of Research Administration

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of Research Administration
Final Program
as of August 7, 2014
National Council of University Research Administrators
THE
evo ution
of Research Administration
Facing the Future...
56
th
ANNUAL
MEETING
August 10-13, 2014 ~ Washington, DC
56
th
ANNUAL
MEETING
Welcome!
Summer is just around the corner and we are looking forward to seeing you August 10-13, 2014 in Washington, DC for
NCURA’s 56th Annual Meeting! The meeting plans are coming together nicely and we are so excited about this year’s
offering (and we think you will be too)!
As we looked at the trends in our profession, we thought about all the issues that have affected Research Administrators
throughout the years. We noted that the number of things that have changed or are in the process of changing as it relates
to our profession is quite staggering. From the recent issuance of the Uniform Guidance to the upcoming full-blown
implementation of sub-account processing for HHS draw functionality, those of us in research administration have
witnessed so many changes in the last several years that it makes one’s head spin. We have seen ARRA come and go, the
addition of FFATA reporting, COI rules strengthened, Responsible Conduct in Research (the list goes on and on)…all of
which has increased the cost of compliance that institutions have had to absorb. In relation to all these regulatory changes,
one thing has never changed – the value of your “professional family” provided through your NCURA membership. It is the
extensive network of colleagues available to you every day that you can reach out to for guidance which makes being a
member of NCURA priceless. This network is where our theme for AM 56 was born: “The Evolution of Research
Administration – facing the future... together.” We hope that you will join us at AM 56 to meet with old friends and
colleagues as well as collaborate with new ones.
Our track leaders have been hard at work creating a robust and meaningful program for you. You asked and we listened to
your evaluations and we have added more senior sessions, including some senior level workshops on Sunday. We’ve
expanded the size and number of Senior Level Discussions available so that our “seasoned leaders” will be able to
participate in meaningful interactions. We will hear from our popular federal agencies such as NSF and NIH and we have
expanded our Federal track to include presentations from USDA, EPA, NEA/NEH and USAID. The effect of the new
Uniform Guidance will also be covered as OMB will be there to answer your questions. Discussion Groups will be offered
to continue the dialog that may begin in Concurrent Sessions on hot topics as well as Spark Sessions for those quick sound
bites on relevant topics.
As our NCURA membership expands internationally, our International track leaders are working to provide insight on doing
business as global partners. With the launch of Horizon 2020 and BILAT, there will be many sessions presented to learn
about the evolving international research environment that these funding opportunities offer and how to deal with
international contractual issues. We encourage everyone to welcome our new International Region and be an active part of
our growing global partnership.
NCURA has also launched a new application that will help you plan your meeting. Watch for updates on how to build your
meeting plans on your personal computing device so that session times and meeting rooms are just a click away.
We are pleased to announce that we will be entertained on Sunday evening with an invigorating “fireside chat” between
Paul Begala and Tucker Carlson after dinner. Their conversation won’t disappoint so plan on relaxing and laughing after
dinner as we all enjoy their lively banter. For our Monday keynote, we have invited a fascinating and engaging speaker, Dr.
Robert Sapolsky, to officially kick-off our meeting. Dr. Sapolsky is a world-renowned professor of biology and neurology at
Stanford University and you will want to come to the ballroom on Monday morning to hear him speak. In addition to all the
wonderful workshops and sessions and speakers we have lined up for our attendees, back by popular demand is Camp
NCURA! So if you want to bring your family to enjoy some time in DC while you attend the conference, you can sign your
children up for camp to keep them entertained during the day. Plans are also well on the way for a fun-filled Tuesday
evening event to celebrate and reflect on what is shaping up to be a very busy summer of change for those of us in
Research Administration. Watch for more news as we get closer to the meeting.
A great part of our lives is spent at our jobs. Remember to include AM56 and your professional family in your summer
plans this August. Join us as we contemplate, commiserate and collaborate how we will evolve into better Research
Administrators as we - face the future... together.
NCURA 56th Annual Meeting Co-Chairs
Georgette Sakumoto, University of Hawaii
Cathy Snyder, Vanderbilt University
Michelle Vazin, Vanderbilt University
Georgette
Cathy
Michelle
Program Committee
NCURA 2014 Vice President
Michelle Vazin, Vanderbilt University
THANK YOU to the following sponsors
for your generous support!
NCURA MEMBER SPONSORS
Co-Chairs
Georgette Sakumoto, University of Hawaii
Cathy Snyder, Vanderbilt University
Biomedical Track
Jamie Caldwell, Loyola University Chicago
Ben Prince, University of Massachusetts
Medical School
Career Skills/Professional
Development Track
Amy Kimble, Evisions, Inc.
Vicki Krell, Arizona State University
Anthony Ventimiglia, Auburn University
NCURA CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS
Compliance Track
John Hanold, The Pennsylvania State
University
Kerry Peluso, Emory University
Departmental Track
Tolise Miles, Children's National
Medical Center
Beth Seaton, Northwestern University
Federal Track
Susan Sedwick, University of Texas
at Austin
Jean Feldman, National Science
Foundation
International Track
Siegfried Huemer, Vienna University
of Technology
David Mayo, California Institute
of Technology
Denise Wallen, University of New Mexico
Post-Award Track
Jeffrey Silber, Cornell University
Randi Wasik, University of Washington
Pre-award Track
Robyn Remotigue, University of North
Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth
Amanda Snyder, University of
Maryland, Baltimore
PUI Track
Kris Monahan, Providence College
Melissa Mullen, California Polytechnic
State University-San Luis Obispo
Workshops
Denise Moody, Harvard University
Pam Whitlock, University of North Carolina
at Wilmington (Emeritus)
3
56
th
CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
ANNUAL
MEETING
GENERAL
NCURA is accredited by the National Registry of
CPE Sponsors. This program is administered by the
National Association of State Boards of Accountancy
(NASBA) to sponsor and award Continuing
Professional Education (CPEs) to accounting
professionals. Certified Public Accountants will need
to complete a CPE credit form in order to receive
CPE credits. CPE forms are available at the NCURA
AM56 Concierge on the Terrace. Forms must be
deposited in the CPE boxes located at the NCURA
AM56 Concierge desk. In accordance with the
standards of the National Registry of CPE Sponsors,
50 minutes equals 1 CPE. Depending on the
sessions and workshops you choose to attend a
maximum of 30.5 CPE credits can be issued for
NCURA’s 56th Annual Meeting. The field of study
available is Specialized Knowledge and
Applications (SK).
REGISTRATION
Registration is available at www.ncura.edu and
is available to any individual engaged in the
administration of sponsored programs in a college,
university, or teaching hospital. Please Note:
Learning objectives for each session will be noted
in the conference program. Please consult the
session descriptions for program level details.
The only prerequisite for meeting attendance is
current involvement in university sponsored
research programs. There is no advanced
preparation required to attend sessions.This
conference is a “group-live” offering. For
information regarding administrative policies such
as complaint resolution and refund, please contact
our office at 202-466-3894.
NCURA is registered with the
National Association of State
Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as
a sponsor of continuing professional
education on the National Registry
of CPE Sponsors. State boards of
accountancy have final authority on the acceptance
of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints
regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to
the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its
website: www.learningmarket.org.
Discussion Groups and the Keynote Address will
not be eligible for CPE Credits.
4
OVERVIEW OF CONCURRENT SESSIONS
AND WORKSHOPS
BASIC assumes some basic, fundamental research
administration knowledge.
INTERMEDIATE assumes basic knowledge and the
sessions introduce and develop topics that exceed
basic knowledge. Sessions focus on building grant
and contract competency.
ADVANCED assumes mastery of the subject and
the session focuses on in-depth knowledge or a
broader range of topics. Sessions focus on
mastering more difficult and complex scenarios.
SENIOR AND SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSIONS
assumes that the member has policy level
responsibility.
OVERVIEW provides a general review of a subject
area from a broader perspective.
UPDATE provides a general review of new
developments.
6
WORKSHOPS SCHEDULEAT-A-GLANCE
7 SUNDAY WORKSHOPS
25 THURSDAY WORKSHOP
27 SENIOR LEVEL
DISCUSSIONS
SATURDAY 8.9.14
4:00 – 7:00 pm
29 REGISTRATION
WELCOME LOUNGE
SUNDAY 8.10.14
7:30 am – 5:00 pm
29 REGISTRATION
8:30 am – 5:00 pm
29 WORKSHOPS
(Additional fee required)
Noon – 1:30 pm
29 WORKSHOP LUNCHEON
FOR FULL DAY SESSION
PARTICIPANTS, FACULTY
AND EVALUATORS
1:00 – 5:00 pm
29 NCURA MARKETPLACE
6:15 – 7:00 pm
29 RECEPTION
7:00 pm
29 SUNDAY DINNER
8:30 pm
29 FIRESIDE CHAT”
BETWEEN PAUL BEGALA
AND TUCKER CARLSON
9:00 pm
29 REGIONAL HOSPITALITY
SUITES OPEN
MONDAY 8.11.14
6:15 – 7:15 am
30 NCURA FITNESS
7:30 am – 5:00 pm
30 AM56 CONCIERGE
EXPOSITION 2014
7:30 – 8:15 am
30 CONTINENTAL
BREAKFAST
8:30 – 10:00 am
30 KEYNOTE ADDRESS
OUTSTANDING
ACHIEVEMENT
IN RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION AWARD
10:00 – 10:30 am
30 NETWORKING AND
REFRESHMENT BREAK
30 GET CONNECTED AND
GET INVOLVED FAIR
10:00 am – 5:00 pm
30 NCURA MARKETPLACE
10:30 – Noon
31 SPARK SESSIONS
31 CONCURRENT SESSIONS
35 DISCUSSION GROUPS
39 SENIOR LEVEL
DISCUSSIONS
Noon – 1:30 pm
40 LUNCHEON AND
PRESENTATION OF
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE
AWARD RECIPIENTS AND
JOSEPH CARRABINO
AWARD
40
41
43
47
1:30 – 2:45 pm
SPARK SESSIONS
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
DISCUSSION GROUPS
SENIOR LEVEL
DISCUSSIONS
2:45 – 3:00 pm
47 NETWORKING AND
REFRESHMENT BREAK
3:00 – 3:45 pm
47 REGIONAL BUSINESS
MEETINGS
3:45 – 4:00 pm
48 NETWORKING AND
REFRESHMENT BREAK
4:00 – 5:00 pm
48 SPARK SESSIONS
48 CONCURRENT SESSIONS
53 DISCUSSION GROUPS
4:00 – 5:00 pm
55 “APPY” HOUR WITH HOW
TO DOERs
11:45 am – 1:15 pm
75 LUNCHEON AND
VOLUNTEER
RECOGNITION
75
75
79
82
1:15 – 2:15 pm
SPARK SESSIONS
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
DISCUSSION GROUPS
SENIOR LEVEL
DISCUSSIONS
2:30 – 3:30 pm
82 SPARK SESSIONS
82 CONCURRENT SESSIONS
87 DISCUSSION GROUPS
3:30 – 4:00 pm
90 NETWORKING AND
REFRESHMENT BREAK
3:30 – 4:00 pm
90 GET CONNECTED AND
GET INVOLVED FAIR
4:00 – 5:00 pm
91 SPARK SESSIONS
91 CONCURRENT SESSIONS
94 DISCUSSION GROUPS
6:00 pm
55 MONDAY EVENING DINE
AROUNDS
9:00 pm
55 REGIONAL HOSPITALITY
SUITES OPEN
9:00 pm
97 REGIONAL HOSPITALITY
SUITES OPEN
WEDNESDAY 8.13.14
6:15 – 7:15 am
56 NCURA FITNESS
7:30 am – Noon
98 AM56 CONCIERGE
7:30 am – 5:00 pm
56 AM56 CONCIERGE
EXPOSITION 2014
7:30 – 8:30 am
98 ANNUAL BUSINESS
MEETING AND
CONTINENTAL
BREAKFAST
7:30 – 8:15 am
56 CONTINENTAL
BREAKFAST AND
BREAKFAST
ROUNDTABLES
8:00 am – 5:00 pm
56 NCURA MARKETPLACE
8:15 – 9:45 am
57 SPARK SESSIONS
57 CONCURRENT SESSIONS
63 DISCUSSION GROUPS
67 SENIOR LEVEL
DISCUSSIONS
9:45 – 10:15 am
67 NETWORKING BREAK
67 GET CONNECTED AND
GET INVOLVED FAIR
10:15 – 11:45
67 SPARK SESSIONS
68 CONCURRENT SESSIONS
72 DISCUSSION GROUPS
CONTENTS
2:15 – 2:30 pm
82 NETWORKING AND
REFRESHMENT BREAK
7:00 – 11:30 pm
97 TUESDAY NIGHT
EVENT – FUN IN
THE SUMMERTIME:
UNDER THE SEA!
TUESDAY 8.12.14
TABLE OF
7:30 – 11:00 am
98 NCURA MARKETPLACE
8:30 – 10:00 am
98 SPARK SESSIONS
98 CONCURRENT SESSIONS
102 DISCUSSION GROUPS
105 SENIOR LEVEL
DISCUSSIONS
10:00 – 10:30 am
105 NETWORKING AND
REFRESHMENT BREAK
10:00 – 10:30 am
105 GET CONNECTED AND
GET INVOLVED FAIR
10:30 am – Noon
105 SPARK SESSIONS
106 CONCURRENT SESSIONS
110 DISCUSSION GROUPS
Noon
ADJOURNMENT
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PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS SCHEDULE AT-A-GLANCE
ANNUAL
MEETING
Sunday 8.10.14
PRE-CONFERENCE
8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
FULL DAY PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS
WORKSHOP 1
WORKSHOP 2
WORKSHOP 3
WORKSHOP 21
WORKSHOP 22
WORKSHOP 23
WORKSHOP 24
WORKSHOPS
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS
WORKSHOP 25
WORKSHOP 4
WORKSHOP 26
WORKSHOP 5
WORKSHOP 6
WORKSHOP 7
WORKSHOP 8
WORKSHOP 9
WORKSHOP 10
WORKSHOP 11
WORKSHOP 12
WORKSHOP 13
Sunday
8.10.14
WORKSHOP 14
WORKSHOP 15
Thursday
8.14.14
WORKSHOP 16
WORKSHOP 17
WORKSHOP 18
WORKSHOP 19
WORKSHOP 20
6
THE BASICS: PRE-AWARD
FUNDAMENTALS
POST-AWARD BASICS
A PRE-AWARD AND POST-AWARD
TUTORIAL FOR DEPARTMENT
ADMINISTRATORS
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS
UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION AND CLINICAL
TRIALS – THE POCKET EDITION:
CHAPTER 1
BASICS OF CONTRACT DRAFTING
AND NEGOTIATIONS
AN INTRODUCTION TO WORKING
WITH U.S. INSTITUTIONS
AND SPONSORS
EFFORT REPORTING: HOW TO
MINIMIZE RISK
SUBAWARDS & SUBRECIPIENT
MONITORING: THE BASICS
AND BEYOND
FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE: CURRENT
AND FUTURE CONSIDERATIONS
OMB CIRCULAR OVERVIEW
EXPORT CONTROLS AND
U(NIVERSITIES): WHAT YOU
(AND "U") NEED TO KNOW!
CREATING A POSITIVE
AND CANDID CULTURE IN
YOUR OFFICE
GRANT WRITING SECRETS EVERY
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR NEEDS
TO KNOW
COMPLIANCE 101 – THE BASICS
F&A RATE PREPARATION/
NEGOTIATION FOR THE
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE
INSTITUTION (PUI)
TRAINING PROGRAMS 101: ENGAGE,
DEVELOP, AND IMPLEMENT!
USING EXCEL FOR BUDGETING
COST SHARING: HOW PRE- AND
POST-AWARD OFFICES CAN WORK
TOGETHER
THE CONSOLIDATION OF THE OMB
CIRCULARS: EXPLORING THE "NEW"
ADMINISTRATIVE RULES
SENIOR ADVANCED FORUM
FOR EXECUTIVES
WORKSHOP 27
WORKSHOP 28
WORKSHOP 29
WORKSHOP 30
WORKSHOP 31
WORKSHOP 32
WORKSHOP 33
WORKSHOP 34
WORKSHOP 35
WORKSHOP 36
ADVANCED CLINICAL
TRIALS WORKSHOP
FAR/DFAR DECONSTRUCTED
HERE COME THE FEDS!
WHAT A SPONSOR AUDIT IS
LOOKING FOR AND HOW TO
PREPARE YOUR INSTITUTION
SERVICE CENTERS – HOW TO OPEN
AND OPERATE – LEGALLY!
TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER,
START UPS AND INDUSTRIAL
COLLABORATIONS
BUILDING BRIDGES: A CROSSWALK
TO THE NEW OMB CIRCULAR
LICENSING & PROVEN EXPORT
CONTROL METHODS FOR
EAR/ITAR/OFAC COMPLIANCE
EMPLOYED AT UNIVERSITIES
A TEAM APPROACH TO DEVELOPING
COMPETITIVE GRANT PROPOSALS
THE "I"S HAVE IT: UNDERSTANDING
THE IRB, IACUC AND IBC
WORKING WITH INTERNATIONAL
INSTITUTIONS; ASSESSING
COMPLIANCE AND MITIGATING RISK
SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL: DOING IT ALL
AT A PUI WITH FEW STAFF MEMBERS
TRAINING PROGRAMS 201:
DEVELOPING TOOLS AND TRAINING
FOR ALL LEVELS OF RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATORS
CURRENT ISSUES FOR SENIOR
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS
USING EXCEL FOR POST-AWARD
GRANT MANAGEMENT (AT THE
DEPARTMENT LEVEL)
BUILDING RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT
INFRASTRUCTURE IN A
DECENTRALIZED UNIVERSITY:
A CASE STUDY
POLICIES, POLICIES, POLICIES!! HOW
TO DEVELOP, IMPLEMENT,
COMMUNICATE AND MAINTAIN
POLICIES FOR RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION!
Thursday 8.14.14
8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
FULL DAY WORKSHOP
WORKSHOP 37
-
PUTTING THE “FUN” IN NIH
FUNDING! A DAY WITH NIH!
8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
FULL DAY PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS
WORKSHOP 1
B
THE BASICS: PRE-AWARD
FUNDAMENTALS
As research administrators, we play a key
supportive role in assisting principal
investigators to navigate their research projects
through the various phases in the sponsored
projects lifecycle. The pre-award phase of the
lifecycle encompasses the development,
institutional review and submission of proposals
to external sponsors, as well as the negotiation
and acceptance of sponsored research awards.
Within the landscape of the pre-award phase,
research administrators are consistently
challenged with ever-changing rules and
regulations related to a myriad topics, including
proposal submission, conflict of interest, use of
animals in research and export controls, just to
name a few. In this workshop, we will delve into
the general regulations governing sponsored
research and apply them in the context of case
studies. We will also explore many of the key
pre-award processes, as well as examine key
compliance areas that affect sponsored research
during the pre-award phase of the sponsored
projects lifecycle.
WORKSHOP 2
B
POST-AWARD
BASICS
This workshop will focus on the topics that are
most relevant in the day-to-day financial
management of sponsored projects while
exploring a bit of the history and big picture in
order to explain why it is we do what we do. It
is designed for individuals new to post-award
research and will include a discussion of issues
such as managing overspending on awards,
timeliness of financial reports, closeout of
awards, collections, cost transfers, cost sharing,
effort reporting, allowable costs, preparing for
audit, and much more. Come and hear the
challenges, successes and lessons learned of
the faculty while engaging in hands-on activities
to help you apply your new knowledge. Bring
your questions, concerns, and your institution's
experience and expect a lively discussion.
WORKSHOPS
Learning Objectives: After completing this
workshop, participants will be able to:
• Participants will be able to articulate the
various stages and activities associated with
the pre-award phase of the sponsored
projects lifecycle.
• Participants will be able to communicate,
interpret and apply the general regulations
applicable to sponsored research in the
context of the pre-award phase.
• Participants will identify the various elements
of a proposal and describe their purpose and
importance.
• Participants will discuss the key compliance
areas that impact the pre-award phase.
Sunday
8.10.14
Bruce Morgan*, Assistant Vice Chancellor for
Research Administration, University of
California-Irvine
Csilla Csaplár, Department Manager,
Geophysics, Stanford University
Learning Objectives
• Participants will gain a basic understanding of
the concepts involved in post award
administration.
• Participants will identify ways to manage dayto-day post award activities from receipt to
closeout and explore ways to minimize
institutional risk.
Debra Murray*, Director, Sponsored Projects
Financial Operations, Georgetown University
Janice Oakley, Manager, Office of Contract and
Grant Accounting, University of Maryland,
College Park
Timothy R. Schailey, Director, Sponsored
Programs, Christiana Care Health System
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
ANNUAL FULL DAY PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
MEETING
WORKSHOP 3
B
PRE-CONFERENCE
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
A PRE-AWARD AND POST-AWARD
TUTORIAL FOR DEPARTMENT
ADMINISTRATORS
This workshop will focus on topics that influence the
daily operations of managing pre and post award. It
is designed for research administrators and will
provide them with an overview of the significant
principles and issues surrounding proposals, grants
and contracts. Topics will include proposal and
budget development, identifying key personnel,
subcontract verses service agreement and cost
sharing. This session will also focus on preparing
financial status reports, account reconciliation,
closeout of awards, cost transfers, allowable and
allocable costs and much more.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will obtain information and learn
techniques to manage the financial day-to-day
activities between pre and post award.
• Participants will learn the basic components of the
proposal budget.
Tolise Miles*, Senior Grants and Contracts
Specialist, Children's National Medical Center
Anne Albinak, Senior Administrative Manager,
Johns Hopkins University
Erin E. Bailey, Associate Director, University at
Buffalo
Fannie Cruz R. Walton, Senior Administrative
Director, Georgetown University Medical Center
Research administration responsibilities can be
overwhelming. The process of putting a proposal
together, managing a grant once funded and
properly closing it out at the end are the day-to-day
activities that department administrators struggle
with. This session will introduce best practices that
will assist department administrators with pre- and
post-award administration.
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS
WORKSHOP 4
I
UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION AND CLINICAL
TRIALS – THE POCKET EDITION:
CHAPTER 1
Clinical trials are conducted in a variety of institutional
settings, and if your organization is engaged in clinical
trials it is likely that you face complex problems, issues
and challenges on a regular basis whether you are a
research administrator in a central sponsored projects
office, in a medical school department, or in a teaching
hospital or research institute. This interactive workshop
will examine key administrative, contractual, financial,
and regulatory issues that arise in the planning, funding
and conduct of clinical trials, including:
• The unique complex regulatory environment for
clinical trials.
• The intricacies of developing a clinical trial budget,
identifying start up costs, hidden costs and
managing expenditures.
• Types of payment schedules and their impact on
cash flow.
• Key negotiation issues that often arise in a clinical
trial agreement.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain an understanding of the
nuances involved in developing and managing a
clinical trial budget and project expenses.
• Participants will learn how to manage multifaceted
issues that often arise in a negotiation of trial
agreements.
• Participants will increase their knowledge in the
review of key contract terms and their implications
and gain confidence in the negotiation process
with sponsors.
• Participants will learn about the complexities of
managing clinical trials, study billing processes and
how it relates to financial compliance.
• Participants will learn how clinical trials are closedout and how to manage post-close-out institutional
obligations and responsibilities.
> continued on next page
8
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
WORKSHOP 4
I
UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION AND
CLINICAL TRIALS – THE
POCKET EDITION: CHAPTER 1
(CONTINUED)
• Identifying strategies for negotiating a
successful trial agreement.
• Exploring institutional models to manage
regulatory challenges such as research billing,
financial disclosures and NIH clinical trials.
• Tools and solutions to manage the clinical
trials enterprise.
• Closing-out clinical trials.
WORKSHOP 5
B
BASICS OF CONTRACT
DRAFTING AND
NEGOTIATIONS
What does all of that legalese mean? How can I
best approach review and negotiation of a "thick"
contract? What sections of a contract should I
focus on? This workshop will introduce
participants to the basics of contract review,
drafting and negotiations with an emphasis on
contracts with non-profit and for-profit sponsors.
The session will focus on contracts for research
and clinical trials. The workshop will use a
combination of lecture, examples, and interactive
exercises to review the meaning and context of
common legal terms and provide techniques to
spot troublesome clauses and redraft them. The
workshop will also discuss how to communicate
positions persuasively and effectively during
negotiations to achieve desired outcomes and
build successful relationships.
WORKSHOP 6
B
AN INTRODUCTION TO
WORKING WITH U.S.
INSTITUTIONS
AND SPONSORS
This workshop will introduce participants to
working under U.S. government funding. The
format of the workshop will follow the basic
lifecycle of an award, from finding funding,
applying for funding, accepting the award,
managing the award to closing out the award.
Pre-Award topics covered will include: finding
funding, institutional registrations with U.S.
government agencies and systems, and
common proposal/budget preparation concerns.
Post-award topics will include financial
management, procurement, property
management and subawards. Compliance topics
will include audit, protection of research
Lisa Benson*, Director, Research
Administration and Sponsored Programs,
Connecticut Children's Medical Center
Patricia Travis, Associate Director, Clinical
Research, Johns Hopkins University School
of Medicine
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn about the contract
mechanisms used for research and clinical
trials.
• Participants will learn common legal terms
and techniques to spot troublesome clauses.
• Participants will learn best practices for
drafting and redrafting contracts clauses to
meet the needs of the parties.
• Participants will learn to communicate
positions effectively and persuasively during
difficult contract negotiations.
Nancy Lewis*, Director, Sponsored Projects,
University of California-Irvine
Heather Kubinec, Senior Contract & Grant
Officer, University of California-Irvine
Tam Tran, Assistant Director, University of
California-Irvine
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to describe the steps
for registering to apply for U.S. funding.
• Participants will be able to search for funding
on Grants.gov.
• Participants will recognize key proposal
components.
• Participants will be able to explain the
minimum requirements for administrative
systems under U.S. funding.
• Participants will be able to identify key
compliance issues associated with U.S.
funding.
> continued on next page
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
ANNUAL MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
MEETING
WORKSHOP 6
B
PRE-CONFERENCE
WORKSHOPS
subjects, and effort reporting. The purpose of this
workshop is to provide participants with a broad
overview of the various issues associated with
working under U.S. government funding in order to
better understand the relevant terminology and
concepts. Sources of additional information on the
various topics will also be provided, for participants
who seek more in-depth knowledge than this
workshop can cover. This workshop is intended for
research administrators from non-U.S. institutions
who are seeking insight into how to work with U.S.
government sponsors, and collaborating with U.S.
institutions from which they receive U.S.
government funding.
WORKSHOP 7
B
10
EFFORT REPORTING: HOW TO
MINIMIZE RISK
Hoping that effort reporting would go away with the
new Federal grant reform?—No such luck. While
there may be some changes, documenting how
faculty and staff are spending their time is still
necessary. And, there aren't many financial
compliance issues that can draw the wrath of PIs
and the interest of auditors as fast as this one. What
can we do to improve the process and minimize the
audit risk? This workshop will focus on some key
principles for good management of the requirements
for effort reporting: policies and procedures, training
programs, documentation and oversight. In addition,
given the continuing federal audits of effort
reporting, the workshop will focus on some
common issues that have arisen in a number of
audits. Workshop participants should plan to engage
in a conversation with the faculty and to bring
suggestions and questions.
WORKSHOP 8
Sunday
8.10.14
AN INTRODUCTION TO WORKING
WITH U.S. INSTITUTIONS
AND SPONSORS (CONTINUED)
O
SUBAWARDS & SUBRECIPIENT
MONITORING: THE BASICS AND
BEYOND
This workshop will explore the full cycle of
subawards and subrecipient monitoring, a complex,
shared responsibility that begins at the time of
proposal development and extends throughout the
life of the subaward. The workshop will focus on
sharing tips, strategies and practical guidance, and
is designed to introduce the topic to newcomers,
as well as provide comprehensive tools to more
experienced research administrators. Through
discussions, case studies and exercises, participants
will work through implementation strategies,
approaches and solutions in areas of pre-award risk
analysis, as well as post-award monitoring.
David Mayo*, Director of Sponsored Research,
California Institute of Technology
David W. Richardson, Associate Vice Chancellor
for Research and Director of Sponsored Programs,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Learning Objectives: Participants will gain an
understanding of the principal requirements of
institutional effort reporting systems, including
policies and procedures; knowledge of effort
reporting audits and findings; knowledge about key
issues that need attention in university practices on
effort reporting.
Robert Andresen*, Director of Research
Financial Services, Associate Director, Research
and Sponsored Programs, University of
Wisconsin-Madison
Zach Belton, Director, Huron Consulting Group
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will recognize subaward
characteristics.
• Participants will understand subrecipient
monitoring responsibilities.
• Participants will learn strategies for addressing
day-to-day monitoring issues.
• Participants will learn strategies for addressing
central monitoring responsibilities.
Antoinette Lawson*, Director, Office of Research
Administration, University of Maryland, College Park
Aimee L. Howell, Manager, University of Maryland,
Baltimore County
Anthony Maranto, Subaward Specialist, Johns
Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public
Health
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
WORKSHOP 9
I
FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE:
CURRENT AND FUTURE
CONSIDERATIONS
Compliance touches everything – direct costs,
indirect costs, equipment purchases, service
center costs, effort reporting, cost sharing, cost
transfers, contracts, subcontracts, gifts, ARRA
funding, you name it. As sponsored research
administrators, we face an ever growing list of
financial compliance requirements. The
complexity and risks of our work requires
periodic reviews of financial compliance issues.
The workshop will discuss financial and
operational compliance risks and offer possible
strategies to mitigate the risk. Using a
combination of the personal experiences, case
studies and OIG audit reports, this interactive
workshop will rely on audience participation and
proven strategies to provide participants with
alternatives for reducing risk in financial
compliance. The session will also provide
perspective on new unified federal guidance.
WORKSHOP 10
B
OMB CIRCULAR
OVERVIEW
New circulars? Old circulars? The basics haven’t
changed! The Office of Management & Budget,
(OMB), issues the regulations that all federal
agencies have to follow. These fundamental
principles must be understood at the
transactional level to ensure compliance and
sound financial stewardship of sponsored funds.
Just as importantly, universities, non-profits and
hospitals use these circulars as the foundation
of their policies and procedures for managing
sponsored awards. This workshop will allow
the participants to review the basic principles
outlined in the existing and revised OMB
Circulars. The workshop will focus on
definitions, the principles of allowable,
allocable and reasonable, and guidelines for
administrating federal awards. Additional
topics will include, re-budgeting, cost-sharing,
subcontractor monitoring requirements and
audits. A brief overview of the F&A calculation
is also included. The presenters will share
their “real-life” experiences and demonstrate
practical application of these regulations and will
reference current audits to drive home the costs
of non-compliance.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn about the current audit
environment related to research compliance
and specific audits at research universities.
• Participants will learn where their institution’s
largest financial risks are.
• Participants will learn how to mitigate these
risks.
• Participants will gain perspective on new
unified guidance.
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of
allowability standards, e.g., allowability,
allocability, consistency, reasonableness
Marisa Zuskar*, Manager, Huron Consulting
Group
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain general knowledge of
the circulars including what costs are allowed
to be charged to contracts and grants.
• Participants will gain an understanding of the
minimum administrative requirements of
managing awards and what auditors are
looking for when they perform reviews.
• Participants will use the circulars to examine
real life issues in research administration.
• Participants will understand the basics of the
Facilities and Administrative (F&A) rate
calculation. This knowledge will allow them to
understand what the F&A rate is paying for at
their institutions.
Denise Clark*, Associate Vice President for
Administration and Chief of Staff, Division of
Research, University of Maryland, College Park
Erin E Bailey, Associate Director, University
at Buffalo
Ann M. Holmes, Assistant Dean,
Administration and Finance, University of
Maryland, College Park
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
11
56
th
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
ANNUAL MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
MEETING
WORKSHOP 11
B
PRE-CONFERENCE
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
EXPORT CONTROLS AND
U(NIVERSITIES): WHAT YOU
(AND "U") NEED TO KNOW!
So you have heard about these things called Export
Controls and you might even know a little bit about
them. But what you don’t know can hurt “U”. What
do you really need to consider when developing an
Export Compliance Program? This workshop will
help you and your “U”niversity to gather the basics
and begin considering your next steps. We will dig
into the following questions: What are the big Export
Control issues? How do those issues impact
universities (e.g. touch points)? What administrative
functions should be considered and who should be
involved in the export compliance process? We will
also discuss developing practical approaches to
compliance, conducting a risk assessment, getting
and giving training, and highlighting resources to tap
into as you build an Export Compliance Program for
you and your “U”.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn the common regulatory
terms and concepts pertaining to export controls.
• Participants will develop familiarity with the
organization and content of the export control
regulations.
• Participants will learn to identify "red flags" that
may indicate the need for additional export
assessment for a particular grant, contract, or
proposed activity.
• Participants will better understand the impact
export control regulations have on research
activities at colleges and universities.
• Participants will learn about the different types of
export licenses and agreements and the steps to
take if a license is needed.
• Participants will learn how to protect export
controlled projects.
• Participants will understand how to use some of
the most common license exceptions and
exemptions related to research and travel outside
the U.S.
Jennifer May*, Director, Research Compliance
Services, University of Missouri - Columbia
Adilia Koch, Director of Export Compliance,
California Institute of Technology
WORKSHOP 12
O
CREATING A POSITIVE
AND CANDID CULTURE IN
YOUR OFFICE
The Gallup Organization launched a multi-year
research project to try to define a great workplace.
Based on this research, the number one key
discovery was: It was not the companies that were
great; it was the workgroups that were great.
