergap.org
Tuesday, along with three
police officers who spent five
days there with some 25,000
hurricane refugees. The
MATINEE POST TIME 1:00 MON., WED. & SAT.
stench of human waste, stagnant water, discarded perEVENING POST TIME 7:30 MON. – SAT.
sonal items and moldy car1-800-272-5000
Min. age 18
pets is so bad you almost
From Page 1-B
MOBILE GREYHOUND PARK
COLLEGE GAME DAY
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
3-B
saturday, september 10, 2005
USM finally
gets season
started
State looking to break jinx
The Southern Miss Golden
Eagles were supposed to start
the season last Sunday, but the
winds and force of Hurricane
Katrina postponed the longest
running series in Conference
USA. USM and Tulane were
scheduled to play the day
before Labor Day, and while
each team missed out on its
opening week their future
opponents had a chance to
play.
Alabama opened the 2005
season with a 26-7 win over
Middle Tennessee State in
Tuscaloosa last Saturday, and
now the Golden Eagles go to
the Capstone in what is going
to be their season opener.
It is the first time in the last
few years that both Alabama
and Southern Miss have been
able to trot first string players
onto the
field,
rather
than players who
are filling
due to
injuries.
Today’s
game in
Tuscaloosa
will pit two JR.
experience Wittner
quarterbacks against each other and
each have to face a stiff test
from the other team’s secondary. USM’s John Eubanks will
be going up against Tide senior
quarterback Brodie Croyle,
while the senior laden secondary at Alabama faces junior
quarterback Dustin Almond.
It has been five years since
the last USM win in the series
as the Golden Eagles claimed a
21-0 in Birmingham in 2000
on their way to an 8-4 mark
and a win over TCU in the
GMAC Bowl.
The Golden Eagles have
quite a few fresh faces and this
will be the last time the two
teams meet until another
agreement can be worked out.
USM and Alabama have faced
each other every year since
1947 and the Golden Eagles
hold just a 6-33-2 record in the
series. Sophomore running
back Larry Thomas will make
his first career start against a
defense with nine returning
starters from a group which
was No. 2 in the nation last
year. The Golden Eagles also
have a solid group returning at
receiver including George
County’s Anthony Perine. Perine, Antwon Courington and
Tavarres Williams give
Almond solid targets to stretch
the field.
Alabama lost a bulk of players up front on offense, but for
the first time in a long while
someone not named Nix will be
running the defense. USM
returns seven starters on
defense, but Alabama has solid
experience at the skill positions.
In the end, I see it: Alabama
24, USM 20.
For the second straight season, the Mississippi State Bulldogs enter a week two tilt with
Auburn coming off a nice win.
The Bulldogs opened last week
with Division I-AA Murray
State and came away with a
38-6 win. Junior quarterback
Omarr Conner tossed four
touchdown passes and Jerious
Norwood got the season off to a
good start with 123 yards
rushing.
Auburn was on the flip side
last week against Georgia
Tech. After losing Carnell
Williams and Ronine Brown to
the NFL, the Tigers had trouble finding a running game
and struggled on the ground in
a lost to the Yellowjackets.
The series between the
teams is one of streaks. MSU
won four straight from 19972000, but the Tigers have won
each year since 2001, including
the last three by an average off
29 points.
I think there will be an upset
on The Plains this week:
Mississippi State 17, Auburn
16.
AUBURN, Ala.— The Auburn
Tigers are hunting a running game
and hoping a young quarterback will
grow up quickly.
Mississippi State sports a star
tailback, a seasoned quarterback
and an offense that even prompted
these words from Auburn defensive
coordinator David Gibbs: “I think
they’re scary.”
Last season, the Bulldogs’ offense
was anything but scary.
Mississippi State doesn’t bring the
same ineffective offense that produced scant yards and few points
against the Tigers last season into
Saturday’s meeting at Jordan-Hare
Stadium in the Southeastern Conference opener for both teams.
They were held scoreless for the
first 58 minutes in that 48-14 loss
last season, with quarterback Omarr
Conner unable to get the offense
going.
“We w er e horrib le,” coa ch
Sylvester Croom said. “It was downright awful. I don’t know how good
we are, but we’re a whole lot better
than we were last year.”
Auburn, meanwhile, is a whole lot
less proven. The Tigers had both
Carnell Williams and Ronnie Brown
rush for 100-plus yards and Jason
Campbell threw three touchdown
passes in the last meeting.
All three of those players have
mov ed on to t he NFL, lea ving
Auburn’s offense to stumble through
an opening loss to Georgia Tech.
Quarterback Brandon Cox’s starting debut was a mishmash of mistakes (four interceptions) and
impressive statistics (342 passing
yards).
Offensive coordinator Al Borges
chalks that game off to a learning
experience for his young passer, but
promised there would be more runs
called against Mississippi State.
“The kid at times showed flashes
of brilliance,” Borges said. “He stood
in there and threw some passes, put
them on a dime with people in his
face. Once he goes through those
experiences, I think that guy could
be a really, really good quarterback.”
First the Tigers have to find a running game to support him after
mostly putting the first game on his
left arm.
The statistics from the opening
game could be deceptive for both
teams. Mississippi State, after all,
compiled its 482 yards and 38 points
against Division I-AA Murray State.
And it’s doubtful Auburn will pass
By JOHN ZENOR
The Associated Press
AP
Mississippi State running back Jerious Norwood runs the ball as Murray State defensive back Derrick
Parrott makes the tackle during the first quarter in Starkville.
WHO: Mississippi State (1-0) at
Auburn (0-1)
WHERE: Jordan-Hare Stadium
WHEN: Today, 11:30 a.m.
TV: Jefferson-Pilot
twice as much as it runs again anytime soon.
Cox expects the Tigers to rediscover their balanced attack.
“That’s what won us games last
year was having a running game as
well as a passing game,” he said.
SEC NOTEBOOK
FLORIDA
Although quarterback Chris Leak and receiver Chad
Jackson had arguably the best performances of their
careers last week against Wyoming, both players were left
out of coach Urban Meyer’s “Champions Club.” The club
honors players of the game.
CB Vernell Brown, S Jarvis Herring, DE Jeremy
Mincey and LB Brandon Siler made it from the defense.
GEORGIA
Tight end Martrez Milner reported for his junior season with a new attitude.
The result: A new weapon for the Georgia offense.
Milner had three catches for 111 yards in the seasonopening victory over Boise State.
SOUTH CAROLINA
When was the last time a team coached by Steve
Spurrier was expected to lose by more than two touchdowns as oddsmakers think will happen Saturday when
South Carolina travels to No. 9 Georgia?
TENNESSEE
The Volunteers’ 17-10 win over UAB last weekend
gave coach Phillip Fulmer plenty of areas for concentration during the team’s off week.
No. 6 Tennessee (1-0) barely scraped by the Blazers
with problems in nearly every phase and unit: quarterback, receiver, offensive line, linebackers, secondary and
kicking game. The Vols next travel to Florida on Sept. 17.
ALABAMA
Alabama freshman Marlon Davis could start at right
guard against Southern Miss.
Senior Mark Sanders went down with a knee and
ankle injury early in the second half of the Middle Tennessee game and is questionable for Saturday.
LSU
The Tigers and Arizona State have moved their football
game Saturday from Baton Rouge to Tempe, Ariz.,
because of Hurricane Katrina.
OLE MISS
Ed Orgeron built his reputation on defense, so it was
fitting that his coaching debut was decided by the Rebels’
defenders.
SEC defensive player of the week Patrick Willis forced
a late fumble and Garry Pack had a game-clinching
interception in Ole Miss’ 10-6 victory over Memphis in
Orgeron’s first game as coach.
