Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr. - Tulane NROTC Alumni Association

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Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr. - Tulane NROTC Alumni Association
A scrapbook of historical information concerning RADM Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr.
Compiled by Gretchen Lowe (class of 1990) and Mike Hallal (class of 1984)
Contents
Page 2 - Excerpt from 1939 Taffrail Log (Tulane NROTC Year Book)
Page 3 – Photo of Cluverius Cup (ENS ACOSTA)
Pages 4-8 – Article about RADM Cluverius (Wikipedia)
Page 9 – Biographic material on RADM Cluverius from his tenure as President of Worchester Polytechnic
Institute (link from references on Wikipedia)
Page 10 – Article about RADM Cluverius account of the sinking of the USS MAINE (50 years after the
event)
Page 11 – Obituary (link from references on Wikipedia)
Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Page 1 of 5
Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr. (12 December 1874 – 28 October 1952)
was an admiral in the United States Navy and president of
Worcester Polytechnic Institute. When he died, he was the last
surviving officer of the sinking of the USS Maine.
Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr.
An 1896 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, Cluverius
joined the crew of the USS Maine in 1897 and was on board when
the ship suffered an explosion in Havana Harbor in 1898. The
sinking of the Maine helped precipitate the Spanish–American War,
a war in which Cluverius participated on a number of ships
including USS Scorpion. During the Philippine–American War he
served in the on the USS Solace. In 1914, he took part in the United
States occupation of Veracruz, commanding a battalion of
bluejackets from the battleship USS North Dakota. During World
War I he commanded the minelayer USS Shawmut, laying the antisubmarine mine barrage across the North Sea, for which he was
awarded the Navy Distinguished Service Medal.
Cluverius was Commandant of Midshipmen at the Naval Academy
from 1919 to 1921, and attended the Naval War College from 1921
to 1922. He was aide to the Secretary of the Navy, Curtis D. Wilbur.
Promoted to flag rank in 1928, he was Commandant of the Norfolk
Navy Yard from 1928 to 1930, commanded Battleship Division
Two the Scouting Fleet from June to November 1930, and was
Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief United States Fleet. He
was commandant of the Ninth Naval District and the Fourth Naval
District before retiring from the Navy on 1 January 1939. In
retirement, Cluverius became president of Worcester Polytechnic
Institute, but returned to active duty during World War II as
secretary of the Naval office of Public Information and as a member
of the Navy Board of Production Awards. In this capacity he was
involved in the conferring of Army-Navy "E" Awards.
Rear Admiral Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr.
Born
25 December 1874
New Orleans, Louisiana
Died
28 October 1952 (aged 77)
New Haven, Connecticut
Allegiance
Service/branch
Years of service
Rank
Rear Admiral
held
Ninth Naval District
USS West Virginia
USS Seattle
USS Baltimore
USS Shawmut
USS Dubuque
USS Sandoval
USS Alvarado
USS Talbot
Battles/wars
Spanish-American War
Philippine–American War
Mexican Revolution
World War I
World War II
Awards
Navy Distinguished Service
Medal
◾ 2 Later life
Naval career
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Tyler_Cluverius,_Jr.
1896–1939, 1942–1945
Fourth Naval District
◾ 1 Naval career
◾ 4 References
United States Navy
Commands
Contents
◾ 3 Notes
United States of America
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Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Page 2 of 5
Wat Tyler Cluverius, Jr. was born in New Orleans, Louisiana on 12
Legion of Honor (France)
[1]
December 1874, the son of Wat Tyler Cluverius, Sr., and his wife
Martha Lewis née Manning. He attended Tulane University before
being appointed to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis,
[2]
Maryland, which he entered on 20 May 1892.
In those days, naval cadets—the rank of midshipman would not
exist for a few more years—by law had to serve for two years
before they were eligible to take the examinations for the rank of
Order of Leopold (Belgium)
Order of St. Olav (Norway)
Relations
William Thomas Sampson
(father in law)
William S. Parsons (son in law)
Wat Tyler Cluverius IV
(grandson)
ensign.[3] Therefore, after graduation from the Naval Academy in
June 1896, Cluverius was posted to the cruiser USS Columbia.[2] In 1897 joined the crew of the USS Maine. He was on
board on 15 February 1898 when the ship suffered an explosion in Havana Harbor.[1] Cluverius made his way out,
splashing through water up to waist deep in the darkness, his path obstructed by wreckage. He joined other survivors on
deck, and was rescued by the SS City of Washington.[4] He was one of only 89 survivors, of whom 18 were officers.[5]
The loss of the Maine helped precipitate the Spanish–American War. Cluverius
saw action during the conflict on a number of ships including USS Scorpion, on
which he participated in the Second Battle of Manzanillo and the bombardments
of Santiago and Aquadores. Commissioned as an ensign, he served in the
Philippine–American War on the USS Solace in 1900. He then served on the
gunboat USS Newport.[2]
Senior officers of Mine Squadron
One, in the North Sea, September
1918. Cluverius is front left.
In 1899, he became engaged to Hannah Walker Sampson, the daughter of Rear
Admiral William T. Sampson. The families knew each other well, and
Cluverius was an usher at the wedding of Hannah's sister Olive.[6] On 5 April
1900, they were married in a ceremony at the Boston Navy Yard.[2] Their
marriage produced two daughters, Elizabeth (Betty) and Martha, and a son, Wat
Tyler Cluverius III. Not only did their son become a naval officer, but both daughters married naval officers, John S.
Crenshaw and William S. Parsons respectively.[7] Both sons in law later became admirals.[8]
Cluverius served at the Naval Academy on court martial duty and as commander of the torpedo boat USS Talbot. He
became commander of the gunboat USS Alvarado in June 1901 and then the USS Sandoval in October. He joined the
torpedo boat USS Stockton in 1902. The next year he was promoted to lieutenant and was posted to the battleship
USS Maine, the namesake of the ship whose sinking he had survived in 1898, as an engineering officer. He was
involved with the 1904 sea trials of the cruisers USS Colorado and USS West Virginia before becoming senior
engineer of the monitor USS Arkansas. In 1908 he became senior engineer of the newly commissioned
USS Mississippi.[2]
Shore duty followed in 1909 as a member of the Naval Examining Board of the Special Service Squadron. For a short
time in 1910, Cluverius was navigator of the USS Massachusetts, an old battleship now used as a training ship for
midshipmen, before becoming Judge Advocate at the Court of Inquiry at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. He attended a
conference of officers at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island from May until August 1911, and then
became Inspection Officer at the New York Navy Yard.[2]
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Page 3 of 5
Cluverius, now a lieutenant commander, was posted to the battleship USS North
Dakota in March 1914.[2] From July to October 1914, he took part in the United
States occupation of Veracruz, commanding a battalion of bluejackets that was
landed from the North Dakota.[9] After returning to the ship he became its
executive officer until July 1915, when he became commander of the
USS Dubuque. He was then posted back to the Naval Academy as an
engineering instructor.[2]
In November 1917, Cluverius became responsible for the conversion of the
steamer SS Massachusetts to a minelayer. The ship was commissioned on 7
December 1917, and renamed USS Shawmut on 7 January 1918. She steamed to
Britain in June 1918 and spent the rest of World War I laying the antisubmarine mine barrage across the North Sea. Shawmut laid 2,970 anchored
Secretary of the Navy Curtis D.
