Stephen Paulus

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Stephen Paulus
A song sung from the heart
can change any person’s tune.
And, this is why the power of music can change lives.
Conspir are , you are an inspir ation in our community. Thank you for all
you do to inspire change . We at UFCU also str ive to inspire positive
change in the lives of our member s; we wor k hard to provide for their
well-being.
As par tner s in our community, we will encour age you to continue
giving the gift of inspir ation ever y day.
U FCU.o rg
Federally insured by NCUA
A Lyrical Life
May 11 – 17 , 2016
A Lyrical Life
May 11 – 17 , 2016
Craig Hella Johnson, Artistic Director & Conductor
FREDERICKSBURG , TX
St. Mary’s Catholic Church
Wednesday, 7:30pm
May 11, 2016
AUSTIN, TX
St. Martin’s Lutheran Church
Thursday & Friday, 8:00pm
May 12-13, 2016
NORTHFIELD, MN
Boe Memorial Chapel, St. Olaf College
Tuesday, 7:30pm
May 17, 2016
pre-concert talk one hour before each Texas performance
A version of this program, along with outreach activities, will also be
performed in Minnesota and Canada.
Season Sustaining Underwriter
®
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1
PROGRAM
All music by Stephen Paulus (1949-2014) except where noted
Arise, My Love We Gather Together Kremser from Nederland-landtsch
Gedenclanck, arr. Stephen Paulus
Little Elegy
Song of Gratitude
Craig Hella Johnson (b. 1962)
Hymn for Dad Greg Paulus (b. 1962);
arr. Cary John Franklin
Shall
We Gather at the River Traditional, arr. Stephen Paulus
Poemas de Amor
(Commissioned by Conspirare and premiered in 2007 at Crossing the Divide: Exploring Influence
and Finding Our Voice, a National Endowment for the Arts American Masterpieces Festival)
I. Soñaba
II. De tu Cama a la Miá
III. Pasas Por Mi Calle
IV. Si lo dicen, digan
V. Mano a Mano
Turn (world premiere) Tarik O’Regan (b. 1978)
When Music Sounds
INT ERM I SSI O N
Agnus DeiSamuel Barber (1910-1981)
(performed in loving memory of Stephen Paulus)
Hymn to the Eternal Flame (from To Be Certain of the Dawn)
All Things Are Passing
All Living Beings (from Awakening)
Singalo, Singalay (from Harmoonia)
Silver the River
Tree of Two Birds (from Fountain of My French)
God With Me
Afternoon on a Hill (from Four Songs on Poems by Edna St Vincent Millay)
Hymn for America
Shenandoah (from Heritage Songs)
Traditional, arr. Stephen Paulus
Black is the Color of My True Love’s Hair Traditional, arr. Stephen Paulus
(from Heritage Songs)
Pilgrims’ Hymn (from The Three Hermits)
PROGRAM TEXTS
Arise, My Love
Arise up my love, my fair one, and come away;
for lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone.
The flow’rs appear upon the earth,
the time of singing has come,
and the voice of the turtledove is heard in our land.
The fig tree puts forth its figs,
and the vines are in blossom;
they give forth fragrance.
Arise my love, my fair one, come away.
O my dove in the clefts of the rock,
and the covert of the cliff,
let me see your face,
let me hear your voice,
for your voice is sweet, and your face is comely.
Arise, my love.
– Anonymous Hebrew, fourth century B.C., Song of Solomon 2:10-13
We Gather Together
We gather together to ask the Lord’s blessing;
He chastens and hastens His will to make known;
The wicked oppressing now cease from distressing;
Sing praises to His Name; He forgets not His own.
Beside us to guide us, our God with us joining,
Ordaining, maintaining His kingdom divine;
So from the beginning the fight we were winning;
Thou, Lord, were at our side, all glory be Thine!
We all do extol Thee, Thou Leader triumphant,
And pray that Thou still our Defender will be;
Let Thy congregation escape tribulation;
Thy Name be ever praised! O Lord, make us free!
– Anonymous 1625, Translated by Theodore Baker (1851-1934)
The Day is Done
O PT I O NA L SE LEC T ION S
“Prospect” from
Southern Harmony,
adapted by Stephen Paulus
Beautiful Things (from Madrigali Michelangelo)
The Road Home
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3
SONG OF GRATITUDE
PROGRAM TEXTS
Little Elegy
Withouten you
No rose can grow;
No leaf be green
If never seen
Your sweetest face;
No bird have grace
Or power to sing;
Or anything
Be kind, or fair,
And you nowhere.
– Elinor Wylie (1885-1928)
PROGRAM TEXTS
Michael Dennis Browne
Song of Gratitude
Audience,
stand
andand
singsing
verses
1 and 3.
Audience
stand
:
Verse 1: please
Expansive q =
Soprano
bb 3
&bbb4
bb
&bbb œ œ œ
6
out of this
∑
∑
˙
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long
-
ing,
b
& b bbb œ œ œ
˙.
bb
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&bbb œ œ
œ œ œ
Out of these songs,
Lift-ing our
b
& b bbb Œ œ œ
24
In the
bb
&bbb œ œ œ
30
We bow
b
& b b b b ˙.
36
te.
F
F
Unis. tutti or
section soli
∑
˙.
œ œ œ
Out of this
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18
Craig Hella Johnson
be - ing:
œ
œ œ
name of the
˙.
down,
œ œ œ
œ œ œ
Out of these voic - es from
œ œ
œ
out of this
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œ
Heart, you are
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spir - it
of
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We bow
˙
sing
œ
-
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ing,
love,
œ œ œ
all of the
œ
œ œ œ
œ œ œ
souls,
Lift - ing our
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˙
a - ges,
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ev’ - ry -where, Deep-er than dream - ing;
˙.
love,
œ
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Al - ways and
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down:
˙
Nam
œ
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ev’ - ry - where,
œ
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as
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p
Verse 2 (Audience remain standing,
choir sings):
Within the source, within the center,
Within the telling of falling and rising,
Within the root, within creation,
Harvest of waves, dancing redeeming:
Hope, you flow everywhere,
Healing our hunger;
In the name of the spirit of love,
Always and everywhere,
We bow down, we bow down:
Namaste.
Copyright © 2016 by G. Schirmer, Inc. (ASCAP), New York, NY
International Copyright Secured. All Rights Reserved.
Warning: Unauthorized reproduction of this publication is
prohibited by Federal law and subject to criminal prosecution.
Reprinted with permission.
Used by permission of G. Schirmer, Inc.
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5
PROGRAM TEXTS
PROGRAM TEXTS
Verse3:3:Audience,
Audienceplease
standstand
and sing:
Verse
and sing.
b
& b bbb
72
&
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∑
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love,
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We bow
˙.
down,
spir - it
spir - it
of
of
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down,
re - turn - ing,
œ œ œ
We bow
Har-mo - ny
∑
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Audience, please be seated.
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Nam
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Nam
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In the
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ev’ - ry - where,
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In the
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ev’ - ry-where,
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Al - ways and
bow,
end-less be -
˙
-
˙˙
as
œœ
˙
˙
as
we are walking
walking with you
light around us
light within us.
calling, chanting
humming, singing
sway of summer
leaves of laughter
O my sister
O my brother
end-less be -
œ œ œ
way,
œ
Al - ways,
love,
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œ œ
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down:
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re - turn - ing,
ev - er
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Har-mo - ny
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flesh,
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ev’ - ry - where, Shap-ing our
gin - nings: Light, you shine
102
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Bless-ing our
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name of the
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name of the
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∑
Hymn for Dad
on your journey
to the river
œ œ œ
We bow
˙.
˙.
-
te.
-
˙.
˙.
one in mind and
one in grace and
one in heart and
one in spirit
all we need
and ever near us
mercy shining
mercy shining
mercy shining
mercy shining
mercy shining
always on us
light around us
light within us
we are walking
walking with you
on your journey
to the river
– Michael Dennis Browne (b. 1940)
te.
Audience, please be seated.
7
PROGRAM TEXTS
PROGRAM TEXTS
V. Mano a Mano
Mano a mano los dos amores,
mano a mano.
El galán y la galana
ambos vuelven el agua clara,
mano a mano.
Shall We Gather at the River
Shall we gather at the river,
Where bright angels’ feet have trod,
With its crystal tide forever
Flowing by the throne of God.