MISSISSIPPI STATE
For the second straight season, the Bulldogs will follow
a successful opening game with a difficult game against
Auburn.
“That’s going to be a big thing this
week.”
Receiver Courtney Taylor went a
step further, promising: “We will
have balance this week.”
Conner and preseason All-SEC
tailback Jerious Norwood are far
more established than the Tigers’
backfield and both had big openers.
Conner said things were just clicking.
“I felt like the Omarr from high
school,” he said. “I just felt like I
was a leader. I just got in the zone
out there.”
Gibbs said the growing confidence
and poise in Mississippi State’s
offense was evident even in game
film as last season went along.
“I think they’re scary,” he said. “I
think they are big up front. I think
they’re fast at wide receiver. They’re
fast at tailback. Their quarterback is
an experienced guy now who can
run around and throw it.”
Defensive tackle T.J. Jackson was
equally impressed with the Bulldogs’ offensive turnaround.
“They’ve made leaps from where
they used to be,” Jackson said.
“That’s a good running back they’ve
got, probably the best in the SEC.”
Conner offers similar mobility to
Tech’s Reggie Ball, who had plenty
of success against the Tigers last
week. Auburn was starting three
new players in the secondary and
two new defensive ends.
“He throws the ball better than
Ball does and runs just as well,”
Gibbs said. “Maybe we will have
learned from our experiences.”
QBs finally healthy in
’Bama/USM matchup
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — Brodie Croyle which had only five completions in last season’s
has played against Southern Mississippi before, 27-3 loss without Almond.
“I think they’re going to come out there and
even if it seems like ages ago. Croyle was a redshirt freshman for Alabama and threw nearly play with more confidence,” Harper said.
as many interceptions (two) as completions “They’re going to try do totally different things.”
Well, not totally different, according to
(four).
On Saturday night, he’ll finally get another Almond. After all, leading rusher Anthony Harris also returns from last season and the Tide
crack at the Golden Eagles.
“Last time I played them, it wasn’t too good led the nation in pass defense in 2004. Alabama’s defense hasn’t lost much, if anything,
of an outing,” Croyle said.
Croyle has missed the past two meetings holding Middle Tennessee to two first downs
and 22 total yards in the
due to injuries for the
second half of a 26-7 openCrimson Tide (1-0). Southing victory.
ern Miss quarterback
Southern Miss hasn’t
Dustin Almond missed last
scored an offensive touchyear’s game with a hamdown against the Tide in
string injury.
the past 13 quarters, dating
With both starters out,
back to the third quarter of
the teams combined for 95
the 2001 game at Birmingpassing yards. Chances are,
WHO: USM (0-0) at Alabama (1-0)
ham’s Legion Field.
the two seniors will top
WHERE: Bryant-Denny Stadium
“We’re going to have to
that fairly early this time.
WHEN: Today, 6:45 p.m.
establish the run against
It’s no surprise the GoldTV: ESPN2
them,” Almond said. “They
en Eagles are more familiar
pride themselves on stopwith Tide tailback Ken
ping the run.
Darby than with Croyle.
“Last year, we ran the ball pretty effectively
Darby rushed for 197 yards and scored a pair of
touchdowns last season, a record for an Alaba- on them. I was sitting on the sidelines watching the whole thing.”
ma player making his first career start.
Croyle was a spectator, too. He and Darby
“It was fun. For that being my first ever collegiate start, I was focused,” Darby said. “I and fullback Tim Castille all ended last season
was more determined to do what I had to do. I injured but returned to the field in strong fashjust had fun out there and played hard as I ion in the opener.
Darby ran for 90 yards, most of it in the seccould.”
Southern Miss coach Jeff Bower offered a ond half. Croyle passsed for an efficient 210
succinct assessment of the Tide offense that yards and Castille had two short rushing touchdowns.
pretty much sums up his team’s experience.
“Seeing Brodie back up there taking charge
“Ken Darby is a very good player. Brodie
Croyle is a good player, too, but we’ve missed and having Tim back there also, it was fun,”
him the past few years because of injury,” Bow- Darby said. “We always have fun when we’re
in the game. That’s what we’re going to do
er said.
Alabama defensive back Roman Harper Saturday, we’re just going to have fun as a
expects a different approach for Southern Miss, trio.”
4-B
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
STATE/REGION
Guardsmen return from Iraq to ravaged homes
By JIM KRANE
Associated Press Writer
ALEXANDRIA, La. — Greeted by
the blasts of water cannon, the first
planeload of 100 Louisiana National
Guardsmen returned home Friday
from Iraq, leaving behind the carnage
of warfare to find their families in
their hurricane-ravaged state.
As soon as the plane touched down,
the troops clapped and yelled, “Yeah!”
“Ladies and gentlemen, welcome
home!” a flight attendant announced
on the P.A. system. “We’re glad you’re
home safe.”
After the plane touched down here
following a flight from Kuwait and
stopovers in Europe and Maine, a pair
of green fire trucks blasted the Boeing
757 with water cannon as 50 to 60
people clapped and held banners saying “Welcome home troops.”
The soldiers clambered down the
stairs and were greeted by Gov. Kathleen Blanco, who shook their hands
and said, “Welcome home, men.”
“Let me say for the citizens of
Louisiana: ’Thank you, thank you,
thank you.’ I wish this could have been
a better place to come to,” she continued, adding: “We can come back, we
will come back. We’ll be better and
stronger.”
Most of the soldiers lost everything
to Hurricane Katrina, and will qualify for safe haven status, in which they
will get a 14-day leave and then be
eligible for demobilization.
“We’re offering them the opportunity to continue to serve in the Guard
and help us rebuild southeast
Louisiana,” Blanco said. “That will
keep them employed. This will be an
opportunity to tide them over.”
Maj. Gen. Bennett Landreneau said
the Guard would help them find housing, and the soldiers would be allowed
to go to New Orleans as soon as it
was safe.
Earlier, the plane stopped in Bangor,
Maine, where the soldiers went
through Customs. At Bangor airport,
elderly members of a U.S. veterans
group waved flags and offered the soldiers cell phones and chocolate chip
cookies.
After seeing 35 of their number
killed in Iraq, members of the 256th
Brigade Combat Team readied to take
care of relatives made refugees, or,
perhaps, mourn family members killed
or hurt by the Aug. 29 hurricane and
its devastating aftermath.
For Spc. Nathan Faust of Chalmette
it’s a total loss. His family home is
flooded to the peak of the roof. His
fiancee’s home in Plaquemines Parish
is at least as devastated. He said his
uncle, the warden at the Orleans
Parish jail, was trapped in his office by
riots for 30 hours in knee-deep water.
“All my stuff, all my family, every-
AP
A Louisiana National Guard of the 256th Brigade Combat team is
welcomed by his family upon arrival to Alexandria, La. Greeted by
the blasts of water cannon, the first planeload of 100 Louisiana
National Guardsmen returned home Friday from Iraq.
one’s homeless,” said Faust, his worrylined face making him appear older
than his 23 years. “I want to move
out of the city and start over someplace else. I can’t put my life on hold
for two years and wait for the city to
get back on its feet.”
The 100 returnees were mainly soldiers from the New Orleans-based 1st
Battalion, 141st Field Artillery Regiment, which left Kuwait on Thursday
night on a charter flight. The few hun-
dred remaining battalion members
are expected to fly home from Kuwait
soon.
Since Katrina struck, soldiers knew
their homecoming would be trading
one disaster zone for another.
“Bittersweet isn’t the word for it.