In this workshop we are going to look at positive
office culture through the lens of what practices we,
as individuals, can incorporate -- beginning right
away -- that will create and enhance our business
relationships, leading to a more positive, candid, and
effective work place. Utilizing a wide variety of
resources, including those from NCURA’s
Leadership Development Institute and the
subsequent Executive Leadership Program, we will
focus on three components of what we can do to
create or enhance the culture in our work place:
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn the most effective tools for
self-management and what goes into managing
your professional reputation.
• This workshop will also examine the gift of
feedback and follow up in your one-on-one
relationships with colleagues, direct reports and
supervisor.
• Further, strategies for effective team
communication and team meetings (and they’re
not in the conference room!) will be explored.
Tara E. Bishop*, Associate Executive Director,
National Council of University Research
Administrators
• Management of Self: Emotional Intelligence and
our professional reputation
• One on One Communications: with your
colleagues, direct reports and supervisor
• Teams and Team Meetings
Sharing goals, managing obstacles, and experiencing
successes as well as disappointments can create strong
bonds when they are coupled with a mindful and candid
approach to self, others, and team communications.
12
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
WORKSHOP 13
B
GRANT WRITING SECRETS
EVERY RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATOR NEEDS
TO KNOW
Are you new to the world of proposal writing
and looking to understand the basics? Are you a
practicing grant writer looking to sharpen your
skills? Are you a seasoned research
administrator exploring ways to add value to the
customer service you offer to faculty? In this
pre-award workshop, the presenters will share
top grant writing secrets that will help increase
the overall quality and competitiveness of the
proposals you submit. Through a mock proposal
review, you will experience the grants process
from the sponsor’s point of view, deciding
whether or not proposals should be funded.
These hands-on and minds-on activities will help
you to effectively analyze RFPs, better match
institutional needs with sponsor funding
priorities, develop persuasive proposals, and
avoid common mistakes.
WORKSHOP 14
B
COMPLIANCE 101 –
THE BASICS
IACUC, IRB, IBC, COI, ITAR, EAR, RCR – fun
with alphabet soup or research compliance
lingo? What does it all mean? What do I need to
know? In Compliance 101: The Basics, we will
provide an overview of research compliance
areas - including human subjects protections,
animal care and use, biosafety, export controls,
conflict of interest, research misconduct and
responsible conduct of research - for those new
to Sponsored Programs. Seasoned compliance
officers will share their practical experiences,
useful definitions, and resources.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to analyze grant
application guidelines.
• Participants will be able to identify sponsor
hot buttons.
• Participants will be able to weave persuasive
themes throughout proposals.
• Participants will understand the grant review
process.
• Participants will be able to identify 5 common
grant pitfalls—and how to avoid them.
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
Jeremy Miner*, Director of Grants and
Contracts, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Joseph C. McNicholas, Director, Office for
Research and Sponsored Projects, Loyola
Marymount University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will have a general understanding
of common research compliance issues
encountered at a research institution.
• Participants will be able to identify activities
that may require a compliance review.
Tracy Arwood*, Assistant Vice President for
Research Compliance, Clemson University
Daniel Vasgird, Director, Office of Research
Integrity and Compliance, West Virginia
University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
13
56
th
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
ANNUAL MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
MEETING
WORKSHOP 15
I
PRE-CONFERENCE
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
F&A RATE PREPARATION/
NEGOTIATION FOR
THE PREDOMINANTLY
UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTION
(PUI)
In the first part of this workshop, two research
administrators – one from an institution with a rate
calculated using the short form and one from an
institution that uses the long form – and one F&A
rate consultant will introduce workshop participants
to the world of F&A rate preparation. They will
explain the difference between the short form and
the long form and an MTDC base vs. a salaries and
wages base, and will discuss the pros and cons of
selecting one process over the other. They will
review the rate preparation and negotiation process
so each participant understands what is involved in
developing a rate. Participants will learn what
financial data is used to prepare the rate. In the
second part of the workshop, the group will review a
sample short form rate proposal and a sample long
form rate proposal, paying particular attention to the
different components used to calculate the rate.
WORKSHOP 16
B
TRAINING PROGRAMS 101:
ENGAGE, DEVELOP, AND
IMPLEMENT!
Providing educational opportunities for faculty,
staff and students related to sponsored programs
is critical for many reasons, including ensuring
compliance with federal regulations. However, in
many situations, it is done on a case-by-case basis
(if at all….) and may not necessarily meet the needs
of the stakeholders involved. This workshop will
focus on the basics of establishing a training
program at your institution focusing on three pillars
of activity: engaging the stakeholders; developing
the appropriate program; and implementing the
program successfully. This will be a highly interactive
workshop targeted for individuals considering a
program for their institution.
WORKSHOP 17
B
USING EXCEL FOR
BUDGETING
This half day workshop will help the attendee to get
familiar with some basics of MS Excel. We will work
on how to re-make a detailed budget for an initial
budget period as well as a budget for an entire
proposed project period using an Excel format.
Using Excel will give the user the advantage of
calculating and re-calculating the budget quickly and
linking the numbers within the tabs and workbooks.
14
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to explain the difference
between the short form and the long form, and
MTDC vs. salaries and wages, and advise their
campus which form is most appropriate for them.
• Participants will be able to outline the rate
negotiation process, including the process
timeline.
• Participants will be able to discuss the
components that determine the F&A rate.
• Participants will be able to advise their campus on
strategies to maximize their F&A rate for the
subsequent rate preparation and negotiation.
Prerequisites: Participants should have a thorough
understanding of how the F&A rate is calculated and
applied on project budgets. They should also have a
working knowledge of the components that
comprise the rate as explained in the federal
regulations (A-21).
Panda Powell*, Director of Sponsored Programs,
University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Jim Carter, Senior Director, Huron Consulting Group
Carolyn Elliott-Farino, Director, Contracts and
Grants Administration, Kennesaw State University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn what should be considered
before a training program is initiated. Participants
will learn about specific tools available when
developing a program.
• Participants will learn about ways to market and
advertise their program.
Anthony Ventimiglia*, Associate Director, Office of
Sponsored Programs, Auburn University
Candice Ferguson, Manager, Research Education &
Communications, Georgia Institute of Technology
Garrett Steed, Contracting Officer, University of
Colorado-Boulder
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will become familiar with creating an
excel budget template with formulas.
• Participants will become familiar with tips and
tricks in excel.
• Participants will leave with the template they
created to use on the job.
Prerequisites: Attendees will need to bring a laptop
with Excel 2007 or later.
Fredric Majnoun*, Director of Finance and
Administration, Boston University Medical Campus
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
WORKSHOP 18
I
COST SHARING: HOW PREAND POST-AWARD OFFICES
CAN WORK TOGETHER
When a Principal Investigator proposes to share
costs of an exciting research project by donating
his or her time or some other tangibles, the pre and
post award administrators are often the last ones
to find out about some of the commitments made
in the proposals. Cost sharing requires involvement
at many levels-the Principal Investigator,
department administrator, pre and post award
offices and sponsoring agency. We will discuss
how by getting involved right from the very
beginning may help the university stay compliant
with Federal requirements and keep the auditors at
bay. This workshop will provide an in-depth,
detailed review of the issues surrounding cost
sharing on sponsored projects, primarily grants
funded by Federal agencies. The workshop will
define cost sharing, including voluntary and
mandatory, committed and uncommitted cost
sharing. Changes in cost sharing requirements in
the recently published OMB Omni Circular,
Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost
Principles, and Audit Requirements will also be
discussed. We will review different types of costs
that qualify for cost sharing and the requirements
for documenting, tracking and reporting cost
sharing. The relationship between cost sharing,
effort reporting, and indirect cost rates will be
analyzed and discussed. The workshop will include
some case studies, based on real incidents,
concerning various aspects of cost sharing.
WORKSHOP 19
O
THE CONSOLIDATION OF THE
OMB CIRCULARS: EXPLORING
THE "NEW" ADMINISTRATIVE
RULES
How will the consolidation of the OMB Circulars
into general government-wide guidance affect
award administration at colleges and
universities? Will the “super-circular” end up
being “super-confusing”? When it comes to
the administering federal assistance awards,
some things will change, but much has stayed
the same. This workshop will outline the
consolidated guidance and how it applies to
day-to-day award administration. Designed for
the newcomer as well as the seasoned research
administrator unfamiliar with the consolidated
circular, this overview will examine the guidance
with an emphasis on the “super-important”
basics. Come prepared to learn the ins and outs
of this complexity of administrative rules and
how the individual federal agencies will
incorporate the guidance into their own
administrative requirements.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand what constitutes
cost sharing.
• Participants will acquire an understanding of
the applicable federal policies, including
expectations for reporting and record keeping.
• Participants will learn different methods for
capturing, tracking and reporting cost sharing.
• Participants will learn how cost sharing
impacts Facilities & Administrative (F&A)
rates.
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
Prerequisites: Pre-award and/or post-award
intermediate level personnel or those reexamining cost sharing policies and practices at
their institution.
Patricia Hawk*, Director, Sponsored Programs,
Oregon State University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain an understanding of
the OMB guidance on federal financial
assistance awards.
• Participants will learn how to apply this
guidance in award administration.
• Participants will learn the next steps in the
implementation of the new federal guidance.
FULL
Jane A. Youngers*, Assistant Vice President
for Research Administration, The University of
Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Gunta Liders, Associate Vice President for
Research Administration, University of
Rochester
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
15
56
th
8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
ANNUAL MORNING PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
MEETING
WORKSHOP 20 SENIOR ADVANCED FORUM
A
PRE-CONFERENCE
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
16
FOR EXECUTIVES
Senior administrators are willing to share their
experience and knowledge with you and facilitate an
open dialogue on hot topics of interest to the
participants. Managing conflicts of interest and
commitment, implementing or revising policies in
response to the Uniform Guidance, and managing
and motivating professionals in tight economic times
are but a few of the topics that might be covered but
this workshop is designed as an interactive forum in
which registered participants create the agenda by
submitting topics and questions they want
addressed at the forum. Registered participants will
receive advance notice of the topics/questions and
are asked to share strategies to address the topics
during the forum. The questions and discussions
should be treated as confidential, so you can feel
SAFE in participating. Come share your questions
and your experience with your colleagues.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn how to address and problem
solve complex problems and issues.
• Participants will gain insights into how other
institutions are handling issues arising in research
administration.
Prerequisites: Participants should be senior
administrators with experience and responsibility for
decision making and effecting policy.
Susan Sedwick*, Associate Vice President for
Research and Director, University of Texas at Austin
Jim Luther, Associate Vice President, Research
Cost Compliance, Duke University
Marianne R. Woods, Academic Program Director,
Master of Science in Research Administration,
Johns Hopkins University
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS
WORKSHOP 21
A
ADVANCED CLINICAL
TRIALS WORKSHOP
This workshop will delve deeper into the elements
of successfully conducting clinical trials. It will focus
on navigating the complex regulatory environment
governing research, building an adequate
infrastructure to support clinical research and
strategies for institutional oversight to mitigate risk.
Topics covered will include establishing processes
and work flows to ensure regulatory compliance;
developing an infrastructure that reduces the
administrative burden on investigators, increases
efficiency and reduces timelines; and working across
the institution to leverage expertise in order to
facilitate streamlined and effective oversight of
clinical research.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will determine key elements involved
in a robust clinical research enterprise.
• Participants will learn how to effectively manage
regulatory requirements.
• Participants will learn how to create an
infrastructure to support clinical research.
• Participants will learn strategies for institutional
oversight of clinical research.
Prerequisites: Advanced level of understanding of
clinical trials. This session will build on standard
operating procedures and best practices.
Tesheia Johnson*, Associate Director of Clinical
Research for Yale School of Medicine COO, YCCI,
Yale University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
WORKSHOP 22
I
FAR/DFAR
DECONSTRUCTED
Do you consider spiderwebs ghastly, horrifying,
the very stuff of nightmares? Or do you find
them oddly elegant as they glisten in the
morning dew? Your answer to this regulatory
Rorschach test may offer a clue as to your
attitudes toward the Federal Acquisition
Regulation (FAR). Some see the FAR as the very
worst in bureaucratic opacity, with definitions
and alternates and prescriptions cross-linked in
ever-widening circles. Others see the FAR as a
magnificent achievement in organic rule-making,
a subtle edifice of our nation's concerted efforts
to purchase goods and services in a fair-minded,
even-handed way. Even if the poetry of the FAR
leaves you cold, it should be obvious why we
need to study it. As our researchers face an
increasingly competitive market for federal
grants, more and more of them will turn to
federal contract work. Federal contracts, subject
to the FAR, are more complicated than federal
grants. And contractual work scopes tend to be
tightly prescribed, significantly increasing the
risk of default. In this session, we will review
the basic structure of the FAR and DFARS.
There is no way to review every FAR clause in a
single workshop, but we will highlight a number
of representative clauses. In addition to
explaining some of the key clauses, we also will
discuss negotiation strategies for removing
inappropriate clauses and incorporating
appropriate alternates and deviations. Finally, we
will discuss ways of communicating the
implications of the FAR to your post-award
offices. We know that our post-award offices
never read any of the clauses referenced in a
FAR contract (unless they are included in full
text), thus it is up to us to communicate the
administrative requirements in a clear and
understandable way.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn how to identify and
analyze key FAR and DFARS clauses.
• Participants will gain confidence in your ability
to negotiate a FAR contract that will protect
your institutional interests.
• Participants will learn how to communicate
the administrative requirements of the FAR
and DFARS to your PI and post-award office.
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
Prerequisites: This workshop will be taught at
the intermediate level. Thus, it would be helpful
if all participants had some familiarity with the
FAR. We will explain basic terms (e.g.,
"prescription"), but only briefly.
John Hanold*, Interim Director, Office of
Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State
University
Amanda Snyder, Assistant Director, Sponsored
Programs Administration, University of
Maryland, Baltimore
Robin Riglin, Associate Director, Office of
Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State
University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
17
56
th
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
ANNUAL AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
MEETING
WORKSHOP 23
I
PRE-CONFERENCE
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
18
HERE COME THE FEDS!
WHAT A SPONSOR AUDIT IS
LOOKING FOR AND HOW TO
PREPARE YOUR INSTITUTION
OIG – The three most feared letters in sponsored
research (just beating out COI and RCR). As Offices
of Inspector General have gained additional funding
and resources, more research programs and offices
find themselves under scrutiny. Most of you have
likely either experienced an audit, or live in fear of
receiving an intent to audit letter. While sponsor
audits are inevitable, and unavoidable, component of
receiving research funding, they don't have to be a
nightmare. This session will help participants to
understand what areas Federal auditors are most
likely to focus on, common findings from the field,
and best practices for "surviving" a sponsor audit.
We will discuss:
Learning Objectives: Participants will be provided
with a working knowledge of audit preparation and
management.
Prerequisites: Experience managing sponsored
awards, transactions, or audits.
Jeffrey Silber*, Senior Director, Sponsored
Financial Services, Cornell University
Kimberly Ginn, Principal, Baker Tilly
• Types of audits conducted (and who is involved)
• The FY2014 audit plans for the major research
agencies (NIH and NSF)
• Purpose of audits and what OIGs are really
looking for
• Common findings
• Practical advice on how to best position and
prepare your institution to face an OIG audit
WORKSHOP 24
I
SERVICE CENTERS – HOW TO
OPEN AND OPERATE – LEGALLY!
University departments use a variety of products or
services to perform their activities. When these
products or services are provided within the
university these units function as nonprofit
businesses and are called recharge or service
centers. The cost of providing products and services
are allocated to users, including federally sponsored
agreements, by establishing billing rates which are
applied to the actual usage of services. The rate is
designed to recover costs from those users who
benefit from the products or services offered. The
complexities of setting up and running a service
center, or recharge center, continue to be a
challenge for research universities and this subject is
often on the DHHS OIG Work Plan for audits. This
session will look at considerations when setting up
and operating a service center. The session will look
in-depth at the rate development including
components of the budget, the rate base and
service center audits. The workshop will incorporate
a case study and exercises.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn the characteristics of a
service center.
• Participants will learn what to budget in the
billing rate.
• Participants will learn the different rate bases that
can be used to calculate the rate.
• Participants will learn what the audit findings on
service centers have been and the risks your
institution should manage.
Patrick Fitzgerald*, Associate Dean for Research
Administration, Harvard University
Anne Sullivan, Senior Director, Huron Consulting
Group
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
WORKSHOP 25
B
TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER,
START UPS AND INDUSTRIAL
COLLABORATIONS
Intellectual property that results from university
research is frequently licensed (a Bayh-Dole
success!) to new or existing companies for
commercialization. Often faculty present
interesting new concepts not yet reduced to
practice that companies wish to further develop
through research contracts that include the
eventual right to license the technology. Nascent
technology needs further development to bridge
the oft-discussed "Valley of Death" through
translational research. The federal government is
keenly interested in moving the technologies
from the laboratory to the marketplace and is
funding the effort through programs such as
NSF's i-Corp. Many universities are also exploring
new contracting mechanisms with new
intellectual property terms. This workshop will
examine the complex relationships that arise
when universities interact in research projects
that involve technology transfer.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain an understanding of
commonly used contracting licensing
approaches that address background
intellectual property and new foreground
intellectual property.
• Participants will explore the concept of a
"Background Intellectual Property Briarpatch,"
understand the importance of sponsored
programs office in managing the IP portfolio,
and propose remedies.
• Participants will consider how to construct
field of use licenses to meet the needs of
sponsors, faculty, and start-up companies.
• Participants will review proprietary rights
agreements for SBIR and STTR projects.
• Participants will share experiences with
federally-funded technology translation
programs.
• Participants will consider the special financial
arrangements and constraints (risks) in
working with start-ups.
• Participants will discuss the requirements for
financial conflict of interest disclosures and
management plans.
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
Jilda Garton*, Vice President for Research and
General Manager of GTRC and GTARC, Georgia
Institute of Technology
WORKSHOP 26
BUILDING BRIDGES: A
CROSSWALK TO THE NEW
OMB CIRCULAR
This workshop will feature a detailed review of
the new OMB Circular with reference points and
crosswalks to previous OMB A-21, A-110 and
A-133 circulars, plus a discussion of the
potential impact changes in the new circular
may pose for college and universities.
Participants will have the opportunity to engage
in discussions of the implications of the changes
in the new circular and to become more
conversant with the circular language and
format, locating familiar sections, and identifying
new language and guidance.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will review key elements of the
new OMB combined circular.
• Participants will be provided with a descriptive
review of contents of the new circular in
terms of A-21 and A-110 guidance.
• Participants will be provided a guided forum
for discussion of the potential impact of the
revised circular on college and university
policies and processes.
Julie Cole*, Director of Research Costing
Compliance, Duke University
Robin L. Cyr, Associate Vice Chancellor for
Research, Director, Office of Sponsored
Research, University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
19
56
th
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
ANNUAL AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
MEETING
WORKSHOP 27
I
PRE-CONFERENCE
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
20
LICENSING & PROVEN EXPORT
CONTROL METHODS FOR
EAR/ITAR/OFAC COMPLIANCE
EMPLOYED AT UNIVERSITIES
This workshop will deliver practical information on
proven export control management methods
implemented by universities to comply with export
regulations administered by the Departments of
State, Treasury and Commerce. Methods include
effective management of jurisdiction determinations,
licensing and voluntary self-disclosures. Workshop
faculty will use real-world examples to facilitate
learning and discussion. Workshop attendees will
participate in the identification, jurisdiction
determination, licensing and technology control
process including managing disclosures. Time will be
allowed for questions, discussion and networking
with others who are responsible for day-to-day
oversight and management of export compliance.
WORKSHOP 28 A TEAM APPROACH TO
I
DEVELOPING COMPETITIVE
GRANT PROPOSALS: THE PREAWARD ROLE IN SUPPORTING
SUCCESS
Today it is common to have a collaborative team
approach to developing and writing a competitive
proposal. This workshop combines didactic and
hands-on activities to explore best practices for
proposal development and good grant writing.
Participants will team up during the workshop and
work together on ideas for possible grant proposals,
but you do not need an idea for a project to
participate! The focus will be more on the process
than the content.
Just bring is your own brainpower, enthusiasm and
experience -- and your willingness to join a proposal
development team. You will have an interactive
opportunity to develop proposal components using
good grant writing techniques.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn the key attributes of an
effective compliance program.
• Participants will learn how to prepare commodity
jurisdiction requests, export license applications,
and other licenses required under the EAR, the
ITAR and OFAC.
• Participants will learn how to detect and manage
voluntary self-disclosures of potential export
violations.
Prerequisites: Participants should have an in-depth
understanding or familiarity with the International
Traffic in Arms Regulations (22 CFR 120-130), Export
Administration Regulations (15 CFR 300-799) and
various Foreign Assets Control Regulations (FACR)
and sanctions programs.
Kay Ellis*, Director of Export Compliance and
Export Control Officer, University of Arizona
Adilia Koch, Director of Export Compliance,
California Institute of Technology
Jennifer May, Director, Research Compliance
Services, University of Missouri - Columbia
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn how to develop and evaluate
good ideas for proposals.
• Participants will discover how to build an effective
team for proposal development.
• Participants will learn about creating a proposal
development plan.
• Participants will learn some of the techniques of
effective proposal writing.
• Participants will work in small teams to develop
proposal sections.
Prerequisites: Participants should have a working
knowledge of the grants and proposal process.
Denise Wallen*, Research Officer/Senior Fellow;
Research Assistant Professor, University
of New Mexico
Jackie Hinton, Senior Grant & Contract
Administrator, Northern Arizona University
Joseph McNicholas, Director, Office for Research
& Sponsored Projets, Loyola Marymount University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
WORKSHOP 29 THE "I"S HAVE IT:
I
UNDERSTANDING THE
IRB, IACUC AND IBC
This workshop offers detailed information for
mid-level research administrators about the
three regulatory committees that oversee use of
human subjects (IRB), animals (IACUC), and
rDNA (IBC) in research.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn when IRB, IACUC, or
IBC approval of research is required.
• Participants will understand the authority and
responsibilities of each committee and how
they sometimes overlap.
• Participants will learn to illuminate the role of
the research administrator, as a steward of
research funding, in assuring institutional
compliance with the applicable IRB, IACUC or
IBC regulations.
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
Prerequisites: Basic-level knowledge of the
research regulatory landscape and a willingness
to learn more.
Suzanne Rivera*, Associate Vice President for
Research, Case Western Reserve University
WORKSHOP 30 WORKING WITH
O
INTERNATIONAL
INSTITUTIONS; ASSESSING
COMPLIANCE AND
MITIGATING RISK
Research universities and institutions worldwide
are reaching across the globe to compete for
project funding and sponsorship while at the
same time the nature of research is becoming
more collaborative and inter-disciplinary. These
factors are translating to a higher number of
research opportunities made possible through
cooperation and collaboration with international
partners. Research administrators must confront
a variety of administrative, legal and compliance
challenges when negotiating and administering
projects with international sponsors and/or
international research collaborators. Workshop
participants will be introduced to a variety of
topics relating to international research
collaborations, from export control compliance
to tax implications. Through exercises,
discussions and presentations, participants
will gain a better understanding of the unique
challenges relating to research administration
for international projects.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn to outline a riskmitigating approach to managing international
research projects.
• Participants will learn practical approaches and
solutions to resolving typical issues in
international projects.
• Participants will be encouraged to start a
dialogue among participants regarding "best
practice" in administration, legal and
compliance matters surrounding international
collaborations.
Jennifer Donais*, Director, Research
Compliance, University of Massachusetts
Amherst
Jeffrey Newman, Associate Director, Contract
Management, Vanderbilt University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
21
56
th
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
ANNUAL AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
MEETING
WORKSHOP 31
O
SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL: DOING
IT ALL AT A PUI WITH FEW
STAFF MEMBERS
PRE-CONFERENCE
WORKSHOPS
Predominately undergraduate institutions (PUIs) come in
all sizes, shapes, and award volumes. This session is
geared toward those who work at institutions with four
or fewer administrators to manage all aspects of
research administration – people who must have a very
broad knowledge base, and who have no departmental
administrators on their campuses. The workshop will be
highly interactive, as we discuss best practices for
juggling all our responsibilities with limited resources.
We'll also discuss how to go about adding additional staff
positions as the enterprise grows, some "must-have"
professional resources, succession planning for small
offices, and other issues specific to staffs that are small
in number but large in capacity and talent.
WORKSHOP 32
O
TRAINING PROGRAMS 201:
DEVELOPING TOOLS AND
TRAINING FOR ALL LEVELS OF
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS
This session will demonstrate how to use a variety
of training techniques to develop your colleagues
and improve business processes. This session will
be interactive so come prepared to participate.
Participants will be have the opportunity to apply
the methods discussed and return to their
institutions with techniques that can be
implemented in their offices.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to state best practices for
offices with small staffs.
• Participants will be able to list at least three
resources for small offices.
• Participants will be able to define typical
succession plans for small offices, (4) perform a
self-evaluation of their practices.
Prerequisites: Participants should be working (or
have previously worked) at a PUI with four or fewer
staff members involved in research administration.
Pamela Napier*, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, Agnes Scott College
Kris Monahan, Director of Sponsored Research and
Programs, Providence College
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn about specific tools available
when developing a program.
• Participants will learn how to develop and apply
formative assessments tools.
• Participants will learn how to develop and apply
problem-based learning tools.
Garrett Steed*, Contracting Officer, University of
Colorado-Boulder
Candice Ferguson, Manager, Research Education &
Communications, Georgia Institute of Technology
Samuel Gannon, Manager, Education & Training,
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Sunday
8.10.14
22
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
WORKSHOP 33
A
CURRENT ISSUES FOR SENIOR
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS
This is a highly interactive session for senior
research administrators targeting topics that are
currently under discussion in the field. These are
the hot topics we need to address on our own
campuses, and this workshop is a great place to
understand common approaches and concerns.
The panel will address major issues including (1)
the Uniform Guidance and how we can plan to
implement it at our universities, (2) financial and
programmatic reporting, including our concerns
about NIH sub-accounting, (3) Internal Controls in
the context of research administration and
especially with the emphasis in the Uniform
Guidance, and (4) training programs for
departmental staff, central administration and
faculty on topics from the Uniform Guidance. In
addition, we will discuss questions suggested by
the participants before and during the workshop.
Participants will be asked to suggest topics or
questions in advance, but there will be plenty of
time for spontaneity. Come share your questions
and your experience with colleagues who speak
the common language of research administration!
WORKSHOP 34
I
USING EXCEL FOR
POST-AWARD GRANT
MANAGEMENT (AT THE
DEPARTMENT LEVEL)
This ½ day workshop will help the attendee to
get familiar with how to organize and manage
their grants using MS Excel. We will work on
how to build financial reports and present data
to PIs, department heads and ourselves using
macros and pivot tables among other tools in
MS Excel.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn how to address current,
complex problems in research administration.
• Participants will understand prevailing
opinions on major topics in the field.
• Participants will build a network of senior
administrators who deal with common
problems.
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
Prerequisites: This workshop is for senior
research administrators who have an
understanding of the broad spectrum of issues
in management and in research administration.
Kim Moreland*, Associate Vice Chancellor for
Research & Sponsored Programs, University of
Wisconsin-Madison
Patricia Hawk, Director, Sponsored Programs,
Oregon State University
Cathy Snyder, Director, Vanderbilt Costing
Activities, Office of Contract And Grant
Accounting, Vanderbilt University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn that using Excel will give
the user the advantage of recognizing
potential issues related to grants.
• Participants will become familiar with macros for
time saving and making reports more readable.
• Participants will become familiar with pivot
tables to summarize data more easily.
Prerequisites: Attendees will need to bring a
laptop with Excel 2007 or later.
Charlotte Gallant*, Compliance Specialist,
Harvard University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
23
56
th
1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
ANNUAL AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS (continued)
MEETING
WORKSHOP 35
O
PRE-CONFERENCE
WORKSHOPS
Sunday
8.10.14
24
BUILDING RESEARCH
DEVELOPMENT INFRASTRUCTURE
IN A DECENTRALIZED
UNIVERSITY: A CASE STUDY
This interactive workshop will focus on how to build
a research development program at both the school
and central levels and how these efforts might
compliment and bolster each other. Discussion will
focus around initial steps and challenges faced in a
decentralized school and university setting and how
to work through these challenges to create a strong
and value added program.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will outline the main functions of research
development at the school and university level to
establish baseline understanding.
• Participants will go through a case study, using
Harvard as an example, on a step by step basis,
learning how research development infrastructure
and support have grown at Harvard and how these
joint efforts have provided support to our faculty.
• Participants will come away with specific tools and
ideas to help you get started at your home
institution and help guide first steps in building
your own program.
Elizabeth Lennox*, Assistant Dean of Research
Administration, Harvard University
Susan Gomes, Director of Research Development
and Strategy, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard
University
Elizabeth Langdon-Gray, Assistant Provost for
Research Development and Planning, Office of the
Vice Provost for Research, Harvard University
WORKSHOP 36
A
POLICIES, POLICIES, POLICIES!!
HOW TO DEVELOP, IMPLEMENT,
COMMUNICATE AND MAINTAIN
POLICIES FOR RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION!
This workshop provides a foundational understanding of
the key components of policy development and
management. Developing effective policies that can be
clearly understood and followed, that address the needs
of the many, and that ensure compliance, can be quite
challenging. This workshop takes attendees through the
full process of developing relevant policies, rolling out
policies to research communities and provides strategies
for monitoring policies to ensure continued applicability
and compliance. Policies are not procedures. Poorly
written policies can create negative and unnecessary
consequences in an audit. It is critical that those involved
in policy development understand the importance of this
process.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will have an understanding of how to
develop an effective policy that meets the needs
of the organization.
• Participants will be able to evaluate existing
policies to determine if they effectively meet the
needs or the organization and if they create an
unnecessary risk.
• Participants will have strategies on how to involve
others in the policy development process and how
to effectively communicate policies through an
organization.
Prerequisites: Foundational understanding of
general research administration. General
understanding of the polices typically needed for the
administration of research.
Kerry Peluso*, Associate Vice President for
Research Administration, Emory University
James Casey, Attorney and Research Manager;
President-elect, NRLD, State Bar of Wisconsin
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
PRE-CONFERENCE
FULL DAY POST-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP
WORKSHOP 37
O
PUTTING THE ‘FUN’ IN NIH
FUNDING…A DAY WITH NIH!
Wear your favorite tropical shirt (it is summer
time!), put on your comfy sandals or loafers, and
join NIH experts for a day of smooth sailing
through the latest NIH grants process, programs
and policies. You may not think of trying to
understand the application forms, working in the
eRA Commons or navigating the NIH websites
as “fun,” but don’t let that stop you from
participating in NCURA’s, “A Day with NIH” on
Thursday, August 14. NIH Program, Review,
and Grants Management officials are offering a
laid back day, filled with informative and
interactive presentations, guidance, and an array
of future NIH contacts for critical points in the
grants process!
With what seems like an ocean-size amount of
information to absorb about NIH, the goal of this
day will be to help you steer through the
resources, understand the course, get-to-know
the rules, and obtain tips for sailing through the
eSubmission and awards process, as well as
learn how avoid getting stuck in the sand along
the way. We’ll share details on high priority
initiatives taking place at NIH, guidance on
grant writing, administrative issues, and so
much more. Experts will demonstrate NIH
on-line resources, such as RePORT and
RePORTER, and how these tools can help
administrators and investigators learn more
about NIH funded research.
WORKSHOPS
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain a better understanding of
policies and procedures affecting the NIH
grants process from application to post-award.
• Participants will have the opportunity for
personal interaction with NIH staff and be able
to obtain insight and suggestions for
managing research grants in an increasingly
complex environment.
Thursday
8.14.14
Cynthia Dwyer*, Communications Specialist &
Outreach Coordinator, Office of Extramural
Research, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Michelle Bulls, Director, Office of Policy for
Extramural Research Administration (OPERA),
National Institutes of Health
Sherri Cummins, Customer Relationship
Manager, eRA, Commons and eSubmission,
National Institutes of Health
Dee Doherty, Deputy, Grants Management
Officer, National Institutes of Health,
NIDDK/GMB
Della Hann, Deputy Director, Office of
Extramural Research (OER), National Institutes
of Health
Michael Reddy, Program Officer, Genetics and
Developmental Biology (GDB) Division, National
Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS),
National Institutes of Health
Joe Schumaker, Communication Specialist,
Electronic Research Administration (eRA),
Office of Extramural Research (OER), National
Institutes of Health
When the sun sets, you’ll be able to return to
your office or lab with a more complete
understanding of NIH and the grants process, as
well as the knowledge of available resources to
help…plus have a chance to relax a little before
heading back to reality.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
25
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th
Monday 8.11.14
ANNUAL
MEETING
10:30 AM – NOON ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
TRAINING AND EVALUATION OF STAFF
SENIOR LEVEL
DISCUSSIONS
Monday
8.11.14
Are you a supervisor, colleague, coach and/or
mentor who decides what is needed in order to
develop, nurture, and grow staff through training?
Do you supervise staff and need to determine how
best to evaluate their success? If so, this Senior
Forum is for you! We will host an interactive
session in which participants will be actively
engaged in in-depth discussions on key topics and
issues regarding training and evaluating staff.