– 16th Century Spanish
Yes we’ll gather at the river,
The beautiful, the beautiful river,
Gather with the saints by the river
That flows by the throne of God.
– Robert Lowry (1826-1899)
V. Hand in Hand
Hand in hand the two lovers,
hand in hand.
The young man and his girl,
they turn the water to light,
hand in hand.
– translated by
Alvaro Cardona-Hine
Turn I am a spark without goal, without direction,
Thrown into the universe as my journey began,
Before long another sun bound itself to me
And turning I lived for an unmeasured while,
Poemas de Amor
I. Soñaba
Soñaba yo que tenía
alegre mi corazón,
mas a la fe, madre mía,
que los sueños, sueños son.
I. I Dreamt
I dreamt
that my heart was happy,
but by my faith, Mother,
dreams are just dreams.
II. De tu Cama a la Mía
De tu cama a la mía pasa un varquillo;
aventúrate y pasa,
moreno mio.
II. From Your Bed to Mine
There’s a boat sailing
from your bed to mine;
take a chance and come over,
my sunburnt lover.
III. Pasas Por Mi Calle
Pasas por mi calle,
no me quieres ver;
corazón de acero
debes de tener.
III. You Pass Down My Street
You pass down my street
but won’t look my way,
you must have
a heart of steel.
IV. Si lo dicen, digan
Si lo dicen, digan,
alma mía,
si lo dicen, digan.
IV. If They Say It, Let Them
If they say it, let them,
dear soul,
if they say it, let them.
Dicen que vos quiero
y por vos me muero;
dicho es verdadero,
alma mía,
si lo dicen, digan.
They say I love you
to death;
true enough,
dear soul,
if they say it, let them.
A kernel of life, empty in itself,
Full of the energy that around me spun.
O that I could without knowing for centuries
Turn within the ungrasped radiating rose.
Endless world, incomplete universe
And without beginning, but where each part
Image is of the whole and a lightshow
Along the eternal ways, tell me, shall once, shall
Ever there be an end to your steady fire,
You, a diamond in the hollow of a hand?
– Albert Verwey (1865-1937), translated by Cliff Crego
When Music Sounds
When music sounds, gone is the earth I know,
And all her lovely things even lovelier grow;
Her flowers in vision flame, her forest trees,
Lift burdened branches, stilled with ecstasies.
When music sounds, out of the water rise
Naiads whose beauty dims my waking eyes,
Rapt in strange dream burns each enchanted face,
With solemn echoing stirs their dwelling-place.
When music sounds, all that I was I am
Ere to this haunt of brooding dust I came;
While from Time’s woods break into distant song
The swift-winged hours, as I hasten along.
– Walter de la Mare (1873–1956)
I N T E RM I SSI O N
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PROGRAM TEXTS
Agnus Dei
Lamb of God,
Agnus Dei
Who takest away the sins of the world,
qui tollis peccata mundi, have mercy upon us.
miserere nobis.
Lamb of God,
Agnus Dei
Who takest away the sins of the world,
qui tollis peccata mundi, Grant us peace.
Dona nobis pacem.
– John 1:29
Hymn to the Eternal Flame
Every face is in you,
Every voice,
Every sorrow in you,
Every pity,
Every love, every memory,
Woven into fire.
Every breath is in you,
Every cry,
Every longing in you,
Every singing,
Every hope, every shining,
Woven into fire.
Every heart is in you,
Every tongue,
Every trembling in you,
Every blessing,
Every soul, every healing,
Woven into fire.
– Michael Dennis Browne
All Things Are Passing
Let nothing disturb thee,
Nothing affright thee;
All things are passing;
God never changeth;
Patient endurance
Attaineth to all things;
Who God possesseth
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PROGRAM TEXTS
In nothing is wanting;
Alone God sufficeth.
– Teresa of Ávila, Spanish (1545-1582),
trans. by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)
All Living Beings
May all beings be happy.
May they live in safety and joy.
All living beings,
Whether weak or strong,
Tall, stout, average, or short,
Seen or unseen, near or distant,
Born or to be born,
May they all be happy.
Let no one deceive another or despise any being in any state, let none
by anger or hatred wish harm to another.
As a mother watches over her child, so with a boundless heart should
one cherish all living beings, suffusing the world with loving kindness
and thus the whole world around and ev’rywhere continue to pervade
with love-filled thoughts abounding sublime beyond measure.
May all beings be happy.
– From the Metta Sutta, version by Gil Fronsdale (b. 1954)
Singalo, Singalay
Sing me a song like the morning,
Sing me a song like the rising sun;
Simple and flowing,
Tender and growing,
Sing me a song for everyone.
Singalo, Singalay,
Follow the call of our melody,
Singalo, Singalay,
Join us in the joy of harmony.
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PROGRAM TEXTS
Bring me a song like the river,
Bring me a song like the summer stream,
Soothing and shining,
Gentle and twining,
Bring me a song we all can dream.
Singalo, Singalay,
Follow the call of our melody,
Singalo, Singalay,
Join us in the joy of harmony.
Only the sounds of our singing,
Round upon round ringing everywhere,
Laughing and playing,
Dancing and swaying,
Show us all the life the world can share.
Singalo, Singalay,
Follow the call of our melody,
Singalo, Singalay,
Join us in the joy of harmony.
– Michael Dennis Browne
Silver the River
The clouds are all drowsy and white and fat,
Silver the river and slow,
The hills are as soft as a snoozing cat,
Softly the waters flow.
On the banks is a boy asleep,
Silver the river and slow;
The field’s yellow flowers are a dream for sheep,
Softly the waters flow.
Willow and shadow and meadow grass,
Silver the river and slow,
The boy still sleeps and the hours pass,
Softly the waters flow and so
Silver the river and slow.
– Michael Dennis Browne
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PROGRAM TEXTS
Tree of Two Birds
Tree of two birds,
tree of two birds,
all winter long
I have heard your song,
and my heart has been like
a tree of two birds.
When it was cold, cold, cold,
when the snow flew,
when the clouds rode
down
down
down,
such song
from the bare branch!
Sweet throat, sweet throat,
all winter long.
Even the darkest days
how you plant
your notes in my heart;
like a fountain,
green fountain in winter,
fountain of my friends,
like my family
singing to me,
O Brother,
O Sister
bird,
from the twigs of winter.
Tree of two birds,
tree of two birds,
feeding me with your song
all winter long.
– Michael Dennis Browne
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House of Hope Presbyterian Church
PROGRAM TEXTS
GOD WITH ME
God With Me
PROGRAM TEXTS
Audience,
please stand and sing.
Celtic Invocation
# 2
& # 4 ˙
˙
with
with
with
with
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with me
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Stephen Paulus
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Copyright © 2000 by Stephen Paulus
Paulus Publications • 1719 Summit Avenue • St. Paul, MN 55105
Phone: (651) 647-9612 • Fax: (651) 647-6488
e-mail: [email protected]
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Audience, please be seated.
-3-
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PROGRAM TEXTS
Afternoon on a Hill
I will be the gladdest thing
Under the sun!
I will touch a hundred flowers
And not pick one.
I will look at cliffs and clouds
With quiet eyes,
Watch the wind bow down the grass,
And the grass rise.
And when lights begin to show
Up from the town,
I will mark which must be mine,
And then start down!
– Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950)
Hymn for America We have loved you for your rivers,
We have loved you for your shores;
Every treasure you have shown us,
Every seed that you have sown;
We have loved you for your mountains,
For your prairies, for your fields,
All these gifts we have been given,
All these glories that we share;
Now we thank you for these blessings,
We, your people, everywhere.
Many are the stars of heaven,
Many are the hopes of earth;
All around us, worlds unfolding,
All around these dreams to grow;
From the moment of our rising
Till we rest when day is done,
May we tell our hearts’ own story,
Hearts that honor and believe,
Through our care for one another,
For this life and land we love.
PROGRAM TEXTS
Shenandoah
Oh, Shenandoah, I long to see you
Away, you rolling river.
Oh, Shenandoah, I long to see you
Away, I’m bound away
’Cross the wide Missouri.
Oh, Shenandoah, I love your daughter,
Away, you rolling river.
For her I’ve crossed the rolling water,
Away, we’re bound away,
’Cross the wide Missouri.