Wilbur and his aide, Captain Wat
Tyler Cluverius, Jr., 25 February
1926
mines before returning to the United States In December 1918,.[10] He was
awarded the Navy Distinguished Service Medal ", for exceptionally meritorious service in a duty of great responsibility
as Commanding Officer of the USS Shawmut, engaged in laying mines in the North Sea".[11] He was also became an
Officer of the French Legion of Honor, and Officer of the Belgian Order of Leopold and a Commander of the
Norwegian Order of St. Olav.[2]
Cluverius commanded the cruiser USS Baltimore from February until June
1919, when he became Commandant of Midshipmen at the Naval Academy, a
post he held until 1921, when he left to attend the Naval War College.[1] After
graduating in 1922, he became Chief of Staff of Commander Base Force,
Pacific Fleet. He commanded the cruiser USS Seattle from June to December
1923, when, following the usual pattern of sea duty alternating with shore duty,
he was posted to the office of the Chief of Naval Operations. He became aide to
the Secretary of the Navy, Curtis D. Wilbur.[2]
Rear Admiral Cluverius (third from
left) with his staff on the deck of his
flagship USS Arkansas in Kiel,
Germany, 9 July 1930
Sea duty followed in 1926 as captain of the cruiser USS West Virginia.[2] In
1928, he was promoted to rear admiral. He was one of only five captains
promoted that year, the others being Arthur Japy Hepburn, Harry E. Yarnell,
Albert Ware Marshall and Thomas Tingey Craven.[12] He was Commandant of
the Norfolk Navy Yard from 1928 to 1930, and commanded Battleship Division
Two (BatDiv2) of the Scouting Fleet from June to November 1930.[1] He then became Chief of Staff to the Commander
in Chief United States Fleet, Admiral Jehu V. Chase, who flew his flag from the battleship USS Texas, the ship on
which his son in law Deak Parsons was also serving.[13]
Cluverius was Commandant of the Ninth Naval District from 1932 to 1935. As such, he was the US Navy
representative at the Century of Progress World's Fair in Chicago from 1933 to 1934. His last sea command was the
Base Force, United States Fleet, from 1935 to 1937. In June 1937 he became Commandant Fourth Naval District and
Philadelphia Navy Yard, a post he held until his retirement on 1 January 1939.[2]
Later life
In retirement, Cluverius became president of Worcester Polytechnic Institute, in succession to Rear Admiral Ralph
Earle, a Naval Academy classmate who died in February 1939. Cluverius announced that his priority would be to
complete the building program envisaged by his predecessor. He began with a footbridge which was named in Earle's
memory.[14]
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Page 4 of 5
Cluverius returned to active duty during World War II as secretary of the Naval office of Public Information and as a
member of the Navy Board of Production Awards. In this capacity he was involved in the conferring of Army-Navy
"E" Awards. In 1943, Worcester was chosen as one of the colleges in the V-12 Navy College Training Program.[15] He
returned to Worcester in 1945 after the war ended. In 1951, he oversaw the establishment of an ROTC unit on the
campus.[16]
On 28 October 1952, Cluverius was returning by train from a Navy reunion in Philadelphia when he became so
seriously ill that when the train stopped in New Haven he was taken to hospital, where he died.[17] The last surviving
officer of the USS Maine, he was buried in Arlington National Cemetery, with his wife Hannah, who died in 1938. He
was survived by his two daughters and his son.[8][18]
Notes
1. ^ a b c d Ancell & Miller 1996, pp. 516–517
2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Navy Biographies Branch 1956
3. ^ Buell 1980, p. 15
4. ^ "Maine Survivor Recalls Blast that Shattered Battleship" (http://fultonhistory.com/Newspaper%2011/North%
20Tonawanda%20NY%20Evening%20News/North%20Tonawanda%20NY%20Evening%20News%201948%20%
20Grayscale/North%20Tonawanda%20NY%20Evening%20News%201948%20%20Grayscale%20-%200132.pdf). North
Tonawanda NY Evening News. 13 February 1948. Retrieved 4 August 2011.
5. ^ "Survivors of USS Maine" (http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq71-3.htm). Naval Historical Center. 6 February 1998.
Retrieved 28 March 2010.
6. ^ "Another Miss Sampson to Wed" (http://fultonhistory.com/Newpapers%20Disk2/Utica%20NY%20Daily%
20Observer/Utica%20NY%20Observer%201899.pdf/Utica%20NY%20Observer%201899%20-%
200511.pdf#xml=http://fultonhistory.com/dtSearch/dtisapi6.dll?
cmd=getpdfhits&u=ffffffffeff6d929&DocId=3635825&Index=Z%3a%2fFulton%
20Historical&HitCount=4&hits=8f2+8fe+92b+c54+&SearchForm=C%3a%5cinetpub%5cwwwroot%5cFulton%5fNew%
5fform%2ehtml&.pdf). Utica NY Observer. 23 January 1899. Retrieved 4 August 2011.
7. ^ Christman 1998, pp. 33–34
8. ^ a b "National Gravesite Locator" (http://gravelocator.cem.va.gov). United States Department of Veterans' Affairs. Retrieved
14 September 2011.
9. ^ "List of Expeditions 1901–1929" (http://www.history.navy.mil/library/online/haiti_list_exp.htm). Department of the Navy –
Naval History and Heritage Command. Retrieved 4 August 2011.
10. ^ Beals 1973, p. 88
11. ^ "Valor Awards for Wat Tyler Cluverius" (http://militarytimes.com/citations-medals-awards/recipient.php?
recipientid=16437). Military Times. Retrieved 4 August 2011.
12. ^ "Army&Navy: Braid Men" (http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,881102,00.html). Time magazine. 2 July
1928. Retrieved 4 August 2011.
13. ^ Christman 1998, pp. 40–41
14. ^ Tymeson 1965, pp. 145, 161
15. ^ Tymeson 1965, p. 163
16. ^ Tymeson 1965, p. 166
17. ^ Tymeson 1965, p. 173
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18. ^ "Last Survivor of Battleship Maine Dies" (http://fultonhistory.com/Newspaper%208/Schenectady%20NY%
20Gazette/Schenectady%20NY%20Gazette%201952%20Grayscale/Schenectady%20NY%20Gazette%201952%
20Grayscale%20-%207263.pdf#xml=http://fultonhistory.com/dtSearch/dtisapi6.dll?
cmd=getpdfhits&u=7eea27f0&DocId=7980325&Index=Z%3a%2fFulton%
20Historical&HitCount=7&hits=3fe+41a+433+7fa+822+836+86f+&SearchForm=C%
3a\inetpub\wwwroot\Fulton_New_form.html&.pdf). Schenectady NY Gazette. 29 October 1952. Retrieved 4 August 2011.