FULL
Dennis Paffrath*, Assistant Vice President for
Sponsored Programs Administration, University of
Maryland, Baltimore
Denise Clark, Associate Vice President for
Administration and Chief of Staff, Division of
Research, University of Maryland, College Park
Vivian Holmes, Director, Sponsored Research
Operations, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
CARBON AND SILICONE: INFORMATION
SYSTEMS AND THE SENIOR RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATOR
Learning Objectives: This session is to provide the
audience with:
This session will target the Senior Research
Administrator interested in how best to leverage
information technology to improve research
administration operations. The discussion will include
panelists from two separate institutions along with a
Director from Huron's Higher Education Technology
practice. Each panelist has been focused in some
capacity on bringing value to research operations and
their research community through the implementation
of technology. We will explore such question and topic
as:
• A clearer picture of what types of technologies
and implementation projects have proven be the
most impactful
• Insight on lessons learned through experience
• Perspective on how best to succeed on improving
operations through the use of technology.
FULL
• Areas of challenge implementing technology
• Identifying the type of technology and/or
implementation that has had the most value to
organizations.
• Key lessons learned through past projects
• The road ahead.
26
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn how to create an effective
training program.
• Participants will have a better understanding of
creating pathways for staff development and
progress.
• Participants will learn what factors impact the
success of employee training.
• Participants will hear about the role of employees
in their own professional development and
evaluation.
• Participants will be able to determine appropriate
and measurable goals to use during the evaluation
process.
Phil Infurna*, Director, Huron Consulting Group
Diane Baldwin, Assistant Vice President,
Sponsored Programs, Boston University
Marcia Smith, Associate Vice Chancellor, Research
Administration, University of California-Los Angeles
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
Tuesday 8.12.14
8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION
FULL
SENIOR
LEVEL
DISCUSSIONS
David Richardson*, Associate Vice Chancellor for
Research and Director of Sponsored Programs,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Simon Kerridge, Director, Research Services,
University of Kent
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
Tuesday
8.12.14
1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
ASSESSING WORKLOAD, COMPLIANCE
AND TRAINING NEEDS THROUGH
INSTITUTIONAL METRICS
This session provides an update on Duke
University's metrics initiative. For several years
Duke has been refining the use of metrics to
assess grant management workload, identify
key indicators of financial compliance, and
target training to appropriate audiences. The
most recent enhancements have enabled the
institution to combine various components into
a powerful management tool for supervisors,
business managers and senior leadership to
better understand and plan for targeted
deployment of resources, specific training and
personnel needs, and potential compliance
issues. Panelists will describe the journey in
developing these separate processes and how
they are being brought together to form a
comprehensive interactive business tool.
Learning Objectives: To identify areas of
compliance, workload and training that are
appropriate for metric analysis To discuss the
planning process for developing and
implementing appropriate metric analyses To
discuss possible ways that separate metric
analyses can be effectively used in combination
to facilitate institutional management of the
research administration enterprise.
FULL
Jim Luther*, Associate Vice President,
Research Cost Compliance, Duke University
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
27
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th
Wednesday 8.13.14
ANNUAL
MEETING
8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
EXPORT REFORM AND ITS IMPACTS
ON HIGHER EDUCATION
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
28
At long last export control reform is here! In major
changes to International Traffic in Arms (ITAR) and
Export Administration Regulations (EAR), the
Department of Commerce and State have
coordinated their regulatory rulemaking in an effort to
place "higher fences around fewer items". They have
moved many items off of the United States
Munitions List (USML) and on to new sections of
the Commerce Control List (CCL). To do this, the
USML is being completely overhauled, and changed
to a "positive", specification-based list. The CCL is
being expanded to accommodate items moving off
the USML, with special rules for control of those
items moved to the CCL. And, in a separate move,
the Department of Energy has proposed harmonizing
its rules with those of Commerce and State.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn about what is migrating from
the Munitions List and what major changes have
been made to the ITAR.
• Participants will learn the rules covering items that
have been taken off the Munitions List and placed
on the new Commerce "Munitions" List.
• Participants will earn about new contract clauses
that will impact fundamental research in defense
contracts.
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of existing export
regulations (ITAR & EAR), and experience reviewing
and negotiating contract terms and conditions that
affect export determinations.
FULL
In this discussion group, we will introduce many new
and challenging concepts such as "catch and release",
and "specially designed", and revised definitions such
"defense services" and "use". Understanding these
concepts and terms are essential to complying with
the new rules. Special attention will be given to new
contract clauses and contract requirements which
are needed to preserve fundamental research.
Participants are invited to share their experiences,
issues, and questions with export reform.
David Brady*, Director, Export and Secure
Research Compliance, Virginia Tech
Elizabeth Peloso, Associate Vice Provost/ Associate
Vice President, Research Services, University of
Pennsylvania
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
Saturday 8.9.14
AGENDA
4:00 – 7:00 PM
Saturday
8.9.14
REGISTRATION
WELCOME LOUNGE
Sunday
8.10.14
Sunday 8.10.14
7:30 AM – 5:00 PM
8:30 PM
REGISTRATION
PAUL AND TUCKER: AFTER DARK
After a delicious dinner, join us for
great after dinner conversation with
Paul and Tucker.
8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
WORKSHOPS
Paul Edward Begala is an
American political consultant and
political commentator. He was an
adviser to President Bill Clinton.
Begala was a chief strategist for
the 1992 Clinton-Gore campaign,
which carried 33 states and made
Clinton the first
Democrat to win the
White House in twelve
years. As counselor to
the President in the
Clinton White House,
he coordinated policy,
politics, and
communications.
(Additional fee required)
NOON – 1:30 PM
WORKSHOP LUNCHEON FOR
WORKSHOP FULL DAY SESSION
PARTICIPANTS, FACULTY
AND EVALUATORS
1:00 – 5:00 PM
NCURA MARKETPLACE
6:15 – 7:00 PM
Tucker Carlson is an
American political news
correspondent and
libertarian
conservative
commentator for
the Fox News
Channel. He is cofounder and
editor-in-chief of The
Daily Caller. He is a
senior fellow of the
Cato Institute and
formerly co-hosted
CNN's Crossfire and
MSNBC's Tucker.
RECEPTION
7:00 PM
SUNDAY DINNER
9:00 PM
REGIONAL HOSPITALITY SUITES OPEN
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
29
56
th
6:15 – 7:15 AM
8:30 – 10:00 AM
ANNUAL NCURA FUN RUN ~ POWER WALK
MEETING The day will start at 6:15 am at the Hilton’s main
PRESENTATION OF THE 2014
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION AWARD
AGENDA
entrance foyer on the lobby level for stretching.
Runners and walkers will then be provided with
maps and directions prior to departing the hotel at
6:30 am and returning around 7:15 am with plenty of
time left for participants to get ready before the first
session.
Jamie Caldwell, Loyola
University Chicago
KEYNOTE ADDRESS
7:30 AM – 5:00 PM
AM56 CONCIERGE
EXPOSITION 2014
7:30 – 8:15 AM
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
Monday
8.11.14
Dr. Robert M. Sapolsky
Dr. Robert M. Sapolsky
is an American
neuroendocrinologist, professor
of biology, neuroscience, and
neurosurgery at Stanford
University, researcher, author and stress expert.
Dr. Sapolsky is a MacArthur “Genius” Fellow, a
professor of biology and neurology at Stanford
University, and a research associate with the
Institute of Primate Research at the National
Museum of Kenya. In 2008, National Geographic &
PBS aired an hour-long special on stress featuring
Dr. Sapolsky and his research on the subject. In
addition to A Primate’s Memoir, which won the
2001 Bay Area Book Reviewers Award in nonfiction,
Robert Sapolsky has written three other books,
including The Trouble with Testosterone, Why
Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers, and Monkeyluv and Other
Essays on our Lives as Animals. Dr. Sapolsky was
awarded Rockefeller University’s Lewis Thomas
Prize for Writing about Science for 2008. His articles
have appeared in publications such as Discover and
The New Yorker, and he writes a biweekly column
for the Wall Street Journal entitled “Mind & Matter.”
He is currently working on a book to be titled:
Human Aggression, Human Compassion And the
Ambiguities of Biology.
10:00 – 10:30 AM ~ NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK
10:00 – 10:30 AM ~ GET CONNECTED AND GET INVOLVED FAIR!
NCURA REGIONS
Colleagues from NCURA’s regions will be available to talk with you and answer questions on the front terrace.
This is a perfect opportunity to learn about the different facets of NCURA and how to get involved TODAY in
your region. Grow your peer network…visit the Get Connected and Get Involved Fair throughout the
Conference!
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM ~ NCURA MARKETPLACE
30
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:30 AM – NOON ~ SPARK SESSIONS
These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff and you will
be able to check out multiple topics in each time slot.
10:30 – 10:50 AM
BRIDGING THE GAP: CENTRAL
ADMINISTRATION AND ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENTS WORKING TOGETHER
Nicole Hammill*, Coordinator, Grants and
Development, Louisiana State University Health
Sciences Center New Orleans
11:00 – 11:20 AM
TICK-TOCK, EFFECTIVELY MANAGING
YOUR TIME
Rashonda Harris*, Associate Director,
Research Accounting Services, Temple
University
11:30 – 11:50 AM
HOW TO WRITE AN EFFECTIVE BUDGET
Deanna Hendrickson*, Manager, Kennesaw
State University
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
10:30 AM – NOON ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
BIOMEDICAL O
CONSTRUCTING MULTI-CENTER TRIALS:
A COORDINATING CENTER EMPLOYMENT
OF NOVEL THINKING (ACCENT)
It seems to be a prerequisite to develop a
catchy title that can be turned into an acronym
to describe a multi-site trial, but there are many
more aspects! Contractual considerations,
financial finagling, and political discussions
abound. This session will address many of the
challenges related to the structuring, proposing,
and ramping up over multiple institutions.
While focusing on the perspective of the
financial/contracting coordinating center, we
will walk through reasonable ways to propose
financial reimbursement plans across sites,
site participation in the proposal process, and
approaches to agreements, providing insight
to both centers and individual sites participating
in trials. Institutional factors play a heavy role
behind the scenes, too! Attend and walk
through the major issues.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to identify potential
financial model for proposing and
administering multi-site trials.
• Participants will understand opportunities to
refine development of a trial budget.
• Participants will learnto describe approaches
to negotiating site reimbursements and
invoicing approaches.
Valerie L. Stevenson*, Administrative Director,
University of Michigan
Heather M. Offhaus, Director, Medical School
Grant Review & Analysis, University of
Michigan-Ann Arbor
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
31
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10:30 AM – NOON ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING BIOMEDICAL
I
MANAGING FACULTY APPOINTMENTS AT
ACADEMIC MEDICAL CENTERS
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Many differences and complexities exist in the
administration of research programs in a clinical
setting compared with those in a traditional
university environment. This session will explore
some of these differences and expand on issues
related to academic medical centers and clinically
based research programs. For example, universities
often complain that it is difficult for institutions to
account fully for the time spent
by physician scientists because the boundaries
associated with teaching, research, and patient care
are blurred. Moreover, these activities are accounted
for differently by specific federal agencies. This
session will cover topics such
as appointment letters, the definition of institutional
base salary, clinical practice plans, affiliated vs. nonaffiliated hospitals, what constitutes 100% effort,
distinguishing between clinical effort and clinical trial
effort, how to manage effort commitments on K
Awards, VA appointments in conjunction with other
clinical responsibilities. This session is designed to
facilitate dialogue among the participants.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT B
PRESENTATION AND TRAINING DELIVERY
SKILLS: HOW TO ENGAGE YOUR AUDIENCE
By delivering presentations we learn more about the
subject matter we are presenting and we increase
our visibility with our clients, stakeholders and peers.
In this session we will focus on reducing
presentation anxiety through successful preparation,
gaining audience participation, sending the message
you want and how to handle difficult participants.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT O
WORKING WITH MILLENNIAL EMPLOYEES IN
CROSS-GENERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS:
TIPS FOR BETTER EMPLOYEE/SUPERVISOR
RELATIONS
This session will discuss the characteristics of the
Millennial Generation and the affects these have on
cross-generational work environments. Practical tips
for playing to Millennial employees' strengths and
how to incorporate them as team members will
be presented.
32
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain knowledge about
compensation and effort reporting requirements
within academic medical centers and clinically
based research programs.
• Participants will articulate federal guidance that
governs faculty appointments at academic medical
centers with a focus on guidance applicable to
University-VA joint appointments and how this is
implemented
at research institutions.
• Participants will assist hospital and clinically based
administrators in better understanding the
administrative and regulatory environments.
• Participants will gain a better understanding
of what is involved in the management of a
comprehensive effort reporting program and
provide the opportunity to discuss participant
practices and experiences.
Prerequisites: Practical experience in managing
complex faculty appointments (including practice
plans and VA appointments), the research portfolio,
and the effort reporting process for physicians and
researchers in academic medical centers.
Jamie Caldwell*, Director, Office of Research
Services, Loyola University Chicago
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn to prepare for a successful
presentation.
• Participants will use adult learning principles to
increase the participation of your audience.
• Participants will use their voice, tone, body
language to convey the message they want.
• Participants will identify tactics for handling
difficult participants.
Marci Copeland*, Export Control Administrator/
Trainer, University of California - Irvine
Samantha Westcott, Manager, Sponsored Projects
Team, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
Angie Karchmer, Principal Contract and Grant
Officer, University of California-Irvine
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn the characteristics of the
Millennial generation.
• Participants will learn ways in which these may
affect a cross-generational work environment.
• Participants will learn how to address these
employees needs, play to their strengths and
incorporate them successfully into your team.
Mandy Funderburk*, Director of Assessment and
Academic Services, Presbyterian College
Sheila T. Lischwe, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, Clemson University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:30 AM – NOON ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
COMPLIANCE B
SUBRECIPIENT MONITORING:
STRATEGIES FOR MANAGING
SUBAWARDS FROM CRADLE TO GRAVE
This session will address institutional and
Principal Investigator roles and responsibilities to
monitor subawards to achieve compliance with
Federal laws and regulations, other sponsored
provisions and institutional policies that govern
the subaward. All stages of the subaward from
proposal to award closeout will be covered.
Topics to be covered include risk assessment
tools, risk management solutions, FCOI, and
overall procedures, and process flow. Copies of
the University of Minnesota subrecipient risk
assessment tools and procedures will be shared.
The session will also briefly cover the changes
expected under the new Uniform Guidance.
DEPARTMENTAL I
CAN I CHARGE THAT TO A GRANT?
Have you ever wondered if you could charge an
item to a sponsored project? This session is
designed to assist administrators determine if a
proposed expense is allowable or unallowable.
We will offer an overview of the cost principles
defined by the OMB providing the basis for
direct charging to sponsored projects. We will
discuss those charges that are normally
considered unallowable and what justifications
are needed to support their inclusion as an
allowable direct cost.
FEDERAL U
NSF UPDATE
This session is a comprehensive review of what
is new and developing with the National Science
Foundation's programs, policies, people and
budgets. Participants will learn about changes
affecting their institution and new programs of
interest to their researchers. And visit us at the
Ask the National Science Foundation booth in
the exhibit hall today!
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn how to effectively
assess their subrecipients' risk.
• Participants will learn strategies to manage
issues that arise during the lifecycle of a
subaward.
• Participants will understand the topics that
need to be addressed in their subrecipient
monitoring policies and procedures.
• Participants will gain insight regarding the new
OMB Uniform Guidance related to
subrecipient monitoring.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Judith A. Krzyzek*, Associate Director,
Sponsored Projects Administration, University
of Minnesota
Andrea Marshall, Senior Grant & Contract
Administrator, University of Minnesota-Twin
Cities
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain an understanding on
why tying expenses to the scope of work is
essential when it comes to cost allowability.
• Participants will learn how developing good
habits will assist in the preparation for audits,
especially those where questionable
expenses have been charged to your projects.
• Participants will gain insight on how to classify
expenses as a direct cost or indirect cost
based on their usage.
Glenda Bullock*, Manager of Business
Operations, Washington University in St. Louis
Craig A. Reynolds, Associate Director, Office
of Research and Sponsored Projects, University
of Michigan-Ann Arbor
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand upcoming
changes to NSF policies and procedures.
• Participants will learn about current and future
NSF budgets, agency priorities, and
involvement in electronic initiatives including
advances with Research.gov.
Jean Feldman*, Head, Policy Office, Office of
Budget, Finance & Award Management,
National Science Foundation
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
33
56
th
10:30 AM – NOON ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING FEDERAL
U
WASHINGTON UPDATE
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
David Kennedy will share an update on the status of
the OMB Uniform Guidance and other issues that
COGR is currently engaged. Madeline Nykaza will
review the status of appropriations bills and provide
an update on other legislation of interest to the
research community.
INTERNATIONAL O
LEGAL AND BUSINESS CHALLENGES OF
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT AND
TAXATION: HOW TO STAY ON THE RIGHT
SIDE OF THE LAW
Increasingly universities establish long-term "boots
on the ground" operations in foreign countries for
purposes of research, technical assistance, or other
federally sponsored projects there. This presentation
provides an overview of the nuts and bolts of
maintaining such operations. We focus on human
resources issues arising from sponsored projects
performed overseas; topics include immigration and
visas for expatriates and third country nationals,
foreign employment and labor law, consultants and
contractors versus employees, and tax issues that
cover personal and organizational incomes taxes for
both the US and host country, VAT, custom duties,
and when tax and if exemption applies.
POST-AWARD A
OMB UNIFORM GUIDANCE AND
F&A PROPOSALS
Are you still wondering what changes in the new
Uniform Guidance (OMNI Circular) will affect your
F&A proposal? Well don't feel like the Lone Ranger!
Come to this session where we will examine the
good, the bad and the ugly. We will discuss the
critical changes affecting the F&A proposal process,
what you need to be aware of, how some
institutions are dealing with the changes and what
questions still remain. While the focus will be on
long form F&A institutions, those using the
simplified method (short form) will also benefit from
this session. While this is a concurrent session you
are strongly encouraged to bring your questions for
discussion and feedback.
34
David Kennedy*, Director, Costing Policy, Council
on Governmental Relations (COGR)
Madeline Nykaza, Legislative Analyst,
Congressional and Governmental Affairs,
Association of Public and Land-grant Universities
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will appreciate the unique business
and legal challenges of "boots on
the ground" operations abroad.
• Participants will have an understanding of
the requirements involved with international
employment for expatriates and third
country nationals.
• Participants will be given an overview of
the various tax obligations for individuals
and institutions involved in global and international
activities
Prerequisites: Minimal international/global
experience.
Marjorie Forster*, Assistant Vice President
for Research and Global Health Initiatives, University
of Maryland, Baltimore
William Ferreira*, Counsel, Hogan Lovells
Bob Lammey, Senior Director, Higher Education
and Non-Profits, High Street Partners
Learning Objectives: This session will provide
insight to the critical changes contained in the new
Uniform Guidance (OMNI Circular) that impact the
F&A proposal and what institutions need to do to
ensure compliance with same.
Prerequisites: Good understanding of the current
requirements of 2CFR, Part 220 - Cost Principles for
Educational Institutions (OMB Circular A-21) and
knowledge of your institution's current F&A process.
Also, at least a basic familiarity with the changes to
the costing principles resulting from the new
Guidance.
Michael Anthony*, Executive Director,
Management Accounting and Analysis, University
of Washington
Lynn McGinley, Assistant Vice President,
Sponsored Projects Accounting and Compliance,
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Paul Nacon, Senior Director, Huron Consulting
Group
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:30 AM – NOON ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
PRE-AWARD A
MOVING FROM DOGMATISM TO
EMPIRICISM IN CONTRACT NEGOTIATION
New negotiators are often trained to spot bad
clauses: Product Liability is bad. Publication
restrictions are bad. Trade secrets are bad. Etc.
This results in a "black or white" approach to
contact negotiation, where the negotiator reads
through the agreement, identifies the bad
clauses, recites standard arguments for the
removal of such clauses, and then waits for a
response from the sponsor. Advanced
negotiators need to develop pathways to more
subtle negotiations. We need to ask ourselves
whether a copyright indemnity clause will hurt
the university in the context of a particular
project, and if not, whether we need to waste
resources negotiating it out. If it really is
important to negotiate it out, the scope-specific
context should make our argument all the
stronger. If it isn't important to negotiate it out,
we should just move on. There's always another
contract to read, and we need to avoid spinning
our wheels if the clause in question won't have
any practical impact on the work we are doing.
PRE-AWARD B
GIFT VS GRANT - CREATING A WIN/WIN
FOR THE UNIVERSITY AND THE
FOUNDATION
Gifts are defined by the IRS tax code, but how
funds received from a charitable organization are
administered can sometimes feel like a mystery
wrapped in an enigma. Arizona State University
and the ASU Foundation launched a pilot to
create a win/win scenario for both the University
and the Foundation.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will discuss a number of
examples of where negotiators can move
from a more dogmatic to a more flexible
approach without exposing their institutions to
additional risk.
• Participants will consider the development of
risk matrices to facilitate good judgment in
contract negotiation.
• Participants will discuss the challenges of
developing “black or white” negotiators into
more agile and advanced thinkers.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Prerequisites: Participants should be familiar
with issues typically addressed in federal and/or
industrial contract negotiations.
John Hanold*, Interim Director, Office of
Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State
University
Learning Objectives: This session will highlight
why the pilot was created, lessons learned and
the best practices for implementation.
Lisa E. Mosley*, Executive Director, Research
Operations, Arizona State University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
35
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10:30 AM – NOON ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
ANNUAL
MEETING BIOMEDICAL
CONFLICT OF INTEREST IN INVESTIGATOR
INITIATED CLINICAL TRIALS: CHALLENGES
AND PITFALLS
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
You will never forget the day when you received a
phone call from one of your investigators stating, “I
would like to initiate a clinical study. What do I need
to do?” Well, your summer reading just became 21
CFR, Part 312. So many questions race through your
head. What do you mean I am now the Sponsor?
What forms are required? Who completes the
forms? Why won’t the pharma company indemnify
us? What are the risks? Whether you are a veteran
research administrator of investigator initiated
studies or just received “the call”. Come join us as
we discuss our challenges, pitfalls and successes.
BIOMEDICAL
CONVERSATIONS WITH CLINICAL AND
TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE AWARD (CTSA)
INSTITUTIONS
Sidnee N. Paschal Young*, Financial Director,
Emory University
In the absence of the Administration Key Function
Committee, this session will provide a forum for
CTSA administrators to discuss topics such as: How
have you established partnerships with industry?
How do you define an investigator for the purpose
of support and tracking? How do you address
cost allowability? What are your thoughts on the
upcoming renewal applications? Other questions
and ideas for discussion will be encouraged
and welcomed.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
STICKING TOGETHER: USING YOUR
NETWORK DURING A CAREER TRANSITION
As research administrators, we are responsible for
helping our PIs and institutions adapt to an ever
changing landscape. So where do we turn for support
when it is time for us to make changes in our own
careers? To each other, of course! Networking is
probably the single-most important thing to do when
making a career change. Finding the right people with
whom to associate is about so much more than finding
a new job; it's also about creating a support system.
Three research administrators with different
backgrounds will share their recent journeys through
career transition. They will share how their professional
association (NCURA) strengthened their planning
process in finding a new path and managing the
transition period that followed.
36
Scott B. Davis*, Associate Director, Office of
Research Administration, University of Oklahoma
Health Sciences Center
Learning Objectives: Participants will come away
with:
• Ability to recognize when it is time to initiate
a change.
• Strategies for networking with colleagues during a
career change.
• Creative approaches to making a change.
• Advice on preparing for your transition.
• Tips for managing the transition to a new role or
environment.
Robyn Remotigue*, Research Manager, School of
Public Health, University of North Texas Health
Science Center at Fort Worth
Laura Letbetter, Contracting Officer, Georgia
Institute of Technology
Rosemary Madnick, Director, Office of Grants and
Contracts Administration, University of Alaska,
Fairbanks
Susan Zipkin, Associate Director, Research
Operations, Boston Medical Center
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:30 AM – NOON ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
COMPLIANCE
AUDIT FINDINGS AND CORRECTIVE
ACTION
Sponsors fund universities, colleges, hospitals,
and non-profit organizations to conduct research
and advance science. Research funding from
sponsors requires all recipients to follow
regulations, guidelines, sponsor rules, and best
practices With these rules come audit findings
from A-133 audits, direct cost audits, and
sponsor priority areas for compliance reviews .
This session will discuss how to prepare for an
audit, the audit methodology, recent audit
findings and corrective actions , while providing
an opportunity for attendees to bring their own
examples and questions relating to audits on our
campuses. The session will be interactive and
discussion is encouraged to provide guidance to
all attendees.
DEPARTMENTAL
FROM START TO FINISH: HOW TO ASSIST
YOUR PI WITH PROPOSAL SUBMISSION?
Gregory Antonecchia*, Manager, Grants &
Contracts Accounting, Memorial Sloan-Kettering
Cancer Center
Keith Graff, Director, Health Industries
Advisory, PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP
Charlie Tardivo, Principal, Research
Administration Consulting Services LLC
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Gina Concannon*, Assistant Director for
Administration, Texas A&M University-Corpus
Christi
Are you already involved in pre-award research
administration, or are you hoping to become
more involved in the process? Would you like to
identify ways you can support new faculty or
senior faculty who are already pros at the
proposal submission process. There are a
variety of ways you can contribute whether or
not you have a technical background or many
years of experience. We hope this discussion
group will be comprised of both veteran and
new departmental and central office
administrators in order to foster a dynamic
dialogue focusing on how you can help your PI
get from point A to point B in submitting a
compliant and competitive proposal.
FEDERAL
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UPDATE
The Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE)
formulates federal postsecondary education
policy and administers programs that address
critical national needs in support of our mission
to increase access to quality postsecondary
education. In addition to managing policy for
Federal Student Aid, the grant programs of OPE
provide support to postsecondary institutions
and other entities; in FY 2014 OPE manages a
portfolio of more than 5,000 grants, with over
$7.1 billion dollars obligated. This presentation
will provide an overview of OPE’s current and
new programs, including our First in the World
initiative, and will also describe what is known
to date about grant opportunities in FY 2015.
John Clement*, Division Director, US
Department of Education, Office of
Postsecondary Education
Eileen Bland, Division Director, Undergraduate
Studies Division, Student Service, US
Department of Education, Office of
Postsecondary Education
Don Crews, Grants Management Specialist,
Strengthening Institutions Division, Institutional
Service, US Department of Education, Office of
Postsecondary Education
Kelly Harris, Senior Program Officer, Fund for
the Improvement of Postsecondary Education
(FIPSE), US Department of Education, Office of
Postsecondary Education
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
37
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th
10:30 AM – NOON ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING POST-AWARD
FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE STORIES – WHAT
WE CAN LEARN FROM EACH OTHER
AGENDA
In all likelihood all sponsored projects offices have
undergone some type of a review, assessment,
audit, or examination of research financial
compliance. Whether these were conducted by
your internal auditor, external/single audit firms, OIG,
OMA or agency sponsor it is likely that you and your
institution came away with at least one new or
enhanced process or procedure that served to
improve compliance with the myriad financial
requirements of post-award administration.
This session is intended to enable participants
to share examples of challenges to financial
compliance and how these were addressed.
Please join us to share how your institution
implemented a corrective action or pro-active
change in process/procedure that others can l
earn from or adapt for themselves.
PRE-AWARD
Monday
8.11.14
TEAM COLLABORATION IN PROJECT
DEVELOPMENT AND PROPOSAL WRITING:
CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS
Proposal writers face numerous challenges whether
they are coordinators of their own scientific research
or experts in proposal writing services at universities
or industry/commercial/ private sector Some
common questions are: how do they function, how
do their teams work? Is there a "dream team"
technique about?
We recognize that the writing team is not
necessarily the scientific team, though it is
increasingly common to have both parties working
together. There are numerous models to implement
in-house service units as well as external SMEs to
develop projects, write funding proposals for clients,
support teams.
They all need to succeed in:
• Finding the right complementary talents to create
a new team.
• Dealing with existing teams and maximizing their
different talents.
• Maintaining team commitments and enthusiasm.
• Making ends meet in the final phase.
• Integrating and disseminating lessons learned.
38
Mary Lee Brown*, Associate Vice President for
Audit, Compliance and Privacy, University of
Pennsylvania
Pamela S. Caudill, Associate Vice President,
University of Pennsylvania
Participant Benefits:
• Will learn about team models.
• Will be made more conscious about their own and
colleagues' talents.
• Will learn how to SWOT with the team talents.
• Will be inspired to try something new next time
Learning Objectives:
• Facilitators will share different team approaches
and discuss their benefits and weaknesses.
• This session will provide an environment to learn
team techniques and how to find appropriate team
players that will function as a successful team.
Prerequisites: Participants should have been
involved in proposal writing or in designing projects
at the pre-award phase.
Denise Wallen*, Research Officer and Senior
Fellow; Research Assistant Professor, University of
New Mexico
Joseph McNicholas, Director, Office for Research
and Sponsored Projects, Loyola Marymount
University
E. Jacqueline Hinton, Senior Grant & Contract
Administrator (GCA), Office of Grant and Contract
Services, Northern Arizona University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:30 AM – NOON ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
Suzanne Rocha*, Assistant Director, Research
Administration, Tufts University
PRE-AWARD
LIMITED SUBMISSIONS UNCUT
Certain agencies limit the number of proposal
submissions allowed from a given institution.
Limited submissions are becoming more
common as they allow the sponsor, federal or
private, to rely on the institution for the first
round of proposal review. The discussion for
this session will focus on the limited submission
process at our different institutions, including
internal announcement methods and selection
processes, in an effort to identify best practices.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
STIMULATING RESEARCH AND
SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY THROUGH
FACULTY INCENTIVES
It's a common goal for many offices of
sponsored programs: to increase the number of
applications submitted and the amount of
funding received. Join your colleagues in a rich
discussion of the combination of faculty
incentives – financial, time, human resource,
other enforced rewards – that effectively
stimulate research and scholarly activity. In this
interactive session, you are also encouraged to
ask questions, share experiences, and reflect on
lessons learned for developing, implementing,
managing, and funding faculty incentives.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will identify financial and nonfinancial incentives that can be used to
stimulate research and scholarly activity
among faculty.
• Participants will gain insights on strategies for
developing and implementing faculty
incentives.
Jeremy Miner*, Director of Grants and
Contracts, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
10:30 AM – NOON ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
Training and Evaluation of Staff
Are you a supervisor, colleague, coach and/or
mentor who decides what is needed in order to
develop, nurture, and grow staff through
training? Do you supervise staff and need to
determine how best to evaluate their success?
If so, this Senior Forum is for you! We will host
an interactive session in which participants will
be actively engaged in in-depth discussions on
key topics and issues regarding training and
evaluating staff.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn how to create an
effective training program.
• Participants will have a better understanding
of creating pathways for staff development
and progress.
• Participants will learn what factors impact the
success of employee training.
• Participants will hear about the role of
employees in their own professional
development and evaluation.
• Participants will be able to determine
appropriate and measurable goals to use
during the evaluation process.
FULL
Dennis Paffrath*, Assistant Vice President for
Sponsored Programs Administration, University
of Maryland, Baltimore
Denise Clark, Associate Vice President for
Administration and Chief of Staff, Division of
Research, University of Maryland, College Park
Vivian Holmes, Director, Sponsored Research
Operations, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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ANNUAL
MEETING
NOON – 1:30 PM ~ LUNCHEON AND PRESENTATION OF NCURA JULIA JACOBSEN DISTINGUISHED
SERVICE AWARD RECIPIENTS AND JOSEPH CARRABINO AWARD
JOSEPH F. CARRABINO AWARD
AGENDA
Evelyn Baisey-Thomas
Information Technology Specialist
National Science Foundation, Emeritus
NCURA JULIA JACOBSEN DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD
Cynthia Hope
Assistant Vice President
for Research & Director,
Sponsored Programs
The University of Alabama
Antoinette Lawson
Director, Office of
Research Administration
University of Maryland,
College Park
Timothy Reuter
Director, Post-Award Operations,
Office of Sponsored Research
Stanford University
Monday
8.11.14
Cathy Snyder
Dan Nordquist
Director, Vanderbilt
Costing Activities,
Office of Contract and
Grant Accounting
Vanderbilt University
Assistant Vice President/Director,
Office of Grant and Research
Development
Washington State University
1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ SPARK SESSIONS
These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff and you will be able
to check out multiple topics in each time slot.
40
1:30 – 1:50 PM
CULTIVATING RESEARCH: ESTABLISHING A
COUNCIL OF PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS AND
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS
Gina Concannon*, Assistant Director for
Administration, Texas A&M University-Corpus
Christi
2:00 – 2:20 PM
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST AND
COLLABORATIVE SCIENCE
Tony Onofrietti*, Director, Research Education, The
University of Utah
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT I
PRACTICAL STEPS FOR DESIGNING
EFFECTIVE TRAINING & PRESENTATIONS
The goal of this session is to enable participants
to apply the ADDIE model to design and
development effective training workshops and
conference presentations. Content includes
discussions on when training is or is not the
appropriate method to resolve a performance
issue, traits of adult learners, steps in
developing a workshop/presentation,
presentation tips and techniques, and
evaluation methods.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT B
SOCIAL MEDIA AND RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION
Social media is as common a communication
tool now as email and fax machines and yet, in
research administration, the use is limited. If you
have felt overwhelmed by how to use it or even
if you should use it (or for that matter, how to
use it), then this session is for you! Twitter,
Facebook, and many other platforms can be
powerful tools in the business of research
administration. Use them internally for your own
professional knowledge and support and/or use
them externally to connect with others and
gather important information, either way, they
can be a valuable part of your communication
toolbox (if used appropriately). This is an
interactive session so feel free to bring your
tech and work along and ask questions.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT B
MIND MAPPING FOR THE RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATOR
Have you ever brainstormed a project or had an
idea, only to find yourself with pages of
information, but no clear view of how it fitted
together? This is where mind mapping can help
you. Mind mapping is a useful technique that
helps you learn more effectively, improves the
way you record information, and supports and
enhances creative problem solving. A mind map
is a graphical way to represent ideas and
concepts. It is a visual thinking tool that helps
structuring information, helping an individual to
better analyze, comprehend, synthesize, recall
and generate new ideas.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will apply the ADDIE model when
creating an instructional workshop.