Oh, Shenandoah, I long to see you
Away, you rolling river.
Oh, Shenandoah, I’ll not deceive you,
Away, we’re bound away,
’Cross the wide Missouri.
Oh, seven long years I’ve been a rover,
Away, you rolling river.
For seven long years I’ve been a rover,
Away, we’re bound away,
’Cross the wide Missouri.
Bound away…
’Cross the wide Missouri…
– Traditional
Black is the Color of My True Love’s Hair
Black, black, black is the color of my true love’s hair.
Her lips are something wond’rous fair,
The purest eyes, and the gentlest hands;
I love the grass on which she stands.
I love my love and well she knows.
I love the ground on which she goes.
If she on earth no more I’d see,
My life would quickly fade away.
– Traditional
– Michael Dennis Browne
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PROGRAM TEXTS
Pilgrims’ Hymn
Even before we call on your name
To ask you, O God,
When we seek for the words to glorify You,
You hear our prayer;
Unceasing love, O unceasing love,
Surpassing all we know.
Glory to the Father,
And to the Son,
And to the Holy Spirit.
Even with darkness sealing us in,
We breathe Your name,
And through all the days that follow so fast,
We trust in You;
Endless Your grace, O endless Your grace,
Beyond all mortal dream.
Both now and for ever,
And unto ages and ages,
Amen.
– Michael Dennis Browne
The Day is Done
The day is done, and the darkness
Falls from the wings of Night,
As a feather is wafted downward
From an eagle in his flight.
I see the lights of the village
Gleam through the rain and the mist,
And a feeling of sadness comes o’er me
That my soul cannot resist:
A feeling of sadness and longing,
That is not akin to pain,
And resembles sorrow only
As the mist resembles the rain.
PROGRAM TEXTS
Not from the grand old masters,
Not from the bards sublime,
Whose distant footsteps echo
Through the corridors of Time.
For, like strains of martial music,
Their mighty thoughts suggest
Life’s endless toil and endeavor;
And tonight I long for rest.
Read from some humbler poet,
Whose songs gushed from his heart,
As showers from the clouds of summer,
Or tears from the eyelids start;
Who, through long days of labor,
And nights devoid of ease,
Still heard in his soul the music
Of wonderful melodies.
Such songs have power to quiet
The restless pulse of care,
And come like the benediction
That follows after prayer.
Then read from the treasured volume
The poem of thy choice,
And lend to the rhyme of the poet
The beauty of thy voice.
And the night shall be filled with music,
And the cares, that infest the day,
Shall fold their tents, like the Arabs,
And as silently steal away.
– Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Come, read to me some poem,
Some simple and heartfelt lay,
That shall soothe this restless feeling,
And banish the thoughts of day.
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PROGRAM TEXTS
PROGRAM TEXTS
OPTIO NAL SE LEC T IO NS
The Road Home
Tell me where is the road
I can call my own,
That I left, that I lost,
So long ago?
All the years I have wandered,
Oh when will I know
There’s a way, there’s a road
That will lead me home?
After wind, after rain,
When the dark is done,
As I wake from a dream
In the gold of day,
Through the air there’s a calling
From far away,
There’s a voice I can hear
That will lead me home.
Rise up, follow me,
Come away, is the call,
With the love in your heart
As the only song;
There is no such beauty
As where you belong;
Rise up, follow me,
I will lead you home.
– Michael Dennis Browne
Beautiful Things (from Madrigali Michelangelo)
Beautiful things, beautiful things are the longing of my eyes.
Just as it is my soul’s to be secure.
But they’ve no other power that lifts to Heaven.
But staring at all those beautiful things are the longing of my eyes . . .
. . . a shining glory falls from the furthest starts above;
T’ward them our wish it pulls,
And here we call it Love.
Beautiful things . . .
Kind heart can never have to enamor and fire it,
And to counsel more than a face with eyes that they resemble.
Beautiful things are the longing of my eyes . . .
If sense will let its flame, too scorching,
Scatter away, from yours to some less beautiful face,
Lord, it has far less force, as in its branches, a fierce mountain river.
Then Heart, whose life goes further in hotter fire,
Can hardly agree with the less burning sighs and tears.
Soul, which can see the error, is glad to have it die,
And turns to Heaven, whither it aspires.
Then Reason, justly shares its wounds among them.
If Sense will let its flame, too scorching, scatter away from yours to
some less beautiful face,
Then Heart, whose life goes further in hotter fire,
can hardly then agree,
With the less burning sighs and rarer tears.
Soul, which can see the error, is glad to have it die,
And turns, to Heaven, whither it aspires.
Then Reason justly shares its wounds among them.
And with tougher bodies all Four of them agree to love you always.
– Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564)
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PROGRAM NOTE
PROGRAM NOTE
One of the things that we as composers are taught about the history of
our art is that it is founded on a linear progression of ideas. Medieval
chants lead to the Renaissance polyphony of Palestrina, and composers
like Monteverdi took those ideas and gently ushered in the Baroque era
before Bach and Handel later defined it. A boy genius named Wolfgang
and a kind man named Haydn subsequently gave us the Classical
era and a composer who would eventually go deaf complicated their
harmonies and pushed us into the Romanticism of the 19th century.
Then the 20th century yielded a plurality of styles that were...well...
there’s just not enough pages here to delve into that particular kettle
of fish.
Of course, I’m making it sound more simplistic than it actually is,
but all of this is to say that a lot of the identity of our art music is
tied up with the idea that composers throughout history were always
consciously standing on the shoulders of giants. Essentially, attempting
to innovate new styles was their primary concern.
But Stephen Paulus’s music isn’t “new” in this sense. The harmonies
aren’t complicated and esoteric like his twelve-tone progenitors, and an
overarching process doesn’t govern it like the music of the minimalists.
It’s elegant, warm, and inviting to the listener. Some folks might even
call it “conservative.” But that’s the wonderful thing about Steve’s
music and what made him so successful. As a composer he was less
concerned with saying something new than he was with saying the
right thing. And over the course of his career he had a lot to say.
Though he wrote in literally every genre — opera, chamber, oratorio,
orchestral, etc. — Steve most frequently wrote for and was beloved by
the choral world. He wrote over 400 works for choral ensembles and
tonight Conspirare presents a retrospective of that particular aspect of
his staggeringly large body of work. We’ll hear short, hymn-like works
written so elegantly you’d think it took him forever to get them right (it
didn’t), as well as some of the dozens of arrangements of pre-existing
melodies he had a knack for casting in his unique and generous
compositional voice. Alongside this remarkable music there will also be
a world premiere by a gifted British composer, an iconic American piece
often used as a means to grieve, and a moving musical eulogy a son
wrote for his father. But most of all — and to borrow a phrase from one
of Steve’s pieces we’ll hear — “the night shall be filled with music.”
But perhaps, for tonight, that might mean something else:
“A life shall be filled with music.”
This is the life and work of Stephen Paulus.
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WRITTEN
BY JOSHUA SHANK
Joshua Shank’s music has been called
“jubilant…ethereal” (Santa Barbara News-Press)
and “evocative and atmospheric…distilling a
sustained mood most impressively” (Gramophone).
He has been commissioned by ensembles such as the Young New
Yorkers’ Chorus, the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, the
American Choral Directors Association, The Esoterics (Seattle),
the Minnesota All-State Choir and the Lorelei Ensemble (Boston).
From 2004-2014, he served as Composer-In-Residence for the
Minneapolis-based professional choir The Singers - Minnesota
Choral Artists. During that time, he collaborated annually to
expand and invigorate the repertoire for professional-caliber
ensembles through innovative programming as well as new works
written specifically for the ensemble.
In 2002, he became the youngest recipient ever of the Raymond
W. Brock Composition Award by the American Choral Directors
Association. The winning piece, “Musica animam tangens,”
was premiered in Avery Fisher Hall at the Lincoln Center
and has since been performed and recorded from Los Angeles to
South Africa. His music was recently featured in the PBS
documentary about the extensive choral tradition in the upper
Midwest, Never Stop Singing, and his published works have sold
over 100,000 copies worldwide.
joshuashank.com
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S T E P H E N PA U LU S
Stephen Paulus was a prolific
American composer of classical
music. He wrote over 600 works
for chorus, opera, orchestra,
chamber ensemble, solo voice,
concert band, piano, and
organ, receiving premieres and
performances throughout the
world as well as a Grammy®
award for Best Contemporary
Classical Composition in 2015.