References
◾ Ancell, R. Manning; Miller, Christine (1996). The Biographical Dictionary of World War II Generals and Flag Officers: The
US Armed Forces. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. ISBN 0-313-29546-8. OCLC 33862161
(https://www.worldcat.org/oclc/33862161).
◾ Beals, Victor (September 1973). "Comment and Discussion". United States Naval Institute Proceedings.
◾ Buell, Thomas B. (1980). Master of Sea Power: A Biography of Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King. Annapolis: Naval Institute
Press. ISBN 1-55750-092-4. OCLC 5799946 (https://www.worldcat.org/oclc/5799946).
◾ Christman, Albert B. (1998). Target Hiroshima: Deak Parsons and the Creation of the Atomic Bomb. Annapolis, Maryland:
Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-120-3. OCLC 38257982 (https://www.worldcat.org/oclc/38257982).
◾ Navy Biographies Branch (30 November 1956), Rear Admiral Wat Tyler Cluverius, Washington, DC
◾ Tymeson, Mildred McClary (1965). The Two Towers: The Story of Worcester Polytechnic Institute
(http://www.wpi.edu/academics/Library/Archives/TwoTowers/index.html). Worcester, Massachusetts: Worcester Polytechnic
Institute. OCLC 256366801 (https://www.worldcat.org/oclc/256366801). Retrieved 4 August 2011.
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wat_Tyler_Cluverius,_Jr.&oldid=591097842"
Categories: 1874 births 1952 deaths People from New Orleans, Louisiana United States Naval Academy alumni
United States Navy admirals American military personnel of the Philippine–American War
American military personnel of the Spanish–American War American military personnel of World War I
American military personnel of World War II United States Navy World War II admirals
Burials at Arlington National Cemetery Recipients of the Navy Distinguished Service Medal
Commanders of the Order of St. Olav Officiers of the Légion d'honneur
Officers of the Order of Leopold (Belgium)
◾ This page was last modified on 17 January 2014 at 09:23.
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using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the
Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
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6/23/2014
Papers of President Wat Tyler Cluverius
President Wat Tyler Cluverius
RG 020_07_00
Administrative Records
ABSTRACT:
These are records of WPI's seventh president, Wat Tyler Cluverius. They include biographical materials, correspondence, and related materials.
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE:
Wat Tyler Cluverius was born December 25, 1874, in New Orleans, Louisiana. In 1892 he received an appointment to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, from
which he graduated four years later. During the Spanish-American War, he served on the gunboat Scorpion in the Cuban campaign and in the Philippines.
After this, he returned to the Naval Academy as an instructor. When the Mexican campaign began in 1914, he was assigned to command the U.S.S. North
Dakota's landing battalion in taking Vera Cruz. After this, he returned to the Naval Academy as head of the engineering department.
During World War I, Captain Cluverius was commanding officer of the U.S.S. Shawmut, which engaged in mine-laying operations in the North Sea. After the
war, he returned to Annapolis and then commanded the cruiser Seattle, the battleship West Virginia, and other fleet units. He became Chief of Staff of the
United States Fleet in 1930, and later was Commandant of the Norfolk Navy Yard, commander of the second and fourth battleship divisions of the United States
Fleet, and Commandant of the Ninth Naval District at the Great Lakes, Illinois, and of the Fourth Naval District and Navy Yard at Philadelphia.
He retired as an Admiral from the Navy in 1938, after receiving the Distinguished Service Medal and honors from several European countries.
Wat Tyler Cluverius married Hannah Walker Sampson, daughter of Adminral William T. Sampson, in 1900. They had two daughters and a son. Mrs. Cluverius
died in 1938.
Admiral Cluverius became WPI's seventh President in 1939, succeeding Ralph Earle, who had been a classmate and friend at the Naval Academy. Expansion of
the campus was one of the President's priorities, and Alden Memorial and Earle Bridge were completed early in his tenure, and soon after Higgins Laboratories
for Mechanical Engineering was built.
During World War II, largely through President Cluverius's efforts, the Navy's V-12 program came to WPI, bringing students from other schools as well as
training WPI students in the program. All WPI's V-12 graduates received commissions in the Naval Reserve. President Cluverius served again with the Navy
during the war, first with the Navy's Office of Public Information and later with the Naval Board of Production Awards. After the war, a Reserve Officers
Training Corps was established at WPI.
After the war, President Cluverius began studies of "Tech's" academic programs. He led the effort to provide a building for the Civil Engineering Department,
Kaven Hall. The 1947-48 Endowment Fund Campaign, under his leadership, raised over $1,200,000 in a few months. President Cluverius's building plans
included an extension of Salisbury Laboratories, remodeling of Boynton Hall and Atwater Kent Laboratories, building another field house, campus lighting and
general repairs.
President Cluverius oversaw, along with industrial leaders, establishment of the School of Management in 1949.
On October 28, 1952, President Cluverius died suddenly of a heart attack while returning from a trip to Philadelphia. In the WPI Journal's tribute to him of
November that year, is the following: "Underlying a native dignity and aplomb was a dynamic personality, a tremendous vitality, an incredible zest for work and
accomplishment, and an enthusiasm that swept others along with him."
Page 1
Many congressmen
believed
that the break in prices had eliminated any need for price controls and rationing demanded by
President Truman.
Sen. A. Willis Robertson, D.,
Chicago, (UP) — The break in cents and pork chops and eggs
a.,
said the price break proved
the commodity market was a down 10 cents each.
Va.,
said the price break proved
break for the housewife with food
An important marketing spe- Gen. Carl Hatch, D., N. M., said
Then a midshipman, Admiral
Worehester, Mas*. (UP) — ReMontreal (UP) — An interna- stores passing down "substantial cialist at the Chicago stockyards that "if prices level off there-will
Cluverius
was
stripped
down
to
his
member the Maine?
tional sale of lottery tickets to price reductions" on many staples estimated that wholesale meat be no price control this session."
undershirt
and
pants
on
the
hot
support the Italian Communists in the National Association of Re-prices dropped as much as five
Rear Admiral Wat Tyler CluverHowever, President
Truman
stifling
night
on
Feb.