• Participants will write clear learning goals &
objectives.
• Participants will learn tips about instructional
and presentation skills.
• Participants will identify & select instructional
techniques and activities.
• Participants will identify evaluation techniques
and use of results.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Jo Ann Smith*, Director, Graduate Programs in
Research Administration, University of Central
Florida
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand how to search for
what you need (@ signs and # hastags).
• Participants will "pull" information from
agencies, nonprofit, industry to know what is
going on
in general.
• Participants will "push" information out to your
constituents and campus.
• Participants will search specific keywords for
targeted searches.
• Participants will network with other Research
Administrators.
Prerequisites: Attendees should have access to
either a Twitter or Facebook account and already
have had some exposure to social media,
however, newbies to social media are welcome
to attend too.
Jeanne M. Viviani*, Director, Research
Programs And Services, New College of Florida
David Ngo, Assistant Vice President of
Sponsored Projects Administration, University
of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to quickly identify and
understand the structure of the project, idea
and or concept.
• Participants will be able to see the way pieces
of information fit together, as well as record
the information in a visual format.
Rosemary Madnick*, Director, Office of Grants
and Contracts Administration, University of
Alaska, Fairbanks
Andrew M. Gray, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
41
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1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING COMPLIANCE
I
EDUCATING AND TRAINING YOUR
UNIVERSITY
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Training is often viewed as critically important…..as
long as it doesn’t interrupt our day jobs. The
problem we encounter is that we are ALWAYS busy
with other work, which makes it difficult to find the
time to be trained. However, training is not only a
key element of enforcing compliance; it is also an
ongoing effort that will help to make us much more
knowledgeable, efficient, and respected at our jobs.
This session will cover the basics of training at a
higher education institution, including the rationale
behind training, how you can promote it where you
work, and training on specific research
administration and costing topics.
FEDERAL U
NSF PROPOSAL PREPARATION: THE GOOD,
THE BAD, AND THE UGLY
This session will provide everything you need to
know about preparing and submitting a proposal
to the National Science Foundation. Learn about
the different types of funding opportunities that
NSF employs, where to find the relevant policies
governing proposal preparation, merit review,
and special guidelines for other topical areas
such as conference proposals and RAPID and
EAGER proposals.
INTERNATIONAL O
EXPORT COMPLIANCE IN GLOBAL
COLLABORATIONS
International research collaborations can be
complicated depending on the type of research
and the parties involved. This session will review
the complexities that result from university multiparty collaborations and global export compliance
regulations. It is not just the United States that
has export control and import regulations and
requirements! Understanding these complexities
and being able to forecast them will help you prevent
unnecessary delays, unforeseen costs, export
violations and other hurdles that can interfere with
your international partner's participation and devastate
your research project. What effect can embargoes
and sanctions, anti-boycott regulations, International
Traffic In Arms Regulations, U.S. Commerce
regulations, U.S. Customs regulations have on your
international collaborations? Learn how to read the
international landscape, find the hurdles and help
your PI go into the collaboration fully aware of the
responsibilities and cost of doing business outside
the United States.
42
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to articulate why training
is important for achieving compliance.
• Participants will learn about the different methods
of training available at universities and how to use
them.
• Participants will learn more about specific topics
where training is needed from a research
compliance perspective.
Josh Rosenberg, Director, Cost Studies,
Emory University
Demetrice Bryant, Director of Training and
Communications, Emory University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand what to look for in an
NSF funding announcement.
• Participants will know what is required as part of
an NSF proposal.
Jean Feldman*, Head, Policy Office, Office of
Budget, Finance & Award Management, National
Science Foundation
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will discuss different international
collaboration scenarios and lessons learned, and
benefit from the experience of others
• Participants will discuss solutions for handling
potential issues brought about by the challenges
of U.S. and global export compliance regulations
that may affect
your project.
Adilia Koch*, Director of Export Compliance,
California Institute of Technology
Elizabeth Peloso, Associate Vice Provost/ Associate
Vice President, Research Services, University of
Pennsylvania
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
POST-AWARD B
YOURS, MINE, AND OURS: THE COST
SHARING LIFE CYCLE
Cost sharing is a binding commitment that a
Principal Investigator puts an university into,
either by responding to a program solicitation
that requires university commitment or by
voluntarily offering in un-solicited grant proposal.
In some schools cost sharing commitment
requires a Dean, Division Chair or Provost's
approval, while in many other schools, where in
absence of a written policy, these binding
commitments go under the radar of the
Academic Departments. Fulfilling the cost
sharing commitments require involvement at
many levels-the Principal Investigator,
department administrator, pre and post award
offices and sponsoring agency. We will discuss
how by getting involved right from the very
beginning may help the university stay
compliant with Federal requirements and keep
the auditors at bay.
POST-AWARD A
SERVICE CENTERS: ADVANCED COST
ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES
A Service Center Cost Analysis is a key
operational and compliance requirement to set
rates in compliance with federal costing
regulations.
The elements of a good cost analysis are more
than coming up with budget. This session will
dive into advanced cost analysis issues focusing
on analyzing costs, usage volume, and market
factors, while documenting your assumptions
and operational constraints. The session will
use real data in a live cost analysis model to
demonstrate
the techniques presented.
PRE-AWARD B
BUDGETING 101
This session will lay the basic framework for
budgeting in sponsored programs. It is intended
that this session will be somewhat interactive
and the participants will be given the opportunity
to build budgets themselves, running some
quick numbers through handheld calculators that
will be available for participants to use.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand what constitutes
cost sharing.
• Participants will acquire an understanding of
the applicable federal policies, including
expectations for reporting and record keeping.
• Participants will learn different methods for
capturing, tracking and reporting cost sharing.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Prerequisites: Pre-award and/or post-award
intermediate level personnel or those reexamining cost sharing policies and practices at
their institution.
Urmila Bajaj*, Director of Project Accounting,
California Institute of Technology
Randi Wasik, Director of Administration and
Finance, University of Washington
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain a command of advanced
costing strategies.
• Participants will learn proper elements to a
cost analysis.
• Participants will learn techniques to properly
estimate costs.
Prerequisites:
• Working knowledge of Cost Accounting
Standards.
• Service Center requirements from OMB
Circular
A-21, A-122, or Uniform Administrative
Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit
Requirements for Federal Awards (§ 200.468).
Martin B. Smith*, Manager, Higher Education
and Academic Medical Centers, Attain, LLC
Andres Chan, Director, Office of Financial
Analysis, University of Southern California
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn about A-21 general
costing principles.
• Participants will learn about direct vs. indirect
costs.
• Participants will learn about mechanics of
building a budget, with special attention to be
paid to the various bases used for F&A
calculations and sponsor limitations on F&A.
• Participants will learn about tips and tricks for
common budgeting problems.
Carly Cummings*, Assistant to the Dean Research, Mississippi State University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
43
56
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1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
I
POST-AWARD MANAGEMENT: RISK
ANALYSIS AND GETTING THROUGH
AUDITS AT SMALL INSTITUTIONS
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
In this session, we will present strategies, tips and
best practices for small institutions to manage the
audit process. Emphasis will be on audit preparation
strategies, how to respond to and implement
recommendations, and best practices for addressing
findings. We will also touch on approaches to
assess and control for audit risks.
• The purpose and nature of audit.
• Audit preparation strategies and best practices for
follow up.
• Approaches for on-going monitoring and risk analysis.
• Tools for effective risk analysis and mitigation.
Alison Sanders*, Director, Research and Sponsored
Programs, San Francisco State University
Marisa Zuskar, Manager, Huron Consulting Group
Jeffrey Wilson, Director, Sponsored Programs,
Sonoma State University
1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL RESEARCH
MARKETING
Creative ways to communicate internal and external
research possibilities from both centralized and
decentralized perspectives and how the two are
married to ultimately grow research at your
institution.
COMPLIANCE
A VACATION FROM THE GRAY AREA OF
FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE
Pack your bags; you are now an express trip to the
land of black and white! Compliance is often defined
as being one big gray area and we, as research
administrators, need to take time to step back and
place our issues in the black and white. In this
session, we will discuss financial compliance issues
brought about by the participants and then vote as a
group to place the issues in the black or white. If you
ever wish you had a room full of research
administrators to help you with a pressing issue that
you just can't seem to come to a final conclusion on,
then this session is for you!
DEPARTMENTAL
Follow-up to Concurrent Session: Can I Charge that to
a Grant, held at 10:30 am
CAN I CHARGE THAT TO A GRANT?
This follow up discussion of "Can I Charge that to a
Grant" will discuss specific items normally denied on
sponsored projects and what could possibly be done
to change the designation to an allowable costs. We
will discuss cost benefit allocations and some
standard justification language that may assist
administrators with direct vs. indirect charging issues.
44
Learning Objectives: This session will build
participants understanding of:
Erica Gambrell*, Coordinator of Research Services,
University of Alabama
Kirsten Yehl, Administrative Director, Northwestern
University
Learning Objectives: Participants will receive live
financial compliance support by the group on their
gray area issue. Each issue will have a live "black" or
"white" vote a the conclusion of each issue
discussed so that each gray area issue is assigned
a final answer.
Prerequisites: Participants should bring a gray area
issue to submit anonymously to the group at the
start of the session.
Rashonda Harris*, Associate Director, Research
Accounting Services, Temple University
Albana Cejne, Associate Director, Research
Accounting Services, Temple University
Glenda Bullock*, Manager of Business Operations,
Washington University in St. Louis
Craig A. Reynolds, Associate Director, Office of
Research and Sponsored Projects, University of
Michigan-Ann Arbor
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
FEDERAL
USAID: ISSUES WITH UNIVERSITY
SPONSORED PROJECTS
Lealie Perry*, United States Agency for
International Development
The U.S. Agency for International Development
(USAID) is THE funding agency for development
projects abroad. Join us for a discussion on
doing business with USAID, the ins and outs
from 'cradle to grave'. Learn more about the
USAID resources available to both the seasoned
USAID contractor, and the organization that is
looking to respond to a RFP/RFA for the very
first time. Also learn more about other types of
funding mechanisms that is available to you.
Bring your questions to the table and let's talk
about it. Before joining the discussion, please
visit USAID's website at: www.usaid.gov, and
select the link "Work with USAID".
INTERNATIONAL
DEVELOPING RESEARCH MANAGEMENT
LEADERS FOR A GLOBAL RESEARCH
ENVIRONMENT – INTERACTIVE
BRAINSTORMING FORMAT
How does one define global research? What
role should research managers play in improving
collaboration across global research? What are
the most likely changes to the global research
environment? What is expected of a leader in
this field? These questions and more will be
discussed in this interactive and structured
session.
INTERNATIONAL
NCURA’S INTERNATIONAL REGION:
OPPORTUNITIES THAT CAN PUT YOU
IN THE SPOTLIGHT AND ENHANCE
YOUR CAREER
How can chairing or serving on a volunteer
committee move you up the career ladder? Join
this discussion group to learn about
volunteerism and how your US colleagues use
opportunities in their professional society to
highlight their leadership ability, expand their
professional network, and grow their reputation
as a subject matter expert. Learn the best ways
in which to make your institution aware of your
acknowledged expertise and how your
connections with colleagues from around the
world can help them grow their own reputation.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn more about the nature
of global research and its future implications
for supporting grants.
• Participants will have at least 2 take home
messages about the importance and
significance of global research.
Prerequisites: Participants should have at least
5 years experience in Research Management
(pre- or post award) and some (but not
necessarily extensive) experience of funding
outside the US.
David Lauder, European Research Project
Manager, University of York
Denise Wallen*, Research Officer, College of
Education, Research Assistant Professor,
Language, Literacy & Sociocultural Studies,
Research Officer/Senior Fellow, RWJF Center
for Health Policy, The University of New Mexico
Eva Björndal, Team Leader, Post-Contract and
Financial Compliance Grants Office, Karolinska
Institutet
Jesse Szeto, Senior Manager, NCURA Global,
National Council of University Research
Administrators
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
45
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1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING POST-AWARD
OMB UNIFORM GUIDANCE: ADVANCED
TOPICS AND DISCUSSION
AGENDA
This will be a discussion and Q&A on the status of
specific and technical aspects of the OMB Uniform
Guidance implementation. The discussion leader will
have minimal prepared comments and the focus will
be on questions and issues raised by the
participants.
PRE-AWARD
Follow-up to Concurrent Session: Advanced Topics in
Contract Negotiations, held at 10:30 am
John Hanold*, Interim Director, Office of
Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State
University
ADVANCED TOPICS IN CONTRACT
NEGOTIATIONS
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
CREATING A CULTURE OF COMPLIANCE:
MANAGING RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT
AND COMPLIANCE FUNCTIONS IN THE
SAME OFFICE
Monday
8.11.14
David Kennedy*, Council on Governmental
Relations (COGR), Director, Costing Policy
Research Administrators at PUIs are tasked with
driving the research enterprise on campus through
"soft skills" while introducing and maintaining strict
compliance requirements mandated by federal
regulations. How to balance the two is increasingly
challenging, especially given the human and financial
resources allocated to their small offices. The
presentation will address specifically how to manage
and motivate faculty toward greater grant
productivity and concurrently identify workflow to
meet compliance regulations that may be perceived
by faculty as an undue burden.
Learning Objectives
• Participants will understand how to use research
administration methods to promote a compliance
oriented campus.
• Participants will understand how to inform or train
faculty of the compliance process
• Participants will learn how to manage different
compliance processes using multiple personnel in
the sponsored research office.
Prerequisites: Knowledge of research
administration compliance.
Delia Gallinaro*, Executive Director, Sam Houston
State University
From a management point of view, this presentation
will address:
• How staff resources can be allocated to meet dual
entrepreneurial and regulatory needs.
• The sponsored office's chain of command for
keeping up with the new and more complex
government concerns regarding scientific
oversight, industry-academic partnerships,
research objectivity and institutional integrity.
• How to create efficient compliance delivery
systems in a cost effective manner.
• Winning over faculty through customer service
and training.
• Creating areas of responsibilities that enhance
institutional efficiencies.
• Advocating for additional compliance-specific
financial resources with upper administration.
• Problem solving faculty compliance issues while
separating research interests that may benefit the
university.
• Other issues specific to PUIs that promote a
culture of compliance.
46
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:30 – 2:45 PM ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
CARBON AND SILICONE: INFORMATION
SYSTEMS AND THE SENIOR RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATOR
This session will target the Senior Research
Administrator interested in how best to leverage
information technology to improve research
administration operations. The discussion will
include panelists from two separate institutions
along with a Director from Huron's Higher
Education Technology practice. Each panelist
has been focused in some capacity on bringing
value to research operations and their research
community through the implementation of
technology. We will explore such question and
topic as:
Learning Objectives: This session is to provide
the audience with:
• A clearer picture of what types of
technologies and implementation projects
have proven be the most impactful
• Insight on lessons learned through experience
• Perspective on how best to succeed on
improving operations through the use of
technology.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
FULL
• Areas of challenge implementing technology
• Identifying the type of technology and/or
implementation that has had the most value
to organizations.
• Key lessons learned through past projects
• The road ahead.
Phil Infurna*, Director, Huron Consulting Group
Diane Baldwin, Assistant Vice President,
Sponsored Programs, Boston University
Marcia Smith, Associate Vice Chancellor,
Research Administration, University of
California-Los Angeles
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
2:45 – 3:00 PM ~ NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK
3:00 – 3:45 PM • REGIONAL BUSINESS MEETINGS
Open to all Annual Meeting participants, and led by the Region’s chairperson, the Regional Business
Meetings introduce current and incoming officers, describe ongoing initiatives and provide information
on the regional meetings and how you can get involved in your region!
REGION I, NEW ENGLAND
REGION V, SOUTHWESTERN
(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont)
(Oklahoma, Texas)
REGION II, MID-ATLANTIC
(Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York,
Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., West
Virginia)
REGION III, SOUTHEASTERN
(Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia,
Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North
Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Virgin Islands, Virginia)
REGION VI, WESTERN
(Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon,
Washington)
REGION VII, ROCKY MOUNTAIN
(Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New
Mexico, Utah, Wyoming)
REGION VIII, INTERNATIONAL REGION
REGION IV, MID-AMERICA
(Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan,
Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North
Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin)
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
47
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th
3:45 – 4:00 PM ~ NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK
ANNUAL
MEETING
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ SPARK SESSIONS
These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff and you will be able
to check out multiple topics in each time slot.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
4:00 – 4:20 PM
HOW TO MANAGE A BUDGET
Deanna Hendrickson*, Manager, Kennesaw State
University
4:30 – 4:50 PM
GENERAL GUIDANCE IN WRITING A
STATEMENT OF WORK
Lucien Finley*, Assistant Director, Sponsored
Projects, The University of Texas at Dallas
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
BIOMEDICAL O
EFFECTIVE PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT FOR
HOSPITALS AND ACADEMIC MEDICAL
CENTERS
The multi-faceted demands placed on researchers at
academic medical centers and hospitals present
unique challenges for faculty, administrators, and
their institutions. Planning is key to successful
proposal development in this arena. In this overview
session we will discuss strategies to keep the
proposal process on track. Key topics will include
communicating roles and responsibilities, identifying
and addressing bottlenecks, and successful
timeline development.
BIOMEDICAL O
TIME MANAGEMENT FOR THE BIOMEDICAL
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR
We work in a fast paced environment with
competing demands for our time and energy. At
Any given moment we may have to redirect our
energies due to an urgent demand. We have to
manage demands from multiple sources and
requiring divergent knowledge sets. Stress can be
almost crippling if we fall prey to those who demand
our talents and do not manage both them and
ourselves. Time management skills are necessary
tools for our individual toolkits to help maintain calm,
increase energy, meet and exceed any goals and
objectives and keep forward momentum.
48
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn strategies to plan and
manage proposal preparation and submission.
• Participants will gain an understanding of potential
barriers to success and how to manage these
barriers.
• Participants will learn how to effectively
communicate guidelines and deadlines.
• Participants will learn various helpful tips to aid in
preparing and submitting proposals.
Jane Tolbert*, Administrator, University of
Rochester
Lynette Nelson, Supervisor, St Jude Children's
Research Hospital
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be shown different methodologies
for time management.
• Participants will examine steps and techniques
that can help you maintain or regain control of
your time.
• Participants will also examine how you can
manage your interactions with your staff
and others.
• Participants will discuss the physical impact of
time management – understanding your personal
energy levels and the need to factoring this into
your daily map.
Randi Wasik*, Director of Administration and
Finance, University of Washington
Julie Guggino, Director, Research & Sponsored
Programs, Central Washington University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT A
"HOW MAY I SERVE YOU?" CHANGING
THE FOCUS FROM SERVICE TO
PROFESSION
We, research administrators, pride ourselves in
being professionals. We gather to improve
ourselves, expand our knowledgebase and to
promote our profession. Often times, we focus
on the service component of our profession with
job descriptions seeking "service oriented"
"customer focused" "client-driven" staff that also
happens to know how to deal with the
complexities of our industry.
Learning Objectives: This session seeks to
open a dialogue with Senior Research
Administrators on addressing the merits of
bringing the professional expertise and the
dedication to the field of research administration
to the forefront.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Shella Batelman*, Senior Grant Administrator,
Suffolk University
Pam B. Whitlock, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, University of North Carolina at
Wilmington (Emeritus)
Samantha J. Westcott, Manager, Sponsored
Projects Team, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
While no one wants a team of people unwilling
to be helpful, it is our knowledge, experience,
and professional skills that our institutions rely
upon. Emphasis on professionalism rather than
"servicing" might strengthen our position within
the institutional hierarchy and consequently
enhance our ability to perform at the highest
level of excellence with a greater professional
satisfaction.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT O
EMBRACING CHAOS, CHANGE,
CUSTOMER SERVICE & COMPLIANCE:
BUILDING INTEGRATED TEAMS AT HOME
AND ABROAD
Research Administration, whether you work in a
central office or a department sometimes feels
chaotic. Changes both internal and external
require administrators and teams to be
adaptable yet remain compliant. Demand for
"better" customer service seems to increase
when the chaos seems to be growing.
Balancing this chaos requires vigilance and
flexibility by the administrator and the team. This
session will explore tips and techniques for
building flexible integrated teams with the goal
of breaking down the internal and external silos
which hamper flexibility and slow down change.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
• Participants will gain an understanding of the
importance of a team approach to problem
solving in the context of research
administration.
• Participants will develop strategies for building
successful teams.
• Participants will begin to recognize potential
pitfalls to be encountered during
implementation.
Patrick Medina*, Director of Grants and
Contract Services, Research and Sponsored
Programs, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Bonniejean Zitske, Managing Officer, Research
and Sponsored Programs, University of
Wisconsin-Madison
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING COMPLIANCE
A
USING YOUR ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS TO
ASSIST IN FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE
MANAGEMENT
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Using electronic systems and spreadsheets to
efficiently and effectively manage the financial
reporting process and the closeout process for
sponsored research. Use of Metric Reports to
measure performance on meeting sponsor
requirements and performance accountability
from a central perspective.
COMPLIANCE I
GRANT ACCOUNTING ISSUES IMPACTING
PROPER AWARD CLOSEOUTS
The grant accounting operation exposes the
institution to considerable risk. At year-end, the fund
balances may be telling a story that is not being
acted on. Important functions such as billing, cash
application, and closeouts are critical to the
compliance success of the institution. Oftentimes,
the focus of compliance is on the day-to-day
transactions; however, the actual accounting for
those transactions and subsequent billing and
closeout expose the institution to the most risk. All
of these issues impact proper closeout of awards.
This session will demonstrate how front-end
financial transactions make the back-end closeout an
arduous task. The institution is exposed to cash
flow issues and financial compliance risks when
closeouts are not performed properly.
DEPARTMENTAL B
OFFICE POLITICS: TAMING THE 800 POUND
GORILLA IN THE ROOM
Politics exists in every organization and at every
level. It is inescapable. It is a game we all must play
in order to be successful and get "stuff" done. By
being political savvy you can gain access to
resources, information, and control outcomes.
It also allows you to build stronger relationships
with your investigators, your boss, and become
more effective.
Learning Objectives: Instead of being frustrated
with sponsored research electronic systems, learn
how to work with them to create efficiencies,
metrics and compliance transparencies.
Prerequisites: General knowledge of financial post
award sponsor requirements and related compliance
issues.
Evelyn Balabis*, Director, Post Award
Administration, Emory University
Nadia Kiklio, Manager, Attain, LLC
Melissa Kuskie, Sponsored Research Financial
Analyst, Emory University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to identify the source of
issues impacting proper award closeout.
• Participants will learn strategies to remedy the
financial compliance issues.
• Participants will see a demonstration of the
General Ledger Balance Sheet and Income
Statement Accounts that require ongoing
reconciliation.
Prerequisites:
• Interest in grant accounting and its impact on
financial operations.
• A basic understanding of key accounting terms
such as "accruals", "cash basis", "balance sheet
accounts", "income statement accounts", "deferred
revenue", and "revenue recognition".
Martin B. Smith*, Manager, Higher Education and
Academic Medical Centers, Attain, LLC
Mark C. Davis, Vice President & Partner, Higher
Education and Academic Medical Centers,
Attain, LLC
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand the importance of
building relationships and establishing a personal
power base in order to better perform your work.
• Participants will understand how power and
influence are related to communication,
negotiation and conflict resolution, and
organizational culture.
• Participants will be able to identify the elements of
managing yourself and others.
• Participants will develop political awareness of the
opportunities and pitfalls that affect our overall
success as a manager and leader.
Dwayne Lehman*, Research Administrator,
Carnegie Mellon University
Dennis J. Paffrath, Assistant Vice President for
Sponsored Programs Administration, University of
Maryland, Baltimore
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
DEPARTMENTAL A
COST TRANSFERS FOR THE
DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATOR: A
NECESSARY EVIL
What are some best practices to avoid cost
transfers? When a cost transfer is necessary,
what documentation is required? This session
will address the key issues departmental
administrators face concerning cost transfers
and the impact of non-compliance. This session
is interactive. The presenters will share real life
examples and encourage participants to do
the same.
FEDERAL U
INSTITUTIONAL EFFORTS TO REDUCE
ADMINISTRATIVE BURDENS ON FACULTY
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand the
responsibilities of the PI, DRA and Central
Administration in the area of cost transfers.
• Participants will understand the compliance
requirements for payroll and non-payroll cost
transfers.
• Participants will share best practices for
minimizing cost transfers.
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Debra Murray*, Director, Sponsored Projects
Financial Operations, Georgetown University
Janice Oakley, Manager, Office of Contract &
Grant Accounting, University of Maryland,
College Park
Jamie Szabo, Senior Fiscal Analyst, PostAward, University of Missouri-Columbia
Jim Luther*, Associate Vice President,
Research Cost Compliance, Duke University
Faculty administrative burden continues to be
identified as a significant issue facing
institutions. Research administrators and
institutional leadership are committed to
addressing but increasing regulatory burden and
significant change driven by events such as the
Uniform Guidance, make it a challenge. In this
session, we will focus on the recent
enforcement by several agencies on closeout
reporting requirements (all financial and
programmatic reports are due within 90 days
after the end of the award) and how one
university is revising/creating policies,
developing technology solutions, and
implementing training and monitoring to
respond to the impending enforcement. The
eRAD Closeout Project Team, and associated
Departmental Implementation Teams, are
focused on removing barriers to the closeout
process and providing improved service to
faculty throughout the life-cycle of the award.
INTERNATIONAL O
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CHALLENGES
IN GLOBALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH
Globalization of research brings about enhanced
challenges when negotiating disposition of
rights to intellectual property in research
agreements. Not only are the governing laws
and associated regulations differ by country, but
also the diverse cultures of the research
sponsors outside of the U.S. affect their
expectations and therefore the terms and
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand the basic
differentiating issues in regard to intellectual
property in global research agreements.
• Participants will be briefed on the primary
considerations when entering into research
agreements with foreign industrial sponsors.
• Participants will gain an understanding of how
the European Commission works with
intellectual property in international research
projects related to FP7 and the Horizon 2020
research and innovation programme.
> continued on next page
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING INTERNATIONAL
O
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CHALLENGES IN
GLOBALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH
(CONTINUED)
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
conditions of the award. While there is a shared aim
for discovery, dissemination, and application of
knowledge, the strategies to accomplish this may
vary greatly.
POST-AWARD I
MANAGING A LARGE AUDIT OR
INVESTIGATION
Any audit can present challenges. Audits are time
consuming, can present financial and reputational
risk, any may disrupt your funding stream. A large
audit or investigation is all that and more, requiring
extra steps to manage resources and best position
your institution for an accurate review. We will
emphasize the federal audit process, and focus on
specific audits in which we have participated.
PRE-AWARD O
LARGE RESEARCH PROPOSALS AND THE
PROCESS FOR SUCCESSFUL PROPOSALS
Penn State is doing a survey on "Large Proposals"
and whether coordination through specific "Large
Proposal Office" is a more effective and successful
structure than an informal structure in the Pre-Award
office. They would plan to discuss the survey at the
meeting and possibly share preliminary results from
pilot groups.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS B
UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FUNDING
SOURCES AT A PUI
This session will cover internal and external ways to
promote and support undergraduate research at
PUIs (Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions) and
ERIs (Emerging Research Institutions). Carolyn
Elliott-Farino, the Executive Director of the Office of
Research at Kennesaw State University, will provide
the PUI perspective, while Tricia Callahan, Director of
Proposal Development at Miami University, will talk
from the ERI perspective. Some of the better known
external sources to support undergraduate research
(such as NSF's RUI grant and NIH's AREA grant) will
be covered in depth. Also covered will be some
lesser known funding sources as well as ways to
support undergraduate research internally.
52
Alexandra McKeown*, Associate Vice Provost for
Research Administration, The Johns Hopkins
University
Troels Jacobsen, Director of Research, Research
and Innovation Department, University of Stavanger,
President of Norwegian Association for Research
Managers and Administrators (NARMA)
George McGuire, Member, Chairman Intellectual
Property Group, Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC
Gregory Slack, Director of Research and
Technology Transfer, Clarkson University
Learning Objectives: This session will assist you in
establishing a framework to manage a large audit or
investigation.
Prerequisites: Attendees should have hands-on
experience with one or more audits.
Jeffrey Silber*, Senior Director, Sponsored
Financial Services, Cornell University
Leslie L. Schmidt, Assistant Vice President for
Research, Office of Sponsored Programs, Montana
State University
Learning Objectives: The session will discuss best
practices for larger, complex proposal preparation.
Matthew J. Faris*, Director, Huron Consulting
Group
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to identify external
sources of funding specific to PUIs and ERIs.
• Participants will be able to interpret and apply the
RUI and AREA grant mechanisms.
• Participants will have the opportunity to share
what they are doing in terms of supporting
undergraduate research at their institutions.
Carolyn Elliott-Farino*, Director, Contracts and
Grants Administration, Kennesaw State University
Tricia Callahan, Director, Proposal Development,
Miami University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
BIOMEDICAL
MULTIPLE CAMPUS COLLABORATIONS/
BIOMEDICAL AND THE COLLEGE OF ARTS
AND SCIENCES
Wayne Brown*, Director of Finance, Rutgers,
The State University of New Jersey
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
How can universities inspire researchers to work
with their College of Arts and Sciences to
cultivate collaborations with various discipline on
Campus? With the growing demand to bring in
research dollars, it is vital that The College of Arts
and Sciences work with researchers to find
innovative research ideas from multiple campus
sources. What are our challenges? Why is this
necessary? Is it possible to unite multiple campus
units and the College of Arts and Sciences?
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
IS A CERTIFICATION PROGRAM RIGHT
FOR MY INSTITUTION?
It seems that creating certifications programs or
revamping current ones is the new "norm" in
research administration. While many
institutions are trying to jump on board before
getting left behind, there are numerous things to
consider before taking that initial plunge. This
will be an interactive session in which the
presenters will share experiences and best
practices from their institutions, as well as solicit
feedback from attendees to address issues of
concern, burning questions, and general advice
related to this topic.
COMPLIANCE
ALLOWABILITY OF COSTS - MANAGING
COMPLIANCE WITH COST STANDARDS
Anthony Ventimiglia*, Associate Director,
Auburn University
Vicki Krell, Assistant Director, Research
Advancement, Arizona State University Main
Bob Andresen*, Director of Research Financial
Services, University of Wisconsin
Every day we are asked the question: “Can I
charge this to my grant?” and every day we
answer: “It depends.” How do we keep track of
those expenses that we said are OK to direct
charge and how do we catch those questionable
expenses that try to sneak through? Join this
discussion to share your questions and ideas on
how to identify those expenses that raise red flags
with the sponsor and the auditor. Learn strategies
on how to monitor and document expenses.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING DEPARTMENTAL
STRATEGIES FOR BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS
WITH FACULTY
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
This session will discuss effective ways for
new research administrators to build relationships
with faculty, focusing on generational, cultural,
discipline and personality-based differences. The
three panelist will speak about their own unique
styles of interaction with their faculty at the
department, school and college-level. This session is
geared towards new research administrators, but
contains helpful insights for all.
FEDERAL
ARE YOU READY FOR THE UNIFORM
GUIDANCE: WHAT HAS YOUR INSTITUTION
DONE TO PREPARE?
Margaret Austin*, Associate Director, for Budget and
Administration, Syracuse University
Jennifer Rudes, Director, Sponsored Programs
Pre-Award & Clinical Trials Officer, The Research
Foundation of State University of New York Upstate
Medical University
Christina Deitz, Grant Development Administrator,
Maxwell School of Syracuse University
Michael Ludwig*, Associate Vice President for
Research Administration, University of Chicago
This session will be a discussion of what actions
Universities are taking to prepare for the
implementation of the Uniform Guidance. How are
others dealing with new Procurement requirements?
Terminal leave benefits? Effort reporting alternative?
These topics and other implementation
considerations will be discussed.
INTERNATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL/IMMIGRATION
ISSUES
Susan Sedwick*, Associate Vice President for
Research and Director, University of Texas at Austin
Visa export certifications, NASA’s China Rule,
and managing export issues in general are just a
few of the fun issues we deal with on a daily basis.
The current national security climate has made it
more challenging for international research
collaboration to happen. Increasingly inquiries are
being made by agents not only from the Federal
Bureau of Information but Immigration and Customs
Enforcement. This discussion group will facilitate
sharing of good practices and a few good horror
stories. The meek of heart should not attend.
POST-AWARD
THE F&A PROPOSAL PROCESS – TIPS
AND PITFALLS
Are you working on your first F&A proposal?
Second? Third? Are you responsible for preparing the
proposal? Did you get put in 'charge' of the space
survey? How do you know if you have calculated a
supportable rate? How do you measure success?
What are the 5-6 areas that you should spend the
most time working on? What are the stupid mistakes
you can avoid? When do you start working on the
proposal?
Learning Objectives:
This session will help identify the areas that an
Institution should be thinking about in regards to the
F&A proposal process. The panel will provide some
of their Tips and Pitfalls they've experienced. The
audience should be prepared to ask questions.
> continued on next page
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
POST-AWARD
THE F&A PROPOSAL PROCESS – TIPS
AND PITFALLS (CONTINUED)
If you want to learn the answer to these
questions and any other you have about the
proposal process this session is for you. A
panel of F&A experts will are ready to provide
answers, stories, suggestions, tips and pitfalls
about one of the most important and frustrating
projects you'll be involved on at a University,
Non-profit or Hospital.