His writing style has been
described by The New York
Times as “lush and extravagant,”
and critics from the The New
York Times, Los Angeles Times,
Cleveland Plain Dealer, Opera
News, and many others have
praised his work. The New Yorker described him as a “bright, lyrical
inventor whose music pulsates with a driving, kinetic energy.” He was
a recipient of both NEA and Guggenheim Fellowships.
Beginning in 1979, fresh out of graduate school with a Ph.D. from the
University of Minnesota, he was commissioned by the Opera Theatre
of Saint Louis and later went on to write a total of 12 operas with
performances coming from the Boston Lyric Opera, Washington Opera,
Minnesota Opera, Sacramento Opera, The Berkshire Opera Company,
and others. With 55 orchestral works to his credit, Paulus served as
a Composer in Residence with the orchestras of Atlanta, Minnesota,
Tucson and Annapolis. Conductors who premiered his works include
Osmo Vänskä, Christoph van Dohnanyi, Kurt Masur, Sir Neville
Marriner, and Leonard Slatkin. Orchestral commissions include a
violin concerto for the Cleveland Orchestra and William Preucil, a jazz
concerto co-written with his son, Greg, for the Minnesota Orchestra
as well as organ concertos for the Phoenix Symphony and the
Portland (Maine) Symphony.
S T E P H E N PA U LU S
Master Chorale, Robert Shaw Festival Singers, VocalEssence, Dale
Warland Singers and countless others. Notable works for vocalist and
orchestra include commissions for Thomas Hampson, Deborah Voigt,
Samuel Ramey and Elizabeth Futral. Instrumental soloists who have
performed Paulus’ works range from Doc Severinsen and Leo Kottke
to Robert McDuffie, William Preucil, Lynn Harrell and Cynthia Phelps.
Paulus was a passionate advocate for the works and careers of his
colleagues. In 1973 he co-founded the Minnesota Composers Forum,
now known as the American Composers Forum, the largest composer
service organization in the U.S. He also served as the Symphony and
Concert Representative on the board of ASCAP from 1990 until 2014.
Stephen Paulus passed away in October, 2014 from complications
of a stroke, but his music continues to be frequently performed and
described by critics as rugged, angular, lyrical, lean, rhythmically
aggressive, original, often gorgeous, moving, and uniquely American.
The New Yorker characterizes his music as having “impeccable
technique and well-honed audience appeal.”
“ Mr. Paulus often finds melodic patterns
that are fresh and familiar at the same time....
His scoring is invariably expert and
exceptionally imaginative in textures
and use of instruments.”
– The New York Times
Paulus wrote over 400 works for chorus ranging from his Holocaust
oratorio, To Be Certain of the Dawn, recorded by Minnesota Orchestra
on the BIS label, to the poignant anthem, “Pilgrims’ Hymn,” sung at
the funerals of Presidents Reagan and Ford. Both works were written
with his frequent collaborator and friend, librettist Michael Dennis
Browne. His works have received thousands of performances and
recordings from such groups as The New York Choral Society, L.A.
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25
L E G A C Y O F S T E P H E N PA U LU S
L E G A C Y O F S T E P H E N PA U LU S
We first talked about it over orecchiette at an old Italian restaurant in
Manhattan. Healthy at the time, my Dad brought up what to do with
his music and the publishing business if he ever passed away. In his
usual self-deprecating way he said it would be OK to sell the business
if we wanted to, but it was clear that was not his hope. He thought
his music should be getting more performances and hoped I would get
involved. Knowing I had ambitions outside of classical music he ended
with a joke, saying that the business would probably really take off just
when he dies.
Less than a year after that dinner he suffered a stroke that ultimately
took his life. Managing my Dad’s musical legacy has been both a
tremendous honor and a heavy responsibility. I’ve found guidance
in the goal, above all else, to do whatever I can so as many people as
possible get to listen to, perform, record, and enjoy his music.
Continuing my Dad’s legacy is not something I can do alone, which is
why I am grateful to the many people who continue to champion his
music. There are too many to list, but my Dad’s legacy lives on in the
performances and passions of others. We are grateful to everyone
who continues to help ensure his music will be enjoyed for generations
to come.
Beyond his own music, a core part of my Dad’s legacy is how much he
cared about fostering and developing the careers of fellow composers.
He always made time to meet with young composers, providing
advice and making connections. Through co-founding the Minnesota
Composers Forum and through his role on the board of ASCAP he was
always working to help his fellow colleagues. Through his humor, wit,
and thoughtful advice he could always cheer up a friend.
26
My Dad was the consummate working composer. He built a prolific
catalog through disciplined work and an empathetic desire to create
music of meaning. He created a diverse catalog, handwriting new
compositions on pen and paper, and always talking to commissioners.
He once described being a composer to a group of kids, saying “It is
not a casual type of thing. You work at it every day, the same way a
lawyer would work at a job every day, or a physician or a carpenter.
The more you work at it, the better you get.” His discipline fostered a
humble confidence in his work, which I’ve seen transfer to my brother
and me as we have grown up. I couldn’t be more grateful to have him
as my father, and I couldn’t be more honored to do all I can to grow his
musical legacy in the years to come. To all those who have helped and
continue to help by performing, listening to, and enjoying his music —
thank you. On nights like tonight his joke seems prescient, if not too
bittersweet.
A N D R E W PA U LU S
Andrew (Spud) Paulus is a Product Manager at BuzzFeed and the
Managing Partner of his family music publishing business. He grew
up in the North and graduated from Georgetown University with a
degree in Finance and Management. When not working, he enjoys
playing basketball, canoeing and wheel-thrown ceramics. His favorite
Paulus pieces are The Road Home, Timepiece and Ice Fields.
Continuing my Dad’s legacy
is not something I can do alone,
which is why I am grateful
to the many people who continue
to champion his music.
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S T E P H E N PA U LU S R E F L E C T I O N
S T E P H E N PA U LU S R E F L E C T I O N
Deep seas in you; worlds within worlds within worlds. And you had no
need to know how this came about, either the weaving and combining of
the surging, complex energies within you or the inspired ways in which,
again and again, you brought them into life. Let it remain unfathomed.
I’ll go with what John Berryman wrote of Theodore Roethke: “ Back
from wherever with it said.”
Such an honor, such a joy for me to write words for you, with you, over
almost four decades, knowing the music was for the ages. (For me, not
a musician, it was what I call a different kind of belonging.) I knew you
as a master of musical shaping, a great begetter. Esteban, I was always
so proud of you.
I loved your generosity to others—young composers, for one large
example; you gave, you gave. And the community you served so well
gave back to you—huge support over the years from your wondrously
loyal family, from musicians such as Dale Warland, Philip Brunelle,
Tom Lancaster, Kathy Salzman Romey, Bruce Carlson, from Jack and
Linda Hoeschler and other members of the commissioning club, from
Fr. Michael O’Connell…the list is a long and distinguished one.
Stephen Paulus and poet Michael Dennis Browne,
friends and longtime collaborators, wrote 17 pieces
together, beginning around 1976. Today’s program
includes several of their collaborations. Michael reflects
on the continuing resonance of this relationship below.
Stephen
In the only dream I have yet had of you, I walked into a kitchen during
a loud party and there you were, looking fit, youthful, your hair rather
long and curly. (I used to ask you: “ Where do you buy your hair?)
Amazed, I asked, “ Stephen, what are you doing here? How are you?”
You said: “ I’m working.”
Should that have surprised me? I have never known anyone else more
disciplined, who worked harder at what he loved and seemed born to
do, so why should it be any different for you in the life beyond this one?
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I once described writing words for music as being like building a boat
rather than a house—something firm, buoyant, to ride on top of the
music; build too heavy, and things sink. (And most words for music on
the page are as about as interesting as boats on sand.) And I wrote of
your vast score for To Be Certain of the Dawn as the largest sea, the
deepest, on which my words had ever been privileged to float.
And now? You belong everywhere, among us always with what you
harvested. In the words of Edna St. Vincent Millay, writing of a young
poet: “No thing that ever flew, / Not the lark, not you, / Can die as
others do.” I’m not able to believe that you, who were so alive, can ever
be other than near to the lives we continue to live “without” you.