15,
1898
when
cents a pound in the past week.
the spring elections was disclos- tail Grocers said today.
ius does — as vividly as though
told
his
news
conference
that
the
The association said a telegraHe said good to choice beef
the disaster occurred only yester- at 8:40 p. m., there was a small ed by police today, after seizure
nation's
economy
still
was
threatdropped 2 to 4 1-2 cents, low
.day instead of 50 years ago Sun- explosion followed by a terrific of 10 books of tickets in a raid phic survey of members in key
detonation."
states made it "evident that flour, grade cow 1 to 1 1-2 cents, and ened by the inflation although
on a private house.
day.
vegetable good to choice lambs 2 to 3 cents. the tumbling commodity markets
Top prize in the lottery was the bacon, ham, lard,
"The aft part of the ship seemThis retired naval officer is one
were a step in the right direction.
of the few living survivors of the ed to sink under my feet," he re- choice of a 30-day trip to Moscow, shortening, eggs, butter, pork and He said that lower grades of
in some cases, beef, have been beef, lamb and mutton showed an
New York, London or Paris.
blast that started the Spanish- called today.
priced
to conform with the low- increase in the previous week beThe 100 and 500 lire tickets
American War — the blowing up
"I found myself trying desperFarmers Get Increase
ered
prices
of the commodity cause higher grades were so high
e i the U. S. Battleship Maine in ately to crawl out through a tiny (selling in Canada for 25 cents
priced. This week he expects the In Payments for Milk
Havana harbor.
porthole. The salt watter poured and $1) were countersigned by markets."
poorer cuts to show a decline.
Palmiro
Togliatti,
leader
of
the
Patsy
D'Agostino
of
New
York
New York, (UP)—Dairy farmAdmiral Cluverius, now 73, re- in over me and I jumped back inItalian
Communists.
No
arrests
City,
president
of
the
Grocers
AsAlbert T. Luer, chairman of the ers will be paid a uniform price
called today how 2<J8 of his ship- to the officers' mess, splashing
have been made, police said.
sociation, said the survey was Western Meat Packers Associa- of $5.31 per hundredweight for
mates drowned or burned to death through the darkness.
"These
tickets,"
a
high
governmade "after the week-end price tion, predicted at San Francisco January deliveries to the New
in their hammocks as the 8000-ton
• I joined up with (the late)
warship went down after two Amon Bronson of Rochester, N.Y„ ment official said, "must be re-flurry in order to determine only that meat prices never again York milkshed's 433 pool-approvwould rise as high as they did ined plants, Dr. J. C. Blanford, admysterious explosions.
and we started forward where we garded as further proof of the ex- genuine reductions."
It showed flour down five to January. He said the price break ministrator of the New York Metcould hear screams," Admiral Clu- istence of a close link between the
verius — now president of Wor- Communists in Canada and those 18 cents on 10-pound bags, lard in livestock was caused by con- ropolitan milk marketing area,
announced today.
down S to 8 cents, shortening sumer resistance.
ehester Polytechnic Institute — in other countries."
Police said the tickets, which down 8 to 4 cents, butter down 5
said.
"The housewife was reached
This compares with, a uniform
were printed in Italian, had been to 6 cents, bacon down 5 to 10 the limit of her buying capacity," price of $5.13 a hundredweight in
"We couldn't get through the
smuggled into the country.
cents, pork loins down 2 to 12he said.
January, 1947.
steel ladders and wreckage and
"They
were
brought
in,"
police
the water was up to our waist by
said, "by an Italian sailor on an
Your BROKEN LENS this time. We finally got eat byItalian
ship...probably a courier
puling ourselves up over a hatch
for the International Party headcoaming."
quarters."
"Up on the pop deck we found
The tickets were seized in a
everyone who had escaped, includ- private house, where they were
ing the only other living survivor found with other Communist docwith whom I have maintained con- uments and literature and a phototact, David F. Boyd, now a retired graph of Tim Buck, head of the
captain, of Sante Fe, N. M."
Canadian Communists.
Admiral Cluverius s a i d he
Police said the tickets were being sold to build Italian Communist Party funds for the forthcoming effort to overthrow the government of Italy in the Spring
elections. The deadline for ticket
sales was May 1, 1948.
At the top of each ticket was
printed a hammer and sickle
super-imposed on an Italian flag,
lore
under which were the letters P.
C I. — the abbreviation for the
Italian Communist Party.
The prizes listed on the reverse
side of the tickets ranged from
the SO-day trips to 15 day excursions to the Isle of Capri and the
historic site of ancient Pompeii.
Italian Reds Stage Nation's Food Stores Make
Maine Survivor Recalls Blast Lottery for Funds 'Substantial* Cut in Prices
That Shattered Battleship
To Support Party
N. T.. Pridmy, Feb. U , IMS
The NIWS of the
SAVE
Russian Producers Warnei
On Poor Goods, False Labi
Moscow (UP) — The top trade
official in Moscow warned producers today they would Be prosecuted for crimes against the
Soviet state if they continued to
pass off shoddy goods, poor service and false labels.
The official, N. Tikhomirov,
head of the Trade Section of the
Moscow City Soviets Executive
Committee, said this practice was
permitted under wartime emergencies but it must stop now.
Writing in the Moscow Bolshevik, Mr. Tikhomirov blasted e s pecially at producers who turn
out poor quality clothing from all
kinds of material just so they
can meet their quotas under the
five-year plan.
*He also pointed an accusing
finger at meat
suppliers who
stuff sausages improperly and
who put labels on packages unwarranted by the inferior contents.
"One must recognize that often
low-quality goods readies shop
shelves owing to the rotten
eralism of some trading wo
and their lenience toward
suppliers of flawed goods,"
said.
"It is necessary to draw up
ports immediately about all
of the supply of flawed good
materials," he said.
"They should be handc
prosecutors
for drawing
manufacturers' attention to
criminal responsibility under
law. which characterizes the
duction of bad goods as a
against the state."
Mr. Tikhomirov
noted
Moscow food shops could imj
their customer service cow
ably, particularly in the t
of packing and an assortmen
goods.
He was particularly displ
by clothing industry.
He mentioned men's and
men's winter coats of gray t
with long-haired Mouton co
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F o r flie Major Portion of Yot
Life that You S p e n d erf Horn
thought six sailors from the ship
also were living today.
"We finally got off in a boat
from the civilian ship City of
Washington," Admiral Cluverius
said. "We tried to get forward to
the others but could not. Some of
them were trapped and burned as
they lay in their hammocks.'*
The New Orleans-born Navy officers said that of 326 men and 35
officers, the Maine lost 266 men
and two officers, and some others
died latter of wounds.
Admiral Cluverius said the court
of inquiry into the disaster determined that an "external force,"
perhaps a mine, had exploded under the ship and touched off the
Maine's forward magazine.
Admiral Cluverius said he felt
the court was "correct'* because
evidence showed the ship's keel
had been blown upward and inward.
The Spanish Court of Inquiry
felt the blast was the result of an
internal explosion," but Admiral
Cluverius said "this is pretty hard
to reconcile with the findings of
our court.'*
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Untitled Document
Thomas M. Tryniski
309 South 4th Street
Fulton New York 13069
www.fultonhistory.com
14
. -GAZETTE PHONE 4-4141
GAZETTE PH(>NB^4144.