It’s worse,” said Sgt. Joe Partin, 34, of
Harahan.
Before their flight, the soldiers were
processed out of the war zone at Camp
Victory, Kuwait. A U.S. Navy customs
official who briefed the glum
Louisianans tried to whip up some
fervor for their flight home.
“Are you all happy to go home?” the
Customs agent yelled. A few troops
replied with a halfhearted “hoo-ah,”
the Army’s rallying cry. The agent
tried again, louder, and failed to raise
enthusiasm.
“I’m going to be in your place in 21⁄2
months and I’m going to be going
nuts,” he admonished the Guardsmen.
Later, when informed he was
addressing troops from New Orleans,
he apologized, Partin said.
“Normally, we’d be yelling and
screaming,” Partin said in an interview aboard the plane.
Partin, like everyone else, had been
gearing to celebrate his homecoming
with friends and family. Now those
people are scattered, some of them
hundreds of miles away.
“We were so pumped up, so high,
so ready to see our families and
friends,” said the soldier, his head
shaved, feet tucked under a camouflage blanket. “We all wanted to go
back to a sense of normalcy.
Now we’re going back to chaos. It’s
very anticlimactic.”
The chartered plane stopped in
Budapest to change crews and then in
Shannon, Ireland, to refuel.
Soldiers streamed into Shannon’s
airport bar and ordered pints of draft
beer and glasses of cognac — their
first drinks in almost a year. Some
gathered around a television showing
their devastated city.
Signs of normality appearing on Coast
By DAVID ROYSE
The Associated Press
GULFPORT — A few familiar routines
of normal life are slowly returning to the
Mississippi Gulf Coast, with many Hurricane Katrina victims going on Friday
to the jobs they knew before the storm,
eating hot meals they could only dream of
in recent days and beginning to rebuild.
Lumber and home stores were open and
customers were buying the supplies to
repair their broken homes, a number of
fast food restaurants were open for breakfast, some people didn’t even have to wait
in line for gas.
And thousands woke up to their first
morning with electricity.
“When the lights came on, that was a
blessing from God,” said Eddie Bigelow.
“Every day is a little better. It’s like giant
steps, if you saw this place last Tuesday.”
Bigelow, wearing a T-shirt that said
“Don’t let reality ruin your day,” was starting to assess what repairs needed to be
made to her father’s house in this city’s
Broadmoor neighborhood and was eager
to get to work.
“It’s like therapy, you feel like you have
AP
Convicted killer Edgar Ray Killen waves while being
wheeled toward the Neshoba County Courthouse by
Greg McMillan, a family friend before an appeal hearing for his bond in Philadelphia, Miss., on Friday.
Killen's bond was revoked and is being put back into
the custody of the state of Mississippi.
Killen sent back to prison
■ Former Klan leader
had been out on bond
while appealing
murder conviction
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. (AP)
— A judge sent Edgar Ray
Killen back to prison Friday
after finding that the former
Ku Klux Klan leader, convicted
for the 1964 slayings of three
civil rights workers, was in better health than the court had
been told.
Four law enforcement officers and a convenience store
owner testified they had seen
Killen driving during the past
two weeks. But at an August
court hearing, the 80-year-old
sawmill owner and preacher
had testified he was in constant pain and confined to a
wheelchair.
Circuit Judge Marcus Gordon decided to revoke the
$600,000 bond that had
allowed Killen to remain free
while
appealing
his
manslaughter convictions. He
spent 53 days in prison, in
between his June conviction
and being released on bond
Aug. 12.
Gordon — who presided over
Killen’s trial and set the appeal
bond — said he couldn’t understand how Killen could have
limited use of his legs and right
arm one week, and be able to
drive two weeks later.
“That’s incredible to me. I
feel fraud was committed on
the court,” Gordon said.
Department of Corrections
Commission Chris Epps said
Killen would be taken back to
the Central Mississippi Correctional Facility, a minimum
security prison where he would
have his own cell and be under
administrative protective custody.
Killen broke both legs during
a tree-cutting accident in
March. At his trial in June, he
sat in a wheelchair and
appeared to doze off several
times. During the bond hearing, he used his left hand to
hoist his right to take his oath
before testifying. Killen told
Gordon he was losing use of
his right hand while in prison.
Killen’s wife, Betty Jo, told
the court Friday her husband
could not walk or go to the
bathroom without help. She
said he could stand briefly if
he had support.
“He has driven some,” she
said. “It helps him working his
feet.”
Winston County sheriff ’s
deputy Connie Hampton testified he saw Killen getting gas
at a Conoco station Aug. 31
and drove around Killen’s
truck to verify it was him.
“The truck pulled up and
stopped and I saw him step
out,” the deputy told the court.
“No one else was in the truck.”
Three Neshoba County
deputies testified they also saw
Killen driving, and two said
they saw Killen drive through
a Labor Day roadblock.
to do something,” said Bigelow, 55.
Some were back at their jobs. Five hundred people who work at an Oreck vacuum factory here were reporting back to
work Friday, the latest to try and return
to some semblance of their lives before
the storm.
A sign scrawled on a piece of plywood
along a major thoroughfare pointed to a
side street and promised: “Laundry open,”
a welcome sight to people who can’t yet
clean their clothes at home.
But for many along this ravaged coastline, life is still far from anything resembling normal and won’t be for months.
Thousands are homeless, many still in
shelters, and some are still unable to contact family members not seen since Katrina hit here Aug. 29.
Officials in Hancock County, just west of
here, said Friday that 52 people are considered unaccounted for in that county
alone and officials in other counties
refused to guess how many coastwide still
haven’t been accounted for by their families. State officials say 211 people are
known to have died so far.
At the airport in Gulfport, a temporary
morgue is trying to match bodies with
reports of missing persons. “We’re trying
to do what it takes to help the families
reach closure,” said Dr. Richard Weems,
an expert in forensic dentistry from Birmingham, Ala.
And for miles, trees, cars and boats
remain in places they shouldn’t be — still
cluttering a number of side streets or
piercing the walls of homes. Electric utilities reported about 162,000 residences
and businesses were still without power
Friday, but thousands of those are too
damaged to receive it when power lines
are repaired.
While some have returned to work
along the coast, thousands don’t have jobs
to go back to.
“Money’s a major concern right now,”
said Anthony Hernandez, who had just
started a job at the Treasure Bay Casino
in Biloxi this summer. “This blew the
whole thing out of the water.”
Besides being out of work, Hernandez
has another problem with something
that’s not back to normal. Fresh produce
is extremely hard to come by, and his pet
iguana Sugarbear hasn’t eaten in a week.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
5-B
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
NATION
Authorities find far fewer bodies than feared
By ERIN McCLAM
The Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS — Alarming predictions of as many as 10,000 dead in
New Orleans may have been greatly
exaggerated, with authorities saying
Friday that the first street-by-street
sweep of the swamped city revealed
far fewer corpses than feared.
“Some of the catastrophic deaths
that some people predicted may not
have occurred,” said Col. Terry Ebbert,
the city’s homeland security chief.
He declined to give a revised estimate. But he added: “Numbers so far
are relatively minor as compared to
the dire projections of 10,000.”
The encouraging news came as
workers repairing New Orleans’ system of levees and water pumps projected Friday that it will take a month
to dry out the city ravaged by Hurricane Katrina.
Authorities officially shifted most of
their attention to counting and removing the dead after spending days cajoling, persuading and all but strongarming the living into leaving the city
because of the danger of fires and disease from the fetid floodwaters.
Ever since the hurricane struck Aug.