I miss you, of course, and think of you every day, but I am confident
that the “working” goes on, goes on in your unimaginable Forever.
I think I will always be talking to you.
Michael Dennis Browne
Michael Dennis Browne’s latest collection of poems is The Voices,
published in 2015 by Carnegie Mellon University Press. His poems have
been published in many magazines and anthologies, and his awards
include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Bush
Foundation, the Jerome Foundation, and the McKnight Foundation.
Two of his collections have won the Minnesota Book Award for poetry.
As a librettist, he has written many texts for music, working for almost
four decades with composer Stephen Paulus. Their post-Holocaust
oratorio, To Be Certain of the Dawn, was nominated for the Pulitzer
Prize in music by the Minnesota Orchestra. Browne is a professor
emeritus of English at the University of Minnesota, where he taught for
thirty-nine years and was a member of the Academy of Distinguished
Teachers.
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COMMISSIONS
Conspirare is committed to the repertoire of the choral canon and
engaging in musical performances that represent both the voices
of today and voices that have been silenced or under-represented.
We actively seek to commission works to achieve this goal. Conspirare
believes in the integrity and power of new music and its place in a
vast choral repertoire. We are committed to the deepest and widest
exploration of new expressions, styles and presentations. Throughout
our history we have championed new music, with the support of
Conspirare patrons and numerous organizations. These works, in
addition to unlisted commissions, comprise an important piece of our
present music-making and legacy:
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Hymn to the Earth (2003) by Donald Grantham
La canción desesperada (2005, rev. 2014) by Donald Grantham
Poemas de Amor (2006) by Stephen Paulus Commissioned as part of the NEA American
Masterpieces Festival: Exploring Influence And Finding
Our Voice
The Changing Light (2009) by Peter Scott Lewis Commissioned by Conspirare and the
Sanford Dole Ensemble
Easter Chorale (Chorale for Ascension Day) (1965)
by Samuel Barber in a new version for chamber
orchestra by Robert Kyr, 2011
The Lovers (1971) by Samuel Barber in a new version
for chamber orchestra by Robert Kyr, 2011
Songs of the Soul (2011) by Robert Kyr
Freedom Song (2011) by Robert Kyar
oh graveyard (Lay This Body Down) (2010) by David Lang
Same Train (2011) by Mark Adamo
To Touch the Sky (2012) & If I Were a Swan (2012)
by Kevin Puts
Commissioned by the Thelma Hunter Fund of the
American Composers Forum and Conspirare
The Cloud of Unknowing (2013) by Robert Kyr
The Radio Hour (2014) by Jake Heggie Pacific Chorale, lead co-commissioner,
with co-commissioners Conspirare, The Philadelphia
Singers and VocalEssence
How Little You Are (2015) by Nico Muhly
Commissioned by Texas Performing Arts for Austin
Classical Guitar and Conspirare with support from the
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
This Delicate Universe (2015) by Eric Banks
Commissioned with the support of Chorus America’s
Dale Warland Singers Award
COMMISSIONS
Come to the Woods (2015) by Jake Runestad
Considering Matthew Shepard (2016) by Craig Hella Johnson
Songs for Muska (forthcoming) by Jocelyn Hagen
Today we celebrate Turn,
a world premiere by Tarik O’Regan.
Conspirare’s commissioning history with Tarik O’Regan began
with these three commissions (available on the Conspirare release
Threshold of Night):
Had I Not Seen the Sun (2007), Tal vez tenemos tiempo (2007)
and I Had No Time to Hate (2007). His piece Death is gonna
lay his icy cold hands on me (2010) is on the Conspirare release
“Sing Freedom.”
Tarik O’Regan has composed music
for a wide variety of ensembles and
organizations; these include the BBC
Symphony Orchestra, Royal Philharmonic
Orchestra, Australian Chamber Orchestra,
BBC National Orchestra of Wales,
Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir,
Sydney Dance Company, Chamber Choir
Ireland, and the BBC Proms at the
Royal Albert Hall, London.
Among O’Regan’s projects for 2015/16 are Mata Hari, a full-length
ballet commissioned by the Dutch National Ballet; A Celestial
Map of the Sky, a large-scale composition for the Hallé Orchestra,
who will record the work as part of a new album of his orchestral
music; and the North American premiere of his first opera, Heart of
Darkness, which opened at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
in 2011. He is currently working on a full-scale opera commissioned
by Houston Grand Opera for 2019.
Born in London in 1978, Tarik O’Regan lives in New York City.
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S I N G E R S A N D I N S T RU M E N TA L I S T S
Soprano
Mela Dailey
Austin, TX
Gitanjali Mathur
Austin, TX
Janeene Williams
Austin, TX
Melissa Givens
Houston, TX
Estelí Gomez
Watsonville, CA
Julie Keim
North Potomac, MD
J.D. Burnett
Athens, GA
Paul D’Arcy
Austin, TX
Brian Giebler
Long Island City, NY
Julie McCoy
Fort Worth, TX
Fotina Naumenko Cincinnati, OH
Kathlene Ritch
Santa Fe, NM
Eric Neuville*
Seattle, WA
Wilson Nichols
New York, NY
Tracy Jacob Shirk
Houston, TX
Cameron Beauchamp
Austin, TX
Rick Gabrillo*
Round Rock, TX
Robert Harlan Austin, TX
Harris Ipock
Cambridge, MA
Craig Peterson
Gilbert, AZ
John Proft
Sacramento, CA
Paul Max Tipton
Boston, MA
*denotes section leader
Thomas Burritt
Percussion Austin, TX
Faith DeBow
Piano San Marcos, TX Kathy Kienzle
Harp
St. Paul, MN (MN performances)
Shari Alise Wilson* Austin, TX
Alto
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Tenor
S I N G E R S A N D I N S T RU M E N TA L I S T S
Janet Carlsen
Campbell Omaha, NE
Cina Crisara
Austin, TX Stella Hastings
Pittsburg, KS
Pam Elrod Huffman*
Dallas, TX
Laura
Mercado-Wright
Austin, TX
Keely J. Rhodes
Austin, TX
Megan Roth
Bloomington, IN
Lauren Vick
Austin, TX
Bass
Instrumentalists
Bodie Gilbert
Houston, TX
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CRAIG HELLA JOHNSON
CRAIG HELLA JOHNSON
He is a great musician.” Composer and collaborator Robert Kyr states
“Craig’s attitude toward creating a community of artists…goes beyond
technical mastery into that emotional depth and spiritual life of the
music.”
Johnson was Director of Choral Activities at the University of Texas
at Austin (1990-2001) and remains an active educator, teaching and
giving clinics statewide, nationally, and internationally at conferences
and universities. In fall 2012 he became the first Artist in Residence
at the Texas State University School of Music.
Craig Hella Johnson brings
unparalleled depth of knowledge,
artistic sensitivity, and rich imagination
to his programs.
As Conspirare’s founder and Artistic Director, Johnson assembles
some of the finest singers in the country to form a world-class
ensemble. In addition to his work with Conspirare, Johnson is
music director of the Cincinnati Vocal Arts Ensemble and conductor
emeritus of the Victoria Bach Festival. He has also served as guest
conductor with the Austin Symphony, San Antonio Symphony,
Oregon Bach Festival, Harvard University and many others in
Texas, the U.S., and abroad. Through these activities, as well as
Conspirare’s recordings on the internationally distributed Harmonia
Mundi label, Johnson brings national and international recognition
to the Texas musical community.
Beloved by audiences, lauded by critics and composers, and revered
by vocal and instrumental musicians, Johnson is known for crafting
musical journeys that create deep connections between performers
and listeners. A unique aspect of Johnson’s programming is his
signature “collage” style: programs that marry music of many styles
from classical to popular to create profoundly moving experiences.
The Wall Street Journal has praised Johnson’s ability to “find the
emotional essence other performers often miss.” Distinguished
composer John Corigliano wrote, “I believe that [Johnson] has
understood my music in a way that I have never experienced before.