SCHENECTADY GAZETTE, WEDNESDAY, OCTQBEB; 3 , 1952
.*-,
^ • — . I H W I l ^1>
Two Youths Win Prizes
Musical Festival Contest
Says Voting
Will Depend
On Economy
v—
To €w$$&l
r$ Favo^iiig Rich
epuDJican§
,
Ronald
Clairmont.
lS-.vear-old
pianist, was awarded first prize of
$100. and Thomas Cifam. 16-year<jld alto clarinetist, was guarded
a. second prize of $30 at the conclusion of the Music Festival Contest at th*> Hotel Nan Curler last
eveningThe contest, the third
sponsored
by \\w Schenectady
Federation of Women's Organizations, wa* judged by Mr*. Edward
" CORTLAND. Oct. 28 LP)—The
Fuench and l i u . Joseph McCu'ien independent voter is "greatly overof Albany and Mrs. Myra King of rated.'' Dr. F. A. Pearson, Cornell
Ballston Spa.
University farm economist, said to¥ # *
night.
¥ ¥ *
MBS. FLOYD B t L U S served as
executive director of this years
PEARSON, WHO PREDICTED
contest and awards weie made by the victory of President Truman In
Mr*. Wesley J Meng. president of j the 3948 election, said in a speech
th* federation There were 15 con- at a Kiwanis club dinner that the
testants participating in the event deciding vote would be cast by
including
*even
pianists;
two those who "vote according to their
clarinetists, one flutist, t u o vocal- pocketbook "
ists, one harpist, one violinist and Pearson recently said the high
one trombonist
level of commodity prices favored
In announcing the judges" de- the election of Gov. Adlai E. Stecision Mis. French commented on venson. the Democratic nominee,
ihe high standard of the peifoim-ibut recent deflationary trends were
a n c e s given throughout the eve-favorable to Gen. JDwight D. Eisenning and expressed amazement at'bower, the Republican candidate,
the amount of talent displayed byj The economist said in a prepared
the city's junior musicians. The'address, that a person's political injudges sat in diffeient parts of heritance was rarely relinquished,
the auditorium during the contest
"HIS E L E C T i q i
tinued,
end ratings were based oh ~ a c
curacy, tone, technique, rhythm, will be dominated by the 20 odd
million traditional Republicans and
phrasing 'and interpretation.
the 20-odd million Democrats w h o
¥ ¥ *
HONORABLE MENTION w a s refuse to dissipate their political
made equally to Carolyn Cholewaj allegiance."
and Grace VaJlier, 17-vear and 16-j T h e y w i U s"° t o t h e polls a n d
year-old pianists. Special mention'; V 0 ] , e a s 8 r a n d P » p p y did." he added,
was made of Sarah Besau, flutist,! Pearson contended that the deand Judy Levinc. harpist.
t ciding vote would be cast by voters
Other contestants included Mar-I who temporarily desert their injorie Stansell. William Armstrong, heritance and "vote according to
Nancy Engel, Lorraine Ritchie, their poeketbook.'' He estimated
Cynthia Finch.' Richard Schuyler. there were two to four million in
Frjscilla Proxmire, Robert Race this group.
¥ ¥ ¥
and Barbara Stalder.
H
E
MAINTAINED
that 'differThe second prize Q$ $50 was made
possible hy an anonymous donor ences in fundamental political iswho during the refreshment period sues are of little importance in d e informed the committee that one termining the outcome of this elec~
prise would not be enough under lion hut of primary importance is
the economic welfare of the voters."
the circumstances*.
He said:
¥ ¥ ¥
"To the Iowa farmer the fundaT H E PROGRAM, designed strict- mental issue is the price of pigs
ly as a contest program, had re- and the fundamental issues t o
markable appeal on its artistic farmers, professors and garage memerits.
chanics a r e their families, their
In the two previous contests^spon- health a n d their pocketbooks."
' gored by the federation the prize of
$100 w a s Bplit. "Winners t h e final
year were-Carol Fonda and Dolores
Contlnillo, both pianists.
Last
year's prize, also split went ta
Nancy Havens, violinist, and Ann
- Wheeler, oboist. Clairmont, who
participated last year, then won
honorable mention.
—
Hafio^^ers
Warned About
'Torch* Masks
N E W YORK, O c t 28 <AP)—
With the approach of halloween and
the custom.of wearing masks.. Fire
Commissioner Jacob Grumet today
'warned against a domino type
mask h e said was made of "highly
^nflammabl£i_iiellulold-like
material.
;*•*:
..'•
- ••
¥
*
*
i T H E Y A R E inexpensive and
those' with decorative lace borders
are especially hazardous, particu-.
jariy if . the wearer attempts to
^strike a. match to light a. clgaret,
:
*lbe commissioner said.
, ""\
^ ' T h e s e masks are of a - h i g h l y
InfiammaMe material," t h e conxfclssioner, Nieclared. adding "we
W^tiit to warn theCpubJIc, especially
parents against buying these masks
; which can cause serious burps and
iactai disflgurement"
-Representatives of major dime
Stores In the c i t y and of t h e distributor of the half-masks .cop*
tarred with Commissioned Grumet
at^his request. Names of the distributor ahd manufacturer were
hot disclosed.
v ..
-/
—
.
• ' »
• N E ^ T ^ r O R K f t Oct, •
<AP)Sen. Irving M- **£* CR, N Y ) *ald
tonight t h e Republican campaign
Is • drive *to^bTln«.rnto our government an. atmosphere of sincerity,
ability* vigor and honesty."
"We stand a t the brink, or what
will be a great Republican victory/'
Ives told a OOP rally In Yorkvllle.
He la seeking re~tlecU<m,
•
—(Gazette Photos—Sellers)
The stern of a 62-foot pleasure boat, which hit a n unknown object
i n the Mohawk river yesterday afternoon and was deliberately run
aground by i t s skipper to save the ship from sinking, i s shown
almost 'submerged i n upper photo. T h e ship, with a hole ripped
open tn t h e a f t section, crashed into the west bank of the river
near Bexford bridge about 2 p.m. None of the craft's passengers
were hurt. They.Were brought ashore by a ladder while Bexford
volunteer firemen and the ship's .owner, G. A. Berbymuk of Hazel
Park, Mich., attempted to float the motor-cruiser by, emptying out
flooded compartments with a portable pump. Pumping operations
were unsuccessiuL Police said a diver will probably be called to
repairthO d a m ^ e ^ h u l l . Lower photo shows bow of ship which was
\ . lifted" out of !ijie %ater several feet when it hit the shoreline.
P.