29, residents, rescuers and cadaversniffing dogs have found bodies floating
in the waters, trapped in attics or
lying on broken highways. Some were
dropped off at hospital doorsteps or
left slumped in wheelchairs out in the
open.
Mayor Ray Nagin suggested last
weekend that “it wouldn’t be unreasonable to have 10,000” dead, and
authorities ordered 25,000 body bags.
But soldiers who had been brought in
over the past few days to help in the
search were not seeing that kind of
toll.
“There’s nothing at all in the magnitude we anticipated,” said Maj. Gen.
Bill Caldwell, commander of the
Army’s 82nd Airborne Division.
Ebbert said the search for the dead
will be done systematically, block-byblock, with dignity and with no news
media allowed to follow along. “You
can imagine sitting in Houston and
watching somebody removed from your
parents’ property. We don’t think that’s
proper,” he said.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
said most of the city could be drained
by Oct. 2, but some of the eastern areas
of New Orleans and the hard-hit community of Chalmette, across the Mississippi River, could be under water
until Oct. 8. Plaquemines Parish,
AP
Ray Menard, right, and an unidentified friend, who declined to give
his name, enjoy the shade near their apartment where they continue to live in New Orleans despite official's attempts to evacuate the
city. Menard was reading his book "The Art of Doing Nothing."
which suffered a storm surge from the
coast, could take another 10 days to
drain.
The Corps had previously said it
could take up to 80 days to drain the
city. Friday marked the first time engineers offered detailed time tables.
The effort to get water out of the
city, which had been 80 percent covered
following the storm and levee breaches, was helped by dry weather and
gaps blown in the levees to allow floodwaters to drain out.
Over the past few days, police and
soldiers trying to rescue the living
marked houses where corpses were
found, or noted their location with
global positioning devices, so that the
bodies could be collected later.
A dozen boats awaiting calls to
retrieve bodies were lined up early
Friday on an interstate ramp that was
being used as a makeshift boat launch.
Soldiers also hauled the last of the
bodies out of the convention center,
which became an increasingly violent
and chaotic place before the evacuees
were finally removed a week ago.
State officials could not provide an
exact count of the dead recovered so
far. Corpses from New Orleans were
taken to a morgue in nearby St.
Gabriel, where medical examiners
worked to identify the remains.
Still, thousands of stubborn holdouts were believed to staying put in the
city, and authorities continued trying to
clear them out.
Police fearing deadly confrontations
with jittery residents enforced a new
order that bars homeowners from owning guns. That order apparently does
not apply to the hundreds of M-16-toting private security guards hired to
protect businesses and wealthy property owners.
But there were still no reports of
anyone being taken out by force under
a three-day-old order from the mayor,
and there were growing indications
that that was little more than an empty threat.
Simulation predicted 61,290 deaths in smaller hurricane
By RON FOURNIER
and TED BRIDIS
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — As Katrina roared into
the Gulf of Mexico, emergency planners pored
over maps and charts of a hurricane simulation
that projected 61,290 dead and 384,257 injured
or sick in a catastrophic flood that would leave
swaths of southeast Louisiana uninhabitable for
more than a year.
These planners were not involved in the frantic preparations for Katrina. By coincidence,
they were working on a yearlong project to prepare federal and state officials for a Category 3
hurricane striking New Orleans.
Their fictitious storm eerily foreshadowed
the havoc wrought by Category 4 Katrina a
few days later, raising questions about whether
government leaders did everything possible —
as early as possible — to protect New Orleans
residents from a well-documented threat.
After watching many of their predictions
prove grimly accurate, “Hurricane Pam” planners now hope they were wrong about one detail
— the death toll. The 61,290 figure is six times
what New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin has
warned people to expect, although by Friday
officials in New Orleans thought the worst predictions were unfounded.
“I pray to God we don’t see those numbers,”
Michael Brown, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, told The Associat-
ed Press. “My gut is ... we don’t. But we just
don’t know.”
The known Katrina death toll was less than
400 on Friday, but officials expect it to skyrocket once emergency teams comb through
90,000 square miles of Gulf Coast debris. Fears
are particularly acute in New Orleans, where
countless corpses lie submerged beneath a toxic gumbo that engulfed the city after levees
gave way.
The death toll is just one of the many chilling
details in a 412-page report obtained by the
AP from a government official involved in the
Hurricane Pam project. Written in ominous
present-tense language, the report predicts
that:
• Flood waters would surge over levees, creating “a catastrophic mass casualty/mass evacuation” and leaving drainage pumps crippled for
up to six months. “It will take over one year to
re-enter areas most heavily impacted,” the
report estimated.
• More than 600,000 houses and 6,000 businesses would be affected, more than two-thirds
of them destroyed. Nearly a quarter-million
children would be out of school. “All 40 medical
facilities in the impacted area (are) isolated
and useless,” it says.
• Local officials would be quickly overwhelmed with the five-digit death toll, 187,862
people injured and 196,395 falling ill. A half
million people would be homeless.
2EACHING/UTTO3HELLAND-OTIVA%MPLOYEES
/URTHOUGHTSAREWITHEVERYONEHURTBY(URRICANE+ATRINA/URGREATESTFOCUSNOWISTO
ASSURETHESAFETYANDWELFAREOFOUREMPLOYEESANDTHEIRFAMILIESINTHEDEVASTATED'ULF
#OASTCOMMUNITIES
)FYOUAREA3HELLOR-OTIVAEMPLOYEEAFFECTEDBYTHISNATURALDISASTERWHOHASNOTALREADY
CONTACTEDYOURSUPERVISORWEURGEYOUTODOSOIMMEDIATELY4HEYCANHELPASYOUTRYTO
MANAGEBOTHYOURPERSONALANDWORKRELATEDNEEDS
#ONTACTOUREMERGENCYRESPONSELINESATOR3(%,,
4HEYAREOPENDAILYFROMAMTOPM#ENTRAL3TANDARD4IMEINCLUDINGWEEKENDS
/RIFYOUCANACCESSTHE7EBSENDANEMAILTOKATRINAHELP SHELLCOMFOR(UMAN
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ORREDIRECTEDPAYROLLDISRUPTIONSINBANKINGANDMAILSERVICESLOANASSISTANCEPRESCRIPTION
DRUGSLOCATIONSPECIlCINFORMATIONANDMORE!LSOGOTOWWWSHELLCOMUSTOlND
OTHER EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE INFORMATION THAT COULD PROVIDE YOU SOME MUCHNEEDED RELIEF
7EAREHERETOHELP
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
7-B
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
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Football
Family pays only lip service
to how much they put away
DEAR ABBY: Please tell me how to
respond to people who sit at a table
with me (in my
home, theirs or out)
and make comments
about being full, eating just “because it's
there,” or “for the flavor” — and continue
to eat? All of my family members are
overweight. I am the
smallest by far at a
size 8. They engage
Dear
in this often, and it
Abby
distresses me.
I don't want to
jump up from the table, clear away the
dishes and tell them to stop eating, but
I also don’t enjoy hearing them talk
about how much they shouldn’t be eating while they continue to do so.
Most of them have been advised more
than once by physicians to lose weight
for the sake of their health. Other than
bringing food to share that’s low in sugar and fat, is there a way to politely
deal with this bizarre behavior? — FED
UP IN HOUSTON
DEAR FED UP: No, there is not. But
you can save your sanity by recognizing
idle chatter for what it is and tuning it
out. In your own home, you can simply
serve less food — or clear away the
tempting leftovers and relocate your
guests away from the table. However, in
a restaurant or in their homes that
wouldn’t work. So accept that your relatives won’t address their weight problems until they are ready to do so, and
try to be less judgmental.