Jim Carter*, Senior Director, Huron Consulting
Group
Brian Farmer, Senior Director, Academic
Affairs, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Michael R. Legrand, Director, Costing Policy &
Analysis, University of California-Davis
AGENDA
Monday
8.11.14
Ruthanne Porreca*, Assistant Dean of
Research Administration, Emory University
PRE-AWARD
STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFUL
PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS
Are tools and templates used, such as timelines
and budget templates, effective, consistent and
efficient? Are techniques, such as mock
reviews, valuable and helpful? This session will
be an interactive discussion of the pre-award
process and ways to streamline the process and
successfully develop quality applications. Come
prepared to share the tools and techniques used
by your institution.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
LEVERAGING DEPARTMENTAL
ADMINISTRATOR SUPPORT AT PUIs
At predominantly undergraduate institutions,
staff is often thin. However, there are often
administrators and others working within
departments and centers who have abilities to
provide at least some level of support for
proposal development and award management.
How do you/can you identify hidden talent
among departmental support? What training
might you provide? In what ways, can existing
staff at the department level be utilized to
support the research enterprise? Come discuss
and bring your ideas!
Learning Objectives:
Participants will be able to identify
administrators and support professionals who
can help support the sponsored research
enterprise. -Discuss how to creatively train and
leverage existing talent at the PUI.
Kris A. Monahan*, Director of Sponsored
Research and Programs, Providence College
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ APPY HOUR WITH HOW TO DOERS
Get acquainted with NCURA on Twitter, YouTube and Collaborate at the NCURA Social Media “Appy
Hour with How-To-Doers”. Join NCURA for quick social media tutorials, contests and even the
opportunity on How to Tweet sessions!
Join your fellow research administrators in spreading the wealth of knowledge by Tweeting what you
learn. Everyone that Tweets something that they learned from a session with #NCURAAM56
#AppyHour will have a chance to win one of three gifts!
Stephanie Moore*, Community Curator, National Council of University Research Administrators
6:00 PM ~ DINE AROUNDS
9:00 PM ~ REGIONAL HOSPITALITY SUITES OPEN
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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6:15 – 7:15 AM
7:30 AM – 5:00 PM
ANNUAL NCURA FUN RUN ~ POWER WALK
MEETING The day will start at 6:15 am at the Hilton’s main
AGENDA
entrance foyer on the lobby level for stretching.
Runners and walkers will then be provided with
maps and directions prior to departing the hotel at
6:30 am and returning around 7:15 am with plenty
of time left for participants to get ready before the
first session.
AM56 CONCIERGE
EXPOSITION 2014
7:30 – 8:15 AM
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLES
Grab your breakfast and join your community for some coffee and conversation!
COMPLIANCE COMMUNITY
COMPLIANCE CHALLENGES WITH THE NEW UNIFORM GUIDANCE
Anastacia Feldman, Financial Officer, MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab
DEPARTMENTAL COMMUNITY
ISSUES FACING DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATORS
Randi Wasik, Director of Administration and Finance, University of Washington
ERA COMMUNITY
ERA - SUGAR, SPICE AND EVERYTHING NICE?
Tuesday
8.12.14
Hosted by the eRA Committee
FRA COMMUNITY
GUIDANCE FOR FINANCIAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS
Julia Rodriguez, Grants and Contracts Administrator, University of Missouri - Columbia
GLOBAL COMMUNITY
GLOBAL FUNDING AND COLLABORATION
Amanda Snyder, Assistant Director, Sponsored Programs Administration, University of Maryland, Baltimore
Siegfried Huemer, Head of EU Research Support, Vienna University of Technology
PRE-AWARD COMMUNITY
IDENTIFYING FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
Nicole Derr, Contract & Grant Specialist, University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy
Jennifer Harman, Director of Sponsored Programs and Faculty Research, Nazareth College
PUI COMMUNITY
CHALLENGES ENCOUNTERED BY THE PUI OFFICE OF RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION
Andrea Moshier, Director of Sponsored Research, Western Carolina University
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM ~ NCURA MARKETPLACE
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ SPARK SESSIONS
These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff and you will
be able to check out multiple topics in each time slot.
8:15 – 8:35 AM
KEYS TO DEPARTMENTAL SUBAWARD
MONITORING
Jeanne Galvin-Clarke*, Manager, Sponsored
Programs Administration, University of
Maryland, Baltimore
8:45 – 9:05 AM
NEW ACCELERATED CLINICAL TRIAL
AGREEMENT
Brenda Kavanaugh*, Associate Director, Office
of Research and Project Administration,
University of Rochester
9:15 – 9:35 AM
AUTOMATING GRANTS MANAGEMENT
WITHOUT BREAKING THE BANK
Diane Barrett*, Senior Research Administration
Consultant, rSmart
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
BIOMEDICAL O
VIRTUAL DATA WAREHOUSES: WELCOME
TO THE NEW WORLD OF EMR AND DATA
SHARING IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH
APPLICATIONS
The massive amounts of data available via
electronic medical records and the requirement
of a data sharing plan for federal grants translate
to a host of issues that academic research
institutions need to address. This session will
focus on what to consider for data sharing
involving enterprise-wide EMRs. Topics will
include whether to include identifiable data,
privacy concerns, opt in vs. opt out, data integrity,
and how to ensure fundable grant applications.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT I
SPANNING THE DECADES: HOW TO PLAN
AND PERSONALIZE YOUR CAREER
Many of us "wandered" into our careers in
research administration without really knowing
how we got here, often remarking "this
opportunity came along and I took it." We all
know that career planning is important, but how
do you set the course for your career when you
are in your 20s, 30s, 40s, or 50s and beyond? A
panel of research administrators spanning these
decades will discuss strategies for setting your
career compass, navigating your career at each
stage, and mapping goals to achieve the best
results and keep you on your path to success.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understanding key issues to
consider when developing data sharing for
research applications.
• Participants will understanding how data
sharing is reviewed by the NIH.
• Participants will learn tips for vendor criteria to
consider when building and implementing a
data warehouse.
Prerequisites: Understanding of grant
requirements and basic clinical research
principles.
Tesheia Johnson*, Associate Director of
Clinical Research for Yale School of Medicine
COO, YCCI, Yale University
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn how
to advance their career by personalizing and
setting goals, regardless of where they are in
their careers.
Sue Kelch*, Senior Financial Specialist,
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
Michelle Schoenecker, Senior Proposal
Development Manager, University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Bonniejean Zitske, Managing Officer, Research
and Sponsored Programs, University of
Wisconsin-Madison
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
O
HOW TO DEVELOP AND CREATE A NCURA
YOUTUBE TUESDAY VIDEO
AGENDA
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT I
MOVING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION: FORMAL
AND INFORMAL METHODS
OF EVALUATION FOR STAFF
TRAINING PROGRAMS
Even the best training programs require care and
feeding. Ideally, evaluation plans are considered at
the design and implementation phases of each
program. Most of the time, evaluation is an
afterthought. Evaluation is a powerful tool that can
help managers keep a program relevant, make
changes when necessary and even support requests
for additional resources. We will address informal
and formal methods of evaluation, timing of
designing and implementing evaluation programs,
and setting the course for the future based on
results. We will provide tips for managing this when
time, budget and data retrieval are challenges.
Tuesday
8.12.14
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand the 10 basic
considerations/components that should
be present in plans for developing a
training program.
• Participants will learn the importance of evaluation
for training programs, and how to make the case
for doing this.
• Participants will learn informal and formal methods
of evaluation (including specific known
frameworks).
• Participants will learn how to establish evaluation
metrics.
• Participants will learn how to use the information
obtained to validate, improve, change (or even
eliminate) their program.
• Participants will learn how to view evaluation
results from an immediate and longitudinal
perspective.
• Participants will learn how to communicate the
results to stakeholders.
Andrea R. Ward Ross*, Assistant Dean, The Ohio
State University Main Campus
Tom Kornacki, Sponsored Programs and Research,
Bowling Green State University
Aimee Nielsen-Link, Director, Health Sciences
Office, Ohio State University
Karla Gengler-Nowak, Director of Business
Analytics & Research Reporting, The Ohio State
University College of Medicine
COMPLIANCE B
EFFORT REPORTING PRIMER
This effort reporting primer session will give an
overview of effort reporting, what it is, why it is
required, and how to best manage the process.
Additional time will be given to discussing what the
circulars have to say about effort, a background on
university audits concerning effort, the meaning of
institutional base salary, best practices, and roles
and responsibilities.
58
Tara E. Bishop*, Associate Executive Director,
National Council of University Research
Administrators
Kallie Firestone, Senior Compliance Specialist,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will leave with a clear understanding
of the effort reporting process.
• Participants will be able to use applied concepts to
ensure their university remains in compliance with
regulations.
• Participants will gain an understanding of effort
best practices.
James Goff*, Associate Director - Cost Analyst and
Reporting, Emory University
Josh Rosenberg, Director, Cost Studies,
Emory University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
DEPARTMENTAL I
NAVIGATING THE RAILS: TRAINING
GRANTS, NIH AND BEYOND
Despite their common presence within
academic institutions - the variability between
the many awards we call training grants is
significant. Generally they support a trainee and
some portion of their work. Beyond that? Well,
a departmental administrator can easily be
overwhelmed with the many requirements,
jargon and peculiarities of these awards.
Through a review of different types of training
grants from several federals sponsors (NIH,
HRSA, AHRQ) attendees will gain an
understanding of how best to navigate the
requirements and successfully manage their
awards while still maintaining their sense of
humor. Practical tools and resources will be
provided which administrators can put to use
immediately. Topics to be covered will include
proposal submission, appointment of trainees,
allowable uses of trainee funds, stipend
supplementation, and requesting carry forward.
FEDERAL U
NSF OIG AND DATA ANALYTICS
Presentation will cover NSF OIG audit planning,
approaches, communication, and automated
technologies for NSF operational and grant
oversight. Material will also cover the use of
data analytics and government-wide topics
being addressed in the Federal audit community.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain an understanding of the
broad array of training grants available from
the different DHHS funding organizations –
beyond NIH.
• Participant will be given the information they'll
need to be confident when faced with
reviewing, submitting and eventually
managing one of these unique training grants.
• Through the experience of the presenters and
their colleagues the participant will begin to
understand the complexity and diversity of
training grants.
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Prerequisites:
• Participant should hold a basic familiarity with
federal grant policies and procedures.
• Participant need not currently work with
training grants but should be familiar with their
purpose and intent.
Anthony Beckman*, Research Administrator,
University of Rochester
Wendy Lynn Roemer, Research Administrator,
University of Rochester
Learning Objectives:
• Participants should be able to describe the
NSF OIG approach to operational and grant
oversight.
• Participants should be able to assess the use
of data analytics.
• Participants should be able to identify current
topics being addressed in the Federal audit
community.
Brett Baker*, Assistant Inspector General for
Audit, National Science Foundation
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING INTERNATIONAL
O
TRANSATLANTIC (GLOBAL) FUNDING
DICTIONARY OR A PLAY ON WORDS IN AN
INFINITE NUMBER OF PARTS
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Why the need for a dictionary? Don’t we have
enough books already?
Vivian Holmes*, Director, Sponsored Research
Operations, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
David Lauder, European Research Project Manager,
University of York
Olaf Svenningsen, Head of Research Support
Office, University of Southern Denmark
In this session, you will learn precisely why a
dictionary can be helpful for both research
administrators and our faculty– not only in one
system, but globally. We use an example of a
talented Professor who has crossed from UK to
the US and is now looking for help with a major
grant application. We walk him through the entire
process from preparation through to compliance
and post-award management. The session will
explore the differences in terminology as well as
the very different cultural milieu in which research
support takes place on either side of the Atlantic
with the aim of taking the first steps towards the
production of a transatlantic and, ultimately, a global
funding dictionary.
And we do this in the form of a play! Come and
prepare to be astounded at the acting talents of the
presenters. You will also have the chance to
participate in this novel new project.
INTERNATIONAL O
HORIZON 2020: NEW SCIENTIFIC FUNDING
OPPORTUNITIES TO IMPROVE GLOBAL
RESEARCH EFFORTS
Horizon 2020 is the biggest EU Research and
Innovation Programme ever with nearly ⇔ 80 billion
of funding available over the next 7 years (2014 to
2020). It promises more breakthroughs, discoveries
and world-firsts by taking great ideas from the lab to
the market. By coupling research and innovation,
Horizon 2020 is helping to achieve this with its
emphasis on excellent science, industrial leadership
and tackling societal challenges. H2020 is open to
everyone, with a lean structure and simplified
procedures to encourage worldwide participation.
But H2020 is still a mega financial instrument with
many different funding schemes. The session will
focus on an update of the EU Framework
Programme, which first calls have already launched.
> continued on next page
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
INTERNATIONAL O
HORIZON 2020: NEW SCIENTIFIC FUNDING
OPPORTUNITIES TO IMPROVE GLOBAL
RESEARCH EFFORTS (CONTINUED)
An explicit attention will be given to the rules
for participation for US institutions and practical
advices on how to participate in an EU project
as a US institution. Participants will learn the
different programme types and funding
schemes in H2020 suitable best for US
institutions. The sessions aims to bring together
representatives of the US institutions interested
in trans-atlantic collaboration with
representatives of the European Commission,
European organizations and currently on-going
European research projects, both from the US
and EU. Our intention is to initiate a lively
discussion about personal experiences in EU
projects, ways to foster collaboration between
America and Europe, and coherence towards
the global challenges.
POST-AWARD A
OMB UNIFORM GUIDANCE: A SUMMARY
OF CHANGES AND STRATEGIES FOR
IMPLEMENTATION ON YOUR CAMPUS
The Uniform Guidance was issued on December
26, 2013, and it takes effect at the end of this
year. There has been analysis, interpretation,
and debate, as well as prolonged pondering
and many perplexed expressions about the
implications for universities and non-profits.
As NCURA, COGR, and FDP continue to work
with OMB and COFAR to develop a common
understanding of the Guidance, there has been
an evolving sense of what the document means
for our campuses. While we are still waiting to
see agency implementation plans, we are
actively developing strategies for application
of the Guidance to our quickly changing policies
and procedures. This session will discuss major
issues in the Guidance and provide news on
recent developments in the dialogue with
Federal agencies and OMB. In addition, the
panel will offer information about efforts to
manage the many changes that are necessary to
apply the Guidance to sponsored programs in
the coming months. Join us to discuss this
major change in research administration!
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be briefed about Horizon 2020
strategy and structure.
• Participants will learn programme types and
funding schemes suitable for US institutions.
• Participants will learn rules for participation for
US institutions.
• Participants will hear about personal
experiences and best practices of applying
and managing research projects from
representatives of both US and EU
institutions.
• Participants will debate about US - EU
cooperative efforts to tackle with global
challenges.
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Prerequisites: No prior knowledge on European
Framework Programmes is required.
Siegfried Huemer*, Head of EU Research
Support, Vienna University of Technology
Patricia A. Hawk, Director, Sponsored
Programs, Oregon State University
Ralf Koenig, The Austrian Research Promotion
Agency
Errol G. Levy, First Secretary, Research and
Innovation Deputy Head of the Science,
Technology and Education Section Delegation
of the European Union to the United States
of America
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain an understanding of the
major issues with the Uniform Guidance and
expected developments with it.
• Participants will learn about strategies to
manage institutional policies and implement
the Guidance.
Kim Moreland*, Associate Vice Chancellor,
Director/Research and Sponsored Programs,
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Mark Davis, Vice President & Partner, Higher
Education and Academic Medical Centers,
Attain, LLC
Cynthia Hope, Assistant Vice President for
Research & Director, Sponsored Programs,
The University of Alabama
Jeffrey Silber, Senior Director, Sponsored
Financial Services, Cornell University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING PRE-AWARD
A
AGENDA
A NEW WORLD FOR RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION – A CASE STUDY OF
EMORY’S MOVE FROM A TRADITIONAL
ORGANIZATION FOR THE SUPPORT OF
RESEARCH TO A SHARED SERVICES MODEL
Representatives from Emory University will share
and discuss their experiences as Emory transitioned
from a traditional model for research administration
support to a shared services model for research
administration. Early in 2013, Emory began to roll
out service center units to support research
throughout the University as the institution moved
from having hundreds of separate departments
handling research administration tasks to world
where they will eventually have only nine service
center units to provide these same services. Topics
discussed will include planning, change
management, training, challenges faced and many
other related topics.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS O
Tuesday
8.12.14
62
STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR YOUR PUI
SPONSORED RESEARCH OFFICE: FACING
THE FUTURE
Change happens. But controlled change is better
than reactionary change – seeing where the current
takes you – or spontaneous change initiated by
someone else. Planning strategically should ideally
cover all the activities, services and resources that
the SRO is engaged in, support the effective use of
its current resources while making the case for
increases if necessary, and rely on and stretch the
training and skills of the staff. Even with the best
planning, though, anticipated challenges arise:
people leave, administrators change, institutional
initiatives begin, proposal- and award-related
adventures distract. But when planning happens,
should (can?) the personal and professional goals,
aspirations and intentions of the SRO staff be
considered? While retirements may be predictable,
many life events are not. Can someone's hope for
increased responsibility be built into the plan so as to
avoid losing them to a promotion in another
department or institution? How might personal
considerations be utilized to positively affect the
quality of the SRO's activities? These are questions
that can be even more complex at PUIs where
offices may be dependent on just one or two
employees. This interactive session will explore
strategies for answering these questions and will
look at both the practical and personal sides of
strategic planning.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will have an understanding about this
new model for research administration support.
• Participants will have an understanding of the
process to move from a traditional research
administration support model to a service center
unit model.
• Participants will have an understanding of the
challenges faced during this process and how
Emory addressed them.
Prerequisites: General understanding of research
administration support.
Kerry Peluso*, Associate Vice President for
Research Administration, Emory University
Kathleen Bienkowski, Associate Vice President for
Research Administration Services, Emory University
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn
strategies for:
• developing a holistic view of strategic planning.
• building a strategic plan that is size and staff
appropriate.
• approaching strategic planning from a proactive
rather than a reactive perspective.
Martin Williams*, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, William Paterson University
Angela Rochat, Director of Sponsored Research &
Federal Relations, Fort Lewis College
Roger Wareham, Director, Grants Development,
University of Minnesota, Morris
Shannon Sutton, Director, Sponsored Projects,
Western Illinois University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS B
CROWDFUNDING—A MATTER FOR
SPONSORED RESEARCH OFFICES?
Crowdfunding is a recent phenomenon where a
large number of contributors pool small individual
donations to support a project in which they
share a common interest. Crowdfunding is used
to support a wide variety of activities including
disaster relief, research, art projects, films,
games, music, technology, and startup
companies. Faculty, staff and students from
many institutions have utilized crowdfunding web
sites to raise funds to support a wide range of
projects that typically fall outside the usual
funding channels. Crowdfunding is also a new
way of engaging the public in higher education.
This form of research support raises many
questions for research administrators. How to
deal with these "unregulated" funds? Should they
be treated as grants or gifts? If treated as gifts,
how do these projects affect such concerns as
ethical and financial compliance across campus?
Should the SRO be involved in the crowdfunding
projects at all? These questions and more will be
discussed as we explore the potentials and the
pitfalls in this new territory of sponsored projects.
Two models developed by two separate
institutions will be presented as examples of
administering "crowd-funded" projects.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn the definition of
crowdfunding and receive an introduction to
models that may be useful for supporting
university activity.
• Participants will understand what types of
activities might be best supported through
crowdfunding.
• Participants will understand the particular
fundraising and compliance challenges that
may arise in crowd-funded projects.
• Participants will discuss the role of the
sponsored research office, if any, in
administering crowdfunding projects.
• Participants will gain familiarity with two
different models of administering.
crowdfunding projects at the university level
• Participants will see an example of a
university project seeking crowdfunding
support.
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Patience Graybill*, Research Administrator, PreAward, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Dave Reed, Vice President for Research,
Michigan Technological University
Jerry Weinberg, Associate Provost for
Research and Dean, The Graduate School,
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
BIOMEDICAL
WHAT IS PCORI? PATIENT-CENTERED
OUTCOMES RESEARCH INSTITUTE
As research administrators, in order to effectively
manage the lifecycle of a grant, it behooves us to
know as much about the organizations that we
apply to as possible. In this session we will
introduce PCORI, Patient-Centered Outcomes
Research Institute; defining who and what PCORI
is, reviewing their mission and vision, and
exploring the various intricacies of applying to this
organization. Specifically, we will discuss their
application process and online submission
system, award terms and conditions, budget
restrictions, and contract execution.
Lindsey Demeritt*, Assistant Manager,
Sponsored Projects Team, Children's Hospital,
Los Angeles
Faith Thurmond, Business Administrative
Associate, College of Applied Health Sciences,
University of Illinois at Chicago
Lori Walker, Grants and Contract Officer,
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Hector Jimenez, Unified Administrator,
Yeshiva University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING BIOMEDICAL
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN CLINICAL
TRIALS
AGENDA
With the increased complexity of clinical trials,
increased scrutiny placed on the financial
management of both federally and industry
sponsored trials, and the bottom line impact on the
institutions, the management of clinical trials has
become difficult for all administrators on campus.
As research administration becomes more highly
specialized, understanding how to manage a clinical
trial from inception (budget, payment schedules
billing process) to the closeout (hospital costs,
final bills, audit, etc.) is critical. This discussion
will give attendees an opportunity to exchange
challenges/solutions in the clinical trial day-to-day
financial management, as well as get input from
some experts in the room on running those
trials successfully.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
COLLABORATIONS WITH HSI, TCU, MSI,
HBCU AND OTHERS
Tuesday
8.12.14
F. John Case*, Senior Vice President for Operations
and Chief Financial Officer, Morehouse School of
Medicine
While the policies and regulations of research
administration apply to all of us, universities have
specific needs depending on their size, type and
focus. This discussion group will focus on minority
institutions and provide an interactive environment
to discuss needs and best practices to enhance
office infrastructure, staff training and professional
development, and strategies to collaborate with
other institutions. We will encourage discussion
about existing models across all NCURA regions
and an exploration of the ways to encourage,
support and sustain networking amongst
minority institutions.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
GOING OFF THE GRID: THE IMPORTANCE
OF AVOIDING BURNOUT BY LEARNING
TO DELEGATE
Learning Objectives: Sharing experience and
increasing motivation to expand the network for
professional development and collaboration amongst
minority institutions.
Samantha Westcott*, Manager, Sponsored
Projects Team, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
Denise Wallen, Research Officer and Senior
Fellow; Research Assistant Professor, University of
New Mexico
Josie Jimenez, Associate Director, Office of Grants
and Contracts, New Mexico State University
Leslie Schmidt, Assistant Vice President for
Research, Office of Sponsored Programs, Montana
State University
Kathleen Larmett*, Executive Director, National
Council of University Research Administrators
Stress continues to be a major cause of illness in the
workplace, and yet, many of us in senior level
positions seem to have a problem letting go of it.
As technology shrinks our world, some of us feel we
are never really out of the office; we carry it with us
wherever we go. We are always on call and, at
times, wonder why we bother with vacation when
our staff continues to email us. Why are we reading
email on vacation? Why are we texting in the
elevator? Why does the flight attendant need to tell
us to close our laptop? Can burnout be far behind?
Let’s find out! Come on in and turn off your iPhone,
close your iPad and your laptop and let’s talk.
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
COMPLIANCE
ANIMAL SUBJECTS RESEARCH:
WORKING CONSTRUCTIVELY WITH OUR
CRITICS
Bill Greer*, Compliance Manager, The
Pennsylvania State University
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
This session will address animal subjects
research, specifically as it relates to institutional
efforts to engage respectfully with the animal
rights community, while at the same time
protecting our facilities from extremist threats.
DEPARTMENTAL
SUCCESSION PLANNING FOR THE
DEPARTMENT RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATOR
Beth Seaton*, Director of Research
Administration, Northwestern University
When the department research administrator
leaves for a different job or happens to retire,
there is often no one in the "pipeline" to fill that
role--leaving the department without research
administration help for a period of weeks or
even months. What can managers do to ensure
there is a plan for succession? What can you do
to ensure there will be someone capable of
taking your place should you be planning to
retire or move on to another post? Come to
discuss the problems associated with
departmental vacancies and effective strategies
to avoid potential disasters.
FEDERAL
FDP: MOVING ON TO PHASE VI The Federal
Demonstration Partnership (FDP) is an association
of federal US agencies, academic research
institutions with administrative, faculty
and technical representation, and research policy
organizations that work to streamline the
administration of federally sponsored research.
FDP members of all sectors cooperate in
identifying, testing, and implementing new, more
effective ways of managing federal research grants
with the goal of improving the productivity of
research without compromising its stewardship.
This session should be of global interest as it will
provide a model by highlighting successful
demonstrations and projects accrued through the
work of the FDP over the past 25+ years and
insights into current and planned initiatives.
Susan Sedwick*, Associate Vice President for
Research and Director, University of Texas at
Austin
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING POST-AWARD
CLOSING OUT AN AWARD – WHAT WORKS
AND PITFALLS TO BE AWARE OF
AGENDA
Closeout is the process in which a sponsor
determines all applicable administrative actions have
been completed by the recipient. The timely
closeout of an award is important in order to meet
the obligations of the award. This discussion session
will serve as a platform for colleagues to discuss and
share ways of closing out an award.
The panel will share their insights and tips for
closeout. Participants are encouraged to bring their
ideas, tips and tools. In addition, participants will
find the information useful and possibly apply the
tips and tools to their environment. We encourage
you to bring your lessons learned and success
stories to share with your colleagues.
PRE-AWARD
HELPFUL TIPS FOR GETTING THE PROPOSAL
OUT THE DOOR
Tuesday
8.12.14
Rosemary Madnick*, Director, Office of Grants and
Contracts Administration, University of Alaska,
Fairbanks
Andrew Gray, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
This session will share best practices for getting a
quality product out the door in sufficient
time to meet the submission deadline, while adhering to
all the sponsor's requirements. Specific topics to be
discussed include proposal preparation, review, approval
and submission processes, incentivizing investigators to
submit their applications in a timely manner, internal
technical review and feedback activities and leadership.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
CONSIDERING AND IMPLEMENTING BEST
PRACTICES (FROM AN R1) IN A SMALL
RESEARCH INSTITUTION: REVIEW OF RISK,
POLICY, RESPONSIBILITY, IMPLEMENTATION
AND MONITORING
Tolise Miles*, Senior Grants & Contracts
Specialist,Grants and Contracts Administration and
Finance, Children's National Medical Center
Cherri Helms, Director, Sponsored Programs
Administration, Towson University
Mary E. Schmiedel, Associate Dean for Research
Administration & Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, Georgetown University
Jared Littman*, Director, Office of Grants and
Sponsored Research, St. John's University
Have you or do you need to implement a policy or
procedure where the best samples are mostly from
larger institutions? How do you, as a PUI, keep the
integrity of the "best practice" and harmonize it with
your campus environment, while balancing risk and
resources; defining roles and responsibilities;
obtaining proper buy-in, and implementation with an
ongoing monitoring plan? Come share your
successes and lessons learned to implement
successful "best practices" with your PUI
community colleagues.
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:15 – 9:45 AM ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION
David Richardson*, Associate Vice Chancellor
for Research and Director of Sponsored
Programs, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign
Simon Kerridge, Director, Research Services,
University of Kent
FULL
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
9:45 – 10:15 AM ~ NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK
9:45 – 10:15 AM ~ GET CONNECTED AND GET INVOLVED FAIR!
NCURA COLLABORATE COMMUNITIES
Colleagues from NCURA’s Collaborate Communities will be available to talk with you and answer
questions on the front terrace. This is a perfect opportunity to learn about the different facets of NCURA’s
Communities and how to get involved TODAY. Grow your peer network…visit the Get Connected and
Get Involved Fair throughout the Conference!
10:15 – 11:45 AM ~ SPARK SESSIONS
These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff and you will
be able to check out multiple topics in each time slot.
10:15 – 10:35 AM
10 STEPS TO FOLLOW WHEN
CONTACTING A SPONSOR
Jo Ann Smith*, Director, Graduate Programs in
Research Administration, University of Central
Florida
10:45 – 11:05 AM
WHAT’S MY SOCIAL FINGER-PRINT
Rashonda Harris*, Associate Director,
Research Accounting Services, Temple
University
11:15 – 11:35 AM
MEETING FEDERAL DATA SHARING
REQUIREMENTS
Linda Detterman*, Assistant Director,
Collection Delivery, ICPSR - University of
Michigan
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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10:15 – 11:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
ANNUAL
MEETING BIOMEDICAL
O
BEST PRACTICES: SUBMISSION AND
MANAGEMENT OF NIH K-AWARDS AND
TRAINING GRANTS
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
NIH Career (K) awards and Training Grants (T, F)
provide valuable opportunities for developing the
new generation of scientific researchers. However,
the submission and management of these awards
present unique challenges. In this session we will
review key aspects, and share best practices, for
application preparation and post-award
management.
BIOMEDICAL O
CLINICAL TRIALS BUDGET DEVELOPMENT
AND MANAGEMENT
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain an understanding of the
submission and management of the various
NIH career developments and training awards.
• Participants will become familiar with key
aspects of institutional training grant application
and management.
• Participants will learn how to guide junior faculty,
post-docs and graduate students through the
application process for individual career awards
and fellowships.
Jane Tolbert*, Administrator, University of
Rochester
Glenda Bullock, Manager of Business Operations,
Washington University in St. Louis
Govind Narasimhan*, Director of Research
Finance, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer
Center
The session will offer an overview of clinical trial
budgets and issues associated with the fiscal
management of clinical trials. The session will
discuss cost considerations that support the
development of a clinical trial budget, post award
and financial management of clinical trials including
close out.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT B
HOW NCURA MEMBERS CAN COLLABORATE
ON COLLABORATE! – NCURA’S
PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING PLATFORM
Stephanie M. Moore*, Community Curator,
National Council of University Research
Administrators
This session will serve as an introduction to help
members understand and maximize the
opportunities that are available with NCURA’s
professional networking platform,
COLLABORATE.Come and take this opportunity to
explore the possibilities of the great networking
features on Collaborate.
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:15 – 11:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
COMPLIANCE I
CASE STUDIES IN RESEARCH ETHICS:
AN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE The proper
conduct and reporting of research is
of paramount importance to our institutions.
Noncompliance can result in severe penalties to
the organization, the individual(s), and their
reputations. The modern definition of research
misconduct however, in the context of
responsible conduct of research training,
reflects an evolution of hundreds of years of
social and ethical issues that have arisen in the
practice of scientific research. What may have
been acceptable practice a century ago may
be considered unacceptable practice by today's
standards. An examination of the global history
of biology, chemistry, physics and medicine
provides some insightful examples of both
responsibly and irresponsibly conducted
research by many famous scientists. In this
highly interactive session, participants will
become familiar with an international case
history of research misconduct and will engage
in discussion of how these prominent cases
have shaped contemporary perspectives on the
responsible conduct of research.
DEPARTMENTAL I
FINDING A-110 IN THE OMB UNIFORM
GUIDANCE: STILL YOUR BLUEPRINT TO A
FEDERALLY COMPLIANT INSTITUTION
This highly interactive session is aimed at both the
new and more experienced research administrator
as we focus on the old and the new OMB
administrative requirements facing us at the end
of this year. For the new administrator, we will
provide an introduction to many of the circular's
definitions and pre- and post-award requirements.
For the experienced administrator, we will
emphasize what's new in the Omnicircular and
follow-up with discussion and analysis of key
sections. At the end of the session, participants
will better understand how these basic standards
affect institutional sponsored program policies,
procedures and practices.
FEDERAL U
NIH UPDATE
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to describe a variety
of famous cases involving ethical issues in
research and apply modern RCR standards to
better assess and work through those issues.
• Participants will discuss the relevant rules and
regulations of modern RCR standards and the
ethical principles and cases that justify current
institutional compliance policies.
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Prerequisites: A basic working knowledge and
fundamental understanding of responsible
conduct of research.
Tony Onofrietti*, Director, Research Education,
University of Utah
NOTE: This is a highly interactive session using
a wireless audience response system to engage
participants, evaluate feedback and formulate
group consensus on a variety of ethical issues
and questions.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn some of the basics of
the Office of Management and Budget's
Uniform Administrative Requirements for
Federal Awards.
• Participants will understand how the circular's
guidance relates to their own institution's
administration of sponsored programs.
Cheryl Williams*, Associate Director, Office of
Research and Project Administration, University
of Rochester
Krista Carmichael, Senior Sponsored Research
Administrator, Harvard University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn about NIH budget
priorities.
• Participants will learn about the evolution of
new policies.
• Participants will gain insight of the current
issues at NIH.
Michelle Bulls*, Director, Office of Policy for
Extramural Research Administration (OPERA),
National Institutes of Health
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
69
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10:15 – 11:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING INTERNATIONAL
O
INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS -- COMPLIANCE
WITH THE NEW OMB UNIFORM GUIDANCE
IN CROSS-BORDER PROJECTS
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
This discussion-oriented session focuses on how
the new OMB Circular will affect financial and
administrative compliance in federally funded foreign
projects and collaborations. For example, unique
costs in international projects include, among others,
foreign housing and living expenses, value added
taxes, consular and visa fees, currency fluctuation,
relocation, security, and severance payments to foreign
nationals. The session will include considerable
opportunity for questions from, discussion with, and
sharing of experiences by, the audience.