J O H N ROHAN,
business
agent agent for the A F L union K
said Szymalak participated in contract negotiations along with several other restaurant proprietors
this summer, b u t refused t o sign
when a h agreement w a s reached
HOPKINSVILLE.; K y , Oct. 2Slwill be adequately, protected from
Sept, &i T h e union^official said h e
(
A
P ) ~ A federal grand jury,' in a violence."
expects a hearing sbon on- the
blistering report on vice a n d law The' grand jury said that the
charge/';" . '-'';-:'f'^.
• '•
enforcement in Hopklnsville de- safety., commissioner and police deT h e restaurant proprietor reportclared today that soldiers from partment had knowledge of wideed that h o w a s notified by h i s emFort Campbell had been "brutally spread prostitution and had done
ployes "ndt to sign t h e Locai 320
beaten or killed" by city policemen. little.to'stop it; that they knew of
contract .since they h a d formed
bootlegging, gambling- a n d illegal
^ T H E COMMISSIONER, said the their-own; union. Ssymalak said he ;Th£ jury recommended that all traffic in narcotics..
the
25,000
personnel
of
Fort
CampIjttasks had been tested in the de- then submitted the case to the
¥ ¥ ¥>
partment • laboratory and quickly state board for a decision on which bell be barred from Hopkinsvilte
"POLICE
OFFICER
Morris Lamb
hurst jnto flames when ignited b y group represented the' majority of until the commissioner of s'afety
and
>
Chief
.
of
Police
Greenfield,''
and
six
policemen
are
removed.
• match.
employes. : H e denied t h e union
the
jury's
report
said,
''have been
¥
¥
¥
" H e said the- retailers were tin- charge. .
.
, observed, t a k i n g soldiers who Were
- -aware of the danger and agreed a t
¥ 4 ¥
FORT CAMPBELL, home of the o t l | e a v e f r o m Fort Campbell to
:pnce t o withdraw-the merchandise
11th
Airborne Division, is 16 miles l h e h o m e o f j g Dukes for* the
A
COMMITTEB
from
the
Schei r o m sate and return, i t , t o t h e
manufacturer. The distributor told nectady Trades'.Assembly, the city- south of thiB community of 16.000 p u r p 0 g e 0 f engaging in prostituj yon.
Grumet that a comparatively small wide A F L orgariftatlon, i s sched- po'pulalion. ' . * . : " . . •
Mayor,
A,
Si
K
o
o
n
said
the
city!
"That Chief of Police Greenfield
uled
t
o
meet
with
t
h
e
restaurant
quantity of the masks were avail.would
a
c
t
in
any.
case
that
came
tor
has
made open advances looking
proprietor
this,
afternoon
to
discuss
able in the city, Grumet said.
officials' attention.
! toward the . establishment by him
the dispute. .,The employs group Is composed S a f e t y Commissioner Joe D a v I s M * house of prostitution i Hopof two waitresses, a cook and two said "I deny everything . in the kinsville."
utility men. Saymalak said last grand jury report," H e added that
night none of the employes had ho would not resign.
The'grand ;jury report, Issued at
walked out, and that the restaurant
Raducnh. Ky.. said "it is apparent
was operating as usual. ;' Cub Pack 59 look t w o field trips
that the Hopkinsvlile police dein October under thei guidance «f
partment and the commissioner of
the den mothers and the auxiliary. arrow: Ronald Splalt, veer pin, safety have accepted bribes and
; The first trip w a s to the Navy gold arrow, stiver arrow, Tommy payoffs."
Depot, during fire preveivtibrt week. Jameson, wolf badge, gold arrow,
i t added that "the treatment by
The boys had fire prevention ex- two irilver arrows; Gregory Davis, the local police In Hopkinsvilte of
wolf
badge,
gold
aTrow,
two
sliver
CANASTOTA, O c t 28 <JP)~ T w o j
plained to them and were given
military personnel from Fort Campthe opportunity to try on t h e fire arrows;. Bernard Hagl, wolf badge, bell, Ky., has In many instances Syracuse University students paid (
gold arrow, two silver arrows;
hoota and helmets.
been brutal and Inhuman." The re- a totai of $80 today because they
:'• T h e second trip w a s Jtf an ice Frederick Van Wagner, wolf badge; port continued:
* • played host* to "fraternity brothers
at a roast pig dinner.
tream plant where they^saw snllk Michael Von Steina, bear badge,
¥ ¥ ¥
¥
¥ ¥
bottled and capped and s a w h o wgold arrow, silver arrow; Michel
"THAT T H E R E H A V E B E E N at
Palut&v Hon badge, gold arrow,
ic* cream Is made.
WILLIAM
McGARVEY,
20. of
The October pack meeting w a i silver arrow; and David Koch, Hon least four instances where soldiers 216> Hlxon avenue, and William
were without provocation brutally
held at the Thomas Corners' fire badge;
Chapman, also 20, of 371 Foster,
•house. The meeting w a s opened Robert Woodrew, David Koch beaten or killed by members of the place, both of Buffalo, pleaded
their HopklnsvjDe police department,"
hy Cubmaster Prank N&ss, dressed and Paul Lang received
guilty to the.theft of the pig from
Webeios
and
graduation
certificates
The grand jury did not identify^
«s an Indian chief.
a restaurant here. They were fined
> Scouts receiving awnrds were and * gift from Cubmaster Frank any soldiers w h o had been beAlen *20 each on charges of petty larJ»mes Burdick, Gary Schuster and Na*s, The boy* w e t * Introduced or killed.
ceny and made restitution of $<0
Walter Hagl, year plhs; Jerry to Scoutmaster. Albert Hardin oS The report followed a M-monlh for the pig when arraigned before
nvestlgalion "conducted In co-op
IWhlte, year p i n / g o l d Arrowy nilver Tiqop 'Bfc
After t h e award*.were made, the eralton with the U.S. district attor- Justice of the Pence Charles Bidin-
•; ~ \ ' .
-
*
v
% • : • •
e Ky. Police
Wive Beaten, Ktlhd GIs
•
.
•
*
'
i
*
.
•
*
•
NO MONTHLY CRAMPS.;:
not even on the VERY FIRST DAY!
BRESLAW'S BREAKING ALL RECORDS,'
°* AH
NOW! You Can Haye
OLD Living Room Suite
Roast Pig
Diinier Costs
Students $80
•
''
;
pack look part In a talk feat. In-jneyto office. The jury said the suc- gor».
The
pair
appeared
In
epurt
after
dlsn hand wre.«A1«, Indian dunce, cccding grand 'jury, would seek to
being 'given summonses by stale
and song*.
Refreshments w e r e j r e l u m Indictments where they are
police w h o charged they took the
served hy l b s auxiliary.