DEAR ABBY: I have been dating
“Zack” for a year and a half. We had discussed taking a trip to visit his friends
in a couple of months. I’m a very independent person, but recently have had
some financial difficulties that I anticipate will be temporary.
I explained to Zack that I wouldn’t be
able to afford the trip. It would have
meant paying for my plane ticket, half
the cost of the car we’d have to rent and
half the hotel bill.
Zack has a steady job that pays very
well. I thought he would speak up and
offer to pay for at least some part of my
expense for the trip, but he didn’t. Was I
expecting too much, or is he just plain
cheap? — DISAPPOINTED IN NEW
JERSEY
DEAR DISAPPOINTED: It would
have been a generous offer, but it
appears your boyfriend isn’t the generous type. In a sense, however, he may
have given you a priceless gift: a
glimpse of what life would be like with
him in the future if the chips were
down. Please act accordingly.
DEAR ABBY: I’m a 13-year-old girl. I
love my mom, but she doesn’t trust me.
Sometimes I would like to talk to her
but she never listens. It’s like she wants
me to mess up so she can punish me.
I once tried to talk to her about sex.
She thought I was pregnant! Am I
wrong for just wanting to know? Sometimes I don’t do anything wrong and I
still get in trouble.
I have thought about running away,
but this is where my heart is. Is it me?
Why won’t she trust me? I make good
grades. — BAFFLED IN BIRMINGHAM
DEAR BAFFLED: Your letter made
me sad. By now, your mother should
have made it clear that you could bring
any question to her and she would
answer it — or help you find the answer
you need.
Your mother may be uncomfortable
talking about sex, or she could be under
stress about something else in her life.
Please ask an adult friend or close relative to speak to her on your behalf. Your
mother may be hard on you because she
does not want you to mess up. Children
do not come with a list of instructions,
and she may be going overboard trying
to protect you.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
To receive a collection of Abby’s most
memorable — and most frequently
requested — poems and essays, send a
business-sized, self-addressed envelope,
plus check or money order for $5 (U.S.
funds) to: Dear Abby — Keepers Booklet,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. (Postage is included in the price.)
Tall teenager seems
short on solutions
easy to avoid a handshake.
Dear Annie: I am a fairly
Just smile winningly and pertall sophomore girl in high
haps touch the greeter’s arm
school. I have dated several
with your left hand, and
guys, but their personalities
you’re home free. Hope these
are not like the guy I have a
suggestions help others as
crush on.
much as they’ve helped me. —
“Ravi” is a junior. He is
Willing but Unable
handsome, shy, intelligent, a good artist
Dear Willing:
and very muscular.
Thank you. Our
The problem is, he is
readers came
the shortest person
through with several
in the whole school. I
suggestions for
like him a lot, and I
avoiding those
want him to notice
excruciatingly
me. But I would feel
painful handshakes.
really awkward
Here’s more:
going up to him and
From Butler,
starting a conversaPa.: Many people in
tion. Please give me
the church I attend
some tips on how to
are elderly and have
Annie’s
approach him. —
arthritis, so they just
Short-Circuited in Mailbox
smile and say,
Oregon
“Peace be with you.”
Dear Oregon: First of all,
Congregants understand that
it’s likely Ravi already has
these parishioners are extendnoticed you. Some short guys
ing them peace but don’t wish
are reluctant to express an
to shake because of their sore
interest in tall girls because
hands.
they fear they will be rejected.
Tell “Let’s Just Wave” to
You will have to make the first spray WD-40 on her hands
move.
three times daily, and in about
When you see him in the
three days her hands will feel
hall or after class, say, “Hi,
better. It works for my knee.
Ravi,” and smile. The next
Midwest: Perhaps when
day, now that you have his
this person is offered a hand
attention, ask him a schoolto shake, the arthritic person
related question (“Can you
could take the offered hand
believe that homework assign- between both palms and
ment?” “Did you finish the
smile, thus preventing anothchemistry project?”). Try to
er person from exerting any
extend that into a short conversation, and see how things pressure.
Missouri: I often hurt for
go from there.
hours following handshaking
Dear Annie: I’d like to
activities at church. Then, I
respond to “Let’s Just Wave,
came up with the idea of offerOK?” who suffered from
ing my left hand instead of my
osteoarthritis and dreaded
right. Somehow, when people
shaking hands at church.
take my left hand, they grip
A hint in an etiquette book
saved my life — or at least my much easier. It’s not as easy to
hand: Go in for the handshake bear down strongly on a left
hand with a right hand. It also
“web first” (the web is the
space between the thumb and throws people because of the
unexpectedness. Yet, it allows
index finger), and shake webme to remain friendly. I hope
to-web. It makes it much
this idea helps.
harder for someone to get a
Please e-mail your questions
bone-scrunching grip on you.
to anniesmailboxcomcast.net,
To avoid shaking hands at
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
church, I always keep my
P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
Bible in my right hand, so
with minor body language, it’s 60611.
Tattoos are difficult, costly
and painful to remove
of a tattoo to get into the miliDear Heloise:
As a plastic surgeon, I think tary, to keep their scholarships, romances gone sour or
that if people only realized
bad memories and associahow difficult it is to remove a
tions—has developed into the
tattoo, understood how costly
T0BIL (Tattoo Obliteration by
and how painful tattoo
Infrared Light) proremoval is, and recgram that is availognized that society
able in many states,
as a whole still views
either by volunteer
tattoos as a stigma,
doctors or in “free for
maybe they would
under 18” programs
think seriously
that we have in
before getting one.
Texas or in private
Many tattoos have
facilities. The cost is
become associated
minimal compared to
with gang or prison
the equally effective
lifestyles. Employers
laser removal of tatmay not hire people By Heloise
toos and the time is
with tattoos.
Laser removal can cost more much less, making it a desirable alternative for hundreds
than $7,000 per tattoo, and
of people.
take at least 10 to 15 treatGo to www.faceandbodydements, spread out over two or
sign.com or fax your request
more years. Even with this
for a referral in your area to
treatment, the tattoo is still
Tattoo Removal (210) 495visible.
7145. Please be sure to include
A project I undertook in
1995 for the American Society your name, city, state and a
return fax or phone number.
for Aesthetic Plastic
— Tolbert S. Wilkinson,
Surgery—a program for teens
M.D., San Antonio, Texas
and adults, who must get rid
I NEED A LOVING HOME
Got a story idea?
Jerrica is a two-year-old female. She is housebroken and
available for adoption at the Jackson County Animal Shelter.
CALL (866) 843-9020
Adopt A Pet and Adopt A Friend For Life
OUR HURRICANE HEADQUARTERS
JACKSON COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER
Phone 497-6350
4400 Audubon Drive
Gautier, MS
8-B
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
HURRICANE KATRINA: DAY 13
William Colgin/The Mississippi Press
The U.S. Naval Hospital Ship Comfort arrived Friday
afternoon at the Port of Pascagoula to aid in hurricane
relief efforts.
Christy Pritchett/The Mississippi Press
A line forms behind Fred Thurman as he recieves a tetanus shot from Sally Beach, a FEMA Disaster Medical
Assistance Team member, in the Ashley Place neighborhood of Ocean Springs Friday afternoon. The mobile
FEMA DMAT strike team will be taking to the streets to give residents the vaccination who have been to busy with
their clean up efforts to leave their homes.
William Colgin/The Mississippi Press
Specialist Lucus Gibson tosses a bundle of bottled
water down to Sgt. Landers Davison to distribute to residents waiting in line for FEMA aid at a station set up at
Pascagoula High School Friday.