POST-AWARD B
IMPLEMENTATION OF NIH SUBACCOUNTING
This session will discuss the NIH transition from a
pooled draw to a Sub Account (Award by Award)
draw. The presentation will discuss the challenges
for both central administration as well as department
research administrators during the transition process.
The key topics will include account transition issues,
FFR reporting, final draw timing, subcontracts,
invoicing, and increased workload. There will be time
for questions and discussion about how other
institutions are managing the transition.
POST-AWARD U
NSF'S HIGHER EDUCATION R&D
SURVEY UPDATE
This session will provide an update on the
latest data available from the NSF Higher Education
R&D Survey, a survey of academic institutional R&D
expenditures. We will also discuss planned changes
to the survey's field of research taxonomy.
PRE-AWARD B
EXPLORING THE ALPHABET SOUP OF
NON-TRADITIONAL AGREEMENTS: CDAs,
MTAs, DUA, MOUs, CA, TAs
Are you interested in learning the meaning behind
all of the acronyms that go into making the alphabet
soup of non-traditional agreements? If you are,
then this is the session for you. Many nontraditional agreements needed to facilitate research
do not involve a monetary award, but the terms and
conditions of these agreements are critical in
ensuring that an institution's, and its faculty's,
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn to
appreciate how the new OMB Circular may
influence the financial and administrative
management of transnational projects.
William Ferreira*, Counsel, Hogan Lovells
Janet Simons*, Director, Research Policy,
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Marta Thompson, Associate, Hogan Lovells
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be given an overview of the
current DHHS transition plan.
• Participants will learn about the potential
challenges to the university community.
• Participants will explore the need for staffing and
systems changes to accommodate
the transition.
Prerequisites: Participants should have a general
understanding of institutional financial systems, cash
management and reporting.
Krystina Gross*, Manager, Washington University
in St. Louis
Nicole Nichols, Research Administrator,
Washington University in St. Louis
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn the types of data available
on R&D spending within universities.
• Survey respondents will learn about upcoming
changes to the survey.
Ronda Britt*, Survey Statistician, National Science
Foundation
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand the meaning behind
the acronyms and characteristics of each
agreement.
• Participants will recognize circumstances in which
non-traditional agreements are needed and
identify the most appropriate type of agreement
to use.
• Participants will identify key issues to be
considered when drafting and negotiating the
different types of agreements.
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:15 – 11:45 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
PRE-AWARD B
EXPLORING THE ALPHABET SOUP OF
NON-TRADITIONAL AGREEMENTS: CDAs,
MTAs, DUA, MOUs, CA, TAs (CONTINUED)
Marjorie Forster*, Assistant Vice President for
Research and Global Health Initiatives,
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Amanda Miller, Manager, Contracts, The
University of Texas at Dallas
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
rights are protected. The main objectives of this
session are to first teach participants the meaning
behind the acronyms and characteristics of each
agreement. Second we want to explain why it is
important for you as a research administrator to
understand the importance and significance of
putting these types of agreements in place at your
institution. We will explore how these agreements
can protect you, your institution and faculty,
particularly in the areas of intellectual property,
data ownership, liability, and material transfers.
In addition, we will discuss the circumstances
under which institutions may want to expand their
collaboration with other entities and outline the
types of agreements that should be used in
those situations.
PRE-AWARD I
PROPOSAL SUBMISSION: THE GOOD, THE
PRACTICAL AND THE POSSIBLE
This session will review proposal submission
considerations for research administrators when
things are good (you have all the time in the
world); when you have to concentrate on the
practical (you are short on time); and what
should be possible (no matter how much time
you have). The discussion will focus on budget
development and authorization, but will include
general proposal techniques and timeline
considerations. The panel will include
perspectives from the department, college, and
central office level.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS I
THE ROLE(S) OF THE PUI SPONSORED
RESEARCH OFFICER IN CONSORTIA
AND COLLABORATIONS
At predominantly undergraduate institutions,
partnerships and collaborations are essential
to creating and sustaining a robust research
program. Increasingly grant guidelines explicitly
suggest the creation of consortia to expand
the impact of federal research dollars. Costconscious universities are also looking to
streamline research operations through
collaborations. Such consortia and collaborations
have a long history in educational programs but
have been undertaken on an ad hoc basis with
research. In the midst of these forces, what can
a research administrator do to help identify, create
and sustain consortia and collaborations?
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn how to identify good,
practical and possible techniques for proposal
development and submission based on the
time allowed.
• Participants will gain an understanding of how
to prioritize proposal development tasks and
identify potential road blocks to successful
proposal submission.
Jennifer Rudes*, Director, Sponsored Programs
Pre-Award & Clinical Trials Officer, The Research
Foundation of State University of New York
Upstate Medical University
Christina Deitz, Grant Development Administrator,
Maxwell School of Syracuse University
Margaret Austin, Associate Director for Budget
and Administration, Syracuse University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand how PUIs can
create and leverage collaborations to best
advantage.
• Participants will increase their knowledge of
the strategies used to create and sustain of
collaborations at PUIs.
• Participants will expand their network of
resource people who can aide you when you
return to your campus.
Joseph McNicholas*, Director, Office of
Research and Sponsored Projects, Loyola
Marymount University
Crist Khachikian, Associate Vice President for
Research, California State University, Northridge
Joann Waite, Director of Sponsored Research
& Programs, Gonzaga University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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10:15 – 11:45 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
ANNUAL
MEETING BIOMEDICAL
NEVER A DULL MOMENT: THE EVOLUTION OF
CLINICAL RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN
ACADEMIC MEDICAL CENTERS
AGENDA
Clinical research administration is a dynamic and
challenging professional path. As research
administrators, we see guidance, regulations, and
institutional priorities evolving as we try to address
the needs of investigators for effective and efficient
management of their increasingly complex clinical
and translational research portfolio. How do we stay
ahead of this learning curve? What training and
support needs do we have for our own professional
growth, and how do we ensure proper oversight
required with high-impact clinical studies? This
discussion session will highlight some of the
contemporary issues we all face when supporting
the work of faculty, including realigning resources
and promoting adherence to ‘best practices’ in
human research. Through a variety of case studies,
and sharing of our own professional experiences, we
will explore possible solutions to the daily challenges
of clinical research administration.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Tuesday
8.12.14
Jamie Caldwell*, Director, Office of Research
Services for the Health Sciences Health Sciences
Division, Loyola University Chicago
SUCCESSFUL MANAGING AND MENTORING:
KEEP THE BEST AND THE BRIGHTEST IN
TOUGH TIMES
To be a good leader you must learn to effectively
manage your team or run the risk of losing valuable
people. We have gathered a team of senior
administrators who will teach you how to motivate,
inspire and encourage your staff. They will share
their personal experiences that have helped them
to thrive as supervisors, and help steer you away
from fail practices. Learn how to reach goals and
contribute to the success of your organization by
understanding what your role is, as a manager.
This session will provide tools and techniques
that can be used in your day-to-day routine.
Tolise Miles*, Senior Grants & Contracts
Specialist,Grants and Contracts Administration and
Finance, Children's National Medical Center
Anne Albinak, Senior Administrative Manager,
Johns Hopkins University
Mary L. Healy, Associate Director, Research
Administration, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences,
Johns Hopkins University
Dennis J. Paffrath, Assistant Vice President for
Sponsored Programs Administration, University of
Maryland, Baltimore
David K. Smelser, Assistant Director of Sponsored
Programs, University of Tennessee
Pim Thukral, Vice President, Financial Accounting
and Systems, Georgetown University
Pamela M. Valentine, Director, Research Support
Services, University of Memphis
COMPLIANCE
COMPLIANCE WITH FEDERAL POST-AWARD
ADMINISTRATION POLICIES AND
PROCEDURES
Developing standard office procedures to comply
with the federal post award policies can be
challenging. This discussion will cover the
challenges many institutions face in adhering to the
policies and identify key controls that need to be in
place to ensure compliance including special terms
and conditions, financial and letter of credit (LOC)
reporting, invoicing, collections, cost transfers,
> continued on next page
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:15 – 11:45 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
COMPLIANCE
COMPLIANCE WITH FEDERAL POSTAWARD ADMINISTRATION POLICIES AND
PROCEDURES (CONTINUED)
Kim Garrison*, Director of Post-Award,
University of Pennsylvania
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
subcontract financial monitoring, Research
Performance Progress Report (RPPR)
submissions and audits. Participants are
encouraged to bring questions and or share
scenarios and best practices from their own
experiences in developing and or implementing
post award compliance policies
and procedures.
DEPARTMENTAL
SUBRECIPIENT MONITORING: IT ALL
BEGINS WITH COMMUNICATION
Subrecipient Monitoring is a shared
responsibility between both departmental and
central administrators. It takes understanding
who will be responsible for what aspects of
administering the subaward. In this discussion
group, we'll share some basic business
practices for subrecipient monitoring. Come
prepared to share your experiences, what
worked and didn't work and lessons learned.
FEDERAL
REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE
BURDEN TASK FORCE
Louise G. Davis*, Compliance Specialist, Office
of Research Administration, University of
Maryland, College Park
Tamara N. Lucas, Specialist, Contracts and
Grants, University of Maryland, Baltimore
Arthur Bienenstock*, National Science Board
Member; Professor of Photon Science,
Stanford University (Emeritus)
The National Science Board's Task Force on
Administrative Burdens was created in December
2012 and charged with examining the
administrative burden imposed on federally
supported researchers. The Task Force, made
up of current and former vice-presidents for
research and university professors, engaged in
data collection efforts in the spring of 2013.
Through a request for information and a series
of roundtable discussions, investigators were
asked to identify which Federal agency and
institutional requirements contribute most to
their administrative workload and to offer
recommendations for reducing that workload.
The responses received represent the views of
roughly 3,400 investigators, university
administrators, and organizations. The Task
Force's findings, the National Science Board's
recommendations and future activities will
be discussed.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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10:15 – 11:45 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING INTERNATIONAL
CHALLENGES TO ESTABLISHING
COLLABORATIONS WITH INTERNATIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Tiina Berg*, Senior Research Funding Advisor,
University of Helsinki
David J. Mayo, Director of Sponsored Research,
California Institute of Technology
Law, language, business culture, and a host of other
issues can create challenges when trying to
establish a collaboration with a partner outside your
country’s borders. Participants in this session will
share some of the challenges they have
encountered as well as solutions they have devised.
POST-AWARD
DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS WITH OUR
GRANT PARTNERS - INTERNAL AND
EXTERNAL TO OUR ORGANIZATION
This session will examine the sometimes difficult
conversations that we need to have with our grant
partners, internal and external to our organization.
The session will also demonstrate to participants the
utilization of management monitoring techniques to
identify trends; ensure efficient operations; take
corrective actions, and sometimes playing the role of
"Good Cop and Bad Cop".
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will develop an understanding of
an effective communication strategy with our
grant partners
• Participants will identify important financial,
operational and compliance trends
• Participants will provide tools to monitor and
manage vital post award functions
• Participants will discuss escalation and
enforcement activities
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of post-award
management.
Richard Blair*, Director, Extramural Funds,
University of California-San Francisco
PRE-AWARD
THE MEAT AND POTATOES OF
RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT
Over the past several years, we have seen
significant growth in research development
programs and the benefits this service provides to
growing the scholarly and research enterprise. In
this session, we will dive into the meat and potatoes
of research development and focus on opportunistic
areas that you can take back to your institutions.
Now and looking ahead, we are facing a tough
funding environment and we need to leverage our
resources to get the biggest bang for the buck!
Vegetarians are encouraged to attend.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
Follow-up to Concurrent Session: Strategic Planning
for Your Sponsored Research Office: Facing the
Future, held at 8:15 am
STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR YOUR
SPONSORED RESEARCH OFFICE:
FACING THE FUTURE
Learning Objectives: In this session, we will
discuss:
• Finding funding sources/opportunities and
education of Faculty (certifications, faculty
workshops.)
• Funding dissemination (Research websites,
newsletters, social media, etc.)
• Communication (Networking events,
Studios/Coffee talks/Research week, etc.)
Erica Gambrell*, Coordinator of Research Services,
University of Alabama
Marc Haon, Research Services Advisor,
Auburn University
Kirsten Yehl, Administrative Director, Northwestern
University
Martin Williams*, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, William Paterson University
Angela Rochat, Director of Sponsored Research &
Federal Relations, Fort Lewis College
Roger Wareham, Director, Grants Development,
University of Minnesota, Morris
Shannon Sutton, Director, Sponsored Projects,
Western Illinois University
This discussion session will provide participants
from the current session to discuss and consider
how to effectively incorporate personal
considerations in their strategic planning.
74
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
11:45 AM – 1:15 PM ~ LUNCHEON AND VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION
1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ SPARK SESSIONS
These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff and you will
be able to check out multiple topics in each time slot.
1:15 – 1:35 PM
HOW TO STAY SANE DURING F&A
PROPOSAL PREPARATION
Mira Levine, Manager, Higher Education
Practice, MAXIMUS
1:45 – 2:05 PM
IS MY TRAINING EFFECTIVE?
Rashonda Harris*, Associate Director,
Research Accounting Services, Temple
University
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
BIOMEDICAL O
SUBMISSION, PEER REVIEW AND BEST
PRACTICES OF MENTORED NIH CAREER
DEVELOPMENT AWARDS (KS) EMPHASIS
ON K25/ K99/R00
We will address the goals, development and
traits of how to submit various K awards, how
the NIH peer review process is when dealing
with K's and some best practices that may
assist in making an administrators life easier
when submitting and managing K awards.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT I
THERE'S AN APP FOR THAT!
This concurrent session will focus on the use of
applications in our work environments.
Applications will be covered broadly including
computer applications and accessories, web
applications, and mobile applications. Come
ready with your ideas and input this session is
meant to be a collaborative sharing of
knowledge and best practices on how to
improve communication and performance for all.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT O
BE THE CHANGE - ADAPTING TO YOUR
EVOLVING OFFICE
In this session, we will present how to adapt to
changes in a research administration office –
including leadership changes, staff fluctuations, and
technology/environment changes. Between Lynda
and Joanne, they have over 50 years of experience
in research administrative offices and been part of
multiple staff transitions. Come join this lively
discussion of how to evolve in a challenging
environment in order to avoid extinction.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be
assisted with the Career development of
Postdoctoral Fellows.
Peter Hague*, Senior Research Administrator Wellman Center for Photomedicine,
Massachusetts General Hospital
Chuck Washabaugh, Health Scientist
Administrator, National Institutes of Health
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will explore new apps that are
utilized for communication and information
sharing.
• Participants will examine the differences in
how applications are used in our personal lives
versus our professional lives.
• Participants will investigate concerns with
using applications to support communication
and information sharing.
Candice Ferguson*, Manager, Research
Education and Communications, Georgia
Institute of Technology
Garrett Steed, Contracting Officer, University of
Colorado-Boulder
Learning Objectives: Participants will engage in
discussion and ideas on how to survive and
flourish with leadership changes, reduction in
staff, and workplace environment changes.
Prerequisites: A willingness to interact and
participate in the discussion
Lynda Wolter*, Deputy Director, ERA and
Training, University of Chicago
Joanne Altieri, Associate Director, Grants
Management, University of Chicago
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
75
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th
1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING COMPLIANCE
A
SPECIAL COMPLIANCE ISSUES ASSOCIATED
WITH INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
AGENDA
Engaging in programs with international
collaborators introduce risks of noncompliance with
numerous federal compliance laws and regulations
not encountered in comparable programs with
domestic partners. In this session, we will focus
several of these compliance issues, including
aspects of import, export, and sanctions compliance
issues that are unique to international partnerships,
and compliance with Anti boycott regulations and
the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Additionally we
will address immigration issues and issues related to
compliance with foreign laws.
DEPARTMENTAL B
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR
DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATORS
Tuesday
8.12.14
As we strive to manage our daily departmental tasks
and achieve successful post-award funds
management, we balance the needs of our faculty,
staff, central offices, and sponsors, as well as a
myriad of internal and external rules/regulations/
deadlines/etc. In a funding environment with
increasingly complex regulations and collaborations,
we need to continually educate our staff and
ourselves to manage portfolios successfully. This
session will examine the department administrator's
role in the post award life cycle, including tips for
successful portfolio management, navigating
potential pitfalls, and what we all really need to
have in our toolkits.
FEDERAL U
SciENCV: HOW ARE THE PILOTS GOING?
The shared presentation will describe an FDP project
called the Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae
(SciENcv). This system was initiated to develop
single collection of data that are normally contained
in a curriculum vitae so that it can be used to help
complete biosketches for federal grant applications
or progress reports. Version 2 of the system has
been built and housed by the National Center of
Biotechnology Information at the National Library of
Medicine. It is limited to the creation of NIH
biosketches at the moment, but in the Fall, SciENcv
also will create NSF biosketches. In addition to
future plans for SciENcv there will be a description
of the Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier
(ORCID) and how ORCIDs are collected in SciENcv.
Finally, the presentation will cover planned changes
in the NIH biosketch and the pilot that has been
launched to test the new format.
76
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn about import, export and
sanctions compliance issues specific to
international programs, including compliance with
Anti boycott regulations.
• Participants will learn about compliance with the
Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.
• Participants will learn about compliance issues
associated with immigration.
Prerequisites: Participants should have experience
with negotiating or managing international
agreements.
David Brady*, Director, Export and Secure
Research Compliance, Virginia Tech
Elisabeth Liadis, Associate, Attorney, Hogan
Lovells
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain insight into the department
administrator's role in financial management of all
forms of funds.
• Participants will learn departmental best practices
we can all share.
• Participants will learn to recognize and develop
collaborations within their department and with
their central offices to manage the award process.
Randi Wasik*, Director of Administration and
Finance, University of Washington
Csilla Csaplár, Department Manager, Geophysics,
Stanford University
Heather M. Offhaus, Director, Medical School
Grant Review & Analysis, University of
Michigan-Ann Arbor
Sinnamon A. Tierney, Assistant Director of
Departmental Research Administration, Portland
State University
Walter Schaffer*, Senior Advisor, National
Institutes of Health
Lori Ann M. Schultz, Assistant Director, Sponsored
Projects Services, University of Arizona
Ron Splittgerber, Director, Research Services,
Colorado State University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
FEDERAL I
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)
CRITICAL DATES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
END AND ACM BASED AWARD
MONITORING ACTIVITIES
The National Science Foundation (NSF) will be
implementing a new core accounting system in
October 2014. As part of the transition to that
system, NSF will be taking their award payment
system, ACM$, off-line for awardee payments
on September 18, 2014. ACM$ will remain offline until the new accounting system is
operational. This session will provide awardee
institutions with important information and
advice that will be critical to insuring successful
operations during that time period. Secondly,
the implementation of ACM$ provided NSF with
the opportunity to revise many of its baseline
post award financial monitoring activities. The
session will review new developments in award
monitoring activities and provide awardees with
insight into areas of emphasis for the future.
Lastly, the session will provide attendees the
opportunity to ask questions directly to NSF
staff members responsible for these activities.
INTERNATIONAL O
NCURA INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP
EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
NCURA's International Fellowship Program is
now in its fifth year. Fellows have reported the
experience from enjoyable to beyond
expectations to career-changing. In this
session, you will have the opportunity to hear
from two Fellows: one who traveled to the
United States; and one who was hosted in
Sweden. Join us to learn about: the benefits
you and your staff receive when hosting an
NCURA International Fellow; expenses for
Hosts and Fellows and what travel money is
available from NCURA; how to apply to become
an NCURA International Fellow or a Host
contact; and what the selection committee
looks for when making decisions for this highly
successful program.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants are informed of NSF's transition
to its new accounting system.
• Participants are informed of all actions
required to be completed by their institutions
due to NSF's transition to its new accounting
system.
• Participants can prepare to take actions to
insure successful operations during NSF's
transition to its new accounting system.
• Participants are aware of NSF policy and
procedure changes related to changes to
baseline award monitoring activities.
• Participants are informed of key NSF contacts
that can provide assistance concerning the
subject areas.
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Michael Howe*, Section Head, Grantee Cash
Management Section, Division of Financial
Management, National Science Foundation
Kathleen Larmett*, Executive Director,
National Council of University Research
Administrators
David Lauder, European Research Project
Manager, University of York
Andreas Ledergerber, Head of Office, Office of
Science & Technology Education, Embassy of
Switzerland in the United States of America
Dan Nordquist, Assistant Vice President/
Director, Office of Grant and Research
Development. Washington State University
Amanda Snyder, Assistant Director, Sponsored
Programs Administration, University of
Maryland, Baltimore
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
77
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1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING POST-AWARD
I
AUDIT – FROM START TO FINISH – LOOKING
AT HOW TO SURVIVE AN AUDIT
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Understanding the audit cycle from start (before the
first transaction) to finish (post audit resolution and
corrective action) can greatly reduce the stress and
risk the accompanies a visit from your friendly
neighborhood (or ahem...federal!) auditor.
Learning Objectives: This session will detail the
audit process and provide tips on surviving an audit
including ideas for gathering documentation,
managing the audit process, insights into auditortype questions, and understanding audit
observations and findings. Participants are
encouraged to share experiences with their peers.
Prerequisites: Participants should have a basic
understanding of federal grant regulations and audits.
Kimberly Ginn*, Principal, Baker Tilly
Mary Lee Brown, Associate Vice President for
Audit,Compliance and Privacy, University of
Pennsylvania
PRE-AWARD I
LIMITED PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS:
UNDERSTANDING THE CHALLENGES
As funding continues to decline, an increasing
amount of Federal and non-federal sponsors are
relying more heavily on institutions to screen all
potential proposals and only submit their best.
Sponsors achieve their goal of reducing the number
of submissions and improving the quality of
proposals by limiting the number of proposals
submitted by an organization (or organizational unit)
to specific program solicitations.
Learn how two institutions:
• identify these limited submission opportunities;
• distribute information regarding these restricted
opportunities to researchers;
• structure an internal review/decision process;
• handle instances of multiple proposals that appear
at the last moment.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain insight into how other
universities are managing limited submissions.
Learn strategies for locating limited submission
opportunities.
• Participants will discover new ways to distribute
information related to limited submissions to
faculty and staff on campus.
Danielle McElwain*, Senior Sponsored Programs
Administrator, University of
South Carolina
Courtney Swaney, Assistant Director, Proposal
Administration, Office of Sponsored Projects,
University of Texas at Austin
All these and more related topics will be discussed
in this concurrent session. Participants are
encouraged to bring questions or situations
occurring at their own institution for discussion at
the end of the presentation.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS O
YOU DON’T HAVE TO DO IT ALONE... PUIs
Explore the ways to create a professional support
network within your institution by sharing your
knowledge and expertise in research administration
with various layers of administrative staff. Even
though your office may only have a few staff, there
are resources throughout your campus that can
provide valuable assistance. Come take part in an
interactive session to gain new ideas for expanding
outreach to others on your campus. Discuss various
way of engaging your colleagues in becoming your
partners in reaching the external funding goals and
assure compliance. Share your experiences –
positive and negative – in reaching out and
expanding institutional resources to enhance
sponsored program activities.
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Learning Objectives:
• Participants will formulate practical strategies to
strengthen the research administration enterprise
in spite of extremely limited workforce resources.
• Participants will learn how to seize an opportunity
to engage department administrators and
business office staff in active learning, to reinforce
their commitment and maintain their involvement.
• Participants will expand your view of what other
units can do to support sponsored programs and
serve as your first line of defense in managing
external funds.
Shella Batelman*, Senior Grant Administrator,
Suffolk University
Pam Whitlock, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, University of North Carolina at
Wilmington (Emeritus)
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
BIOMEDICAL
HOT TOPICS IN CLINICAL TRIAL
AGREEMENT LANGUAGE
Scott Davis*, Associate Director, Office of
Research Administration, University of
Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Clinical Trial Agreement (CTA) language is
becoming more complex each year.
Indemnification, Subject Injury, Publication,
Intellectual Property, AAHRPP requirements:
where does it end? These are just some of the
areas in which new laws and regulations- have
recently been added to the extensive list of
items that research administrators must review
in Clinical Trial Agreements. Be prepared to
discuss which CTA language is problematic to
your institution and to share your successes in
having clinical trial sponsors revise their CTA
language. You can expect a lively discussion
with plenty of ideas on how to handle your
problematic Clinical Trial Agreement language.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
BUILDING A LOCAL AREA RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION NETWORK
Barbara Richard*, Director, Sponsored
Programs Administration, Baystate Medical
Center
This session will present some personal
experiences in creating a Local Area Research
Administration group. We will identify the
frustrations and the rewards. We will talk about
how to get started and how to identify potential
participants. We will explore how to maintain
interest among research administrators from
institutions of diverse size and missions (i.e.,
finding commonalities for community colleges
and academic medical centers!).
COMPLIANCE
THE BENEFITS OF HUMAN RESEARCH
PROTECTION ACCREDITATION IN A
COMPETITIVE AND GLOBAL RESEARCH
ENVIRONMENT
Sarah Kiskaddon*, Director, Business
Development, Communications, and Public
Relations, Association for the Accreditation of
Human Research Protection Programs
(AAHRPP)
This panel will discuss the need to ensure
compliance, and build an effective infrastructure
before expanding a research portfolio.
Efficiency and collaboration are on the rise in
order to maximize the impact of research
funding. What is the best way to function at
high standards and allow flexibility in order to
increase efficiency? The importance of forming
alliances with other HRPPs, and sharing/ceding
IRB review will be discussed.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING DEPARTMENTAL
Follow-up to Concurrent Session: A-110/
OMB Uniform Guidance: Your Blueprint
to a Federally Compliant Institution,
held @ 10:15 am
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
OMB UNIFORM GUIDANCE: EXPECTATIONS
FROM OMB’S STREAMLINING OF THE FEDERAL
ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS
We will continue discussions started in the session,
"Finding A-110 in the Omnicircular (A-81): Still Your
Blueprint to a Federally Compliant Institution," and will
especially focus on the impact of the A-81
Administrative Requirements to institutional sponsored
programs policies, procedures and practices.
FEDERAL
ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT: THE
PROGRAMS OF ARPA-E AND EPA
The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research
Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) representative and
an EPA representative will discuss current trends in
federal R&D investments. ARPA-E invests in
disruptive ideas to create America’s future energy
technologies while EPA funds a wide-range of grants
focused on protecting human health and the
environment.
INTERNATIONAL
CHALLENGES MANAGING A GLOBALLY
FUNDED PORTFOLIO
As universities become more successful in
diversifying their research funding sources, this
expansion has increasingly included funding sources
from different countries. Especially with regards to
government research funding agencies, these
different funding sources will have their own sets of
rules and regulations. For institutions that may be
optimized for one particular set of government rules
and regulations, it may be challenging to discern
what new systems, policies, and procedures are
needed in order to comply with different countries'
research funding agencies. This session will discuss
ways that an institution can review its policies and
identify common issues that will need to be
addressed in order to successfully manage an
globally funded research portfolio.
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Krista Carmichael*, Senior Sponsored Research
Administration, Harvard University
Cheryl Williams, Associate Director, Office of
Research and Project Administration, University of
Rochester
Shane Kosinski*, Deputy Director for Operations,
Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy
(ARPA-E)
Adam H. Goldstein, Support Contractor to ARPA-E,
Booz Allen Hamilton
Bronda Harrison, United States Environmental
Protection Agency
James H. Johnson, Director, National Center for
Environmental Research, Office of Research and
Development, U. S. Environmental Protection
Agency
David W. Richardson*, Associate Vice Chancellor
for Research and Director of Sponsored Programs,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Simon Kerridge, Director, Research Services,
University of Kent
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
POST-AWARD
MANAGING F&A AS WELL AS SURPLUS
DOLLARS – FROM ALLOCATION TO WHAT
THEY ARE USED FOR
Deanna Hendrickson*, Grants Manager,
Kennesaw State University
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
What happens when you have left-over funds
from awards? What are you allowed to spend
them on? This session will focus on how to
manage surplus funds when and if we are
allowed to keep them. Budget management and
how to monitor your rate of spending through the
life of the award so you zero out at the end can
also be reviewed. Participants are encouraged to
share their tips and best practices.
PRE-AWARD
A NEW WORLD FOR RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION – MOVING FROM A
TRADITIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR THE
SUPPORT OF RESEARCH TO A SHARED
SERVICES MODEL, DISCUSSING THE
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
Kerry Peluso*, Associate Vice President for
Research Administration, Emory University
This discussion group will provide an opportunity
to discuss the challenges and opportunities
offered by moving to non-traditional
organizational structures to support
research administration.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
SO ALIKE, SO DIFFERENT: COMPARING
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION AT PUBLIC
AND PRIVATE PUIs
Research administrators at public and private
PUIs contend with the same regulations and
grant programs, but we do so within differing
institutional structures and cultures that present
both challenges and opportunities. This
discussion session will identify and explore
some of the many ways in which our daily work
is directly affected by our institutions' identities,
affiliations, and missions, such as faculty
workload and flexibility, attitudes toward
compliance, relationships with development
offices, budgeting constraints, and state policies
in addition to federal ones.
Sally J. Southwick*, Director of Sponsored
Programs & Foundation Relations, Earlham
College
Anne Pascucci, Director, Sponsored Programs
Christopher Newport University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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1:15 – 2:15 PM ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
ANNUAL
MEETING
ASSESSING WORKLOAD, COMPLIANCE AND
TRAINING NEEDS THROUGH INSTITUTIONAL
METRICS
AGENDA
Learning Objectives: To identify areas of
compliance, workload and training that are
appropriate for metric analysis To discuss the
planning process for developing and implementing
appropriate metric analyses To discuss possible
ways that separate metric analyses can be
effectively used in combination to facilitate
institutional management of the research
administration enterprise.
FULL
This session provides an update on Duke
University's metrics initiative. For several years Duke
has been refining the use of metrics to assess grant
management workload, identify key indicators of
financial compliance, and target training to
appropriate audiences. The most recent
enhancements have enabled the institution to
combine various components into a powerful
management tool for supervisors, business
managers and senior leadership to better understand
and plan for targeted deployment of resources,
specific training and personnel needs, and potential
compliance issues. Panelists will describe the
journey in developing these separate processes and
how they are being brought together to form a
comprehensive interactive business tool.
Jim Luther*, Associate Vice President, Research
Cost Compliance, Duke University
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
2:15 – 2:30 PM ~ NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK
2:30 – 3:30 PM ~ SPARK SESSIONS
Tuesday
8.12.14
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These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff.
2:30 – 2:50 PM
CHARTING COMMON GROUND:
CONSIDERATIONS FOR RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY
INSTITUTES
Christina Leigh Deitz*, Grant Development
Administrator, Maxwell School, Syracuse University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
2:30 – 3:30 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
BIOMEDICAL O
TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH:
FUNDAMENTALS AND CHALLENGES
Translation of biomedical innovations to
commercial partners and ultimately to clinical
practice is of critical importance for improving
patient care and advancing science. Translational
research process management is very
challenging because it requires a strong team
approach, visionary planning, interdisciplinary
performance, coordination across multiple
interfaces, specific education and training. This
session will introduce key challenges and
potential models for improving the process and
accelerating the pace of translational research.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT B
TIME MANAGEMENT SUPER POWERS:
OVERCOME THE TIME-DESTROYING
FORCES OF EVIL!
Have you ever experienced the disheartening
feeling that you have worked like a maniac all day
long and cannot answer the simple question:
"What did you do today?" It might be time for you
to take a refresher course in time management. In
this interactive session, we will explore methods
to tie what you WANT to do with your day with
how you actually spend your day. Time
management is a self-discipline super power for
productivity that enables you to get more of your
priorities accomplished and helps you to feel a
greater sense of satisfaction with the results of
your day. Learn some simple techniques to help
you get more done and draw some lines through
that long "to do" list. Oh yeah, and you also be able
to answer the "What did you do today?" question
with a mind boggling stream of accomplishments!
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT O
MAXIMIZING YOUR NCURA EXPERIENCE
Gabriela Apiou*, Translational Research Core
Director, Massachusetts General Hospital
Tammy Heesakker, Senior Business Strategy
and Licensing Manager, Partners Healthcare
Innovation
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn techniques for setting
daily priorities.
• Participants will learn techniques for
eliminating time wasters.
• Participants will learn how to tactfully say "No"
when appropriate.
• Participants will learn tactics to increase task
completion rates for higher productivity.
Brigette S. Pfister*, Director of Sponsored
Programs, College of Humanities & Sciences,
Virginia Commonwealth University
David L. Mineo, Managing Director, DLMineo
Consulting, LLC
Tara E. Bishop*, Associate Executive Director,
National Council of University Research
Administrators
Emily Ainsworth, Coordinator of Membership
Services, National Council of University
Research Administrators
Christina K. Hansen, Regional Volunteer
Assistance Coordinator, National Council of
University Research Administrators
Stephanie M. Moore*, Community Curator,
National Council of University Research
Administrators
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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2:30 – 3:30 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING COMPLIANCE
B
EXPORT CONTROLS BASIC
AGENDA
While universities generally have a mission to
disseminate knowledge to the greatest extent
possible, US Export regulations are designed to
restrict the dissemination of technology,
commodities, and services to non-US persons
and locations. This session will provide an
overview of the regulations applicable to university
research while providing some basic guidance for
administrators on how to maintain compliance while
staying true to the mission of the university. We will
discuss questions such as: When do OFAC sanctions
apply to research? What is a "deemed export"? What
is the fundamental research exclusion and when does
it apply? What are the technologies I need to be
concerned about? What are the export control
considerations for international research? Session
will include examples and scenarios.