•
hvatranted "and w h e n t h e witnesses
pig and a silver tray It was on
preparatory t o being served in a
restaurant on Oct. 21.' ;
TROOPER F R A N K STR1TTER
*ald the pkir w a * arretted after
they were Identified from; a picture
Not Till*
^
an Atnaieur photographer had tak. i t f you belong to your company'i
en of t h e birthday patty that the
I \Mtm C»rj8a-JiHfB SHttsUft Group
pig had been Intended Jfor. The
* l^^flfl|iTtr^n^f0l'l!ht'*6r»t;'.;'..
studentk. ' Strlttcr
added,
were
l| .today, lomorrow, at long as you art
shown standing near t h e pig,
a wl>scrlb*r. r'or, under tkt*t nonStritter said the t r a y , was re«
\ '(refit 3%na, you can Continue to
covered, but t h a i t h e pig h a d been
; ealiitr «tt iM^ ir*e**i«<Sl prdt-ectiort—
eaten by- fraternity brothers of t h e
Buffalo students'. H e did not iden-:"" iimfcMJfa'M'vrWm voureiitu, Bwn tify t h e fraternity.
C*o«B pray* lor 21 nay*! a year semi-1 ) ^ ) s W r o « n > i r d , generi BUY DIRECT FROM
^ awiint—ror • « * enrolled m*mMANUPACTURIR ,
| f P ;oTtli*'.fl«tu1y«;,i^Ji.:r^m
Am
0
e
m
M
.
«
!>ST
woatKB
u
r
*
:
;
SmstA helpe hay your doctor's bill*
:: SohY n »^ddjr leAna w a y ov«r
p o t h e r . * » dnesh't do a n y
«apJo3.-w for rulrdtUils
Natlortalty; Adveirttsed;
h i s plate Kfiheh l i e eats.*'. •","'
'ROhil-••$$..'«ne-''io<.-:t.ry,jahd rnak*
^iakey Brings; Ittdail /
;»:.' M o t h ^ ^WeJJall haye some
the -vcHildren stt ttft j s t i a l g h t
*' b w l e i ^ t e Schehe^ciady •'
had hah?Is An^l It you're''.'smart
; - i » ^ : ^ ^ : ' - ^ e ^ | ! ^ ; v w h e ^ their
:ta;»»r,:,;ji*&Vthem • Auch^- a • ter>:.' 5?ou'll.lm|tavos ot»t j^odv not our
r«fc/ Cepitet
msttiti,
itwfo *«km'p1*.,v;::;,;.
.AcltAowledglnir t h e other p a r e n t Is hot perfect, a n d crtticUmi
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Cushions anifeplatforma rebuilt — springs replaced
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.ADVEKT1SKMKNT
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MTER65?
Poiiits for Parent
CUSTOMBUILT
•
Cotton felt, and sisal
where needed.*
§i F r a m e s retouched,
braced and repaired.
Suit* fcterllhred and
cleaned.
www.fultonhistory.com
I CUSHIONS
RfMADI
OKI NiW
LOWfiST PRICES!
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T.k vl
Untitled Document
Thomas M. Tryniski
309 South 4th Street
Fulton New York
13069
SOFA
CHAIR
BIG SELECTION
. ^ F COVERS!
•*V
$iSAV6$$
FAIRWAY
#
*«*2fe
hi,
<"«:,;v*
* &
•
Cub ^ r S T v i s U g
Naval Depot, Ice Cream
Plant on Field! Traps
mtm
*
Church Plans
Addition to
Parish Hall
¥
LEON -S&YMAJLEK, proprietor,
said last night he has asked the
state labor relations board for a
decision on whether the employes
are represented by Local 320 or hy
their o w n independent union. Two
informal hearings have. already
h e e n held before the board, h e
said.
The u n i o n h a s flled em unfair
tabor practice charge against the
restaurateur, Charging that since
JtiJyghe h ^ f o i t e r e d and supported
a "company union," t h e Employes
Association of Leon's R e s t a u r a n t
*
: N E W YORK, Oct. k$ ( A P ) ~
John Cashmore, Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate* said tonight
the Republicans Want t o "march oh
Washington"'behind the cloak of a
distinguished soldier, and there to
set up a . dictatorship of the rlch>
for the rich a n d by. t h e rich."
Last Survivor
Of Battleship
Maine Dies
Local 320, A F L Hotgl and Restaurant Employes Union, has-established picket lines in front of
Leon's Restaurant, Jay street, in
a dispute over representation of
employes there.
¥
SAN F R A N C i S C b , O c t 28 t<P>~
A ^roup p t experts offered advice
here today on how physically handicapped teen-agers can be helped
to get along in the world without
running up medical bills that
would wreck the average family's
income.
THINGS THAT CAN B E D O N E
CASHMORE'S R E M A R K S were
In the horn,* can. Improve; to some In a speech prepared for delivery
OF T H E VOTERS, Ives declared: extent a t least, the lot of virtually at t h e Madison Square Garden
"These same Americans are sick all crippled children, these experts rally for Governor AdiaTStevenson,
and tired of being let down by said. They addressed the National Democratic candidate for presitheir government, sick a n d tired Society for Crippled Children* and dent.of hearing only excuses and abuse Adults.
t
Cashmore,
Brooklyn
borough when they look; ^fpr reports of
The handicapped youngster w h o president, charged that Stevenson
achievement, sick and tired of - e e - can h e trained t o take care of h i s has been "made the target for a
i n g offices of high public trust,! personal appearance h a s a good bitter and unwarranted attack by
debased b y m e n of shallow con-i chance of being able to get along those w h o , unable or unwilling to
with people, said Harriet C. John meet the stern issues confronting
science.'
Jvea .touched on «uch subjects as son, medical social worker of the our people, have resorted to pernational defense, price controls, the University of California School of sonal abuse andu character assas^
sj nation."
Taft-Hartley law and civil rights. Medicine.
.The .GOP senator said, congress
He apparently w a s referring to
An especially pretty dreis or. a
appropriated liberally for national super hair-do m a y Improve the a television speech last night hy
defense but that ?the present Dem- emotional and social status of a Senator Joseph McCarthy (R, Wis.)
pcratic administration h a s been so crippled adolescent girl, Miss John> who discussed Stevenson's alleged
indifferent- to Us responsibilities son said. Despite her handicap, the association wlt,h people McCarthy
that' i t has allowed our defense pro- ^irl wan'a to be attractive to the described as "pro-Communists" .or
gram to fall l | ; months behind boys. Also, the girl's appearance "left-wingers." •
!
. ¥ £-. ¥
schedule."
. .
may-count heavily when it comes^
iYes said congrfss'gave President to her being accepted by the boys
NAlt ING THAT Stevenson's, recTruman stand-by price and wage and girls generally In her age ord of leadership, patriot ism . c o u r c v ntrol powers a n d ''for five long group.
age and efficiency has inspired all
months h e d i d / nothing" while
of u s in this fight to preserve
¥ ¥ ¥ •
prices rose eight t o 10 per cent.