William Colgin/The Mississippi Press
Residents form a line in front of Pascagoula High School to register for FEMA aid.
Christy Pritchett/The Mississippi Press
A note to looters on Halsead Road in Ocean Springs.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2005
THE MISSISSIPPI PRESS
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www.gulflive.
affiliate
Our online
Katrin
Katrina
‘totally
destroyed
lives’
confirmed in
■ Five deaths
more
with
Ocean Springs rch and resexpected as sea
cue continues
By CLAIR BYRD
The Mississippi
Press
city of Ocean
NGS — The
ze the extent
OCEAN SPRI
starting to reali
Springs is just Katr ina. Five deat hs have
dof Hurr icane , with more expected, accor
been confirmed official.
city
one
loss of life,”
ing to
a number of Fire Chief
“There’s been
and
nse Director
said Civil Defe ch and rescue is still goingMark Hare. “Sear recovery will begin short
and
on and search
Byrd conly.”
ty Sheriff Mike
Jackson Coun s in the Gulf Hills and
death
still missing
firmed nine
areas, with four
Bay
aux
Porte
Press
ty CoroGulf Hills.
Coun
/The Mississippi
from
son
Colgin
William
t
reach Jack
Attempts to dus to confirm the exac
n
ions of the spa
ner Vickie Broas were unsuccessful, in part
swept away sect
number of deathtelephone service.
icane Katrina
Biloxi after Hurr
insulation
to
to sporadic
and
due
ngs
wood
Spri
bare
ge from Ocean
Across the city, g holes in roofs, a stark
brid
draw
the
gapin
of
behind. Amid
glared from
Little remains
shingles left
the
contrast to the trees, some kept out of
Monday.
ped
the homes were power lines, some snap
ed
street by down s simply uprooted.
came in here
in half and other
called Katrina said Mary
icane
hurr
,”
“A
dest roye d lives to clean up
and total ly
pted
h
as she attem
the end of Beac
Thompkins,
her yard near tes.
nthe debris in
Mississippi Natio
t
Gulf Park Esta
Meanwhile, ass rescued residents
View Road in to a yard across the stree
H
pointed
Guard troop tried to untangle a
By PAUL SOUT
She
al
GS, Page 8-A
ATT
and
See OCEAN SPRIN
from rooftops ed power lines, trees
and JOHN SURR
Press
ippi
down
The Mississ
the snarl of s in a search for the missA — Whi le
the
debri
y
OUL
and
surve
CAG
ito
PAS
4 winds of Hurr
other locals tried
esses,
wicked Category long gone Tues- ing, ge to their homes, busin
were
dama
schools.
cane Katrina
’s legacy
churches and , St. Peter the Aposlysmic storm
intensiday, the catac
In Moss Point
its neighdestruction
pi Gulf tle Catholic Church andl were perof death and
the Miss issip
y schoo
entar
fied acro ss
elem
g
walls on
borin
rmed
Katrina. Brick
Coast.
only one confi a 4- secuted by the school were torn
of
of
On Monday,
h
reported, that t. But the frontwas the front of the churc
fatality was
away, as
exposed to
agoula infan
month-old Pasc day brought news sanctuary, leaving pews
and humidity. y in Ocean
County,
the light of Tues
entar
l es in Jackson in the theAtheat
d adeath
Oak Park Elemrooms were laid
L u cof emore
d
nine people killedareas in
n
class
a
ding
four
r
inclu
gs,
e
were
Sprin
u t i
after walls
Porteaux Bay
i n t , G a
Gulf Hills and community of extreme bare to the elements
ina.
down by Katr
o s s P o
the St. Martin County.
sent tumbling reported at Moss
n g s , M
west Jackson were reported Tues- Damage was also and St. Martin.
Chief Point, Pascagoula
Five deaths
thed
n Springs Fire
County, an unsca
day by Ocea
Across Jackson , or house of worship
.
ing business, home
Mark Hare
were investigat
goula was a rare sight.
or,
Authorities
deaths in Pasca
n Spri ngs Harbing
reports of two s in Gulf Hills.
At the Ocea
float
once
ted
like
ly all the boats
and four death
25¢
er of people repor cy near adorned tattered oak trees
With a numb
rgen
issip pi Eme moved there tmas ornaments.
ed
miss ing, Miss
als
oach
Chris
offici
appr
Agency
nt,
moto rists
es
As
Management
law enforceme ch
by bridge, hous
sear
to combine local
Fontainebleau . But Katr ina left
Gua rd and
the Nati onal ive search-and-res- were stan dingsurprise.
t comteams in a mass Kelli Hamilton of behind a cruel
rfron
wate
e
s,
sippi Press
In the picturesqu
cue effort, said
d away home
son/The Missis
rippe
na
Carisa Ander
Katri
le, who munity,
MEMA.
r
stone slabs or
who are unab
are leaving behind only
house water towe
“To get people
their areas, they
Andrews light dation by Katrina
ations.
are trapped in le first,” Hamilton cracked found however, disappeared The St.
its foun
glimpse
The homes, s, save scatt ered was lifted from
putting the peop
tower offers a .
trace
fallen
as
e
few
The
al
rescu
with
said.
storm
and cryst
Monday.
h and
said the searcOne team from belongings like china
lived
wreaked by the
c
She
er
once
y
havo
Regist
famil
le
the
a
of
da.
r/Mobi
that
Flori
John David Merce
ed in the the only clues
team is from
Fla., was spott enforce- there.
Jacksonville,
90 bridge linkr law
, Page 6-A
shows the U.S. d by Hurricane county Tuesday. Othe
is also
See DEATH TOLL
Sunshine State
roye
, taken Tuesday,
ment from the Coast.
This aerial view gs to Biloxi after it was dest es in South Misheaded for the
an Sprin
and bridg
ion
of new destruct
With discovery rising death toll
comes a rapidly
S p r i
I PRESS
P
P
I
S
S
I
S
S
I
THE M
o u l a ,
P a s c a g
S e r v i n g
O c e a n
Th ur sd ay
, Se pt em be
r 1, 20 05
COMING HOME
K
A
E
R
B
T
R
A
E
H
TO snags, long lines and shattereimdbslives
e affiliate
com Our onlin
www.gulflive.
ing Oce
Several highways
waters.
Katrina Monday. lfed by the storm’s flood
engu
sissippi were
LOC AL, 2-A
fought for life
Biloxi residents rtments
in swamped apa
CIR CUL ATIO
cl
n
Communicatio ees, as Katrina’s death toll
rn
tu
re
t
gree
NEW SRO OM:
ADV ERT ISIN
762 -003 3
REG ION , 7-A
dwaters recede,
In Alabama, floo m devastation
revealing more stor
1
G: 762 -111
PS
N: 769 -MS
(677 7)
Pag es ©
No. 243 , 8
Vol. 159 —
KER
By BRAD CROC
The Mississippi
Press
— The death
PASCAGOULA ty from HurCoun
toll in Jackson stood at 15 at noon
ricane KatrinaThat number was
Wednesday. as search and resrise
expected to
n making their
cue crews bega uniti es wher e
ways into comm
uction could take
debris and destr
.
weeks to clear food began trickWater, ice and distribution sites,
us
ling in to vario ing in number by
which were grow thro ugho ut the
mid- after noon
county.
trepidation and
unBut anxieties,
the
known have
some resident s onedge.
y
Tomm
s, 39, and
Dwayne Davi
bors in Escatawpa
Moye, 37, neighated, were some of
who had evacu 2,000 people who
the more than on County Faircame to the Jacksgoula in a matter
grounds in Pasca ing all they could
of minutes, carryning staples that
of the life-sustai e since Katrina
noon.
have been scarc
Monday after
churned north bad. We got lucky
“This was too Dennis) but we
this
with (Ivan and
wrong side of little
were on the
“We had a
’t
wasn
one,” Davis said.
that
re but
time to prepa the magnitude of
enough, not for
some
this one.”
suffered
Davis and Moye Davis’ family
but
tree damage everything.
members lost
AK, Page 6-A
See HEARTBRE
ett/The
Christy Pritch
bound lane
es in the west
in Pascagoula
in the wake of
Mississippi Press
ina.