DEPARTMENTAL I
ETHICAL DILEMMAS FACING DEPARTMENT
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATORS
Tuesday
8.12.14
As Department Research Administrators, we are
often faced with decisions that pose ethical
dilemmas. Although there are rules and regulations
that we need to follow, there are far more grey areas
than black and white. For example, a PI asks you to
order something that you feel may not be
appropriate. You know you can get it done, but
should you? In this session, we will discuss
examples of ethical dilemmas facing Department
Research Administrators and strategies for handling
them. We have our own thoughts about how to
handle these situations; however we are also
looking for answers so come prepared to share and
discuss this intriguing topic with us.
FEDERAL U
PUBLIC ACCESS FROM AN INSTITUTIONAL
PERSPECTIVE
Recent directives from funding agencies as well as
institutions that have adopted open access policies
requires increased awareness of issues such as
copyright, compliance, handling of sensitive
information, and support for meeting new public
access requirements. Researchers are often confused
and seek guidance for understanding what their roles
and responsibilities are in complying. Others feel that
they don't really need to change the way they work
and choose not to comply. In the end, it is many times
the institution that is scrambling to provide education
about public access, services to ensure compliance,
and mediation with commercial publishers regarding
research publications. What part of the institution does
this? It takes a campus.
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Learning Objectives:
• Participants will have a basic understanding of the
export regulations most applicable to university
research.
• Participants will identify export compliance risks
related to technical data, international travel,
visitors, collaboration and physical exports.
• Participants will have a basic understanding of
common university practices to help mitigate
compliance risks.
• Participants will know when to ask for help!
Adam Grant*, Export Compliance Officer,
University of Maryland, College Park
Marci Copeland, Export Control Administrator/
Trainer, University of California - Irvine
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will identify the ethical values that are
important to Department Research Administrators.
• Participants will recognize unethical behavior and
what to consider when faced with an ethical
dilemma.
• Participants will learn the strategies and decision
making processes that provide a framework for
understanding and working through ethical
conflicts.
Jim Maus*, Senior Research Administrator,
Washington University in St. Louis
Diane L. Hillebrand, Grant & Contract Officer,
School of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of
North Dakota
Learning Objectives: This session will provide an
overview of the current state of public access and
how institutions can draw on the expertise
throughout the campus to address the public access
policies around research publications.
Geneva Henry*, UV Librarian & Vice Provost,
George Washington University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
2:30 – 3:30 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
FEDERAL O
IT IS TIME TO RENEW OUR VOWS:
REVITALIZING THE UNIVERSITY/FEDERAL
AGENCY PARTNERSHIP
When personal relationships get tense, the best
course of action is typically to take a step back,
take a deep breath and commit to having a calm
and rational discussion about the situation. Once
it is all sorted out, it often turns out that the
problems were really rooted in a lack of mutual
understanding about the roles, responsibilities
and expectations of each partner. While the FDP
is, of course, an excellent forum for discussion
of the University and Agency partnership, there
isn't always the time to take that step back and
talk about the roles of the agencies, the IGs, the
OMB and the various other federal offices,
councils, etc. that all have a bearing
on the administrative burden research
institutions bear. Our best chance for a happy
future is to understand our partner and
recognize that we're stuck between the rock
and the hard place together.
INTERNATIONAL O
INTERNATIONAL SUBRECIPIENTS – THE
LONG AND WINDING ROAD
Are you responsible for issuing or managing
international subrecipient agreements? If so, then
you know they have interesting twists and turns.
Don't let challenging situations and unique issues
that arise stand in the way of a productive
international collaboration. Starting with the
proposal and moving through effective subaward
negotiation and subaward management, the
presenters will provide tips, tools and examples
from our experiences. We will delve into the
complexities of risk assessment, export and other
compliance issues. We will discuss agreement
terms and subrecipient oversight strategies that
balance monitoring and micromanagement.
POST-AWARD A
LEAN IN: THE POST-AWARD PROCESS AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN MEDICAL
SCHOOL
For the past 2+ years the Medical School has
been developing new ways of performing work
under the post-award umbrella. Teams have been
formed and Lean principles have been used to
develop new standard work across the Medical
Campus. Using Lean to improve business
processes is becoming more popular in academia
and in this session you will learn how to use Lean
principles in your own operation to standardize
and refresh how you do business.
Cynthia Hope*, Assistant Vice President for
Research & Director, Sponsored Programs,
The University of Alabama
Jean Feldman, Head, Policy Office, Office of
Budget, Finance & Award Management,
National Science Foundation
Jennifer Rodis, Grants and Contracts
Specialist, University of Wisconsin-Madison
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Learning Objectives: Key take-aways for
participants will include:
• Questions to ask before submission when the
proposal involves an international subrecipient.
• Tools to identify potential export control,
sanctions, and other compliance red flags that
may require action before the collaborator can
begin project work.
• Specific examples of agreement terms that
address key issues unique to international
subawards.
• Effective strategies for monitoring your
international collaborators' project work.
Janet Simons*, Director, Research Policy,
University of Maryland, Baltimore
David Brady, Director, Export and Secure
Research Compliance, Virginia Tech
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn how to use Lean
principles in your own operation.
• Participants will gain knowledge about the
major lessons learned and the wins realized
from the new process.
• Participants will learn how and why
Procurement is considered part of post-award.
Melissa Karby*, Administrative Manager
Associate, University of Michigan
Elizabeth Brant, Senior Research Administrator,
University of Michigan
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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2:30 – 3:30 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING POST-AWARD
A
F&A STRATEGIES FOR SENIOR LEADERSHIP
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
This session will provide an overview of facilities and
administrative (F&A) rate strategies geared towards
senior leadership and decision makers for F&A
approach at your institution. This session will explore
opportunities with Operations and Maintenance
(O&M) cost pools, Building depreciation, Equipment
depreciation, and Organized Research Space
Utilization, along with impact of the new
Uniform Circular.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS I
DEVELOPING NEW SPONSORED PROGRAM
OFFICES: THE PUI PERSPECTIVE
As research administrators we share many common
obligations and responsibilities; but at PUIs we also
encounter special situations and circumstances that
make our lives uniquely challenging -- and colorful. In
this session a panel of seasoned research
administrators from a diverse group of
Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions will share
personal experience, insights, and useful tips for
developing and enhancing sponsored programs
offices at PUIs.
PRE-AWARD A
STRUCTURING A PRE-AWARD OFFICE
FOR MAXIMUM EFFECTIVENESS
Working smarter, not harder. Doing more with less.
These are the realities of our current environment.
How do we accomplish this objective without
burning out our most precious resource - our
people? This session will explore ways to structure
a central, pre-award office for maximum efficiency.
Our panelists will explore areas such as the pros and
cons of various structures, having staff act as
generalists vs. specialists, pulling out unique tasks to
be handled by separate groups, establishing career
ladders within the office, and the role that
technology can play. They will give examples of
what has worked in their offices, as well as specific
challenges to keep in mind.
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Learning Objectives: Participants will gain a better
understanding of strategies that can be used by
institutional senior leaders in developing an F&A rate
proposal.
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of cost
principles and components of F&A Rate proposal.
Martin Smith*, Manager, Higher Education and
Academic Medical Centers, Attain, LLC
Wallace Davis, Partner, Attain, LLC
Deston Halverson, Senior Manager, Attain, LLC
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn about
the unique challenges (and joys) associated with
guiding the development of a sponsored programs
office at a PUI, including:
• How the unique culture of each institution plays a
role in the development of a sponsored programs
office.
• The value of good assessment in determining your
institution's sponsored programs needs.
• Common PUI pitfalls that you will want to avoid.
• What we can do to ensure that our offices
continue to evolve in positive directions.
Roberta Truscello*, Director of Sponsored
Programs, Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Pamela Napier, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, Agnes Scott College
Sally J. Southwick, Director of Sponsored Programs &
Foundation Relations, Earlham College
Martin Williams, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, William Paterson University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will leave with an understanding of
the pros and cons of various pre-award office
structures and strategies as they relate to overall
operating efficiency.
• Participants will discover how to use technology in
connection with office structure to ensure an
effective pre-award office.
Prerequisites: Participants should have a general
understanding of the needs of a central, pre-award
research administration office and of the challenges
facing managers in organizational change and
structure.
Amanda Snyder*, Assistant Director, Sponsored
Programs Administration, University of Maryland,
Baltimore
Barbara Gray, Director of Sponsored Programs,
East Carolina University
Dennis Paffrath, Assistant Vice President for
Sponsored Programs Administration, University of
Maryland, Baltimore
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
2:30 – 3:30 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
BIOMEDICAL
GETTING A HANDLE ON DARING (OR,
RATHER, DATA SCATTERING)
AGREEMENTS
Collaboration across disciplines, across
institutions and across international boundaries
defines today's research environment. And
these days it's not just ideas that get tossed
around. Data that results from those ideas gets
passed from one investigator to another, back
again, then is tossed to a new colleague who
has interesting, intersecting research ideas.
More and more the casual group of colleagues
grows into a "center" or "consortium"
or other more formal, yet less understood,
relationships. There may or may not be interinstitutional agreements underpinning these
scientific collaborations.
Jeanne Galvin-Clarke*, Manager, Sponsored
Programs Administration, University of
Maryland, Baltimore
Leerin Shields, Manager, Contracts & Grants,
University of Maryland, Baltimore
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
We will discuss the complications that arise in
structuring a data sharing agreement that can
accommodate the reality of data-scattering.
How do you begin to capture all the potential
institutions that should be party to such an
agreement and define all the possible crosssharing among them? How is this affected
when federal data repositories are involved in
the mix? Should there be formal agreements
at all?
Whether you have answers or questions, stories
to share, solutions you've tried and others you
need to figure out, please join us to take a stab
at tackling this puzzle.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT FOR
INTROVERTS
Being an introvert does not mean sitting in a
corner and watching the business world happen
around you. Many of today's most successful
leaders are introverts, but how do they do it?
Come and learn about strategies and
techniques, tips and tricks,
that can help you navigate a world of extroverts.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will identify resources for
introverts (print, online, social networking).
• Participants will talk with other self-identified
introverts about career development
techniques.
• Participants will learn how to navigate through
the NCURA annual meeting when you are
overwhelmed with all of the information and
interaction.
Robin Dewey*, Director of Academic and
Government Grants, McDaniel College
Gayle Hurlbutt, Administrator, University
of Rochester
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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2:30 – 3:30 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING COMPLIANCE
COI WAR STORIES (IMPLEMENTING
THE AUGUST 2012 REVISION TO NIH’S
COI POLICY)
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
This discussion group will present an open forum for
participants to share the challenges they
encountered and the triumphs they achieved in
implementing the August 2012 revisions to the
National Institutes of Health's policy on Financial
Conflicts of Interest. Many institutions, of all sizes,
faced challenges in the months leading up to the
effective date of the policy change. Now that the
effective date is in our rear view mirror, this session
affords participants the opportunity to reflect on their
processes, and to consider how what they learned
could be applied to future policy changes.
DEPARTMENTAL
FEDERAL FINANCIAL COMPLIANCE: WHAT’S
A DEPARTMENT TO DO?
Anne Albinak*, Senior Administrative Manager,
Johns Hopkins University
Does your department have internal controls in place
for compliance with federal rules and regulations for
allowable costs, cost sharing, cash management
and/or financial reporting? Are some of these issues
more difficult to comply with than others? Do you
have advice for others about issues you've
encountered and solved? We will discuss problems
as well as solutions for financial compliance
issues in departments.
FEDERAL
USDA/NIFA UPDATE
The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)
is an agency within the U.S. Department of
Agriculture (USDA). Congress created NIFA through
the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008.
NIFA replaced the former Cooperative State
Research, Education, and Extension Service
(CSREES), which had been in existence since 1994.
The Office of Grants and Financial Management
(OGFM) supports NIFA’s mission of advancing food
and agricultural science by administering grants,
cooperative agreements, and other federal financial
assistance with policy, funding, and oversight. This
session will provide participants with the opportunity
to meet OGFM staff and learn more about NIFA and
its financial assistance efforts.
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Holly Sommers*, Director, Pre-Award Grants
Administration, Emory University
Maria Koszalka*, Director, Division of Policy and
Oversight, National Institute of Food and
Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture
Melanie Krizmanich, Senior Policy Specialist, POD,
National Institute of Food and Agriculture,
Lisa Scott-Morring, Branch Chief, Policy Branch,
OGFM, National Institute of Food and Agriculture,
U.S. Department of Agriculture
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
2:30 – 3:30 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
INTERNATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL CONTRACTING ISSUES
David Mayo*, Director of Sponsored Research,
California Institute of Technology
Our researchers are collaborating more and
more with international partners, and these
collaborations often create new challenges for
the research administrator. This session will
discuss various issues associated with
international contracting, including protection of
IP, disputes, dealing with exchange rates, and
choice of applicable law.
POST-AWARD
BEST PRACTICES FOR SUBRECIPIENT
MONITORING
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Keri Godin*, Assistant Director of Research
Integrity, Harvard Medical School
This discussion group session will enable
participants to share established best practices
in fulfilling prime institutions' Subrecipient
Monitoring obligations and will serve as a
sounding board for proposed implementation
of monitoring policies, tools and guidance
documents to mitigate risk and promote
compliance in this high-risk area. Time will
be allotted to discuss how the Uniform
Guidance may impact institutions' policies
and practices related to subrecipient monitoring
and what proactive measures institutions
are implementing now in anticipation of
forthcoming changes.
PRE-AWARD
USING SOCIAL MEDIA IN PRE-AWARD
O.k., O.k., now that we are getting used to the
Social Media stuff, let's really discuss if it's
working or not. Are you using Facebook for
funding opportunities, policy dissemination,
managing events, etc.? Does Twitter work for
your office and/or institution? What about blogs,
are any you (us) using them? Then there are all
the others - Google Plus, home-grown systems,
am I leaving anything out? Come on by and let's
discuss. I will for sure tell you my story - it's ups
and downs and all arounds.
Dan Nordquist*, Assistant Vice President/
Director, Office of Grant and Research
Development. Washington State University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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2:30 – 3:30 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING POST-AWARD
WHAT IS IT? WHO PROCESSES IT?
DETERMINING RESEARCH V. GIFT V SERVICE
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Have you ever received a document for review and
weren’t quite sure what the document was or who
should process it? Funding mechanism
determination is step 1 and critical to maintaining
streamlined research administration operations. This
session will provide participants with best practices
for interpreting and reviewing of funding
mechanisms. Through real life examples,
participants will gain a greater ability to recognize the
attributes of funding mechanisms, have a better
understanding of how the funding mechanisms
differ and learn about the nuanced gray lines that
exist between funding mechanisms.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
WHAT NEW FACULTY AT PUIs NEED TO
KNOW ABOUT SPONSORED RESEARCH
David Ngo*, Assistant Vice President of Sponsored
Projects Administration, University of Texas
Southwestern Medical Center
Brian Korblick, Manager, Huron Consulting Group
Stacy Riseman*, Director of Sponsored Research,
College of the Holy Cross
Building a new faculty orientation program? Are you
part of the interview process for hiring new faculty at
your institution? What are some of the things these
individuals need to know during their tenure at a
predominately undergraduate institution? Some
things we will discuss are the challenges faculty at
PUI's cope with, such as higher teaching loads, closer
interaction with students, juggling time and many
responsibilities, lack of research overlap with other
faculty, and how all of this affects applying for and
receiving grants. Let's discuss what our institutions
do to support new faculty facing these challenges.
Our goal is to come away with fresh and exciting
ideas to take back to our own PUI's! Please share at
least one creative idea your institution has created or
plans to create.
3:30 – 4:00 PM ~ NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK
3:30 – 4:00 PM ~ GET CONNECTED AND GET INVOLVED FAIR!
NCURA NATIONAL COMMITTEES
Colleagues from NCURA’s National Committees – Board of Directors, Financial Management Committee,
Nominating and Leadership Committee and the Professional Development Committee will be available to talk
with you and answer questions on the front terrace. This is a perfect opportunity to learn about the different
facets of NCURA. Grow your peer network…visit the Get Connected and Get Involved Fair throughout the
Conference!
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ SPARK SESSIONS
These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff and you will
be able to check out multiple topics in each time slot.
4:00 – 4:20 PM
CONNECT WITH ME! NCURA’S
SOCIAL MEDIA
David Ngo*, Assistant Vice President of
Sponsored Projects Administration, University
of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
4:30 – 4:50 PM
BASE TYPES AND WHEN TO CHARGE IDC
Lucien Finley*, Assistant Director, Sponsored
Projects, The University of Texas at Dallas
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
BIOMEDICAL O
PRIMER ON CLINICAL TRIALS
Classic training for research administrators will
often focus on submitting grant proposals and
administering federal awards. While this may
provide very good fundamental background, the
clinical research environment differs greatly.
This session offers an overview of the process,
types, phases, institutional complexities and
regulatory requirements necessary for
successful administration of clinical trials, as
provided in the recently issued NCURA
publication of the same name.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will obtain an understanding of
the regulatory framework that governs many
aspects of clinical research.
• Participants will obtain an understanding of
the contracting process for review and
negotiation of clinical research agreements
with a commercial sponsor.
• Participants will obtain an understanding of an
approach to prepare and negotiate a clinical
trial budget to ensure the trial is selfsustaining and to prevent billing errors.
• Participants will obtain an understanding o
fprevention and detection controls to achieve
improved financial oversight and mitigation for
the risk of billing errors.
David Lynch*, Executive Director, Office of
Sponsored Research, Northwestern University
Ronald Polizzi, Associate Director, Contracts
Office of Research Administration Thomas
Jefferson University
Thomas Wilson, Assistant Vice
President/Senior Research Administration, Rush
University Medical Center
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT O
LIFE, LOVE AND RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION
As research administrators we often get caught
up into the high demands our jobs. Whether
meeting deadlines, filing reports, or simply
fulfilling customer service duties, we can
sometimes forget about ourselves - getting lost
in the chaos of day-to-day requirements. This
workshop will provide an insightful glimpse into
the human aspect of research administration.
We will take you on a guided tour of "YOU", the
most valuable asset. We will offer tips on how
to successfully navigate through your journey as
a research administrator while balancing the
demands of life. After all, what is research
administration without YOU?
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand the value of
Human Capital.
• Participants will apply the principles of
Maslow's Hierarchy in the workplace.
• Participants will enhance knowledge of
personality types/behaviors.
• Participants will walk away having insight on
how to balance the demands of work/life.
Tonya Pinkerton*, Compliance Manager, Texas
Tech University
Adrien Bennings, Accounting Manager, Texas
Tech University
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING COMPLIANCE
I
IMPACTS OF OMB UNIFORM GUIDANCE
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
The Uniform Guidance has challenged all of us to
take a hard look at our practices, policies and
procedures to ensure that we are in compliance with
these new regulations. While research
administrators are working to identify the impacts,
many of us are facing the challenge
of getting others in our organizations involved
in the process. This session will outline the major
impacts of the Uniform Guidance and introduce
ideas for addressing these changes across the
organization.
DEPARTMENTAL B
ORGANIZING YOUR DAY: TIPS FOR
SUCCESSFULLY MANAGING YOUR
WORKLOAD FOR PRE AND POST-AWARD
ADMINISTRATORS
The dynamic world of research administration can be
havoc to control without the right tools and
organization. This session will offer demonstrated
approaches for managing your workload for both
pre- and post-award administrators. You will learn
strategies to simplify your work so that you can take
control of your day before it takes control of you!
FEDERAL O
HIGHER EDUCATION AND NATIONAL
SECURITY: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN
LAW ENFORCEMENT, INTELLIGENCE
GATHERING, AND ACADEMIA
The FBI’s Academic Alliance Program is a national
outreach effort charged with sharing information and
establishing a dialogue with academic institutions to
increase awareness of threat and national security.
The FBI’s goal is to help universities take proactive
steps to better protect their institutions. We also aim
to help develop new strategies to keep Americans
safe while remaining sensitive to unique concerns
and cultures on campus.
FEDERAL U
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE UPDATE: THE
PROGRAMS OF NIST AND NOAA
This session will describe the research grant (federal
financial assistance) programs of the Department of
Commerce's two largest science bureaus - NIST
and NOAA.
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Learning Objectives:
• Participants will have a better understanding of the
clauses in the Uniform Guidance may require
changes to the practices and/or policies of your
institution.
• Participants will be able to identify which
departments or units within your organization
should be involved in the changes.
• Participants will learn approaches to organizing a
team dedicated to addressing the impact of the
changes within your institution.
Ann Holmes*, Assistant Dean, Administration and
Finance, University of Maryland, College Park
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn to be prepared for their
many different types of responsibilities.
• Participants will learn to organize their time to
effectively tackle the tasks at hand at any point in
time.
• Participants will identify tools they can use to
simplify their work.
Brooke Marchetti*, Research Administration
Manager, University of Pittsburgh
Darleen Noah, Research Manager, Juvenile
Diabetes Institute, University of Pittsburgh
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will discuss the outreach efforts of the
FBI to academic institutions.
• Participants will be provided awareness of the
threats to academic research, products and
personnel.
• Participants will be provided practical ways to
lessen the vulnerabilities at academic institutions.
Kescha Wilson*, Special Agent, Strategic
Partnership Program, Federal Bureau of
Investigation
Phillip Hoffman*, Director, Oceans and
Atmospheric Research (OAR) Cooperative Institutes
Dianne Poster, Special Assistant to the Principal
Deputy and Associate Director for Laboratory
Programs, National Institute of Standards and
Technology (NIST)
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
INTERNATIONAL O
ASSESSING AND MANAGING RISKS IN
INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS
Sponsored research has become a global
enterprise, and with greater international
research collaborations come greater
institutional risks that are often unique and
different than risks inherent in domestic
research agreements. From compliance with
federal laws that regulate academic exchanges
and international collaborations , such as export
and sanctions, antiboycott and foreign
corruption regulations, to intellectual property,
tax, and legal issues, international project risks
can frequently be identified at the Pre-Award
phase of project development, and mitigated in
the negotiation of the agreement. Using
traditional risk assessment approaches, the
presenters will identify a variety of red flags
associated with international research
collaborations, discuss methods of assessing
these risks, and discuss mitigation strategies.
POST-AWARD B
MANAGING A SUBRECIPIENT
MONITORING PROCESS
Subrecipient Monitoring efforts often require
review and refining to ensure compliance with
federal requirements and institutional policies.
Managing this function can be challenging with
competing priorities and limited resources. This
session will explore institutional policies and
procedures and steps taken to maintain
compliance with federal regulations.
PRE-AWARD B
SUBCONTRACT BASICS
In today’s highly regulated environment,
Subawards are becoming increasingly complex to
create and monitor. This session is an overview
of what it takes to prepare a Subaward and what
is involved in monitoring that agreement
throughout the period of performance. It will
touch on a few laws/regulations governing the
Subaward process.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be provided with an overview
of institutional risks that are unique to, or
more challenging in, international projects.
• Using risk assessment analysis, participants
will learn how institutions can assess their
risks in an international project and develop
mitigation strategies for their international
projects.
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
David Brady*, Director, Export and Secure
Research Compliance, Virginia Tech
Janet Simons, Director, Research Policy,
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Learning Objectives: Participants will examine
the decision making process for implementing
subrecipient monitoring procedures.
Antoinette Lawson*, Director, Office of
Research Administration, University of
Maryland, College Park
Aimee Howell, Manager, University of
Maryland, Baltimore County
Learning Objectives: This session will focus on
the basics of Subaward Management and
Administration. By the end of the session, we
will have provided tools showing:
• How to prepare and manage Subawards
including:
– Before you write the Subaward—analysis
– Appropriate flow down from prime awards
– Crafting your subaward—key clauses
– Subrecipient monitoring
– FFATA
Debra E. Brodlie*, Assistant Director,
Subawards, Johns Hopkins University,
Bloomberg School Public Health
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING POST-AWARD
I
COST SHARING
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Cost sharing represents an administratively complex
and high-risk business objective. This session will
discuss many elements of cost sharing, including
more basic concepts such as what constitutes cost
sharing at the proposal stage and federal policies
and guidelines related to cost sharing. Additionally,
this session will examine more complicated
concepts, including the impacts of cost sharing on
an institution, the functional areas cost sharing
touches outside of sponsored research (e.g., finance
and budget), and the weighing of strategic interests
against traditional compliance when entering into a
cost share agreement. The session will also explore
challenges and approaches related to tracking and
funding of cost share commitments and effectively
using enterprise management systems to help
where possible, which will include a review of
recent institutional changes in the way
Northwestern University manages post-award
cost sharing tracking (including evaluation, design,
and implementation).
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain an understanding of the
different considerations that are taken into
account when deciding to cost share and the
reasoning behind the decision to engage in
voluntary cost sharing.
• Participants will understand the various impacts
cost sharing has on an institution, including the
compliance, administrative, financial, investigator,
and F&A rate impacts.
• Participants will be presented with various
approaches to tracking and managing cost share
commitments at the post-award stage.
Kelly E. Morrison*, Grant and Cost Share Officer,
Northwestern University
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
BIOMEDICAL
Follow-up to Concurrent Session: Best Practices:
Submission and Management of NIH
K-awards and Training Grants, held at 10:15 am
BEST PRACTICES: SUBMISSION AND
MANAGEMENT OF NIH K-AWARDS AND
TRAINING GRANTS
Jane Tolbert*, Administrator, University of
Rochester
Glenda Bullock, Manager of Business Operations,
Washington University in St. Louis
NIH Career (K) awards and Training Grants (T, F)
provide valuable opportunities for developing the
new generation of (biomedical) scientific
researchers. However, the submission and
management of these awards present some unique
challenges. Join us to discuss tips and tools for preand post-award management of these awards.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
CREATING A CRA STUDY GROUP FOR
YOUR CAMPUS
Marjorie Townsend*, Research Advancement
Manager, Arizona State University Main
Get a step-up on studying for the Certified Research
Administrator exam. When starting
a group, keeping them active and motivated
can be a difficult task. Using technology to
your advantage can target multiple departments and
helps keep the group focused while advancing their
knowledge. This discussion group will provide tips
and tricks on successful techniques used to aid in
studying for professional certification.
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
COMPLIANCE
EXPORT CONTROL REFORM – WHERE DO
WE STAND?
Wayne L. Mowery Jr.*, University Export
Compliance Officer, The Pennsylvania State
University
Export Control Reform is real, but it is far from
spectacular! As we begin to cope with the first
real, major changes to the Export Regulations in
the last 15 years, come join other Research
Administrators and Export Compliance Officers
as we discuss the benefits and the challenges
that have been created as part of the Export
Control Reform process.
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
This Discussion Group will not have any
prepared agenda or presentation materials.
It is designed to allow for discussion of your
problems with ECR and how your institution
is addressing the changing landscape of
export controls.
COMPLIANCE
HOW INTERNAL AUDIT CAN HELP YOU
MANAGE RESEARCH AND RELATED
RISKS
When we hear the word "audit" in terms of
research compliance, we tend to think of
Federal audit reports and the current "hot audit
topics". However, you can use internal
auditors' expertise to evaluate your institutional
research risks, and have them help you drive
organizational change to manage those risks.
This breakout session will focus on how to
engage your own Internal Auditors to:
• Assist management in determining if
anecdotal research risks are factual, thus
transitioning from subjective decision making
into objective decision making.
• Review the current internal control structure
for research risks and operational
efficiencies.
• Help determine if the organization is meeting
their obligations as required in sponsored
program grant and contractual agreements.
• Determine if sufficient monitoring practices
and controls are in place to comply with
regulatory requirement (IRB, IACUC, effort
reporting, allowable and allocable expenses
charged to sponsor budgets, conflict of
interest, etc.).
Learning Objectives: Participants will explore
the relationship between their internal audit
function and research at their institution.
• In what ways has internal audit helped your
institution to manage research risk?
• Are there Non-traditional audit areas where
internal auditors can help your institution to
manage research risk?
• How can internal audit further help your
institution?
Prerequisites: Openness to ways Internal
Audit can assist in managing research risk in
your organization.
Suzanne M. Cheesebrough*, Financial
Auditor, The Pennsylvania State University
Vincent Falvo, Associate Controller,
Department of Finance & Business, The
Pennsylvania State University
With your internal auditors' assessment of your
research operations and controls there should
be less angst when government auditors notify
you that they are coming to audit.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING DEPARTMENTAL
CURRENT ISSUES IN MANAGING RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION: BEST PRACTICES FOR
DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATORS
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
This discussion session will focus on crucial issues
associated with managing research administration at
the departmental level. The panel will discuss
successful policies and procedures that have been
developed in their departments. Please join our open
forum discussion as we review key research issues
that are affecting departmental administrators.
FEDERAL
NSF GRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS:
ISSUES ON THE CAMPUS
This is an informal discussion group for the people
who help manage NSF Graduate Research
Fellowships at their institution. This includes
coordinating officials and financial officials at
campuses where NSF Fellows are enrolled. Others
who have an interest in this program are also
welcome. The discussion will begin with a brief
overview of the structure of NSF Fellowship awards
and the purpose of the Cost of Education Allowance
component of the grants. Participants will be
encouraged to share information about how NSF
Fellowships are managed at their institutions.
INTERNATIONAL
NSF AND NIH – OUTSIDE THE U.S.
Are you an international institution receiving
NIH/NSF grants or a US institution managing
NIH/NSF projects with foreign subrecipients? Please
come and join this discussion group where we will
learn from each other regarding the challenges of
ensuring compliance for international organizations.
What regulations, policies and procedures can be
implemented at your institution to overcome both
financial and non-financial compliance challenges?
POST-AWARD
COMPLEX FUNDING MANAGEMENT
This discussion group will engage participants in
examining best practices and challenges in
managing complex awards. In an increasingly
collaborative research world, we are seeing more
applications submitted that will require subcontracts,
multiple budgets, multiple sites, international and
many other components to the award. As
administrators our challenge is to be a part of the
grant as early as possible and have a proverbial seat
at the table. This means that we have to come in
with knowledge and expertise, and be ready to
participate in the administration of these projects
from the very start so as to avoid being considered a
hindrance to the research success.
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Tolise Miles*, Senior Grants & Contracts
Specialist,Grants and Contracts Administration and
Finance, Children's National Medical Center
Mary E. Schmiedel, Associate Dean for Research
Administration & Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, Georgetown University
Kris K. Wolff, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, Fordham University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn the structure of NSF
Graduate Research Fellowships.
• Participants will learn how one campus
administers and manages the Fellowships.
• Participants will learn other examples and options
for managing the Cost of Education Allowance.
Prerequisite: There are no prerequisites for
participation; however, those who are designated as
the coordinating official or financial official for NSF
Fellowships will benefit more than those who are
not in such a role.
Steven Smartt*, Associate Dean, Graduate School
and Assistant Provost for Research, Vanderbilt
University
Learning Objectives: To discuss compliance
challenges common to international institutions and
how to overcome them.
Eva Bjorndal*, Compliance Coordinator, Karolinska
Institutet
Tiina Berg, Senior Advisor, Research Funding
Services, University of Helsinki
Laura Plant, Coordinator, Grants Office, Karolinska
Institute
Olaf Svenningsen, Head of Research Support
Office, University of Southern Denmark
Randi Wasik*, Director of Administration and
Finance, University of Washington
Lindsey Demeritt, Assistant Manager, Sponsored
Projects Team, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
4:00 – 5:00 PM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
PRE-AWARD
CROWDFUNDING – HOW DO WE
DO THAT?
Crowdfunding is an alternative funding source
that several Institutions are using, or thinking
about using, to fund a variety of research
projects. Unlike traditional funding sources,
Crowdfunding capitalizes on the use of social
media and communication. What are the risks?
What are the benefits? Is this the next big thing
or just a passing fad? Join us to discuss the ins
and outs of Crowdfunding and share best
practices from other Institutions.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
TIPS, TOOLS, AND TEMPLATES TO MAKE
STRONGER GRANT PROPOSALS
If we come away from a conference with even
one idea for improving the services of our office,
we count our time well spent. Bring your best
idea for solving proposal problems including
web pages, forms, templates or even advice
from a mentor. Be prepared to share your idea
and maybe have your headaches cured by a tip
from a colleague! Whether you are a seasoned
veteran or a newcomer to our field, you can
always use a good idea. Come and share or just
come and listen...it will be time well spent!
Lisa Mosley*, Executive Director, Research
Operations, Arizona State University
Jeremy Forsberg, Assistant Vice President of
Research, The University of Texas at Arlington
AGENDA
Tuesday
8.12.14
Patricia Zibluk*, Director, Sponsored Programs
and Research, Southern Connecticut State
University
Vincenzo Cassella, Assistant Director for PostAward Services, Southern Connecticut State
University
7:00 – 11:30 PM ~ TUESDAY NIGHT EVENT
NCURA FUN IN THE SUMMERTIME: UNDER THE SEA!
Join us for a night to unwind and enjoy in the International Ballroom! Doors open at 7:00 pm with
summertime fare and the dancing begins at 7:30 pm. Drink tickets are in your packet and your badge
is your entrance ticket. NCURA will have a photo station from 7:30 – 9:30 pm so wear your happy
face and upload your photos to Facebook and Twitter right from the photo station! Bring the kids for
fun times in the moon bounce and face painting from 7:00 – 9:30 pm. At 9:30 pm we’ll say good night
to the children, with music and dancing continuing until 11:30 pm for the adults.
9:00 PM ~ REGIONAL HOSPITALITY SUITES OPEN
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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7:30 AM – NOON
7:30 – 8:30 AM
ANNUAL AM56 CONCIERGE
MEETING
ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING
AND CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
7:30 – 11:00 AM ~ NCURA MARKETPLACE
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ SPARK SESSIONS
These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff and you will be able
to check out multiple topics in each time slot.