GOOD "GROOMING will help human decency." Cashmore also
¥ * ¥ the crippled boy but fancy clothes praised t h e recOrd of President
OF TAFT-HARTLEY, Ives claim- won't do so much for him, Miss Truman.
ed President .Truman refused, to Johnson s a i d r H e w a n t s masculine " H e charged that in recent week's
sit down .with'-' labor and manage- strength and!independence. If they "the American people have been
ment to work out amendments but are unattainable, the boy probably shocked by the campaign of mis"insisted on trying t o make po- should havt special guidance to representation and venom conductlitical, capital and on playing help him firm substitutes for these, ed by the Republican party and Its
masters of reaction. "
partisan politics."Miss Johnson added!
"Harry S. Truman is hated by
Added the N e w York senator:
For the cerebral palsied child the Tafts, the McCarthys, t h e JenWORCESTER, Mass.. Oct. 28
'"And again, with respect to the
CUP)—Retired Rear Admiral Wat matter of civil rights, the same who cannot talk diet can he. a part ners, the Nlxons and all t h e other
Tyler Cluverius, 77. president of kind of unscrupulous policies pre- of the home treatment, said Dr. other threwbacka to t h e old guard
Worcester
Polytechnic Institute, vail on the part of the Truman Harold B. Westlake, director of the Republicanism and political feudalspeech and hearing clinks at North- Ism," Cashmore said.
and one of the last survivors of administration.
<?
western
University,
Foods
which
the battleship Maine disaster, died
"In the case of civil rights, how- are especially effective in develop-*
OLD T A N K S R E S T O R E D
today.
ever. I warn that those w h o seek ing the muscles of speech can be
If growing conditions In the
Word w a s r e c e h e d at his home to play partisan politics with this used to advantage.
Northern Dry Zorife of Ceylon c a n
here that Cluverius died at a New question are playing with destrucbe made .as good a s t h e y were a
Also
some
cerebral
palsied
chilHaven, Conn., hospital after being tion. If they persist in these hypo- dren can be taught independence thousand years ago, that country
stricken aboard train en route critical activities, they will stir up and self reliance at home, Dr. m a y grow its own sugar, Colombo
a tempest which will reach so great
from Philadelphia to Worcester.
said.
This
breaking reports. Once that area had a
proportions, that it can destroy Westlake
*.¥.'.¥
away from parental protection is system of tank irrigation which
them.''
A N A T I V E O F N e w Orleans,
one of the first steps toward suc- supported a flourishing civilization.
La.. Cluverius w a s elected presiInvaders destroyed i t about -a
cessful treatment, he said.
dent of W P I in 1939 after his reProfessor .Charles R. Strother, thousand years ago and some of
tirement from t h e navy. During
University of Washington psycho- these tanks now a r e being reAgricultural experts are
World w a r II h e w a s recalled to
logist, reported the emotional needs stored.
active service with the office of
of crippled youngsters could he reclaiming desert lands which they
public information under the secbetter .filled by widening their op- hope "will produce 100,000 tons of
retary of the navy,
portunities
Tor acceptance by sugar, yearly. Ceylon now imports
normal children's groups and by two-thirds of its food.
'A graduate of Annapolis. Cluverproviding a great variety of vocaius w a s a midshipman aboard the
;
_^^_. .—,—
tional opportunities.
Maine w h e n : it w a s sunk by an
Several days after the corner.«.
..—.—
explosion off Havana. Cuba, Feb.
stone w a s laid in Saint Francis
The first law school in the United Cathedral in Santa F e , NM, in
15, 1898. The ' disaster took the I MIDDLEBURG—An addition to
lives of 268 officers and men and[the parish hall of St. Mark's j states was established at Litchfield,[1869, it disappeared and h a s never
Church was approved at I Conn., in 1784.
'been heard of since.
was followed by the nation's entry-iI Lutheran
special meeting of the
a
recent
in t h e Spanish-American war. i
Cluverius was writing a letter congregation.
¥ ¥ ¥
home when the blast shook the
T
H
E
PROJECT,
estimated to
ship. Ha escaped after wading
cost
between
$20,000
and $25,000,
knee-deep in water and wreckage
by pulling himself through a would provide a parlor, church office, eight department and classDoctors* tests »h©w ammting provtnlto* tellef
hatch onto the deck.
rooms and a storage room in a
of (win, bockdeh**, nervous feelings
EXACT CAUSE of t h e blast was two story structure at the south• Women a n d girls who era In actiou. It exerts a renever determined but . Cluverius east corner of the church and con- suffer
markably calming effect on
from the functionmaintained, a s did a naval board nected to the present parish hall. ally-caused cramps, backthe uterus—without tke une
Of pain-ieadening drugs!
of inquiry, that the explosion came
The church council w a s au- aches and headaches due • The effectiveness of Lydla
to
menstruation—who
feel
from the outside as from a mine. thorized to plan and carry out
Pinkham's needs no proof to- /
Cluverius served in the Cuban a fund raising drive and to proceed upset and irritable on certhe millions of women and
tain,
"particular
d
a
y
s
"
girls whom it has benefited.
and Philippine campaigns, in the with the erection of the addition.
every month—may be *u/«
But how about you? Do you
Mexican campaign, and during
know what It may do for you?
A feature of the \ new building fering quite needlessly!
World war - 1 w a s decorated by will be the parlor and meeting
Such is t h e conclusion
Tate Lydla Plnkham'ai See
four nations for heroism with a room, to be known as t h e . w o l f o r d from tests,by doctors in
If votidon't get the same relief from cramps and weakNor-th sea mining squadron. H e Memorial Room, in honor of the which Lydla E. Pinkham's ness
. . . feel better both bealso served a s commandant of "the late Dr. Frank Wolford, pastor of V e g e t a b l e - C o m p o u n d fore and.during your perlodt
stopped
or
gave
amazing
Norfolk, Va„ navy . yard, and the St. Mark's for 21 years. Just 49 relief of such distress In 3
Get either Lydia. Pinkham's
cytfie Pinkham'e
Ninth and Fourth nava) districts. years ago the church w a s com- out of 4 of t h e cases . . . Compound, or new, Improved
*hi a quMing efTablets,
with
added
Iron!
fect on the uterHe leaves a son, Rear Admiral pletely remodeled under his leader- eoen on the very first and
Lydla Pinkham's Is wontrie contraction*
worst day of the period/
Wat Tyler Cluverius Jr. of,Chicago ship.
derful for "hot flashes" and
(see chart) lehieh
Year Medical evidence
other
functional
distress
of
and two daughters, Martha and
may of\tn eam«
__
«
proves LydiaPlnlcbam '• mod.
the
"change
of
Ufe,"
tool
menstrual
pain!
Elizabeth.
6 p.m. Classified Ad Closing Time
*
Leon Denies
r Labor
Practice Count
¥
pailtin^
Sea* Ives Sees
Skipper Beaches l^gb$j>^^
STREET
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PHONE 64266
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