Hurricane Katr
s ,
S p r i n g
M o s s
P o i n t ,
r
G a u t i e
ina’s wrath I
Power of KatrS
in
artP
ISSt.SMIP
ligSht in
mes to I
HcoE
piec
o u l a ,
seway lies in
er King Jr. Cau
P a s c a g
The Martin Luth
S e r v i n g
M
T
O c e a n
a n d
l e
L u c e d a
PRESS
25¢
walls of the
flooded and the
y home was
The three-stor blown out.
was wearing
were
bottom floors ,” said Natasha Tapp, who yard. “It was
CLAIR BYRD
Press
“It was scary hats she found in the front
ateMississippi
n home to see
affiliThe
straw
e
.”
retur
to
her
n
onlin
ocean
of
the
bega
Bay
one
com Our
— Residents
the middle of homes around Porteaux
www.gulflive.
of like being in
ST. MARTIN
hed as the
ged skeleton
left behind.
The family watc .
what Katrina nothing but a badly dama
away
away,” said Rhon
le.
were washed everybody’s house blow
Many found
found only rubb
down the bay,”
gutted, as were
“We watched “A whole house floated
their home. Some Gulf Hills home was
Champagne.
d
da
of
Randy McElroy’s
e
tosse
was
“Som
bors.
said.
s, a boat
others’ home
those of his neighbeen a tornado,” McElroy,” he said as he she said.
hed
watc
ly
have
As the fami
ay
or half gone
“It had to
home.
ood.
side of their
are totally gone
wall at 5:30 Mond
these houses remained of his neighborh of his home. against the ed rushing over the sea
.
ows
Water start
the second level s how we knew
surveyed what to the shattered wind r, he said.
at
up
d
ende
that’
feet of wate
He pointed
but morning and front door crashed in,
was six to seven to ride out the storm, er.
Tapp said.
“At 11:30 the
Inside, there
in Latim
coming apart,” ys wanted a breeze,” Rhond
had intended
The McElroys by their children to join themsalvage any- the house was
“I alwa
looke
g to
e said as she
were persuadedhis wife, Pam, were tryin
da Champagn ge walls used to be.
McElroy and
out were gara it!”
, like a jewelry
could
they
got
open to
thing that
Gabby
“Honey, we
had to be pried e.
and Dawn and
Pate
Bay
cabinet that
Robin
aux
sakes insid s of
in the Porte
retrieve the keep
Williams were a family member’s
bits and piece but
on
,
“We’ve found
Rivarea checking
dmother’s chinaPam
uke Avenue and
,”
my great-gran
home at Dism
antiq ue dolls
seen
none of the
iera Drive.
ly car could be
McElroy said.
who lives
ed and the famiwhere it was tossed
er,
flood
moth
was
ge door
The home
Her 86-year-old only one pair of
rneath the gara
has
,
unde
ing
them
able
peek
with
water.
kind of surhave not been
le.
nd in the flood know yet,” Pate said. “It’s
’s
arou
shoes, and they matching pair in the rubb
what
er
e, so I don’t know
“They don’t even
to find anoth
re!” Pate
homeless befor familiar roar of a Cuation pictu
.
nowreal.”
“I’ve never been
’s Valerie’s grad
is in the yard
said over the
“Oh, look, here looked through the debr
picnext,” McElroy overhead.
to stay in the
showed off a
as she
130 cargo planeParrish Champagne choseosa,” during the exclaimed Katie-bug!” she said as she
nda-r
Miss
Rhonda and
young niece.
t Dane “Here’s
ely call the “Rho
n Foreman,
her
Grea
of
Glen
ionat
their
is,
found
affect
and Otis,
ture she
home
through debr Avenue, came up to
ITERthey
s that remained
were sifting
family members
By ADAM NOSS
home
uke
they
Four
.
As
Dism
three
of
the
storm
Press
of
The Associated
at the north end.
the storm in one t subdivision.
Storm
rode
— out
S
built it, who lives
a laugh as
fared
t Poin
Tapp said. “He Parrish see how his friends boat!” Foreman said with the interNEW ORLEAN stand
n, the Asco
ing in
y’s
strong enough,”
g at
raped and beate
ed to
victims were
“That’s my dadd large shrimp boat sittin e.
out, it was d,” she said as she point
“Wee knew
brok
the home.
Riviera Driv
why ,we staye
company built
pointed to the
fight s and firesinthat’
thes open
e construction les in the storm, savored he on of Dismuke Avenue andof water in his home, said
out
pagn
corpses lay
lawe, whos
feet
secti
vehic
Cham
and
s
three
eight
opter
got
lost
helic
who
e
KER
and rescu
Foreman,
shot y, who
The famil
ng on a ride.
IN, Page 6-A
Press
By BRAD CROC
the family
sippint
officers were
Missis
See ST. MART
Press
wine while waiti
ceme
son/The
ofns
Come on in,”
enfor
a glass
The Mississippi
Orlea
Carisa Ander
t New
by as they
Rhonda-rosa!
come
as flood
mesed-ou
s- to the neighbors who stopped
A — Arm ed
“Wel
Thur
with
chy
paintedat
PAS CAG OUL Deve n Hull
once stood.
nded
frien
e anarsaid to
” ds and
desce
icaninto
SOS,
riera Drive are
garage walls
Hurr
is a desperate
with a shot gun, leston, S.C.,
home where
homes on Rive residents are safe afterday.
“This
. r said. entered the
Porteaux Bay
hood
e from Char
know
drov
hbor
yone
neig
Washingmayo
ever
in
g
the
for
the
d
St. Mart
ted across
sages lettin
Thursday boun Pascagoula to
d homes in the
Anger moun thousands of
in
Katrina destroye
ton Avenue that had been in
ruined city, with incre asin gly
guard a home
of
storm victi ms
150 years.
erate and tired
his family for alone as some
hungry, desp
them
to take
He was not
age s ©
waiting for buses
turned into small
No. 244 , 12
neighborhoods residents feared
Vol. 159 —
out.
here like pure
cities and some math of Hurri“We are out
”
cdon’t have help,
that in the after
animals. We Clark, 68, -555
said 1
greed was repla
cane Katrina
Issac
Rev.
: (251 ) 219
survival.
the
ERS
Confor
ns
ART
need
Orlea
the
DQU
ing
ct it best I can
outside the Newwhere corpses
RIC ANE HEA
“I want to prote e would come
er,
PRE SS HUR
vention Cent
peopl
MIS SISS IPPI
and the and
and we knew
be here. I
to
lay in the open comp laine d
had
I
down here.