34
A composer and arranger, Johnson works with G. Schirmer
Publishing on the Craig Hella Johnson Choral Series, featuring
specially selected composers as well as some of his original
compositions and arrangements. His works are also published
by Alliance Music Publications. A unique aspect of Johnson’s
programming is his signature “collage” style: through-composed
programs that marry music and poetry to blend sacred and secular,
classical and contemporary, traditional and popular styles. In 2006
he was engaged to create a special peace-themed collage program
for the North Central ACDA convention, and in 2007 by the
famed St. Olaf Choir to create and conduct a collage program during
a five-week residency. Craig’s first concert-length composition
Considering Matthew Shepard was premiered in 2016 by Conspirare.
Johnson’s accomplishments have been recognized with numerous
awards and honors. Notably among them, he and Conspirare won
a 2014 Grammy® for Best Choral Performance; Chorus America
recognized his achievements with the Michael Korn Founders Award
for Development of the Professional Choral Art in 2015, and the Texas
State Legislature named him the Texas State Musician for 2013.
Other honors have included 2008 induction into the Austin Arts Hall
of Fame, Chorus America’s 2009 Louis Botto Award for Innovative
Action and Entrepreneurial Zeal, and the 2011 Citation of Merit from
international professional music fraternity Mu Phi Epsilon. Johnson
studied at St. Olaf College, the Juilliard School, and the University of
Illinois, and earned his doctorate at Yale University.
Performing Note
Conspirare has the privilege of performing in a variety of beautiful venues that best enhance
choral performances. While our performing venues and the text of some of our repertoire
may be representative of specific traditions, it is in no way intended to be exclusive of any
individual whose experience or set of beliefs is not represented. Conspirare respects and
celebrates the great diversity of religious, artistic and human experiences represented among
our singers and audience members. The audience creates the space in which the music is held.
35
ABOUT CONSPIRARE
ABOUT CONSPIRARE
Conspirare made their first commercial recording through the
green fuse in 2004. The second album, Requiem, was released in
2006 and received two Grammy nominations. In 2008 Threshold
of Night (Conspirare’s first recording for Harmonia Mundi) also
received two nominations. Harmonia Mundi’s international
re-release of Requiem in 2009 won the Netherlands’ prestigious
2010 Edison Award for choral music, the Dutch equivalent of the
Grammy. Conspirare’s 2009 PBS television special “A Company
of Voices: Conspirare in Concert,” available on both DVD and CD,
received one Grammy nomination. The 2015 release Path of
Miracles was awarded the Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik,
a highly respected German CD award.
Inspired by the power of music to change lives,
Conspirare engages audiences in extraordinary
musical experiences through world-class choral
performances and recordings.
Conspirare is an internationally recognized, professional choral
organization now in its twenty-third season. Led by founder and
Artistic Director Craig Hella Johnson, Conspirare includes two
adult performing ensembles and an educational program. Our
flagship ensemble is a Grammy® award-winning chamber choir
of extraordinarily talented singers from around the country.
They perform an annual concert series in Austin and other Texas
communities, and also tour in the U.S. and abroad. Four other
ensembles complete the Conspirare family: Conspirare Symphonic
Choir, a large ensemble that performs works for chorus and
instruments, and Conspirare Youth Choirs, an educational program
for singers in 2nd – 12th grades who learn and perform in three
separate ensembles, Kantorei, Allegro and Prelude.
Conspirare’s 2014 album The Sacred Spirit of Russia, released
on the distinguished Harmonia Mundi label, won the 2015
Grammy for Best Choral Performance. The ensemble’s complete
discography to date includes twelve commercial albums and
seventeen self-produced live recordings of its popular holiday concerts.
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The Conspirare organization and ensembles have received
numerous honors and awards. All four ensembles have received
local awards from Austin Critics Table. In 2005, Conspirare
received the Margaret Hillis Award for Choral Excellence from
the national service organization Chorus America. In 2007, as
one of the select choral organizations to receive a grant from the
National Endowment for the Arts under its American Masterpieces
initiative, Conspirare presented a four-day festival with a
distinguished gathering of composers and conductors, three
world premieres, and a gala closing concert with a 600-voice choir.
In July 2008 Conspirare represented the U.S. at the Eighth World
Symposium on Choral Music in Copenhagen, joining invited choirs
from nearly forty countries. The choir has performed at the
American Choral Directors Association annual convention and for
several regional ACDA conventions. Conspirare received the 2010
Dale Warland Singers Commission Award from Chorus America
to support the commission of a new work by Seattle composer Eric
Banks, which premiered in May 2015. In February 2011, Conspirare
gave three invited performances in New York City under auspices of
the Weill Music Institute of Carnegie Hall. In fall 2012, the group
traveled to France for six invited performances at the Polyfollia
Festival and a public concert in Paris. Conspirare became a Resident
Company of the Long Center for the Performing Arts in 2013.
Our flagship ensemble is a Grammy®
award-winning chamber choir
of extraordinarily talented singers
from around the country.
37
C O N S P I R A R E B OA R D & S TA F F
Board of Directors
Fran Collmann, Chair
Robert Harlan, Vice Chair
Larry Collmann, Treasurer
William C. Bednar, Secretary
Ken Beck
Mary Anne Connolly
Susanna Finnell
Nancy Lesch
David C. Smith
Marion Lear Swaybill
Joni Wallace
Patrick Willis
Advisory Board
Stephen Aechternacht
John Aielli
Sue Barnes
Mark Bierner
Ray Brimble
David Burger
David Claflin
Tom Driscoll
Virginia Dupuy
Maydelle Fason
Jolynn Free
Billy Gammon
Vance George
Helen Hays
Dan Herd
William B. Hilgers
Wayne Holtzman
Judith Jellison
Bob Murphy
Lynn Murphy
Cliff Redd
Gayle Glass Roche
Nancy Scanlan
Angela Smith
Bernadette Tasher
Louann Temple
Eva Womack
Midge Woolsey
Artistic & Administrative Staff
Craig Hella Johnson
Artistic Director
SUPPORTERS
Season Sustaining Underwriter
Tamara Blanken
Online Services Manager
Kelly Brownlee
Annual Fund & Grants Manager
Performance Sponsors
Christy Butler
Marketing Manager
Wravan Godsoe
Office Manager
Robert Harlan
Production Consultant
Alice Kleberg Reynolds
Foundation
Ben R. King
Foundation Supporters
Production Assistant
Meri Krueger
Artist Relations
Kathy Leighton
House Manager
Russell Hill Rogers Fund
for the Arts
Kodosky Foundation
Mattsson-McHale Foundation
Rachael & Ben Vaughan Foundation
Shield-Ayres Foundation
Ann & Gordon Getty Foundation
Keating Family Foundation The Still Water Foundation Eva & Marvin Womack Foundation
Restaurant Partners
Ann McNair
Executive Assistant to the Artistic Director
Director of Program Fulfillment
& Artistic Operations
Jane Ramirez
Business Manager
Public Agency Sponsors
Supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division
of the City of Austin Economic Development Department
Nina Revering
Director, Conspirare Youth Choirs
Christina Tannert
Administrator, Conspirare Youth Choirs
Media Sponsors
Meredith Thomas
Director of Development
Lauren Vick
Production & Development Assistant
In-Kind Sponsors
Luke Wooldridge
Production Intern
Sessi,
Chamberlain
& Stewart, LLP
38
39
DONORS
DONORS
We thank each individual, foundation, business, government & city
agency for your investment in Conspirare and in our mission to
change lives through the power of music. This list represents gifts
made between July 1, 2015 – May 2, 2016. When we make music,
we make it together.