8:30 – 8:50 AM
DEVELOPING A GRANTSMANSHIP SERIES
FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
Jo Ann Smith*, Director, Graduate Programs in
Research Administration, University of Central
Florida
9:00 – 9:20 AM
STREAMLINING SPONSORED PROGRAMS
MANAGEMENT WITH ERA
Tiffanie Nichols*, Marketing Manager, rSmart
9:30 – 9:50 AM
IT’S NOT US, IT’S THEM: HOW DO WE
COMMUNICATE WITH OUR PEERS?
Tolise Miles*, Senior Grants and Contracts
Specialist, Children's National Medical Center
8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT I
THE CHANGING SPACE OF ELECTRONIC
RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION
For years, electronic research administration (eRA)
meant proposal and award management experience
with Grants.gov, the eRA Commons, and NSF
FastLane. However, as cloud-based tools such as
PARiS, Kuali Coeus, Sophia, Dropbox, Cayuse, etc.,
have come online, eRA means so much more.
Effective eRA is shifting to require the knowledge
and expertise to use what you have available to you
in the most efficient way possible--whether that be a
sophisticated data management tool, or a shared
drive and an Excel spreadsheet. This session will
look at various options and tools available--both free
source and for purchase and how to use what you
have more effectively.
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Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn about the various cloudbased systems available to them: Ex Sophia,
PARiS, Coeus, Dropbox.
• Participants will learn how to use in house
systems to better share information: Ex. Shared
drives, VPNs.
• Participants will learn how to present these tools
to faculty and staff.
Lindsey Demeritt*, Assistant Manager, Sponsored
Projects Team, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles
Diane Meyer, Pre-Award Services, Iowa State
University
Chad Macuszonok, Assistant Director, IT Business
Services, University of Central Florida
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
COMPLIANCE A
RESEARCH MISCONDUCT: BEST
PRACTICES AND LESSONS LEARNED FOR
HANDLING A LARGE SCALE, PUBLIC
INVESTIGATION
Gearoid Griffin*, Research Integrity Officer,
Harvard University
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
This presentation will provide a general
overview of a research misconduct case that
Harvard University conducted into Marc Hauser,
a former tenured professor at the university.
Lessons learned and best practices for largescale research misconduct investigations and
handling the process of publically releasing
information.
DEPARTMENTAL B
DEPARTMENTAL RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATION 101
A Departmental Research Administrator (DRA)
oversees and coordinates all aspects of
sponsored project administration at the
departmental level in support of the researcher.
As a liaison between central offices, faculty, and
staff they also serve as educators while striving
to ensure compliance with federal regulation
and institutional policies. This session will
provide a basic understanding of a DRA's
responsibilities as well as tools and strategies
for success. Topics include proposal
development, award review, subagreements,
cost transfers, cost sharing, closeout and audit.
FEDERAL U
AGENCY IMPLEMENTATION OF
PUBLIC ACCESS
Representatives from NASA, NIH, and NSF will
discuss their agencies' approaches to expanding
public access to the results of Federally funded
research, as required by the February 22, 2013
memorandum research by the Office of Science
and Technology Policy (OSTP). Their
presentations will address the following:
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain an understanding of the
role of the Departmental Research
Administrator.
• Participants will hear tips on how to manage
sponsored projects at the department level.
• Participants will gain an appreciation of how
federal regulations and institutional policies
impact their work.
Brenda Kavanaugh*, Associate Director, Office
of Research and Project Administration,
University of Rochester
Nathan Youngblood, Research Coordinator,
Northwestern University
Amy Friedlander*, Senior Advisor, National
Science Foundation
Mark Allen, Deputy Associate Administrator of
Research, Science Mission Directorate, NASA
Kathryn Funk, Program Specialist, PMC
(contractor) NCBI, National Library of Medicine
Neil Thakur, Special Assistant to the NIH
Director for Extramural Research, National
Institutes of Health (NIH)
• What is the requirement?
• What should institutions do to prepare?
• What's the current status of the initiative at
an agency?
• How do might systems phase in (for those
that aren't up and running yet) or evolve
functions or capabilities?
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING INTERNATIONAL
O
FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT WITH
FOREIGN INSTITUTIONS
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
This session will focus on financial risks that are
common to foreign institutions receiving US federal
funding. No project is completely risk free, but which
financial risks may be necessary to accept? And
which risks should be avoided at any costs ? Do you
have the right internal controls and policies in place
in order to identify and mitigate financial risks? This
session will focus on the most common financial
risks, some of them specific to academic medical
centers and others more general, and will be based
on the panel’s own experience from Foreign
Organization Systems Review (FOS). Welcome to
what we are hoping to be a very interactive session!
INTERNATIONAL O
WORKING WITH JAPANESE RESEARCH
UNIVERSITIES
Japanese research institutions and researchers are some
of the most prominent in the world and have consistently
been among the top-ranked in patent applications,
scientific literature, and absolute R&D spending as a
percentage of GDP. Over the past decades, Japanese
universities have significantly increased collaborative
research with foreign institutions. This session will share
how a non-Japanese institution can successfully
undertake in such collaboration. We will explore some of
the main regulatory and compliance issues that a nonJapanese institution might encounter and discuss the
biggest challenges that a non-Japanese institution might
face when receiving sub awards involving Japanese
funding agencies.
POST-AWARD I
EFFORT REPORTING IN THE AGE OF OMB
UNIFORM GUIDANCE
Join us for a session to review the changes to effort
reporting in the Uniformed Guidance. The specific
examples contained in A-21 have been eliminated
providing institutions more flexibility to develop
systems and processes that will meet the
documentation requirements. The changes,
including the added emphasis on the internal control
system, create questions on how personnel charges
will be audited in the future. The Federal
Demonstration Partnership (FDP) has piloted Payroll
Certification (an alternative to effort reporting) at four
FDP institutions since 2011. We will review the
background, structure and current status of the
pilots. We hope the experiences and lessons
learned from these schools will inform the broader
research community as institutions evaluate
potential changes to their own systems.
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Learning objectives:
• Participants will learn about financial risks that
foreign institutions often face when receiving US
federal funding.
• Participants will learn about Foreign Organization
Systems Review (FOS).
Eva Bjorndal*, Compliance Coordinator, Karolinska
Institutet
Tiina Berg, Senior Advisor, Research Funding
Services, University of Helsinki
Olaf Svenningsen, Head of Research Support
Office, University of Southern Denmark
David W. Richardson*, Associate Vice Chancellor
for Research and Director of Sponsored Programs,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
David Hajime Kornhäuser, Senior Research
University Administrator, International Affairs &
Communications, Kyoto University
Tadashi Sugihara, Research Administrator,
Kyoto University
Michael Laskofski*, Associate Vice President of
Research Operations, Office of Sponsored
Programs, George Mason University
Deborah Rafi, Director, Indirect Cost Branch, Office
of Naval Research
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
PRE-AWARD I
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE PRE-AWARD
OFFICE
As the competition for federal and state funding
increases Universities are seeking to enhance
their interactions with industry to secure a new
source of sponsored funding. Universities strive
to serve as the R & D arm of existing industries
or as the source of new technology for the
industries of tomorrow. Industry- university
relationships often look great on paper and have
great potential to benefit both parties in areas
beyond research and development (R&D). In
reality the differing expectations of both parties
put the research administrators in a difficult
situation. As they are expected to close the deal
while negotiating agreements that complying
with state and federal regulations that govern
not-for-profit entities that grant IP rights and the
industry partner expects to maintain complete
ownership of any IP. These two positions appear
to be in direct conflict.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will about intellectual property,
copyrights, inventions, trademarks and plant
varieties.
• Participants will research contract negotiating
strategies for managing industry IP
expectations.
• Participants will learn the obstacles to
colleges and universities prospectively
granting intellectual property rights to
inventions resulting from sponsored research.
• Participants will learn about IP rights in
Federal awards.
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
Gregory Slack*, Director of Research &
Technology Transfer, Clarkson University
Charles Bartunek, Contracts Associate, The
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of
Public Health
George McGuire, Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC
This session focuses on the many challenges
facing research administrators who manage
intellectual property, negotiate private industrial
research agreements, and state and federal
awards.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS I
EXPORT CONTROL: RISK ASSESSMENT
AND COMPLIANCE STRATEGIES FOR PUIs
Export control law applies equally to all
individuals and to all institutions, regardless of
size, type or resources. The applicable statutes
and regulations are daunting in their complexity
and scope, and the potential civil and criminal
penalties are stiff. Research administrators at
PUIs have been known to emerge from
sessions on this topic looking dazed, shellshocked and terrified. Research administrators
at small (and not-so-small) institutions often
fear that if they take on the challenge, they
will become de facto export control officers.
Presenters at this session will draw on their
experiences assisting in policy development
and implementation at two very different types
of PUIs. Topics to be covered include: realistic
risk-assessment; characterizing institutional
culture to determine effective means of
spreading the word about export control; and
helping our institutions reasonably assign
compliance responsibilities.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn strategies for assessing
the level and urgency of export control risk
exposure at their institutions.
• Participants will learn approaches for creating
a culture of compliance at their institution.
• Participants will discover resources for
keeping apace of a frequently changing
regulatory environment.
Prerequisite: Session will be most useful to
research administrators from PUIs who have
some prior familiarity with EAR and ITAR
regulations.
Joseph Tomaras*, Associate Director, Office
for External Grants, Bates College
Pamela Vargas, Executive Director, Kutztown
University Research Center, Kutztown
University of Pennsylvania
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
ANNUAL
MEETING BIOMEDICAL
Follow-up to Concurrent Session: Translational
Research: Fundamentals and Challenges,
held at 2:30 pm on Tuesday.
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH:
FUNDAMENTALS AND CHALLENGES
This session will introduce concrete examples of
success and failure in the process of moving a new
idea through the stages of exploratory, feasibility,
development and transfer to market. The main goal
will be to share with the attendees multi-institutional
experiences, discuss different approaches and overall
improve our way of thinking and performing in the
complex environment of translational research.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
NCURA BOOK CLUB: SERVANT LEADERSHIP
Servant leadership is increasingly becoming a
aligned with research administration. This session
will discuss how to be a servant leader and build a
creative team, develop great morale and improve
bottom line performance.
Gabriela Apiou*, Translational Research Core
Director, Massachusetts General Hospital
Tammy Heesakker, Senior Business Strategy and
Licensing Manager, Partners Healthcare Innovation
Les Lipkind, Senior Translational Research Program
Manager, Wellman Center for Photomedicine,
Massachusetts General Hospital
David Ngo*, Assistant Vice President of Sponsored
Projects Administration, University of Texas
Southwestern Medical Center
Greg Luttrell, Director, Research Contracts and
Awards, University of Notre Dame
This session will go into depth on bestselling author
James A Autry's book, "The Servant Leader", which
offers practical suggestions on how to heartfully
create better operational results and transform
managers into leaders.
COMPLIANCE
CHALLENGES IN MANAGING SERVICE AND
RECHARGE CENTERS
Josh Rosenberg*, Director, Cost Studies, Emory
University
For those individuals actively involved in running a
service or recharge center to those who are tasked
with oversight and approval, a strong understanding
of the rate calculation process, university
accounting, compliance with federal regulations, and
how to manage day to day operations is required.
This discussion session will cover the issues and
challenges associated with service center operations
and strategies for effective management at both the
departmental and central levels.
DEPARTMENTAL
WE’RE PLAYING IN THE SAME SANDBOX:
COLLABORATING ACROSS CAMPUS SO
EVERYONE WINS
It is important to abide by the rules of the sandbox:
•
•
•
•
•
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Linnea Minnema*, Director of Research and
Evaluation, University of Tennessee
Jennifer Webster, Sponsored Programs
Administrator, University of Tennessee
David K. Smelser, Assistant Director of Sponsored
Programs, University of Tennessee
Throwing sand is not OK.
Being mean will result in you playing on your own.
No taking other people's buckets.
No kicking other people's sandcastles.
The best sandcastles are built at low tide.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
INTERNATIONAL
SUCCESS FACTORY MOBILITY: MARIE S.
CURIE ACTIONS UNDER HORIZON 2020
Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions (MSCA) serve
as the worldwide cross-sector mobility career
development and training program targeted at
beginning researchers under Horizon 2020, the
European Union’s biggest EU Research and
Innovation program ever with nearly ⇔80 billion
of committed funding available over the next
seven years.
Viktoria Bodnarova*, Regional Representative,
Euraxess
Michael J. Kusiak, Research Policy Analyst,
University of California Office of the President
David Lauder, European Research Project
Manager, University of York
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
Under the EU’s previous Seventh Framework
Program (FP7), over 55,000 researchers were
supported. Horizon 2020 will expand this base
of support to as many as 65,000 researchers
over the next seven years. Under FP7, 728
European researchers took advantage of the
International Outgoing Fellowships, finding a
host institution in the United States, one of the
top destinations for European fellows outside
Europe. Even for the largest research
universities, negotiating and understanding the
nuances of MSCA agreement can be daunting.
The purpose of this discussion group is to help
research administrators understand the
advantages and challenges of hosting MSCA
fellows and develop strategies to streamline the
negotiation process to weigh institutional risk
and enable international research collaboration.
POST-AWARD
ONLY THE SHADOW KNOWS – THE
POWER AND WEAKNESS OF SHADOW
SYSTEMS
Randi Wasik*, Director of Administration and
Finance, University of Washington
As our profession continues to transform to
meet the change to the new OMB circular,
difficulties in obtaining funding, shrinking in
award levels, etc. we must become more
nimble with and astute in managing the
funding we have. Most of us have developed
shadow systems, but they are just that – a
shadow reporting on the system of record at
our institutions. This discussion group will focus
on the power and weakness in shadow
systems. We need to partner in discussing
challenges we have all faced in
maintaining/reporting from our shadow systems
so that when we implement these systems the
blinders are off and these systems enable us to
achieve our financial goals.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING PRE-AWARD
TIPS FOR IDENTIFYING AND DISSEMINATING
FUNDING INFORMATION
AGENDA
Positioning your faculty and institution to be
competitive in the race for funding starts well before
a proposal is written. There are thousands of funding
announcements for federal, state, nonprofit, and
corporate sponsors, and many sources of information
for finding those opportunities. Identifying the best
ones for your faculty and institution is an essential
step toward getting funded.
Would you like to become a better matchmaker?
This session will focus on tips for finding funding
opportunities that fit your faculty's research and
program interests. We will also discuss how to
disseminate funding information effectively on your
campus. Participants are encouraged to share their
tips and best practices.
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
DIRECTING THE DEVELOPMENT OF
YOUR WEBSITE
Wednesday
8.13.14
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Deanna Hendrickson*, Grants Manager, Kennesaw
State University
Pamela Napier*, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, Agnes Scott College
Sponsored programs websites are important tools
for ensuring transparency about policies and
procedures. What are the best practices for sharing
mission statements, new policies and procedures,
financial reports, and other information through
your office website? Should it be open to the public,
or protected behind a password wall? How do you
keep yours up to date? What happens when your
campus overhauls its entire web presence? These
are just some of the questions we will tackle in
this session which focuses on websites at the
macro level.
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
8:30 – 10:00 AM ~ SENIOR LEVEL DISCUSSION
EXPORT REFORM AND ITS IMPACTS
ON HIGHER EDUCATION
At long last export control reform is here! In major
changes to International Traffic in Arms (ITAR) and
Export Administration Regulations (EAR), the
Department of Commerce and State have
coordinated their regulatory rulemaking in an
effort to place "higher fences around fewer
items". They have moved many items off of the
United States Munitions List (USML) and on to
new sections of the Commerce Control List
(CCL). To do this, the USML is being completely
overhauled, and changed to a "positive",
specification-based list. The CCL is being
expanded to accommodate items moving off the
USML, with special rules for control of those
items moved to the CCL. And, in a separate
move, the Department of Energy has proposed
harmonizing its rules with those of Commerce
and State.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn about what is migrating
from the Munitions List and what major
changes have been made to the ITAR.
• Participants will learn the rules covering
items that have been taken off the Munitions
List and placed on the new Commerce
"Munitions" List.
• Participants will earn about new contract
clauses that will impact fundamental research
in defense contracts.
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of existing
export regulations (ITAR & EAR), and experience
reviewing and negotiating contract terms and
conditions that affect export determinations.
FULL
In this discussion group, we will introduce many
new and challenging concepts such as "catch and
release", and "specially designed", and revised
definitions such "defense services" and "use".
Understanding these concepts and terms are
essential to complying with the new rules.
Special attention will be given to new contract
clauses and contract requirements which are
needed to preserve fundamental research.
Participants are invited to share their experiences,
issues, and questions with export reform.
David Brady*, Director, Export and Secure
Research Compliance, Virginia Tech
Elizabeth Peloso, Associate Vice Provost/
Associate Vice President, Research Services,
University of Pennsylvania
No Fee. Pre-registration is required.
10:00 – 10:30 AM ~ NETWORKING AND REFRESHMENT BREAK
10:00 – 10:30 AM ~ GET CONNECTED AND GET INVOLVED FAIR!
NCURA MAGAZINE, JOURNAL (RMR) AND MEMBERSHIP SERVICES
Colleagues from NCURA’s Magazine, Journal (RMR) and Membership Services will be available to talk
with you and answer questions on the front terrace. This is a perfect opportunity to learn about the
different facets of NCURA and how to get involved TODAY. Grow your peer network…visit the Get
Connected and Get Involved Fair!
10:30 AM – NOON ~ SPARK SESSIONS
These 15-20 minute, high energy, high deliverable offerings will get right to the good stuff.
10:30 – 10:50 AM
JOINT EFFORT BETWEEN THE CTSAS
AND THE UIDP
Brenda Kavanaugh*, Associate Director, Office
of Research and Project Administration,
University of Rochester
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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10:30 AM – NOON ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS
ANNUAL
MEETING CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
I
ASSESSMENT AND ADMINISTRATIVE
BURDEN: WHY ASSESSMENT IS IMPORTANT
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
This session will explore the various types of
assessment that can be useful for research
administration offices, and the importance of the
information that can arise from assessment. We will
examine the tipping point between this valuable
information and the growing administrative burden
that arises from sponsored program activity. We will
also discuss several illustrative case studies.
COMPLIANCE B
HOW TO EFFECTIVELY INFLUENCE FACULTY
BEHAVIOR: IS IT POSSIBLE?
Faculty members are notoriously resistant to training
efforts. You can make them do online tutorials, but
they only do the bare minimum to pass the simple
little quizzes, then they print off their certificates, and
immediately forget everything. It is sometimes
possible to get them to learn a little bit about export
control (especially if you threaten them with jail time).
But it often seems like a lost cause to get faculty
members to understand what effort certification is all
about. Faculty seem genuinely clueless about why
they can't just charge their equipment to whatever
project has the largest remaining balance (or
whatever project is going to be expiring first). And
there are SO MANY topics that they need trained on:
effort, cost-sharing, export, re-budgeting rules, cost
allowability and allocability, human subjects, conflict
of interest, lab safety, research misconduct, coauthorship rules, mentorship responsibilities,
intellectual property, etc. Every office on campus
considers their issue to be the most important issue
in the world. If you added up all the time it would
take to an effective job of providing training on all of
these issues, it would require an insanely long time.
But whenever there is a scandal, an audit finding, or a
subject injury, all of the administrators run around
screaming: "faculty training, faculty training, what we
need more than anything is faculty training!"
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will be able to Identify the various
types of assessment.
• Participants will be able to analyze the pros and
cons of assessment in the context of
administrative burden.
Brigette Pfister*, Director of Sponsored Programs,
College of Humanities & Sciences, Virginia
Commonwealth University
David Mineo, Managing Director, DLMineo
Consulting, LLC
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will commiserate with other research
administrators who, like you, have been asked to
do the impossible.
• Participants will discuss advantages and
disadvantages of different faculty training
methodologies and strategies.
• Participants will compare your approach to faculty
training to those of other research administrators.
John Hanold*, Interim Director, Office of
Sponsored Programs, The Pennsylvania State
University
Pamela A. Webb, Associate Vice President for
Research, University of Minnesota
The purpose of this session is to consider possible
approaches to faculty training: online, in person,
transactional, and other. We will consider the
challenges associated with prioritizing among all of
the topics where, arguably, more faculty training is
needed. We will discuss the distortion effect that
results when training resources are focused on
responding to scandals rather than optimizing faculty
behavior. And we'll encourage all participants to share
success stories and strategies for improving faculty
education efforts at their own institutions.
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:30 AM – NOON ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
DEPARTMENTAL I
MY SHADOW AND I: SHARING IDEAS ON
HOW TO BETTER MONITOR YOUR
EXPENSE ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTIONS
IN YOUR AWARD PORTFOLIO
This panel presentation focuses on ways to
facilitate effective reporting. The session will
contain ideas on how to create an award
portfolio monitoring spreadsheet, as well as
tools that will enhance forecasting of revenues
and expenditures. It will also show easy ways to
make these financial tools faster to read for the
final users (PIs).
FEDERAL U
OMB UNIFORM GUIDANCE: TELL US
WHAT TO EXPECT, OMB!!
On December 26, 2013, the Office of
Management and Budget issued final guidance
on federal grants: 2 CFR 200. The new guidance
– a sweeping consolidation of decades of OMB
circulars, guidance, and the “common rule” on
grants management – will replace ALL the
current OMB Grant Circulars and will have a
profound impact on how grants are awarded,
administered and audited. So put your Old
Circulars A-21, A110 and A-133 in the shredder
and come listen to OMB and NSF at this session.
This session will include a brief history, a
summary of the process used to develop the
Uniform Guidance and a high level assessment
of how the guidance will impact your institution,
including Single Audits. Both OMB and Agency
perspectives will frame this conversation.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understanding the needs of
PIs when reviewing financial information.
• Participants will learn to present data
effectively.
• Participants will improving on forecasting
techniques.
• Participants will learn to provide analysis of
financial information.
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
Muftiat Fahm*, Director, Georgetown
University Medical Center
Donna Jean Garrett, Assistant Director,
Finance and Administration, Georgetown
University
Ricardo Roques, Senior Research and Financial
Administrator, Georgetown University Medical
Center
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will gain insight into the
development of the Uniform Guidance.
• Participants will understand the highlights of
key changes in grant requirements.
• Participants will learn about the potential
impact on institution grant management
systems.
• Participants will know the timelines for
implementation and effective dates.
Gilbert Tran*, Senior Technical Manager, Office
of Management and Budget
Michelle Bulls, Director, Office of Policy for
Extramural Research Administration (OPERA),
National Institutes of Health
Victoria Collin, Policy Analyst, Office of
Management and Budget
Jean I. Feldman, Head, Policy Office, Office of
Budget, Finance & Award Management,
National Science Foundation
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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10:30 AM – NOON ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING INTERNATIONAL
O
INTERNATIONAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
AND THEIR COLLABORATIONS AND
CHALLENGES
AGENDA
Faculty collaborate globally and faculty complete for
funding globally. However, language/terms used in
U.S. funding opportunity announcement and
language used in funding opportunities outside of
the U.S. may be different. Horizon 2020 is the new
"umbrella" for European research and innovation
funding, and there are two different agencies who
administer the programs: the Research Executive
Agency (REA) and the European Research Council
(ERC). In order for our faculty to successfully
compete for funding at a global level, this session
will compare and contrast a funding opportunity
announcement from the European Commission and
from the United States.
POST-AWARD A
CLINICAL TRIAL PLANNING AND
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Wednesday
8.13.14
This session will focus on the lifecycle of a clinical
trial from negotiation to close-out. We will discuss
challenges and management for success.
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn to
compare and contrast European and U.S. funding
opportunities, therefore gaining a better
understanding of the similarities and differences
between funding agencies.
Patricia Hawk*, Director, Sponsored Programs,
Oregon State University
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will understand the lifecycle of a
clinical study from a financial point of view.
• Participants will understand the purpose and
impact of an internal budget and how it should be
used in contract negotiations.
• Participants will understand what kinds of costs
will be incurred.
• Participants will understand how revenue is
earned and paid by the company.
• Participants will understand the importance of
financial planning and management for success.
Prerequisites: Attendees should have basic
knowledge of clinical research or research funded
using capitated rate structures.
Loretta Bassler*, Research Administrator, Internal
Medicine, University of Iowa
Brian Farmer, Senior Director, Academic Affairs,
The Cleveland Clinic Foundation
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:30 AM – NOON ~ CONCURRENT SESSIONS (continued)
PRE-AWARD A
IMPLEMENTING ERA SYSTEMS: DO YOUR
HOMEWORK!
You've decided to either replace a legacy eRA
system, or implement an eRA system to move
away from paper. Now what? No matter what
system you choose, or what functionality you
implement, the same process and pitfalls apply.
We'll talk about how to manage the changes
that result in having a new system, and the
resultant shift in your business processes.
Plenty of advance preparation is key!
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS O
SPONSORED PROGRAM MANAGEMENT
IN THE CLOUD
The grants management landscape is more
challenging than ever with an increased focus on
research and other sponsored funding, internal
competitions, compliance regulations, and
demand for oversight and reporting.
For many PUIs, a comprehensive grant and
research management solution has been out of
reach due to the cost, complexity, and limited IT
resources.
Participants will share:
• The decision-making processes and
experiences of implementing an electronic
system.
• What processes and systems should move
first.
• Various electronic research administration
(eRA) solutions and why they chose a cloudbased solution.
• The implementation process, timeline, and
lessons learned as early adopters of a cloudbased grants management solution.
• Specific examples of how they were able to
reduce paper-based or other processes and
improve efficiencies with online workflows and
electronic notifications.
• The value of built-in reporting and real-time
visibility into campus performance in
sponsored programs activity.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn best practices in eRA
implementation.
• Participants will review the issues common to
system implementations, large or small.
• Participants will evaluate impact on users,
processes, and your staff.
• Participants will learn about options: doing it
yourself or hiring outside.
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
Lori Ann Schultz*, Assistant Director,
Sponsored Projects Services, University of
Arizona
Steve Dowdy, Director, Research Information
and Systems, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will learn tips for preparing for an
implementation.
• Participants will identify the key parts of an
implementation process.
• Participants will learn options for go-live and
campus training.
Diane Barrett*, Senior Research Administration
Consultant, rSmart
Diane Ashe, Senior Account Manager, rSmart
Dawn Boatman, Director, Sponsored Projects
Administration, Portland State University
Bruxanne Hein, Director, Office of Research
Services, Coastal Carolina University
Pamela Whitlock, Director, Office of Sponsored
Programs, University of North Carolina at
Wilmington (Emeritus)
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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10:30 AM – NOON ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS
ANNUAL
MEETING BIOMEDICAL
DRUG DISCOVERY 101
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
Are you new to clinical research? Would you like to
learn more about how drugs are developed from
initial concept to entering the market? Bring your
questions! We will discuss the clinical research
process, including a summary of new drug
development (key steps, study phases), and the
(many!) parties involved in getting a drug from
lab to market.
CAREER SKILLS/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
NO ONE TOLD ME! TIPS AND HINTS FOR
INFORMATION DISSEMINATION
As research administrators, our universal mantra is
"It depends". However, we regularly hear a different
mantra from principal investigators and others
engaged in the research enterprise at our institutions
and organizations…"No one told me!" As committed
research administrators, it is disconcerting and
frustrating to hear these words. This discussion
session will seek to identify and explore successful
practices and experiences in the marketing of
research administration information that includes
policies, procedures, and services – all methods to
promote compliance. Participants are encouraged to
contribute to the discussion by sharing their
experiences, practices, strategies and tactics for
ensuring that communications and messages to our
research communities are delivered, received,
understood and retained.
COMPLIANCE
RCR TRAINING – HOW TO TEACH
COMPLIANCE
Jane Tolbert*, Administrator, University of
Rochester
Jennifer Harman, Director of Sponsored Programs
and Facility Research, Nazareth College of
Rochester
Bruce Morgan*, Assistant Vice Chancellor for
Research Administration, University of California Irvine
Lisa Mosley, Executive Director, Research
Operations, Arizona State University
Kris West*, Associate Vice President, Research and
Compliance, Emory University
Discussion to include:
• NIH/NSF requirements for mandatory training.
re. the responsible conduct of research.
• On-line and in-person training requirements.
• Tracking of training completion.
• Monitoring of program.
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:30 AM – NOON ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
DEPARTMENTAL
THE DRA: DEPARTMENT RESEARCH
ADMINISTRATORS, THE FIRST LINE OF
DEFENSE FOR COMPLIANCE
Department Research Administrators are often
the first to learn or discover issues associated
with compliance, as such, this session will
provide an open forum of discussion for DRA's
to discover alternate options utilized to resolve
various compliance related issues. This session
will also provide attendees with guidance on
compliance regulations.
Learning Objectives:
• Participants will leave with detailed material
about current and ongoing issues that directly
impact Department Research Administrators,
especially and specifically those areas where
the compliance of an institution is dependent
upon the due-diligence of the Departmental
Administrator.
• Participants are encouraged to share their
tools and practices in managing their workload
while meeting the compliance requirements,
as well as navigating the responsibilities of
being the liaison between the central
administrative office, faculty, and any other
research units.
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
Prerequisites: Participants should have a basic
understanding of general terms, structure, and
the business of research administration as a
whole as well as within their respective
institutions. Our session will cover a wide range
of research administration issues for
Departmental Research Administrators. We
anticipate that this session will be helpful to
newcomers allowing them to get up-to-speed
quickly on what is a priority; we also expect that
participants with many years of experience will
gain useful and timely information also.
Rashonda Harris*, Associate Director,
Research Accounting Services, Temple
University
Albana Cejne, Associate Director, Research
Accounting Services, Temple University
Derick Jones, Program Manager, The Medical
Genetics Institute, Los Angeles Biomedical
Research Institute
FEDERAL
UPDATE ON FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
AT THE NEA, NEH, AND IMLS
Representatives of the National Endowment for
the Arts, National Endowment for the
Humanities, and Institute of Museum and
Library Services will describe current grant
initiatives at the cultural agencies and answer
questions about programs and grant
management.
Learning Objectives: Participants will gain a
greater awareness of grant opportunities at the
cultural agencies.
Carrie Holbo*, Grants Management Specialist,
National Endowment for the Arts
Karmen Bisher, Senior Grants Management
Specialist, Institute of Museum and Library
Services
Anne Lopez-Buitrago, Deputy Director,
National Endowment for the Humanities
Russell Wyland, Deputy Director, National
Endowment for the Humanities
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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56
th
10:30 AM – NOON ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
ANNUAL
MEETING POST-AWARD
RECORDS RETENTION
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
Learning Objectives: Participants will better
understand their institution's policy.
Retaining records serves two main purposes.
In the short term, it provides those responsible
for management with the means to monitor
transactions and resolve problems. In the long term,
it enables the Institution to comply with Federal
Acquisition Regulations, the Internal Revenue
Service regulations and other federal, state and local
regulations governing auditability.
Mitali Ravindrakumar*, Contract Administrator,
Rand Corporation
POST-AWARD
Caroline Beeman*, Senior Manager, Maximus
Mira L. Levine, Manager, Maximus
OMB UNIFORM GUIDANCE ON
ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS
What are the administrative change implications of
2 CFR 200, the new Uniform Guidance? Are we
improving outcomes by reducing red tape? The
new circular brings administrative change
implications for Internal controls, procurement,
equipment, reporting performance and financial
data, subawards and subrecipient monitoring, cost
sharing, proposal budgets, and direct charging. We
will discuss what the impact of each of these may
be on affected institutions.
PRE-AWARD
Follow-up to Concurrent Session: Intellectual
Property Considerations for the Pre-Award Office,
held @ 8:30 am
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CONSIDERATIONS
FOR THE PRE-AWARD OFFICE
Gregory Slack*, Director of Research & Technology
Transfer, Clarkson University
George McGuire, Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC
Charles Bartunek, Contracts Associate, The Johns
Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
As the competition for federal and state funding
increases Universities are seeking to enhance their
interactions with industry to secure a new source of
sponsored funding. Universities strive to serve as the
R & D arm of existing industries or as the source of
new technology for the industries of tomorrow.
Industry- university relationships often look great on
paper and have great potential to benefit both parties
in areas beyond research and development (R&D). In
reality the differing expectations of both parties put
the research administrators in a difficult situation. As
they are expected to close the deal while negotiating
agreements that complying with state and federal
regulations that govern not-for-profit entities that grant
IP rights and the industry partner expects to maintain
complete ownership of any IP. These two positions
appear to be in direct conflict.
This session will be a follow up open forum focusing
on the many challenges facing research
administrators who manage intellectual property,
negotiate private industrial research agreements,
and state and federal awards.
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PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
10:30 AM – NOON ~ DISCUSSION GROUPS (continued)
PREDOMINANTLY UNDERGRADUATE INSTITUTIONS
TOOLS OF THE PUI COMMUNITY TO
MANAGE POST-AWARD COMPLIANCE AT
SMALL INSTITUTIONS
Have you looked at your policy recently and
realized you are at audit risk for compliance?
Have you already received recommendations
to improve your policies and procedures? As a
Predominately Undergraduate Institution, what
are the tools your colleagues have used to
implement best practices from larger institutions
that work well for your campus environment.
The discussion will focus the group on sharing
various tools used to improve post-award
compliance policies and procedures in key
areas including, internal controls, sub-recipient
monitoring, procurement transactions and
cost-share.
Melissa Mullen*, Sponsored Programs
Manager, California Polytechnic State
University-San Luis Obispo
Katie Plum, Director, Office of Sponsored
Projects, Angelo State University
AGENDA
Wednesday
8.13.14
NOON ~ CONFERENCE ADJOURNS
PROGRAM LEVELS: B – BASIC; I – INTERMEDIATE; A – ADVANCED; O – OVERVIEW; U – UPDATE * Lead presenter
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