” said Hull, 37,
othe r evac uees
dropped off and
had to come help,the .12-guage
that they were — no food, no
who borrowed d and shotgun
given nothing cine.
one frien
sippi Press from
er while his
water, no medi to 20,000 peoett/The Missis
Christy Pritch
shells from anoth
About 15,000
ed on their proper at
work
shelt
ts
in
paren
taken
Avenue
street.
ple who had center to await
on Washington ding to take security
erty down the
and debris
the convention asingly hostions a motorist
deci
With felled trees Hull still
shotgun, ques residents frustrated and
a
rent,
with
buses grew incref Eddie Comd
deter
arme
usted
as some
rleston, S.C.,
rists and those
tile. Police Chie in 88 officers
rs have left exha
n Hull of Cha
questioned moto sure they “had
number of loote
pass said he sent tion at the Deve
la. A growing
on foot to make neighborhood.
situa
agou
the
Pasc
quell
to
hands.
business” in the historic home,
they were quicky
into their own
building, but
His family’s
by an angr
the corner of
re order and
ly beaten back
which stood near Park, was one
in to help resto looting, carmob.
iduals who put a stop to the
Pascagoula Beachof homes com“We have indivd, we have
gunfire that have
of the hundreds in the southjackings and
rape
Orleans in the
ng
are getti ng
New
getti
ed
are
pletely destroyedcity, still had
gripp
ina
who
individuals
said . days since Hurricane Katr r
part of the
pass
ern
Com
unde
colle ctibl e art,
of the city
beat en,”
unre cove red and other famiwalking in that plunged much
ng
“Tourists are
antiques, silverA couch and an
water.
they are getti
nt to CNN ,
.
direction and
ly heirlooms were found, but
In a stat eme is a desperpreyed upon.” defu sing the
ue icebox
n said: “This we are out
antiq
Nagi
of
s
half-mile away
In hope
t now
they were one
convention cen- ate SOS. Righ the convention
Country Club
unrest at the Nagin gave the
on the Pascagoula
resources at
h of er and don’t antic ipate
ter, Mayor Ray
golf course.
ission to marc
cent
ht driving down
need buses.
refugees perm e to the city’s
“I never thoug
gh buses. We
enou
cenn would be
n
bridg
a
uctio
conventio
across
here the destr
bank for what
Currently the y and unsafe
know where
don’t
You
unflooded west can find. But
nitar
like this.
proter is unsa
just going to
ing out of supever relief theythe convention
to start. I’m
and we’re runn
” said Hull, who
the bedlam at to make leavtect what’s here,
plies.”
ared
during Hureland
appe
goula
Hom
r
n,
cente
was in Pasca
In Washingto
and Elena and
Mich ael
ing difficult.
ricanes Frederic n during Huropter tried
rity Secr etary
t
A military helic ention cen- Secu toff said the governmen
in Charlesto
was
conv
Cher
National
to land at the
ricane Hugo.
s to drop off is sending in 1,400 help stop
sippi Press
ter several timeBut the rushday to
Page 6-A
ett/The Missis
r.
Guardsmen a
Christy Pritch
See LOOTING,
lawlessness
food and wate d the choppers
looting and otherAlready, 2,800
ing crowd force
for looters.
Troo pers then in New Orleans.
n are in
leave a message
to back off.
the
onal Guardsme
in Pascagoula
t
supp lies to
Nati
Stree
the
in
ed
toss
the
dents on Mart
10 feet off
the city, he said.
6-A Resi
crow d from
Page
.
CHY,
away
See ANAR
s,
ground and flewdsmen poured
s in pickup truck
National Guar
obliterated homebeen spotted by offiies drove past
s had
bors.
red severe injur r stopping where bodie
family or neigh are bodies
ned or suffe
. Thei
victims drow
or reported by
around them
there
teams and dogs when buildings collapsed from the water or cials we’ve been told is that
to them all,”
h-and-rescue
“All
get
ed
rted
searc
can’t
wash
as
disto
pose.
and we
borhoods
Thursday
faces have been
started to decom
relli said.
lying around,
ruins of neigh
M
.
le and they have
lman John Salta
go through the
were swept
treat the
By RUSS BYNU
huge storm surge son Coun ty — the rubb tification and clothes miles from police patro y and neighbors tried to
Press
found
away by the
The Associated
Many famil
g what they
ier Their iden
bodie s in Jack
s had drifted
driving around
agoula, Gaut
respect, usin bodies.
Most of the
— Crews are
and many bodie
left on
bodies with
towns of Pasc
been away,
PASCAGOULA
ng up bodies
dental
is to wrap the
older
where the beachgs were swamped — have
issippi, picki
home.
scars, tattoos, pho- amid the debr the crew picke d up an
siting them in
any
Moss
Sprin
for
in
coastal Miss
depo
n
e
ng
and
ting and
garbage
out on a sidecon- and Ocea
Funeral Hom
“We are looki
Wed nesd ay,
Coroners are
had been laid
sidewalks like
the Heritage
DNA, fingerprinisn’t like lookr, power or
to
ues.
that
tment
doing
wate
morg
body
taken
apar
le
I’m
no
.
the
an’s
brick
ess has
easy. This
and work
refrigerated mobi in parking lots because
he wom in front of a single-story
in covered
Point. The busin ng the job of storing er tos,” she said. “It’s not
sies
and telling what
walk
terned curta
ducting autop
the sun.
ty coron
service, maki
standing there y are not identifilex. A flower-pat were outstretched. Her
light is from
ts are phone
comp
difficult for coun st work- ing at James
reall
effor
dead
f
le
the
arms
relie
peop
only available
e
her
Katrina
- identifying
sic pathologi
, Page 6-A
her body, and
looks like. Thes
Most Hurricane , many of whom are strug Vicki Broadus and a foren
See THE DEAD
now.”
r
in Waveland,
living
- able right
her.
focused on the gh food, water, shelter, powe
side of the state e and others
ing in the park
pri- ing with
On the other
polic
h
truck was runn
gling to get enou tion. The dead are a lower
est-hit towns,
A refrigerated with 10 bodies, six of whic
fying
one of the hard
sday
and medical atten bodies have been putre
said most of the
ing lot Thur
ified. Broadus
ident
be
ority, and manyreceded Monday.
not
g could
r
126 and risin
since the wate
death toll was
The official
pt em be
Fr ida y, Se
r 2, 20 05
S
O
CFigHhtA
t;
s, gunfire erup
o anarchy
ps int
New Orleans sli
Katrina
As fear
of looting
grows, Pas
homeowners
pack heat
REG ION , 3-A
s citizens
ans; mayor urge s
lem
ly dead in New Orle
‘Thousands’ likeswamped city due to health prob
to leave
REG ION , 2-A
says
take years, Bush
recovery likely to
g lot autopsies
gues, parkin
frigerated mor
ad
deal with the de
Re
and photos.
A, fingerprinting
rk. I’m doing DN telling what he looks like.
oos, dental wo
and
tatt
re
rs,
the
sca
ng
any
ndi
g for
g at James sta ntifiable right now.”
“We are lookin
s isn’t like lookin
ide
It’s not easy. Thi These people really are not n County coroner
s, Jackso
— Vicki Broadu
STA
STATE, 2-A
toll stands at 126
Mississippi death
MIS SISS IPPI
RIC ANE
PRE SS HUR
-555
ERS : 251 -219
HEA DQU ART
REG ION , 2-A
astation
view hurricane dev
President Bush to
Pag es ©
No. 245 , 12
Vol. 159 —
-902
1, 866 -843
0
On Monday, August 29, 2005,
Hurricane Katrina roared ashore
here in South Mississippi and
changed life as we know it.
We are pleased to say that
The Mississippi Press has
published an edition each day since
the storm. To view these editions
online, just go to www.gulflive.com
and download the edition you wish
to see. We are here to serve you
with critical news and information
after this most devastating event.
If you need to reach us...
For news, call 251-219-5551
or Toll Free 1-866-843-9020.
Email: [email protected]
For advertising and circulation,
call 251-219-5570
or Toll Free 1-866-843-8911.
For circulation, call 1-251-219-5354.
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