Conspirare Circle
$20,000 +
Anonymous (2)
City of Austin
Ginger & Michael Blair
Fran and Larry Collmann
Lynne Dobson & Greg Wooldridge
Lara & Robert Harlan
Gail & Jeff Kodosky,
The Kodosky Foundation
Still Water Foundation
Lee Manford & Casey Blass
National Endowment for the Arts
South Texas Money Management
Composer’s Circle
$10,000-$19,999
Alice Kleberg Reynolds Foundation
Anonymous
Dixie Camp
Factory 733 LLC
Evelyn & Rick Gabrillo
Mary Nell Frucella
HEB Tournament of Champions
Jeanne & Van Hoisington
Ellen Justice & Eric Leibrock
Susan & Jack Robertson
Gayle & Mike Roche
Russell Hill Rogers Fund for the Arts
Shield-Ayres Foundation
Texas Commission on the Arts
Rachael and Ben F. Vaughan Foundation
Eva & Marvin Womack Foundation
Vox Circle
$5,000-$9,999
Joyce & Ken Beck
William C. Bednar
Mela Sarajane Dailey & Peter Bay
Paula D’Arcy
Susanna & Richard Finnell
Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation
Trish & Robert Karli
Jack Leifer & Carr Hornbuckle
40
Angie & Steve Larned
Stefanie Moore & Todd Keister
Susan & Craig Lubin
Per Stirling Group
Linda & Robert Ramsey
Carolyn & Marc Seriff
Susanne Tetzlaff & Eric Tiblier
Julia & Patrick Willis
Conductor’s Circle
$2,500-$4,999
James Arth
Nancy & Randy Baden
Chris & J. Dennis Cavner
Catherine Clark
Danna & Crutch Crutchfield
Joanne & John Earls
Jeanne & Donald Grantham
Gary Cooper & Richard Hartgrove
James K. Ferguson Foundation, Jim
Ferguson & Art Sansone
Keating Family Foundation
Wendi & Brian Kushner
Marion Lear Swaybill
Nancy Lesch & Janet Bezner
Emily Little
William Nemir
Kimberly & Dan Renner
Keely Rhodes
Nancy Scanlan
Dan Seriff
David C. Smith
Hettie Tetzlaff & Don Gunn
Linda & Nick van Bavel
Benefactors
$1,000-$2,499
Austin Community Foundation
Austin Community Foundation
Mim Luetje & Garrett Beauvais
Becky Beaver & John Duncan
K’Andrea Bickerstaff
Mark Bierner
Vera Ayres Bowen
Pat & Robert Brueck
Annette Carlozzi & Dan Bullock
Sarah & Ernest Butler
Margaret Murray-Miller &
Carl A Caricari
Janis & David Claflin
Mary Anne Connolly
Katelena & James
Hernandez Cowles
Jerry Craft (deceased)
Tracy & Michael DiLeo
Dian Graves Owen Foundation
Nancy Quinn & Thomas Driscoll
Ann Fields
Khris Ford
Susan & John Fox
Frost Bank
Kim & Steve Gilbert
Glenda Goehrs
Cynthia Gonzales
Maria & Eric Groten
Gusto’s Italian Kitchen
Helen & Bob Hays
Marisa I. Hormel
Carlo Gavino & Andy Snyder
Karen & Gerry Jacknow
Marge Johnson
Allison Kelly
Michael Kentor
Karen Kibler & Tom Grimes
Stephanie & Robert Kincheloe
Timothy Koock
Kathy & Henry Leighton
Life in the City
Thomas Lukens
Sheila Lummis
Marcia Manhart
Sue & Phil Maxwell
Joyce Mayer
Vance McMahan
Kathryn & Dave McNeely
Milton D. Miller II
Eric Neuville
Sylvia Maud Noteware
Cat & Rudy Prince
Joel Quade
Flo Ann Randle
Susan & Forest Rees
Louise N. Reeser
Lynn & Dick Rew
Judy & Douglas Rhodes
Augustin Rubio
Salesforce.org
Bobbye & Allan Sawatzky
Gene Alice & Max Sherman
Suzanne & John Shore
Brenda & Larry Smith
Debbie & William Stassen
Bernadette Tasher
Peter Flagg Maxson & John Taylor
Texas Appleseed
Sandi Aitken & Bob Tomlinson
Anne & William Wagner
Joni Wallace
David Webber & Ransom Baldasare
Kathleen & Jim Wicoff
Elsa Vorwerk & Bill Wood
Sustainers
$500-$999
Anonymous
Apple Inc.
Margaret & Robert Ayres
Anne Bertholf
Mary Parse & Klaus Bichteler
Birdsong Insurance
Ann & Jeff Bomer
Jennifer & Charles Botchway
Kay Brumley
James & Greg Bryant
Judy & John Bush
Sandra Derby
Roxie & Jack Elrod
Executive Development Associates,
Liz & Kenny Howard
Lisa Fisch
Cheryl Fuller
Kendal & Ken Gladish
Cynthia Harkness
Pam & Rick Huffman
Cheline Jaidar
Craig Hella Johnson & Phil Overbaugh
Frana Keith
Patricia Kellam
Mary M. Kevorkian & Tom Holzbach
Karen & Donald Kirmis
KLRU-TV
Dina Kuntz
Lou Ann & Bill Lasher
Cindy Libera
Kathy & Don Lougheed
Melissa Marse & Andy Hopwood
41
DONORS
DONORS
Aditya & Jyoti Mathur
Catherine Mauzy &
Hans Magnusson
Ruth & Bob McGregor
Suzanne Mitchell & Richard Zansitis
Michele Morrison
Sue Morrison
Chandra Muller
Rebecca A. Muniz
Suzi & Doug Nelson
Cynthia & Lip Norvell
Olden Lighting
Dixie & John Paulos
Jordan Peterson
Stu Phillips
Ann Phipps & Michael Cannatti
Becky Pigott & Ara Carapetyan
Louis Renaud
Beverly & Gene Ross
Linda Rowald & George Brown
Marilyn Sharratt
Kerry Tate
Kay Taylor & Charles Singletary
Colleen & Tom Terkel
Patricia Tollison
Anne & Tony Vance
Lynda Young
Sponsors
$250-$499
Cynthia & Robert Abrams
Kalpana Alamela
Kevin J. Barry
Sally Beaudette
Pamela Brown
Amy & Kyle Bryson
Paul Carapetyan
Ellen Chase
Kathryn & Michael Coffey
Nathasha & David Collmann
Cina M. Crisara
Robert Dailey
Nina & Jeffrey Di Leo
The Dlabal Foundation
Prentiss Douthit
Gitanjali Dubey
Sharon Duboise
John E. Farrar
Jill B. Fatzer
Luke Frels
Mary Gifford
Charlotte Hale
42
Glenn Haluska
Martha & David Harrington
Carolyn Harris Hynson
Pam & Newt Hasson
Carol & Bob Hayden
Benjamin Heller
Margaret Henderson
Kit Holmes
David Hunt
Royce G. Hunter
Sylvia & David Jabour
Karen & Peter Jakes
Judith Jellison & Robert Duke
Eric Johnson
Julie Keim
Lynn & David Kindler
Lawrence Lawver
Marion Lewin
Kendra Welton-Lipman &
Sam Lipman
Ann & Tim Lowry
Sue Mahan
Leslie & Les Mashburn
Gitanjali Mathur & Ciji Isen
Marsha McCary
Mary McKaughan
Everett McKinley
M.J. McReynolds
Robin & Paul Melroy
Janie Keys & Ivan Milman
Fran & Steven Moss
Megan & Stephen Mulva
Jack Olson
Aurelia Palubeckas
Pelton Charitable Trust
Douglas Plummer
Lynn & Brian Powell
Lisa & Bob Radebaugh
Joanne & Jerome Ravel
Joanne & Hamilton Richards
Sally & Andy Ritch
Michal Rosenberger
Barbara Schutz
April Schweighart
Jackie & Bob Shapiro
Silicon Valley Community Foundation
Bea Ann Smith
Jim Sotiros
Carol & Michael Stehling
Sonja Tengblad
Meredith Thomas & Walter Stroup
Jennifer & Scott Tiller
Matt Trietsch
Dale & Roy Truitt
Cynthia Wilson
Susan Zolla-Pazner
Patrons
$100-$249
Jonnet & Peter Abeles
Susan Adair
Britte Anchor
Helen & Dan Armstrong
Stephanie & Ames Asbell
Carolyn Asbell
Erika Bacon
Deanna Badgett
Lynn Baker
Steven Beebe
Elsa Bignoli & T.K. Lakshman
Andrea Black
Pat Black
Brian Miller & Jack Brannon
Michael Dennis Browne & Lisa McLean
Kelly & John Brownlee
Chris Bussell
Viera Buzgova
Janet & Charles Campbell
Marsha & Tom Caven
Grayson Cecil
Jonn Cherico
Patricia Cherico
Barbara & Dwayne Cooper
James Copeland
Mary Crouch
Paul Cummings
Brad Cummins
Karel Dahmen
Ronald Dandrea
William Davidson
Tynan Davis
Cecilia Neuhaus Deaton & William
Deaton
Mary Alice & Mike DeBow
Matthew Donnelly
Dianne Donovan
Bonnie Drenik
Doree DuToit & Tim Tengblad
Jon Eddison
Melissa Eddy & Tracy Schiemenz
Johnathan Edwards
John Elford
Michael Ensrude
Constance & Rex Esau
Elizabeth & Paul Escamilla
Jacquetta & Lowell Feldman
Tim Ferchill
Stephen Finn
Gwen & Bruce Flory
Mary Anne Flournoy
Dick Francis
Jill & Terry Frisbie
Robert Garrett
Melondie & Gary Gentry
Nelsa Gidney
Wilhelmina & Gerald Gilligan
Judy Gordon
Ellen Gould & Daniel Ray
Melissa Gray
Richard Gray
John Grubbs
Rebecca & Steven Guengerich
Mary Louise & James Gwynn
Elizabeth & Scott Hanna
Robert Hardgrave
Michael Harper
Douglas Harvey
Judith & Beber Helburn
Jane Hembree
Cathy Holland
Joan & Wayne Holtzman
Paul Hudson
Georgina Hudspeth & John Zeuner
Melissa Huebsch-Stroud
Bobbie Huffman
Todd Jermstad
Charlotte & Ben Johnson
Diane Johnson
Mary Jones
Beth & Greg Judd
James Kettlewell
Charles Kiley
Ann & Bill Kleinebecker
Tina & Dale Knobel
Tim Koderl
Lindsey Lane
Dell Lawhead
Judy Leatherwood Smith
Cynthia & Sanford Levinson
Catherine & David Light
Alaire & Thomas Lowry
Teresa & Krzysztof Lyson
Edward McCrone
Janet McCullar
Laurie McDaniel
Michael McGowan
43
DONORS
Karen McLaughlin
Rebecca Mercado
Mary & James Miller
Kathy & Eldridge Moak
Jenifer Ryan Moberg
Evan Morgan
Cindy & Jim Morriss
Toni & Joseph P. Murgo
Elizabeth & Jerele Neeld
Rebecca Nemser
Alissa Neubauer
Karen Olson
Ann Marie Olson
Monica & John O’Sullivan
Thomas Overbaugh
Joyce & Jim Parrish
DeeAnne & Steven Paulson
Ruth Pennebaker
Sherie Pfister
Elizabeth & Lawrence Pinsky
Joan & Gary Pope
Paul Ramsey
Teresa Ringness
Leslie Robb
Deborah Rupp
Dan Rusthoi
Donna Rutherford
Safeway, Inc.
Gwenn & James Sandoz
Art Sansone
Deb Sarosdy
Harold Schneider
Michelle Schumann & Matt Orem
Lori Schwanz
Jo Scurlock-Dillard
Barbara Fiorito & Michael Shimkin
Jeanne Sigel
Margot Smit
Jeffrey Smith
Flint Sparks
Clara Spriggs-Adams
Susan Stevenson
Virginia Stotts
Eileen & Robert Sudela
Patrice Sullivan
Peg Syverson
Dawn & Lance Thompson
Tiki2
Don Trapp
Pat Uhls
Douglas Upchurch
44
Max & Hiroko Warshauer
Eric Whitacre
Diana Whitley
Nancy Whitworth
Debra Williams
Paul J. Williams
Virginia J. & Geoff Willig
Shari Wilson & Jason Shestok
Luke Wooldridge
Rebecca & Curtis Wyffels
Tim Young
Meg Youngblood
Richard Yu
Joyce Zehr & Marvin Burke
Robert Zeiler
Legacy of Sound Donors
Anonymous (2)
William Bednar
Ginger & Michael Blair
Pat & Robert Brueck
Catherine Clark
Fran & Larry Collmann
Mary Anne Connolly
Danna & Crutch Crutchfield
Susanna & Richard Finnell
Lara & Robert Harlan
Richard Hartgrove & Gary Cooper
Helen & Bob Hays
The Kodosky Foundation, Gail & Jeff
Kodosky
Ellen Justice & Eric Leibrock
Trish & Robert Karli
Robert Kyr
Wendi & Brian Kushner
Susan & Craig Lubin
The Mattsson-McHale Foundation
Louise Morse
Elizabeth & Jerele Neeld
E. Stuart Phillips
Nancy Quinn & Thomas Driscoll
Susan & Jack Robertson
Nancy Scanlan
Dan Seriff
Bea Ann Smith
David C. Smith
The Still Water Foundation
Marion Lear Swaybill
Anne & William Wagner
Julia & Patrick Willis
THANK YOU
Conspirare Ambassadors
Julie Adams
Camille Atkins
Taja Beekley
Pat Black
Gay Bullard
Melissa Eddy
Michelle Foster
Stephanie Foster
Veryan and Greg Foster
Tim and Vivian Ferchill
Mary Gifford
Kathryn Govier
Barbara Grajski
Bob and Helen Hays
Henry Leighton
Susan Meitz
Susan Morgan
Diana Phillips
Peach and Cynthia Reynolds
Christy Salinas
Mary Simon
Carol Walker
Conspirare Ambassadors volunteer as
ushers, CD sales associates, artist hosts
and for other concert functions. We invite
new volunteers who enjoy meeting the
public and contributing to Conspirare’s
operations. If you are interested in
becoming part of the Conspirare team,
please contact Kathy Leighton at
[email protected] to learn more.
Production Team
Robert Harlan, Stage Manager
Viera Buzgova, Stage Manager
Corey Cochran-Lepiz
Robert Friedrich
Sebastian Garcia
Elaine Jacobs
Michael Kriese
J. Azrriel Salazar
Sarah Sheffield
Hal Siegel
Sarah Kay Stephens
Denver Surgener
Steve Wager
Friends & Supporters
Jeff Bina
Brink Creative
Aaron Brown
Michael Dennis Browne
Chez Zee
Randall Davidson
Bob Gómez
Fork & Vine
Gusto Italian Kitchen + Wine Bar
King Florist
KLRU
KMFA
KUT/KUTX
McCarthy Print
John Nuechterlein
Philip Overbaugh
Patty Paulus
Andrew Paulus
St. Cecilia Music Series
The Steeping Room
St. Mary’s Catholic Church,
Fredericksburg, TX
St. Olaf: Anton Armstrong, Jean Parish
Kristen Simpson
St.Martin’s Lutheran Church,
Thom Pavlechko, Emily Vanderslice,
Dawn Beacom
South Texas Money Management
Texas Performing Arts
University Federal Credit Union
Rebecca Wyffels
Special thanks to the Fredericksburg
Friends of Conspirare for their support
of the Fredericksburg performance:
Dian Graves Owen Foundation
Barbara & Royce Hunter
Timothy Koock
Susan & Frosty Rees
Bobbye Lew & Allan Sawatzky
Suzanne & John Shore
Conspirare also thanks all donors of gifts under
$100 and regrets that space does not permit listing
each name. Your support is equally appreciated.
We strive to publish an accurate donor list. If an
error or omission is noted, please let us know.
Conspirare is proud to invite
youth and their families
from the following schools
to attend this performance:
Bailey Middle School
Crockett High School
Eastside High School
Kealing Middle School
LBJ High School
Reagan High School
45
SANITY
HEAR THE BEST IN CLASSICAL MUSIC
FROM A TRUSTED AUSTIN SOURCE
LISTEN TO
AVAILABLE ONLINE
INVEST IN YOUR KLRU TODAY AT KLRU.ORG
Central
4400 N Lamar Blvd
512-977-8337
Domain
11410 Century Oaks Terrace
512-467-2663
thesteepingroom.com
Expires 6/30/16
Sing
with CYC
Auditions for 2016/17
will be held May – August.
.
Submit a request at conspirare.org/youth-choirs/join-us/audition/
We’ve added a new
choir for 2nd-3rd graders!
P R E LU D E
No auditions required, just
a recommendation from
your school music teacher.
mozart requiem undead
SEE IT LIVE HErE.
Announcing
our 2016/17 Season
this June!
www.conspirare.org
Roomful of Teeth and Mozart Requiem Undead SEp 16; Illustration by Joshua Röpke
To be the first to know what we have in store,
sign up online for our newsletter.
The 2016/17 Essential Series
Dance. Chamber. Voice. Film. Theater. Vampires.
Tickets starting at $25
texasperformingarts.org

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